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1

Integration of the White Sands Complex into a Wide Area Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA White Sands Complex (WSC) satellite communications facility consists of two main ground stations, an auxiliary ground station, a technical support facility, and a power plant building located on White Sands Missile Range. When constructed, terrestrial communication access to these facilities was limited to copper telephone circuits. There was no local or wide area communications network capability. This project incorporated a baseband local area network (LAN) topology at WSC and connected it to NASA's wide area network using the Program Support Communications Network-Internet (PSCN-I). A campus-style LAN is configured in conformance with the International Standards Organization (ISO) Open Systems Interconnect (ISO) model. Ethernet provides the physical and data link layers. Transmission Control Protocol and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are used for the network and transport layers. The session, presentation, and application layers employ commercial software packages. Copper-based Ethernet collision domains are constructed in each of the primary facilities and these are interconnected by routers over optical fiber links. The network and each of its collision domains are shown to meet IEEE technical configuration guidelines. The optical fiber links are analyzed for the optical power budget and bandwidth allocation and are found to provide sufficient margin for this application. Personal computers and work stations attached to the LAN communicate with and apply a wide variety of local and remote administrative software tools. The Internet connection provides wide area network (WAN) electronic access to other NASA centers and the world wide web (WWW). The WSC network reduces and simplifies the administrative workload while providing enhanced and advanced inter-communications capabilities among White Sands Complex departments and with other NASA centers.

Boucher, Phillip Larry; Horan, Sheila, B.

1996-01-01

2

White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

1973-01-01

3

Ecological release in White Sands lizards  

PubMed Central

Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

2011-01-01

4

NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory  

NASA Video Gallery

Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

5

Geology Fieldnotes: White Sands National Monument, New Mexico  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The White Sands National Monument site contains park geology information, maps, related links, and visitor information. The park geology section discusses the park's geologic history, the formation of the gypsum sand dunes, and the four types of dunes found at the White Sands National Monument: dome, barchan, transverse, and parabolic. The park maps section includes a map of the White Sands National Monument and the surrounding area, showing the location of each type of dune.

6

www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES  

E-print Network

www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES SUMMARY White Sands Test Facility (WSTF Missile Range (WSMR). EXPERIENCE WSTF works with WSMR in support of customer needs and test activities and missile launch, tracking, and recovery · Nuclear effects testing · High-speed sled track · Directed energy

7

NASA Johnson Space Center: White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the testing facilities and laboratories available at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The mission of WSTF is to provide the expertise and infrastructure to test and evaluate spacecraft materials, components and propulsion systems that enable the safe exploration and use of space. There are nine rocket test stands in two major test areas, six altitude test stands, three ambient test stands,

Aggarwal, Pravin; Kowalski, Robert R.

2011-01-01

8

Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2008-09-01

9

Standards Development Activities at White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of standards and standard activities at the JSC White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been expanded to include the transfer of technology and standards to voluntary consensus organizations in five technical areas of importance to NASA. This effort is in direct response to the National Technology Transfer Act designed to accelerate transfer of technology to industry and promote government-industry partnerships. Technology transfer is especially important for WSTF, whose longterm mission has been to develop and provide vital propellant safety and hazards information to aerospace designers, operations personnel, and safety personnel. Meeting this mission is being accomplished through the preparation of consensus guidelines and standards, propellant hazards analysis protocols, and safety courses for the propellant use of hydrogen, oxygen, and hypergols, as well as the design and inspection of spacecraft pressure vessels and the use of pyrovalves in spacecraft propulsion systems. The overall WSTF technology transfer program is described and the current status of technology transfer activities are summarized.

Baker, D. L.; Beeson, H. D.; Saulsberry, R. L.; Julien, H. L.; Woods, S. S.

2003-01-01

10

Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

Fischer, Holger

2008-01-01

11

Hydrologic Modeling of the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shallow groundwater flow system of White Sands dune field, located within the Tularosa Basin of Southern New Mexico, likely stabilizes the base of the largest gypsum dunefield in the world. Water table geometry and elevation play a critical role in controlling dune thickness, spatial extent, and migration rates. The White Sands National Monument (WHSA) is concerned that lowering the water table may lead to increased scour and migration of the dune field, which could be unfavorable to the preservation of the flora and fauna that have adapted to survive there. In response to projected increases in groundwater pumping in the regional Tularosa Basin groundwater system, changes in surface water use, and the threat of climate change, the WHSA is interested in understanding how these changes on a regional scale may impact the shallow dune aquifer. We have collected hydrological, geochemical, and geophysical data in order to identify the sources of recharge that contribute to the shallow dune aquifer and to assess interactions between this water table aquifer and the basin-scale, regional system. Vertical head gradients, temperature, and water quality data strongly suggest that local precipitation is the primary source of recharge to the dune aquifer today. This suggests that the modern dune system is relatively isolated from the deeper regional system. However, geochemical and electrical resistivity data indicates that the deeper basin groundwater system does contribute to the shallow system and suggests that hydrologic conditions have changed on geologic time scales. We have constructed a preliminary cross-sectional hydrologic model to attempt to characterize the interaction of the shallow dune aquifer with the deeper basin groundwater. The model cross-section extends about 80 km across the Tularosa Basin in a NW-SE direction parallel to the primary flow path. We represented 6 km of Precambrian crystalline basement, Paleozoic sedimentary rocks as well as Pleistocene and Quaternary units. Preliminary results indicate a component of deep groundwater flows to a depth of 5 km and is discharged near Lake Lucero located west of the WHSA. Computed and observed salinity and groundwater residence times are the primary means of model calibration. The results will allow for an improved understanding of the interaction between the basin- and dune-scale groundwater flow systems.

Bourret, S. M.; Newton, B. T.; Person, M. A.

2013-12-01

12

Good Laboratory Practices of Materials Testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach to good laboratory practices of materials testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility is presented. The contents include: 1) Current approach; 2) Data analysis; and 3) Improvements sought by WSTF to enhance the diagnostic capability of existing methods.

Hirsch, David; Williams, James H.

2005-01-01

13

NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp  

NASA Video Gallery

The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

14

NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp  

NASA Video Gallery

The NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging s...

15

ICESat Calibration and Validation Experiments at White Sands, New Mexico, 2003-2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Center for Space Research (CSR) at the University of Texas at Austin has operated a primary site for ICESat cal\\/val activities near the White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH) area of the White Sands Missile Range, NM. This site was chosen for both geophysical (flat, reflective) and logistical (domestic, secure site) reasons. Before launch in 2003, a several-hundred-meter-scale grid comprised

B. E. Schutz; T. J. Urban

2010-01-01

16

Genetic evidence for two evolutionarily significant units of White Sands pupfish  

E-print Network

in southern New Mexico: Salt Creek, Malpais Spring and Mound Spring located on White Sands Missile Range Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2 Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, Salt Creek, Mound Spring and Lost River. Recently reported histor- ical accounts indicate

Jones, Adam

17

Microbial Nitrogen and Sulfur Cycles at the Gypsum Dunes of White Sands National Monument, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The White Sands National Monument from New Mexico (U.S.A) contains one of the largest known gypsum dune fields with unique, rapidly migrating, arid, evaporitic habitats. Deposits from dune sides and interdune areas were collected in order to determine the characteristics of microbial habitat and communities through mineral assemblages, microbial pigments along with investigations of nitrogen and sulfur cycles. The most

Mihaela Glamoclija; Marilyn L. Fogel; Andrew Steele; Adrienne Kish

2012-01-01

18

Meso-scale cooling effects of high albedo surfaces: Analysis of meteorological data from White Sands National Monument and White Sands Missile Range  

SciTech Connect

Urban summer daytime temperatures often exceed those of the surrounding rural areas. Summer ``urban heat islands`` are caused by dark roofs and paved surfaces as well as the lack of vegetation. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are interested in studying the effects of increasing the albedo of roof tops and paved surfaces in order to reduce the impacts of summer urban heat islands. Increasing the albedo of urban surfaces may reduce this heat island effect in two ways, directly and indirectly. The direct effect involves reducing surface temperature and, therefore, heat conduction through the building envelope. This effect of surface albedo on surface temperatures is better understood and has been quantified in several studies. The indirect effect is the impact of high albedo surfaces on the near surface air temperatures. Although the indirect effect has been modeled for the Los Angeles basin by Sailor, direct field observations are required. The objective of this report is to investigate the meso-scale climate of a large high albedo area and identify the effects of albedo on the near surface air temperature. To accomplish this task, data from several surface weather stations at White Sands, New Mexico were analyzed. This report is organized into six sections in addition to this introduction. The first gives the general geological, topographic, and meteorological background of White Sands. The second is a discussion of the basic surface meteorology of the White Sands region. This section is followed by a general discussion of the instrumentation and available data. The fourth section is a description of the method used for data analyis. The fifth section which presents the results of this analysis. Finally, the last section is the summary and conclusion, where a discussion of the results is presented.

Fishman, B.; Taha, H.; Akbari, H.

1994-05-20

19

Two Years of Simultaneous K(sub a)-Band Measurements: Goldstone, CA; White Sands, NM; and Guam, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to statistically characterize the effect of the Earth's atmosphere on Ka-Band links, site test interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at three of NASA s operational sites to directly measure each site's tropospheric phase stability and rain attenuation. These STIs are composed of two antennas on a short baseline (less than 1km) that observe the same unmodulated beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (e.g., Anik F2). The STIs are used to measure the differential phase between the two received signals as well as the individual signal attenuation at each terminal. There are currently three NASA sites utilizing STIs; the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California; the White Sands Complex in Las Cruces, New Mexico; and the Guam Remote Ground Terminal on the island of Guam. The first two sites are both located in desert regions that have highly similar climates in terms of their seasonal temperatures, average humidity, and annual rain fall (the primary factors in determining phase stability). In contrast, Guam is in a tropical region with drastically higher annual rainfall and humidity. Five station years of data have been collected in Goldstone, three in White Sands, and two in Guam, yielding two years of simultaneous data collection across all three sites. During this period of simultaneous data collection, the root-mean-square (RMS) of the time delay fluctuations stayed under 2.40 picoseconds for 90% of the time in Goldstone, under 2.07 picoseconds for 90% of the time in White Sands, and under 10.13 picoseconds for 90% of the time in Guam. For the 99th percentile, the statistics were 6.32 ps, 6.03 ps, and 24.85 ps, respectively. These values, as well as various other site quality characteristics, will be used to determine the suitability of these sites for NASA s future communication services at Ka-Band.

Acosta, Roberto J.; Zemba, M.; Morse, J.; Nessel, J.

2012-01-01

20

Session D--Ecology of Fire on White Sands Missile Range--Boykin USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189 2008. 131  

E-print Network

Session D--Ecology of Fire on White Sands Missile Range--Boykin USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189 2008. 131 Response of Selected Plants to Fire on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico1 related to many plants and communities within White Sands Missile Range. I began by identifying the known

Standiford, Richard B.

21

The White House & Tar Sands Remarks in front of the White House on 29 August 2011.  

E-print Network

feasible to avoid dangerous climate tipping points, but only if conventional fossil fuel emissions Press Club on 29 August 2011. Figure 1. Total conventional fossil fuel emissions (purple) and 50% of unconventional resources (blue) Figure 1 helps make clear why the tar sands and other unconventional fossil fuels

Hansen, James E.

22

Morphology and formation of the upwind margin at White Sands Dune Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A remarkable transitional landscape occurs at the upwind margin of White Sands Dune Field. Over the course a few hundred meters the landscape changes from an flat, sand availability-limited playa, to a sand sheet with strong spatial grain-size sorting, to meter high slipfaceless proto-dunes and finally to several meter high dunes with angle-of-repose slip faces. Within one wavelength of the first dune, dunes rise to nearly 10 meters in height above Alkali Flat, the upwind playa that extends for 13 km westward from the dune field. This abrupt rise in topography may perturb the dominant southwesterly wind flow and trigger an internal boundary layer, which causes a spatial decrease in surface wind stress and decline sediment flux, thereby altering the dune dynamics and dune field morphology downwind. Though the emergence of this upwind transition may play a key role in the morphodynamics of the dune field, what are the morphodynamics of the transition? What are the feedbacks between the emerging topography and the wind within the transition? This presentation uses high-resolution aerial photos, time-series airborne LiDAR and terrestrial laser scanning to characterize the transitional morphology the upwind margin of White Sands and discusses these morphologies in the context of the interplay between wind flow and dune field topography. Alkali Flat playa is sparsely sand covered, the amount of which varies temporally. The sparse sand cover occurs as sand patches that form in the lee of bushes or within topographic lows generated by deflated gypsum crust. Adjacent and downwind of the playa is a sand sheet composed of variable wavelength, coarse grained ripples. Ten to thirty meter wide ripple patches organized into a repeating sequence of coarse-grained, > 15 cm wavelength ripples to fine-grained, < 15 cm wavelength ripples occur across the sand sheet. Downwind the ripple patches organize into low-relief protodune hummocks. The protodunes are covered by a range of ripple sizes that are spatially organized similar to the ripple patches within the sand sheet. The coarsest-grained, largest wavelength ripples occur at the protodune crest and fine downwind. The inter-protodune areas are typically free of sand, exposing indurated dune stratigraphy. The protodunes grow in height, but the wavelength remains ~ 70 m downwind until a slipface develops. Rapid growth into 5-10 meter high dunes occurs within one wavelength after slipface development and generates an abrupt topographic increase in topography. Dune migration rates are approximately 6 m/year at the upwind margin and decline to around 3 m/year within a few kilometers of the upwind margin. A generalized model of dune emergence at the upwind margin of dune fields is proposed using examples from other dune fields.

Ewing, R. C.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.; Reitz, M. D.; Phillips, C. B.; Falcini, F.; Masteller, C.

2012-12-01

23

Analysis of the Dryden Wet Bulb GLobe Temperature Algorithm for White Sands Missile Range  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In locations where workforce is exposed to high relative humidity and light winds, heat stress is a significant concern. Such is the case at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Heat stress is depicted by the wet bulb globe temperature, which is the official measurement used by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The wet bulb globe temperature is measured by an instrument which was designed to be portable and needing routine maintenance. As an alternative form for measuring the wet bulb globe temperature, algorithms have been created to calculate the wet bulb globe temperature from basic meteorological observations. The algorithms are location dependent; therefore a specific algorithm is usually not suitable for multiple locations. Due to climatology similarities, the algorithm developed for use at the Dryden Flight Research Center was applied to data from the White Sands Missile Range. A study was performed that compared a wet bulb globe instrument to data from two Surface Atmospheric Measurement Systems that was applied to the Dryden wet bulb globe temperature algorithm. The period of study was from June to September of2009, with focus being applied from 0900 to 1800, local time. Analysis showed that the algorithm worked well, with a few exceptions. The algorithm becomes less accurate to the measurement when the dew point temperature is over 10 Celsius. Cloud cover also has a significant effect on the measured wet bulb globe temperature. The algorithm does not show red and black heat stress flags well due to shorter time scales of such events. The results of this study show that it is plausible that the Dryden Flight Research wet bulb globe temperature algorithm is compatible with the White Sands Missile Range, except for when there are increased dew point temperatures and cloud cover or precipitation. During such occasions, the wet bulb globe temperature instrument would be the preferred method of measurement. Out of the 30 dates examined, 23 fell under the category of having good accuracy.

LaQuay, Ryan Matthew

2011-01-01

24

Investigation of earth's albedo using Skylab data. [White Sands, New Mexico and Lake Michigan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Specific test sites in the White Sands, New Mexico and Lake Michigan areas were chosen because of their stability and known reflectances. Skylab S192 multispectral data and ERIM aircraft multispectral data were collected for these sites and were compared with results of atmospheric radiative transfer calculations in order to determine the aerosol content of the atmosphere. The spectral shape of the Skylab data compared quite favorably with the nearly simultaneous spectral character of the aircraft data. Although there were difficulties in the calibration of the S192 instrument which remain unresolved, interesting mathematical and physical relationships were discovered.

Turner, R. E. (principal investigator)

1976-01-01

25

Complex Conductivity Response to Nanomaterials in a Sand Matrix  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nano-scale metallic particles are being used with increasing frequency in a variety of industrial, medical, and environmental remediation applications. The fate and transport of such materials in the subsurface is not fully understood, neither is the impact of these materials on human health. Materials at this small nano-scale sometimes have unusual physical properties which differ from larger sized particles of the same material. Feasibility experiments were performed to investigate the geoelectrical properties of nanomaterials in the environment. Five nanomaterials were selected for laboratory column experiments within a sand matrix. These nanomaterials included: Zero-Valent Iron, Cerium Dioxide, Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, and Silver. These materials were mixed at different concentrations (.025-2.5 weight percent) into a medium grained silica sand matrix and saturated with simulated groundwater then packed into PVC columns. Complex conductivity measurements (0.1-12 kHz) were performed on these various columns. Preliminary results suggest that there is a minimal geoelectrical response associated with all of the materials except for silver as a function of increasing concentration of particles. These results are counter to our expected results which predicted that we should see a noticeable response from the materials due to their increased surface area. Further experiments are being planned to further evaluate how well geoelectrical techniques are suited for detecting these materials in geologic media under various geochemical environments.

Joyce, R.; Werkema, D.; Atekwana, E.; Atekwana, E.

2008-12-01

26

Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol in sand-clay mixtures  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements on laboratory columns to investigate changes in electrical properties as a result of varying ethanol (EtOH) concentration (0% to 30% v/v) in a sandclay (bentonite) matrix. We applied Debye decomposition, a phenomenological model commonly used to fit CR data, to determine model parameters (time constant: ?, chargeability: m, and normalized chargeability: mn). The CR data showed a significant (P ? 0.001) time-dependent variation in the clay driven polarization response (~ 12 mrad) for 0% EtOH concentration. This temporal variation probably results from the claywater reaction kinetics trending towards equilibrium in the sandclaywater system. The clay polarization is significantly suppressed (P ? 0.001) for both measured phase (?) and imaginary conductivity (??) with increasing EtOH concentration. Normalized chargeability consistently decreases (by up to a factor of ~ 2) as EtOH concentration increases from 0% to 10% and 10 to 20%, respectively. We propose that such suppression effects are associated with alterations in the electrical double layer (EDL) at the clayfluid interface due to (a) strong EtOH adsorption on clay, and (b) complex intermolecular EtOHwater interactions and subsequent changes in ionic mobility on the surface in the EDL. Changes in the CR data following a change of the saturating fluid from EtOH 20% to plain water indicate strong hysteresis effects in the electrical response, which we attribute to persistent EtOH adsorption on clay. Our results demonstrate high sensitivity of CR measurements to clayEtOH interactions in porous media, indicating the potential application of this technique for characterization and monitoring of ethanol contamination in sediments containing clays.

Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

2013-01-01

27

Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol in sand-clay mixtures.  

PubMed

We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements on laboratory columns to investigate changes in electrical properties as a result of varying ethanol (EtOH) concentration (0% to 30% v/v) in a sand-clay (bentonite) matrix. We applied Debye decomposition, a phenomenological model commonly used to fit CR data, to determine model parameters (time constant: ?, chargeability: m, and normalized chargeability: mn). The CR data showed a significant (P?0.001) time-dependent variation in the clay driven polarization response (~12 mrad) for 0% EtOH concentration. This temporal variation probably results from the clay-water reaction kinetics trending towards equilibrium in the sand-clay-water system. The clay polarization is significantly suppressed (P?0.001) for both measured phase (?) and imaginary conductivity (??) with increasing EtOH concentration. Normalized chargeability consistently decreases (by up to a factor of ~2) as EtOH concentration increases from 0% to 10% and 10 to 20%, respectively. We propose that such suppression effects are associated with alterations in the electrical double layer (EDL) at the clay-fluid interface due to (a) strong EtOH adsorption on clay, and (b) complex intermolecular EtOH-water interactions and subsequent changes in ionic mobility on the surface in the EDL. Changes in the CR data following a change of the saturating fluid from EtOH 20% to plain water indicate strong hysteresis effects in the electrical response, which we attribute to persistent EtOH adsorption on clay. Our results demonstrate high sensitivity of CR measurements to clay-EtOH interactions in porous media, indicating the potential application of this technique for characterization and monitoring of ethanol contamination in sediments containing clays. PMID:23603518

Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

2013-06-01

28

In-flight Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the Thematic Mapper. [White Sands, New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ground spectral reflectance and atmospheric spectral optical depth measurements made at White Sands, New Mexico were used with an atmospheric radiative transfer program to determine the spectral radiance at the entrance pupil of the LANDSAT-4 TM. Comparison with the output digital counts of the TM, when imaging the measured ground area, provided an absolute calibration for five detectors in TM bands 2, 3, and 4. By reference to an adjacent, larger uniform area, the calibration was extended to all 16 detectors in each of three bands. Preflight calibration results agreed with these inflight measurements to 6.6%, 2.4%, and 12.9% in bands 2,3, and 4, respectively.

Palmer, J.; Slater, P. N. (principal investigators); Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

1984-01-01

29

ICESat Calibration and Validation Experiments at White Sands, New Mexico, 2003-2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Center for Space Research (CSR) at the University of Texas at Austin has operated a primary site for ICESat cal/val activities near the White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH) area of the White Sands Missile Range, NM. This site was chosen for both geophysical (flat, reflective) and logistical (domestic, secure site) reasons. Before launch in 2003, a several-hundred-meter-scale grid comprised of hundreds of numbered PVC base-plates was installed at the chosen site to permanently mark the locations of various pieces of experiment hardware. In summary, CSR has supported four primary types of experiments at the cal/val site: (1) a permanent grid of laser retro-reflectors (corner cube reflectors) placed on top of poles of various known heights and collocated with 25 of the base plates, in use for the duration of the mission, (2) a set of computer-monitored position and timing detectors utilized for cal/val during the first three years of the project, (3) several camera-equipped aircraft flyovers of the area designed to capture images of the green and infrared footprints on the surface at the precise time of ICESat overflights, (4) elevation comparisons between the ICESat data and a high-resolution (1 m) DEM derived via small-footprint airborne lidar collections in 2003 and 2007. The experiments at WSSH were targeted by the ICESat spacecraft approximately four times per campaign, making this cal/val site one of the most sampled locations in the world. This presentation will chronicle the extensive collection of ICESat and experimental data collected at WSSH from 2003 to 2010.

Schutz, B. E.; Urban, T. J.

2010-12-01

30

Deciphering complex soil/site formation in sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper summarizes aspects of the geoarchaeological research at two adjacent multi-component archaeological sites, 13JP86 and 13JP87, along Indian Creek in central Iowa, USA. The sites, both recently salvaged but now destroyed, formed in late Pleistocene sands reworked from glacial sediments that emanated from the wasting Des Moines Lobe glacier some 13,000-14,000 years ago. The soils contained shallowly dispersed and mixed artifacts that span the Paleoindian-to-historic cultural spectrum. In open areas, as at Indian Creek, site formation processes equate to natural soil genetic processes, plus human imprints. Cultural materials, once deposited, become part of the soil and subject to dynamic soil processes. These soils had reasonably well expressed Ap, A, and E horizons that collectively formed thick one-layered biomantles, underlain by well expressed argillic Bt horizons. The biomantles had been well bioturbated, deeply in some pedons, but still exhibited organized A and E horizons. The Bt horizons were also bioturbated, though less so, and consisted of multiple thin to thick sandy clay bands, termed illuvial clay lamellae (icl's). The icl's contained modest to appreciable amounts of illuvial clay as bridges between grains, and as diffuse splotches and blebs separated by less clayey, E horizon-like interlamellar sandy zones. Deeper and less bioturbated E-like sandy zones had accumulated so much clay that they had coalesced with icl's into thick, complexly banded argillic Bt horizons. The process histories of the sandy pedons were obviously extremely complex. The geoarchaeological aspects of the project, which were mainly complex pedologic ones, were largely interpreted by drawing on the genetic principles of dynamic denudation to explain soil/site evolution. Many questions were raised, and most were answered under these principles. New concepts and perspectives were gained in this study, and the resulting interpretive scenarios carry explanatory implications for sandy soils everywhere, whether charged with cultural materials or not.

Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, D. N.; Benn, D. W.; Bettis, E. A., III

2008-10-01

31

Genetic features of soils on marine sands and their windblown derivatives on the White Sea coast (the Kola Peninsula)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Quaternary deposits on the Tersk coast of the White Sea are represented by marine deposits (the Tersk sands) enriched in the sea-sorted eluvium of the red Tersk sandstone. These deposits and the soils developed from them are characterized by the predominance of the fine sand fraction and the absence of gravel and the coarser fractions. The sediments derived from the red Tersk sandstone have an impoverished chemical composition (the silica content reaches 75-80%). The iron-illuvial podzols developed from them are characterized by the slightly pronounced differentiation of the main oxides and by the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the amorphous Al and Fe compounds. Sandy soilspsammozemswith undifferentiated soil profiles are developed from windblown sands subjected to afforestation and from coastal marine sands under a relatively thin natural plant cover. Iron-illuvial podzols buried under a thin sand layer preserve the Al-Fe-humus type of the profile differentiation. In the recently deposited sand layer, the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the chemical elements is absent.

Pereverzev, V. N.; Kazakov, L. A.; Chamin, V. A.

2011-01-01

32

Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

1982-01-01

33

Aqueous Cleaning and Validation for Space Shuttle Propulsion Hardware at the White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has developed an entirely aqueous final cleaning and verification process to replace the current chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 113 based process. This process has been accepted for final cleaning and cleanliness verification of WSTF ground support equipment. The aqueous process relies on ultrapure water at 50 C (323 K) and ultrasonic agitation for removal of organic compounds and particulate. The cleanliness is verified bv determining the total organic carbon (TOC) content and filtration with particulate counting. The effectiveness of the aqueous methods for detecting hydrocarbon contamination and particulate was compared to the accepted CFC 113 sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and cutting and lubricating oils, to establish a correlation between aqueous TOC and CFC 113 nonvolatile residue (NVR) was performed. Particulate sampling on cleaned batches of hardware that were randomly separated and sampled by the two methods was performed. This paper presents the approach and results, and discusses the issues in establishing the equivalence of aqueous sampling to CFC 113 sampling, while describing the approach for implementing aqueous techniques on Space Shuttle Propulsion hardware.

Hornung, Steven D.; Biesinger, Paul; Kirsch, Mike; Beeson, Harold; Leuders, Kathy

1999-01-01

34

Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

1995-01-01

35

A laboratory study of subjective response to sonic booms measured at White Sands Missile Range  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sonic Boom Simulator of the Langley Research Center was used to quantify subjective loudness response to boom signatures consisting of: (1) simulator reproductions of booms recently recorded at White Sands Missile Range; (2) idealized N-waves; and (3) idealized booms having intermediate shocks. The booms with intermediate shocks represented signatures derived from CFD predictions. The recorded booms represented those generated by F15 and T38 aircraft flyovers and represented a variety of waveforms reflecting the effects of propagation through a turbulent atmosphere. These waveforms included the following shape categories: N-waves, peaked, rounded, and U-shaped. Results showed that Perceived Level and Zwicker Loudness Level were good estimators of the loudness of turbulence modified sonic booms. No significant differences were observed between loudness responses for the several shape categories when expressed in terms of Perceived Level. Thus, Perceived Level effectively accounted for waveform differences due to turbulence. Idealized booms with intermediate shocks, however, were rated as being approximately 2.7 dB(PL) less loud than the recorded signatures. This difference was not accounted for by PL.

Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.

1993-01-01

36

Long term geological record of a global deep subsurface microbial habitat in sand injection complexes  

PubMed Central

There is extensive evidence from drilling into continental margins for microbial colonization of a deep biosphere. However it is difficult to prove deep biosphere activity in the geological record, where evidence for life is dominated by the remains of organic matter buried after deposition at the surface. Nevertheless we propose that natural injections of sand into muddy strata at continental margins represent an excellent habitat opportunity for deep microbial activity down to several kilometres' present day depth. Sulphur isotope data for iron sulphides precipitated soon after injection indicate consistent microbial sulphate reduction through the geological record. The complexes are favourable sites for colonization, because high permeability and extensive sand/mud interface allow ready availability of electron donors and nutrients. The measured examples of iron sulphide in injected sands extend back to the Proterozoic, and show that injected sand complexes have been a long-term environment for deep subsurface microbial colonization. PMID:23681146

Parnell, John; Boyce, Adrian J.; Hurst, Andrew; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Ponicka, Joanna

2013-01-01

37

6. MCDONALD RANCH: AERIAL VIEW OF RANCH COMPLEX, LOOKING SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. MCDONALD RANCH: AERIAL VIEW OF RANCH COMPLEX, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD NORTHERN TIP OF SAN ANDREAS RANGE - White Sands Missile Range, Trinity Site, Vicinity of Routes 13 & 20, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

38

CYP1A Induction and Blue Sac Disease in Early Life Stages of White Suckers (Catostomus commersoni) Exposed to Oil Sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of natural oil sands on the early developmental stages of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) and to determine whether biochemical responses in this species were similar to native fish caught in the Athabasca Oil Sands area. Early life stage (ELS) sediment toxicity tests were conducted using controls, reference sediments, natural oil

Maria V. Colavecchia; Peter V. Hodson; Joanne L. Parrott

2006-01-01

39

Dust Plume Modeling from Ranges and Maneuver Areas on Fort Bliss and the White Sands Missile Range: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating on and between the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical move-out activities occurring on the installations were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing the modeling scenarios are summarized and results of simulations conducted under these assumptions are presented for four representative meteorological periods.

Chapman, Elaine G.; Barnard, James C.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Shaw, William J.

2009-05-04

40

IR Characterization of BiPropellant Reaction Control Engines During Auxiliary Propulsion Systems Tests at NASA's White Sands Test Facility In Las Cruces, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the application of a FLIR Systems A40M infrared (IR) digital camera for thermal monitoring of a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol bi-propellant Reaction Control Engine (RCE) during Auxiliary Propulsion System (APS) testing at the National Aeronautics & Space Administration's (NASA) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) near Las Cruces, New Mexico. Typically, NASA has relied mostly on the

Elizabeth Holleman

41

White organic light-emitting diodes with Zn-complexes.  

PubMed

This paper reviews OLEDs fabricated using Zn-complexes. Zn(HPB)2, Zn(HPB)q, and Zn(phen)q were synthesized as new electroluminescence materials. The electron affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP) of Zn complexes were also determined and devices were characterized. Zn complexes such as Zn(HPB)2, Zn(HPB)q, and Zn(phen)q were found to exhibit blue and yellow emissions with wavelengths of 455, 532, and 535 nm, respectively. On the other hand, Zn(HPB)2 and Zn(HPB)q were applied as hole-blocking materials. As a result, the OLED efficiency by using Zn(HPB)2 as a hole-blocking material was improved. In particular, the OLED property of Zn(HPB)2 was found to be better than that of Zn(HPB)q. Moreover, Zn(phen)q was used as an electron-transporting material and compared with Alq3. The performance of the device with Zn(phen)q as an electron-transporting material was improved compared with Alq3-based devices. The Zn complexes can possibly be used as hole-blocking and electron-transporting materials in OLED devices. A white emission was ultimately realized from the OLED devices using Zn-complexes as inter-layer components. PMID:24749410

Kim, Dong-Eun; Shin, Hoon-Kyu; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Burm-Jong; Kwon, Young-Soo

2014-02-01

42

LIDAR first results from the Oil Sands Region: A complex vertical atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environment Canada is using LIDAR technology to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere over the oil sands region. This provided the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements and model verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed an autonomous aerosol LIDAR system that can be deployed to remote areas such as the oil sands. The trailer that contains the LIDAR system includes a roof hatch assembly, basic meteorological tower, radar interlock system, climate control system and leveling stabilizers. A precipitation sensor is used to operate the roof hatch and three pan/tilt webcams capture sky conditions and monitor the Lidar system's health. A remote control interface is used to monitor all vital components of the system, including the ability to provide hard resets to the various electronic devices onboard. Every 10 seconds the system provides vertical aerosol profiles from near ground to 20 km. The LIDAR transmitter emits two wavelengths (1064nm and 532nm) and the detector assembly collects three channels (1064nm backscatter, 532nm backscatter and 532nm depolarization). The depolarization channel provided key information in identifying and discriminating the various aerosol layers aloft such as dust, forest fire plumes, industrial plume sources or ice crystals. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events and when aircraft fly over the site. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. First results from an intensive field campaign will be presented. LIDAR false color plot showing the bottom 7 km of the atmosphere during a forest fire event. Note the forest fire plume is between 1.5 and 5 km.

Strawbridge, K. B.

2012-12-01

43

An investigation of several aspects of LANDSAT-5 data quality. [Palmer County, Shelby, mt; White sands, NM; Great Salt Lake, UT; San Matted Bridge and Sacramento, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Band-to-band registration, geodetic registration, interdector noise, and the modulation transfer function (MTE) are discussed for the Palmer County; TX scene. Band combinations for several LANDSAT 4 and LANDSAT 5 scenes; the geodetic registration test for the Sacramento, CA area; periodic noise components in TM band 5; and grey level measurements by detector for Great Salt Lake (UT) dark water forescans and backscans are considered. Results of MTF analyses of the San Mateo Bridge and of TM high resolution and aerial Daedalus scanner imagery are consistent and appear to be repeatable. An oil-on-sand target was constructed on the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The two-image analysis procedure used is summarized.

Wrigley, R. C. (principal investigator)

1984-01-01

44

Analysis of the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Test System for Friction-Ignition of Metallic Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Friction is a known ignition source for metals in oxygen-enriched atmospheres. The test system developed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility in response to ASTM G-94 has been used successfully to determine the relative ignition from friction of numerous metallic materials and metallic materials pairs. These results have been ranked in terms of a pressure-velocity product (PV) as measured under the prescribed test conditions. A high value of 4.1(exp 8) watts per square meter for Inconel MA 754 is used to imply resistance to friction ignition, whereas a low value of 1.04(exp 8) watts per square meter for stainless steel 304 is taken as indicating material susceptible to friction ignition. No attempt has been made to relate PV values to other material properties. This work reports the analysis of the WSTF friction-ignition test system for producing fundamental properties of metallic materials relating to ignition through friction. Three materials, aluminum, titanium, and nickel were tested in the WSTF frictional ignition instrument system under atmospheres of oxygen or nitrogen. Test conditions were modified to reach a steady state of operation, that is applied, the force was reduced and the rotational speed was reduced. Additional temperature measurements were made on the stator sample. The aluminum immediately galled on contact (reproducible) and the test was stopped. Titanium immediately ignited as a result of non-uniform contact of the stator and rotor. This was reproducible. A portion of the stator sampled burned, but the test continued. Temperature measurements on the stator were used to validate the mathematical model used for estimating the interface (stator/rotor) temperature. These interface temperature measurements and the associate thermal flux into the stator were used to distinguish material-phase transitions, chemical reaction, and mechanical work. The mechanical work was used to analyze surface asperities in the materials and to estimate a coefficient of fiction. The coefficient of fiction was analyzed in terms of material properties that is, hardness, Young's modulus and elasticity/plasticity of the material.

Shoffstall, Michael S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

2000-01-01

45

Habitat Specialization by Birds in Western Amazonian White-sand Forests Jose Alvarez Alonso1,4  

E-print Network

, Avenida Abelardo Qui~nones, Km. 2.5, Iquitos, Peru, PO BOX 784. 2 Department of Plant Pathology on these habitats in Peru. The high degree of habitat specialization found in these 26 bird species highlights-sand forests (hereafter WSFs) on nutrient-poor soils are a conspicuous component of the edaphic heterogeneity

Fine, Paul V.A.

46

Results of calibrations of the NOAA-11 AVHRR made by reference to calibrated SPOT imagery at White Sands, N.M  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The calibration method reported here makes use of the reflectances of several large, uniform areas determined from calibrated and atmospherically corrected SPOT Haute Resolution Visible (HRV) scenes of White Sands, New Mexico. These reflectances were used to predict the radiances in the first two channels of the NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The digital counts in the AVHRR image corresponding to these known reflectance areas were determined by the use of two image registration techniques. The plots of digital counts versus pixel radiance provided the calibration gains and offsets for the AVHRR. A reduction in the gains of 4 and 13 percent in channels 1 and 2 respectively was found during the period 1988-11-19 to 1990-6-21. An error budget is presented for the method and is extended to the case of cross-calibrating sensors on the same orbital platform in the Earth Observing System (EOS) era.

Nianzeng, Che; Grant, Barbara G.; Flittner, David E.; Slater, Philip N.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Jackson, Ray D.; Moran, M. S.

1991-01-01

47

Test wells T23, T29, and T30, White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss Military Reservation, Dona Ana County, New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three test wells, T23, T29, and T30, were drilled in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Army in November 1982. Test well T23 was drilled as an exploratory and monitoring well in the proposed Soledad well field at the Fort Bliss Military Reservation. Test wells T29 and T30 were drilled at White Sands Missile Range. Test well T29 was drilled as an observation well in the vicinity of the outfall channel from the sewage treatment plant. Test well T30 was drilled as an observation well for a landfill south of the well site. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs for all wells and borehole-geophysical logs from the cased wells for test wells T29 and T30. (USGS)

Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

1984-01-01

48

Issues of Indigenous Representation: White Advocacy and the Complexities of Ethical Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the tensions and complexities for two principals as they work towards equity and improved social and educational outcomes for their Indigenous students. Drawing on Foucault's fourfold ethical frame and poststructuralist notions of the subject, this paper presents the different ways the white female principals of Indigenous

Niesche, Richard; Keddie, Amanda

2014-01-01

49

Nonseptic diseases associated with the hoof complex: keratoma, white line disease, canker, and neoplasia.  

PubMed

This article addresses nonseptic diseases associated with the hoof complex, namely keratoma, white line disease, canker, and neoplasia. Keratoma is an uncommon cause of lameness, which may be surgically removed. White line disease, a keratolytic process on the solar surface of the hoof, is treated with therapeutic farriery and resection of the hoof wall when appropriate. Equine canker is an infectious process that results in development of a chronic hypertrophy of the horn-producing tissues. Neoplasia involving the equine foot is rare, and melanoma is the most common type of neoplasm reported. PMID:22981198

Redding, W Rich; O'Grady, Stephen E

2012-08-01

50

Drilling, construction, and testing of water-supply wells 21 and 22, White Sands Missle Range, Dona Ana County, New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the spring and summer of 1976, two municipal-supply wells (designated as well 21 and well 22 - 2,000 feet apart) were drilled at the Post Headquarters area of White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The design specifications for both wells called for 24-inch diameter surface casing cemented in place to a depth of about 430 feet, with 16-inch liner and slotted casing from the surface to a depth of about 700 feet. Each well was pumped continuously for 32 hours in a step-drawdown test. This test consisted of four steps, with discharge rates varying from about 500 to 1,150 gallons per minute. The drawdown test for well 21 gave an estimated transmissivity of 17,300 gallons per day per foot, and a final specific capacity of slightly less than 11 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. The step-drawdown test and later drawdown and recovery test on well 22 gave an average transmissivity of 32,600 gallons per day per foot, and a final specific capacity of about 15 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. The data collected indicated that the aquifer in the vicinity of well 22 is more permeable than the aquifer around well 21. Both wells furnish a satisfactory quantity of excellent-quality water. The dissolved-solids content of water from wells 21 and 22 is 232 and 301 mg/liter respectively. (Woodard-USGS)

Wilson, Clyde A.; White, R. R.; Roybal, R. G.; Gonzales, J. L.

1978-01-01

51

Plague in a complex of white-tailed prairie dogs and associated small mammals in Wyoming.  

PubMed

Fleas were collected from white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) and other small mammals trapped on six grids during a field study near Meeteetse (Wyoming, USA) in 1989 and 1990 to investigate the dynamics of plague in this rodent population. Fleas were identified and tested for Yersinia pestis by mouse inoculation. Yersinia pestis-positive fleas were found on prairie dogs and in their burrows. Flea species on prairie dogs changed from spring to late summer. White-tailed prairie dog numbers were significantly lower in the presence of Y. pestis-positive fleas; however, affected populations generally recovered 1 to 2 yr following absence of detectable plague. Grids where recovery occurred had a high proportion of juvenile male prairie dogs. Eighteen flea species were identified on small mammals, six of which were infected with Y. pestis. Some flea species were associated with a particular small mammal species, while others were found on a broad range of host species. Flea species most important in the potential interchange of Y. pestis between associated small mammals and white-tailed prairie dogs were Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris, Oropsylla idahoensis, and Oropsylla labis. Plague cycled through the white-tailed prairie dog complex in an unpredictable manner. Each summer the complex was a mixture of colonies variously impacted by plague: some were declining, some were unaffected by plague, and others were recovering from plague population declines. These data provide insight into the dynamics of plague in white-tailed prairie dog complexes, but predicting movement of plague is not yet possible and the role of associated mammals in maintenance of plague is not understood. PMID:9391955

Anderson, S H; Williams, E S

1997-10-01

52

2005 annual progress report: elk and bison grazing ecology in the Great Sand Dunes complex of lands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: In 2000 the U.S. Congress authorized the expansion of the former Great Sand Dunes National Monument by establishing a new Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in its place, and establishing the Baca National Wildlife Refuge. The establishment of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve and the new Baca National Wildlife Refuge in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado was one of the most significant land conservation actions in the western U.S. in recent years. The action was a result of cooperation between the National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Forest Service (USDA-FS), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC). The new national park, when fully implemented, will consist of 107,265 acres, the new national preserve 41,872 acres, and the new national wildlife refuge (USFWS lands) 92,180 acres (fig. 1). The area encompassed by this designation protects a number of natural wonders and features including a unique ecosystem of natural sand dunes, the entire watershed of surface and groundwaters that are necessary to preserve and recharge the dunes and adjacent wetlands, a unique stunted forest, and other valuable riparian vegetation communities that support a host of associated wildlife and bird species. When the National Park was initially established, there were concerns about over-concentrations and impacts on native plant communities of the unhunted segments of a large and possibly growing elk (Cervus elaphus) population. This led to the designation of the Preserve as a compromise solution, where the elk could be harvested. The Preserve Unit, however, will not address all the ungulate management challenges. In order to reduce the current elk population, harvests of elk may need to be aggressive. But aggressive special hunts of elk to achieve population reductions can result in elk avoidance of certain areas or elk seeking refuge in areas where they cannot be hunted, while removals of whole herd segments and abandonment or alterations of migration routes can occur (Smith and Robbins, 1994; Boyce and others, 1991). Elk may seek refuge from hunting in the newly expanded Park Unit and TNC lands where they might over-concentrate and impact unique vegetation communities. In these sites of refugia, or preferred loafing sites, elk and bison could accelerate a decline in woody riparian shrubs and trees. This decline may also be due to changes in hydrology, climatic, or dunal processes, but ungulate herbivory might exacerbate the effects of those processes. To address the questions and needs of local resource managers, a multi-agency research project was initiated in 2005 to study the ecology, forage relations, and habitat relations of elk and bison in the Great Sand Dunes-Sangre de Cristo-Baca complex of lands. Meetings and discussions of what this research should include were started in 2001 with representatives from NPS, USFWS, TNC, the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW), and USDA-FS/BLM. The final study plan was successfully funded in 2004 with research scheduled to start in 2005. The research was designed to encompass three major study elements: (1) animal movements and population dynamics, (2) vegetation and nutrient effects from ungulate herbivory, and (3) development of ecological models, using empirical data collected from the first two components, that will include estimates of elk carrying capacity and management scenarios for resource managers.

Schoenecker, Kate A.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Zeigenfuss, Linda C.; Mao, Julie

2006-01-01

53

Subduction Complex Provenance redefined: modern sands from the Indo-Burman-Andaman-Nicobar Ridge and Barbados Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subduction complexes large enough to be exposed subaerially and to become significant sources of terrigenous detritus are formed by tectonic accretion above trenches choked with thick sections of remnant-ocean turbidites. They thus need to be connected along strike to a large Alpine-type or Andean-type orogen, where huge volumes of orogenic detritus are produced and conveyed via a major fluvio-deltaic system to the deep sea (Ingersoll et al., 2003). We investigated sediment generation and recycling in the Indo-Burman-Andaman-Nicobar subduction complex, representing the archetype of such settings in the eastern prolongation of the Himalayan collisional system. "Subduction Complex Provenance" is composite, and chiefly consists of detritus recycled from largely turbiditic parent rocks (Recycled Clastic Provenance), with local supply from ultramafic and mafic rocks of forearc lithosphere (Ophiolite Provenance) or recycled paleovolcanic to neovolcanic sources (Volcanic Arc Provenance; Garzanti et al., 2007). In order to specifically investigate the effect of recycling, we characterized the diverse detrital signatures of Cenozoic sandstones deposited during subsequent stages of "soft" and "hard" Himalayan collision and exposed from Bangladesh to the Andaman Islands, and discuss the reasons for compositional discrepancies between parent sandstones and their recycled daughter sands. A companion study was carried out with the same methodologies, rationale and goals on Barbados Island, one of the few other places where a large accretionary prism is subaerially exposed. Also modern Barbados sands are largely multicyclic, reflecting mixing in various proportions of detritus from the basal Scotland Formation (sandstones and mudrocks), their stratigraphic and tectonic cover, the Oceanic Formation (quartzose turbidites and deep-water biogenic oozes including radiolarite), and from the Pleistocene calcarenite and reefal cap, as well as from volcanic layers ultimately derived from the Lesser Antilles. Mixing of detritus recycled from orogen-derived turbidites transported long distance with detritus from oceanic mlange, pelagic sediments and younger calcareous cap rocks and in addition volcaniclastic products thus redefines the diagnostic mark of Subduction Complex Provenance as quite distinct from the original definition by Dickinson and Suczek (1979). REFERENCES Dickinson, W.R., and Suczek, C.A., 1979, Plate tectonics and sandstone composition: American Association Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, 63, 2164-2172. Garzanti, E., Doglioni, C., Vezzoli, G., and And, S., 2007, Orogenic belts and orogenic sediment provenances: Journal of Geology, 115, 315-334. Ingersoll, R.V., Dickinson, W.R., and Graham, S.A., 2003, Remnant-ocean submarine fans: largest sedimentary systems on Earth, [in] Chan, M.A., and Archer, A.W., eds., Extreme Depositional Environments: Mega End Members in Geologic Time: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 370, 191-208.

Limonta, Mara; Resentini, Alberto; And, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Bandopadhyay, Pinaki C.; Najman, Yani; Boni, Maria; Bechstdt, Thilo; Garzanti, Eduardo

2013-04-01

54

Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Test Summary of the RS-18 Lunar Ascent Engine at Simulated Altitude Conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted with the RS18 rocket engine using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4) propellants under simulated altitude conditions at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This project is part of NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) project. "Green" propellants, such as LO2/LCH4, offer savings in both performance and safety over equivalently sized hypergolic propellant systems in spacecraft applications such as ascent engines or service module engines. Altitude simulation was achieved using the WSTF Large Altitude Simulation System, which provided altitude conditions equivalent up to approx.120,000 ft (approx.37 km). For specific impulse calculations, engine thrust and propellant mass flow rates were measured. Propellant flow rate was measured using a coriolis-style mass-flow meter and compared with a serial turbine-style flow meter. Results showed a significant performance measurement difference during ignition startup. LO2 flow ranged from 5.9-9.5 lbm/sec (2.7-4.3 kg/sec), and LCH4 flow varied from 3.0-4.4 lbm/sec (1.4-2.0 kg/sec) during the RS-18 hot-fire test series. Thrust was measured using three load cells in parallel. Ignition was demonstrated using a gaseous oxygen/methane spark torch igniter. Data was obtained at multiple chamber pressures, and calculations were performed for specific impulse, C* combustion efficiency, and thrust vector alignment. Test objectives for the RS-18 project are 1) conduct a shakedown of the test stand for LO2/methane lunar ascent engines, 2) obtain vacuum ignition data for the torch and pyrotechnic igniters, and 3) obtain nozzle kinetics data to anchor two-dimensional kinetics codes.

Melcher, John C., IV; Allred, Jennifer K.

2009-01-01

55

Infrared Camera Characterization of Bi-Propellant Reaction Control Engines during Auxiliary Propulsion Systems Tests at NASA's White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the application of a FUR Systems A40M infrared (IR) digital camera for thermal monitoring of a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol bi-propellant Reaction Control Engine (RCE) during Auxiliary Propulsion System (APS) testing at the National Aeronautics & Space Administration's (NASA) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) near Las Cruces, New Mexico. Typically, NASA has relied mostly on the use of ThermoCouples (TC) for this type of thermal monitoring due to the variability of constraints required to accurately map rapidly changing temperatures from ambient to glowing hot chamber material. Obtaining accurate real-time temperatures in the JR spectrum is made even more elusive by the changing emissivity of the chamber material as it begins to glow. The parameters evaluated prior to APS testing included: (1) remote operation of the A40M camera using fiber optic Firewire signal sender and receiver units; (2) operation of the camera inside a Pelco explosion proof enclosure with a germanium window; (3) remote analog signal display for real-time monitoring; (4) remote digital data acquisition of the A40M's sensor information using FUR's ThermaCAM Researcher Pro 2.8 software; and (5) overall reliability of the system. An initial characterization report was prepared after the A40M characterization tests at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to document controlled heat source comparisons to calibrated TCs. Summary IR digital data recorded from WSTF's APS testing is included within this document along with findings, lessons learned, and recommendations for further usage as a monitoring tool for the development of rocket engines.

Holleman, Elizabeth; Sharp, David; Sheller, Richard; Styron, Jason

2007-01-01

56

White emission phosphors based on Dy3+-doped into anhydrous rare-earth benzenetricarboxylate complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

White light emitting rare earth anhydrous complexes RE(TMA):Dy3+ (RE3+ = Y3+ and Lu3+) containing the trimesic acid ligands (TMA) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction patterns, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallinity and thermostability of these luminescent materials were determined. Since the first excited triplet state (T1: 24,000 cm-1) of TMA ligand is located at higher energy than the main emitting 4F9/2 level (21,000 cm-1) of the Dy3+ ion, TMA can act as efficient luminescent sensitizer in the intramolecular energy transfer of RE(TMA):Dy3+ material. The near-white emission colour originated from the intraconfigurational transitions of Dy3+ ion 4F9/2?6HJ is discussed.

Silva, Ivan G. N.; Kai, Jiang; Felinto, Maria C. F. C.; Brito, Hermi F.

2013-03-01

57

Effect of organic complexing agents on the interactions of Cs(+), Sr(2+) and UO(2)(2+) with silica and natural sand.  

PubMed

Sorption processes play a key role in controlling radionuclide migration through subsurface environments and can be affected by the presence of anthropogenic organic complexing agents found at contaminated sites. The effect of these complexing agents on radionuclide-solid phase interactions is not well known. Therefore the aim of this study was to examine the processes by which EDTA, NTA and picolinate affect the sorption kinetics and equilibria of Cs(+), Sr(2+) and UO2(2+) onto natural sand. The caesium sorption rate and equilibrium were unaffected by the complexing agents. Strontium however showed greater interaction with EDTA and NTA in the presence of desorbed matrix cations than geochemical modelling predicted, with SrNTA(-) enhancing sorption and SrEDTA(2-) showing lower sorption than Sr(2+). Complexing agents reduced UO2(2+) sorption to silica and enhanced the sorption rate in the natural sand system. Elevated concentrations of picolinate reduced the sorption of Sr(2+) and increased the sorption rate of UO2(2+), demonstrating the potential importance of this complexing agent. These experiments provide a direct comparison of the sorption behaviour of Cs(+), Sr(2+) and UO2(2+)onto natural sand and an assessment of the relative effects of EDTA, NTA and picolinate on the selected elements. PMID:23473428

Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Worsfold, Paul J; Keith-Roach, Miranda J

2013-05-01

58

Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Test Results of the RS-18 Lunar Ascent Engine at Simulated Altitude Conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted with the RS-18 rocket engine using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4) propellants under simulated altitude conditions at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This project is part of NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) project. "Green" propellants, such as LO2/LCH4, offer savings in both performance and safety over equivalently sized hypergolic propulsion systems in spacecraft applications such as ascent engines or service module engines. Altitude simulation was achieved using the WSTF Large Altitude Simulation System, which provided altitude conditions equivalent up to 122,000 ft (37 km). For specific impulse calculations, engine thrust and propellant mass flow rates were measured. LO2 flow ranged from 5.9 - 9.5 lbm/sec (2.7 - 4.3 kg/sec), and LCH4 flow varied from 3.0 - 4.4 lbm/sec (1.4 - 2.0 kg/sec) during the RS-18 hot-fire test series. Propellant flow rate was measured using a coriolis mass-flow meter and compared with a serial turbine-style flow meter. Results showed a significant performance measurement difference during ignition startup due to two-phase flow effects. Subsequent cold-flow testing demonstrated that the propellant manifolds must be adequately flushed in order for the coriolis flow meters to give accurate data. The coriolis flow meters were later shown to provide accurate steady-state data, but the turbine flow meter data should be used in transient phases of operation. Thrust was measured using three load cells in parallel, which also provides the capability to calculate thrust vector alignment. Ignition was demonstrated using a gaseous oxygen/methane spark torch igniter. Test objectives for the RS-18 project are 1) conduct a shakedown of the test stand for LO2/methane lunar ascent engines, 2) obtain vacuum ignition data for the torch and pyrotechnic igniters, and 3) obtain nozzle kinetics data to anchor two-dimensional kinetics codes. All of these objectives were met with the RS-18 data and additional testing data from subsequent LO2/methane test programs in 2009 which included the first simulated-altitude pyrotechnic ignition demonstration of LO2/methane.

Melcher, John C., IV; Allred, Jennifer K.

2009-01-01

59

Bedform-field pattern formation through bedform interactions within a set of boundary conditions: Example from White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence of bedform patterns is explored within the context of self-organizing systems and the imposition of boundary conditions that affect the types and frequency of bedform interactions. One explanation for bedform patterns is self-organization in which the pattern emerges because of interactions among the bedforms themselves. Models, remote images, field studies and lab experiments have identified bedform interactions that involve whole bedforms, only bedform defects, or that are remote interactions between bedforms. It is proposed that bedform interactions form a spectrum from constructive to regenerative in pattern development. Constructive interactions, including merging, lateral linking, cannibalization, and remote transfer of sediment, push the system toward fewer, larger, more widely spaced bedforms. Regenerative interactions, including bedform splitting, defect creation and calving, push the system back toward a more initial state. Other interactions, including off-center collision, defect migration, and bedform and defect repulsion, cause pattern change, but may not be strongly constructive or regenerative. We argue that the rich diversity of bedform-field patterns arises because of boundary conditions, which are the unique set of environmental variables within which each field evolves. Boundary conditions are broadly similar within system types, but are unique for each bedform field so that no two are ever exactly alike. Boundary conditions guide the uniqueness of each pattern by altering the type and frequency of interactions. These hypotheses are tested using time-series aerial photographs and airborne LiDAR at White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico. Time-series imagery shows that fully developed, crescentic aeolian dunes, interact and the dune pattern organizes in systematically similar ways as wind ripples and subaqueous dunes and ripples. Documented interactions include: (1) merging, (2) lateral linking, (3) defect repulsion, (4) bedform repulsion, (5) off-center collision, (6) defect creation, and (7) dune splitting. Measurements of pattern parameters (number of dunes, crest length, defect density, crest spacing, dune height), dune migration rates, and the type and frequency of dune interactions within a 3,500 m box transect from the upwind margin to the core of the dune field show that most pattern organization occurs within the upwind field. Upwind dominance by constructive interactions yields to neutral and regenerative interactions in the field center. This spatial change reflects upwind line-source and sediment-availability boundary conditions arising from antecedent paleo-lake topography. Pattern evolution is most strongly coupled to the pattern parameters of dune spacing and defect density, such that spatially or temporally the frequency of bedform interactions decreases as the dunes become farther apart and have fewer defects.

Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.; Mohrig, D.

2009-12-01

60

Sand Stories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The objective of this project is to use a sample of sand from a give are to tell its geologic history. Each student is given a 50 mL tube of sand labeled with the latitude and longitude of where it was found. They must then use this information along with analysis of the sand itself to tell the story of its formation.

Christensen, Hilary

61

New platinum complexes for hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new series of mixed ligand platinum(II) complexes with a formula of FPtXND, where XND = 4-hydroxy-1,5-naphthyridine derivates and F = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, were newly synthesized, and their photophysical properties were examined. Single crystal X-ray diffraction of FPtOPhND were determined to elucidate their variation of solid state phosphorescence and electroluminescence. Organic hole transporting as well as blue light-emitting NPB (1-naphthylphenylbiphenyl diamine) or 4P-NPD (1-naphthylphenylquaterphenyl diamine) was employed in the platinum complex-based hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with a simplified device configuration of ITO/4P-NPD or NPB/CBP:FPtXND/TPBI/LiF/Al or ITO/4P-NPD /4P-NPD:FPtXND/TPBI/LiF/Al.

Poloek, Anurach; Chen, Chin-Ti; Chen, Chao-Tsen

2013-09-01

62

Expression profiling of a complex thaumatin-like protein family in western white pine.  

PubMed

The protein content in the plant apoplast is believed to change dramatically as a result of host defense response upon infection with various pathogens. In this study, six novel thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were identified in western white pine (Pinus monticola) needle apoplast by a proteomic strategy using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sequent cDNA cloning found that ten P. monticola TLP genes (PmTLP-L1 to -L6 and -S1 to -S4) were expressed in various tissues. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these PmTLP genes belong to a large, complex, and highly diverse plant TLP family. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) using gene-specific primer pairs showed that each PmTLP gene exhibited a characteristic pattern of mRNA expression based on their unique organ distribution, seasonal regulation, and response to abiotic and biotic stresses. A time-course analysis at the early stages of infection by white pine blister rust pathogen Cronartium ribicola revealed that a coordinated upregulation of multiple PmTLP genes was involved in P. monticola major gene (Cr2) resistance. The structural and expressional differentiations suggest that the PmTLP family may contribute to host defense as well as other mechanism. PMID:19997927

Liu, Jun-Jun; Zamani, Arezoo; Ekramoddoullah, Abul K M

2010-02-01

63

Sand Dunes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Most will agree that nothing is more relaxing that lying or walking on a beach. While unwinding, have you ever wondered what caused those big mounds of sand that you crossed to get there? This topic in depth addresses this issue, featuring Web sites that discuss sand dune processes and formations. Some of the Web sites also discuss research, mining, and protection activities taking place in areas with sand dune.The Environment Bay of Plenty in New Zealand has an online brochure (1) dealing with the coastal processes that form sand dunes and beaches. From this site, users can obtain a general understanding of how dunes change with time. Ted Brambleby developed the second site (2) for the Marine Education Society of Australasia, Inc. This site gives a great overview of the functions and formations of dunes as well as describing their unique beauty and strategies on how to care for the dunes. Produced by Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History, the third site (3) is an online pamphlet discussing the physical features and locations of sand dunes in Nova Scotia. Visitors can also read about the ecosystem supported by these dynamic features. The forth site (4), created by John Mangimeli for the National Park Service, is a review of the scientific research completed throughout the years dealing with the geology of sand dunes. Visitors will find a more in-depth discussion about sand movement, sand accumulation, and sand dune features. The fifth site is a scientific paper (5 ) written by R.L. Van Dam, et al. Studying the long term evolution of the Parengarenga Sandspit, these researchers used ground penetrating radar (GPR) "to (1) explore the possibilities for mapping lateral continuity of the coffee rock, (2) study the sedimentary architecture and stratigraphy of the solitary dunes, and (3) reconstruct the wind regime on the sandspit." The next two sites discuss the threats to sand dunes and activities taking place to protect them. The Lake Michigan Federation addresses the issues of mining (6). Visitors can learn about alternatives to mining dune sand and the ecological values of dunes. The Department of Environmental Quality in Michigan created a site (7) that provides users with statistical information dealing with the amount of sand harvested, the regulations of mining, and maps of critical dune areas. After learning about the formation, processes, threats, and protections efforts; the last site (8), created by Eva Hornecker with the University of Bremen, will allow users to get a real sense of the beauty of the sand dunes. The site features a collage of spectacular images of the Great Sand Dunes in the San Luis Valley.

Enright, Rachel

64

Physical interaction between VIVID and white collar complex regulates photoadaptation in Neurospora  

PubMed Central

Photoadaptation, the ability to attenuate a light response on prolonged light exposure while remaining sensitive to escalating changes in light intensity, is essential for organisms to decipher time information appropriately, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In Neurospora crassa, VIVID (VVD), a small LOV domain containing blue-light photoreceptor protein, affects photoadaptation for most if not all light-responsive genes. We report that there is a physical interaction between VVD and the white collar complex (WCC), the primary blue-light photoreceptor and the transcription factor complex that initiates light-regulated transcriptional responses in Neurospora. Using two previously characterized VVD mutants, we show that the level of interaction is correlated with the level of WCC repression in constant light and that even light-insensitive VVD is sufficient partly to regulate photoadaptation in vivo. We provide evidence that a functional GFP-VVD fusion protein accumulates in the nucleus on light induction but that nuclear localization of VVD does not require light. Constitutively expressed VVD alone is sufficient to change the dynamics of photoadaptation. Thus, our results demonstrate a direct molecular connection between two of the most essential light signaling components in Neurospora, VVD and WCC, illuminating a previously uncharacterized process for light-sensitive eukaryotic cells. PMID:20733070

Chen, Chen-Hui; DeMay, Bradley S.; Gladfelter, Amy S.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Loros, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01

65

Booming Sands  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video segment, adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, presents basic concepts of physics behind booming sand dunes. See how surface tension affects potential and kinetic energy and how it all works together to create sound.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2007-04-19

66

Yellow/orange emissive heavy-metal complexes as phosphors in monochromatic and white organic light-emitting devices.  

PubMed

Owing to the electron spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and fast intersystem crossing (ISC), heavy-metal complexes (such as iridium(III), platinum(II) and osmium(II) complexes, etc.) are phosphorescent emitters at room temperature. Since 1998, heavy-metal complexes as phosphors have received considerable academic and industrial attention in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), because they can harvest both the singlet (25%) and triplet (75%) excitons for emission during the electro-generated processes. Among all the visible colors (blue, green, yellow, orange and red), the yellow/orange heavy-metal complexes play an important role for realizing full-color OLEDs as well as high-efficiency white OLEDs, and thus the development of highly efficient yellow/orange heavy-metal complexes is a pressing concern. In this article, we will review the progress on yellow/orange heavy-metal complexes as phosphors in OLEDs. The general principles and useful tactics for designing the yellow/orange heavy-metal complexes will be systematically summarized. The structure-property relationship and electrophosphorescence performance of the yellow/orange heavy-metal complexes in monochromatic phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs) and white OLEDs (WOLEDs) will be comprehensively surveyed and discussed. PMID:24927103

Fan, Cong; Yang, Chuluo

2014-09-01

67

Defrosting Sand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

2 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a patch of frost-covered, dark sand that, at the time the picture was acquired in June 2005, had begun to defrost. The frost is carbon dioxide. Dunes and other patches of sand are usually the first polar features to develop dark spots as the frost begins to sublime away.

Location near: 78.9oS, 80.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

2005-01-01

68

Production Mechanisms for the Sand on Titan and the Prospects for a Global Sand Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With ~15% of its surface covered by sand seas, Titan turns out to be the Arrakis of the solar system. How the sand particles that make up the dunes are created, however, remains an outstanding question. Titan's haze particles are organic in composition as required by spectral analysis of dunes, however they have diameters of ~1um, and are 10,000,000 times too small by mass to directly represent the ~200-um sand particles. In addition to previous suggestions that sand could come from sintering of sand particles or by burial, lithification, and subsequent erosion (more like typical sands on Earth), we suggest two new mechanisms for production of sand in association with Titan's liquid reservoirs. Dissolution and reprecipitation as evaporite forms the gypsum dunes of White Sands, NM, USA on Earth, and could play a role on Titan as well. Alternatively, haze particles in the lakes and seas could aggregate into larger particles via flocculation, a mechanism seen to occur on Earth in Morocco. Each of these sand particle production ideas has associated predictions that can be tested by future observations. The lack of evident sand sources in VIMS data implies that Titan's sand seas may be old and their continuous interconnectedness across the Dark Equatorial Belt implies that all of the equatorial dunefields may represent a single compositionally uniform sand sea. We will present possibilities for sands from this sea to bridge the large gap across Xanadu, including barchan chains and fluvial transport.

Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; MacKenzie, Shannon

2014-11-01

69

A contrast and surface code explains complex responses to black and white stimuli in v1.  

PubMed

We investigated the cortical mechanisms underlying the visual perception of luminance-defined surfaces and the preference for black over white stimuli in the macaque primary visual cortex, V1. We measured V1 population responses with voltage-sensitive dye imaging in fixating monkeys that were presented with white or black squares of equal contrast around a mid-gray. Regions corresponding to the squares' edges exhibited higher activity than those corresponding to the center. Responses to black were higher than to white, surprisingly to a much greater extent in the representation of the square's center. Additionally, the square-evoked activation patterns exhibited spatial modulations along the edges and corners. A model comprised of neural mechanisms that compute local contrast, local luminance temporal modulations in the black and white directions, and cortical center-surround interactions, could explain the observed population activity patterns in detail. The model captured the weaker contribution of V1 neurons that respond to positive (white) and negative (black) luminance surfaces, and the stronger contribution of V1 neurons that respond to edge contrast. Also, the model demonstrated how the response preference for black could be explained in terms of stronger surface-related activation to negative luminance modulation. The spatial modulations along the edges were accounted for by surround suppression. Overall the results reveal the relative strength of edge contrast and surface signals in the V1 response to visual objects. PMID:25339751

Zurawel, Guy; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Zweig, Shay; Shapley, Robert; Slovin, Hamutal

2014-10-22

70

Efficient and tunable white-light emission of metal-organic frameworks by iridium-complex encapsulation  

PubMed Central

Metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) are well known for their tunable structure and porosity. Many studies have shown they are promising for various important applications, for which their performance can be further enhanced by encapsulating functional species, such as luminescent guest molecules, within the frameworks. Although numerous MOFs are luminescent, very few emit white light and their quantum yield is usually low. Here we report a strategy to achieve efficient white-light emission by encapsulating an iridium complex in the MOF cavity. A mesoporous blue-emitting MOF is prepared as host to encapsulate a yellow-emitting iridium complex, [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)]+. The resultant composites emit bright white light with good colour quality (for example, Commission International de IEclairage coordinates, colour-rendering index and correlated colour temperature of (0.31, 0.33), 84.5 and 5409?K, respectively), and high quantum yield up to 115?C. This strategy may open new perspectives for developing high-performance energy-saving solid-state lighting materials. PMID:24212250

Sun, Chun-Yi; Wang, Xin-Long; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Chao; Li, Peng; Su, Zhong-Min; Zhu, Dong-Xia; Shan, Guo-Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Wu, Han; Li, Jing

2013-01-01

71

Efficient and tunable white-light emission of metal-organic frameworks by iridium-complex encapsulation.  

PubMed

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are well known for their tunable structure and porosity. Many studies have shown they are promising for various important applications, for which their performance can be further enhanced by encapsulating functional species, such as luminescent guest molecules, within the frameworks. Although numerous MOFs are luminescent, very few emit white light and their quantum yield is usually low. Here we report a strategy to achieve efficient white-light emission by encapsulating an iridium complex in the MOF cavity. A mesoporous blue-emitting MOF is prepared as host to encapsulate a yellow-emitting iridium complex, [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)](+). The resultant composites emit bright white light with good colour quality (for example, Commission International de I'Eclairage coordinates, colour-rendering index and correlated colour temperature of (0.31, 0.33), 84.5 and 5409?K, respectively), and high quantum yield up to 115?C. This strategy may open new perspectives for developing high-performance energy-saving solid-state lighting materials. PMID:24212250

Sun, Chun-Yi; Wang, Xin-Long; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Chao; Li, Peng; Su, Zhong-Min; Zhu, Dong-Xia; Shan, Guo-Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Wu, Han; Li, Jing

2013-01-01

72

Ganges Chasma Sand Sheet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

Today's sand sheet is located in the Ganges Chasma portion of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, note that the dune forms are seen only at the margin and that the interior of the sand sheet at this resolution appears to completely lack dune forms.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.4, Longitude 310.7 East (49.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2005-01-01

73

Role Models for Complex Networks, 2007, Jrg Reichardt, Douglas R. White. European Physical Journal B. Selected for Europhysics News 39(1):11 2008 "Highlights"  

E-print Network

Role Models for Complex Networks, 2007, Jörg Reichardt, Douglas R. White. European Physical Journal B. Selected for Europhysics News 39(1):11 2008 "Highlights" Representing complex network structure to specific patterns in the link structure of their interaction network. Understanding complex multi

White, Douglas R.

74

Defrosting Sand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

19 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark spots formed in carbon dioxide frost that covers the surfaces of patches of sand in the south polar region. As spring arrived this year in the martian southern hemisphere, so began the annual defrosting process. The fact that sand dunes begin to defrost earlier than other surfaces, and that the defrosting process involves the formation of spots like these, has been known since the earliest days of the MGS mission.

Location near: 66.8oS, 15.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

2005-01-01

75

Magnetic field evolution in white dwarfs: The hall effect and complexity of the field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We calculate the evolution of the magnetic fields in white dwarfs, taking into account the Hall effect. Because this effect depends nonlinearly upon the magnetic field strength B, the time dependences of the various multipole field components are coupled. The evolution of the field is thus significantly more complicated than has been indicated by previous investigations. Our calculations employ recent white dwarf evolutionary sequences computed for stars with masses 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 solar mass. We show that in the presence of a strong (up to approximately 10(exp 9) G) internal toroidal magnetic field; the evolution of even the lowest order poloidal modes can be substantially changed by the Hall effect. As an example, we compute the evolution of an initially weak quadrupole component, which we take arbitrarily to be approximately 0.1%-1% of the strength of a dominant dipole field. We find that coupling provided by the Hall effect can produce growth of the ratio of the quadrupole to the dipole component of the surface value of the magnetic field strength by more than a factor of 10 over the 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 10) year cooling lifetime of the white dwarf. Some consequences of these results for the process of magnetic-field evolution in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

Muslimov, A. G.; Van Horn, H. M.; Wood, M. A.

1995-01-01

76

"It's Almost like a White School Now": Racialised Complexities, Indigenous Representation and School Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on a broader study that focused on examining principal leadership for equity and diversity, this paper presents the leadership experiences of "Jane", a White, middle-class principal of a rural Indigenous school. The paper highlights how Jane's leadership is inextricably shaped by her assumptions about race and the political dynamics and

Keddie, Amanda; Niesche, Richard

2012-01-01

77

Evolution of anticollapsing objects (white holes) in complex space-time with electromagnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with real and imaginary subspaces is considered, in which evolution of spherically symmetric space with electromagnetic field and anticollapsing objects from dust-like matter is studied. The connection of evolution laws for anticollapsing objects (white and grey holes) in different subspaces is determined. It is proposed as possible manifestation of additional dimensions.

V. S. Gurin

1991-01-01

78

Large-eddy Simulation of Boundary Layer Flow over Desert Sand Dune Structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex spatiotemporal coupling exists between desert sand dune topography and surface layer physics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Although the interactions of individual desert sand dunes have been extensively studied, with categorical interaction mechanisms identified, the aero-mechanical coupling associated with these dune interactions remains an open problem. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate turbulent boundary layer flow over dune structures from White Sands, NM. The dunes are resolved with an immersed boundary method (IBM). The flow-forcing (imposed pressure gradient) is varied to simulate the three common prevailing wind conditions at White Sands (southwest, southeast, and northwest, with southwest being the most common). In the present research, comparison between flow statistics (dune wall pressure distribution retrieved from the IBM) and time-difference dune elevation data are used to characterize the mechanisms responsible for erosion (stoss side) and deposition (lee side) of sand. Additionally, statistical details of time series of aerodynamic forcing at different locations on the dune face are evaluated, which may be used to deepen understanding of erosion and deposition events observed in the time-difference lidar data.

Uhlrich, S.; Anderson, W.; Passalacqua, P.; Mohrig, D. C.; Kocurek, G.

2012-12-01

79

Theoretical and functional complexity of white variegation of unripe fleshy fruits  

PubMed Central

In many plant species, the bright colors of ripe fruit serve to attract frugivores to enable efficient seed dispersal. Here I show that the fleshy fruit of several dozens of species originating from Asia (southeastern, eastern and central), the Middle East, Africa, America (South, Central and North), Australia, Polynesia and Micronesia, with fruit usually larger than 1 cm, have white or light green spots while they are still unripe. In many of these species, while the spots are conspicuous, the unripe fruit is known to be poisonous, bitter or sour. I propose that this fruit syndrome may signal frugivores that the fruit is still unripe. Similarly to the succulent leaves of window-plants, these spots form windows that enable light to penetrate deeper into the photosynthetic layers in the developing fruit. This seems to be a solution to overcome the limitations of light harvest because of the high volume to surface ratio of developing fleshy fruits. The white or whitish variegation in these unripe fleshy fruits may serve at least five functions: 1) Windows for photosynthesis, 2) camouflage, 3) signaling to frugivores that they are not ripe (possibly sometimes a type of mutualism with frugivores), 4) signaling to frugivores that they are poisonous - aposematism, and 5) mimicking insect eggs to reduce egg laying. All these functions may be partly or fully simultaneous. Because these white spots appear in plants of diverse geographical and taxonomic origin, it is probably an old adaptation, and such a syndrome has appeared and been selected for many times. PMID:23921545

Lev-Yadun, Simcha

2013-01-01

80

Atlas of Dutch drift sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger occurrences associated with push moraines show that drift sand occurs in elongated cells that are parallel to the prevailing SW wind. Their internal structure reflects the characteristic sequence of geomorphological processes: deflation dominant in the south-west, transport and accumulation towards the north east. Literature Jungerius, P.D., Riksen, M.J.P.M., 2010. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt. Baltica 23, 1: 59-70. Koster EA. 2005. Aeolian environments. In The physical Geography of Western Europe, Koster EA (ed). Oxford Regional Environments, Oxford University Press;139-160.

Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

2013-04-01

81

Northern Sand Sea  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. The image is completely dominated by dunes. In sand seas, it is very common for a single type of dune to occur, and for a single predominate wind to control the alignment of the dunes.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.2, Longitude 152.5 East (207.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2005-01-01

82

Industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2010 was about 26.5 Mt (29.2 million st), a 6-percent increased from 2009. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as sand for container glass, golf course sand, recreational sand, specialty glass and water filtration, showed increased demand in 2010.

Dolley, T. P.

2011-01-01

83

Tar sand  

SciTech Connect

Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

1990-01-01

84

White Rock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

(Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can't see . . . things like information about what kinds of minerals make up the landforms. Mars scientists once thought, for instance, that these unusual features might be vast hills of salt, the dried up remains of a long-ago, evaporated lake. Not so, said an instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, which revealed that the bright material is probably made up of volcanic ash or windblown dust instead. And talk about a cyclical 'ashes to ashes, dust to dust' story! Particles of this material fell and fell until they built up quite a sedimentary deposit, which was then only eroded away again by the wind over time, leaving the spiky terrain seen today. It looks white, but its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the surrounding material is so dark. Of course, good eyesight always helps in understanding. A camera on Mars Global Surveyor with close-up capabilities revealed that sand dunes are responsible for the smudgy dark material in the bright sediment and around it. But that's not all. The THEMIS camera on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft that took this image reveals that this ashy or dusty deposit once covered a much larger area than it does today. Look yourself for two small dots of white material on the floor of a small crater nearby (center right in this image). They preserve a record that this bright deposit once reached much farther. Since so little of it remains, you can figure that the material probably isn't very hard, and simply blows away. One thing's for sure. No one looking at this image could ever think that Mars is a boring place. With all of its bright and dark contrasts, this picture would be perfect for anyone who loves Ansel Adams and his black-and-white photography.

2002-01-01

85

Spatial HARDI: improved visualization of complex white matter architecture with Bayesian spatial regularization.  

PubMed

Imaging of water diffusion using magnetic resonance imaging has become an important noninvasive method for probing the white matter connectivity of the human brain for scientific and clinical studies. Current methods, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) such as q-ball imaging, and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), are limited by low spatial resolution, long scan times, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These methods fundamentally perform reconstruction on a voxel-by-voxel level, effectively discarding the natural coherence of the data at different points in space. This paper attempts to overcome these tradeoffs by using spatial information to constrain the reconstruction from raw diffusion MRI data, and thereby improve angular resolution and noise tolerance. Spatial constraints are specified in terms of a prior probability distribution, which is then incorporated in a Bayesian reconstruction formulation. By taking the log of the resulting posterior distribution, optimal Bayesian reconstruction is reduced to a cost minimization problem. The minimization is solved using a new iterative algorithm based on successive least squares quadratic descent. Simulation studies and in vivo results are presented which indicate significant gains in terms of higher angular resolution of diffusion orientation distribution functions, better separation of crossing fibers, and improved reconstruction SNR over the same HARDI method, spherical harmonic q-ball imaging, without spatial regularization. Preliminary data also indicate that the proposed method might be better at maintaining accurate ODFs for smaller numbers of diffusion-weighted acquisition directions (hence faster scans) compared to conventional methods. Possible impacts of this work include improved evaluation of white matter microstructural integrity in regions of crossing fibers and higher spatial and angular resolution for more accurate tractography. PMID:20670684

Raj, Ashish; Hess, Christopher; Mukherjee, Pratik

2011-01-01

86

Complex life cycle of Pterygodermatites peromysci, a trophically transmitted parasite of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus).  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to experimentally verify the intermediate host of a common gastrointestinal nematode, Pterygodermatites peromysci, infecting the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) and describe the complex life cycle. As with other nematodes in the family Rictulariidae, adult worms reside in the small intestine of the host, and infective eggs are shed into the environment where they are ingested by scavenger insects. A field survey of common nocturnal insects on the forest floors of central Pennsylvania was conducted to identify the putative intermediate host. Encysted nematode larvae were recovered from the hemocoel of three species of camel cricket, Ceuthophilus pallidipes, Ceuthophilus guttulosus, and Ceuthophilus gracilipes. The mean prevalence of infection was 11-17%, and the intensity of infection ranged from 1 to 41 cysts per cricket. Laboratory white-footed mice were infected with cysts harvested from the three species of crickets. Cysts taken from the C. pallidipes produced the highest level of infection (41%); the adult worms recovered from the mice were confirmed as P. peromysci. Laboratory infections of naive C. pallidipes with P. peromysci eggs yielded a 70% infection rate, further verifying that the cricket C. pallidipes is a suitable intermediate host for P. peromysci. We discuss the importance of identifying the intermediate host for understanding the transmission dynamics of a trophically transmitted parasite. PMID:21766236

Luong, Lien T; Hudson, Peter J

2012-01-01

87

Associations between major histocompatibility complex genes and production traits in White Leghorns.  

PubMed

The frequency of the MHC haplotype B15 had been found in a previous study to be more than two times higher in a White Leghorn line selected for high egg production compared with the unselected control strain. To further evaluate these findings, matings were performed between chickens with the same heterozygous B genotypes, being combinations of the most frequent haplotypes, i.e., B15, B19, and B21. In total, more than 1,300 observations from two generations were analyzed. In each generation, approximately one half of the chickens were derived from the line selected for total egg mass, the other half from the control strain. The MHC genotypes were determined serologically. Additive and dominance effects of B haplotypes on production traits were analyzed using an individual animal model. The estimation of genotypic values, together with the analysis of gene substitution effects, showed that the B15 haplotype was associated with early sexual maturity and low egg production during the late production period, i.e., between 43 and 63 wk of age, whereas B19 was associated with later onset of sexual maturity. The association of B15 with early sexual maturity would thus explain the high frequency of the B15 haplotype previously observed in a line selected for high early egg production. No dominance effect of the B system was observed for any of the traits, suggesting that the present results were due predominantly to additive gene effects. PMID:8321827

Lundn, A; Edfors-Lilja, I; Johansson, K; Liljedahl, L E

1993-06-01

88

Creating Sand Dunes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This experiment demonstrates the formation and movement of sand dunes. Students will simulate the effects of wind using a hair dryer on bare sand, then add stones and grass to observe how the effects are changed. They should be able to explain how sand dunes are formed, what circumstances effect the movement or formation of sand dunes, and relate this information to soil conservation.

1998-01-01

89

Industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2011 was about 30 Mt (33 million st), increasing slightly compared with 2010. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

Dolley, T. P.

2012-01-01

90

Industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

Dolley, T. P.

2013-01-01

91

Sand Castle Saturation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about saturation (page 1 of PDF), learners will build a series of sand castle towers using a 16 oz cup. Learners begin with completely dry sand and then add a ¼ cup of water to the sand for each successive tower, each time measuring the height and width of the resulting sand mound until they make a tower that maintains the shape of the cup. Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Sand Dunes.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2005-01-01

92

Isolation and properties of a protein complex containing flagellar movement-initiating phosphoprotein from testes of a white salmon.  

PubMed

Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue within a 15-kDa protein has been found to play a role in the initiation of flagellar movement of quiescent spermatozoa of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri [Morisawa & Hayashi (1986) Biomed. Res. 6, 181-184; Hayashi et al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 16692-16698]. In order to find a more accessible source of the 15-kDa protein for biochemical studies, phosphorylation of proteins was studied in other organs from other species. Cell-free extracts from spermatozoa and testes of Salmonidae were prepared and all catalyzed the cAMP-dependent, Mg(2+)-requiring, but Ca(2+)-independent phosphorylation of the 15-kDa proteins. Protein from the testes of a white salmon, Oncorhynchus keta, was isolated by conventional purification methods. The 15-kDa protein in the cell-free extract was found to be complexed with several other proteins such that the 15-kDa protein and its phosphorylating activity were copurified. Isolation of a sufficient amount of the complex for the preparation of antibodies against the various constituents is now possible. PMID:8056771

Jin, Z X; Nakajima, T; Morisawa, M; Hayashi, H

1994-03-01

93

Measurements of thermal updraft intensity over complex terrain using American white pelicans and a simple boundary-layer forecast model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An examination of boundary-layer meteorological and avian aerodynamic theories suggests that soaring birds can be used to measure the magnitude of vertical air motions within the boundary layer. These theories are applied to obtain mixed-layer normalized thermal updraft intensity over both flat and complex terrain from the climb rates of soaring American white pelicans and from diagnostic boundary-layer model-produced estimates of the boundary-layer depth zi and the convective velocity scale w*. Comparison of the flatland data with the profiles of normalized updraft velocity obtained from previous studies reveals that the pelican-derived measurements of thermal updraft intensity are in close agreement with those obtained using traditional research aircraft and large eddy simulation (LES) in the height range of 0.2 to 0.8 zi. Given the success of this method, the profiles of thermal vertical velocity over the flatland and the nearby mountains are compared. This comparison shows that these profiles are statistically indistinguishable over this height range, indicating that the profile for thermal updraft intensity varies little over this sample of complex terrain. These observations support the findings of a recent LES study that explored the turbulent structure of the boundary layer using a range of terrain specifications. For terrain similar in scale to that encountered in this study, results of the LES suggest that the terrain caused less than an 11% variation in the standard deviation of vertical velocity.

Shannon, H.D.; Young, G.S.; Yates, M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Seegar, W.

2003-01-01

94

Luminescence properties of Sm, Tb(Sal)3Phen complex in polyvinyl alcohol: an approach for white-light emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polyvinyl alcohol polymer films doped with Sm,Tb(Sal)3Phen complexes have been synthesized using solution casting technique. An enhancement in absorption intensity is observed revealing the encapsulation of rare earth ions by salicylic acid (Sal)/1,10 phenanthroline (Phen) complex. Photoluminescence spectra of the co-doped samples were examined by varying the concentration of Tb3+ keeping concentration of Sm3+ ions fixed and vice-versa. It is found that the polymer samples emit a combination of blue, green and orange-red wavelengths tunable to white light when excited with 355 nm radiation. The emission spectra also show a self-quenching effect at higher concentration of Sm3+ ions. An efficient energy transfer was observed from Tb3+ : 5D4 ? Sm3+ : 4G9/2. The reason for the enhancement in fluorescence intensities of Sm3+ in the co-doped polymer sample is the intermolecular as well as the intramolecular energy transfer.

Kaur, Gagandeep; Rai, S. B.

2011-10-01

95

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND927005  

E-print Network

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND92­7005 Unlimited Release UC­261 Fatigue of Fiberglass Wind Turbine Blade . #12;Distribution CategoryUC-261 SAND92-7005 UnlimitedRelease PrintedAugust 1992 FATIGUE OF FIBERGLASS

96

China Dust and Sand  

... article title: Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China View Larger Image ... these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an ...

2013-04-16

97

Mineral Sands Down Under  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource describes what mineral sands are, and discusses the heavy, dark-colored minerals that they contain (rutile, ilmenite, zircon, monazite). A map shows locations of mineral sands deposits in Australia.

98

Luminescence color-tuning through polymorph doping: preparation of a white-emitting solid from a single gold(I)-isocyanide complex by simple precipitation.  

PubMed

We report the luminescent color tuning of a new complex, 2-benzothiophenyl(4-methoxyphenyl isocyanide)gold(I) (1), by using a new "polymorph doping" approach. The slow crystallization of the complex 1 afforded three different pure polymorphic crystals with blue, green, and orange emission under UV-light irradiation. The crystal structures of pure polymorphs of 1 were investigated in detail by means of single-crystal X-ray analyses. Theoretical calculations based on the single-crystal structures provided qualitative explanation of the difference in the excited energy-levels of the three polymorphs of 1. In sharp contrast, the rapid precipitation of 1, with the optimized conditions reproducibly afforded homogeneous powder materials showing solid-state white-emission with Commission Internationale de l'clairage (CIE) 1931 chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.35), which is similar to pure white. New "polymorphic doping" has been revealed to be critical to this white emission through spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. The coexistence of the multiple polymorphs of 1 within the homogeneous powder materials and the ideal mixing of multiple luminescent colors gave its white emission accompanied with energy transfer from the predominant green-emitting polymorph to the minor orange-emitting polymorph. PMID:24249690

Seki, Tomohiro; Kurenuma, Sayaka; Ito, Hajime

2013-11-25

99

Elucidating aeolian dune history from lacustrine sand records in the Lake Michigan Coastal Zone, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aeolian sand in two small lakes within a Lake Michigan coastal-dune complex southwest of Holland, Michigan, provides a more detailed higher-resolution history of dune activity, during the later half of the Holocene, than do combined palaeosol and OSL ages from the dunes themselves. The sand signal from four cores within these lakes consists of visible sand laminae and invisible sand

Emily A. Timmons; Timothy G. Fisher; Edward C. Hansen; Elliott Eisaman; Trevor Daly; Michaele Kashgarian

2007-01-01

100

Investigating the Capability to Resolve Complex White Matter Structures with High b-Value Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the MGH-USC Connectom Scanner.  

PubMed

Abstract One of the major goals of the NIH Blueprint Human Connectome Project was to map and quantify the white matter connections in the brain using diffusion tractography. Given the prevalence of complex white matter structures, the capability of resolving local white matter geometries with multiple crossings in the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data is critical. Increasing b-value has been suggested for delineation of the finer details of the orientation distribution function (ODF). Although increased gradient strength and duration increase sensitivity to highly restricted intra-axonal water, gradient strength limitations require longer echo times (TE) to accommodate the increased diffusion encoding times needed to achieve a higher b-value, exponentially lowering the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquisition. To mitigate this effect, the MGH-USC Connectom scanner was built with 300 mT/m gradients, which can significantly reduce the TE of high b-value diffusion imaging. Here we report comparisons performed across b-values based on q-ball ODF metrics to investigate whether high b-value diffusion imaging on the Connectom scanner can improve resolving complex white matter structures. The q-ball ODF features became sharper as the b-value increased, with increased power fraction in higher order spherical harmonic series of the ODF and increased peak heights relative to the overall size of the ODF. Crossing structures were detected in an increasingly larger fraction of white matter voxels and the spatial distribution of two-way and three-way crossing structures was largely consistent with known anatomy. Results indicate that dMRI with high diffusion encoding on the Connectom system is a promising tool to better characterize, and ultimately understand, the underlying structural organization and motifs in the human brain. PMID:25287963

Fan, Qiuyun; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Zanzonico, Roberta; Keil, Boris; Cauley, Stephen; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Tisdall, Dylan; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Buckner, Randy L; Wedeen, Van J; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

2014-11-01

101

White Toenails  

MedlinePLUS

... Ankle Conditions White Toenails Text Size Print Bookmark White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

102

Foundry sand reclamation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dry method of conditioning spent foundry sand is disclosed. After having sized the sand and removal of tramp metallic elements, the sand is subjected to a sequence of squeezing under a high-stress low kinetic energy system for a period of 5-30 minutes, and then propelled against a target with high-kinetic energy in the presence of a suction for several

A. J. Filipovitch; J. M. Bleuenstein

1984-01-01

103

Industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, domestic production of industrial sand and gravel was about 31 Mt, a 5% increase from 2004. This increase was bouyed by robust construction and petroleum sectors of the US economy. Based on estimated world production figures, the United States was the world's leading producer and consumer of industrial sand and gravel. In the short term, local shortages of industrial sand and gravel will continue to increase.

Dolley, T. P.

2006-01-01

104

"Sand Boil" on Bay Bridge  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

"Sand boil" or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction). Vented sand contains-marine shell f...

2009-01-26

105

Strength and sintering effects at ejection of explosively driven sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A description of the response of sand to extreme loads is very important for the evaluation of the sand ejecta impact effects on various targets. Sand is a complex material to simulate because of its porosity where the inter-phase equilibrium is hard to achieve under transient shock wave loading. A previously developed two-phase model with strength has been implemented in CTH and applied to sand. The shock response of the sand, including the Hugoniot abnormality known from the literature for highly porous silica, is adequately described with the material model. The sand unloading effects appearing as the ejecta are observed in the present work using dynamic flash X-ray of an aluminium target plate loaded by limestone sand ejecta from the detonation of a buried high explosive charge. The CTH modelling results compared with the flash X-ray images have demonstrated good agreement, particularly, in the description of momentum transfer to the target.

Resnyansky, A. D.; Weckert, S. A.

2014-05-01

106

Glycemic and glycosuric responses in white sturgeon ( Acipenser transmontanus) after oral administration of simple and complex carbohydrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of white sturgeon to utilize different carbohydrates was studied by using a technique combining esophageal intubation, dorsal aorta cannulation, and urinary catheterization. Seven groups of five fish each were intubated with 1 g kg?1 body weight of gelatin (sham), glucose, maltose, corn dextrin, potato dextrin, raw corn starch, or raw potato starch 48 h post-operation. The observed plasma

Dong-Fang Deng; Stle Refstie; Silas S. O Hung

2001-01-01

107

Dynamic Sand Dunes  

Microsoft Academic Search

When sand falling in the spacing between two plates goes past an obstacle, a dynamic dune with a parabolic shape and an inner triangular region of nonflowing or slowly creeping sand forms. The angle of the triangular zone increases with the height of the dune and saturates at a value determined by the geometry of the cell. The width of

Y. Amarouchene; J. F. Boudet; H. Kellay

2001-01-01

108

Effects of complex radiative and convective environments on the thermal biology of the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii).  

PubMed

The energy budgets of small endotherms are profoundly affected by characteristics of the physical environment such as wind speed, air temperature and solar radiation. Among these, solar radiation represents a potentially very large heat load to small animals and may have an important influence on their thermoregulatory metabolism and heat balance. In this investigation, we examined the interactive effects of wind speed and irradiance on body temperature, thermoregulatory metabolism and heat balance in the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii). We measured changes in metabolic heat production by exposing birds to different wind speeds (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m s(-1)) and irradiance combinations (<3 W m(-2) and 936+/-11 W m(-2); mean +/- s.d.) at an air temperature of 10 degrees C. Body temperature was not affected by wind speed, but was significantly higher in animals not exposed to simulated solar radiation compared with those exposed at most wind speeds. In the absence of solar radiation, metabolic heat production was strongly affected by wind speed and increased by 30 % from 122 to 159 W m(-2) as wind speed increased from 0.25 to 2.0 m s(-1). Metabolic heat production was even more strongly influenced by wind speed in the presence of simulated solar radiation and increased by 51% from 94 to 142 W m(-2) as wind speed increased from 0.25 to 2. 0 m s(-1). Solar heat gain was negatively correlated with wind speed and declined from 28 to 12 W m(-2) as wind speed increased from 0.25 to 2.0 m s(-1) and, at its maximum, equaled 11% of the radiation intercepted by the animal. The overall thermal impact of the various wind speed and irradiance combinations on the animal's heat balance was examined for each treatment. Under cold conditions, with no solar radiation present, an increase in wind speed from 0.25 to 2.0 m s(-1) was equivalent to a decrease in chamber air temperature of 12.7 degrees C. With simulated solar radiation present, a similar increase in wind speed was equivalent to a decrease in chamber air temperature of 16 degrees C. Overall, shifting environmental conditions from a wind speed of 0.25 m s(-1) and irradiance of 936 W m(-2) to a wind speed of 2.0 m s(-1) with no short-wave radiation present was equivalent to decreasing chamber air temperature by approximately 20 degrees C. The sensitivity to changes in the convective environment, combined with the complex effects of changes in irradiance levels revealed by re-analyzing data published previously, significantly complicates the task of estimating the heat balance of animals in nature. PMID:10648222

Wolf, B O; Wooden, K M; Walsberg, G E

2000-02-01

109

Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes.  

PubMed

Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification. PMID:25434372

Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

2014-01-01

110

Crystal structure of the WOPR-DNA complex and implications for Wor1 function in white-opaque switching of Candida albicans.  

PubMed

Wor1 (white-opaque switching regulator 1) is a master regulator of the white-opaque switching in Candida albicans, an opportunistic human fungal pathogen, and is associated with its pathogenicity and commensality. Wor1 contains a conserved DNA-binding region at the N-terminus, consisting of two conserved segments (WOPRa and WOPRb) connected by a non-conserved linker that can bind to specific DNA sequences of the promoter regions and then regulates the transcription. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C. albicans Wor1 WOPR segments in complex with a double-stranded DNA corresponding to one promoter region of WOR1. The sequentially separated WOPRa and WOPRb are structurally interwound together to form a compact globular domain that we term the WOPR domain. The WOPR domain represents a new conserved fungal-specific DNA-binding domain which uses primarily a conserved loop to recognize and interact specifically with a conserved 6-bp motif of the DNA in both minor and major grooves. The protein-DNA interactions are essential for WOR1 transcriptional regulation and white-to-opaque switching. The structural and biological data together reveal the molecular basis for the recognition and binding specificity of the WOPR domain with its specific DNA sequences and the function of Wor1 in the activation of transcription. PMID:25091450

Zhang, Shicheng; Zhang, Tianlong; Yan, Minghui; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Jiangye

2014-09-01

111

Enhancing genetic mapping of complex genomes through the design of highly-multiplexed SNP arrays: application to the large and unsequenced genomes of white spruce and black spruce  

PubMed Central

Background To explore the potential value of high-throughput genotyping assays in the analysis of large and complex genomes, we designed two highly multiplexed Illumina bead arrays using the GoldenGate SNP assay for gene mapping in white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) and black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.). Results Each array included 768 SNPs, identified by resequencing genomic DNA from parents of each mapping population. For white spruce and black spruce, respectively, 69.2% and 77.1% of genotyped SNPs had valid GoldenGate assay scores and segregated in the mapping populations. For each of these successful SNPs, on average, valid genotyping scores were obtained for over 99% of progeny. SNP data were integrated to pre-existing ALFP, ESTP, and SSR markers to construct two individual linkage maps and a composite map for white spruce and black spruce genomes. The white spruce composite map contained 821 markers including 348 gene loci. Also, 835 markers including 328 gene loci were positioned on the black spruce composite map. In total, 215 anchor markers (mostly gene markers) were shared between the two species. Considering lineage divergence at least 10 Myr ago between the two spruces, interspecific comparison of homoeologous linkage groups revealed remarkable synteny and marker colinearity. Conclusion The design of customized highly multiplexed Illumina SNP arrays appears as an efficient procedure to enhance the mapping of expressed genes and make linkage maps more informative and powerful in such species with poorly known genomes. This genotyping approach will open new avenues for co-localizing candidate genes and QTLs, partial genome sequencing, and comparative mapping across conifers. PMID:18205909

Pavy, Nathalie; Pelgas, Betty; Beauseigle, Stephanie; Blais, Sylvie; Gagnon, France; Gosselin, Isabelle; Lamothe, Manuel; Isabel, Nathalie; Bousquet, Jean

2008-01-01

112

Industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2009 was about 27 Mt (30 million st), declining by 10 percent compared with 2008. Certain end uses of industrial sand and gravel, such as foundry and glassmaking sand, may have declined by a factor greater than 10 percent in 2009. U.S. apparent consumption was 24.7 Mt (27.2 million st) in 2009, down by 10 percent from the previous year, and imports declined to 83 kt (91,000 st).

Dolley, T. P.

2010-01-01

113

Sand boils without earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sedimentary deformation caused by liquefaction has become a popular means for inferring prehistoric strong earthquakes. This report describes a new mechanism for generating such features in the absence of earthquakes. Sand boils and a 180-m-long sand dike formed in Fremont Valley, California, when sediment-laden surface runoff was intercepted along the upslope part of a 500-m-long preexisting ground crack, flowed subhorizonally in the crack, and then flowed upward in the downslope part of the crack where it discharged as sand boils on the land surface. If the sand boils and their feeder dike were stratigraphically preserved, they could be misinterpreted as evidence for earthquake-induced liquefaction. -Authors

Holzer, T. L.; Clark, M. M.

1993-01-01

114

Vent of Sand Volcano  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

2009-01-26

115

Sand consolidation methods  

SciTech Connect

Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic salt catalyst such as ZnCl/sub 2/ is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed druing the polymerization reaction.

Friedman, R.H.

1984-01-24

116

Magic Sand Movie  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document from the Midwest Regional Center for Nanotechnology Education (NANO-LINK) is intended to be used with the other materials in the "magic sand" series of classroom lessons, which are available here. This resource is a 4 minute video demonstrating the magic sand experiment. In this experiment, students "will explore how the properties of a substance at the molecular level affects the way that it reacts and behaves."

2013-07-03

117

7. SAND FILTERS, CANAL TO LEFT. CONCRETE OVERFLOW AREA TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. SAND FILTERS, CANAL TO LEFT. CONCRETE OVERFLOW AREA TO LEFT OF CANAL ORIGINALLY PLANNED AS A STORAGE LAKE. VIEW LOOKING DUE WEST OF HINDS COMPLEX IN BACKGROUND OF SAND FILTERS. - Hinds Pump Plant, East of Joshua Tree National Monument, 5 miles north of Route 10, Hayfield, Riverside County, CA

118

Pollack Crater's White Rock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also has a higher spatial resolution that enables CRISM to see smaller exposures of these minerals, if they occur. If White Rock is an evaporative lacustrine or lake deposit, CRISM has the best chance of detecting telltale mineralogical signatures. The images above reveal what CRISM found.

The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic of Pollack Crater taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). White Rock actually appears dark in the THEMIS mosaic due to a low daytime temperature, because its light color leads to less heating by the Sun. The middle-left image is an infrared, false color image that reveals White Rock's reddish hue. The middle-right image shows the signatures of different minerals that are present. CRISM found that White Rock is composed of accumulated dust perhaps with some fine-grained olivine (an igneous mineral), surrounded by basaltic sand containing olivine and dark-colored pyroxene. The lower two images were constructed by draping CRISM images over topography and exaggerating the vertical scale to better illustrate White Rock's topography. White Rock still appears not to contain evaporite, but instead to be composed of accumulated dust and sand.

CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Mars Science Laboratory for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

2008-01-01

119

City-swallowing Sand Dunes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this Science at NASA site, you'll learn about the physics of sand movement and the research done to understand mechanisms of dune migration. The physics and the landforms are interesting because granular materials like sand show properties of both solids and fluids, including saltation, sheet flow, and avalanches. This site provides a summary of the physics involved along with photographs of sand dunes on Mars, close-ups of sand particles, and a sand dune advancing on a town.

Bell, Trudy E.

2007-06-19

120

Sand Sheet on Crater Floor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

As with yesterday's image, this dune field is located inside a crater, in this case an unnamed crater at 26 degrees North latitude. In this VIS image the dunes are coalescing into a sand sheet, note the lack of dune forms to the north of the small hills. The presence of ridges and hills in the area is affecting the dune shapes.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.4, Longitude 62.7 East (297.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2005-01-01

121

Assessing the Effects of Light on Differentiation and Virulence of the Plant Pathogen Botrytis cinerea: Characterization of the White Collar Complex  

PubMed Central

Organisms are exposed to a tough environment, where acute daily challenges, like light, can strongly affect several aspects of an individual's physiology, including pathogenesis. While several fungal models have been widely employed to understand the physiological and molecular events associated with light perception, various other agricultural-relevant fungi still remain, in terms of their responsiveness to light, in the dark. The fungus Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive pathogen able to cause disease on a wide range of plant species. Natural B. cinerea isolates exhibit a high degree of diversity in their predominant mode of reproduction. Thus, the majority of naturally occurring strains are known to reproduce asexually via conidia and sclerotia, and sexually via apothecia. Studies from the 1970?s reported on specific developmental responses to treatments with near-UV, blue, red and far-red light. To unravel the signaling machinery triggering development and possibly also connected with virulence we initiated the functional characterization of the transcription factor/photoreceptor BcWCL1 and its partner BcWCL2, that form the White Collar Complex (WCC) in B. cinerea. Using mutants either abolished in or exhibiting enhanced WCC signaling (overexpression of both bcwcl1 and bcwcl2), we demonstrate that the WCC is an integral part of the mentioned machinery by mediating transcriptional responses to white light and the inhibition of conidiation in response to this stimulus. Furthermore, the WCC is required for coping with excessive light, oxidative stress and also to achieve full virulence. Although several transcriptional responses are abolished in the absence of bcwcl1, the expression of some genes is still light induced and a distinct conidiation pattern in response to daily light oscillations is enhanced, revealing a complex underlying photobiology. Though overlaps with well-studied fungal systems exist, the light-associated machinery of B. cinerea appears more complex than those of Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans. PMID:24391918

Hevia, Montserrat A.; Tudzynski, Paul; Larrondo, Luis F.

2013-01-01

122

Sedimentology and reservoir potential of Matilija sandstone: an Eocene sand-rich deep-sea fan and shallow-marine complex, California  

SciTech Connect

A deep-sea fan facies model for the Matilija Sandstone (southern California) regression from turbidite to shallow-marine to brackish deposits are documented. In addition, reservoir characteristics and the diagenetic history of the deep-sea fan complex is discussed. Despite thick, favorable source beds and generally good initial reservoir characteristics, the Matilija Sandstone is not a productive unit of the Ventura basin because of low reservoir permeability and porosity.

Link, M.H. (Cities Service Co. Research, Tulsa, OK); Welton, J.E.

1982-10-01

123

Steady-State Phosphorylation of Light-Harvesting Complex II Proteins Preserves Photosystem I under Fluctuating White Light1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

According to the state transitions theory, the light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation in plant chloroplasts is essential to adjust the relative absorption cross section of photosystem II (PSII) and PSI upon changes in light quality. The role of LHCII phosphorylation upon changes in light intensity is less thoroughly investigated, particularly when changes in light intensity are too fast to allow the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes to occur. Here, we demonstrate that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stn7 (for state transition7) mutant, devoid of the STN7 kinase and LHCII phosphorylation, shows a growth penalty only under fluctuating white light due to a low amount of PSI. Under constant growth light conditions, stn7 acquires chloroplast redox homeostasis by increasing the relative amount of PSI centers. Thus, in plant chloroplasts, the steady-state LHCII phosphorylation plays a major role in preserving PSI upon rapid fluctuations in white light intensity. Such protection of PSI results from LHCII phosphorylation-dependent equal distribution of excitation energy to both PSII and PSI from the shared LHCII antenna and occurs in cooperation with nonphotochemical quenching and the proton gradient regulation5-dependent control of electron flow, which are likewise strictly regulated by white light intensity. LHCII phosphorylation is concluded to function both as a stabilizer (in time scales of seconds to minutes) and a dynamic regulator (in time scales from tens of minutes to hours and days) of redox homeostasis in chloroplasts, subject to modifications by both environmental and metabolic cues. Exceeding the capacity of LHCII phosphorylation/dephosphorylation to balance the distribution of excitation energy between PSII and PSI results in readjustment of photosystem stoichiometry. PMID:23033142

Grieco, Michele; Tikkanen, Mikko; Paakkarinen, Virpi; Kangasjarvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari

2012-01-01

124

Provenance and recycling of Arabian desert sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study seeks to determine the ultimate origin of aeolian sand in Arabian deserts by high-resolution petrographic and heavy-mineral techniques combined with zircon U-Pb geochronology. Point-counting is used here as the sole method by which unbiased volume percentages of heavy minerals can be obtained. A comprehensive analysis of river and wadi sands from the Red Sea to the Bitlis-Zagros orogen allowed us to characterize all potential sediment sources, and thus to quantitatively constrain provenance of Arabian dune fields. Two main types of aeolian sand can be distinguished. Quartzose sands with very poor heavy-mineral suites including zircon occupy most of the region comprising the Great Nafud and Rub' al-Khali Sand Seas, and are largely recycled from thick Lower Palaeozoic quartzarenites with very minor first-cycle contributions from Precambrian basement, Mesozoic carbonate rocks, or Neogene basalts. Instead, carbonaticlastic sands with richer lithic and heavy-mineral populations characterize coastal dunes bordering the Arabian Gulf from the Jafurah Sand Sea of Saudi Arabia to the United Arab Emirates. The similarity with detritus carried by the axial Tigris-Euphrates system and by transverse rivers draining carbonate rocks of the Zagros indicates that Arabian coastal dunes largely consist of far-travelled sand, deposited on the exposed floor of the Gulf during Pleistocene lowstands and blown inland by dominant Shamal northerly winds. A dataset of detrital zircon U-Pb ages measured on twelve dune samples and two Lower Palaeozoic sandstones yielded fourteen identical age spectra. The age distributions all show a major Neoproterozoic peak corresponding to the Pan-African magmatic and tectonic events by which the Arabian Shield was assembled, with minor late Palaeoproterozoic and Neoarchean peaks. A similar U-Pb signature characterizes also Jafurah dune sands, suggesting that zircons are dominantly derived from interior Arabia, possibly deflated from the Wadi al-Batin fossil alluvial fan or even from Mesozoic sandstones of the Arabian margin accreted to the Cenozoic Zagros orogen. Due to extensive recycling and the fact that zircon is so resistant to weathering and erosion, the U-Pb age signatures are much less powerful a tracer of sedimentary provenance than framework petrography and heavy minerals. Actualistic provenance studies of dune fields at subcontinental scale shed light on the generation and homogenization of aeolian sand, and allow us to trace complex pathways of multistep sediment transport, thus providing crucial independent information for accurate palaeogeographic and palaeoclimatic reconstructions.

Garzanti, Eduardo; Vermeesch, Pieter; And, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Valagussa, Manuel; Allen, Kate; Kadi, Khalid A.; Al-Juboury, Ali I. A.

2013-05-01

125

Provenance and recycling of Arabian desert sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study seeks to determine the ultimate origin of aeolian sand in Arabian deserts by high-resolution petrographic and heavy-mineral techniques combined with zircon U-Pb geochronology. Point-counting is used here as the sole method by which unbiased volume percentages of heavy minerals can be obtained. A comprehensive analysis of river and wadi sands from the Red Sea to the Bitlis-Zagros orogen allowed us to characterize all potential sediment sources, and thus to quantitatively constrain provenance of Arabian dune fields. Two main types of aeolian sand can be distinguished. Quartzose sands with very poor heavy-mineral suites including zircon occupy most of the region comprising the Great Nafud and Rub' al-Khali Sand Seas, and are largely recycled from thick Lower Palaeozoic quartzarenites with very minor first-cycle contributions from Precambrian basement, Mesozoic carbonate rocks, or Neogene basalts. Instead, carbonaticlastic sands with richer lithic and heavy-mineral populations characterize coastal dunes bordering the Arabian Gulf from the Jafurah Sand Sea of Saudi Arabia to the United Arab Emirates. The similarity with detritus carried by the axial Tigris-Euphrates system and by transverse rivers draining carbonate rocks of the Zagros indicates that Arabian coastal dunes largely consist of far-travelled sand, deposited on the exposed floor of the Gulf during Pleistocene lowstands and blown inland by dominant Shamal northerly winds. A dataset of detrital zircon U-Pb ages measured on twelve dune samples and two Lower Palaeozoic sandstones yielded fourteen identical age spectra. The age distributions all show a major Neoproterozoic peak corresponding to the Pan-African magmatic and tectonic events by which the Arabian Shield was assembled, with minor late Palaeoproterozoic and Neoarchean peaks. A similar U-Pb signature characterizes also Jafurah dune sands, suggesting that zircons are dominantly derived from interior Arabia, possibly deflated from the Wadi al-Batin fossil alluvial fan or even from Mesozoic sandstones of the Arabian margin accreted to the Cenozoic Zagros orogen. Due to extensive recycling and the fact that zircon is so resistant to weathering and erosion, the U-Pb age signatures are much less powerful a tracer of sedimentary provenance than framework petrography and heavy minerals. Actualistic provenance studies of dune fields at subcontinental scale shed light on the generation and homogenization of aeolian sand, and allow us to trace complex pathways of multistep sediment transport, thus providing crucial independent information for accurate palaeogeographic and palaeoclimatic reconstructions.

Garzanti, Eduardo; Vermeesch, Pieter; And, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Valagussa, Manuel; Allen, Kate; Kadi, Khalid; Al-Juboury, Ali

2013-04-01

126

Intranasal Inoculation of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Lyophilized Chronic Wasting Disease Prion Particulate Complexed to Montmorillonite Clay  

PubMed Central

Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known prion disease endemic in wildlife, is a persistent problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations. This disease continues to spread and cases are found in new areas each year. Indirect transmission can occur via the environment and is thought to occur by the oral and/or intranasal route. Oral transmission has been experimentally demonstrated and although intranasal transmission has been postulated, it has not been tested in a natural host until recently. Prions have been shown to adsorb strongly to clay particles and upon oral inoculation the prion/clay combination exhibits increased infectivity in rodent models. Deer and elk undoubtedly and chronically inhale dust particles routinely while living in the landscape while foraging and rutting. We therefore hypothesized that dust represents a viable vehicle for intranasal CWD prion exposure. To test this hypothesis, CWD-positive brain homogenate was mixed with montmorillonite clay (Mte), lyophilized, pulverized and inoculated intranasally into white-tailed deer once a week for 6 weeks. Deer were euthanized at 95, 105, 120 and 175 days post final inoculation and tissues examined for CWD-associated prion proteins by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that CWD can be efficiently transmitted utilizing Mte particles as a prion carrier and intranasal exposure. PMID:23671598

Nichols, Tracy A.; Spraker, Terry R.; Rigg, Tara D.; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Hoover, Clare; Michel, Brady; Bian, Jifeng; Hoover, Edward; Gidlewski, Thomas; Balachandran, Aru; O'Rourke, Katherine; Telling, Glenn C.; Bowen, Richard

2013-01-01

127

Dynamic Sand Dunes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When sand falling in the spacing between two plates goes past an obstacle, a dynamic dune with a parabolic shape and an inner triangular region of nonflowing or slowly creeping sand forms. The angle of the triangular zone increases with the height of the dune and saturates at a value determined by the geometry of the cell. The width of the dune, related to the radius of curvature at the tip, shows universal features versus its height rescaled by geometrical parameters. The velocity profile in the flowing part is determined and found to be nonlinear. The parabolic shape can be accounted for using a simple driven convection-diffusion equation for the interface.

Amarouchene, Y.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

2001-05-01

128

Sand ripples and dunes 1 Sand ripples and dunes  

E-print Network

Sand ripples and dunes 1 Sand ripples and dunes Franc¸ois Charru Institut de M´ecanique des Fluides of environments: in water channels, rivers and coastal ar- eas (Best 2005), in deserts on Earth (Bagnold 1941, Pye

129

The Uve1 Endonuclease Is Regulated by the White Collar Complex to Protect Cryptococcus neoformans from UV Damage  

PubMed Central

The pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans uses the Bwc1-Bwc2 photoreceptor complex to regulate mating in response to light, virulence and ultraviolet radiation tolerance. How the complex controls these functions is unclear. Here, we identify and characterize a gene in Cryptococcus, UVE1, whose mutation leads to a UV hypersensitive phenotype. The homologous gene in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease acting in the UVDE-dependent excision repair (UVER) pathway. C. neoformans UVE1 complements a S. pombe uvde knockout strain. UVE1 is photoregulated in a Bwc1-dependent manner in Cryptococcus, and in Neurospora crassa and Phycomyces blakesleeanus that are species that represent two other major lineages in the fungi. Overexpression of UVE1 in bwc1 mutants rescues their UV sensitivity phenotype and gel mobility shift experiments show binding of Bwc2 to the UVE1 promoter, indicating that UVE1 is a direct downstream target for the Bwc1-Bwc2 complex. Uve1-GFP fusions localize to the mitochondria. Repair of UV-induced damage to the mitochondria is delayed in the uve1 mutant strain. Thus, in C. neoformans UVE1 is a key gene regulated in response to light that is responsible for tolerance to UV stress for protection of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:24039606

Verma, Surbhi; Idnurm, Alexander

2013-01-01

130

Sand consolidation methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for consolidating unconsolidated mineral particles including sand in a subterranean petroleum formation penetrated by a well in fluid communication with at least a portion of the formation. The method consists of: (a) providing a fluid comprising a polymerizable resin, a polar organic diluent for the resin, and an oil soluble acid catalyst capable of causing polymerization

R. H. Friedman; B. W. Surles

1989-01-01

131

Building with Sand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of

Ashbrook, Peggy

2010-01-01

132

Extracting Oil From Tar Sands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recovery of oil from tar sands possible by batch process, using steam produced by solar heater. In extraction process, solar heater provides steam for heating solvent boiler. Boiling solvent removes oil from tar sands in Soxhlet extractor.

Ford, L. B.; Daly, D.

1984-01-01

133

Modelling hydrodynamics in the Rio Paran, Argentina: An evaluation and inter-comparison of reduced-complexity and physics based models applied to a large sand-bed river  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Depth-averaged velocities and unit discharges within a 30 km reach of one of the world's largest rivers, the Rio Paran, Argentina, were simulated using three hydrodynamic models with different process representations: a reduced complexity (RC) model that neglects most of the physics governing fluid flow, a two-dimensional model based on the shallow water equations, and a three-dimensional model based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Flow characteristics simulated using all three models were compared with data obtained by acoustic Doppler current profiler surveys at four cross sections within the study reach. This analysis demonstrates that, surprisingly, the performance of the RC model is generally equal to, and in some instances better than, that of the physics based models in terms of the statistical agreement between simulated and measured flow properties. In addition, in contrast to previous applications of RC models, the present study demonstrates that the RC model can successfully predict measured flow velocities. The strong performance of the RC model reflects, in part, the simplicity of the depth-averaged mean flow patterns within the study reach and the dominant role of channel-scale topographic features in controlling the flow dynamics. Moreover, the very low water surface slopes that typify large sand-bed rivers enable flow depths to be estimated reliably in the RC model using a simple fixed-lid planar water surface approximation. This approach overcomes a major problem encountered in the application of RC models in environments characterised by shallow flows and steep bed gradients. The RC model is four orders of magnitude faster than the physics based models when performing steady-state hydrodynamic calculations. However, the iterative nature of the RC model calculations implies a reduction in computational efficiency relative to some other RC models. A further implication of this is that, if used to simulate channel morphodynamics, the present RC model may offer only a marginal advantage in terms of computational efficiency over approaches based on the shallow water equations. These observations illustrate the trade off between model realism and efficiency that is a key consideration in RC modelling. Moreover, this outcome highlights a need to rethink the use of RC morphodynamic models in fluvial geomorphology and to move away from existing grid-based approaches, such as the popular cellular automata (CA) models, that remain essentially reductionist in nature. In the case of the world's largest sand-bed rivers, this might be achieved by implementing the RC model outlined here as one element within a hierarchical modelling framework that would enable computationally efficient simulation of the morphodynamics of large rivers over millennial time scales.

Nicholas, Andrew P.; Sandbach, Steven D.; Ashworth, Philip J.; Amsler, Mario L.; Best, James L.; Hardy, Richard J.; Lane, Stuart N.; Orfeo, Oscar; Parsons, Daniel R.; Reesink, Arnold J. H.; Sambrook Smith, Gregory H.; Szupiany, Ricardo N.

2012-10-01

134

White holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that observable white holes may be considered local inhomogeneities of the cosmic background field. Calculations are proposed for the magnitude of the frequency shift on the Schwarzschild sphere, governing the formal stability of white holes. The white holes which are observable have not expanded beyond their Schwarzschild spheres in our space and have always been visible. Other

KAYLL LAKE

1978-01-01

135

Special report: Athabasca tar sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

A synthetic crude oil is being produced from the Athabasca oil sands region of northeastern Alberta. The Athabasca operations are broken down into 3 divisions: mining, extraction of oil from the sand, and pipelining to market. The entire project, operated by Great Canadian Oil Sands, Ltd., an affiliate of Sun Oil Co., is self-sufficient except for the water supply. By-

W. A. Bachman; D. H. Stormont

1967-01-01

136

Does complex terrain matter for global terrestrial ecosystem models? Forest ecosystem dynamics in the White Mountains, NH. (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental scientists have long recognized that vegetation varies consistently at a landscape-scale due to variation in soils, hydrology, and topography. We expect that this variation to interact with climate change in complex ways, potentially allowing some species to persist in refugia while shifting other species to locations that may be edaphically unfavorable. Despite the recognized importance of this variation, it has not been incorporated into global and regional scale models because this heterogeneity occurs at a finer spatial scale than can be captured explicitly by refining model resolution. Rather than represent landscape-scale variability explicitly, we develop a spatially implicit approach to capture variation in soils, lateral hydrologic flow, and the effects of topography on microclimate and radiation interception. This scheme is incorporated in the Ecosystem Demography model. We tested this approach by first calibrating the model to forest inventory data and eddy-covariance fluxes of carbon, water, and energy from the Bartlett Experimental Forest in central NH and then validating it against 40+ years of vegetation and hydrology data from the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study, located 40km in forests of similar composition. When applied to Hubbard Brook the model is able to capture watershed streamflow at monthly to interannual scales and the variation in growth rates with topography, soils, and hydrology, and reproduces observed NPP during the forest growth phase. Growth rates were overestimated during the latter portion of the record, likely due to the cumulative impacts of acid rain which are not yet accounted for in the model. By sequentially switching off each source of edaphic variation, we find that the effect of elevation on microclimate has the greatest impact on the within-watershed distribution of NEE and NPP. The effects of slope and aspect on radiation are strongest at mid-elevation while lateral hydrology is most important on ridges and in valley-bottoms. A failure to include the effects of complex terrain is shown to result in a non-trivial overestimation of the net carbon sink. The model is then applied at a regional scale to forecast forest change under climate change scenarios. The addition of complex terrain is shown to buffer the effects of climate change on regional carbon fluxes. This effect occurs because climate change effects differ not only in magnitude but also in direction at a landscape-scale.

Dietze, M. C.; Richardson, A. D.; Moorcroft, P. R.

2010-12-01

137

Sand Sieve Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

John R. Anderson of Georgia Perimeter College has authored this lab experiment on grain size sorting in which students learn about performing a sieve analysis of sand and produce various graphs to represent the data collected. Included are equations for making the graphs and basic information on the importance of sieve analysis and the four useful statistical measurements used to make the graphs. This is a great resource to either the creation or enhancement of an instructors curriculum on this topic.

Anderson, John

2009-05-21

138

Complex interplay between glutamate receptors and intracellular Ca2+ stores during ischaemia in rat spinal cord white matter  

PubMed Central

Electrophysiological recordings of propagated compound action potentials (CAPs) and axonal Ca2+ measurements using confocal microscopy were used to study the interplay between AMPA receptors and intracellullar Ca2+ stores in rat spinal dorsal columns subjected to in vitro combined oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Removal of Ca2+ or Na+ from the perfusate was protective after 30 but not 60 min of OGD. TTX was ineffective with either exposure, consistent with its modest effect on ischaemic depolarization. In contrast, AMPA antagonists were very protective, even after 60 min of OGD where 0Ca2+ + EGTA perfusate was ineffective. Similarly, blocking ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization from internal stores (0Ca2+ + nimodipine or 0Ca2+ + ryanodine), or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ release (block of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors with 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 or IP3 receptor block with 2APB; each in 0Ca2+) were each very protective, with the combination resulting in virtually complete functional recovery after 1 h OGD (97 32% CAP recovery versus 4 6% in artificial cerebrospinal fluid). AMPA induced a rise in Ca2+ concentration in normoxic axons, which was greatly reduced by blocking ryanodine receptors. Our data therefore suggest a novel and surprisingly complex interplay between AMPA receptors and Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores. We propose that AMPA receptors may not only allow Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space, but may also significantly influence Ca2+ release from intra-axonal Ca2+ stores. In dorsal column axons, AMPA receptor-dependent mechanisms appear to exert a greater influence than voltage-gated Na+ channels on functional outcome following OGD. PMID:16945971

Ouardouz, Mohamed; Malek, Sameh; Coderre, Elaine; Stys, Peter K

2006-01-01

139

A 550 Mbit/s real-time visible light communication system based on phosphorescent white light LED for practical high-speed low-complexity application.  

PubMed

In this paper, we first experimentally demonstrate a 550 Mbit/s real-time visible light communication (VLC) system based on nonreturn-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation of a commercial phosphorescent white light LED. The 3-dB modulation bandwidth of such devices is only a few megahertz. We proposed an analog pre-emphasis circuit based on NPN transistors and an active post-equalization circuit based on an amplifier to enhance the 3-dB bandwidth of VLC link. Utilizing our proposed pre-emphasis and post-equalization circuits, the 3-dB bandwidth of VLC link could be extended from 3 to 233 MHz with blue-filter, to the best of our knowledge, which is the highest ever achieved in VLC systems reported. The achieved data rate was 550 Mbit/s at the distance of 60 cm and the resultant bit-error-ratio (BER) was 2.6 10-9. When the VLC link operated at 160 cm, the data rate was 480 Mbit/s with 2.3 10-7 of BER. Our proposed VLC system is a good solution for high-speed low-complexity application. PMID:25401871

Li, Honglei; Chen, Xiongbin; Guo, Junqing; Chen, Hongda

2014-11-01

140

ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA  

E-print Network

vegetation was Atriplex con fertifolia (Torr. & Frem.), Tetradymia tetra meres (Blake), Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus (Hookl), Astragalus lentiginousus Dougl., and Psoralea lanceolata (Pursh.), and at Sand Mountain

Hanks, Lawrence M.

141

Laboratory singing sand avalanches.  

PubMed

Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stphane

2010-02-01

142

Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyolands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. The total in place resources, are 6.3 billion barrels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses is necessary before a more accurate determination of resources is attempted.

Dana, G. F.; Oliver, R. L.; Elliott, J. R.

1984-05-01

143

Committed White Male Teachers and Identifications: Toward Creative Identifications and a "Second Wave" of White Identity Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Committed White male teachers of inner-city students seeks to supersede previous research on White teacher and other White identities by narrating respondents' "creative identifications" and initiating a "second wave" of White identity studies. This research reflection articulates complex, viable, and creative White identities, reconceptualized

Jupp, James C.; Slattery, G. Patrick, Jr.

2010-01-01

144

WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS  

E-print Network

93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Non-aeolian sand ripples  

Microsoft Academic Search

By examining the initial stages of the impact of a granular jet on a flat horizontal solid surface we evidenced the existence of oscillatory sand fronts. These oscillations give rise to a novel mechanism for the formation of ripples on sand surfaces. We here show that as the front advances, its slope changes periodically in time, leaving behind a succession

J. F. Boudet; Y. Amarouchene; B. Bonnier; H. Kellay

2005-01-01

146

Exploring Magic Sand  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nanotechnology is an area of science and engineering that occurs at the atomic and molecular level. This is certainly a difficult concept to grasp. This website, presented by The National Infrastructure Network, highlights many critical concepts to understanding this smaller scale. By using a product called "Magic Sand," the activity "will explore how the properties of a substance at the molecular level affects the way that it reacts and behaves." Additionally, students will explore nanotechnology as an emerging and interdisciplinary field. The experiment will show students how developments in the field can improve devices, materials, and structures we use on a daily basis. A student and teacher guide is provided with the lab. Overall, this is a great exercise for any science classroom interested in the workings of nanotechnology.

2009-01-16

147

Sand and Water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Released 7 November 2003

This image shows a relatively small crater (35 km across) in the heavily cratered terrain of the southern highlands. At the midlatitudes, this area is known both for its water-formed gullies and its sand dunes. This crater shows spectacular examples of both. In fact, the gullies running down the northern edge of the crater made it to the cover of Science magazine on June 30, 2000. The large dark spot in the floor of the crater is sand that has accumulated into one large dune with a single curvilinear crest.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.9, Longitude 17.5 East (342.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2003-01-01

148

Sand, Syrup and Supervolcanoes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supervolcanic eruptions are amongst the most awesome events in the history of the Earth. A supervolcano can erupt thousands of cubic kilometers of ash devastating entire countries and changing the climate for decades. During the eruption, the magma chamber partially empties and collapses. As the chamber collapses at depth, a massive subsidence pit develops at the surface, called a caldera, some calderas can be the size of the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Fortunately, a supervolcano of this size has not erupted since the development of modern man. Due to the infrequency and massive scale of these eruptions, volcanologists do not yet fully understand how calderas form and how the eruption is affected by the roof collapse and vice versa. Therefore, simple analogue experiments are amongst the best ways to understand these eruptions. We present two of these experiments that can be fun, cheap, and helpful to high school and university instructors to demonstrate caldera formation. The first experiment illustrates how magma chamber roofs collapse to produce different style calderas, the second experiment demonstrates how the magma in the chamber affects the collapse style and magma mixing during a supervolcanic eruption. The collapse of a magma chamber can be demonstrated in a simple sandbox containing a buried balloon filled with air connected to a tube that leads out of the sandbox. At this small scale the buried balloon is a good analogue for a magma chamber and sand has an appropriate strength to represent the earths crust. Faults propagate through the sand in a similar way to faults propagating through the crust on a larger scale. To form a caldera just let the air erupt out of the balloon. This experiment can be used to investigate what controls the shape and structure of calderas. Different shaped balloons, and different burial depths all produce sand calderas with different sizes and structures. Additionally, experiments can be done that erupt only part of the volume of the balloon. These sandbox experiments can be compared to natural calderas and help us understand their internal structure. The second experiment helps us understand how magma behaves during collapse. For this experiment we allowed dense cylindrical blocks to sink into syrup solutions filled with poppy seeds. We mix the syrup with warm water to reduce its viscosity. A series of sinking experiments can be done at different viscosities to investigate different regimes of fluid flow. A key parameter used to the character of the flow of magma is the Reynolds number, the ratio between inertial and viscous forces. The experiments show how the Reynolds number of the magma affects the speed and the style that the block sinks, and also how the magma behaves in the chamber. Fast subsidence in low viscosity fluid (high Reynolds numbers) produces seed vortices in the syrup, indicating mixing. This experiment helps us understand the interplay between eruption and collapse and why mixed magma frequently erupts from calderas. These two simple experiments not only demonstrate caldera formation, but also can be used to get quantative information about the processes governing caldera formation.

Kennedy, B.; Jellinek, M.; Stix, J.

2006-12-01

149

Sand control system  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for controlling sands in a wellbore, the method comprising the steps of: introducing an amount of particles into the wellbore, introducing a tubular string into the particles and moving the string downwardly in the particles, the tubular string having swivel means for rotatably connecting an entry tool to the string, the swivel means connected between the string and the entry tool, the swivel means having a diameter no greater than the diameter of the string, the entry tool mounted to the swivel means for relative rotation. The tool has auger means for facilitating the introduction of the string into the particles. A tool for facilitating the introduction of a tubular string into an accumulation of particles in a wellbore has perforations for production. The tool comprises: body means; rotative connection means for rotatably connecting the body means to the string for relative rotation; the rotative connection means connects between the string and the body means and has a diameter no greater than the diameter of the string; and auger means connects to the body means for augering into the particles and for facilitating the movement of particles into the perforations.

Guidry, J.P.; Gavranovic, L.R.C.

1987-07-21

150

Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles  

PubMed Central

Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

2014-01-01

151

Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands  

E-print Network

A total of 62 cohesiveness sands were tested to rographics. investigate the importance of the water content, grain size distribution, grading of the soil, particle shape, grain crushing during testing and laboratory compaction test method...

Delphia, John Girard

2012-06-07

152

Sound-producing sand avalanches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sound-producing sand grains constitute one of nature's more puzzling and least understood physical phenomena. They occur naturally in two distinct types: booming and squeaking sands. Although both varieties of sand produce unexpectedly pure acoustic emissions when sheared, they differ in their frequency range and duration of emission, as well as the environment in which they tend to be found. Large-scale slumping events on dry booming dunes can produce acoustic emissions that can be heard up to 10 km away and which resemble hums, moans, drums, thunder, foghorns or the drone of low-flying propeller aircraft. These analogies emphasize the uniqueness of the phenomenon and the clarity of the produced sound. Although reports of these sands have existed in the literature for over one thousand years, a satisfactory explanation for either type of acoustic emission is still unavailable.

Sholtz, Paul; Bretz, Michael; Nori, Franco

1997-05-01

153

Non-aeolian sand ripples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By examining the initial stages of the impact of a granular jet on a flat horizontal solid surface we evidenced the existence of oscillatory sand fronts. These oscillations give rise to a novel mechanism for the formation of ripples on sand surfaces. We here show that as the front advances, its slope changes periodically in time, leaving behind a succession of surface elevations and depressions. A key feature of these oscillations is the interplay between the deposition of mobile sand and the avalanching of the static parts giving rise to a remarkable self-regulating system. These features come out naturally from a simplified version of recently proposed models for the dynamics of sand piles.

Boudet, J. F.; Amarouchene, Y.; Bonnier, B.; Kellay, H.

2005-02-01

154

Sesame fertilization on lakeland sand  

E-print Network

SESAME FERTILIZATION ON LAKELAND SAND A Thesis RAMON HUERTA M. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1961... Ma/or Sub]ect: Agronomy SESAME FERTILIZATION ON LAKELAND SAND A Thesis RAMON HUERTA M. Approved as to style and content hy: Chairssn of Conunittee Head of partment January 1961 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his sincere...

Huerta, Ramon Moreno

2012-06-07

155

Large-scale hydrocarbon-driven sand injection in the Paleogene of the North Sea  

E-print Network

-seismic and borehole data [1,2]). The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributedLarge-scale hydrocarbon-driven sand injection in the Paleogene of the North Sea Davide Duranti, Adriano Mazzini * Injected Sands Group, Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University

Mazzini, Adriano

156

Direct and Indirect Effects of Case Complexity, Guilty Pleas, and Offender Characteristics on Sentencing for Offenders Convicted of a White-Collar Offense Prior to Sentencing Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research on the punishment of offenders convicted of a white-collar offense estimated models that specify only direct effects of defendant characteristics, offense-related variables, and guilty pleas on sentence severity. Drawing from conflict or labeling theories, much of this research focused on the effects of offender's socioeconomic status on sentence outcomes. Findings from this research are inconsistent about the relationship

Celesta A. Albonetti

1998-01-01

157

MAJOR-HISTOCOMPATIBILITY-COMPLEX-ASSOCIATED VARIATION IN SECONDARY SEXUAL TRAITS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS): EVIDENCE FOR GOOD-GENES ADVERTISEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Good-genes hypotheses predict that development of secondary sexual characters can be an honest adver- tisement of heritable male quality. We explored this hypothesis using a cervid model (adult, male white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus) to determine whether antler development could provide an honest signal of a male's genetic quality and condition to adversaries. We compared antler, morphometric, hormonal, and parasitic data

Stephen S. Ditchkoff; Robert L. Lochmiller; Ronald E. Masters; Steven R. Hoofer; Ronald A. Van Den Bussche

2001-01-01

158

Nematodes infect, but do not manipulate digging by, sand crabs, Lepidopa benedicti.  

PubMed

We examined sand crabs (Lepidopa benedicti) for endoparasites, and found the only parasite consistently infecting the studied population were small nematodes. Because many nematodes have complex life cycles involving multiple hosts, often strongly manipulating their hosts, we hypothesized that nematodes alter the behavior of their sand crab hosts. We predicted that more heavily infected crabs would spend more time above sand than less heavily infected crabs. Our data indicate infection by nematodes was not correlated with duration of time crabs spent above sand. We also suggest that organisms living in sandy beaches may benefit from relatively low parasite loads due to the low diversity of species in the habitat. PMID:24916475

Joseph, Meera; Faulkes, Zen

2014-07-01

159

Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by their proximity to the interacting object or force with the sand. To illustrate an example, as a rover wheel moves forward and approaches a particular sand region, that region will continue to subdivide until individual sand particles are represented. Conversely, if the rover wheel moves away, previously subdivided sand regions will recombine. Thus, individual sand particles are available when an interacting force is present but stored away if there is not. As such, this technique allows for many particles to be represented without the computational complexity. We have also further generalized these subdivision regions in our sand framework into any volumetric area suitable for use in the simulation. This allows for more compact subdivision regions and has fine-tuned our framework so that more emphasis can be placed on regions of actively participating sand. We feel that this increases the framework's usefulness across scientific applications and can provide for other research opportunities within the earth and planetary sciences. Through continued collaboration with our academic partners, we continue to build upon our sand simulation framework and look for other opportunities to utilize this research.

Clothier, M.

2013-12-01

160

The binding of platinum hexahalides (Cl, Br and I) to hen egg-white lysozyme and the chemical transformation of the PtI6 octahedral complex to a PtI3 moiety bound to His15  

PubMed Central

This study examines the binding and chemical stability of the platinum hexahalides K2PtCl6, K2PtBr6 and K2PtI6 when soaked into pre-grown hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals as the protein host. Direct comparison of the iodo complex with the chloro and bromo complexes shows that the iodo complex is partly chemically transformed to a square-planar PtI3 complex bound to the N? atom of His15, a chemical behaviour that is not exhibited by the chloro or bromo complexes. Each complex does, however, bind to HEWL in its octahedral form either at one site (PtI6) or at two sites (PtBr6 and PtCl6). As heavy-atom derivatives of a protein, the octahedral shape of the hexahalides could be helpful in cases of difficult-to-interpret electron-density maps as they would be recognisable objects. PMID:25195880

Tanley, Simon W. M.; Starkey, Laurina-Victoria; Lamplough, Lucinda; Kaenket, Surasek; Helliwell, John R.

2014-01-01

161

Caryophyllaceae (Pink family) White campion (white cockle)  

E-print Network

Caryophyllaceae (Pink family) White campion (white cockle) Silene latifolia Poir. Life cycle Annual Similar weeds Bladder campion [S. vulgaris (Moench) Garcke] Differs by having a strong perennial nature

162

Lipid, Fatty Acid and Energy Density Profiles of White Sharks: Insights into the Feeding Ecology and Ecophysiology of a Complex Top Predator  

PubMed Central

Lipids are major sources of metabolic energy in sharks and are closely linked to environmental conditions and biological cycles, such as those related to diet, reproduction and migration. In this study, we report for the first time, the total lipid content, lipid class composition and fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver tissue of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, of various lengths (1.53.9 m), sampled at two geographically separate areas off southern and eastern Australia. Muscle tissue was low in total lipid content (<0.9% wet mass, wm) and was dominated by phospholipids (>90% of total lipid) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (3412% of total fatty acids). In contrast, liver was high in total lipid which varied between 5181% wm and was dominated by triacylglycerols (>93%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (3612%). With knowledge of total lipid and dry tissue mass, we estimated the energy density of muscle (18.40.1 kJ g?1 dm) and liver (34.13.2 kJ g?1 dm), demonstrating that white sharks have very high energetic requirements. High among-individual variation in these biochemical parameters and related trophic markers were observed, but were not related to any one biological or environmental factor. Signature fatty acid profiles suggest that white sharks over the size range examined are generalist predators with fish, elasmobranchs and mammalian blubber all contributing to the diet. The ecological applications and physiological influences of lipids in white sharks are discussed along with recommendations for future research, including the use of non-lethal sampling to examine the nutritional condition, energetics and dietary relationships among and between individuals. Such knowledge is fundamental to better understand the implications of environmental perturbations on this iconic and threatened species. PMID:24871223

Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Parrish, Christopher C.; Bruce, Barry D.; Young, Jock W.; Nichols, Peter D.

2014-01-01

163

Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack; Arvidson, Raymond; Grin, Edmond; Li, Ronxing; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, Barbara; Bell, James F.; Aileen Yingst, R.

2014-05-01

164

Geology on a Sand Budget  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Earth science teaches know how frustrating it can be to spend hundreds of dollars on three-dimensional (3-D) models of Earth's geologic features, only to use the models for a few class periods. To avoid emptying an already limited science budget, teachers can use a simple alternative to the expensive 3-D models--sand. Modeling geologic processes and features with sand is an effective way for teachers to promote student understanding of Earth science topics, quickly assess students' prior knowledge, and identify common misconceptions.

Kane, Jacqueline

2004-09-01

165

Molecular and functional basis of phenotypic convergence in white lizards at White Sands  

E-print Network

) There are many striking examples of phenotypic convergence in nature, in some cases associated with changes on the predictability of mechanisms generating adaptive change. Here we test whether independent mutations in the melano different evolutionary consequences. Here we dissect the molecular mechanism of convergent evolution

Childress, Michael J.

166

Molecular and functional basis of phenotypic convergence in white lizards at White Sands  

E-print Network

) There are many striking examples of phenotypic convergence in nature, in some cases associated with changes light on the predictability of mechanisms generating adaptive change. Here we test whether independent different evolutionary consequences. Here we dissect the molecular mechanism of convergent evolution

Nachman, Michael

167

Soggy-sand electrolytes: status and perspectives.  

PubMed

Soggy-sand electrolytes (solid-liquid composites, typically gel electrolytes, with synergistic electrical properties) are reviewed as far as status and perspectives are concerned. Major emphasis is put on the understanding of the local mechanism as well as the long-range transport along the filler network. The beneficial property spectrum includes enhanced conductivity of one ion type and decreased conductivity of the counter ion, but also the exciting mechanical properties of the solid-liquid composites. Inherent but not insurmountable problems lie in the reproducibility and stationarity of the composites microstructure and morphology. Owing to the huge parameter complexity and hence to the multitude of adjusting screws, there are various strategies for materials optimization. The technological relevance is enormous, in particular for battery electrolytes as here all the above-mentioned electrical and mechanical benefits are welcome. The soggy-sand electrolytes combine high Li(+) conductivity, low anion conductivity and good wettability of electrode particles with the mechanical stability of semi-solids. PMID:24080900

Pfaffenhuber, C; Gbel, M; Popovic, J; Maier, J

2013-11-14

168

Sand and Water Table Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical

Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

2010-01-01

169

NU Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball  

E-print Network

NU Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid be responsible for collecting his team's IDs and registering their uniform numbers with the IM staff. 3. 3 Unsportsmanlike Penalties will result in the player leaving the game. Only a team's designated Captain is allowed

Sridhar, Srinivas

170

Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nations future.

Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

2010-12-31

171

Regeneration of sand waves after dredging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sand waves are large bed waves on the seabed, being a few metres high and lying hundreds of metres apart. In some cases, these sand waves occur in navigation channels. If these sand waves reduce the water depth to an unacceptable level and hinder navigation, they need to be dredged. It has been observed in the Bisanseto Channel in Japan

M. A. F. Knaapen; S. J. M. H. Hulscher

2002-01-01

172

Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones  

SciTech Connect

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09

173

Sand reinforced with shredded waste tires  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using shredded waste tires to reinforce sand. Direct shear tests were conducted on mixtures of dry sand and shredded waste tires. The following factors were studied to evaluate their influence on shear strength: normal stress, sand matrix unit weight, shred content, shred length, and shred orientation. From results of

Gary J. Foose; Craig H. Benson; Peter J. Bosscher

1996-01-01

174

Unveiling White Privilege.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racism, discrimination, and prejudice are typically viewed from the perspective of the disadvantaged ethnic minority, but another approach is to address the advantages of whites. There is one culture that is usually invisible to whites, and that is "whiteness." To grow up white is to be the focal point from which others differ. Whites grapple with

Pappas, Georgia

1995-01-01

175

Breeding biology of the White-fronted Plover (Charadrius marginatus) in the south-western cape, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

A small breeding population of White-fronted Plovers Charadrius marginatus was studied at Langebaan Lagoon, South Africa, between 1974 and 1977. Adults maintained territories throughout the year though territory holders sometimes joined flocks of non-territorial birds, usually outside the breeding season. Territories included sections of sand dune and beach where nests were located, and an area of intertidal sand flat where

Ronald W. Summers; Philip A. R. Hockey

1980-01-01

176

Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyonlands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well-sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. Resources were calculated from analytical data from the three coreholes drilled by the Laramie Energy Technology Center and other available data. The total in-place resources, determined from this study, are 6.3 billion barels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses will be necessary before a more accurate determination of resources can be attempted. 8 references, 11 figures, 7 tables.

Dana, G.F.; Oliver, R.L.; Elliott, J.R.

1984-05-01

177

Thermal Properties of oil sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.710-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.210-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.010-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5106 J/m3K to 2.11106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

2013-12-01

178

Pupil - white spots  

MedlinePLUS

White spots in the pupil is a condition that causes the pupil of the eye to look white instead of black. ... Sometimes, the pupil of the eye may appear white, or the normal red reflex may appear to ...

179

Giant sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A field of giant sand waves, among the largest in the world, recently was mapped in high resolution for the first time during a multibeam survey in 2004 and 2005 through the strait of the Golden Gate at the mouth of San Francisco Bay in California (Figure la). This massive bed form field covers an area of approximately four square kilometers in water depths ranging from 30 to 106 meters, featuring more than 40 distinct sand waves with crests aligned approximately perpendicular to the dominant tidally generated cross-shore currents, with wavelengths and heights that measure up to 220 meters and 10 meters, respectively. Sand wave crests can be traced continuously for up to two kilometers across the mouth of this energetic tidal inlet, where depth-averaged tidal currents through the strait below the Golden Gate Bridge exceed 2.5 meters per second during peak ebb flows. Repeated surveys demonstrated that the sand waves are active and dynamic features that move in response to tidally generated currents. The complex temporal and spatial variations in wave and tidal current interactions in this region result in an astoundingly diverse array of bed form morphologies, scales, and orientations. Bed forms of approximately half the scale of those reported in this article previously were mapped inside San Francisco Bay during a multibeam survey in 1997 [Chin et al., 1997].

Barnard, P.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Rubin, D.M.; Kvitek, R.G.

2006-01-01

180

Crystal structures of hen egg-white lysozyme complexes with gadolinium(III) and gadolinium(III)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.  

PubMed

Analysis at 0.25 nm resolution of the crystal structures of lysozyme-Gd(III) and lysozyme-Gd(III)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNac), prepared by diffusion methods, show that there are two main binding positions for Gd(III), one of which is close to glutamic acid-35 and the other close to aspartic acid-52. The two sites are 0.36 nm part. There is no evidence for the weak binding of Gd(III) to any of the eight other carboxy groups of lysozyme. In the presence of Gd(III), the binding of GlcNac is similar to that observed for the binding of the beta-anomer in subsite C. There are numerous small conformational changes in the protein on binding (Gd(III) and the sugar, and these have been quantified to a first approximation by real-space refinement. These changes are similar in both structures, and involve, among other small movements, shifts of one of the disulphide bridges by up to 0.05 nm. The movement of residues 70--74 observed in the binary complex of lysozyme-GlcNac [Perkins, Johnson, Machin & Phillips (1978) Biochem. J. 173-617] is not observed in the ternary complex of lysozyme-Gd(III)-GlcNac. The nature of the lysozyme-Gd(III) complex is discussed in the light of evidence from other crystallographic studies and n.m.r. solution studies. Preliminary findings for a lysozyme-Gd(III) complex prepared by co-crystallization methods are reported. PMID:486153

Perkins, S J; Johnson, L N; Machin, P A; Phillips, D C

1979-07-01

181

Effects of autochthonous microbial community on the die-off of fecal indicators in tropical beach sand.  

PubMed

The recently observed high levels of fecal indicators in beach sand confound beach water monitoring efforts. The high levels of fecal indicators may be caused by the loss or the reduced activities of common environmental stresses controlling die-off in the sand. Microcosm experiments were conducted to compare the effects of biotic stresses from autochthonous sand bacteria, protozoa, and viruses on Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis in two tropical beach sands. The inhibition of protozoan activities by cycloheximide did not significantly affect the die-off of E. coli, indicating that protozoan predation played a limited role in beach sand. The contribution from phage infection to E. coli die-off was also negligible. Consequently, autochthonous bacteria were identified as the predominant biotic stress to the die-off of E. coli in beach sand. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that the beach sand had a very low protozoan concentration and low protozoan growth potential when compared with various environmental samples. Co-culturing of E. coli with autochthonous sand bacterial isolates significantly enhanced E. coli die-off. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed a complex sand bacterial community, suggesting that bacterial antagonistic effects may be widespread. The study also found that E. faecalis exhibited a much longer survival in beach sand compared with E. coli. PMID:20629750

Feng, Fan; Goto, Dustin; Yan, Tao

2010-10-01

182

[Environmental toxicity of waste foundry sand].  

PubMed

The metal leaching characteristics and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five different types of waste foundry sands were analyzed with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and head space-gas chromatography (HS-GC). Microtox and soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) tests were then used to evaluate the bio-effects of these waste sands. The results showed that due to the different metals poured and casting materials used to make the sand molds, there was significant difference among the five waste foundry sands in the compositions and concentrations of metal and organic pollutants. The concentrations of Fe in the leachates of iron and steel casting waste foundry sand exceeded the maximal allowable concentrations specified in the National Standard of Drinking Water Quality, whereas the As concentration in the leachate of aluminum casting waste foundry sand exceeded the standard. The five waste foundry sands had quite different compositions and levels of VOCs, which resulted in different levels of inhibition effects on the luminescent bacteria (30% and 95%). Additionally, the soil DHA tests suggested that metal pollutants in waste foundry sands may inhibit the soil microbial activity, whereas organics in the sands may slightly promote the microbial activity. The results of this study indicated that the waste foundry sands may pose considerable threat to the environment when improperly disposed. PMID:23745431

Zhang, Hai-Feng; Wang, Yu-Jue; Wang, Jin-Lin; Huang, Tian-You; Xiong, Ying

2013-03-01

183

Volumetric sand production model and experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sand production model was developed for volumetric sand production predictions that take into account the effects of the external stresses and fluid flow rate. The model couples the poro-mechanical behaviour of the solid-fluid system with the erosion behaviour of the solids due to fluid flow. It predicts reasonably experimental volumetric sand production data from a hollow cylinder test on a weak sandstone. The test results show that in weak and compactive sandstones, sand production is associated with decohesioning and plasticification of a zone around the inner hole which can then be mobilized by the hydrodynamic forces of the fluid flow. The sand production rate increases both with external applied stress and fluid flow rate but it is constant with time under constant external stress and fluid flow rate. In both cases a critical lower limit has to be exceeded for sand production initiation.

Papamichos, E.; Vardoulakis, I.; Tronvoll, J.; Skjrstein, A.

2001-07-01

184

Liquefaction of sand under low confining pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. this process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand. In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

Shaoli, Yang; Sandven, Rolf; Grande, Lars

2003-10-01

185

White Light Interferometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

White light interferometry is an extremely powerful tool for optical measurements. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of white light interferometry compared to laser light interferometry. Three different white light interferometers are discussed; 1. diffraction grating interferometers, 2. vertical scanning or coherence probe interferometers, and 3. white light scatterplate interferometers.

James C. Wyant

2002-01-01

186

The White Nile sedimentary system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nile River flows for ~6700 km from south of the Equator to finally reach the Mediterranean Sea at northern subtropical latitudes (Woodward et al. 2007). This is the longest sedimentological laboratory on Earth, a unique setting in which we are investigating changes in sediment composition associated with diverse chemical and physical processes, including weathering and hydraulic sorting. The present study focuses on the southern branch of the Nile across 20 of latitude, from hyperhumid Burundi and Rwanda highlands in central Africa to Khartoum, the capital city of Sudan at the southern edge of the Sahara. Our study of the Kagera basin emphasizes the importance of weathering in soils at the source rather than during stepwise transport, and shows that the transformation of parent rocks into quartzose sand may be completed in one sedimentary cycle (Garzanti et al. 2013a). Micas and heavy minerals, less effectively diluted by recycling than main framework components, offer the best key to identify the original source-rock imprint. The different behaviour of chemical indices such as the CIA (a truer indicator of weathering) and the WIP (markedly affected by quartz dilution) helps us to distinguish strongly weathered first-cycle versus polycyclic quartz sands (Garzanti et al. 2013b). Because sediment is efficiently trapped in East African Rift lakes, the composition of Nile sediments changes repeatedly northwards across Uganda. Downstream of both Lake Kyoga and Lake Albert, quartzose sands are progressively enriched in metamorphiclastic detritus supplied from tributaries draining amphibolite-facies basements. The evolution of White Nile sediments across South Sudan, a scarcely accessible region that suffered decades of civil war, was inferred from the available information (Shukri 1950), integrated by original petrographic, heavy-mineral and geochemical data (Padoan et al. 2011). Mineralogical and isotopic signatures of Bahr-el-Jebel and Sobat sediments, derived respectively from Archean gneisses of Uganda and Neoproterozoic basements of Ethiopia, become gradually homogenized and enriched in quartz, and remain finally unchanged down to Khartoum. This suggests massive sediment dumping in the Sudd and Machar Marshes, and explains why White Nile sediment contribution to the main Nile is negligible (Garzanti et al. 2006). REFERENCES Garzanti E., And S., Vezzoli G., Megid A.A.A., El Kammar A., 2006. Petrology of Nile River sands (Ethiopian and Sudan): sediment budgets and erosion patterns. EPSL 252:327-341. Garzanti E., Padoan M., Setti M., Peruta L., Najman Y., Villa I.M., 2013. Weathering geochemistry and Sr-Nd fingerprints of equatorial upper Nile and Congo muds. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 14:292-316. Garzanti E., Padoan M., And S., Resentini A., Vezzoli G., Lustrino M., 2013. Weathering and relative durability of detrital minerals in equatorial climate: sand petrology and geochemistry in the East African Rift. J.Geol. 121:547-580. Padoan M., Garzanti E., Harlavan Y., Villa I.M., 2011. Tracing Nile sediment sources by Sr and Nd isotope signatures (Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75:3627-3644. Shukri N.M., 1950. The mineralogy of some Nile sediments. Quart. J. Geol. Soc. London 105:511-534. Woodward J.C., Macklin M.G., Krom M.D., Williams M.A.J. 2007. The Nile: Evolution, quaternary river environments and material fluxes. In: Large Rivers, Avijit Gupta (Ed.), Wiley, 261-292.

Garzanti, Eduardo; And, Sergio; Padoan, Marta; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Villa, Igor

2014-05-01

187

Luminescence dating of mojave desert sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infra-red stimulated luminescence has been used to date periods of sand deposition in the Mojave Desert, California. Dates from the Cronese Basins, Kelso Dunes and Silver Lake are compared with published IRSL ages to provide evidence for discrete pulses of sand accretion during the late Pleistocene and Holocene, linked to both arid and pluvial climates. A critical factor in aeolian deposition throughout this area is shown to be the availability of sand from existing source areas.

Clarke, M. L.; Richardson, C. A.; Rendell, H. M.

188

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters  

E-print Network

the incoming wastewater; ? Chemical sorption, in which contaminants stick to the surface of the sand and to the biological growth on the sand surface; and ? Assimilation, in which aerobic microbes eat the nutrients in the wastewater. The success of treat...- ing wastewater depends on these microbes. Air must be available for these microbes to live. Sand filters are often partially or completely buried in the ground, but may be built above ground where there is a high water table or bedrock...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23

189

Offshore sand resources for coastal erosion control in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

An inventory of existing geophysical data supplemented by more than 15,000 km of high-resolution seismic profiles and 400 vibracores collected cooperatively by the Louisiana Geological Survey and US Geological Survey since 1981 indicates that a wide range of aggregate minerals occurs on the continental shelf in a variety of depositional settings. The distribution of these deposits is controlled by the geometry of the preexisting fluvial and deltaic channel systems and the stratigraphic signature of the Holocene Transgression across these features. The geology of coastal and offshore Louisiana is tied to the depositional history of the Mississippi River. Offshore of the delta plain, five types of aggregate sources can be identified: inner shelf shoals, submerged barrier islands, tidal inlets, distributary channels, and barrier platforms. This paper describes the geology of offshore Louisiana, the available geophysical data sets, and the distribution of aggregate mineral resources. On the continental shelf of the Mississippi River delta plain, two extensive seismic survey grids have been developed by the Louisiana Geological Survey and US Geological Survey. The most prospective resources found are the huge sand bodies of Ship Shoal and associated distributaries, Cat Island Pass tidal channels and associated tidal deltas, and Barataria Pass/Grand Terre tidal channels and associated tidal deltas. East of the mouth of the Mississippi River are the Chandeleur Islands, where LGS identified seven major sand resource targets, truncated barrier-spit and tidal inlet deposits, submerged beach ridges, and distributaries associated with abandoned St. Bernard delta complexes. Abundant sand resources can be found in offshore Louisiana. Many of the sand bodies contain heavy minerals, but their concentration and distribution is unknown. Other potential sand resources not yet adequately explored include Sabine Bank, the Outer Shoal, and the St. Bernard shoal.

Ramsey, K.E.; Penland, S.; McBride, R.A. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA)); Suter, J.R. (Exxon Production Research, Houston, TX (USA)); Williams, J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA))

1990-09-01

190

The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks for the White Rim oil. The most attractive potential sources for White Rim oil include beds within one or more of the following formations: the Proterozoic Chuar Group, which is present in the subsurface southwest of the Tar Sand triangle; the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone and equivalent formations, the Permian Kaibab Limestone, the Sinbad Limestone Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation, and the Jurassic Arapien Shale, Twin Creek Limestone, and Carmel Formation, which are present west of the Tar Sand triangle; the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation in the Paradox basin east of the Tar Sand triangle; and the Permian Park City Formation northwest of the Tar Sand triangle. Each formation has a high total organic carbon content and is distributed over a wide enough geographic area to have provided a huge volume of oil. Source beds in all of the formations reached thermal maturity at times prior to or during the time that migration into the White Rim is interpreted to have occurred. Based on all available data, the most likely source for the Tar Sand triangle appears to be the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone. Secondary migration out of the Delle is interpreted to have occurred during the Cretaceous, during Sevier thrusting. Subsequent tertiary migration into the Tar Sand triangle reservoir is interpreted to have occurred later, during middle Tertiary Laramide deformation.

Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

1999-01-01

191

Pediatric neurodegenerative white matter processes: leukodystrophies and beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pediatric neurodegenerative white matter processes are complex, numerous and result from a vast array of causes ranging from\\u000a white matter injury or inflammation to congenital metabolic disorders. When faced with a neurodegenerative white matter process\\u000a on neuroimaging, the first step for the radiologist is to determine whether the findings represent a congenital metabolic\\u000a leukodystrophy or one of various other white

Jonathan A. Phelan; Lisa H. Lowe; Charles M. Glasier

2008-01-01

192

76 FR 60557 - Closure of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Two White Flint North Building Entrance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Two White Flint North Building Entrance AGENCY...October 3, 2011, all visitors to the NRC White Flint Complex headquarters shall be required...enter through the recently renovated One White Flint North (OWFN) building...

2011-09-29

193

Coupled changes in sand grain size and sand transport driven by changes in the upstream supply of sand in the Colorado River: relative importance of changes in bed-sand grain size and bed-sand area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sand transport in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons was naturally limited by the upstream supply of sand. Prior to the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the river exhibited the following four effects of sand supply limitation: (1) hysteresis in sediment concentration, (2) hysteresis in sediment grain size coupled to the hysteresis in sediment concentration, (3) production of inversely graded flood deposits, and (4) development or modification of a lag between the time of a flood peak and the time of either maximum or minimum (depending on reach geometry) bed elevation. Construction and operation of the dam has enhanced the degree to which the first two of these four effects are evident, and has not affected the degree to which the last two effects of sand supply limitation are evident in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons. The first three of the effects involve coupled changes in suspended-sand concentration and grain size that are controlled by changes in the upstream supply of sand. During tributary floods, sand on the bed of the Colorado River fines; this causes the suspended sand to fine and the suspended-sand concentration to increase, even when the discharge of water remains constant. Subsequently, the bed is winnowed of finer sand, the suspended sand coarsens, and the suspended-sand concentration decreases independently of discharge. Also associated with these changes in sand supply are changes in the fraction of the bed that is covered by sand. Thus, suspended-sand concentration in the Colorado River is likely regulated by both changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area. A physically based flow and suspended-sediment transport model is developed, tested, and applied to data from the Colorado River to evaluate the relative importance of changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area in regulating suspended-sand concentration. Although the model was developed using approximations for steady, uniform flow, and other simplifications that are not met in the Colorado River, the results nevertheless support the idea that changes in bed-sand grain size are much more important than changes in bed-sand area in regulating the concentration of suspended sand.

Topping, D.J.; Rubin, D.M.; Melis, T.S.

2007-01-01

194

Journal of Environmental Management (1996) 48, 299303 Estimating 24-h Habitat Use Patterns of White-Tailed Deer from  

E-print Network

habitat use patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) at Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, habitat use, Odocoileus virginianus, radio telemetry, South Dakota, white-tailed deer. 1. Introduction) concluded that nocturnal habitat use by female desert mule deer (O. hemionus) was representative of diurnal

195

Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused

Kee Dae Kim

2005-01-01

196

Liquefaction in Subsurface Layer of Sand  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and silt, which moved from right to left toward the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed "lateral spreading," is a p...

2009-01-26

197

Explorations with the Sand and Water Table.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents sand and water activities for young children as examples of sensory explorations, science activities, and comforting play. Includes information on health and safety precautions, adaptations for children with physical disabilities, the use of other materials, and sand and water toys made from one-liter plastic bottles. (KB)

Texas Child Care, 2001

2001-01-01

198

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN SLOW SAND FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), including the Surface Water Treatment Rule, have helped to renew the interest in the use of slow sand filtration (SSF) for treating surface waters for small communities. low sand filtration is not a...

199

DRINKING WATER TREATMENT USING SLOW SAND FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent re-interest in slow sand filtration was brought about by the needs for small communities to install treatment technologies that are effective, less costly, and easier to operate and maintain than the more sophisticated rapid sand filters. These simpler technologies for sma...

200

Sand reinforced with shredded waste tires  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using shredded waste tires to reinforce sand. Direct shear tests were conducted on mixtures of dry sand and shredded waste tires. The following factors were studied to evaluate their influence on shear strength: normal stress, sand matrix unit weight, shred content, shred length, and shred orientation. From results of the tests, three significant factors affecting shear strength were identified: normal stress, shred content, and sand matrix unit weight. A model for estimating the strength of reinforced soils was also evaluated to determine its applicability to mixtures of sand and tire shreds. When the model is calibrated using results from one shred content, it may be useful for estimating the friction angle for other shred contents. In all cases, adding shredded tires increased the shear strength of sand, with an apparent friction angle ({phi}{prime}) as large as 67{degree} being obtained. Shred content and sand matrix unit weight were the most significant characteristics of the mixes influencing shear strength. Increasing either of these variables resulted in an increase in {phi}{prime}. Tests were also conducted on specimens consisting of only shredded tires (no sand), and the friction angle obtained was 30{degree}.

Foose, G.J.; Benson, C.H.; Bosscher, P.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-09-01

201

Elastic properties of unconsolidated porous sand reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of compressive stress and pore fluid properties on elastic properties of unconsolidated sand reservoirs was determined by laboratory velocity and pore volume measurements on two specimens. These consisted of a naturally occurring very fine grained sand and glass beads, each with a porosity of approximately 38 percent. Compressional- and shear-wave velocities and pore compressibility were measured in the

S. N. Domenico

1977-01-01

202

Western gas sands: Technology status report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western gas sands research is conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center to encourage the development of very low permeability, lenticular gas sands in the western US. This research is an integral part of DOE's Unconventional Gas Recovery Program, which is a multidisciplinary effort to develop the technology for producing natural gas from resources that

K. H. Frohne; C. A. Komar

1989-01-01

203

Hematite Outlier and Sand Dunes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Released 4 December 2003

This image shows a crater just south of the edge of the famous hematite-bearing surface, which is visible in the context image as a smooth area to the north. The crater has two features of immediate note. The first is a layered mound in the north part of the crater floor. This mound contains hematite, and it is an outlying remnant of the greater deposits to the north that have otherwise completely disappeared in this crater. The second feature is a dune field in the center of the crater floor, with dark dunes indicating winds from the northwest. The dunes grade into a dark sand sheet with no coherent structure, indicating that the sand layer thins out to the south and east.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 357.3 East (2.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2003-01-01

204

Altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand in three areas of Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand form the second most productive aquifer in Arkansas. The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand range in thick- ness from 0 to 900 feet, consisting of fine- to medium-grained sands interbedded with layers of silt, clay, shale, and minor amounts of lignite. Within the three areas of interest, the top surface of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand dips regionally east and southeast towards the axis of the Mississippi Embayment syncline and Desha Basin. Local variations in the top surface may be attributed to a combination of continued development of structural features, differential compaction, localized faulting, and erosion of the surface prior to subsequent inundation and deposition of younger sediments.

Pugh, Aaron L.; Westerfield, Paul W.; Gonthier, Gerard J.; Poynter, David T.

1998-01-01

205

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY Measuring White Specks in Dyed Cotton Fabrics Using the Optimas Imaging System  

Microsoft Academic Search

White specks are fiber clusters that appear as small white flecks on dyed fabrics. Their minute size and depth of shade increases the subjectivity and complexity of detecting and\\/or measuring them. No standard methods exist to quantify the level of white specks. Image analysis was evalu- ated as a means to measure white specks in order to remove subjectivity from

P. Bel; T. Von Hoven

2007-01-01

206

Confronting White Privilege  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even as the United States becomes more diverse, a new era of "white flight" is unfolding. Whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities, white students are likely to attend schools that reinforce their perceptions of cultural dominance. The average white student attends a school where 77 percent of the student body is of their race.

Swalwell, Katy

2012-01-01

207

Death of white holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We critically review Eardley's argument which shows that, due to accretion, white holes are eventually converted into black holes-the death of white holes. While Eardley's main conclusions remain unscathed, we question some of the details of his analysis. We argue, together with Lake and Roeder, and Blau, that the death of white holes is caused by the gravitational effects of

Claude Barrabs; Patrick R. Brady; Eric Poisson

1993-01-01

208

Indicator geostatistical analysis of sand interconnections within a till  

SciTech Connect

At the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site in southwestern Ohio, sand and gravel lenses within till provide potential pathways for the flow of contamination into the underlying aquifer. These high-permeability lenses account for 22% of the volume of the till, have a complex arrangement, and are smaller in scale than the site. Even the relatively dense subsurface sampling program at the FEMP site is not adequate to determine facies interconnections with certainty. To delineate probable facies boundaries, a binary indicator random variable was used to represent the presence of high or low-permeability sediment. The 800 available lithologic logs that penetrate the till were coded with the binary system at 2 ft (0.6 m) intervals yielding 15,829 observations. These data were used to compute the declustered mean of indicator values in horizontal intervals, giving an estimate of the proportion of high-permeability sediment in each vertical zone. The areal correlation in specific zones was examined through indicator variograms, which had pronounced anisotropy. Three-dimensional indicator point kriging was used to produce maps of the probability of existence of high-permeability sediment. These maps were used in a preliminary analysis of sand body interconnectedness. Results indicate that portions of sand bodies are interconnected through the entire interval studied and that the areal extent of vertical interconnection is up to 1,000 ft.

Sminchak, J.R.; Dominic, D.F.; Ritzi, R.W. Jr. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States)

1996-11-01

209

Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils  

PubMed Central

The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, ?, and ?. The range of the value of M, ?, and ? is 0.8030.998, 0.1440.248, and 1.7272.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated. PMID:24757417

Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

2014-01-01

210

White on whiteness: becoming radicalized about race.  

PubMed

Race difference and whiteness--key elements in the construction of my cultural identity - became a focus of my reflective practice that began over 5 years ago. This article reflects critically on the production of white identity from my social location as a white nurse. My attention focused on two aspects of whiteness: the social location from which I live and learn, and the hegemonic but unmarked discourse that informs the knowledge I read and create as a researcher. My white identity is characterized by four features: the absent presence of whiteness; the need for an oppositional identity; the entitlement of choice and subjectivity; and the denial of a dominant position and relation to the racialized Other. Exploring these features is critically important at this juncture in global and professional history because of the persistence of neoliberalism and the popularity of culturalist approaches to diversity. Examining the process of my radicalization about race simultaneously calls attention to the historiography of ideas about whiteness and race difference and the institutionalization of beliefs and practices about race difference that continuously reproduce racialized identities and inform collective nursing practice and research. PMID:17518827

Gustafson, Diana L

2007-06-01

211

Wind Induced Raindrop Splash Sand Transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU abstract Title: Wind Induced Raindrop Splash Sand Transport Raindrop splash is widely accepted as an important mechanism of soil erosion (e.g. Van Dijk, Bruijnzeel, and Eisma 2003) as it can cause both particle detachment and transport. Since 1950, a number of papers have been published to identify and quantify the factors that influence splash transport (e.g. Ekern 1944; Rose 1960; Hudson 1963; Morgan 1981). More recently there has been attention focused on the combined processes of splash detachment and grain transport enhanced by the presence of wind using numerical models to simulate raindrop trajectories and terminal velocities as well as some empirical experiments to estimate the distribution of ejected particles. s (e.g. Erpul et al., 2009, 2008; Foulds and Warbuton 2007a, b; Cornelis et al. 2004a, 2004b; Erpul, Norton, and Gabriels 2002). These efforts have ignored the role of wind in altering particle trajectories after the initiation drop-induced ejection. The purpose of this paper is to use numerical simulation to describe the wind-enhanced splash transport process for a flat, sandy surface before and after a splash event. In this study, we first consider a single falling raindrop and use a physics model to analyze its behavior in the air, at impact and then the behaviors of droplets and grains ejected by the splash. The simulation shows that the speed of the raindrop relative to the wind speed is zero, but the relative speed increases rapidly very near the surface. The angle of drop incidence and terminal velocity are functions of drop size and the wind velocity profile. Once the raindrop hits the surface, a number of droplets are ejected; most of them include a number of sand particles. We apply several empirical measurements to represent the distributions of ejected drop sizes, number of grains entrained, and the angles and speeds of ejecta, and then use a coordinate transformation to convert them into conditions related to the angle of incidence of the impinging raindrop. The transport distance is the function of near-surface wind speed, droplet size, and ejection angle and speed. As the ejecting droplets are very small, resaltation after their impact is not considered. After we get the result from a single raindrop, we enlarge our picture to all the raindrops in a certain rainfall event, and then estimate the transport rate to all the directions from the estimate of raindrop distribution. The simulated results are compared with some empirical studies for verification purposes. In summary, the process of wind induced raindrop splash sand transport is very complex. Wind plays a role in the changing the raindrop terminal velocity and incidence angle and the droplets flying distance and direction. Numerical simulation can help us to understand on the internal mechanism of the whole wind induced splash process.

Li, B.; Sherman, D.

2009-12-01

212

Indications and potential sources of change in sand transport in the Brazos River, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Changes in the capacity of the Brazos River to transport sand can be identified within the context of Lane?s relation through changes in channel geometry, changes in the characteristics of suspended loads, and changes in discharge. The Brazos River channel has been undergoing continual adjustment since the 1940s. For a discharge of 5,000 cubic feet per second, the water-surface altitude has decreased 2 to 4 feet at the Hempstead and Richmond streamflow-gaging stations between 1940 and 1995. The characteristics of suspended-sediment samples at the Richmond streamflow-gaging station have changed between the periods 1969?81 and 1982?95. The amount of sand-size sediment transported in suspension has decreased. The distribution of both daily and annual-peak discharges has changed. However, the computed annual loads of suspended sand indicate no statistically significant change in the median annual load. The transport of sand in the Brazos River depends on a complex set of factors, most of which are continually changing. Potential sources of change in sand transport in the Brazos River include the effects of reservoir construction, changes in land use, and instream sand and gravel mining. Extensive reservoir construction in the Brazos River Basin has reduced sand transport by trapping sediment and by reducing the magnitude of peak discharges. However, reductions in sand transport associated with reservoir construction apparently are compensated for by increases associated with tributary sediment inflow and localized bank erosion. The total area of harvested acres of non-hay crops in the lower Brazos River Basin during 1924?92 decreased more than 75 percent from about 32 percent to about 8 percent of the total area. Correspondingly, erosion potential has decreased substantially. Several sand and gravel mining sites are located on the Brazos River between Hempstead and Rosharon. The quantity of sediment extracted by instream sand and gravel mining operations could represent from 11 to 25 percent of the total sand transported by the Brazos River. The effects of mining on sand transport could not be quantified.

Dunn, David D.; Raines, Timothy H.

2001-01-01

213

Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic soils, and conservation of surrounding sand dune areas.

Kim, Kee Dae

2005-01-01

214

Fecal indicators in sand, sand contact, and risk of enteric illness among beachgoers  

PubMed Central

Background Beach sand can harbor fecal indicator organisms and pathogens, but enteric illness risk associated with sand contact remains unclear. Methods In 2007, visitors at two recreational marine beaches were asked on the day of their visit about sand contact. Ten to 12 days later, participants answered questions about health symptoms since the visit. F+ coliphage, Enterococcus, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. in wet sand were measured using culture and molecular methods. Results We analyzed 144 wet sand samples and completed 4,999 interviews. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were computed, comparing those in the highest tertile of fecal indicator exposure with those who reported no sand contact. Among those digging in sand compared with those not digging in sand, a molecular measure of Enterococcus spp. (calibrator cell equivalents/g) in sand was positively associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness (aOR = 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23.2]) and diarrhea (2.4 [1.44.2]). Among those buried in sand, point estimates were greater for GI illness (3.3 [1.37.9]) and diarrhea (4.9 [1.813]). Positive associations were also observed for culture-based Enterococcus (colony-forming units/g) with GI illness (aOR digging = 1.7 [1.12.7]) and diarrhea (2.1 [1.33.4]). Associations were not found among non-swimmers with sand exposure. Conclusions We observed a positive relationship between sand contact activities and enteric illness as a function of concentrations of fecal microbial pollution in beach sand. PMID:22157306

Heaney, Christopher D.; Sams, Elizabeth; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Stephen; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

2011-01-01

215

White Students Reflecting on Whiteness: Understanding Emotional Responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present investigation, we explored potential predictors of White students' general emotional responses after they reflected on their Whiteness in a semistructured interview (n = 88) or written reflection (n = 187). Specifically, we examined how color-blindness (i.e., awareness of White privilege) and racial affect (i.e., White empathy, White guilt, and White fear), assessed before the interview or written

Nathan R. Todd; Lisa B. Spanierman; Mark S. Aber

2010-01-01

216

A comparison of general circulation model predictions to sand drift and dune orientations  

SciTech Connect

The growing concern over climate change and decertification stresses the importance of aeolian process prediction. In this paper the use of a general circulation model to predict current aeolian features is examined. A GCM developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center was used in conjunction with White`s aeolian sand flux model to produce a global potential aeolian transport map. Surface wind shear stress predictions were used from the output of a GCM simulation that was performed as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project on 1979 climate conditions. The spatial resolution of this study (as driven by the GCM) is 4{degrees} X 5{degrees}; instantaneous 6-hourly wind stress data were saved by the GCM and used in this report. A global map showing potential sand transport was compared to drift potential directions as inferred from Landsat images from the 1980s for several sand seas and a coastal dune field. Generally, results show a good correlation between the simulated sand drift direction and the drift direction inferred for dune forms. Discrepancies between the drift potential and the drift inferred from images were found in the North American deserts and the Arabian peninsula. An attempt to predict the type of dune that would be formed in specific regions was not successful. The model could probably be further improved by incorporating soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation information for a better assessment of sand threshold conditions. The correlation may permit use of a GCM to analyze {open_quotes}fossil{close_quotes} dunes or to forecast aeolian processes. 48 refs., 8 figs.

Blumberg, D.G. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)] [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Greeley, R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)] [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Shera (Israel)

1996-12-01

217

Developments in tar sands in 1981  

SciTech Connect

Activity in tar sands projects during 1981 continued at a very significant pace. The bulk of activity was in Canada, where 38 pilot projects were active, 2 commercial plants continued operations, 1 commercial scheme was canceled, and another was put into the twilight zone. Activity in the United States was low, whereas Venezuelan efforts reflect a firm commitment toward commercial development. The tenacious attitude of both industry and certain governments in the pursuit of tar sands development will keep the greater tar sands dream alive.

Wennekers, J.H.N.

1982-11-01

218

Electrostatic force on saltating sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In blizzards and sandstorms, wind transport of particles is associated with separation of electrostatic charge. Moving particles develop charge of sign opposite the electrostatic charge on stationary surface particles. This electrification produces forces in addition to the gravitational and fluid friction forces that determine trajectories for particles being transported in saltation. Evaluating electrostatic forces requires the electric field strength very near the saltation surface and charge-to-mass ratios for the moving particles. In a low-level blowing sand event we measured an average charge-to-mass ratio of +60 ?C kg-1 on the saltating particles at 5-cm height and a maximum electric field of +166 kV m-1 at 1.7-cm height, in wind gusts near 12 m s-1 at 1.5-m height. The electrostatic force estimated from these measurements was equal in magnitude to the gravitational force on the saltating particles. Including electrostatic forces in the equations of motion for saltating particles may help explain discrepancies between measurements and models of saltation transport.

Schmidt, D. S.; Schmidt, R. A.; Dent, J. D.

1998-04-01

219

Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments  

SciTech Connect

A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

Seigel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

1995-09-01

220

Petrophysical Analysis of Oil Sand in Athabasca  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil sands are the major unconventional energy sources which have great reserves in Alberta, Canada. Recovery techniques such as CSS (Cyclic Steam Stimulation) and SAGD (Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage) enabled to develop deeper bitumen about several hundred meter depth. Before applying CSS and SAGD, reservoir heterogeneity of mud barriers or shale breccias should be clarified to establish injection and production wells successfully. We conducted the integrated petro-physical analysis for oil sands deposits in Athabasca by correlating well logs with seismic data. From 33 well logs and 3D seismic, we have made P-wave impedance by recursive inversion. Target formations of our analysis were the top of Wabiskaw member. Using inverted impedance and multi-attributes, porosity volume was derived at a target depth. Porosity of time slice 375 ms ranged 20 ~ 40 % stretching porous sand body from NE to SW direction. Characteristics of porosity distribution may be useful to design optimum oil sands recovery in Athabasca.

cheong, S.; Lee, H.

2013-12-01

221

Sand consolidation methods using adsorbable catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic zirconium salt catalyst, such as ZrOCl/sub 2/, Zr(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, or ZrCl/sub 4/, is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed during the polymerization reaction.

Friedman, R. H.

1985-04-23

222

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-print Network

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01

223

Laser Sintering of Silica Sand Mechanism and Application to Sand Casting Mould  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silica sand is commonly used in the foundry industry. With a high melting point of 160 C, the silica sand is normally sintered in a high-temperature furnace. However, silica with contents of calcium, aluminium, magnesium, and chlorine, etc. can form low-melting point eutectics. Therefore, a relatively low-power laser can be used to sinter the silica sand directly. The investigation of

X. H. Wang; J. Y. H. Fuh; Y. S. Wong; Y. X. Tang

2003-01-01

224

Sand Beach Bacteria: Enumeration and Characterization  

PubMed Central

Bacteria in the water-saturated sand of a relatively unpolluted sand beach were enumerated by direct microscope and viable counting. The number of interstitial bacteria was estimated to be a significant fraction of the total number of bacteria present. Three hundred sixty-two strains were isolated and submitted to cultural and biochemical tests. Fermentational abilities and the production of indole suggested that a significant number of these bacteria were symbiotically associated with resident metazoans. PMID:4356458

Khiyama, H. M.; Makemson, J. C.

1973-01-01

225

Hydrothermal deformation of granular quartz sand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotropic and triaxial compression experiments were performed on porous aggregates of St Peter quartz sand to explore the influence of temperature (to 225C). During isotropic stressing, samples loaded at elevated temperature exhibit the same sigmoidal stress-strain curves and non-linear acoustic emission rates as have previously been observed from room temperature studies on sands, sandstones, and soils. However, results from our

Stephen L. Karner; Andreas K. Kronenberg; Frederick M. Chester; Judith S. Chester; Andrew Hajash Jr

2008-01-01

226

Developing Alberta's oil sands, 1920--2002  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation examines the origins and development of the Alberta oil sands industry over the last century from a scientific project to a commercial endeavor. Based on extensive use of primary sources, the manuscript integrates the developments in a number of fields (politics, international relations, business and economics, and changing oil-recovery technology) that have made it possible to "manufacture" oil from the Alberta tar sands at less than $10 U.S. per barrel.

Chastko, Paul Anthony

227

A Physical Taxonomy of Martian Sand and Dust Grainsat the Phoenix Landing Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative taxonomy of martian sand and dust grains for soil samples at the Phoenix lander site has been developed from the missions optical microscope data with a resolution of 4 ?m per pixel. Approx. 3-4000 grains were analyzed for color, hue, size, shape, surface texture, aspect ratio, and optical properties. At least 26 types of sand and dust grains have been identified. Grain colors include black, brown, orange, red, white, and clear. Most grains are opaque, but many are translucent or transparent. Grain shapes range from botryoidal, blackberry-like, bead-like and rounded, to subrounded, elongate, angular, and highly irregular forms. Surface textures range from knobbly, rough, and multifaceted to smooth and polished. Surface reflectivity varied from dull to shiny to specularly reflective. Materials may include augite, pyroxenes, olivine, volcanic glass, hematite, other iron oxides, and salts. Grain size of the sand has a modal value of ~90 ?m, but there is no gradation into dust sizes, indicating a bimodal distribution of the samples. The dust was probably imported into the region from aeolian dust storms. This accords with a mineralogical dissimilarity between the sand and dust grain populations. The sand is dominated by black and brown grains; the dust is dominated by orange grains. The Phoenix site also has centimeter and larger stones in abundance that again have no apparent gradation into the sand size material. Thus, the Phoenix landing site soil appears multimodal. The soil appears to be magnetically susceptible, but it is unclear what the source of magnetism might be. Specific magnetic minerals were not identified in the samples with the possible exception of paramagnetic microbotryoidal hematite. The soil was nevertheless adhesive to the substrates and internally cohesive (forming spherical aggregates) owing to van der Waals forces and possibly salt/moisture bonding.

Marshall, John; Stoker, Carol

2014-11-01

228

WITSEG sampler: a segmented sand sampler for wind tunnel test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The flux profile of blowing sand is the reflection of a large number of sand particles moving in different trajectories. To describe the function of the flux profile requires measuring the flux of blown sand at different heights. A segmented sand sampler for wind tunnel study (WITSEG sampler) has been designed and evaluated in a wind tunnel. The sampler is

Zhibao Dong; Hongyi Sun; Aiguo Zhao

2004-01-01

229

2D Mesoscale Simulations of Projectile Penetration into Sand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical Phenomena governing projectile instabilities during penetration of granular media (e.g. sand) are not well understood. To gain insight into projectile -- granular media interactions, 2-D mesoscale simulations were performed to examine projectile penetration into sand targets with explicit representation of sand grains and representative porosities. The computational procedure used to generate a mesoscale representation of a sand target is

R. D. Teeter; S. K. Dwivedi; C. W. Felice; Y. M. Gupta

2007-01-01

230

COMPLEX CONDUCTIVITY RESPONSE TO NANOMATERIALS IN A SAND MATRIX  

EPA Science Inventory

Nano-scale metallic particles are being used with increasing frequency in a variety of industrial, medical, and environmental remediation applcations. The fate and transport of such materials in the subsurface is not fully understood, neither is the impact of these materials on ...

231

Morphological characteristics and sand volumes of different coastal dune types in Essaouira Province, Atlantic Morocco  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Altogether three coastal dune fields, one located north and two south of the city of Essaouira, Atlantic Morocco, have been investigated to establish the distribution and overall sand volumes of various dune types. The purpose of the study was to characterize and classify the aeolian landforms of the coastal dune belt, to estimate their sand volumes and to assess the effectiveness of coastal dune stabilization measures. The northern dune field is 9 km long and lined by a wide artificial foredune complex fixed by vegetation, fences and branches forming a rectangular grid. Active and ephemeral akl dunes border the inner backshore, while some intrusive dunes have crossed the foredune belt and are migrating farther inland. The total sand volume of the northern dune belt amounts 13,910,255 m3. The central coastal sector comprises a much smaller dune field located just south of the city. It is only 1.2 km long and, with the exception of intrusive dunes, shows all other dune types. The overall sand volume of the central dune field amounts to about 172,463 m3. The southern dune field is characterized by a narrower foredune belt and overall lower dunes that, in addition, become progressively smaller towards the south. In this sector, embryonic dunes (coppice, shadow dunes), tongue-like and tabular dunes, and sand sheets intrude from the beach, the profile of which has a stepped appearance controlled by irregular outcrops of old aeolianite and beach rock. The total volume of the southern dune field amounts 1,446,389 m3. For the whole study area, i.e. for all three dune fields combined, a sand volume of about 15,529,389 m3 has been estimated. The sand of the dune fields is derived from coastal erosion and especially the Tensift River, which enters the sea at Souira Qedima some 70 km north of Essaouira. After entering the sea, the sand is transported southwards by littoral drift driven by the mainly north-westerly swell climate and the Trade Winds blowing from the NNE. This sand feeds the beaches along the coast, from where it is blown obliquely onshore to generate the dune fields. The maximum sand input occurs in the north, from where it gradually decreases southwards, this being also reflected in the grain size and dune typologies. The study shows that dune stabilization measures have been reasonably effective along most of the coast, with the exception of a large area immediately north of Essaouira where the almost complete destruction of the plant cover has reactivated sand mobilitythis may in the future threaten the city.

Flor-Blanco, Germn; Flor, Germn; Lharti, Saadia; Pando, Luis

2013-04-01

232

Repellent efficacy of a combination containing imidacloprid and permethrin against sand flies ( Phlebotomus papatasi ) in dogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection in dogs and humans with the protozoan parasite Leishmania are widespread in tropical and subtropical countries around the globe. Sand flies of the order Phlebotomus in the Old World and Lutzomyia in the New World function as the vector of this disease. In dogs, skin lesions are the most prominent signs of canine leishmaniasis, besides other complex underlying manifestations.

N. Mencke; P. Volf; V. Volfova; D. Stanneck

2003-01-01

233

Meso-scale cooling effects of high albedo surfaces: Analysis of meteorological data from White Sands National Monument and White Sands Missile Range  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban summer daytime temperatures often exceed those of the surrounding rural areas. Summer ``urban heat islands`` are caused by dark roofs and paved surfaces as well as the lack of vegetation. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are interested in studying the effects of increasing the albedo of roof tops and paved surfaces in order to reduce the impacts of summer

B. Fishman; H. Taha; H. Akbari

1994-01-01

234

Recycling of iron foundry sand and glass waste as raw material for production of whiteware.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the production feasibility of triaxial whiteware using sand from cast iron moulds as a raw material instead of silica, and recycled glass in place of feldspar. Formulations were prepared using sand, glass waste, and white-firing clay such that only 50% of the composition was virgin material (clay). The ceramic bodies were formed by pressing and fired at different temperatures (between 1100 and 1300 degrees C). Specimens were characterized in terms of green density prior to firing; and their flexural strength, linear shrinkage, and water absorption were measured after firing. The microstructure was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Possible environmental impacts of this recycling process were also evaluated, through solubility and leaching tests, according to Brazilian standards. Gaseous emissions during the firing process were also analysed. The results showed that it is possible to produce triaxial ceramics by using such alternative raw materials. PMID:16496871

Bragana, Saulo R; Vicenzi, Juliane; Guerino, Kareline; Bergmann, Carlos P

2006-02-01

235

Spearfish water sand: an overlooked play  

SciTech Connect

The Waskada-Pierson plays in the Amaranth Formation in southern Manitoba have prompted a study of similar units in Bottineau County, north-central North Dakota. The pay zone in the Waskada field is a sequence of sandstones and siltstones trapping oil which has migrated from the underlying Mississippian strata. The Triassic Spearfish Formation of North Dakota, correlative with the Amaranth Formation of Manitoba, consists of a similar sequence of interbedded sandstones and siltstones which unconformably overlie carbonate and anhydrite rocks of the Madison Group. Log characteristics show the sandstone and siltstones of this sequence to be laterally continuous over the study area. Except for one well, production in the Bottineau area of North Dakota has been confined to either a portion of the Madison Group or a basal Spearfish sand. This basal sand is overlain by a 20 to 25-ft (6 to 7-m) thick impermeable siltstone which acts as a vertical seal for the Newburg/South Westhope pay. Above this siltstone is a unit locally known as the Spearfish water sand, a water-bearing sandstone in the Newburg/South Westhope fields. The one exception to basal Spearfish production is located in Sec. 6, T163N, R78W, where the Cardinal Petroleum 1 Oscar Aftem well has been producing from the Spearfish water sand since December 1961, indicating that the water sand may have potential for more production in the area.

Lefever, J.A.; Anderson, S.B.; Lefever, R.D.

1983-08-01

236

Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.  

PubMed

Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation. PMID:22482494

Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

2012-06-01

237

A study of morphology, provenance, and movement of desert sand seas in Africa, Asia, and Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description and classification of major types of sand seas on the basis of morphological pattern and lineation are discussed. The steps involved in analyzing the patterns of deposits on ERTS-1 imagery, where the visible forms are mostly dune complexes rather than individual dunes are outlined. After completion of thematic maps portraying the pattern and lineation of the sand bodies, data on directions and intensity of prevailing and other winds are plotted on corresponding bases, as a preliminary to determination of internal structures through ground truth.

Mckee, E. D.; Breed, C. S.

1973-01-01

238

Activity of Wind-Blown Sand and the Formation of Feathered Sand Ridges in the Kumtagh Desert, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the activity of wind-blown sand and its effects on the evolution of feathered sand ridges in the Kumtagh Desert, China, and attempt to reveal the formation process of feathered sand ridges using wind-tunnel experiments, remote sensing data, and detailed field observations from 2005 to 2008. The prevailing wind direction in the Kumtagh Desert is easterly in winter and north-easterly in other seasons. The average annual wind speed is 5.9 ms-1, and winds sufficiently strong to entrain sand occur on 143 days per annum. The sand transport rate within 0.4 m of the ground is strongly influenced by local landforms, and is related to wind speed by a power function. Wind erosion occurs on the crest, the windward slope of crescent sand ridges and inter-ridge sand strips, where the blowing sand cloud is in an unsaturated state; in contrast, sand accumulation occurs on the leeward slope of the crescent sand ridges, where the blowing sand cloud is in an over-saturated state. These results indicate that the development of feathered sand ridges in the Kumtagh Desert is mainly controlled by the local wind regime. The dominant winds (from the north, north-north-east and north-east) and additional winds (from the east-north-east, east and east-south-east) determine the development of crescent sand ridges, but winds that are approximately parallel to sand ridges form the secondary inter-ridge sand strips.

Liao, Kongtai; Qu, Jianjun; Tang, Jinnian; Ding, Feng; Liu, Hujun; Zhu, Shujuan

2010-05-01

239

White-Nose Syndrome  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Indiana Department of Natural Resource posted cave access restrictions sign at Clifty Falls State Park in southern Indiana in response to the lethal threat posed by White-Nose Syndrome to various cave-inhabiting bat species. White-Nose Syndrome is a bat disease that is still not well understood but is presumptively caused by the associated fungus Geomyces destructans.

Douglas Stemke (University of Indianapolis ;)

2011-04-28

240

White Teachers Talking Race  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American

Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

2013-01-01

241

1. Elevation from E. White Holly in foreground, with White ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Elevation from E. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage behind. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

242

Standardization and Whiteness: One and the Same?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article "There Is No Culturally Responsive Teaching Spoken Here: A Critical Race Perspective" by Cleveland Hayes and Brenda C. Juarez suggests that the current focus on meeting standards incorporates limited thoughtful discussions related to complex notions of diversity. Our response suggests a strong link between standardization and White

Weilbacher, Gary

2012-01-01

243

Planet-wide sand motion on mars  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

Bridges, N. T.; Bourke, M. C.; Geissler, P. E.; Banks, M. E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M. P.; Hansen, C. J.; Mattson, S.; Mcewen, A. S.; Mellon, M. T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B. J.

2012-01-01

244

Flocculation settling characteristics of mud: sand mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When natural muds become mixed with sandy sediments in estuaries, it has a direct effect on the flocculation process and resultant sediment transport regime. Much research has been completed on the erosion and consolidation of mud/sand mixtures, but very little is known quantitatively about how mixed sediments interact whilst in suspension, particularly in terms of flocculation. This paper presents the settling velocity findings from a recent laboratory study which examined the flocculation dynamics for three different mud/sand mixtures at different concentrations (0.2-5 g.l-1) and turbulent shear stresses (0.06-0.9 Pa) in a mini-annular flume. The low intrusive video-based Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics instrument was used to determine floc/aggregate properties (e.g., size, settling velocity, density and mass) for each population. Settling data was assessed in terms of macrofloc (>160 ?m) and microfloc (<160 ?m) settling parameters: Wsmacro and Wsmicro, respectively. For pure muds, the macroflocs are regarded as the most dominant contributors to the total depositional flux. The parameterised settling data indicates that by adding more sand to a mud/sand mixture, the fall velocity of the macrofloc fraction slows and the settling velocity of microflocs quickens. Generally, a mainly sandy suspension comprising 25% mud and 75% sand (25M:75S), will produce resultant Wsmacro which are slower than Wsmicro. The quickest Wsmicro appears to consistently occur at a higher level of turbulent shear stress (? 0.6 Pa) than both the macrofloc and microfloc fractions from suspensions of pure natural muds. Flocculation within a more cohesively dominant muddy-sand suspension (i.e., 75M:25S) produced macroflocs which fell at similar speeds (10%) to pure mud suspensions at both low (200 mg l-1) and intermediate (1 g l-1) concentrations at all shear stress increments. Also, low sand content suspensions produced Wsmacro values that were faster than the Wsmicro rates. In summary, the experimental results of the macrofloc and microfloc settling velocities have demonstrated that flocculation is an extremely important factor with regards to the depositional behaviour of mud/sand mixtures, and these factors must be considered when modelling mixed sediment transport in the estuarine or marine environment.

Manning, Andrew J.; Baugh, John V.; Spearman, Jeremy R.; Whitehouse, Richard J. S.

2010-04-01

245

Analytical mesoscale modeling of aeolian sand transport  

E-print Network

We analyze the mesoscale structure of aeolian sand transport, based on a recently developed two-species continuum model. The calculated sand flux and important average characteristics of the grain trajectories are found to be in remarkable agreement with field and wind-tunnel data. We conclude that the essential mesoscale physics is insensitive to unresolved details on smaller scales and well captured by the coarse-grained analytical model, thus providing a sound basis for precise and numerically efficient mesoscale modeling of aeolian structure formation.

Marc Lmmel; Anne Meiwald; Klaus Kroy

2014-05-03

246

Investigation of sands subjected to dynamic loading  

E-print Network

that a closer study was needed on Equation 4. Before such a study, how- ever, some addi. tional testing was done on sands taken from actual locations where piles had been driven and Smith's equations, adapted 9 to a computer program, had been employed..., employed in the computer studies of field tests on Victoria and Arkansas sands, varied from 0. 00 to 0. 30. These values were assigned, based on approximations, to yield the best computer analysis corresponding to the pile load tests done in the field...

Reeves, Gary Neil

2012-06-07

247

Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux.  

PubMed

Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100?km scale) of ?(s)=0.010.0015?N?m(-2). PMID:25268931

Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Newman, C E; Richardson, M I; Lucas, A; Leprince, S; Bridges, N T

2014-01-01

248

Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1100?km scale) of ?s=0.010.0015?N?m?2.

Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

2014-09-01

249

Dune-associated sand fluxes at the nearshore termination of a banner sand bank (Helwick Sands, Bristol Channel)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sand dunes typically migrate in opposing directions along the two sides of sand banks, reflecting a circulation driven by tidal current asymmetry, but it has been less clear how this pattern is distorted where banks intersect the coastline. The nearshore end of Helwick Sands, a banner bank in the Bristol Channel, was surveyed three times over three years, twice with a high-resolution multibeam echo-sounder. In both multibeam surveys, an unusual geometry was found over the crest of the bank, whereby dunes connect continuously with the dunes on the flanks, despite the flank dunes migrating in opposite directions. The crestal dunes thus appear to realign rapidly. We suggest that this morphological behaviour arises here because of vigorous wave-driven transport and because surface waves propagate almost exactly parallel to the crestal dunes. Sand transported parallel to the crestal dunes ensures that efficient reconnection occurs with dunes migrating along the flanks, particularly at low tide when wave currents are more strongly felt at the bed.

Schmitt, Thierry; Mitchell, Neil C.

2014-03-01

250

Interior of Left Powerhouse showing the Whiting (Company's) "Tiger" crane ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior of Left Powerhouse showing the Whiting (Company's) "Tiger" crane with a capacity of 350 tons, looking west. Note the terrazzo floor below depicting a Francis turbine. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam Powerplant Complex, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

251

Object technology: A white paper  

SciTech Connect

Object-Oriented Technology (OOT), although not a new paradigm, has recently been prominently featured in the trade press and even general business publications. Indeed, the promises of object technology are alluring: the ability to handle complex design and engineering information through the full manufacturing production life cycle or to manipulate multimedia information, and the ability to improve programmer productivity in creating and maintaining high quality software. Groups at a number of the DOE facilities have been exploring the use of object technology for engineering, business, and other applications. In this white paper, the technology is explored thoroughly and compared with previous means of developing software and storing databases of information. Several specific projects within the DOE Complex are described, and the state of the commercial marketplace is indicated.

Jordan, S.R.; Arrowood, L.F.; Cain, W.D.; Stephens, W.M.; Vickers, B.D.

1992-05-11

252

Physical white chaos generation  

E-print Network

Physical chaos is a fascinating prospect for high-speed data security by serving as a masking carrier or a key source, but suffers from a colored spectrum that divulges system's intrinsic oscillations and degrades randomness. Here, we demonstrate that physical chaos with a white spectrum can be achieved by the optical heterodyning of two delayed-feedback lasers. A white chaotic spectrum with 1-dB fluctuation in a band of 11 GHz is experimentally obtained. The white chaos also has a perfect delta-like autocorrelation function and a high dimensionality of greater than 10, which makes chaos reconstruction extremely difficult and thus improves security.

Anbang Wang; Yuncai Wang; Bingjie Wang; Lei Li; Mingjiang Zhang; Wendong Zhang

2014-01-26

253

Ottawa Sand for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

What appear to be boulders fresh from a tumble down a mountain are really grains of Ottawa sand, a standard material used in civil engineering tests and also used in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment. The craggy surface shows how sand grans have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even causing sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM uses the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. These images are from an Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study conducted by Dr. Binayak Panda of IITRI for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). (Credit: NASA/MSFC)

2000-01-01

254

Conoco's South Texas Tar Sands Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description is given of activities and first pilot results of the South Texas Tar Sands Project. Included is a description of a new process for which a patent has been applied. The process, known as Fracture Assisted Steamflood Technology, or FAST, is a blend of high pressure steam flooding and horizontal fracturing techniques. 169,000 barrels of tar were produced

Oshlo

1981-01-01

255

Animals Between the Sand Grains - Meiofauna  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lab activity, students will observe the minute animals that live between sand grains. The activity includes a list of materials, procedures, and discussion question. It is supplemented with reference images and a list of species and their phyla, including Gastrotrichicha, Crustacea/Ostracoda, Crustacea/Copepoda/Harpacticoidea, Nematoda, Turbellaria, Nemertina, Archiannelida, Polychaeta, and Oligochaeta.

Center, Ucla M.

256

EXPRESSING SUPPLY LIMITATION IN SAND SALTATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Saltation-driven sandblasting is the most effective producer of windblown dust. Modeling of wind-blown dust emissions requires an efficient parameterization of sand flux in the saltating mode. According to the theory of P. R. Owen the horizontal mass flux of saltating uniform p...

257

Fracturing yields oil from poorly consolidated sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The technique of fracturing poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs and filling them with a thick multilayer of proppant has proven successful since sustained production has been obtained from zones previously not producible. Since there was no significant difference in results when fluids of varying polymer concentrations were used, the least expensive fluid was applied. The 70\\/140 mesh sand used as a

S. A. Lambert; R. T. Dolan; J. P. Gallus

1984-01-01

258

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry

Stauffer

1981-01-01

259

Macrodispersion in Sand-Shale Sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Macrodispersion in sand-shale sequences is investigated by a series of numerical tracer tests. Hydraulic conductivity is modeled as a binary, spatially correlated random function. Realizations of the random conductivity field are simulated on a nodal grid discretizing the heterogeneous formation. Corresponding realizations of the random velocity field are obtained by solving the equation for saturated steady state flow. Particle tracking,

Alexandre J. Desbarats

1990-01-01

260

Macrodispersion in sand-shale sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Macrodispersion in sand-shale sequences is investigated by a series of numerical tracer tests. Hydraulic conductivity is modeled as a binary, spatially correlated random function. Realizations of the random conductivity field are simulated on a nodal grid discretizing the heterogeneous formation. Corresponding realizations of the random velocity field are obtained by solving the equation for saturated steady state flow. Particle tracking,

Alexandre J. Desbarats

1990-01-01

261

SANDIA REPORT SAND2001-0643  

E-print Network

), fiber-optic sensors, and surface-acoustic-wave sensors. However, very few chemical sensors have been; and (4) optical sensors. Based on the review criteria set forth in this report, the most viable sensorsSANDIA REPORT SAND2001-0643 Unlimited Release Printed March 2001 Review of Chemical Sensors for In

Ho, Cliff

262

SOURCE ASSESSMENT: TRANSPORT OF SAND AND GRAVEL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes a study of atmospheric emissions from the transport of sand and gravel on unpaved roads. The potential environmental effect of this emission source was evaluated using source severity, defined as the ratio of the time-averaged maximum ground level concentrat...

263

SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315  

E-print Network

-Mail: reports@adonis.osti.gov Online ordering: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available to the public from U.SSANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315 Unlimited Release Printed August 2006 A generating set direct search. Kolda, R. M. Lewis, and V. Torczon Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

Lewis, Robert Michael

264

SAND2000-8213 Unlimited Release  

E-print Network

search, direct search, fault tolerance, distributed computing, cluster computing. #3; Email: pdhough@ca.sandia.gov 2 R n and f : R n ! R. We introduce a family of asynchronous parallel pattern search (APPS) methodsSAND2000-8213 Unlimited Release Printed January 2000 Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search

Kolda, Tamara G.

265

Two Tales of Martian Sands and Dust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We invert for mineral abundances and grain sizes of dunes at Endeavour and Gale craters from CRISM data and Hapke's theory. Our results are consistent with ground truth from the rovers. We detect dust on dunes at Gale, and relate it to sand activity.

Lapotre, M. G. A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Minson, S. E.; Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N.

2014-07-01

266

Mineral resource of the month: industrial sand and gravel  

USGS Publications Warehouse

With many diverse uses, industrial sand and gravel, also known as silica sand, is one of the most important nonmetallic minerals in the world. Industrial sand and gravel is a mining industry term used for sands that have a very high percentage of silicon dioxide, or greater than 95 percent quartz. Deposits of industrial sand and gravel can be found virtually everywhere on Earth, but are less widespread than deposits of common construction sand and gravel. Industrial sand and gravel is distinctive in grain size, hardness, inertness and resistance to high temperature and chemical action. Beverage containers, fiberglass insulation, fiber-optic cables and light bulbs are just some of todays many products produced from industrial sand and gravel.

Dolley, Thomas P.

2007-01-01

267

Magnetism in White Dwarfs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Searches have been made for the normal and quadratic Zeeman effect and broadband circular polarization in white dwarf stars. A positive effect has been found in Grw +70 degrees 8247 whose continuum shows both linear and circular polarization. (Author)

J. D. Landstreet, J. R. P. Angel

1971-01-01

268

Ryan White Program  

MedlinePLUS

... the larger fiscal environment and health system. Recent economic conditions have meant increased demands on Ryan White at a time when resources have been constrained and, as a result, some states have instituted cost-containment measures, such ...

269

White organic light emitting devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complexity of white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs) stem from the fact that multiple dopants must typically be incorporated in devices such that broad emission over the visible range is achieved. Several structures are demonstrated that emit white light using electrophosphorescent dopants co-doped into a single emissive layer or into 'bands'. Also, a novel technique that uses emission from excimers and dimers is elucidated. Platinum and iridium electrophosphorescent dopants have the demonstrated ability to harness both singlet and triplet excitons, and thereby extend the theoretical limit of device internal quantum efficiency to 100%. Also, electrophosphorescent dopants are shown to be very effective at increasing the efficiency of fluorescent devices by non-radiatively transferring energy from the triplet manifold of the phosphor to the singlet manifold of the fluorophore via phosphor sensitized fluorescence. Co-doping a phosphor and a fluorophore into a single host matrix enables 100% triplet-to-singlet energy transfer, and simultaneous emission from both dopants generates white light. The long diffusion length of triplet excitons enables the design of devices with several juxtaposed emissive bands. The diffusion length of triplets is far greater than singlets, since they have several orders of magnitude smaller radiative decay rates than triplets. Assuming that triplet excitons form in a narrow region of a host and that excitons then diffuse throughout, blue, orange and red dopants are situated within the host such that excitons are partitioned among the dopants in order to produce white light from a combination of emission from all dopants. A single excimeric dopant is shown to produce emission over the entire visible spectrum, and its use enables the design and fabrication of white devices similar to the principles used for monochromic devices. The excimer state is studied in terms of its steady-state and transient photophysical processes, and its application in devices. Due to the similarity of ease with which WOLEDs with excimers are fabricated, p-i-n WOLEDs were studied in terms of improving power efficiency and increasing operational lifetime. P-i-n WOLEDs employing excimers have some of the highest reported power efficiencies, and future directions inserting this technology into commercial applications are discussed.

D'Andrade, Brian W.

270

Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2003-08-01

271

Inorganic nitrogen transformations within permeable carbonate sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A combination of in-situ push pull tests and a flow through reactor trial were used to quantify the inorganic nitrogen sinks in the permeable carbonate sands of a tropical coral cay (Heron Island - Great Barrier Reef). Addition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in the form of nitrate - NO3-, and ammonium - NH4+) directly into sediment porewater resulted in uptake of up to 97% and 60% of added DIN respectively. The initial push pull experiment qualitatively showed that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA), denitrification and nitrification were all active in the sediments. A flow through reactor experiment provided a more detailed approach to quantify these processes and showed that both denitrification and DNRA occurred within the sands at rates of 7.3 and 5.5 ?mol N cm-3 d-1, respectively. Unexpectedly the addition of labile organic material (fresh coral spawn) to the permeable sands did not result in the release of DIN from the reactors, on the contrary it resulted in the increased uptake of both NO3- and NH4+. This was most likely because of the stimulated N uptake associated with the addition of high C:N coral spawn material. The bulk of NH4+ produced via DNRA was found to be adsorbed to sediments within the reactor and was not released with the outlet water. A mass balance over the entire experimental period showed that more inorganic N was retained within the sediments than lost as gaseous products. Our results point to permeable carbonate sands acting as reservoirs of N under the influence of advective flow, even during sudden enrichment periods such as those following coral mass spawning. This implies that permeable carbonate sands may help to buffer coral reefs during periods of extreme oligotrophy.

Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

2014-04-01

272

When White Dwarfs Collide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried out at impact parameters b=1 and b=2 (grazing). Finally, I will address future work to be performed (Chapter IV).

Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

273

Slowly rotating white holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of gravitationally anticollapsing objects, white holes, is constructed on the basis of the Kerr metric in the limit\\u000a of small rotation with a corresponding interior metric. The extended space-time manifold is considered and the spectral shift\\u000a of radiation from the point of view of a remote observer is calculated for different parameters of such white holes.

V S Gurin

1992-01-01

274

Arsenate removal from water using sandred mud columns  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes experiments in which sorption filters, filled with chemically modified red mud (Bauxsol) or activated Bauxsol (AB) coated sand, are used to remove As(V) (arsenate) from water. Bauxsol-coated sand (BCS) and AB-coated sand (ABCS) are prepared by mixing Bauxsol or AB with wet sand and drying. Samples of the BCS and ABCS are also used in batch experiments

Hlya Gen-Fuhrman; Henrik Bregnhja; David M McConchie

2005-01-01

275

Sand, die and investment cast parts via the SLS selective laser sintering process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex three-dimensional parts can be manufactured directly from CAD data using rapid prototyping processes. SLS selective laser sintering is a rapid prototyping process developed at the University of Texas at Austin and commercialized by DTM Corporation. SLS parts are constructed layer by layer from powdered materials using laser energy to melt CAD specified cross sections. Polymer, metal, and ceramic powders are all potential candidate materials for this process. In this paper the fabrication of complex metal parts rapidly using the investment, die and sand casting technologies in conjunction with the selective laser sintering process are being explained and discussed. TrueForm and polycarbonate were used for investment casting, while RapidSteel metal mould inserts were used for the die casting trials. Two different SandForm materials, zircon and silica sand, are currently available for the direct production of sand moulds and cores. The flexible and versatile selective laser sintering process all these materials on one single sinterstation. Material can be changed fast and easily between two different builds.

van de Crommert, Simon; Seitz, Sandra; Esser, Klaus K.; McAlea, Kevin

1997-09-01

276

Process and apparatus for stripping solids from bituminous sand  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process and apparatus for the recovery of bitumen from bituminous sand utilize a flotation gas which is passed through a bituminous sand slurry. In the process, a slurry of bituminous sand is introduced into the upper portion of an inverted-cone-shaped flotation tank (or ''stripper'') containing a column of water. The slurry may be formed by any conventional means such

1966-01-01

277

Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands  

DOEpatents

A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

2003-04-29

278

7 CFR 319.56-57 - Sand pears from China.  

... 2014-01-01 false Sand pears from China. 319.56-57 Section 319.56-57...Vegetables 319.56-57 Sand pears from China. Fresh sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia ) from China may be imported into the United States...

2014-01-01

279

7 CFR 319.56-57 - Sand pears from China.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Sand pears from China. 319.56-57 Section 319.56-57...Vegetables 319.56-57 Sand pears from China. Fresh sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia ) from China may be imported into the United States...

2013-01-01

280

Tar sands. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning mining of tar sands and the recovery of bitumen and other materials from tar sands. The physical and chemical properties of tar sands are discussed, and the economics of their use are considered. Processes include alkaline extraction, water cracking, catalytic cracking, and in situ combustion. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01

281

An overview of Canadian oil sand mega projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are currently a number of existing oil sand Mega-Projects as well as many other related projects planned and under construction in the Alberta oil sands region. There are many challenges facing the oil sands. The demanding climate conditions cost of extraction, environmental, energy constraints as well as the rising construction costs are examples. To develop this huge petroleum reserve,

R. Paes; M. Throckmorton

2008-01-01

282

Impact on demersal fish of a large-scale and deep sand extraction site with ecosystem-based landscaped sandbars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the seaward harbour extension of the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, approximately 220 million m3 sand was extracted between 2009 and 2013. In order to decrease the surface area of direct impact, the authorities permitted deep sand extraction, down to 20 m below the seabed. Biological and physical impacts of large-scale and deep sand extraction are still being investigated and largely unknown. For this reason, we investigated the colonization of demersal fish in a deep sand extraction site. Two sandbars were artificially created by selective dredging, copying naturally occurring meso-scale bedforms to increase habitat heterogeneity and increasing post-dredging benthic and demersal fish species richness and biomass. Significant differences in demersal fish species assemblages in the sand extraction site were associated with variables such as water depth, median grain size, fraction of very fine sand, biomass of white furrow shell (Abra alba) and time after the cessation of sand extraction. Large quantities of undigested crushed white furrow shell fragments were found in all stomachs and intestines of plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), indicating that it is an important prey item. One and two years after cessation, a significant 20-fold increase in demersal fish biomass was observed in deep parts of the extraction site. In the troughs of a landscaped sandbar however, a significant drop in biomass down to reference levels and a significant change in species assemblage was observed two years after cessation. The fish assemblage at the crests of the sandbars differed significantly from the troughs with tub gurnard (Chelidonichthys lucerna) being a Dufrne-Legendre indicator species of the crests. This is a first indication of the applicability of landscaping techniques to induce heterogeneity of the seabed although it remains difficult to draw a strong conclusion due the lack of replication in the experiment. A new ecological equilibrium is not reached after 2 years since biotic and abiotic variables are still adapting. To understand the final impact of deep and large-scale sand extraction on demersal fish, we recommend monitoring for a longer period, at least for a period of six years or even longer.

de Jong, Maarten F.; Baptist, Martin J.; van Hal, Ralf; de Boois, Ingeborg J.; Lindeboom, Han J.; Hoekstra, Piet

2014-06-01

283

32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National...Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand, gravel,...

2013-07-01

284

32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.  

...Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National...Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand, gravel,...

2014-07-01

285

32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644.505 National...Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering sand, gravel,...

2012-07-01

286

Vegetation and soil water interactions on a tailings sand storage facility in the athabasca oil sands region of Alberta Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between vegetation and soil water was studied on the Syncrude South West Sand Storage facility in the Athabasca Oil Sands region of Alberta, Canada. Soil water and relevant soil chemical and physical properties were measured at the soil surface, as well as above and below the reclamation soil and tailings sand interface, in areas of low and high

M. A. Naeth; D. S. Chanasyk; T. D. Burgers

2011-01-01

287

Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu-White model for shear-wave velocity estimation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu-White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu-White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu-White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand-clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu-White model for sand-clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu-White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu-White model.

Bai, Jun-Yu; Yue, Cheng-Qi; Liang, Yi-Qiang; Song, Zhi-Xiang; Ling, Su; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wei

2013-06-01

288

Laboratory and field evaluation of an underwater sand height gage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An underwater sand height gage was investigated. This instrument consisted of two transducers, one screened and one unscreened. Laboratory experimentation included static and dynamic tests with three test sands--fine, medium, and coarse. Field tests were conducted at Rudee Inlet, Virginia Beach, Virginia. Test results showed a linear response to up to 10 inches of sand loading. Deviation observed in identical tests appeared to be due to variation in the density of sand. Density differences reflected varying packing styles which, in turn, were a consequence of grain size and flow regime. Further evaluations of the sand height gage reflect this instrument's potential.

Swift, D. J. P.; Mcgrath, D. G.

1972-01-01

289

Conoco's South Texas Tar Sands Project  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of activities and first pilot results of the South Texas Tar Sands Project. Included is a description of a new process for which a patent has been applied. The process, known as Fracture Assisted Steamflood Technology, or FAST, is a blend of high pressure steam flooding and horizontal fracturing techniques. 169,000 barrels of tar were produced before shutdown in June 1980, with a ratio of 10.6 barrels of steam injected per barrel of tar. The primary application of FAST is in reserviors that contain extremely viscous tar or are thin enough that heat losses to the confining strata are a problem. Commercialization of the project is expected to require large amounts of lead time, capital and manpower. Tar sands activities are said to be synfuels projects rather than an extension of heavy activities. (JMT)

Oshlo, E.L.

1981-06-01

290

Fracturing yields oil from poorly consolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

The technique of fracturing poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs and filling them with a thick multilayer of proppant has proven successful since sustained production has been obtained from zones previously not producible. Since there was no significant difference in results when fluids of varying polymer concentrations were used, the least expensive fluid was applied. The 70/140 mesh sand used as a fluid loss additive apparently was effective and possibly less damaging than silica flour. Larger sized sand pumped at the end of treatments did not have a discernible effect on production rate, but wells treated with Clay Acid apparently produced at higher rates than wells not treated. The stimulation method described for poorly consolidated, sandstone reservoirs may be expected to be effective in areas other than the Cook Inlet of Alaska, i.e., in areas where conventional fracturing in relatively soft formations has not been successful.

Lambert, S.A.; Dolan, R.T.; Gallus, J.P.

1984-05-01

291

Effects of starvation on protein synthesis and nucleic acid metabolism in the muscle of the barred sand bass Paralabrax nebulifer  

SciTech Connect

Starvation induced different protein synthesis responses in red and white muscle of the barred sand bass Paralabrax nebulifer. Red muscle had /sup 14/C-leucine incorporation rates into total protein which were several times higher than white muscle in both the fed and starved states. Muscle was separated into a myofibrillar fraction consisting of the structural proteins and a sarcoplasmic fraction consisting of soluble proteins. Synthesis of the myofibrillar fraction of white muscle decreased by 90%, while red muscle myofibrillar synthesis remained essentially unchanged. Changes in the labeling of several enzymes purified from the sarcoplasmic fraction were different even though the overall loss of enzyme activity was similar, suggesting that changes in synthesis rates were important in maintaining appropriate relative enzyme concentrations.

Lowery, M.S.

1987-01-01

292

Fusion of arkosic sand by intrusive andesite  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An andesite dike in the Valles Mountains of northern New Mexico has intruded and partly fused arkosic sediments for a distance of 50 feet from its contacts. The dike is semi-circular in form, has a maximum width of about 100 feet, and is about 500 feet long. Small associated arcuate dikes are arranged in spiral fashion around the main dike, suggesting that they were intruded along shear fractures similar to those described by Burbank (1941). The fused rocks surrounding the andesite dike are of three general types: 1) partly fused arkosic sand, 2) fused clay, and 3) hybrid rocks. The fused arkosic sand consists of relict detrital grains of quartz, orthoclose, and plagioclase, imbedded in colorless glass containing microlites of tridymite, cordierite, and magnetite. The relict quartz grains are corroded and embayed by glass; the orthoclase is sanidinized and partly fused; and the plagioclase is inverted to the high temperature form and is partly fused. The fused clay, which was originally a mixture of montmorillonite and hydromica, consists primarily of cordierite but also contains needle-like crystals of sillimanite (?) or mullite (?). The hybrid rocks originated in part by intermixing of fused arkosic sediments and andesitic liquid and in part by diffusion of mafic constituents through the fused sediments. They are rich in cordierite and magnetite and also contain hypersthene, augite, and plagioclase. The composition of pigeonite in the andesite indicates that the temperature of the andesite at the time of intrusion probably did not exceed 1200?C. Samples of arkosic sand were fused in the presence of water in a Morey bomb at 1050?C. Stability relations of certain minerals in the fused sand suggest that fusion may have taken place at a lower temperature, however, and the fluxing action of volatiles from the andesite are thought to have made this possible.

Bailey, Roy A.

1954-01-01

293

Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised  

SciTech Connect

This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

Locke, T.K. [ed.

1996-04-01

294

Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Penney, W.R.

1990-01-01

295

New insights into the magnetic variations of aeolian sands in the Tarim Basin and its paleoclimatic implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tarim Basin, where aeolian activity is widespread, has been regarded as a major source for global dust production. Therefore, knowledge about variation of magnetic parameters in aeolian sands from the Tarim Basin has a global significance. Systematic rock magnetic studies of aeolian sands from this region are still scarce because of the vast area and poor accessibility of the basin. In this paper, multi-parameter rock magnetic investigations of a larger number of aeolian sand samples from a wide area in the Tarim Basin have been conducted. We find that magnetic properties of aeolian sands are controlled by changes in the concentration of larger pseudo-single domain and multidomain magnetite grains, which are produced by weathering and erosional processes in the surrounding mountain regions. In addition, aeolian sands, collected from different geographic regions of the Tarim Basin, exhibit different magnetic properties, suggesting that selective wind and river transport and low-temperature oxidation might play a critical role for the magnetic properties of aeolian sands in the Tarim Basin. Our study also provides a better understanding of the complex relationships between magnetic properties and source materials for Pliocene deposits in the basin.

Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Appel, Erwin; Yan, Maodu; Yang, Shengli

2014-04-01

296

The sedimentary structure of linear sand dunes  

PubMed

Linear sand dunes--dunes that extend parallel to each other rather than in star-like or crescentic forms--are the most abundant type of desert sand dune. But because their development and their internal structure are poorly understood, they are rarely recognized in the rock record. Models of linear dune development have not been able to take into account the sub-surface structure of existing dunes, but have relied instead either on the extrapolation of short-term measurements of winds and sediment transport or on observations of near-surface internal sedimentary structures. From such studies, it has not been clear if linear dunes can migrate laterally. Here we present images produced by ground penetrating radar showing the three-dimensional sedimentary structure of a linear dune in the Namib sand sea, where some of the world's largest linear dunes are situated. These profiles show clear evidence for lateral migration in a linear dune. Moreover, the migration of a sinuous crest-line along the dune produces divergent sets of cross-stratification, which can become stacked as the dune height increases, and large linear dunes can support superimposed dunes that produce stacked sets of trough cross-stratification. These clear structural signatures of linear dunes should facilitate their recognition in geological records. PMID:10894538

Bristow; Bailey; Lancaster

2000-07-01

297

Stone heave field experiment in sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Movements of 24 cm large globes and cuboids of granite, concrete and wood were recorded during four and a half years. The objects were buried at three different depths in well-sorted sand in a natural cool temperate environment. All objects moved during the experiment and at the end most wood objects, which had a relatively low thermal conductivity had moved up, and the granite and concrete objects with higher thermal conductivities had sunk a little or remained almost in place. Also the soil surface moved and its final height was up to 1 cm above that at the start. The movements of the objects started within a few hours after temperature shifts around 0 C with the granite reacting more readily than the wood. It is hypothesized that the movements are related to the thermal properties of the objects and the soil. The experiment was done in parallel with an experiment in clayey silt and the net results in sand show clear parallels to the movements of similar objects in the silt. It is concluded that the material and shape of the object are more important to movements than whether they are embedded in sand or silty clay.

Kolstrup, Else; Thyrsted, Tage

2011-06-01

298

Dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand under cyclic loading is discussed in this paper. The discussion includes the transient time dependency behaviors based on the analysis of the results obtained in conventional cyclic triaxial tests and cyclic torsional shear triaxial tests. It has been found that the dynamic effective shear strength is composed of effective frictional resistance and viscous resistance, which are characterized by the strain rate dependent feature of strength magnitude, the coupling of consolidation stress with cyclic stress and the dependency of time needed to make the soil strength sufficiently mobilized, and can also be expressed by the extended Mohr-Coulomb's law. The two strength parameters of the dynamic effective internal frictional angle ?d and the dynamic viscosity coefficient ? are determined. The former is unvaried for different number of cyclic loading, dynamic stress form and consolidation stress ratio. And the later is unvaried for the different dynamic shear strain ratedot ? _t developed during the sand liquefaction, but increases with the increase of initial density of sand. The generalization of dynamic effective stress strength criterion in the 3-dimensional effective stress space is studied in detail for the purpose of its practical use.

Shengjun, Shao; Dingyi, Xie

2002-08-01

299

White light emitting diodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

300

North beach (Nazar) sand tracer experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The littoral in the vicinity of Nazar (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazar headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazar bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazar headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazar canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazar headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazar canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the beach southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazar bay beach showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazar canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the beach and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.

Duarte, Joo; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mnica; Cascalho, Joo; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

2014-05-01

301

Blending foundry sands with soil: Effect on dehydrogenase activity.  

PubMed

Each year U.S. foundries landfill several million tons of sand that can no longer be used to make metalcasting molds and cores. A possible use for these materials is as an ingredient in manufactured soils; however, potentially harmful metals and resin binders (used to make cores) may adversely impact the soil microbial community. In this study, the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of soil amended with molding sand (clay-coated sand known as "green sand") or core sands at 10%, 30%, and 50% (dry wt.) was determined. The green sands were obtained from iron, aluminum, and brass foundries; the core sands were made with phenol-formaldehyde or furfuryl alcohol based resins. Overall, incremental additions of these sands resulted in a decrease in the DHA which lasted throughout the 12-week experimental period. A brass green sand, which contained high concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn, severely impacted the DHA. By week 12 no DHA was detected in the 30% and 50% treatments. In contrast, the DHA in soil amended with an aluminum green sand was 2.1 times higher (all blending ratios), on average, at week 4 and 1.4 times greater (30% and 50% treatments only) than the controls by week 12. In core sand-amended soil, the DHA results were similar to soils amended with aluminum and iron green sands. Increased activity in some treatments may be a result of the soil microorganisms utilizing the core resins as a carbon source. The DHA assay is a sensitive indicator of environmental stress caused by foundry sand constituents and may be useful to assess which foundry sands are suitable for beneficial use in the environment. PMID:15975632

Dungan, Robert S; Kukier, Urzsula; Lee, Brad

2006-03-15

302

Sand wave fields beneath the Loop Current, Gulf of Mexico: Reworking of fan sands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Extensive fields of large barchan-like sand waves and longitudinal sand ribbons have been mapped by deep-towed SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar on part of the middle and lower Mississippi Fan that lies in about 3200 m of water. The area is beneath the strongly flowing Loop Current. The bedforms have not been adequately sampled but probably consist of winnowed siliciclastic-foraminiferal sands. The size (about 200 m from wingtip to wingtip) and shape of the large barchans is consistent with a previously observed peak current speed of 30 cm/s, measured 25 m above the seabed. The types of small-scale bedforms and the scoured surfaces of chemical crusts, seen on nearby bottom photographs, indicate that near-bed currents in excess of 30 cm/s may sometimes occur. At the time of the survey the sand transport direction was to the northwest, in the opposite direction to the Loop Current but consistent with there being a deep boundary current along the foot of the Florida Escarpment. Some reworking of the underlying sandy turbidites and debris flow deposits is apparent on the sidescan sonar records. Reworking by deep-sea currents, resulting in erosion and in deposits characterised by coarsening upwards structures and cross-bedding, is a process that has been proposed for sand found in cores in shallower parts of the Gulf of Mexico. This process is more widespread than hitherto supposed. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

Kenyon, N.H.; Akhmetzhanov, A.M.; Twichell, D.C.

2002-01-01

303

Complexity in natural landform patterns  

PubMed

Patterns in nature, such as meandering rivers and sand dunes, display complex behavior seemingly at odds with their simplicity of form. Existing approaches to modeling natural landform patterns, reductionism and universality, are incompatible with the nonlinear, open nature of natural systems. An alternative modeling methodology based on the tendency of natural systems to self-organize in temporal hierarchies is described. PMID:10102803

Werner

1999-04-01

304

White cell design considerations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

Hannan, Paul

1989-01-01

305

White light velocity interferometer  

DOEpatents

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01

306

Modeling of heavy metal migration in sand\\/bentonite and the leachate pH effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulations were carried out using a multicomponent reactive solute transport model to study the migration of four heavy metals (Cd2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+) in a sand\\/bentonite mixture. The numerical model is capable of simulating simultaneous processes of water flow, advectivedispersive solute transport, and chemical reactions such as acidbase reaction, complexation, ion exchange, precipitation and dissolution. The migration of

Guangxi Wu; Loretta Y. Li

1998-01-01

307

Hydrogen and Storage Initiatives at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA WSTF Hydrogen Activities: a) Aerospace Test; b) System Certification & Verification; c) Component, System, & Facility Hazard Assessment; d) Safety Training Technical Transfer: a) Development of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Practices; b) Support of National Hydrogen Infrastructure Development.

Maes, Miguel; Woods, Stephen S.

2006-01-01

308

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF PLANT DIVERSITY: APPLICATION TO WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Diversity is an average property of a community and is identified as the species variety and abundance. The study of biodiversity is important because it is one of the central themes in ecology; the diversity of a system is often seen as an indicator of the well-being of the syst...

309

Environmental impact statement for Manned Spacecraft Center and White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This environment has not only attracted people and increased payrolls, but has also created a broader base for the local economy. The activity of the center was a catalyst to private enterprise and has led to sizeable residential and commercial developments. Adequate treatment of domestic and industrial waste water was maintained. A feasibility study is now being conducted to establish a plan for a coordinated, centerwide plan for advanced treatment of domestic and industrial waste water.

1971-01-01

310

Why Count Types of White Blood Cells?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How can we make use of complex cellular level responses in the human body to microbial infections and other disorders? Why is it important to differentiate between white blood cells in a blood sample and keep a record of their numbers? Improve skills at cell identification and explore these questions with the program Cell Differentials. * identify lymphocytes in a clinical laboratory simulation of blood cell counts

Ethel D. Stanley (Beloit College;Biology); Donald Buckley (Quinnipiac University;Biology)

2006-05-20

311

Mesophilic Actinomycetes in the natural and reconstructed sand dune vegetation zones of Fraser Island, Australia.  

PubMed

The natural coastal habitat of Fraser Island located in the State of Queensland, Australia, has been disturbed in the past for mining of the mineral sand ilmenite. Currently, there is no information available on whether these past mining disturbances have affected the distribution, diversity, and survival of beneficial soil microorganisms in the sand dunes of the island. This in turn could deleteriously affect the success of the natural regeneration, plant growth, and establishment on the sand dunes. To support ongoing restoration efforts at sites like these mesophilic actinomycetes were isolated using conventional techniques, with particular emphasis on the taxa previously reported to produce plant-growth-promoting substances and providing support to mycorrhizal fungi, were studied at disturbed sites and compared with natural sites. In the natural sites, foredunes contained higher densities of micromonosporae replaced by increasing numbers of streptomycete species in the successional dune and finally leading to complex actinomycete communities in the mature hind dunes. Whereas in the disturbed zones affected by previous mining activities, which are currently being rehabilitated, no culturable actinomycete communities were detected. These findings suggest that the paucity of beneficial microflora in the rehabilitated sand dunes may be limiting the successful colonization by pioneer plant species. Failure to establish a cover of plant species would result in the mature hind dune plants being exposed to harsh salt and climatic conditions. This could exacerbate the incidence of wind erosion, resulting in the destabilization of well-defined and vegetated successional dunal zones. PMID:17578635

Kurtbke, D I; Neller, R J; Bellgard, S E

2007-08-01

312

BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.  

SciTech Connect

BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

2008-05-27

313

A study of morphology, provenance, and movement of desert sand seas in Africa, Asia, and Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Recent acquisition of generally high quality color prints for most of the test sites has enabled this project to make significant advances in preparing mosaics of sand desert areas under study. Computer enhancement of imagery, where details of complex dune forms need to be determined, has been achieved with arrival of computer-compatible ERTS-1 tapes. Further, a comparator, recently received, gives precise visual measurements of width, length, and spacing of sand bodies and so improves comparison of patterns in various test sites. Considerable additional meteorological data recently received on sand-moving winds in China, Pakistan, Libya, and other study areas enabled much progress to be made in developing overlays for the dune mosaics. These data show direction, speed, and frequency of winds. Other new data for use in preparing overlays used with ERTS-1 image mosaics include ground truth on moisture control, geologic settings, and plant distribution. With the addition of visual observation data and prints from hand-held photography now being obtained by the Skylab 4 mission, much progress in interpreting the patterns of sand seas for 17 desert sites is anticipated.

Mckee, E. D. (principal investigator); Breed, C. S.

1974-01-01

314

A study of morphology, provenance, and movement of desert sand seas in Africa, Asia, and Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Recent acquisition of generally high quality color prints for most of the test sites has enabled the project to make significant advances in preparing mosaics of sand desert areas under study. Computer enhancement of imagery of selected sites, where details of complex dune forms need to be determined, has been achieved with arrival of computer-compatible ERTS-1 tapes. Further, a comparator, recently received, gives precise visual measurements of width, length, and spacing of sand bodies and so improves comparison of patterns in various test sites. Considerable additional meteorological data recently received on sand-moving winds in China, Pakistan, Libya and other areas enabled much progress to be made in developing overlays for the dune mosaics. These data show direction, speed, and frequency of winds. Other new data for use in preparing overlays used with ERTS-1 image mosaics include ground truth on moisture control, geologic settings, and plant distribution. With the addition of visual observation data and prints from hand-held photography now being obtained by the Skylab mission, much progress in interpreting the patterns of sand seas for 17 desert sites is anticipated.

Mckee, E. D. (principal investigator); Breed, C. S.

1973-01-01

315

Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience  

SciTech Connect

For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

None, None

2013-09-01

316

White Sea - Russia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

2002-01-01

317

WHITE PAPER Understanding  

E-print Network

Addressing: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know CONTENTS Internet Scaling Problems 1 Classful IP Addressing 3;Understanding IP Addressing: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know The Internet continues to grow at a phenomenalWHITE PAPER Understanding IP Addressing: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know #12;Understanding IP

Ricci, Laura

318

White Dwarf Stars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NASA site provides information about white dwarfs, produced when stars like our Sun exhaust their nuclear fuel and blow off much of their mass. The site contains an explanation of their properties and composition. Additional links include an introductory article, online quiz, cool facts, FAQ, and other resources.

2007-01-26

319

Snow White 5 Trench  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 35th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 34 (June 29, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White 5.' The trench is 4-to-5 centimeters (about 1.5-to-1.9 inches) deep, 24 centimeters (about 9 inches) wide and 33 centimeters (13 inches) long.

Snow White 5 is Phoenix's current active digging area after additional trenching, grooming, and scraping by Phoenix's Robotic Arm in the last few sols to trenches informally called Snow White 1, 2, 3, and 4. Near the top center of the image is the Robotic Arm's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe.

Snow White 5 is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.'

This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

320

White Dwarf Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). Garca-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

Kepler, S. O.

2014-10-01

321

White Students Reflecting on Whiteness: Understanding Emotional Responses  

PubMed Central

In the present investigation, the authors explored potential predictors of White students general emotional responses after they reflected on their Whiteness in a semi-structured interview (n = 88) or written reflection (n = 187). Specifically, the authors examined how color-blindness (i.e., awareness of White privilege) and racial affect (i.e., White empathy, White guilt, and White fear), assessed before the interview or written reflection, may predict positive and negative emotional responses, assessed immediately following the interview or written reflection. Furthermore, the authors considered whether affective costs of racism to Whites moderated the association between racial color-blindness and general positive and negative emotional responses of White students. Findings indicated that affective costs of racism moderated associations between racial color-blindness and general emotional responses. Specifically, White fear moderated associations for the written reflection group whereas White empathy moderated an association in the interview. White guilt did not moderate, but instead directly predicted a negative emotional response in the written reflection group. Findings suggest that the interaction between racial color-blindness and racial affect is important when predicting students emotional responses to reflecting on their Whiteness. Implications for educators and administrators are discussed. PMID:20657811

Todd, Nathan R.; Spanierman, Lisa B.; Aber, Mark S.

2010-01-01

322

White Institutional Presence: The Impact of Whiteness on Campus Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this conceptual paper, Diane Gusa highlights the salience of race by scrutinizing the culture of Whiteness within predominately White institutions of higher education. Using existing research in higher education retention literature, Gusa examines embedded White cultural ideology in the cultural practices, traditions, and perceptions of

Gusa, Diane Lynn

2010-01-01

323

Subcritical compaction and yielding of granular quartz sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cylindrical samples of water-saturated, initially loose, St. Peter quartz sand were consolidated using triaxial deformation apparatus at room temperature, constant fluid pressure (12.5 MPa), and elevated confining pressures (up to 262.5 MPa). The samples were deformed along four loading paths: (1) hydrostatic stressing tests in which confining pressure was monotonically increased; (2) hydrostatic stress cycling similar to (1) except that effective pressure was periodically decreased to initial conditions; (3) triaxial deformation at constant effective pressure in which differential stress was applied after raising effective pressure to an elevated level; and (4) triaxial stress cycling similar to (3) except that the axial differential stress was periodically decreased to zero. Hydrostatic stressing at a constant rate results in a complex nonlinear consolidation response. At low pressures, large strains occur without significant acoustic emission (AE) activity. With increased pressure, the stress versus strain curve becomes quasi-linear with a corresponding nonlinear increase in AE rates. At elevated pressures, macroscopic yielding is marked by the onset of large strains, high AE rates, and significant grain failure. Stress cycling experiments show that measurable inelastic strain occurs at all stages of hydrostatic loading. The reload portions of stress cycles are characterized by a poro-elastic response and lower AE rates than during constant rate hydrostatic stressing. As the stress nears and exceeds the level that was applied during previous loading cycles, strain and AE rates increase in a manner consistent with yielding. Triaxial stressing cycles achieve greater consolidation and AE rates than hydrostatic loading at similar mean stress levels. By comparing our results with previously published studies, we construct a three-component model to describe elastic and inelastic compaction of granular sand. This model involves acoustically silent grain rearrangement that contributes significant inelastic strain at low pressures, poro-elastic (Hertzian) deformation at all pressures, and inelastic strain related to granular cracking and particle failure which increases in significance at greater pressures.

Karner, Stephen L.; Chester, Frederick M.; Kronenberg, Andreas K.; Chester, Judith S.

2003-12-01

324

Perceived Whiteness under Different Lighting Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many white and nearly white objects are in our living and working areas, such as documents written on white paper, white curtains, white clothes, white walls, and white furniture. The perceived whiteness of these objects is important to the impression of the lighting in these areas. To investigate the perceived whiteness in living areas, a series of experiments were conducted using four different fluorescent lamps in three different environments. It was found that the areas of perceived whiteness in the living area environments were larger than the areas of perceived whiteness under achromatic conditions. Based on these results, a perceived whiteness index is proposed for these experimental conditions.

Oota, Akiko; Kanaya, Sueko; Ayama, Miyoshi; Mukai, Kenji

325

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a heart condition in which there is an abnormal extra electrical pathway of the ... to episodes of rapid heart rate ( tachycardia ). Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most common ...

326

White Supremacist Activity in Montana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Introduction; The Extend and Basis of the Problem; Characteristics of White Supremacism and Hate Crimes; The Nature of White Supremacist Organizations; The Legislative Perspective; The Law Enforcement Perspective; The Perspective of Human Rights...

1994-01-01

327

White matter of the brain  

MedlinePLUS

White matter is tissue found in the brain. It contains nerve fibers. Many of these nerve fibers ( ... of fat called myelin. The myelin gives the white matter it's color. Myelin acts as an insulator. ...

328

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01

329

Aeolian Sand Transport with Collisional Suspension  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aeolian transport is an important mechanism for the transport of sand on Earth and on Mars. Dust and sand storms are common occurrences on Mars and windblown sand is responsible for many of the observed surface features, such as dune fields. A better understanding of Aeolian transport could also lead to improvements in pneumatic conveying of materials to be mined for life support on the surface of the Moon and Mars. The usual view of aeolian sand transport is that for mild winds, saltation is the dominant mechanism, with particles in the bed being dislodged by the impact of other saltating particles, but without in-flight collisions. As the wind becomes stronger, turbulent suspension keeps the particles in the air, allowing much longer trajectories, with the corresponding increase in transport rate. We show here that an important regime exists between these two extremes: for strong winds, but before turbulent suspension becomes dominant, there is a regime in which in-flight collisions dominate over turbulence as a suspension mechanism, yielding transport rates much higher than those for saltation. The theory presented is based on granular kinetic theory, and includes both turbulent suspension and particle-particle collisions. The wind strengths for which the calculated transport rates are relevant are beyond the published strengths of current wind tunnel experiments, so these theoretical results are an invitation to do experiments in the strong-wind regime. In order to make a connection between the regime of saltation and the regime of collisional suspension, it is necessary to better understand the interaction between the bed and the particles that collide with it. This interaction depends on the agitation of the particles of the bed. In mild winds, collisions with the bed are relatively infrequent and the local disturbance associated with a collision can relax before the next nearby collision. However, as the wind speed increases, collision become more frequent and the agitation need not decay completely. In the regime of collisional suspension, the particles near the surface of the bed are assumed to be in a state of constant agitation. We indicate the conditions at the bed corresponding to the limits of saltation and collisional suspension and outline experiments, simulations, and modeling that have been undertaken to bridge these limits.

Jenkins, James T.; Pasini, Jose Miguel; Valance, Alexandre

2004-01-01

330

Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures  

DOEpatents

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

2009-12-22

331

Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure  

DOEpatents

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

2010-01-12

332

Dune Sand Fixation: Mauritania Seawater Pipeline Macroproject  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Wide-spreading actively migratory sand dune fields are mainly found in the Earths climatically designated desert regionshot\\u000a deserts cover ~14.2% of Earths land (Peel et al. 2007; Parsons and Abrahams 2009). Some eremologists suspect that global desertification, a persistent decline of ecosystems benefits for humansloss of\\u000a utility or potential utility of landin already dry regions, is occurring and will increase as

Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart

333

Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes.  

PubMed

Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in model studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power; and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a crossover between two different forms of desertification. PMID:23496449

Kinast, Shai; Meron, Ehud; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

2013-02-01

334

Technology of Sand Level Detection Based on CCD Images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heavy oil takes advantage of proportion in world petroleum resources. Thermal recovery technology, the chief means of heavy-oil exploitation, has been widely applied in development of world heavy-oil reservoir. To study the effect of sand-control technology in the process of heavy-oil thermal recovery, A HTRSTS (Heavy-oil Thermal Recovery Simulation Testing System) has been build. The detection of sand level in sand container is very important. The sand level detection technology adopted in this system is image processing technique based on CCD. Sand container image is taken by CCD, and then HTRSTS locks the interface between sand and liquid through CCD scanning. The preliminary experimental result shows that the standard deviation is about 0.02 liter, which could satisfy practical requirement quite well.

Jiang, Bing; Li, Xianglin; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhang, Tengfei; Feng, Chi; Zhang, Fei

335

Biogenic and anthropogenic organic components of Saharan sands.  

PubMed

Till now, the Sahara desert sands have scarcely characterized for their organic contents, despite they are known to heavily affect Europe and America when transported by winds. In this study, the composition of sands collected in ten oasis lying in two regions of the Algerian Sahara during 2011 was investigated with regards to organic fraction. Attention was paid to anthropogenic and biogenic sources of organics associated to sands, through the characterization of n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkanedioic acids, n-alkanols, sterols, PAHs and caffeine. The organic fraction load on sands associable to natural sources was higher in the Region of Biskra than in that of Ouargla. The biogenic contribution to the total amount of organics in sands exceeded that of the anthropogenic sources. The composition of sands from Hassi Messaoud, compared to that observed there in 2006, showed that the anthropic impact over the region was not changed. PMID:24875880

Balducci, Catia; Ladji, Riad; Muto, Valeria; Romagnoli, Paola; Yassaa, Nourredine; Cecinato, Angelo

2014-07-01

336

Continental scale fluvial sediment recycling as expressed by a constant cosmogenic nuclide ratio in sand supplied from the Nile River over the last 2.5 Ma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quartz in the eastern Mediterranean coastal plain is supplied through an extended transport system, which includes the Nile River, east Mediterranean longshore currents, and inland (Aeolian) sand transport. During this long and complex transport system, quartz grains are dosed with cosmogenic nuclides. While the concentrations of 26Al and 10Be, and their ratio, in modern sand deposited along the coast of the eastern Mediterranean reflect the combined effect of sand exposure and burial during transport, the concentrations of these nuclides in ancient buried sand are the result of decay of such an initial dosing. Samples of modern exposed sand (n=3) collected from the coastal plain of Israel yield an average 26Al/10Be ratio of 4.80.2, significantly lower than the expected ratio of 6.8 for exposed quartz grains at the surface. This ratio is equivalent to an apparent burial period of ~600 ka. A ratio of 4.50.3 was measured in a Pleistocene last glacial sand sample. This ratio is similar, within 1? to the average ratio of the modern sand indicating similar exposure-burial histories during transport in spite of the difference in climatic conditions. The results imply a steady, pre-burial cosmogenic nuclide ratio related to the Nile River's ability, through storage and recycling, to buffer the effects of climatic and tectonic perturbations on cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in the transported quartz. All ancient and buried sand samples (n=9) fall on a decay path which originates from concentrations and ratio of 26Al and 10Be in modern sand suggesting steady pre-burial concentrations of cosmogenic nuclides in quartz sand over the past 2.5 Ma.

Matmon, Ari; Davis, Michael; Rood, Dylan; Avnaim-katav, Simona

2013-04-01

337

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey  

E-print Network

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey and Permanent Vegetation Monitoring Plots Prepared for: U Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 March 1998 #12;WHITE RANCH WETLANDS assessment of the White Ranch wetlands. In addition we set up permanent plots along transects to collect

338

Black Students in White Skins  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of the 281 million Americans, "Scientific American" estimates that White Africans (21% of White Caucasians) have Black heritage. This article discusses the present state of black elite and the transformation of black students in the United States. Some strategies to become a "white" student are also discussed.

Snell, Joel C.

2008-01-01

339

Final report on Thermally Modified Sand demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The use of salt and salt/sand mixtures on icy roadway surfaces has dramatically increased during the past 30 years. Despite extensive documentation on salt related damage to the roadway improvements, vehicles and the environment, road maintenance departments have continued to rely on this practice. Road maintenance departments in northern climate areas have long recognized the safety benefits for public mobility on icy roadways from the use of sand. As an abrasive material, the sand improves the surface traction that results in more drivable and less hazardous road conditions during the winter months. Stockpiles of pure sand stored during the winter months oftentimes freeze into large unworkable, monolithic piles. To maintain a free-flowing condition, it has been found to be necessary to add salt to the sand. The addition of salt in amounts ranging from 5 to 10 percent to that of sand, is usually sufficient to provide relatively free-flowing abrasive material that could be stored in stockpiles and applied to icy road surfaces with conventional sand spreading trucks. Another alternative for winter storage of pure sand to maintain a free-flowing condition is in humidity-controlled, heated buildings. As would be expected, this method has high capital and operating costs. and not cost effective for general highway maintenance use. The invention demonstrated herein is a method of thermally modifying pure sand that will remain in a free-flowing state throughout the winter season without the need for the salt additive. The thermally modified sand provides an abrasive material that when applied to icy roads does not cause environmental and corrosive damage as done by the application of sand with salt. By employing a very simple process of freezing screened sand particles by forced air convection under subfreezing conditions, the invention creates a product that has significant value in terms of economic and environmental benefits.

Not Available

1994-09-23

340

Offshore sand prospecting in : History and recent efforts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea Engineering, Inc. (SEI) has continued long-standing efforts to find exploitable offshore sand resources for the purpose of nourishing Hawaii's beaches. Investigations by University of Hawaii researchers in the 1970's established the potential presence of large bodies of sand in ancient offshore alluvial channels and wave-cut terraces. Sampling efforts showed that much of the sand was too fine-grained to be

James H. Barry

2011-01-01

341

Have the northwest Negev dunefield sands reddened since their deposition?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sand grain coating redness has been extensively both in coastal and inland desert dunes. In Israel, sand redness has been quantified by calculating a spectral redness index (RI) using single RGB bands (RI= R2\\/(B*G3)) from reflectance spectroscopy. The RI values have been correlated to ferric oxide mass that was dissolved from sand grain coatings (Ben Dor et al., 2006; Tsoar

Joel Roskin; Haim Tsoar; Dan G. Blumberg; Naomi Porat; Ofer Rozensten

2010-01-01

342

Parasite infection and sand coarseness increase sand crab (Emerita analoga) burrowing time.  

PubMed

Parasites with indirect life cycles require trophic transmission from intermediate hosts to definitive (vertebrate) hosts. Transmission may be facilitated if parasite infection alters the behavior of intermediate hosts such that they are more vulnerable to predation. Vulnerability to predation may also be influenced by abiotic factors; however, rarely are the effects of parasites and abiotic factors examined simultaneously. The swash zone of sandy beaches is a particularly harsh environment. Sand crabs (Emerita analoga) burrow rapidly in the swash zone to avoid predators and dislodgment. We examined prevalence and abundance of the acanthocephalan parasite Profilicollis altmani in sand crabs, and investigated the synergistic effects of sand grain size (an important abiotic factor), parasite infection, body size and reproductive condition on burrowing speed in females, from three California sites. More heavily parasitized crabs burrowed more slowly, making them potentially more vulnerable to predation by marine bird definitive hosts. Ovigerous females harbored more parasites than non-ovigerous females, but burrowed more quickly. All crabs burrowed slowest in the coarsest sand, and burrowing times increased with repeated testing, suggesting that it is energetically costly. Abiotic and biotic factors influence burrowing, and behavioral variation across sites may reflect the response to natural variation in these factors. PMID:21959036

Kolluru, Gita R; Green, Zachary S; Vredevoe, Larisa K; Kuzma, Matthew R; Ramadan, Sera N; Zosky, Marc R

2011-11-01

343

TRANSPORT OF MACROMOLECULES AND HUMATE COLLOIDS THROUGH A SAND AND A CLAY AMENDED SAND LABORATORY COLUMN  

EPA Science Inventory

Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if macromolecules or humate colloids would transport through sand columns and if they would exhibit any variations in their relative velocity based upon their molecular volumes and the pore size distribution of the column packing...

344

Evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery in mapping and managing soil and range resources in the Sand Hills Region of Nebraska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Interpretations of high altitude photography of test sites in the Sandhills of Nebraska permitted identification of subirrigated range sites as well as complexes of choppy sands and sands range sites, units composing approximately 85% of the Sandhills rangeland. These range sites form the basic units necessary for the interpretation of range condition classes used in grazing management. Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery acquired during August, September and October, 1972 indicated potential for the identification of gross differences in forage density within given range sites identified on early season aerial photography.

Seevers, P. M.; Drew, J. V.

1973-01-01

345

TOS9 Regulates White-Opaque Switching in Candida albicans?  

PubMed Central

In Candida albicans, the a1-?2 complex represses white-opaque switching, as well as mating. Based upon the assumption that the a1-?2 corepressor complex binds to the gene that regulates white-opaque switching, a chromatinimmunoprecipitation-microarray analysis strategy was used to identify 52 genes that bound to the complex. One of these genes, TOS9, exhibited an expression pattern consistent with a master switch gene. TOS9 was only expressed in opaque cells, and its gene product, Tos9p, localized to the nucleus. Deletion of the gene blocked cells in the white phase, misexpression in the white phase caused stable mass conversion of cells to the opaque state, and misexpression blocked temperature-induced mass conversion from the opaque state to the white state. A model was developed for the regulation of spontaneous switching between the opaque state and the white state that includes stochastic changes of Tos9p levels above and below a threshold that induce changes in the chromatin state of an as-yet-unidentified switching locus. TOS9 has also been referred to as EAP2 and WOR1. PMID:16950924

Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Borneman, Anthony R.; Daniels, Karla J.; Pujol, Claude; Wu, Wei; Seringhaus, Michael R.; Gerstein, Mark; Yi, Song; Snyder, Michael; Soll, David R.

2006-01-01

346

Diversity of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Ibitipoca State Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil.  

PubMed

Leishmaniasis is a complex of zoonotic diseases that are endemic to many Brazilian states. They are transmitted to the vertebrates by the bite of the hematophagous female sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors. Despite the increasing occurrence of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in large urban centers, their transmission continues to occur primarily in a wild environment and may be associated with professional activities, ecotourism activities, or both. This study investigates the ecological parameters of the sand flies present in Ibitipoca State Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil. During 2009, systematic collections of sand flies were made monthly using HP light traps installed at five sites, including three natural settings (a cave, riparian vegetation, and a rain forest), the tourist and researchers' accommodations, and a surrounding domestic livestock area. In total, 161 sand flies (seven species) were collected, the most abundant, particularly in the surrounding domestic livestock area, being Lutzomyia (Psychodopygus) lloydi (Antunes, 1937). Furthermore, a previously unidentified Lutzomyia (Sciopemyia) sp. was prevalent in the cave environment. There are no existing records of the occurrence of leishmaniasis in Ibitipoca State Park; however, the some species of the subgenus Psychodopygus are known vectors of Leishmania spp in Brazil. Hence, the presence of a species of this genus in areas surrounding the park may represent a risk to ecotourism and the local inhabitants. Our study shows the importance of regular monitoring of the various areas used by humans to determine the distribution and spread of sand fly vectors for preventive management to forestall potential risk to health and consequent effect on ecotourists. PMID:21845934

Carvalho, Gustavo Mayr de Lima; De Vasconcelos, Fernanda Bernardes; Da Silva, Daniela Gonalves; Botelho, Helbert Antnio; Filho, Jos Dilermando Andrade

2011-07-01

347

Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

Mathews, S., LLNL

1998-02-25

348

Microbes in beach sands: integrating environment, ecology and public health  

E-print Network

- logical factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

349

CIR sand casting system for trans-tibial socket.  

PubMed

The authors have developed a trans-tibial socket fabrication system based on the "dilatancy" principle, a process that has been commonly used in forming wheelchair Seating. The CIR Sand Casting System replaces plaster of Paris with sand for forming both a negative sand mould and a positive sand model, which can be modified for either thermoplastic socket formation or resin lamination. Initial clinical trials suggest that fabrication times are approximately 90 minutes from patient evaluation and casting to dynamic alignment. Compatibility with all existing prosthetic components is retained. It is believed the CIR socket fabrication system may be a competitive alternative for prosthetic service providers in developing countries. PMID:14571945

Wu, Y; Casanova, H; Smith, W K; Edwards, M; Childress, D S

2003-08-01

350

'Snow White' Trench  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 43, the 43rd Martian day after landing (July 8, 2008). This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White.'

Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample was taken from the surface area just left of the trench and informally named 'Rosy Red.' It was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). The second sample, informally named 'Sorceress,' was taken from the center of the 'Snow White' trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 41 (July 6, 2008).

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

351

Bahamian whitings - no fish story  

SciTech Connect

Bahamian whitings, controversial patches of drifting mud-laden water, have been thought to be produced by fish. Observations over several 7-day periods show that whitings are long-lived phenomena (days and possibly weeks) and that the dozens which exist at any time on the Great Bahama Bank continually rain aragonitic sediment. Although chemical changes consistent with precipitation have not been detected in seawater near or within whitings, new data indirectly suggest that precipitation from seawater causes whitings. Lime mud settled in approximately 6 hr in large (30 gal) containers of water taken from whitings, whereas in the sea, the parent whitings persisted for days. Sediment traps verified continual transport of sediment. Divers noted no fish stirring up the bottom nor any evidence of bottom feeding. Side-scan sonar failed to detect unusually large schools of fish, and a shrimper's net dragged in the whitings failed to catch any fish known to be bottom feeders. Dragging the net in clear water near active whitings created artificial whitings that settled back to the bottom in a few hours. Current measurements within and outside of whitings ruled out current eddies. Near the edge of the Bahama platform, whitings occur over bottom sediments too coarse-grained to be stirred into suspension, yet the muddy bottom of the banks was miles away. These data suggest that natural whitings must be continually replenished with sediment. Filtration of known volumes of water from 15 whitings and from clear seawater indicates that active-whiting water contains only a very small (10-12 mg/L) amount of suspended carbonate sediment, yet whitings are considered a potential major source of lime mud on the Great Bahama Bank. Inasmuch as nearly one-half the world's oil is pumped from limestone, knowledge of the origin and deposition of lime mud has implications for hydrocarbon exploration.

Shinn, E.A.; Steinen, R.P.; Lidz, B.H.; Halley, R.B.

1985-02-01

352

Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples  

E-print Network

Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement towards the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by mid-air collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport.

Orencio Duran; Philippe Claudin; Bruno Andreotti

2014-11-07

353

Oil sands tailings leachability and toxicity evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Fine tailings disposal and reclamation is a major issue facing the oil sands mining and extraction industry. Government regulations dictate that reclamation must return the site to a level of self-sustaining biological capability which approximates the natural condition. A two-phase laboratory program has been completed to investigate the suitability of alternative reclamation materials. For the first phase of the study, chemical and toxicological analyses were carried out on 13 different reclamation and reference materials (solid phase and extractions). Seedling emergence, nematode maturation, algal growth and bacterial luminescence for leachate samples showed a range of sensitivities in response to the tested materials, although phytotoxicity tests were generally the most sensitive. With the exception of one test material, high toxicity ratings were consistent with that expected from the chemical data. The second phase of the study focused on the evaluation of chemical and toxicological conditions in leachate water generated using bench-scale column percolation tests. Leachate water equivalent to 10 pore volume replacements was generated and temporal variations in toxicity and chemistry monitored. Similar to phase 1 findings, phytotoxicity tests were the most sensitive tests to leachate waters. For most materials tested, most toxicity was removed after 2--3 porewater replacements. More persistent toxicity was noted for samples containing bitumen (e.g., fine tails and oil sands). No clear correspondence was noted between chemical concentrations and toxicity in leachate waters.

Gulley, J.R. [Suncor Inc., Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada). Oil Sands Group; Hamilton, H.R.; Taylor, B. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31

354

Yield stress transition in gas fluidized sand.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gas fluidized powders can take on three distinct states. I: Solid like for low gas flow rates. II: At intermediate flow rates, the bed expands and drastically reduces its yield stress, i.e. quicksand which cannot support the weight of solid objects. III: At high flow rates rising gas bubbles churn the sand grains violently. We have measured that the transition from regime I to II does not occur simultaneously for the entire column, but rather as a well defined front which sweeps through the column as a function of gas flow rate. Earlier measurements sensed this front by measuring the depth to which a brass sphere would sink in the liquid phase. We have supplemented this with careful measurements of the vertical gas pressure gradient throughout the column. The pressure profile shows a distinct change in the gradient at a height which correlates well with results from the sinking sphere measurement. From the pressure gradient we calculate the local gas permeability of the sand, which is related to the grain density, which can be measured with an accuracy of better than 1 part in 100. We thank the NSF-REU program for partial support of this research.

Stoker, David; Poker, Jennifer; Savrin, Tamara; Rutgers, Maarten

2000-11-01

355

Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples.  

PubMed

Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement toward the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by midair collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use of the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport. PMID:25331873

Durn, Orencio; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

2014-11-01

356

Avalanches of Singing Sand in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The song of dunes is a natural phenomenon that has arisen travellers' curiosity for a long time, from Marco Polo to R.A. Bagnold. Scientific observations in the XXth century have shown that the sound is emitted during a shear flow of these particular grains, the free surface of the flow having coherent vibrations like a loud speaker. The sound emission is also submitted to a threshold effect with many parameters like humidity, flow speed, surface of the grains. The sound has been reproduced in laboratory avalanche experiments close to the natural phenomenon on field, but set in a channel with a hard bottom and a few centimeters of sand flowing, which contradicts explanations of the sound that involve a sand dune under the avalanche flow. Flow rates measurements also show the presence of a plug region in the flow above the sheared band, with the same characteristic length as the coherence zones of the sound. Finally we show experimentally that the Froude number, once modified to take into account the height of this plug band, is the parameter that sets the amplitude of the sound, and produces a threshold that depends on the grain type.

Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; Douady, Stphane

2011-03-01

357

Imaging white light VISAR  

SciTech Connect

An imaging white light velocimeter consisting of two imagine superimposing Michelson interferometers in series with the target interposed is demonstrated. Interferometrically measured 2-D velocity maps can be made of moving surfaces using unlimited bandwidth incoherent and extended area sources. Short pulse and broadband chirped pulse lasers can be used to provide temporal resolution not possible with monochromatic illumination. A 20 m/s per fringe imaging velociemter is demonstrated using an ordinary camera flash for illumination.

Erskine, D.J.; Holmes, N.C.

1996-10-01

358

White coat principles.  

PubMed

The White Coat Ceremony, which many dental schools use to mark the transition to patient care, is an opportunity to reflect on the values of dental practice. Eight principles are offered for consideration: 1 ) patient care is the point of practice; 2) the doctor-patient relationship is essential; 3) discuss options and possibilities; 4) mistakes will be made; 5) tell the truth; be assertive; 7 ) consult; and 8) manage your stress and your life. PMID:15948496

Peltier, Bruce N

2004-01-01

359

[The White Book].  

PubMed

It is necessary for European countries to have references and guidelines to cope with the wide field of blood transfusion. It is the institutions and professionals' role to provide for technical specifications linked to the collection, qualification, preparation, storage and distribution of labile blood products. In this context, EuroNet-TMS publishes every five year (2005, 2010...) a White Book meant to issue statements on the current situation, activities in progress in Europe and future developments. PMID:18922721

Rouger, P

2008-11-01

360

White leafy seadragon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This seadragon is white with a light pattern. It has a snout (right end) and the back end is to the left. Seadragons can't hold onto sea plants like seahorses can. It has some fins along its back that it uses to propel itself and move around in the water. The leafy parts are only used to blend in and look like seaweed.

Wendy Rathey (None;)

2006-01-01

361

Snow White Trenches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 25th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 24 (June 19, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trenches informally called 'Snow White 1' (left) and 'Snow White 2' (right). The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long.

'Snow White' is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, the side farthest away from the lander, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.'

This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

362

Activity of Wind-Blown Sand and the Formation of Feathered Sand Ridges in the Kumtagh Desert, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the activity of wind-blown sand and its effects on the evolution of feathered sand ridges in the Kumtagh Desert,\\u000a China, and attempt to reveal the formation process of feathered sand ridges using wind-tunnel experiments, remote sensing\\u000a data, and detailed field observations from 2005 to 2008. The prevailing wind direction in the Kumtagh Desert is easterly in\\u000a winter and

Kongtai Liao; Jianjun Qu; Jinnian Tang; Feng Ding; Hujun Liu; Shujuan Zhu

2010-01-01

363

Variation in grain shape and surface textures of fine guartz sands in the South Texas Eolian Sand Sheet  

E-print Network

VARIATION IN GRAIN SHAPE AND SURFACE TEXTURES OF FINE QUARTZ SANDS IN THE SOUTH TEXAS EOLIAN SAND SHEET A Thesis by DONALD RALPH SIMS JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 198'4 Major Subject: Geology VARIATION IN GRAIN SHAPE AND SURFACE TEXTURES OF FINE QUARTZ SANDS IN THE SOUTH TEXAS EOLIAN SAND SHEET A Thesis by DONALD RALPH SINS JR. Approved as to style and content by: Jame...

Sims, Donald Ralph

2012-06-07

364

Faecal indicator bacteria enumeration in beach sand: A comparison study of extraction methods in medium to coarse sands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aims: The absence of standardized methods for quantifying faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in sand hinders comparison of results across studies. The purpose of the study was to compare methods for extraction of faecal bacteria from sands and recommend a standardized extraction technique. Methods and Results: Twenty-two methods of extracting enterococci and Escherichia coli from sand were evaluated, including multiple permutations of hand shaking, mechanical shaking, blending, sonication, number of rinses, settling time, eluant-to-sand ratio, eluant composition, prefiltration and type of decantation. Tests were performed on sands from California, Florida and Lake Michigan. Most extraction parameters did not significantly affect bacterial enumeration. anova revealed significant effects of eluant composition and blending; with both sodium metaphosphate buffer and blending producing reduced counts. Conclusions: The simplest extraction method that produced the highest FIB recoveries consisted of 2 min of hand shaking in phosphate-buffered saline or deionized water, a 30-s settling time, one-rinse step and a 10 : 1 eluant volume to sand weight ratio. This result was consistent across the sand compositions tested in this study but could vary for other sand types. Significance and Impact of the Study: Method standardization will improve the understanding of how sands affect surface water quality. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

Boehm, A. B.; Griffith, J.; McGee, C.; Edge, T. A.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Whitman, R.; Cao, Y.; Getrich, M.; Jay, J. A.; Ferguson, D.; Goodwin, K. D.; Lee, C. M.; Madison, M.; Weisberg, S. B.

2009-01-01

365

Gill and liver histopathological changes in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to oil sands process-affected water.  

PubMed

The extraction of bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands (Alberta, Canada) produces significant volumes of process-affected water containing elevated levels of naphthenic acids (NAs), ions, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The sublethal response of aquatic organisms exposed to oil sands constituents in experimental aquatic environments that represent possible reclamation options has been studied. In this study, the effects of process-affected waters on gill and liver tissues in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and caged goldfish (Carassius auratus) held in several reclamation ponds at Syncrude's Mildred Lake site have been assessed. Following a 3-week exposure, significant gill (epithelial cell necrosis, mucous cell proliferation) and liver (hepatocellular degeneration, inflammatory cell infiltration) histopathological changes were noted in fish held in waters containing high levels of oil sands process-affected water. In addition, measurements of gill dimensions (gill morphometrical indices) proved sensitive and provided evidence of a physiological disturbance (gas exchange) with exposure to oil sands materials. Due to the complexity of oil sands process-affected water, the cause of the alterations could not be attributed to specific oil sands constituents. However, the histopathological parameters were strong indicators of exposure to oil sands process-affected water and morphometrical data were sensitive indicators of pathological response, which can be used to identify the interactive effects of ionic content, NAs, and PAHs in future laboratory studies. PMID:15964628

Nero, V; Farwell, A; Lister, A; Van der Kraak, G; Lee, L E J; Van Meer, T; MacKinnon, M D; Dixon, D G

2006-03-01

366

The effect of methane hydrate morphology and water saturation on seismic wave attenuation in sand under shallow sub-seafloor conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A better understanding of seismic wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments is needed for the improved geophysical quantification of seafloor methane hydrates, important for climate change, geohazard and economic resource assessment. Hence, we conducted a series of small strain (<10-6), seismic frequency (50-550 Hz), laboratory resonant column experiments on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sands under excess-water seafloor conditions. The results show a complex dependence of P- and S-wave attenuation on hydrate saturation and morphology. P- and S-wave attenuation in excess-water hydrate-bearing sand is much higher than in excess-gas hydrate-bearing sand and increases with hydrate saturation between 0 and 0.44 (the experimental range). Theoretical modelling suggests that load-bearing hydrate is an important cause of heightened attenuation for both P- and S-waves in gas and water saturated sands, while pore-filling hydrate also contributes significantly to P-wave attenuation in water saturated sands. A squirt flow attenuation mechanism, related to microporous hydrate and low aspect ratio pores at the interface between sand grains and hydrate, is thought to be responsible for the heightened levels of attenuation in hydrate-bearing sands at low hydrate saturations (<0.44).

Best, Angus I.; Priest, Jeffrey A.; Clayton, Christopher R. I.; Rees, Emily V. L.

2013-04-01

367

Combination fluid bed dry distillation and coking process for oil\\/tar sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process and apparatus for direct coking of tar sands which includes contacting the tar sand with heat transfer particles resulting from combustion of coked sand effluent from the coking process, and transporting the combination up a riser\\/mixer to a coking vessel whereby separation of oil and hydrocarbon gases from the sand is initiated. The tar sand is introduced into

H. Owen; J. H. Haddad; J. C. Zahner

1985-01-01

368

Remote sensing observations of sand movement in the Bahariya Depression, Western Egypt  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerial photographs taken in the 1940's have been used in combination with recent Landsat MSS and TM data to study dune movement in the Western Desert of Egypt. The El-Ghorabi dunes track northwest to southeast along the eastern edge of the Bahariya Depression. These dunes are of complex longitudinal form with well-defined, lag-covered interdune corridors. Studies using both aerial coverage and multitemporal MSS and TM image data reveal little or no net southward extension or movement of the seifs, although field measurements and remote sensing data indicate small-scale lateral migration of dune crests and interdune corridors through time. The primary process of sand transport for these dunes seems to be in response to seasonal shifts in dominant wind direction, as reflected in the development and rapid response of sand shadows leeward of the main dune masses.

Maxwell, Ted A.; Jacobberger, Patricia A.

1987-01-01

369

A study of morphology, provenance, and movement of desert sand seas in Africa, Asia, and Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The most significant result to date is recongition that complexes are indeed visible on ERTS-1 images, and that the extent and nature of dune fields in many remote areas of the world can, for the first time, be observed almost simultaneously and directly compared. The primary scientific problem is to determine accurately the relationships among certain patterns, trends, and boundaries clearly revealed on ERTS-1 imagery to true surface configurations of desert landforms, and further, to relate the defined features to controlling factors such as wind direction and intensity, moisture in the air and on the ground and barriers to sand movement. It is hoped to produce, by photographic and cartographic extraction from ERTS-1 images, a set of thematic maps that will illustrate the relationships of optical appearance of various materials and effects of the color of various sand bodies upon ERTS-1 images.

Mckee, E. D. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

370

Suppression of mutation induction and failure to detect mutagenic activity with athabasca tar sand fractions.  

PubMed

5 different histidine-requiring strains of Salmonella typhimurium were used to test the mutagenic activity of 7 different fractions of Athabasca tar-sand. None of the 7 fractions (bitumen, maltenes, asphaltenes, saturated, monoaromatic, diaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons), showed positive mutagenic response in any of the Salmonella typhimurium strains. We have tested a wide range of concentrations. The results obtained so far are consistent with the lack of mutagenic activity of all investigated fractions in the absence and in the presence of metabolic activation. Assuming that there might be an association between the absence of mutagenic activity and the complexity of the tar-sand fractions, we investigated the effect of the polyaromatic hydrocaron fraction on the mutagenicity of the carcinogenic agent 2-aminoanthracene. The data obtained indicate clearly that the polyaromatic hydrocarbon fraction suppresses the mutagenic activity of 2-aminoanthracene. PMID:362193

Shahin, M M; Fournier, F

1978-09-01

371

Fluid Flow and Solute Transport in the Bullwinkle Field J2 Sand, Offshore Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bullwinkle field is located in a Pliocene-Pleistocene salt withdrawal minibasin approximately 90 km southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana. Most of the production has been from the prolific "J" sand sequence, a late Pliocene age channel and sheet sand turbidite complex. Salinities of the oil-leg waters (i.e., the pre-production immobile waters located above the original oil-water contact) vary from over 300 g/L near salt to approximately 150 g/L at the original oil-water contact in the J2 sand. Aquifer waters below the original oil-water contact generally have salinities between 150 g/L and 100 g/L. We developed numerical models to simulate fluid flow and associated solute transport in a gently dipping, relatively thin but high permeability sand body such as the J2 sand in Bullwinkle field. Dissolution of salt exposed in the updip portion of a confined aquifer can generate kilometer-scale fluid circulation with velocities of 10-40 cm/yr. Aquifer dips can be less than 5 degrees. Salt dissolution can generate a dense brine throughout a minibasin scale aquifer within 10,000 to 100,000 years. The fluid circulation pattern and amount of salt dissolved depends on permeability, dip, dispersivity, salt available for dissolution, and aquifer thickness. Dissolution of salt is massive, 1 billion kg or more. Salt dissolution within aquifers may be an important process in removing the last few meters of salt to form salt welds. Stratigraphic variations in aquifer salinity may be related to differences in spatial/temporal contact with salt bodies rather than a complex pattern of fluid migration. Once salt dissolution stops, continued density driven flow in minibasin scale aquifers will largely eliminate spatial variations in salinity. Introduction of hydrocarbons must be rapid in order to preserve the observed spatial gradients in oil-leg water salinity. Model simulations indicate that vertical as well as horizontal spatial variations in preproduction oil-leg water salinities may exist. Pre- production spatial distributions of oil-leg and aquifer waters salinities in the J sands of the Bullwinkle field are quantitatively consistent with: fluid circulation driven by updip dissolution of salt; introduction of hydrocarbons which traps oil-leg waters and stops further salt dissolution; and continued mixing of aquifer waters driven by density driven flow until salinity variations are largely eliminated.

Nunn, J. A.; Hanor, J. S.

2006-12-01

372

Accumulation and soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in the Nile Delta coastal black sand habitats.  

PubMed

The radionuclide content was estimated in the soil of three black sand habitats in the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, namely, sand mounds and coastal sand planes and dunes. In addition, a total of 14 heavy minerals found in the soils were characterized. The soil to plant transfer of uranium and thorium was tested on three black sand species, namely, Cakile maritima Scop., Senecio glaucus L. and Rumex Pictus Forssk. The transfer of thorium and uranium radionuclides from the soil to plant is complex process that is subjected to many variables; among which are the organic matter and clay content of the soil, the type of radionuclides and plant species. The study revealed a strong negative relationship between uranium and thorium uptake by S. glaucus and R. pictus and the clay and organic matter content of soil. Concentration of thorium in the soil has a negative correlation with soil-to-plant transfer factor. The study results suggest the possibility of using black sand species for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radioactive elements. The potentiality of S. glaucus as phytoremediator of radionuclides polluted soils is greater than R. pictus which in turn outweigh C. maritima. PMID:21598782

Hegazy, A K; Emam, M H

2011-02-01

373

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity  

E-print Network

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

Way, Andy

374

Paleoenvironment and depositional environment of Miocene Olcese Sand, Bakersfield, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Olcese Sand near Bakersfield, California, contains evidence of a range of paleoenvironments including nonmarine, estuarine, and outer shelf depositional settings. Foraminifera from surface and subsurface samples place the Olcese in the Saucesian and Relizian of the California benthic stages. A pumice bed in the Olcese has been dated by fission track methods at 15.5 Ma. The Olcese Sand interfingers

H. C. Olson

1986-01-01

375

Major tar sand and heavy oil deposits of the US  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for this report has grown with each passing year since the last official tabulation of US tar sands, the 1965 Department of Interior\\/Bureau of Mines Monograph 12 entitled, Surface and Shallow Oil-Impregnated Rocks of the United States. Four important national energy resource objectives are addressed: (1) to develop an updated assessment of US tar sand resources; (2) to

Hammershaimb

1983-01-01

376

Oil shale and tar sands as substitute fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the sheer magnitude of the resources available, coal takes a strong position as the alternate source of fuel supplies when petroleum is unavailable. However oil shale and tar sands are also possibilities, and, indeed, have some advantages over coal. Although Oklahoma has no oil shale deposits, it does have appreciable amounts of tar sands. Oil shale deposits in the

Ball

1974-01-01

377

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-print Network

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2009-05-15

378

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-print Network

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2008-10-10

379

Spatial variability of flow parameters in a stratified sand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial variability in porosity, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and various grain size fractions is analyzed for several sets of samples from the Quadra Sand. This unit is a well-sorted, medium grained, horizontally stratified sand with relatively few silt or gravel interbeds. Both random and uniformly spaced sample plans are used. The heterogeneity of the flow parameters is characterized by frequency

Leslie Smith

1981-01-01

380

Coastal Sand Dune Plant Ecology: Field Phenomena and Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of selecting coastal sand dunes as the location for field ecology studies. Presents a descriptive zonal model for seaboard sand dune plant communities, suggestions concerning possible observations and activities relevant to interpreting phenomena associated with these forms of vegetation, and additional

McDonald, K.

1973-01-01

381

Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic  

E-print Network

Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

2004-01-01

382

Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing in Oil Sands  

E-print Network

`Oil sands' exist in some parts of the world as thick deposits .... Settari and Raisbeck [10,11] provided two of the early work ...... is kept equal to zero at the top surface; everywhere else, ..... Lane Mountain sand grain was determined to be 2.65.

2008-11-16

383

The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1990-07-01

384

The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1990-07-01

385

Sand filtration. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and applications of sand filtration for water and wastewater purification. Applications include purification of drinking water and catchment water, as well as sewage treatment and wastewater reclamation. Mathematical models of sand filters are also presented. (Contains a minimum of 175 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-06-01

386

Bulk engineering and durability properties of washed glass sand concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reports the results of an experimental programme aimed at examining the performance of Portland-cement concrete produced with washed glass sand (WGS), as natural sand substitute- by mass. The effects of up to 50% WGS on fresh, engineering and durability related properties have been established and its suitability for use in a range of normal-grade concrete production assessed. WGS

Mukesh C. Limbachiya

2009-01-01

387

SLOW SAND FILTER MAINTENANCE COSTS AND EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted to determine how slow sand filter effluent quality is affected by scraping and to quantify the labor required to operate and maintain a slow sand filter. The data were obtained by monitoring scraping and other maintenance operations at six full-size slow san...

388

A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions  

E-print Network

A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions during off-road vehicle travel M to investigate the interactions between a stereotypical pneumatic tire and sand during off-road vehicle travel. Different components of the pneumatic tire were modeled using elastic, hyper- and visco-elastic material

Grujicic, Mica

389

Productivity and equipment selection in surface mining of oil sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of mining equipment is used in the mining of oil sands by surface mining. This includes bucket wheel excavators, draglines, hydraulic shovels and off-highway trucks. This paper examines the existing mining schemes and equipment used. Peculiarities of oil sands surface mining and their influence on equipment selection, utilization and mining schemes are described. Recent developments undertaken to improve

R. K. Singhal; R. J. Kolada; T. I. Vladut

1985-01-01

390

20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to remove schmutzdeck (top, dirty sand layer containing particulate contamination, dead microorganisms and debris) for cleaning and or disposal. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

391

BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING IN FOREGROUND IS NOT RELATED TO THE MACHINE. THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE LOWER LEFT. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

392

Self-similar dynamic quasi-two-dimensional sand fronts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on a study of advancing quasi-two-dimensional sand fronts on an inclined flat and thin strip confined between two vertical plates. These fronts form when a thin initial stream of sand running down the flat obstacle gets trapped at some distance from the injection point. Right after this trapping, the front starts to advance upstream and grow in time.

J.-F. Boudet; S. Gauthier; Y. Amarouchene; H. Kellay

2003-01-01

393

31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY FORCES CONDITIONED MOLDING SAND, AT HIGH VELOCITY, INTO MOLDS TOO BIG TO BE MADE ON ONE OF THE CONVEYOR SYSTEMS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

394

Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting  

E-print Network

Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting A. J. Melendez, K. D. Carlson pouring, as well as their final locations on the surface of steel sand castings. Inclusions originate. The inclusion model is implemented in a general-purpose casting simulation code. The model is validated

Beckermann, Christoph

395

Spontaneous Emergence of Order in Vibrated Sand*  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Granular media such as sand, pharmaceuticals, cereal, cosmetics, and asteroids are involved in many processes, yet granular media remain less well understood than fluids and solids. Vertically oscillating granular layers provide a test bed for theory and modeling of granular dynamics. Experiments on vertically oscillating granular layers have revealed a variety of spatial patterns that emerge spontaneously as a function of the container acceleration amplitude and frequency: stripes, squares, hexagons, spirals, and oscillons (localized structures). Molecular dynamics simulations yield results in quantitative accord with laboratory observations. Since the gradients of density and velocity are large over a particle mean free path, the applicability of continuum theory has been questionable. However, hydrodynamic equations proposed for dissipative particles yield results in surprising qualitative accord with the laboratory observations. *Work in collaboration with C. Bizon, D. Goldman, W.D. McCormick, S.J. Moon, E. Rericha, M. Shattuck, and J. Swift. Supported by DOE.

Swinney, Harry L.

2004-05-01

396

Coagulation in the sand crab (Ovalipes bipustulatus).  

PubMed

The coagulation mechanism of the sand crab (O. bipustulatus) has been investigated. From the coagulocytes (amoebocytes) present in the crab haemolymph (blood), fibrinogen (coagulogen) was isolated. It was shown to be homogeneous by electrophoresis on S.D.S. polyacrylamide gel and had a molecular weight similar to the A alpha-chain of human fibrinogen. Unlike human fibrinogen. Unlike human fibrinogen it cannot be dissociated by reduction. In fibrin polymerization, a crosslinking process takes place and this process was inhibited by glycine ethyl ester. A fibrin stabilizing factor is present in the crab haemolymph and this protein was able to cross-link human fibrin in the same manner as human factor XIII. PMID:505375

Madaras, F; Parkin, J D; Castaldi, P A

1979-08-31

397

Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams  

DOEpatents

The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

1993-01-01

398

Great Sand Dunes National Monument and Preserve  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website describes the natural resources of this park such as plants, mammals and birds (with species lists); endemic or rare species; geology; hydrology; and wind (eolian) systems. These natural resources include a high mountain valley holding the tallest dunes in North America and flanked by some of the highest peaks in the Rocky Mountains; unique wind-powered geologic systems; insects physically adapted to life in the sand and found nowhere else; alpine lakes and tundra; disappearing ponds; and interdunal wetlands. There is information on hiking and camping in the park and planning a visit; cultural history of the park area including that of ancient Americans; and a photo gallery.

399

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

1988-05-04

400

Process and apparatus for recovery of oil from tar sands  

SciTech Connect

A crude oil product is extracted from a tar sand by first crushing the tar sand as mined and then fine grinding the crushed material in a grinding mill in the presence of a cleansing liquid, such as an aqueous solution of a caustic. The resulting slurry is passed into suitable extractor-classifier equipment, such as that shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,814,336, in which a body of cleansing liquid is maintained. Agitation of the slurry in such maintained body of cleansing liquid substantially completes removal of the bituminous matter from the sand, and the resulting crude oil and cleansing liquid phase is discharged separately from the sand solid phase. The liquid phase is treated for the removal of residual sand particles and for the separation of residual cleansing liquid from the crude oil. The cleansing liquid so recovered is recycled and the crude oil is passed to further processing or for use as such.

Brewer, J.C.

1982-11-30

401

Drained cavity expansion in sands exhibiting particle crushing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The expansion of cylindrical and spherical cavities in sands is modelled using similarity solutions. The conventional Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and the state parameter sand behaviour model, which enables hardening-softening, are used in the analysis. The sand state is defined in terms of a new critical state line, designed to account for the three different modes of compressive deformation observed in sands across a wide range of stresses including particle rearrangement, particle crushing and pseudoelastic deformation. Solutions are generated for cavities expanded from zero and finite radii and are compared to those solutions where a conventional critical state line has been used. It is shown that for initial states typical of real quartz sand deposits, pseudoelastic deformation does not occur around an expanding cavity. Particle crushing does occur at these states and causes a reduction in the stress surrounding the cavity. This has major implications when using cavity expansion theory to interpret the cone penetration test and pressuremeter test.

Russell, A. R.; Khalili, N.

2002-04-01

402

Great White Shark  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this episode of the Podcast of Life, students from Martha's Vineyard Regional High School in Massachusetts and La Salle Academy in Rhode Island question shark researcher Greg Skomal about this charismatic predator at the top of the ocean food chain. Learn some surprising facts and the answers to such questions as what preys on the Great White and do they mate for life? Also included is a Learn More section that provides background information on the scientists recorded in the podcast, lessons, images, and cool facts.

2009-01-01

403

Snow White Trench (Animation)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

This animation shows the evolution of the trench called 'Snow White' that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began digging on the 22nd Martian day of the mission after the May 25, 2008, landing.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

404

Phoenix's Snow White Trench  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A soil sample taken from the informally named 'Snow White' trench at NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander work site produced minerals that indicate evidence of past interaction between the minerals and liquid water.

This image was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 103, the 103rd day since landing (Sept. 8, 2008).

The trench is approximately 23 centimeters (9 inches) long.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

405

'Snow White' in Color  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench.

The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

406

Spinning White Light  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this demonstration, students see how the different wavelengths of the visible light spectrum combine to make white light. Student cut circles out of poster board, color sections red, orange, yellow, blue, green and violet, suspend it in the air on a thread, and spin it to experience visually the combination of colors. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA Why Files: The Case of the Mysterious Red Light. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

407

Sand waves, bars, and wind-blown sands of the Rio Orinoco, Venezuela and Colombia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During March 1982, a reconnaissance study was carried out along a reach of the Rio Orinoco between Puerto Ayacucho and Ciudad Bolivar. This was the low-flow season. Samples of bed material and suspended sediments were collected, sonic records of the bed were obtained at several locations, and the exposed bars and sand waves were studied at four locations. Sounding records were obtained at two of these locations during June and November when flow covered the bars, and additional studies were made on the ground at some of these same sites during March 1983. The bed of the river is mostly sand with small quantities, about 5 percent by weight on average, of gravel. Suspended- sediment concentrations were low, ranging between 20 milligrams per liter above Rio Apure to almost 40 milligrams per liter below its confluence with the Rio Orinoco. The annual sediment load is estimated to be 240x10 6 megagrams per year. During the dry season, 35 percent or more of the bed is exposed in the form of large bars composed of many sand waves. Trade winds blow upriver and there is substantial upriver transport of river sediments by the wind. If the bars contain very coarse sands and fine gravel, deflation forms a lag deposit that armors the bar surface and prevents further erosion. Theoretical calculations show that the lower limit for the fraction of the bed that needs to be covered with nonmoving particles to prevent further erosion and the smallest size of the armor particles depend only on wind speed. Calculations of bed-material transport were made for a typical wide and narrow section of the river; the annual load, excluding the wash load, is about 30 x 10 6 megagrams per year. A new definition for wash load is proposed; it is material that can be suspended as soon as its motion is initiated. For the Rio Orinoco, this is material finer than 0.1 millimeters.

Nordin, Carl F.; Perez-Hernandez, David

1989-01-01

408

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Constellation Program  

E-print Network

at the Orion Abort Flight Test Launch Complex at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range near Las Cruces, N equipment. For the White Sands ascent abort test flights, surplus Peacekeeper missile rocket motors

409

40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The...

2010-07-01

410

76 FR 68503 - Ungulate Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Great Sand Dunes National Park and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, CO AGENCY...for the Ungulate Management Plan, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve...for the Ungulate Management Plan, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve,...

2011-11-04

411

43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public...MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas 3141.2 Prelease exploration...

2011-10-01

412

40 CFR 436.40 - Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. 436.40 Section 436...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Industrial Sand Subcategory 436.40 Applicability; description of the industrial sand subcategory. The provisions of...

2011-07-01

413

40 CFR 436.30 - Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. 436.30 Section...PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Construction Sand and Gravel Subcategory 436.30 Applicability; description of the construction sand and gravel subcategory. The...

2011-07-01

414

32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

2011-07-01

415

32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

2010-07-01

416

Pink/White (ladies' only) Light Blue/White (ladies' only)  

E-print Network

Pink/White (ladies' only) Light Blue/White (ladies' only) White/Stone Dill/Dark Green Slate Blue, Dill/Dark Green, Light Blue/White, Navy/White, Pink/White, Stone/Fawn, White/Stone Men's Colors: Black/Navy (men's only) Stone/Fawn Red/Black (men's only) Navy/White Black/Heather (men's only) Black/White

Wechsler, Risa H.

417

White Dwarf Stars (With 37 figures)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction White Dwarfs as Useful Stars Origins: the Clue of White Dwarf Masses The Main Channel Why Such a Narrow Mass Distribution? Observed Properties of White Dwarfs Discovery of White Dwarfs Finding White Dwarfs White Dwarf Colors and the White Dwarf Luminosity Function White Dwarf Optical Spectra Distribution of Spectral Types with Effective Temperatures Magnetic White Dwarfs Pulsating White Dwarfs Physics of White Dwarf Interiors Equation of State Heat Transport in Degenerate Matter Nonideal Effects Specific Heat White Dwarf Formation and Early Cooling Thermal Pulses on the AGB Departure from the AGB The PNN Phase Nuclear Shutdown and Neutrino Cooling Chemical Evolution of White Dwarfs Diffusive Processes Accretion of "Fresh" ISM vs. Mass Loss Convection Chemical Evolution Scenarios White Dwarf Cooling and the White Dwarf Luminosity Function A Simplified Cooling Model Complications: Neutrinos and Crystallization Realistic Cooling Calculations Construction of Theoretical Luminosity Functions The Age of the Galactic Disk Nonradial Oscillations of White Dwarfs: Theory Review of Observations Hydrodynamic Equations Local Analysis and the Dispersion Relation g-mode Period Spacings Mode Trapping Rotational and Magnetic Splitting The Seismological Toolbox Pulsating White Dwarfs The Whole Earth Telescope PG 1159 Stars and Pulsating PNNs GD 358: A Pulsating DB White Dwarf The ZZ Ceti Stars Astrophysical Applications of White Dwarfs Stellar Evolution as a Spectator Sport The White Dwarf Luminosity Function and Our Galaxy White Dwarfs and Cluster Ages The Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function and Galaxy Distances Driving and Damping of Pulsations and Convective Efficiency in - White Dwarfs Ceti Stars Final Thoughts References

Kawaler, Steven D.

418

Climate change impacts on sand supply and the formation of desert sand dunes in the south-west  

E-print Network

) and Namib Desert (Vogel, 1989; Teller et al., 1990) of Africa to the deserts of the American southClimate change impacts on sand supply and the formation of desert sand dunes in the south-west U.S.A. Mich`ele L. Clarke* & Helen M. Rendell *Department of Geography, University College London, 26 Bedford

Clarke, Michèle

419

Mechanical properties of sand, silt, and clay containing tetrahydrofuran hydrate  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to large strains has relevance for the stability of the seafloor and submarine slopes, drilling and coring operations, and the analysis of certain small-strain properties of these sediments (for example, seismic velocities). This study reports on the results of comprehensive axial compression triaxial tests conducted at up to 1 MPa confining pressure on sand, crushed silt, precipitated silt, and clay specimens with closely controlled concentrations of synthetic hydrate. The results show that the stress-strain behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments is a complex function of particle size, confining pressure, and hydrate concentration. The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments at low hydrate concentration (probably 50% of pore space), the behavior becomes more independent of stress because the hydrates control both stiffness and strength and possibly the dilative tendency of sediments by effectively increasing interparticle coordination, cementing particles together, and filling the pore space. The cementation contribution to the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments decreases with increasing specific surface of soil minerals. The lower the effective confining stress, the greater the impact of hydrate formation on normalized strength.

Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, C.J.; Ruppel, C.

2007-01-01

420

Pattern selection and evolution for vortex ripples in sand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vortex ripples are a familiar occurrence in coastal waters, where the waves expose the sand surface at the sea bottom to an oscillatory flow. The name reflects the important role of the separation vortices that form on the lee side of the ripples in stabilizing the ripple slopes. In this talk recent laboratory experiments on vortex ripple formation in a one-dimensional annular geometry will be discussed, and a simple mass transfer model will be presented which captures some aspects of the wavelength selection and coarsening mechanisms. The key ingredient in the model is a transfer function, which describes the amount of mass eroded by a ripple from its downstream neighbor during one-half of the oscillation period. Using nonlinear data analysis, the transfer function can be determined from experimental runs, and the predictions of the mass transfer model can be compared to the experiment [1]. Theoretical issues of interest concern the determination of the selected wavelength from the shape of the transfer function [2] and the coarsening of the mean wavelength for transfer functions which are monotonically increasing [3]. [1] K.H. Andersen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 234302 (2002). [2] J. Krug, Adv. Complex Systems 4, 353 (2001). [3] E.K.O. Helln and J. Krug, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011304 (2002).

Andersen, K. H.; Abel, M.; Krug, J.; Ellegaard, C.; Hellen, E. K. O.; Soendergaard, L. R.; Udesen, J.

2003-03-01

421

The effect of temperature on a variable permeability, two-stage sand consolidation technique  

E-print Network

-STAGE, SAND CONSOLIDATION TREATMENTS Page 15 17 17 17 21 27 INTRODUCTION Sand production from unconsolidated formations in oil and gas wells has been a major problem in the petroleum industry for many years. Sand production may result in reduced...-STAGE, SAND CONSOLIDATION TREATMENTS Page 15 17 17 17 21 27 INTRODUCTION Sand production from unconsolidated formations in oil and gas wells has been a major problem in the petroleum industry for many years. Sand production may result in reduced...

Barger, Blane Rene

2012-06-07

422

Have the northwest Negev dunefield sands reddened since their deposition?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sand grain coating redness has been extensively both in coastal and inland desert dunes. In Israel, sand redness has been quantified by calculating a spectral redness index (RI) using single RGB bands (RI= R2/(B*G3)) from reflectance spectroscopy. The RI values have been correlated to ferric oxide mass that was dissolved from sand grain coatings (Ben Dor et al., 2006; Tsoar et al., 2008). Five main requirements have been proposed to enhance sand grain reddening: iron source from the weathering of iron-bearing minerals originating from parent rock or aeolian dust, minimum moisture content, oxidizing interstitial conditions, sediment stability and time. Thus, as many researches have suggested, when the source factors and climatic conditions are homogenous, redder sands indicate increased maturity. The northwest Negev dunefield has been classified by Tsoar et al. (2008) into 3 incursion units based upon contouring a grid of RI values for surface sand samples. The central incursion unit has been suggested to be younger due to relatively lower RI values that decrease to the east. This work tests the relationship between RI values and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of aeolian sand sampled from the near surface down to dune substrate throughout the NW Negev dunefield. Room-dried sand samples were measured in the laboratory with an ASD FieldSpec spectrometer and RI was calculated. Dune sections have been found to usually have similar RI values throughout their vertical profile despite OSL ages ranging between recent and Late Pleistocene. Along a W-E transect, RI values also tend to be similar. The central (Haluzza) part of the dunefield exhibits significantly lower RI values than RI of sands south of the Qeren Ridge. Dune base OSL ages possibly representing burial/stabilization of an initial incursion are slightly more mature in the south and may be evidence of the earliest dune incursion into the Negev. Thus the increased redness may be attributed to an older sand source but not to reddening in situ with time. Remotely sensed RI calculated from Landsat TM 5 (30 m pixel) RGB bands of bare Sinai sands also portrays the spatial RI difference between the central and southern sands. To summarize, we find no direct connection between dune sand deposition age and sand grain coating redness in the Negev dunes. It seems that stable aeolian sand and dune sections in the Negev have not reddened since their deposition. Sand grain coating redness was probably inherited during an earlier diagenetic stage in an environment different than today's. References Ben-Dor, E., Levin, N., Singer, A., Karnieli, A., Braun, O. & Kidron, G.J., 2006. Quantitative mapping of the soil rubification process on sand dunes using an airborne hyperspectral sensor. Geoderma, 131:1-21. Tsoar, H., Wenkart, R. & Blumberg, D.G., 2008. Formation and geomorphology of the north-western Negev sand dunes. In (Breckle, S.W., Yair, A.& Veste, M.) eds., Arid dunes ecosystems: The Nizzana sands in the Negev Desert. Springer pub. 475 pp.

Roskin, Joel; Tsoar, Haim; Blumberg, Dan G.; Porat, Naomi; Rozensten, Ofer

2010-05-01

423

White Light and Colored Light  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the subtractive nature of white light in this Moveable Museum unit. It contains two procedures in which students "take apart" white light and then "put it back together again." The six-page PDF guide includes suggested general background readings for educators, activity notes, step-by-step directions, an easy-to-assemble color wheel, and information about where to obtain supplies. Students use special glasses to see that white light is made up of all the colors of the rainbow and then create a colorful top and spin it to see how the different colors blend into white.

424

The Achievement Gap between White and Non-White Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Collection contains three seminal modules by Authors Ana Rojas-LeBouef and John R. Slate, professors and researchers from Sam Houston State University in Texas. They are nationally recognized scholars in the area of the academic inequity between White and Non-White students. This paper is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1--The

Rojas-LeBouef, Ana; Slate, John R.

2012-01-01

425

Shades of white: an examination of whiteness in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apart from millennium concerns about what it means to be English, 'whiteness' has largely escaped examination, particularly in the leisure literature. Where 'black' people have been seen as the significant other in British sport, 'whiteness' could be seen as the 'silent' other. This paper begins to redress this by drawing on the experience of a suite of studies conducted by

Jonathan Long; Kevin Hylton

2002-01-01

426

Adsorption of Mn2+ from aqueous solution using Fe and Mn oxide-coated sand.  

PubMed

The adsorption of Mn2+ onto immobilized Mn-oxide and Fe-oxide adsorbent such as manganese oxide-coated sandl (MOCS1), manganese oxide-coated sand2 (MOCS2), iron oxide-coated sand2 (IOCS2), and manganese and iron oxide-coated sand (MIOCS) was investigated. The effects of pH (5.5 to 8.0) and temperature (25 to 45 degrees C) on the equilibrium capacity were examined. Equilibrium studies showed that there is a good fit with both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm, which indicates surface heterogeneity and monolayer adsorption of the adsorbents. Kinetic data showed high correlation with the pseudo second-order model, which signifies a chemisorption-controlled mechanism. The activation energies, activation parameters (deltaG, deltaH, deltaS), and thermodynamic parameters (deltaG0, deltaH0, deltaS0) confirmed that adsorption with MIOCS was endothermic and more spontaneous at higher temperature while an opposite trend was observed for the other adsorbents. Thermodynamic studies showed that adsorption involved formation of activated complex, where MOCS 1 and MIOCS follow a physical-chemical mechanism, while MOCS2 and IOCS2 follows purely chemical mechanism. PMID:24218863

Kan, Chi-Chuan; Aganon, Mannie C; Futalan, Cybelle Morales; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P

2013-07-01

427

Pyrolysis of foundry sand resins: a determination of organic products by mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) was used to identify the major organic products produced by pyrolysis of three foundry sand resins: (i) Novolac and (ii) phenolic urethane (PU) (both phenol-formaldehyde based resins) and (iii) furan (furfuryl alcohol based resin). These resins are used in the metal casting industry as a "sand binder" for making cores (used to produce cavities in molds) and molds for nonferrous castings. During the casting process, the cores and molds are subjected to intense heat from the molten metal. As a result, the organic resins undergo thermal decomposition and produce a number of complex organic compounds. In this study, the organics were tentatively identified by MS after pyrolysis of the resins at 750 degrees C. The major thermal decomposition products from the Novolac, PU, and furan resins were derivatives of phenol, benzene, and furan, respectively. Compounds identified that are of potential environmental concern were benzene, toluene, phenol, o- and p-xylene, o- and m-cresol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Pyrolysis of the Novolac resin resulted in the generation of the most compounds of environmental concern. Because there is interest in beneficially using foundry molding sands in manufactured soils and other agricultural products, it is necessary that organic thermal decomposition products be identified to ensure environmental protection. PMID:15991723

Dungan, Robert S; Reeves, James B

2005-01-01

428

Luminescence chronology of the inland sand dunes from SE India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Records of past climate changes have been preserved variously on the earth's surface. Sand dunes are one such prominent imprint, and it is suggested that their presence is an indicator of periods of transition from arid to less arid phases. We report inland sand dunes from Andhra Pradesh (SE India) spread over an area of ~ 500 km2, ~ 75 km inland from the east coast. The dune sands are examined to understand their provenance, transportation, timing of sand aggradation and their relationship to past climates. The dune distribution, grain morphology and the grain-size studies on sands suggest an aeolian origin. Physiography of the study area, heavy mineral assemblage, and abundance of quartz in the parent rocks indicate that the dune sands are largely derived from first-order streams emanating from hills in the region and from weathering of the Nellore schist belt. It appears that the geomorphology and wind direction pattern both facilitated and restricted the dune aggradation and preservation to a limited area. OSL dating of 47 dune samples ranged from the present to ~ 50 ka, thereby suggesting a long duration of sand-dune aggradation and/or reworking history.

Reddy, Dontireddy Venkat; Singaraju, Vuddaraju; Mishra, Rakesh; Kumar, Devender; Thomas, Puthusserry Joseph; Rao, Karra Kameshwa; Singhvi, Ashok Kumar

2013-09-01

429

Age and dynamics of the Namib Sand Sea: A review of chronological evidence and possible landscape development models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Namib Sand Sea constitutes a major physiographic feature of the Namib Desert on the west of Namibia, covering a 50-160 km wide region of the coast between Lderitz and Walvis Bay. It is widely considered to be one of the oldest desert regions, with a Tertiary-aged fossil desert underlying the modern sand sea. The sand sea has been well studied, benefiting from the presence of the Gobabeb Training and Research Centre during the past 50 years. Whilst much is understood about its sediments and geomorphology, it is only recently that new chronological information, using cosmogenic-nuclide burial dating and optically stimulated luminescence dating have offered new insights, and this calls for an updated review of the age and landscape development of the sand sea. This assessment of the geomorphological and Quaternary dynamics of the region is complemented by developments in the description and analysis of sediment composition. New age control from cosmogenic dating indicates that the sand sea is in excess of a million years old. Initial data from luminescence dating yields depositional ages for dune sediments from three broad areas of the sand sea that include MIS 5, later in the Pleistocene around the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene, although it is not expected that these will be the only, or discrete age groupings. Detailed dating and application of ground penetrating radar in the far northern reaches reveals extensive dune migration and deposition during the Holocene. It is important to stress that the upper limit of luminescence dating here is about 200 ka (depending on the environmental dose rate of the site) and that migration and reworking of dunes resets the luminescence signal (so what is recorded is(are) the last phase(s) of preserved sediment accumulation). Whilst there are three potential sources of material for the Namib Sand Sea (reworked Tsondab Sandstone (TSS), material from the Great Escarpment derived by rivers and water and wind-derived material from the Orange River delta) the weight of evidence points towards the dominance of an Orange River source, with localised contribution from fluvially-derived escarpment material close to river courses. Despite the fact that it remains difficult to definitively distinguish between recent Orange River sediment and recycled TSS, because of a great mineralogical similarity, an Orange River source contemporaneous with the accumulation of the sand sea appears to be favoured. Models of landscape development rely on an understanding of the source region, and an Orange River source suggests growth and extension from south to north (a wind-displaced Orange Delta), rather than localised reworking of sediment from the TSS. One proposed model, developed for the southern part of the sand sea, divides accumulation into two distinct phases with different palaeoenvironmental conditions: large draas accumulating under enhanced Pleistocene trade winds and superimposed features on the eastern dune flanks formed by westerly winds moving material over the crest. However, the latter phase could equally be explained by a northerly migration of the superimposed features, and there is still too little in the way of chronological control to construct a coherent picture of dune accumulation and migration for the sand sea as a whole. There are also interesting insights from conceptualising dune bedform patterning in sand seas as a time-dependent, self-organising, complex system, rather than necessarily requiring changing palaeoenvironmental conditions for different scales of features, with some of this research referring directly to the Namib Sand Sea. Refining the details of the accumulation of the Namib Sand Sea requires both detailed site-specific studies and joined-up analysis.

Stone, A. E. C.

2013-06-01

430

Depositional settings of sand beaches along whitewater rivers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The numbers and sizes of sand beaches suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. Beaches found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of beach size. Beaches located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and beaches there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of beaches is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most beaches (1.2 beaches km-1). Emergent sand beaches are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand beaches are fairly common (0.8-1.1 beaches km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 beaches km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study re