Sample records for whole-body vibration training

  1. Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

    2007-01-01

    ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 10, pp. 1794-1800, 2007. Purpose: Excessive, chronic whole-body vibration (WBV) has a number of negative side effects on the human body, including disorders of

  2. Whole Body Vibration Training - Improving Balance Control and Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Kramer, Andreas; Bernhardt, Sascha; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and “control” groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p?=?0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p?=?0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p?=?0.25 and CON ±0%, p?=?0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV. PMID:24587114

  3. Effects of whole-body vibration training on sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgos Paradisis; Elias Zacharogiannis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole body vibration (WBV) training on sprint running kine- matics and explosive strength performance. Twenty-four volun- teers (12 women and 12 men) participated in the study and were randomised (n = 12) into the experimental and control groups. The WBV group performed a 6-wk program (16-30

  4. Strength Training with Superimposed Whole Body Vibration Does Not Preferentially Modulate Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Weier, Ashleigh T.; Kidgell, Dawson J.

    2012-01-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate 4?wks of leg strength training with and without whole body vibration (WBV) on corticospinal excitability and short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI). Participants (n = 12) were randomly allocated to either a control or experimental (WBV) group. All participants completed 12 squat training sessions either with (WBV group) or without (control group) exposure to WBV (f = 35?Hz, A = 2.5?mm). There were significant (P < 0.05) increases in squat strength and corticospinal excitability and significant (P < 0.05) reductions in SICI for both groups following the 4?wk intervention. There were no differences detected between groups for any dependant variable (P > 0.05). It appears that WBV training does not augment the increase in strength or corticospinal excitability induced by strength training alone. PMID:22654645

  5. Effects of whole-body vibration training on fibrinolytic and coagulative factors in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Ghazalian, Farshad; Hakemi, Laleh; Pourkazemi, Lotfali; Akhoond, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim was to evaluate effects of 5-week whole body vibration (WBV) training with different amplitudes and progressive frequencies on fibrinolytic/coagulative factors. Materials and Methods: 25 subjects were divided randomly in high or low-amplitude vibration, and control groups. Training consisted of 5-week WBV with amplitudes 4 or 2 mm. Plasma samples were analyzed before and after training. Statistical analysis was done using one-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed ranked test. P <0.05 was considered significant. Results: High-amplitude vibration caused an increase in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (P = 0.028) (pretest: 1744.61 ± 707.95; posttest: 2313.63 ± 997.19 pg/ml), and decrease in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (P = 0.033) (pretest: 97.94 ± 34.37; posttest: 85.12 ± 36.92 ng/ml). Fibrinogen and plasminogen were not changed significantly. Low-amplitude vibration caused an increase in tPA (P = 0.006) (pretest: 2208.18 ± 1280.37; posttest: 3492.72 ± 3549.22 pg/ml). PAI-1, fibrinogen and plasminogen were not changed significantly. There were no significant differences between groups. Conclusion: Amplitude of vibrations in WBV training may affect fibrinolytic factors. PMID:25538784

  6. Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Resistance Training for Untrained Adults

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yusuke; Oguma, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    Although resistance training (RT) combined with whole-body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular among untrained adults, the additional effects of WBV on muscle fitness are still not well understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of WBV on muscle strength, muscle power, muscle endurance, and neuromuscular activities compared with the identical RT without WBV. Thirty-three individuals (6 males and 27 females; 22-49 years old) were randomly assigned to a training program using slow-velocity RT coupled with WBV (RT- WBV group, n = 17) or an identical exercise program without WBV (RT group, n = 16). Participants performed eight exercises per 60 min session on a vibration platform (RT-WBV group, frequency, 35 Hz; amplitude, 2 mm) twice weekly for seven weeks. To evaluate the effects of WBV, the maximal isometric and isokinetic knee extension strength, maximal isometric lumbar extension strength, countermovement-jump, and the number of sit-ups were measured before and after the trial. Significantly higher increases were observed in the maximal isometric and concentric knee extension strength (p = 0.02, p = 0.04 , respectively), and maximal isometric lumbar extension strength at 60 degrees of trunk flexion (p = 0.02) in the RT-WBV group (+36.8%, +38.4%, +26.4%, respectively) in comparison to the RT group (+16.5%, +12.8%, +14.3%, respectively). A significant difference was also observed between the RT-WBV group (+8.4%) and the RT group (+4.7%) in the countermovement jump height (p = 0.02). In conclusion, the results suggest that significant additional increases in maximal isometric and concentric knee extension and lumbar extension strength, and countermovement jump height can be achieved by incorporating WBV into a slow-velocity RT program during the initial stage of regular RT in untrained healthy adults. Key points A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of slow velocity resistance training combined with whole-body vibration on maximal muscle strength, power, muscle endurance, and neuromuscular activities in healthy untrained individuals. Resistance training program for lower extremities and trunk muscles were performed twice weekly for 7 weeks. A 7 weeks slow velocity resistance training program with whole-body vibration significantly increased maximal isometric knee extension and lumbar extension strength and power in healthy untrained individuals. PMID:24149879

  7. The acute effect of whole body vibration training on flexibility and explosive strength of young gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Dallas, G; Kirialanis, P; Mellos, V

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of a single bout of whole body vibration (WBV) on flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young artistic gymnasts. Thirty-two young competitive gymnasts volunteered to participate in this study, and were allocated to either the vibration group or traditional body weight training according to the vibration protocol. The vibration intervention consisted of a single bout of eccentric and concentric squatting movements on a vibration platform that was turned on (vibration group: VG n = 15), whereas the traditional body weight (no vibration) group performed the same training protocol with the WBV device turned off (NVG: n= 17). Flexibility (sit and reach test) and explosive strength tests [squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ), and single leg squat (right leg (RL) and left leg (LL))] were performed initially (pre-test), immediately after the intervention (post-test 1), and 15 minutes after the end of the intervention programme (post-test 15). Four 2x3 ANOVAs were used to examine the interaction between group (VG vs NVG) and time (pre, post 1, and post 15) with respect to examined variables. The results revealed that a significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to SJ (p < 0.05). However, no significant interaction between group and time was found with respect to flexibility, CMJ, RL and LL after the end of the intervention programme (p > 0.05). Further, the percentage improvement of the VG was significantly greater in all examined variables compared to the NVG. This study concluded that WBV training improves flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in young trained artistic gymnasts and maintains the initial level of performance for at least 15 minutes after the WBV intervention programme. PMID:25177103

  8. Benefits of whole body vibration training in patients hospitalised for COPD exacerbations - a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with stable COPD show improvements in exercise capacity and muscular function after the application of whole body vibration. We aimed to evaluate whether this modality added to conventional physiotherapy in exacerbated hospitalised COPD patients would be safe and would improve exercise capacity and quality of life. Methods 49 hospitalised exacerbated COPD patients were randomized (1:1) to undergo physiotherapy alone or physiotherapy with the addition of whole body vibration. The primary endpoint was the between-group difference of the 6-minute walking test (day of discharge – day of admission). Secondary assessments included chair rising test, quality of life, and serum marker analysis. Results Whole body vibration did not cause procedure-related adverse events. Compared to physiotherapy alone, it led to significantly stronger improvements in 6-minute walking test (95.55?±?76.29 m vs. 6.13?±?81.65 m; p?=?0.007) and St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (-6.43?±?14.25 vs. 5.59?±?19.15, p?=?0.049). Whole body vibration increased the expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1-? and serum levels of irisin, while it decreased serum interleukin-8. Conclusion Whole body vibration during hospitalised exacerbations did not cause procedure-related adverse events and induced clinically significant benefits regarding exercise capacity and health-related quality of life that were associated with increased serum levels of irisin, a marker of muscle activity. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005979. Registered 17 March 2014. PMID:24725369

  9. Effects of adding whole body vibration to squat training on isometric force/time characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Hugh S; Cramer, Joel T; Bemben, Debra A; Shehab, Randa L; Anderson, Mark A; Bemben, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Resistance training interventions aimed at increasing lower-body power and rates of force development have produced varying results. Recent studies have suggested that whole-body low-frequency vibration (WBLFV) may elicit an acute postactivation potentiation response, leading to acute improvements in power and force development. Potentially, the use of WBLFV between sets of resistance training rather than during training itself may lead to increased recruitment and synchronization of high-threshold motor units, minimize fatigue potential, and facilitate the chronic adaptation to resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of applying TriPlaner, WBLFV, prior to and then intermittently between sets of Smith machine squats on short-term adaptations in explosive isometric force expression. Thirty recreationally resistance trained men aged 18-30 were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: resistance training only (SQT, n = 11), resistance plus whole-body vibration (SQTV, n = 13), or active control (CON, n = 6). An isometric squat test was performed prior to and following a 6-week periodized Smith machine squat program. Whole-body low-frequency vibration was applied 180 seconds prior to the first work set (50 Hz, 2-4 mm, 30 seconds) and intermittently (50 Hz, 4-6 mm, 3 x 10 seconds, 60 seconds between exposures) within a 240-second interset rest period. Subjects were instructed to assume a quarter squat posture while positioning their feet directly under their center of mass, which was modified using a handheld goniometer to a knee angle of 135 +/- 5 degrees . Instructions were given to subjects to apply force as fast and as hard as possible for 3.5 seconds. Isometric force (N) and rates of force development (N.s(-1)) were recorded from the onset of contraction (F(0)) to time points corresponding to 30, 50, 80, 100, 150, and 250 milliseconds, as well as the peak isometric rate of force development (PISORFD), and rate of force development to initial peak in force (RFDinitial). Repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance revealed no significant group by trial interactions for isometric rate of force development (ISORFD) between 0-30, 0-50, 0-80, 0-100, 0-150, and 0-250 milliseconds and PISORFD (p > 0.05). A significant group x trial interaction was seen for RFDinitial with SQTV >CG (p = 0.04, mean difference 997.2 N.s(-1)) and SQTV >SQT (p = 0.04, mean difference 1,994.22 N.s(-1)). Significant trial by covariate interactions (week one measures for ISORFD) and main effects for trial were observed for ISORFD between 0-80, 0-100, 0-and 150 milliseconds; PISORFD; and RFDinitial (p < 0.01). A significant trial effect was seen for Finitial (%) when expressed as a relative percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (MVC = 100%) (p = 0.015; week 1 > week 7, mean difference, 5.82%). No significant differences were seen for any other force variables from the onset of contraction to MVC between weeks 1 and 7 (p > 0.05). The data suggest that there was a significant benefit afforded by adding WBLFV to a short-term resistance training protocol with regard to "explosive" strength expression. The addition of vibration prior to and between sets of resistance exercise may be a viable alternative to vibration applied during resistance exercise when trying to improve "explosive" isometric strength. PMID:19924007

  10. Effects of Whole-body Vibration Training on Sprint Running Kinematics and Explosive Strength Performance

    PubMed Central

    Giorgos, Paradisis; Elias, Zacharogiannis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole body vibration (WBV) training on sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Twenty-four volunteers (12 women and 12 men) participated in the study and were randomised (n = 12) into the experimental and control groups. The WBV group performed a 6-wk program (16-30 min·d-1, 3 times a week) on a vibration platform. The amplitude of the vibration platform was 2.5 mm and the acceleration was 2.28 g. The control group did not participate in any training. Tests were performed Pre and post the training period. Sprint running performance was measured during a 60 m sprint where running time, running speed, step length and step rate were calculated. Explosive strength performance was measured during a counter movement jump (CMJ) test, where jump height and total number of jumps performed in a period of 30 s (30CVJT). Performance in 10 m, 20 m, 40 m, 50 m and 60 m improved significantly after 6 wk of WBV training with an overall improvement of 2.7%. The step length and running speed improved by 5.1% and 3.6%, and the step rate decreased by 3.4%. The countermovement jump height increased by 3.3%, and the explosive strength endurance improved overall by 7.8%. The WBV training period of 6 wk produced significant changes in sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Key pointsWBV training.Sprint running kinematics.Explosive strength performance PMID:24149223

  11. Whole body vibration added to endurance training in obese women - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilms, B; Frick, J; Ernst, B; Mueller, R; Wirth, B; Schultes, B

    2012-09-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) training is an increasingly popular training method that is strongly promoted for weight loss, but scientific data on its effectiveness, particularly in obese subjects, are sparse. 14 obese women (BMI: 37.4 ± 1.3 kg/m2) randomized to 2 different groups (each n=7) participated in a 6-week endurance training program that was either combined or not combined with additional WBV training. Anthropometric measures, phase angle and body composition (assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis; BIA), and resting energy expenditure (REE) were obtained before and after the training program. Body weight did not change during the training period (P=0.87), but waist circumference decreased in both groups (P=0.007; WBV: -3.4 ± 1.4 cm; no-WBV: -1.7 ± 0.7 cm) independent of WBV training (P=0.29 for group×time interaction). BIA revealed an enhancing effect of WBV training in comparison to no-WBV training on the phase angle (+0.20 ± 0.12° vs. -0.19 ± 0.12°; P=0.04) and calculated body cell mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 vs. -0.3 ± 0.4 kg; P=0.02), while calculated percentage fat mass decreased in both conditions (P=0.05) to similar extent (P=0.59; WBV: -0.8 ± 0.2%; no-WBV: -0.4 ± 0.5%). REE increased across the training (P=0.01; WBV: +77 ± 33 kcal/24 h; no-WBV: +68 ± 34 kcal/24 h), with this increase again not depending on WBV condition (P=0.85). Results of our pilot study in obese women provide preliminary evidence for a beneficial effect of WBV, when added to endurance training, on the bioelectrical phase angle, an increasingly recognized marker of individual's health status. PMID:22562734

  12. Long-term effect of whole body vibration training on jump height: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Manimmanakorn, Nuttaset; Hamlin, Michael J; Ross, Jenny J; Manimmanakorn, Apiwan

    2014-06-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) is widely promoted as a means of improving muscle strength, but the evidence of a performance benefit is unclear with some reporting improvements and others finding none. The objective of this study was to analyze the current evidence for the effectiveness of WBV on jump height. We included randomized controlled trials or matched design studies comparing the effect of WBV training on countermovement and squat jump (SJ) height, which were gathered from MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, Sciencedirect, Proquest, Scopus, Google Scholar, and SPORTDiscus databases. The overall effect of WBV training (from the 15 studies included) compared with having no additional exercise on countermovement jump height yielded a positive standardized mean difference of 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.99). The effect of WBV training on SJ height was 0.68 (0.08-1.11). Vibration exercise consisting of a higher frequency (>30 Hz, 0.86, 0.62-1.10), higher amplitude (>3 mm, 0.84, 0.52-1.17), longer exposure duration (>10 minutes per session, 0.92, 0.48-1.36), longer training period (>12 weeks, 0.87, 0.56-1.19) and among nonathletes (0.96, 0.63-1.30) had greater benefit for jump height improvement than a lower frequency (? 30 Hz, 0.56, 0.13-0.99), lower amplitude (? 3 mm, 0.66, 0.35-0.98), shorter exposure duration (? 10 minutes per session, 0.68, 0.45-0.92), intermediate training period (4-12 weeks, 0.72, 0.35-1.09), shorter training period (<4 weeks, 0.58, -0.08 to -1.23) and in athletes (0.59, 0.31-0.88). The effect of WBV training compared with a standard cardiovascular-type exercise group from 4 studies was 0.63 (0.10-1.15). In conclusion, WBV training produces a moderate-to-large effect on jump height. Vibration training protocols with higher frequencies, higher amplitudes, longer exposures per session, and longer training periods are more likely to enhance muscle power. PMID:24276295

  13. Stochastic Resonance Whole-Body Vibration, Musculoskeletal Symptoms, and Body Balance: A Worksite Training Study

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Arnold, Sibille; Schade, Volker; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Background Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training (SR-WBV) was tested to reduce work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Methods Participants were 54 white-collar employees of a Swiss organization. The controlled crossover design comprised two groups each given 4 weeks of exercise and no training during a second 4-week period. Outcome was daily musculoskeletal well-being, musculoskeletal pain, and surefootedness. In addition, participants performed a behavioral test on body balance prior to when SR-WBV started and after 4 weeks of SR-WBV. Results Across the 4-week training period, musculoskeletal well-being and surefootedness were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas musculoskeletal pain was significantly reduced only in those who reported low back pain during the last 4 weeks prior to the study (p < 0.05). Body balance was significantly increased by SR-WBV (p < 0.05). Conclusion SR-WBV seems to be an efficient option in primary prevention of musculoskeletal complaints and falls at work. PMID:24106645

  14. Effects of whole body vibration training on balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villarroya, M Adoración; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Moros, Teresa; Gómez-Trullén, Eva; Casajús, José A

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether a whole body vibration training program (WBV) is able to improve static standing balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescents with DS aged 11-20 years (DSG) and 27 adolescent, age/sex matched, without DS (CG) joined the study. Participants of each group were divided into two comparable groups, those who performed WVB (in DSG: VDSG; in CG: VCG) and those who did not perform WVB (in DSG: nVDSG; in CG: nVCG). Static-standing-balance under four conditions (C1: open-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C2: closed-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C3: open-eyes/compliant-foot-support; C4: closed-eyes/compliant-foot-support) was examine, before and after a 20-week WBV training program. For balance study, Postural-Parameters (PPs), based on center of pressure (COP) oscillations (anterior/posterior and medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity), and PPs ratios among the four conditions were calculated. After WBV training, no significant differences were found in any parameter in the VCG and nVCG and neither in the nVDSG, but there was a decrease of mean values in the analyzed PPs under C4, with significant differences in medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity, and a significant decrease in the ratio C4/C1 of the mean velocity in VDSG. Therefore, WBV training had positive effects in the balance of DS adolescents although only under specific conditions, with vision and somatosensory input altered. The positive results of this study are encouraging and open a wide field of research, looking for the most efficient program for this population. PMID:23872530

  15. Whole-Body Vibration Training Effect on Physical Performance and Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chung, Yi-Hsiu; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the beneficial effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on exercise performance, physical fatigue and obesity in mice with obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: normal group (n=6), fed standard diet (control), and experimental group (n=18), fed a HFD. After 4-week induction, followed by 6-week WBV of 5 days per week, the 18 obese mice were divided into 3 groups (n=6 per group): HFD with sedentary control (HFD), HFD with WBV at relatively low-intensity (5.6 Hz, 0.13 g) (HFD+VL) or high-intensity (13 Hz, 0.68 g) (HFD+VH). A trend analysis revealed that WBV increased the grip strength in mice. WBV also dose-dependently decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels and increased glucose level after the swimming test. WBV slightly decreased final body weight and dose-dependently decreased weights of epididymal, retroperitoneal and perirenal fat pads and fasting serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, CK, glucose, total cholesterol and triacylglycerol. Therefore, WBV could improve exercise performance and fatigue and prevent fat accumulation and obesity-associated biochemical alterations in obese mice. It may be an effective intervention for health promotion and prevention of HFD-induced obesity. PMID:25317067

  16. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training for chair rising performance on untrained elderly: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Slavko; Hilfiker, Roger; Schmid, Stefan; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The present randomized controlled pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the study protocol and the effects of four-week-long sessions involving stochastic resonance whole-body vibration (SR-WBV) training on chair rising in elderly individuals. Twenty elderly participants were divided into a SR-WBV group or a sham group. Peak force, rate of force development, rising time, time to stabilization and total time during chair rising performance were investigated. Intraclass correlation coefficients, Mann-Whitney U-tests and Wilcoxon signed-ranked tests were used. Low volume SR-WBV over 12 training sessions might provide a safe treatment method. PMID:22425243

  17. Effects of whole-body vibration training on explosive strength and postural control in young female athletes.

    PubMed

    Fort, Azahara; Romero, Daniel; Bagur, Caritat; Guerra, Myriam

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a whole-body vibration training program to improve neuromuscular performance in young elite female athletes. Twenty-three women basketball players (14-18 years old) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, n = 11) or to a whole-body vibration group (WBVG, n = 12). During the study period, both groups continued their usual training program, but the WBVG also underwent a 15-week vibration training program. We analyzed the countermovement jump test (CMJ), the 1-leg hop test for the right leg and for the left leg, and the single-limb standing balance for both legs and with eyes open and closed at 3 time points: before training (T1), after an 8-week training period (T2), and after a further 7-week training period (T3). Compared with the CG, CMJ increased significantly in the WBVG from T1 to T2 (6.47%, p < 0.001), T1 to T3 (10.07%, p = 0.005), and T2 to T3 (3.38%, p < 0.001). One-leg hop test for the right and left legs also showed significantly higher values in WBVG from T1 to T2 (10.12%, p < 0.001 and 9.63%, p = 0.002, respectively) and T1 to T3 (14.17%, p = 0.001 and 15.17%, p = 0.004, respectively). Lateral deviation of the center of pressure in the closed eyes test decreased significantly in WBVG for both right and left leg, from T1 to T2 (-22.20%, p = 0.043 and -34.77%, p < 0.001, respectively) and from T1 to T3 (-33.14%, p = 0.027 and -33.58%, p = 0.043, respectively) compared with the CG. In conclusion, our results show that a 15-week whole-body vibration training program improves explosive strength and postural stability in adolescent female basketball players. PMID:22446665

  18. Effects of Eight Months of Whole-Body Vibration Training on the Muscle Mass and Functional Capacity of Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Rey-López, Juan P; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Cristi-Montero, Carlos S; Garatachea Vallejo, Nuria

    2015-07-01

    Santin-Medeiros, F, Rey-López, JP, Santos-Lozano A, Cristi-Montero, CS, and Garatachea Vallejo, N. Effects of eight months of whole-body vibration training on the muscle mass and functional capacity of elderly women. J Strength Cond Res 29(7): 1863-1869, 2015-Few intervention studies have used whole-body vibration (WBV) training in the elderly, and there is inconclusive evidence about its health benefits. We examined the effect of 8 months of WBV training on muscle mass and functional capacity in elderly women. A total of 37 women (aged 82.4 ± 5.7 years) voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a vibration group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 18). The vibration group trained on a vertical vibration platform twice a week. The control group was requested not to change their habitual lifestyle. The quadriceps femoris muscle cross-sectional area was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. All participants were evaluated by a battery of tests (Senior Fitness Test) to determine their functional capacity, as well as handgrip strength and balance/gait. General linear repeated-measure analysis of variance (group by time) was performed to examine the effect of the intervention on the outcomes variables. After 8 months, nonstatistically significant differences in the quadriceps CSA (pre-training: 8,516.16 ± 1,271.78 mm and post-training: 8,671.63 ± 1,389.03 mm) (p > 0.05) were found in the WBV group (Cohen's d: -0.12), whereas the CON group significantly decreased muscle mass (pre-training: 9,756.18 ± 1,420.07 mm and post-training: 9,326.82 ± 1,577.53 mm), with moderate effect size evident (Cohen's d: 0.29). In both groups, no changes were observed in the functional capacity, handgrip strength and balance/gait. The WBV training could prevent the loss of quadriceps CSA in elderly women. PMID:26102257

  19. Impact of Whole-Body Vibration Training Versus Fitness Training on Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Men: A 1Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    An Bogaerts; Christophe Delecluse; Albrecht L. Claessens; Walter Coudyzer; Steven Boonen; Sabine M. P. Verschueren

    2007-01-01

    Background. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 1-year whole-body vibration (WBV) training on isometric and explosive muscle strength and muscle mass in community-dwelling men older than 60 years. Methods. Muscle characteristics of the WBV group (n ¼31, 67.3 6 0.7 years) were compared with those of a fitness (FIT) group (n ¼ 30, 67.4 6 0.8 years) and

  20. Acute effect of whole body vibration on isometric strength, squat jump, and flexibility in well-trained combat athletes.

    PubMed

    Kurt, C; Pekünlü, E

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on maximal strength, squat jump, and flexibility of well-trained combat athletes. Twelve female and 8 male combat athletes (age: 22.8 ± 3.1 years, mass: 65.4 ± 10.7 kg, height: 168.8 ± 8.8 cm, training experience: 11.6 ± 4.7 years, training volume: 9.3 ± 2.8 hours/week) participated in this study. The study consisted of three sessions separated by 48 hours. The first session was conducted for familiarization. In the subsequent two sessions, participants performed WBV or sham intervention in a randomized, balanced order. During WBV intervention, four isometric exercises were performed (26 Hz, 4 mm). During the sham intervention, participants performed the same WBV intervention without vibration treatment (0 Hz, 0 mm). Hand grip, squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength tests were performed after each intervention. The results of a two-factor (pre-post[2] × intervention[2]) repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.018) of pre-post × intervention only for the hand grip test, indicating a significant performance increase of moderate effect (net increase of 2.48%, d = 0.61) after WBV intervention. Squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength performances were not affected by WBV. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study potentiated hand grip performance, but did not enhance squat jump, trunk flexion, or isometric leg strength in well-trained combat athletes. PMID:26060334

  1. Acute effect of whole body vibration on isometric strength, squat jump, and flexibility in well-trained combat athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pekünlü, E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on maximal strength, squat jump, and flexibility of well-trained combat athletes. Twelve female and 8 male combat athletes (age: 22.8 ± 3.1 years, mass: 65.4 ± 10.7 kg, height: 168.8 ± 8.8 cm, training experience: 11.6 ± 4.7 years, training volume: 9.3 ± 2.8 hours/week) participated in this study. The study consisted of three sessions separated by 48 hours. The first session was conducted for familiarization. In the subsequent two sessions, participants performed WBV or sham intervention in a randomized, balanced order. During WBV intervention, four isometric exercises were performed (26 Hz, 4 mm). During the sham intervention, participants performed the same WBV intervention without vibration treatment (0 Hz, 0 mm). Hand grip, squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength tests were performed after each intervention. The results of a two-factor (pre-post[2] × intervention[2]) repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.018) of pre-post × intervention only for the hand grip test, indicating a significant performance increase of moderate effect (net increase of 2.48%, d = 0.61) after WBV intervention. Squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength performances were not affected by WBV. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study potentiated hand grip performance, but did not enhance squat jump, trunk flexion, or isometric leg strength in well-trained combat athletes. PMID:26060334

  2. Effect of standing posture during whole body vibration training on muscle morphology and function in older adults: A randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica Mikhael; Rhonda Orr; Fleur Amsen; David Greene; Maria A Fiatarone Singh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whole body vibration (WBV) is a novel modality of exercise shown to improve musculoskeletal function. This study aims to examine the effects of standing posture during low magnitude WBV training on muscle function and muscle morphology in older adults. METHODS: Nineteen men and women (50-80 years) were recruited to a three month randomised controlled trial and allocated to one

  3. Reducing whole body vibration in forklift drivers.

    PubMed

    Motmans, R

    2012-01-01

    Forklift drivers in warehouses are often exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) during the total day. There is however an association between working as a forklift operator and the development of low back pain. In this study the exposure to WBV was measured in five forklift drivers who performed a standardised order picking task during 10 minutes. The effect of driving surface (uneven concrete vs. new flat concrete), driving speed (15 km/h vs. 8 km/h) and seat suspension (mechanical suspension vs. air suspension) was investigated. Improving the driving surface was the most effective preventive measure by reducing the whole body vibration with 39%, from 1.14 to 0.69 m/s2. Lowering the speed limit resulted in a reduction of WBV with 26% (1.05 vs. 0.78 m/s2). An air suspension seat was 22% more effective compared to mechanical suspension (1.02 vs. 0.80 m/s2). On uneven concrete an air suspension seat performed even better by reducing the WBV by 29% (1.33 vs. 0.95 m/s2). A combination of a new driving surface, limiting the maximum speed and the introduction of an air suspension seat reduced the whole body vibrations below the action limit of 0.5 m/s2 as mentioned in the European directive. None of the interventions were effective enough on their own. PMID:22317090

  4. Short-term effect of whole-body vibration training on balance, flexibility and lower limb explosive strength in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Despina, Tsopani; George, Dallas; George, Tsiganos; Sotiris, Papouliakos; Alessandra, Di Cagno; George, Korres; Maria, Riga; Stavros, Korres

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether whole-body vibration (WBV) training results in short-term performance improvements in flexibility, strength and balance tests in comparison to an equivalent exercise program performed without vibration. Eleven elite rhythmic gymnasts completed a WBV trial, and a control, resistance training trial without vibration (NWBV). The vibration trial consisted of eccentric and concentric squatting exercises on a vibration platform that was turned on, whereas the NWBV involved the same training protocol with the platform turned off. Balance was assessed using the Rhythmic Weight Shift (RWS) based on the EquiTest Dynamic Posturography system; flexibility was measured using the sit & reach test, and lower limb explosive strength was evaluated using standard exercises (squat jump, counter movement jump, single leg squat). All measurements were performed before (pre) immediately after the training program (post 1), and 15 minutes after the end of the program (post 15). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA was used with condition (WBV-NWBV) as the primary factor and time (pre, post 1, post 15) as the nested within subjects factor, followed by post-hoc pairwise comparison with Bonferroni corrections. Results confirmed the hypothesis of the superiority of WBV training, especially in the post 15 measurement, in all flexibility and strength measures, as well as in a number of balance tests. PMID:24055361

  5. Changes in balance, functional performance and fall risk following whole body vibration training and vitamin D supplementation in institutionalized elderly women. A 6 month randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, An; Delecluse, Christophe; Boonen, Steven; Claessens, Albrecht L; Milisen, Koen; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2011-03-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a growing public health problem. This randomized controlled trial investigated the potential benefit of 6 months of whole body vibration (WBV) training and/or vitamin D supplementation on balance, functionality and estimated fall risk in institutionalized elderly women. A total of 113 women (mean age: 79.6) were randomly assigned to either a WBV or a no-training group, receiving either a conventional dose (880 IU/d) or a high dose (1600 IU/d) of vitamin D3. The WBV group performed exercises on a vibration platform 3×/week. Balance was evaluated by computerized posturography. Functionality was assessed by 10 m walk test, Timed up and Go (TUG) performance and endurance capacity (Shuttle Walk). Fall risk was determined with the Physiological Profile Assessment. Performance on the 10 m walk test and on TUG improved over time in all groups. For none of the parameters, high-dose vitamin D resulted in a better performance than conventional dosing. The improvements in the WBV group in endurance capacity, walking at preferred speed, and TUG were significantly larger than the changes with supplementation alone. No additional benefit of WBV training could be detected on fall risk and postural control, although sway velocity and maximal isometric knee extension strength improved only in the WBV group. This trial showed that a high-dose vitamin D supplementation is not more efficient than conventional dosing in improving functionality in institutionalized elderly. WBV training on top of vitamin D supplementation provided an added benefit with regard to walking, TUG performance, and endurance capacity. PMID:21256028

  6. Potential beneficial effects of whole-body vibration for muscle recovery after exercise.

    PubMed

    Kosar, Angela C; Candow, Darren G; Putland, Jessica T

    2012-10-01

    Whole-body vibration is an emerging strategy used by athletes and exercising individuals to potentially accelerate muscle recovery. The vibration elicits involuntary muscle stretch reflex contractions leading to increased motor unit recruitment and synchronization of synergist muscles, which may lead to greater training adaptations over time. Intense exercise training, especially eccentric muscle contractions, will inevitably lead to muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness, which may interfere with the maintenance of a planned training program. Whole-body vibration before and after exercise shows promise for attenuating muscle soreness and may be considered as an adjunct to traditional therapies (i.e., massage, cryotherapy) to accelerate muscle recovery. PMID:22130390

  7. Wireless Network for Measurement of Whole-Body Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Diogo; Chiaramonte, Marilda S.; Balbinot, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the development of a system integrated to a ZigBee network to measure whole-body vibration. The developed system allows distinguishing human vibrations of almost 400Hz in three axes with acceleration of almost 50g. The tests conducted in the study ensured the correct functioning of the system for the project's purpose.

  8. Acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Zahno, Jasmine; Taeymans, Jan; Blasimann, Angela; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) training to identify possible explanations for preventive effects against musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this quasi-experimental pilot study. Acute physiological and psychological effects of SR-WBV training were examined using electromyography of descending trapezius (TD) muscle, heart rate variability (HRV), different skin parameters (temperature, redness and blood flow) and self-report questionnaires. All subjects conducted a sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (2 Hz with noise level 0) and a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (6 Hz with noise level 4). They were tested before, during and after the training. Conclusions were drawn on the basis of analysis of variance. RESULTS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this study (age = 22.4 ± 2.1 years; body mass index = 21.6 ± 2.2 kg/m2). Muscular activity of the TD and energy expenditure rose during verum SR-WBV compared to baseline and sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). Muscular relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than at baseline and after sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). During verum SR-WBV the levels of HRV were similar to those observed during sham SR-WBV. The same applies for most of the skin characteristics, while microcirculation of the skin of the middle back was higher during verum compared to sham SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Skin redness showed significant changes over the three measurement points only in the middle back area (P = 0.022). There was a significant rise from baseline to verum SR-WBV (0.86 ± 0.25 perfusion units; P = 0.008). The self-reported chronic pain grade indicators of pain, stiffness, well-being, and muscle relaxation showed a mixed pattern across conditions. Muscle and joint stiffness (P = 0.018) and muscular relaxation did significantly change from baseline to different conditions of SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Moreover, muscle relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than after sham SR-WBV (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Verum SR-WBV stimulated musculoskeletal activity in young healthy individuals while cardiovascular activation was low. Training of musculoskeletal capacity and immediate increase in musculoskeletal relaxation are potential mediators of pain reduction in preventive trials. PMID:24147265

  9. Whole-body vibration exposure in sport: four relevant cases.

    PubMed

    Tarabini, Marco; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2014-09-30

    This study investigates the whole-body vibration exposure in kite surfing, alpine skiing, snowboarding and cycling. The vibration exposure was experimentally evaluated following the ISO 2631 guidelines. Results evidenced that the most critical axis is the vertical one. The weighted vibration levels are always larger than 2.5 m/s(2) and the vibration dose values are larger than 25 m/s(1.75). The exposure limit values of the EU directive are reached after 8-37 min depending on the sport. The vibration magnitude is influenced by the athletes' speed, by their skill level and sometimes by the equipment. The large vibration values suggest that the practice of sport activities may be a confounding factor in the aetiology of vibration-related diseases. Practitioner Summary: The vibration exposure in some sports is expected to be large, but has never been quantified in the literature. Results of experiments performed in cycling, alpine and water sports outlined vibration levels exceeding the EU standard limit values. PMID:25267689

  10. 20Hz whole body vibration training fails to counteract the decrease in leg muscle volume caused by 14 days of 6° head down tilt bed rest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jochen Zange; Joachim Mester; Martina Heer; Götz Kluge; Anna-Maria Liphardt

    2009-01-01

    A 6° head down tilt bed rest (HDT) was used to simulate the effects of muscle unloading in space. We tested whether vibration\\u000a training (VT) reduces the decrease in leg muscle volume induced by 14 days HDT. In two study phases eight healthy male subjects\\u000a received both (1) HDT and VT or (2) HDT and a control intervention. Twice daily five

  11. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work. PMID:24806038

  12. Stochastic resonance whole body vibration reduces musculoskeletal pain: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Thomann, Jan; Schade, Volker; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To examined the effects of stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training on musculoskeletal pain in young healthy individuals. METHODS: Participants were 43 undergraduate students of a Swiss University. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomized group allocation. The RCT consisted of two groups each given 12 training sessions during four weeks with either 5 Hz- Training frequency (training condition) or 1.5 Hz Training frequency (control condition). Outcome was current musculoskeletal pain assessed in the evening on each day during the four week training period. RESULTS: Multilevel regression analysis showed musculoskeletal pain was significantly decreased in the training condition whereas there was no change in the control condition (B = -0.023, SE = 0.010, P = 0.021). Decrease in current musculoskeletal pain over four weeks was linear. CONCLUSION: Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration reduced musculoskeletal pain in young healthy individuals. Stochastic resonance vibration and not any other exercise component within training caused pain reduction. PMID:22474630

  13. Guidelines for Whole-Body Vibration Health Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    POPE, M.; MAGNUSSON, M.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; HULSHOF, C.; VERBEEK, J.; BOVENZI, M.

    2002-05-01

    There is strong epidemiological evidence that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. A prototype health surveillance scheme for WBV is presented in this paper. Surveillance is the collection, analysis, and dissemination of data for the purpose of prevention. The aims are to assess health status and diagnose vibration-induced disorders at an early stage, to inform the workers on the potential risk associated with vibration exposure, to give preventive advice to employers and employees and to control whether preventive measures which have been taken, were successful. It is suggested that a pre-placement health examination should be offered to each worker who will be exposed to WBV so as to make the worker aware of the hazards, to obtain baseline health data, and to identify medical conditions that may increase the risk due to WBV. The case history should focus on personal history, work history, and leisure activities involving driving of vehicles. The personal medical history should detail back pain complaints, disorders in the spine, any injuries or surgery to the musculoskeletal system. A physical examination on the lower back should be performed on workers who have experienced LBP symptoms over the past 12 months. The preplacement examination should be followed by periodic health reassessment with a regular interval according to the legislation of the country. It is suggested that periodic medical examination should be made available at least every 2 years to all workers who are exposed to WBV. Any change in vibration exposure at the workplace should be reported by the employer. If an increase in vibration exposure or a change in health status have occurred, the medical re-examination should be offered at shorter intervals at the discretion of the attending physician. There should be a periodic medical examination, which includes recording any change in exposure to WBV. The findings for the individual should be compared with previous examinations. Group data should also be compiled periodically. Medical removal may be considered along with re-placement in working practices without exposure to WBV. This paper presents opinions on health surveillance for whole-body vibration developed within a working group of partners funded on a European Community Network (BIOMED2 concerted action BMH4-CT98-3251: Research network on detection and prevention of injuries due to occupational vibration exposures). The health surveillance protocol and the draft questionnaire with explanation comments are presented for wider consideration by the science community and others before being considered appropriate for implementation.

  14. PAHA study: Psychological Active and Healthy Aging: psychological wellbeing, proactive attitude and happiness effects of whole-body vibration versus Multicomponent Training in aged women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence demonstrates that physical exercise and psychological wellbeing are closely interlinked, particularly in older-aged women. However, research investigating how different forms of exercise influence mental health in older-aged women is underdeveloped. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial (N?=?300) will assess the relative effectiveness of two different exercise programs (whole-body vibration and Multicomponent Training) for improving psychological wellbeing in older-aged women. The following outcomes will be assessed at three time points (that is, pre, post, and follow-up): psychological wellbeing, proactive attitude, quality of life, and happiness. Discussion Results will have important implications for preventing psychological and physiological disease in older-aged women and for managing health-related costs for this population group. Trial registration Number NCT01966562 on Clinical Gov database the 8 October 2013 PMID:24886107

  15. Acute Whole-Body Vibration does not Facilitate Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ella W.; Lau, Cheuk C.; Kwong, Ada P.K.; Sze, Yan M.; Zhang, Wei Y.; Yeung, Simon S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute effect of whole-body vibration (WBV) training may enhance muscular performance via neural potentiation of the stretch reflex. The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute WBV exposure affects the stretch induced knee jerk reflex [onset latency and electromechanical delay (EMD)] and the isokinetic knee extensor peak torque performance. Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group received WBV in a semi-squat position at 30° knee flexion with an amplitude of 0.69 mm, frequency of 45 Hz, and peak acceleration of 27.6 m/s2 for 3 minutes. The control group underwent the same semii-squatting position statically without exposure of WBV. Two-way mixed repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no significant group effects differences on reflex latency of rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL; p = 0.934 and 0.935, respectively) EMD of RF and VL (p = 0.474 and 0.551, respectively) and peak torque production (p = 0.483) measured before and after the WBV. The results of this study indicate that a single session of WBV exposure has no potentiation effect on the stretch induced reflex and peak torque performance in healthy young adults. Key Points There is no acute potentiation of stretch reflex right after whole body vibration. Acute whole body vibration does not improve mus-cle peak torque performance in healthy young adults. PMID:24570602

  16. Masking effects in vertical whole body vibrations C.R. Hernandez and E. Parizet

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Masking effects in vertical whole body vibrations C.R. Hernandez and E. Parizet Laboratoire Vibrations Acoustique INSA Lyon, 25 bis avenue Jean Capelle, Villeurbanne, F-69621 Lyon, France carmen-rosa.hernandez

  17. Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. J. Hulshof; J. H. A. M. Verbeek; I. T. J. Braam; M. Bovenzi; F. J. H. van Dijk

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. Methods: An experimental pretest\\/post-test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services ( OHS) in the experimental group in the use of the programme. OHS in the control group were asked to deliver care as usual. In

  18. [The influence of posture on transmission and absorption of vibration energy in whole body vibration exercise].

    PubMed

    Berschin, G; Sommer, H-M

    2010-03-01

    Muscle exercise using whole body vibration platforms is well known as an alternative physical exercise in therapy as well as in high performance sports. Various studies could show an effectiveness in particular to improve maximal strength and springiness. Using these platforms there is no consideration to posture although the damage potential of vibration stress i. e. on intervertebral discs is well-known. Therefore the effect of posture on the transmission and absorption of vibration loads in bipedal standing was examined in a study with 20 sport students. They were exposed to a whole body vibration load in bipedal standing at a vibration frequency of 25 Hz. The transmission of energy was measured at the head in different postural positions. An average transmission of 9 % was measured in spontaneous bipedal standing. It significantly decreased with gradual changes of posture. After 6 weeks posture conditioning exercise this effect was significantly improved. In conclusion different posture in bipedal standing implies not only different energy absorption but also different effects on muscle performance which can explain the partly inconsistent results after vibration exercise. In addition whole body vibration exercise in a prone or sitting position may increase the risk of overload and should be avoided because of reduced energy absorption capacity. PMID:20229446

  19. Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

    2007-01-01

    ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 9, pp. 1642-1650, 2007. Purpose: Leg muscle strength and power are increased after whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise. These effects may result from increased neuromuscular

  20. Using consumer electronic devices to estimate whole-body vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Rebecca; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The cost and complexity of commercially available devices for measuring whole-body vibration is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard at workplaces. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by use of an accelerometer calibrator, and by collecting 42 simultaneous pairs of measurements from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and one of two gold standard vibration measurement devices (Svantech SV111 [Svantech, Warsaw, Poland] or Brüel & Kjær 4447 [Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nærum, Denmark]) while driving light vehicles on a variety of different roadway surfaces. While sampling rate limitations make the accelerometer data collected from the iPod Touch unsuitable for frequency analysis, the vibration amplitudes recorded are sufficiently accurate (errors less than 0.1 m/s(2)) to assist workplaces manage whole-body vibration exposures. PMID:24498944

  1. An overview of strategies to reduce whole-body vibration exposure on drivers: A systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivo J. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

    2007-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) at the workplace cost a lot. These MSD, low back pain in particular, can be caused by exposure to whole body vibration (WBV). Preventive strategies to reduce vibration exposure may contribute to a decrease in MSD. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore which evidence-based preventive strategies reduce vibration exposure on drivers. A systematic literature

  2. Modelling the response of the spinal system to whole-body vibration and repeated shock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helmut Seidel; Michael J. Griffin

    2001-01-01

    Back problems are very common and contribute to discomfort and days off work. Some back disorders are attributed to inappropriate loading of the spine that can be combined with other influential factors such a body posture, whole-body vibration and shock. Many models have been developed to predict the forces in the spine associated with vibration and shock. However, the problem

  3. Self-reported back pain in tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Paulien M. Bongers; Carel T. J. Hulshof

    1990-01-01

    Summary A postal questionnaire on symptoms of ill health and exposure to whole-body vibration was completed by 577 workers (response rate 79%) who were employed in certain functions by two companies 11 years before. The relation between the occupational history of driving vibrating vehicles (mainly agricultural tractors) and back pain has been analyzed. The prevalence of reported back pain is

  4. Whole body vibration for older persons: an open randomized, multicentre, parallel, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Institutionalized older persons have a poor functional capacity. Including physical exercise in their routine activities decreases their frailty and improves their quality of life. Whole-body vibration (WBV) training is a type of exercise that seems beneficial in frail older persons to improve their functional mobility, but the evidence is inconclusive. This trial will compare the results of exercise with WBV and exercise without WBV in improving body balance, muscle performance and fall prevention in institutionalized older persons. Methods/Design An open, multicentre and parallel randomized clinical trial with blinded assessment. 160 nursing home residents aged over 65 years and of both sexes will be identified to participate in the study. Participants will be centrally randomised and allocated to interventions (vibration or exercise group) by telephone. The vibration group will perform static/dynamic exercises (balance and resistance training) on a vibratory platform (Frequency: 30-35 Hz; Amplitude: 2-4 mm) over a six-week training period (3 sessions/week). The exercise group will perform the same exercise protocol but without a vibration stimuli platform. The primary outcome measure is the static/dynamic body balance. Secondary outcomes are muscle strength and, number of new falls. Follow-up measurements will be collected at 6 weeks and at 6 months after randomization. Efficacy will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis and 'per protocol'. The effects of the intervention will be evaluated using the "t" test, Mann-Witney test, or Chi-square test, depending on the type of outcome. The final analysis will be performed 6 weeks and 6 months after randomization. Discussion This study will help to clarify whether WBV training improves body balance, gait mobility and muscle strength in frail older persons living in nursing homes. As far as we know, this will be the first study to evaluate the efficacy of WBV for the prevention of falls. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01375790 PMID:22192313

  5. The Effect of Whole-Body Vibration Frequency and Amplitude on the Myoelectric Activity of Vastus Medialis and Vastus Lateralis

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Piotr; Piecha, Magdalena; Slomka, Kajetan; Sobota, Grzegorz; Polak, Anna; Juras, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of training protocols for whole body vibration (WBV) training through the modulation of the frequency and amplitude of vibration. Despite the large number of studies regarding effects of such training, there is still lack of knowledge regarding optimum training protocols. The study analyzed the influence of whole-body vibration parameters (i.e., the frequency and amplitude) on the myoelectric activity of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis in 29 females with the use of electromyography (EMG). The first and second of the eight consecutive trials were performed without vibrations; the remaining six trials were performed in a randomized order on a platform vibrating at different amplitude (2mm and 4mm) and frequency (20 Hz, 40 Hz and 60 Hz) combinations. The results revealed significantly higher EMG amplitude of both muscles during the vibration as compared with the non- vibrated trials (trial 1 and 2). Furthermore, the EMG activity significantly increased both with the amplitude and frequency, being the highest when the frequency and amplitude of reached 60 Hz and 4 mm, respectively. The study aims to determine the optimal vibration parameters in the aspect of purposeful stimulation of chosen leg muscles. Based on the results of the presented investigation, sports trainers and physiotherapists may be able to optimize training programs involving vibration platforms. Key points The observed vibration effect significantly increases both with the amplitude and frequency. Certain frequency/amplitude combinations of mechanical vibrations cause the same level of myoelectric muscle activity. PMID:24149311

  6. Modeling of human reactions to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F M

    1987-08-01

    A computer-automated approach for studying the human body vibration is presented. This includes vertical, horizontal, and torsional vibration. The procedure used is based on Finite Segment Modeling (FSM) of the human body, thus treating it as a mechanical structure. Kane's equations as developed by Huston et al. are used to formulate the governing equations of motion. The connective tissues are modeled by springs and dampers. In addition, the paper presents the transient response of different parts of the body due to a sinusoidal forcing function as well as an impulse function applied to the lower torso in the vertical direction. PMID:3657108

  7. Biodynamics of the human body under whole-body vibration: Synthesis of the reported data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Rakheja; R. G. Dong; S. Patra; P.-É. Boileau; P. Marcotte; C. Warren

    2010-01-01

    Identification of most probable ranges of biodynamic responses of the human body exposed to whole-body vibration is essential for developing effective integrated human-machine system design tools, improved vibration mitigation devices and frequency-weighting for exposure assessment. The international standard, ISO-5982 (2001), defines such ranges for very limited conditions, namely for body seated without a back support and exposed to vertical vibration.

  8. Localised muscle tissue oxygenation during dynamic exercise with whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Daniel; Elwell, Clare; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings. Key pointsWhole body vibration affects tissue oxygenation of the lateral gastrocnemius.The underlying mechanism could be either increased blood flow or a vasospastic response in the feet.The local metabolic cost of heel raise activity on the lateral gastrocnemius does not appear to be increased by whole body vibration. PMID:24149209

  9. Determination of optimal whole body vibration amplitude and frequency parameters with plyometric exercise and its influence on closed-chain lower extremity acute power output and EMG activity in resistance trained males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Nikki J.

    The optimal combination of Whole body vibration (WBV) amplitude and frequency has not been established. Purpose. To determine optimal combination of WBV amplitude and frequency that will enhance acute mean and peak power (MP and PP) output EMG activity in the lower extremity muscles. Methods. Resistance trained males (n = 13) completed the following testing sessions: On day 1, power spectrum testing of bilateral leg press (BLP) movement was performed on the OMNI. Days 2 and 3 consisted of WBV testing with either average (5.8 mm) or high (9.8 mm) amplitude combined with either 0 (sham control), 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz frequency. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), bicep femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles for EMG analysis. MP and PP output and EMG activity of the lower extremity were assessed pre-, post-WBV treatments and after sham-controls on the OMNI while participants performed one set of five repetitions of BLP at the optimal resistance determined on Day 1. Results. No significant differences were found between pre- and sham-control on MP and PP output and on EMG activity in RF, VL, BF and GA. Completely randomized one-way ANOVA with repeated measures demonstrated no significant interaction of WBV amplitude and frequency on MP and PP output and peak and mean EMGrms amplitude and EMG rms area under the curve. RF and VL EMGrms area under the curve significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude, whereas low amplitude significantly decreased GA mean and peak EMGrms amplitude and EMGrms area under the curve. VL mean EMGrms amplitude and BF mean and peak EMGrms amplitudes were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude when compared to sham-control. WBV frequency significantly decreased (p < 0.05) VL mean and peak EMGrms amplitude. WBV frequency at 30 and 40 Hz significantly decreased (p < 0.05) GA mean EMGrms amplitude and 20 and 30 Hz significantly decreased GA peak EMGrms amplitude. MP and PP output was not significantly effected by either treatment. Conclusions. It is concluded that WBV combined with plyometric exercise does not induce alterations in subsequent MP and PP output and EMGrms activity of the lower extremity. Future studies need to address the time of WBV exposure and magnitude of external loads that will maximize strength and/or power output.

  10. The effect of occupational whole-body vibration on standing balance: A systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramakrishnan Mani; Stephan Milosavljevic; S. John Sullivan

    2010-01-01

    Adverse health effects from exposure to occupational whole-body vibration (WBV) are common among drivers. In particular some researchers consider that there is kinaesthetic and balance disturbance from WBV exposure in the workplace and this might be one of the aetiological factors responsible for occupational low back pain in drivers. The purpose of this study was to undertake a critical review

  11. Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Makhsous; R. Hendrix; Z. Crowther; E. Nam; F. Lin

    2005-01-01

    A new car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion supports the lumbar spine, was quantitatively tested to determine its effectiveness and potentials in reducing whole-body vibration (WBV) and musculoskeletal disorders in automobile drivers. Nine subjects were tested to drive with the seat in: 1) the conventional seating arrangement

  12. Whole body vibration exposures in forklift operators: comparison of a mechanical and air suspension seat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan P. Blood; James D. Ploger; Peter W. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Using a repeated measures design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures when 12 forklift operators drove the same forklift with a mechanical suspension and an air suspension seat. A portable PDA-based WBV data acquisition system collected and analysed time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 WBV measurement standards. Tri-axial measurements of weighted vibration

  13. EMG activity during whole body vibration: motion artifacts or stretch reflexes?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramona Ritzmann; Andreas Kramer; Markus Gruber; Albert Gollhofer; Wolfgang Taube

    2010-01-01

    The validity of electromyographic (EMG) data recorded during whole body vibration (WBV) is controversial. Some authors ascribed\\u000a a major part of the EMG signal to vibration-induced motion artifacts while others have interpreted the EMG signals as muscular\\u000a activity caused at least partly by stretch reflexes. The aim of this study was to explore the origin of the EMG signal during

  14. The effects of whole body vibration on balance, joint position sense and cutaneous sensation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ross D. PollockSally ProvanFinbarr; Sally Provan; Finbarr C. Martin; Di J. Newham

    Whole body vibration (WBV) may enhance muscular strength and power but little is known about its influence on sensory-motor\\u000a function. Vibration of a single muscle or tendon affects the afferent system in a manner that depends on amplitude and frequency.\\u000a WBV stimulates many muscle groups simultaneously and the frequencies and amplitudes used are different from many of the studies\\u000a on

  15. Whole-body vibration: Evaluation of emission and exposure levels arising from agricultural tractors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Scarlett; J. S. Price; R. M. Stayner

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to quantify whole-body vibration (WBV) emission and estimated exposure levels found upon a range of modern, state-of-the-art agricultural tractors, when operated in controlled conditions (traversing ISO ride vibration test tracks and performing selected agricultural operations) and whilst performing identical tasks during ‘on-farm’ use. The potential consequences of operator WBV exposure limitations, as prescribed by the European

  16. Effects of whole-body vibration on spinal reflexes in man.

    PubMed

    Roll, J P; Martin, B; Gauthier, G M; Mussa Ivaldi, F

    1980-11-01

    Recent studies have described sensory-motor function alterations resulting from vibrations applied to various parts of the body. The present work describes the effects produced at the myotatic loop level by long-term vibration. Hoffmann and Tendon reflexes as well as tendon vibration response were substantially depressed by 18 Hz, +/- 0.25 G vibration applied to the whole body or to the legs of seated human subjects. The reflex inhibition lasted throughout the 15-min vibration period and persisted minutes after stimulus cessation. In contrast, vibration limited to the S's head and trunk showed much weaker effects. This suggests that the vibration acts mainly upon extero- and proprioceptive receptors rather than upon the vestibular organs. The results are discussed in relation to findings derived from experiments involving locally applied short-duration vibration. PMID:7213269

  17. Exploring the effects of seated whole body vibration exposure on repetitive asymmetric lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jay P; Lavender, Steven A; Jagacinski, Richard J; Sommerich, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the physiological and behavioral responses to repetitive asymmetric lifting activity after exposure to whole body vibrations. Seventeen healthy volunteers repeatedly lifted a box (15% of lifter's capacity) positioned in front of them at ankle level to a location on their left side at waist level at the rate of 10 lifts/min for a period of 60 minutes. Prior to lifting, participants were seated on a vibrating platform for 60 minutes; in one of the two sessions the platform did not vibrate. Overall, the physiological responses assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy signals for the erector spinae muscles decreased significantly over time during the seating and the lifting tasks (p < 0.001). During repetitive asymmetric lifting, behavioral changes included increases in peak forward bending motion, twisting movement, and three-dimensional movement velocities of the spine. The lateral bending movement of the spine and the duration of each lift decreased significantly over the 60 minutes of repetitive lifting. With exposure to whole body vibration, participants twisted farther (p = 0.046) and twisted faster (p = 0.025). These behavioral changes would suggest an increase in back injury risk when repetitive lifting tasks are preceded by whole body vibration exposure. PMID:25264920

  18. Effect of Whole-Body Vibration on Speech. Part 2; Effect on Intelligibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect on speech intelligibility was measured for speech where talkers reading Diagnostic Rhyme Test material were exposed to 0.7 g whole body vibration to simulate space vehicle launch. Across all talkers, the effect of vibration was to degrade the percentage of correctly transcribed words from 83% to 74%. The magnitude of the effect of vibration on speech communication varies between individuals, for both talkers and listeners. A worst case scenario for intelligibility would be the most sensitive listener hearing the most sensitive talker; one participant s intelligibility was reduced by 26% (97% to 71%) for one of the talkers.

  19. Good Vibrations – Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Attention in Healthy Individuals and Individuals with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Lange, Klaus W.; Tucha, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Most of the current treatment strategies of ADHD are associated with a number of disadvantages which strengthen the need for alternative or additional approaches for the treatment of ADHD. In this respect, Whole Body Vibration (WBV) might be interesting as it was found to have beneficial effects on a variety of physiological measures. The present study explored the effects of WBV on attention of healthy individuals and adults diagnosed with ADHD. Methods Eighty-three healthy individuals and seventeen adults diagnosed with ADHD participated in the study. WBV treatment was applied passively, while participants were sitting on a chair which was mounted on a vibrating platform. A repeated measure design was employed in order to explore potential effects of WBV treatment on attention within subjects. Attention (i.e. inhibitory control) was measured with a color-word interference paradigm. Results A period of two minutes of WBV treatment had significant beneficial effects of small to medium size on attention of both healthy individuals and adults with ADHD. The effect of WBV treatment on attention did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions WBV was demonstrated to improve cognitive performance of healthy individuals as well as of individuals with ADHD. WBV treatment is relatively inexpensive and easy to apply and might therefore be of potential relevance for clinical use. The application of WBV treatment as a cognitive enhancement strategy and as a potential treatment of cognitive impairments is discussed. PMID:24587412

  20. Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hoy; N. Mubarak; S. Nelson; M. Sweerts de Landas; M. Magnusson; O. Okunribido; M. Pope

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different

  1. The rate of muscle temperature increase during acute whole-body vibration exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Cochrane; S. R. Stannard; A. J. Sargeant; J. Rittweger

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the rate of muscle temperature (T\\u000a m) increase during acute whole-body vibration (WBV), to that of stationary cycling and passive warm-up. Additionally we wanted\\u000a to determine if the purported increase in counter-movement jump and peak power cycling from acute WBV could be explained by\\u000a changes in muscle temperature. Eight active participants volunteered for the study, which involved

  2. Effects of random whole-body vibration on postural control in Parkinson's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Turbanski; Christian T. Haas; Dietmar Schmidtbleicher; Antje Friedrich; Petra Duisberg

    2005-01-01

    We investigated spontaneous effects of random whole-body vibration (rWBV) on postural control in Parkinsonian subjects. Effects were examined in biomechanical tests from a total of 52 patients divided equally into one experimental and one control group. Postural control was tested pre- and post-treatment in two standardized conditions (narrow standing and tandem standing). The intervention was based on rWBV (y: 3

  3. Whole-Body Vibration and Rehabilitation of Chronic Diseases: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chanou, Konstantina; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Jamurtas, Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to review the current literature and findings on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training method on performance and its ability to aid in the rehabilitation of chronic diseases (neurological, musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions). Six electronic databases were searched. The combination of the search terminology used included WBV and several neurological, musculoskeletal and metabolic conditions. Twenty six papers were found to be relevant for this review and were included for critical evaluation with regards to sample characteristics, research intervention and methodology. Most studies were conducted on patients diagnosed with neurological conditions (n = 15) while less were performed on patients suffering from musculoskeletal (n = 7) or metabolic (n = 4) disorders. Comparisons were difficult to draw on because of the different pathologies and the differences in the methodology of each study. Some of the observed methodological flaws included limitations in relation to insufficient randomisation, lack of sample homogeneity (size, age variability) and poor blinding in most studies. No consensus could be reached as to whether WBV is more effective than other interventions or no intervention at all, while the additional effects that WBV may have in relation to other interventions could not be assumed. Nevertheless, chronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic but not from neurological conditions. Although WBV did not prove to be more effective compared to other training methods, it can be used, in some cases, as a less fatiguing and less time-consuming method to enhance physical capabilities. Future research should focus on the effectiveness of WBV in relation to no treatment at all, and to age. Key pointsChronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions.WBV did not prove to be more effective than other interventions, while the positive effects of WBV in relation to no intervention at all could not be established.No consensus could be reached as to which vibration type is more effective.WBV training could be used as a safe, less fatiguing and less time-consuming type of exercise for patients with neurologic conditions instead of other more demanding interventions. PMID:24149191

  4. Predicting discomfort from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting with an inclined backrest.

    PubMed

    Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Current methods for evaluating seat vibration to predict vibration discomfort assume the same frequency weightings and axis multiplying factors can be used at the seat surface and the backrest irrespective of the backrest inclination. This experimental study investigated the discomfort arising from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting on a rigid seat with no backrest and with a backrest inclined at 0° (upright), 30°, 60°, and 90° (recumbent). Within each of these five postures, 12 subjects judged the discomfort caused by vertical sinusoidal whole-body vibration (at frequencies from 1 to 20 Hz at magnitudes from 0.2 to 2.0 m s(-2) r.m.s.) relative to the discomfort produced by a reference vibration (8 Hz at 0.4 m s(-2) r.m.s.). With 8-Hz vertical vibration, the subjects also judged vibration discomfort with each backrest condition relative to the vibration discomfort with no backrest. The locations in the body where discomfort was experienced were determined for each frequency at two vibration magnitudes. Equivalent comfort contours were determined for the five conditions of the backrest and show how discomfort depends on the frequency of vibration, the presence of the backrest, and the backrest inclination. At frequencies greater than about 8 Hz, the backrest increased vibration discomfort, especially when inclined to 30°, 60°, or 90°, and there was greater discomfort at the head or neck. At frequencies around 5 and 6.3 Hz there was less vibration discomfort when sitting with an inclined backrest. PMID:23190680

  5. The feasibility of whole body vibration in institutionalised elderly persons and its influence on muscle performance, balance and mobility: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN62535013

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan Bautmans; Ellen Van Hees; Jean-Claude Lemper; Tony Mets

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue or lack of interest can reduce the feasibility of intensive physical exercise in nursing home residents. Low-volume exercise interventions with similar training effects might be an alternative. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the feasibility of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in institutionalised elderly, and its impact on functional capacity and muscle performance. METHODS: Twenty-four

  6. Low back and neck pain in locomotive engineers exposed to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    McBride, David; Paulin, Sara; Herbison, G Peter; Waite, David; Bagheri, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and excess risk of low back pain and neck pain in locomotive engineers, and to investigate the relationship of both with whole-body vibration exposure. A cross-sectional survey comparing locomotive engineers with other rail worker referents was conducted. Current vibration levels were measured, cumulative exposures calculated for engineers and referents, and low back and neck pain assessed by a self-completed questionnaire. Median vibration exposure in the z- (vertical) axis was 0.62 m/s(2). Engineers experienced more frequent low back and neck pain, odds ratios (ORs) of 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-2.64) and 1.92 (95% CI: 1.22-3.02), respectively. The authors conclude that vibration close to the "action levels" of published standards contribute to low back and neck pain. Vibration levels need to be assessed conservatively and control measures introduced. PMID:24499248

  7. Whole-body vibration applied during upper body exercise improves performance.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Herrero, Azael J; Milton, John G; Hazell, Tom J; García-López, David

    2013-07-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has exercisers perform static and dynamic resistance training exercises on a ground-based platform. Exposure to WBV exposure has demonstrated benefits and no effect on lower body strength, power, and performance. The aim of this study was to determine if WBV exposure (50 Hz, 2.51 mm) has any potentiating effects postexercise by measuring the kinematic variables of a set of upper body elbow-extensor exercise (70% one-repetition maximum [1RM]) to volitional exhaustion. Sixteen recreationally active students (12 male and 4 female) performed 3 different experimental conditions on separate days. Each condition had the subjects perform 1 set of elbow-extension exercise to fatigue with 1 of 3 WBV treatments: WBV simultaneously during the set (AE); 60 seconds after application of WBV for 30 seconds (RE); and no WBV (CTRL). Kinematic parameters of each repetition were monitored by linking a rotary encoder to the highest load plate. The mean velocity and acceleration throughout the set and perceived exertion were analyzed. A significant increase (p < 0.05) was observed in the mean velocity for the whole set in the AE condition vs. the CTRL condition. The mean acceleration was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the AE condition in comparison with RE (increased by 45.3%) and CTRL (increased by 50.4%) conditions. The positive effect induced by WBV on upper-limb performance is only achieved when the stimulus is applied during the exercise. However, WBV applied 60 seconds before upper body exercise results in no benefit. PMID:23085972

  8. Vibration energy absorption in the whole-body system of a tractor operator.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Jan; Tana?, Wojciech; Kromulski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Many people are exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) in their occupational lives, especially drivers of vehicles such as tractor and trucks. The main categories of effects from WBV are perception degraded comfort interference with activities-impaired health and occurrence of motion sickness. Absorbed power is defined as the power dissipated in a mechanical system as a result of an applied force. The vibration-induced injuries or disorders in a substructure of the human system are primarily associated with the vibration power absorption distributed in that substructure. The vibration power absorbed by the exposed body is a measure that combines both the vibration hazard and the biodynamic response of the body. The article presents measurement method for determining vibration power dissipated in the human whole body system called Vibration Energy Absorption (VEA). The vibration power is calculated from the real part of the force-velocity cross-spectrum. The absorbed power in the frequency domain can be obtained from the cross-spectrum of the force and velocity. In the context of the vibration energy transferred to a seated human body, the real component reflects the energy dissipated in the biological structure per unit of time, whereas the imaginary component reflects the energy stored/released by the system. The seated human is modeled as a series/parallel 4-DOF dynamic models. After introduction of the excitation, the response in particular segments of the model can be analyzed. As an example, the vibration power dissipated in an operator has been determined as a function of the agricultural combination operating speed 1.39 - 4.16 ms(-1). PMID:24959797

  9. Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, J.; Mubarak, N.; Nelson, S.; Sweerts de Landas, M.; Magnusson, M.; Okunribido, O.; Pope, M.

    2005-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different positions were adopted (bending, leaning and twisting) and postural analyses were conducted using the OWAS and RULA techniques. Forklift vibrations at the seat (exposure) were measured in the three orthogonal axes ( x-fore and aft, y-lateral and z-vertical) under actual working conditions according to the recommendations of ISO 2631-1. The results showed that LBP was more prevalent amongst forklift drivers than among non-drivers and driving postures in which the trunk is considerably twisted or bent forward associated with greatest risk. Furthermore, forklift drivers showed to be exposed to acceptable levels of vibration in the x- and y-directions (i.e., below the EU Physical Agents Directive on Vibration Exposure recommended action level—0.5 m/s 2), but not in the z-direction. There were indications that whole-body vibration acts associatively with other factors (not independently) to precipitate LBP.

  10. An iOS Application for Evaluating Whole-body Vibration Within a Workplace Risk Management Process.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, James; Burgess-Limerick, R; Lynas, D

    2015-07-01

    Workplace management of whole-body vibration exposure requires systematic collection of whole-body vibration data in conjunction with the numerous variables which influence vibration amplitudes. The cost and complexity of commercially available measurement devices is an impediment to the routine collection of such data by workplaces. An iOS application (WBV) has been developed which allows an iPod Touch to be used to measure whole-body vibration exposures. The utility of the application was demonstrated by simultaneously obtaining 98 pairs of whole-body vibration measurements from both the iPod Touch application and a commercially available whole-body vibration device during the operation of a variety of vehicles and mobile plant in operation at a surface coal mine. The iOS application installed on a fifth-generation iPod Touch was shown to provide a 95% confidence of +/- 0.077 m/s(2) r.m.s. constant error for the vertical direction. Situations in which vibration levels lay within the ISO2631.1 health guidance caution zone were accurately identified, and the qualitative features of the frequency spectra were reproduced. The low cost and relative simplicity of the application has potential to facilitate its use as a screening tool to identify situations in which musculoskeletal disorders may arise as a consequence of exposure to whole-body vibration. PMID:25625605

  11. An exploratory study of whole-body vibration exposure and dose while operating heavy equipment in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Cann, Adam P; Salmoni, Alan W; Vi, Peter; Eger, Tammy R

    2003-12-01

    Whole-body vibration measurements were recorded for various types of heavy equipment used within the construction industry. The purpose of these measurements was to provide more information about the potential levels of whole-body vibration experienced by equipment operators in the construction industry, as well as to identify types of equipment warranting further research. In total, 67 pieces of equipment were tested from 14 different equipment types. Testing took place at various construction sites including corporate, public, and residential work projects. Measurements were made (following the 1997 International Standards Organization's 2631-1 whole-body vibration standards) for 20-minute testing periods using a Larson Davis HVM100 vibration monitor and a triaxial accelerometer. The mobile equipment tested was associated with greater levels of whole-body vibration than the stationary equipment. When whole-body vibration levels were compared to the International Standards Organization's 2631-1 standards, wheel loaders, off-road dump trucks, scrapers, skid steer vehicles, backhoes, bulldozers, crawler loaders, and concrete trowel vehicles exceeded the recommendations based on measured vibration dose values. Further research incorporating larger sample sizes and controlled testing conditions is required to better understand the levels of exposure experienced by operators as well as the amount to which seating, terrain, mobility, and vehicle structure might affect whole-body vibration. PMID:14612296

  12. Can an iPod Touch be used to assess whole-body vibration associated with mining equipment?

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Rebecca; Di Corleto, Luke; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

    2014-11-01

    The cost and complexity of commercially available whole-body vibration measurement devices is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by collecting 58 simultaneous pairs of acceleration measurements in three dimensions from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and gold standard whole-body vibration measurement devices, while a range of heavy mining equipment was operated at three surface coal mines. The results suggest that accelerometer data gathered from a consumer electronic device are able to be used to measure whole-body vibration amplitude with 95% confidence of ±0.06 m s(-2) root mean square for the vertical direction (1.96 × standard deviation of the constant error). PMID:25106947

  13. Implementation of double-pulsed holography in evaluation of whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Wos, H; Svensson, L B; Norlander, S

    1991-11-01

    This study used a unique holographic technique to evaluate the effects of vibration on soft tissues and bones. It was possible to record forced whole-body vibration in humans by holograph interferometry using a double-pulsed ruby laser. The study investigated the manner in which the muscles of the back and vertebral column are affected by vibrations applied to the human buttocks in the sitting position. The subject was exposed to vibration at two frequencies: 40 and 60 Hz (vertical Z axis). Transmission of the vibrations along the subject's back was recorded by means of double-pulsed holography and electromyography. Evaluation of the vibration pattern showed that the vibrations are transmitted along the back all the way up to the neck and head. The pattern of vibration in the muscles of the back and vertebral column showed that the greatest effect was exerted on the lumbar region of the back and the area of transition between the thoracic and cervical regions. PMID:1800103

  14. The Effect of Whole-Body Resonance Vibration in a Porcine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Chak, Jason; Dressler, Dan; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena B; Anderson, Lisa M; Melnyk, Angela D; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2015-06-15

    Whole-body vibration has been identified as a potential stressor to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients during pre-hospital transportation. However, the effect that such vibration has on the acutely injured spinal cord is largely unknown, particularly in the frequency domain of 5?Hz in which resonance of the spine occurs. The objective of the study was to investigate the consequences of resonance vibration on the injured spinal cord. Using our previously characterized porcine model of SCI, we subjected animals to resonance vibration (5.7±0.46?Hz) or no vibration for a period of 1.5 or 3.0?h. Locomotor function was assessed weekly and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected to assess different inflammatory and injury severity markers. Spinal cords were evaluated histologically to quantify preserved white and gray matter. No significant differences were found between groups for CSF levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and lL-8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were lower in the resonance vibration group, compared with the non-vibrated control group. Spared white matter tissue was increased within the vibrated group at 7?d post-injury but this difference was not apparent at the 12-week time-point. No significant difference was observed in locomotor recovery following resonance vibration of the spine. Here, we demonstrate that exposure to resonance vibration for 1.5 or 3?h following SCI in our porcine model is not detrimental to the functional or histological outcomes. Our observation that a 3.0-h period of vibration at resonance frequency induces modest histological improvement at one week post-injury warrants further study. PMID:25567669

  15. Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Amonette, William E; Boyle, Mandy; Psarakis, Maria B; Barker, Jennifer; Dupler, Terry L; Ott, Summer D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the head accelerations using a common whole body vibration (WBV) exercise protocol acutely reduced neurocognition in healthy subjects. Second, we investigated differential responses to WBV plates with 2 different delivery mechanisms: vertical and rotational vibrations. Twelve healthy subjects (N = 12) volunteered and completed a baseline (BASE) neurocognitive assessment: the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Subjects then participated in 3 randomized exercise sessions separated by no more than 2 weeks. The exercise sessions consisted of five 2-minute sets of static hip-width stance squats, with the knees positioned at a 45° angle of flexion. The squats were performed with no vibration (control [CON]), with a vertically vibrating plate (vertical vibration [VV]), and with a rotational vibrating plate (rotational vibration [RV]) set to 30 Hz with 4 mm of peak-to-peak displacement. The ImPACT assessments were completed immediately after each exercise session and the composite score for 5 cognitive domains was analyzed: verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control. Verbal memory scores were unaffected by exercise with or without vibration (p = 0.40). Likewise, visual memory was not different (p = 0.14) after CON, VV, or RV. Significant differences were detected for visual motor speed (p = 0.006); VV was elevated compared with BASE (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences (p = 0.26) in reaction time or impulse control (p = 0.16) after exercise with or without vibration. In healthy individuals, 10 minutes of 30 Hz, 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement vibration exposure with a 45° angle of knee flexion did not negatively affect neurocognition. PMID:25536489

  16. The effect of whole-body cryostimulation on lysosomal enzyme activity in kayakers during training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alina Wozniak; Bartosz Wozniak; Gerard Drewa; Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska; Andrzej Rakowski

    2007-01-01

    Effects of whole-body cryostimulation on lysosomal enzyme activity: acid phosphatase (AcP), arylsulphatase (ASA) and cathepsin\\u000a D (CTS D), as well as on the creatine kinase (CK), and the cortisol concentration in the serum of kayakers during training\\u000a were studied. Additionally, the effect of a single cryostimulation treatment in untrained men was evaluated. The kayakers\\u000a were subjected to a ten-day training

  17. [Evaluation of forklift trucks operated in dockyards for reducing exposure to whole-body vibration].

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Hiroji; Taoda, Kazushi; Nishiyama, Katsuo

    2005-03-01

    Our preceding study revealed that many fork-lift truck drivers in Japanese dockyards suffer from fatigue symptoms such as low back pain (LBP). It has been suggested that exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) is a cause of their LBP. Using forklift models manufactured from 1982 to 2000, we measured and evaluated the vibration of forklift trucks operated in dockyards, adopting experimental procedures based on the European Standard. We investigated various factors related to WBV, with the main focus on attenuating seat vibration. This study showed that (1) the seats did not attenuate vibration in the vertical direction, (2) forklift trucks and their seats had not improved in terms of WBV attenuation for a decade, (3) some forklift trucks in which the seat suspension could no longer be adjusted to the driver's weight continued to be used without being repaired, and impractical seat adjustment methods were adopted, and (4) the seats did not attenuate vertical vibration well in the most undesirable frequency range. We conclude that forklift trucks and especially their seats should urgently be improved with regard to WBV attenuation in order to prevent LBP in forklift truck drivers. PMID:15852682

  18. Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaoki, Gen; Yoshimura, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kaoru; Nakai, Kazuma

    In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to the spinal column. This model has the spinal column and the support structures such as the muscles of the back and the abdomen. The spinal column is made by the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks that are considered the rigid body and the rotational spring and damper respectively. The parameter of this model is decided by the literature and the body type of the subject with respect to the mass and the model structure. And stiffness and damping parameters are searched by fitting the model simulation results to the experimental measured data with respect to the vibration transmissibilities from the seat surface to the spinal column and the head and with respect to the driving-point apparent mass. In addition, the natural modes of the model compare with the result of experimental modal analysis. The influence of the abdomen and the muscles of the back are investigated by comparing three models with respect to above vibration characteristics. Three model are the proposed model, the model that has the spinal column and the model that has the muscles of the back in addition to the spinal column.

  19. Prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to whole body vibration in Great Britain: findings from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, K.; Griffin, M.; Bendall, H.; Pannett, B.; Coggon, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To estimate the number of workers in Great Britain with significant occupational exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and to identify the common sources of exposure and the occupations and industries where such exposures arise.?METHODS—A postal questionnaire was posted to a random community sample of 22 194 men and women of working age. Among other things, the questionnaire asked about exposure to WBV in the past week, including occupational and common non-occupational sources. Responses were assessed by occupation and industry, and national prevalence estimates were derived from census information. Estimates were also made of the average estimated daily personal dose of vibration (eVDV).?RESULTS—From the 12 907 responses it was estimated that 7.2 million men and 1.8 million women in Great Britain are exposed to WBV at work in a 1 week period if the occupational use of cars, vans, buses, trains, and motor cycles is included within the definition of exposure. The eVDV of >374 000 men and 9000 women was estimated to exceed a proposed British Standard action level of 15 ms-1.75. Occupations in which the estimated exposures most often exceeded 15 ms-1.75 included forklift truck and mechanical truck drivers, farm owners and managers, farm workers, and drivers of road goods vehicles. These occupations also contributed the largest estimated numbers of workers in Great Britain with such levels of exposure. The highest estimated median occupational eVDVs were found in forklift truck drivers, drivers of road goods vehicles, bus and coach drivers, and technical and wholesale sales representatives, among whom a greater contribution to total dose was received from occupational exposures than from non-occupational ones; but in many other occupations the reverse applied. The most common sources of occupational exposure to WBV are cars, vans, forklift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, and loaders.?CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to whole body vibration is common, but only a small proportion of exposures exceed the action level proposed in British standards, and in many occupations, non-occupational sources are more important than those at work. The commonest occupational sources of WBV and occupations with particularly high exposures have been identified, providing a basis for targeting future control activities.???Keywords: whole body vibration; population; prevalence; exposure PMID:10810108

  20. Whole body vibration exposures in forklift operators: comparison of a mechanical and air suspension seat.

    PubMed

    Blood, Ryan P; Ploger, James D; Johnson, Peter W

    2010-11-01

    Using a repeated measures design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures when 12 forklift operators drove the same forklift with a mechanical suspension and an air suspension seat. A portable PDA-based WBV data acquisition system collected and analysed time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 WBV measurement standards. Tri-axial measurements of weighted vibration (A(w)), crest factor, vibration dose values, time-weighted average-peak, raw (+) peak, raw (-) peak and static compression dose (S(ed)) were compared between seats. There were significant differences in z-axis WBV exposures with the air suspension seat, yielding lower WBV exposures. In addition, there were differences between seats in how they attenuated WBV exposures based on the driver's weight. In the mechanical suspension seat, WBV exposures were weight-dependent, with lighter drivers having higher WBV exposures, whereas with the air suspension seat, the same trends were not as prevalent. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study contributes to the understanding of how different seat suspensions can influence WBV transmission and how some components of vibration transmission are dependent on the weight of the driver. Additional systematic studies are needed to quantify how various factors can influence WBV exposures. PMID:20967660

  1. Combination of external load and whole body vibration potentiates the GH-releasing effect of squatting in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Giunta, M; Rigamonti, A E; Agosti, F; Patrizi, A; Compri, E; Cardinale, M; Sartorio, A

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, whole body vibration (WBV) has become an efficient complement or alternative to resistance training. Very limited data on the effects of different WBV protocols on anabolic hormones are available. In this study, we compared the growth hormone (GH), blood lactate (LA), and cortisol responses to different protocols involving WBV. Six healthy women recreationally active performed 10 sets of 12 dynamic squats in the following conditions: squatting alone (S), squatting+vibration (SV), squatting+external load (SE), and squatting+external load+vibration (SEV). All responses at the different stimuli determined acute increases in GH, cortisol, and LA. In particular, GH secretion significantly increased in all 4 conditions immediately after the exercise session compared to other time points. Furthermore, a significantly larger increase was identified following SEV as compared to the other conditions. Cortisol concentrations significantly decreased after S, SV and SE whereas they increased significantly following SEV. LA peaks occurred immediately at the end of each condition. However it reached statistical significance only following SEV. The results of our study demonstrate that the combination of squatting+external load+vibration (SEV) could represent the most suitable modality to potentiate the somatotropic function and, indirectly, to obtain an increase in muscle strength and positive changes in the body composition. Further studies are necessary in order to determine the chronic effects of this exercise modality on the hormonal profile. PMID:23589230

  2. Whole-body vibration-related health disorders in occupational medicine - an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Johanning, Eckardt

    2015-07-01

    Workers with whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure are likely to report non-specific health complaints. Health and safety providers may not recognise such occupational injuries and may be unfamiliar with appropriate exposure assessment and prevention. This is a review of clinical studies, medical evidence, differential diagnostic evaluation protocols, surveillance programmes, national and international standards, and interventions recommendations utilising PubMed and other online resources. In summary, several studies show a clear trend: with increasing duration and intensity of occupational WBV exposure, primarily musculoskeletal or neurological disorders of the spine occur. Other organ damage has also been reported. In some European Union countries, spinal injury caused by WBV is recognised as an occupational disease and may be compensable. The WBV-related injury diagnosis includes a review of the work history, exposure assessment and differential diagnostic evaluation. WBV health surveillance should assess health status of WBV-exposed workers and address preventive measures. PMID:25655650

  3. Inter-individual postural variability in seated drivers exposed to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Amari, Maël; Caruel, Eric; Donati, Patrice

    2015-07-01

    Long-term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) is a cause of low back pain for seated drivers. Poor and long-term seated postures are considered as a cofactor in the risk. It depends on the vehicle's ergonomics and tasks. Differences in posture may also be observed between operators doing identical tasks. An experiment has been performed in order to simultaneously measure posture and WBV for 12 drivers in 3 vehicles (loader, dumper and excavator) during controlled tasks. The inter-individual postural variability has been evaluated. The positions and movements of the body were measured with the CUELA system (computer-assisted recording and long-term analysis of musculoskeletal loads). Significant differences were observed between the three vehicles in the WBV, positions and movements of the body. Significant postural differences were observed between drivers (EN 1005-4 2005). Individual strategies for performing a task were also identified. PMID:25537005

  4. The effect of whole-body cryostimulation on the prooxidant–antioxidant balance in blood of elite kayakers after training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alina Wozniak; Bartosz Wozniak; Gerard Drewa; Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole-body cryostimulation prior to kayak training on the prooxidant-antioxidant balance was evaluated and compared\\u000a to the effect of a single cryostimulation treatment in untrained men. The kayakers underwent a ten-day training cycle with\\u000a pre-training daily whole-body cryostimulation for three min (temperature: –120 to –140?C) and training without cryostimulation\\u000a as a control. Blood samples were obtained before and

  5. Whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain affects approximately 80% of people at some stage in their lives. Exercise therapy is the most widely used nonsurgical intervention for low back pain in practice guidelines. Whole body vibration exercise is becoming increasingly popular for relieving musculoskeletal pain and improving health-related quality of life. However, the efficacy of whole body vibration exercise for low back pain is not without dispute. This study aims to estimate the effect of whole body vibration exercise for chronic low back pain. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 120 patients with chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly assigned into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group will participate in whole body vibration exercise twice a week for 3 months. The control group will receive general exercise twice a week for 3 months. Primary outcome measures will be the visual analog scale for pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and adverse events. The secondary outcome measures will include muscle strength and endurance of spine, trunk proprioception, transversus abdominis activation capacity, and quality of life. We will conduct intention-to-treat analysis if any participants withdraw from the trial. Discussion Important features of this study include the randomization procedures, single-blind, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for whole body vibration in chronic low back pain. This study aims to determine whether whole body vibration exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise for chronic low back pain. Therefore, our results will be useful for patients with chronic low back pain as well as for medical staff and health-care decision makers. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003708. PMID:24693945

  6. Whole body vibration exposure in heavy earth moving machinery operators of metalliferrous mines.

    PubMed

    Vanerkar, A P; Kulkarni, N P; Zade, P D; Kamavisdar, A S

    2008-08-01

    As mining operations get mechanized, the rate of profit generation increases and so do the rate of occupational hazards. This study deals with one such hazard - occupational vibration. The present study was carried out to determine the whole body vibration (WBV) exposure of the heavy earth moving machinery (HEMM) operators in two types of metalliferous mines in India, when they were engaged in the mining activity. Cross-comparison was done of the vibration dose value (VDV) for HEMM operators as well as each type of mine. The VDV for the shovel operator in bauxite mine was observed to be 13.53 +/- 5.63 m/s(7/4) with 25% of the readings higher than the prescribed limit whereas in iron ore mine VDV for dumper operator was 10.81 +/- 3.44 m/s(7/4) with 14.62% readings on the higher side. Cross-comparison of the VDV values for bauxite and iron ore mines revealed that it was 9.57 +/- 4.93 and 8.21 +/- 5.12 m/s(7/4) with 21.28 and 14.95% of the readings on the higher side respectively. The Student's t test level was found to be insignificant for both type of mines, indicating that the WBV exposure is not dependent on the type of mine but is dependent on the working condition and type of HEMM in operation. PMID:17874194

  7. Synchronous whole-body vibration increases VO? during and following acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Tom J; Lemon, Peter W R

    2012-02-01

    Single bout whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise has been shown to produce small but significant increases in oxygen consumption (VO(2)). How much more a complete whole-body exercise session (multiple dynamic exercises targeting both upper and lower body muscles) can increase VO(2) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify VO(2) during and for an extended time period (24 h) following a multiple exercise WBV exercise session versus the same session without vibration (NoV). VO(2) of healthy males (n = 8) was measured over 24 h on a day that included a WBV exercise session versus a day with the same exercise session without vibration (NoV), and versus a control day (no exercise). Upper and lower body exercises were studied (five, 30 s, 15 repetition sets of six exercises; 1:1 exercise:recovery ratio over 30 min). Diet was controlled. VO(2) was 23% greater (P = 0.002) during the WBV exercise session versus the NoV session (62.5 ± 12.0 vs. 50.7 ± 8.2 L O(2)) and elicited a higher (P = 0.033) exercise heart rate versus NoV (139 ± 6 vs. 126 ± 11 bpm). Total O(2) consumed over 8 and 24 h following the WBV exercise was also increased (P < 0.010) (240.5 ± 28.3 and 518.9 ± 61.2 L O(2)) versus both NoV (209.7 ± 22.9 and 471.1 ± 51.6 L O(2)) and control (151.4 ± 20.7 and 415.2 ± 51.6 L O(2)). NoV was also increased versus control (P < 0.003). A day with a 30-min multiple exercise, WBV session increased 24 h VO(2) versus a day that included the same exercise session without vibration, and versus a non-exercise day by 10 and 25%, respectively. PMID:21573780

  8. The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Finn Tüchsen; Helene Feveile; Karl B Christensen; Niklas Krause

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. METHODS: A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension

  9. Mathematical models for the apparent masses of standing subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-02-01

    Linear lumped parameter models of the apparent masses of human subjects in standing positions when exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been developed. Simple models with a single degree-of-freedom (d.o.f.) and with two (d.o.f.) were considered for practical use. Model parameters were optimised using both the mean apparent mass of 12 male subjects and the apparent masses of individual subjects measured in a previous study. The calculated responses of two (d.o.f.) models with a massless support structure showed best agreement with the measured apparent mass and phase, with errors less than 0.1 in the normalised apparent mass (i.e., corresponding to errors less than 10% of the static mass) and errors less than 5° in the phase for a normal standing posture. The model parameters obtained with the mean measured apparent masses of the 12 subjects were similar to the means of the 12 sets of parameters obtained when fitting to the individual apparent masses. It was found that the effects of vibration magnitude and postural changes on the measured apparent mass could be represented by changes to the stiffness and damping in the two (d.o.f.) models.

  10. Effect of whole body vibration on the postural control of the spine in sitting.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Graham, Ryan B; Grenier, Sylvain G

    2015-04-01

    Stability is defined by the ability to return to the initial (or unperturbed) state following a perturbation and hence can be assessed by quantifying the post-perturbation response. This response may be divided into two phases: an initial passive response phase, dependent upon both the steady state of the system and the system's intrinsic mechanical properties; and a recovery phase, dependent upon active control and reflexes. These two phases overlap and interact with each other. Whole body vibration (WBV) is assumed to influence neuro-sensory functions and perhaps both response stages. The current study observed the effect of WBV on several novel response factors that quantify the two phases in response to an external perturbation. The results indicate a significant effect of vibration exposure on: (1) the normalized maximum distance traveled by center of pressure (COP) from the neutral seated posture, and (2) the normalized time to maximum distance (?), such that B and ? increased after WBV exposure and decreased after sitting without WBV. These changes may be indicative of passive visco-elastic changes caused by WBV exposure on the spinal tissues which has been indicated as a creep deformation of tissues post-exposure. This change may make the spine vulnerable to injury. Similar trends were noticed in the variables calculated from center of mass data. PMID:25544340

  11. Whole body vibration at different exposure frequencies: infrared thermography and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Sonza, Anelise; Robinson, Caroline C; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) on physiological parameters, cutaneous temperature, tactile sensitivity, and balance. Twenty-four healthy adults (25.3 ± 2.6 years) participated in four WBV sessions. They spent 15 minutes on a vibration platform in the vertical mode at four different frequencies (31, 35, 40, and 44 Hz) with 1 mm of amplitude. All variables were measured before and after WBV exposure. Pressure sensation in five anatomical regions and both feet was determined using Von Frey monofilaments. Postural sway was measured using a force plate. Cutaneous temperature was obtained with an infrared camera. WBV influences the discharge of the skin touch-pressure receptors, decreasing sensitivity at all measured frequencies and foot regions (P ? 0.05). Regarding balance, no differences were found after 20 minutes of WBV at frequencies of 31 and 35 Hz. At 40 and 44 Hz, participants showed higher anterior-posterior center of pressure (COP) velocity and length. The cutaneous temperature of the lower limbs decreased during and 10 minutes after WBV. WBV decreases touch-pressure sensitivity at all measured frequencies 10 min after exposure. This may be related to the impaired balance at higher frequencies since these variables have a role in maintaining postural stability. Vasoconstriction might explain the decreased lower limb temperature. PMID:25664338

  12. THE FATE OF MRS ROBINSON: CRITERIA FOR RECOGNITION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION INJURY AS AN OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. J. HULSHOF; G. VAN DER LAAN; I. T. J. BRAAM; J. H. A. M. VERBEEK

    2002-01-01

    Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four

  13. Review of the Literature Whole-body vibration and postural stress among operators of construction equipment: A literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Kumar Kittusamy; Bryan Buchholz

    Introduction: Operators of construction equipment perform various duties at work that expose them to a variety of risk factors that may lead to health problems. A few of the health hazards among operators of construction equipment are: (a) whole-body vibration, (b) awkward postural requirements (including static sitting), (c) dust, (d) noise, (e) temperature extremes, and (f) shift work. It has

  14. The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. J. Hulshof; G. van der Laan; I. T. J. Braam; J. H. A. M. Verbeek

    2002-01-01

    Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four

  15. Seated whole body vibrations with high-magnitude accelerations—relative roles of inertia and muscle forces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Bazrgari; A. Shirazi-Adl; M. Kasra

    2008-01-01

    Reliable computation of spinal loads and trunk stability under whole body vibrations with high acceleration contents requires accurate estimation of trunk muscle activities that are often overlooked in existing biodynamic models. A finite element model of the spine that accounts for nonlinear load- and direction-dependent properties of lumbar segments, complex geometry and musculature of the spine, and dynamic characteristics of

  16. A whole body vibration perception map and associated acceleration loads at the lower leg, hip and head.

    PubMed

    Sonza, Anelise; Völkel, Nina; Zaro, Milton A; Achaval, Matilde; Hennig, Ewald M

    2015-07-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has become popular in recent years. However, WBV may be harmful to the human body. The goal of this study was to determine the acceleration magnitudes at different body segments for different frequencies of WBV. Additionally, vibration sensation ratings by subjects served to create perception vibration magnitude and discomfort maps of the human body. In the first of two experiments, 65 young adults mean (± SD) age range of 23 (± 3.0) years, participated in WBV severity perception ratings, based on a Borg scale. Measurements were performed at 12 different frequencies, two intensities (3 and 5 mm amplitudes) of rotational mode WBV. On a separate day, a second experiment (n = 40) included vertical accelerometry of the head, hip and lower leg with the same WBV settings. The highest lower limb vibration magnitude perception based on the Borg scale was extremely intense for the frequencies between 21 and 25 Hz; somewhat hard for the trunk region (11-25 Hz) and fairly light for the head (13-25 Hz). The highest vertical accelerations were found at a frequency of 23 Hz at the tibia, 9 Hz at the hip and 13 Hz at the head. At 5 mm amplitude, 61.5% of the subjects reported discomfort in the foot region (21-25 Hz), 46.2% for the lower back (17, 19 and 21 Hz) and 23% for the abdominal region (9-13 Hz). The range of 3-7 Hz represents the safest frequency range with magnitudes less than 1 g(*)sec for all studied regions. PMID:25962379

  17. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on running gait in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Filingeri, Davide; Chamari, Karim; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Calcagno, Giuseppe; Bosco, Gerardo; Annino, Giuseppe; Tihanyi, Jozsef; Pizzolato, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) on running gait. The running kinematic of sixteen male marathon runners was assessed on a treadmill at iso-efficiency speed after 10 min of WBV and SHAM (i.e. no WBV) conditions. A high-speed camera (210 Hz) was used for the video analysis and heart rate (HR) was also monitored. The following parameters were investigated: step length (SL), flight time (FT), step frequency (SF), contact time (CT), HR and the internal work (WINT). Full-within one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the randomised crossover design indicated that when compared to SHAM conditions, WBV decreased the SL and the FT by ~4% (P < 0.0001) and ~7.2% (P < 0.001), respectively, and increased the SF ~4% (P < 0.0001) while the CT was not changed. This effect occurred during the first minute of running: the SL decreased ~3.5% (P < 0.001) and SF increased ~3.3% (P < 0.001). During the second minute the SL decreased ~1.2% (P = 0.017) and the SF increased ~1.1% (P = 0.02). From the third minute onwards, there was a return to the pre-vibration condition. The WINT was increased by ~4% (P < 0.0001) during the WBV condition. Ten minutes of WBV produced a significant alteration of the running kinematics during the first minutes post exposure. These results provide insights on the effects of WBV on the central components controlling muscle function. PMID:24576194

  18. Impairment in Extinction of Contextual and Cued Fear Following Post-Training Whole-Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Reid H. J.; Marzulla, Tessa; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Because of the use of radiation in cancer therapy, the risk of nuclear contamination from power plants, military conflicts, and terrorism, there is a compelling scientific and public health interest in the effects of environmental radiation exposure on brain function, in particular hippocampal function and learning and memory. Previous studies have emphasized changes in learning and memory following radiation exposure. These approaches have ignored the question of how radiation exposure might impact recently acquired memories, which might be acquired under traumatic circumstances (cancer treatment, nuclear disaster, etc.). To address the question of how radiation exposure might affect the processing and recall of recently acquired memories, we employed a fear conditioning paradigm wherein animals were trained, and subsequently irradiated (whole-body X-ray irradiation) 24?h later. Animals were given 2?weeks to recover, and were tested for retention and extinction of hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning or hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning. Exposure to irradiation following training was associated with reduced daily increases in body weights over the 22-days of the study and resulted in greater freezing levels and aberrant extinction 2?weeks later. This was also observed when the intensity of the training protocol was increased. Cued freezing levels and measures of anxiety 2?weeks after training were also higher in irradiated than sham-irradiated mice. In contrast to contextual freezing levels, cued freezing levels were even higher in irradiated mice receiving 5 shocks during training than sham-irradiated mice receiving 10 shocks during training. In addition, the effects of radiation on extinction of contextual fear were more profound than those on the extinction of cued fear. Thus, whole-body irradiation elevates contextual and cued fear memory recall. PMID:25071488

  19. Effect of stochastic resonance whole body vibration on functional performance in the frail elderly: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jessica; Radlinger, Lorenz; Baur, Heiner; Rogan, Slavko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effect size of a four-week stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) intervention on functional performance and strength in frail elderly individuals. Twenty-seven participants have been recruited and randomly distributed in an intervention group (IG) and a sham group (SG). Primary outcomes were feasibility objectives like recruitment, compliance and safety. Secondary outcomes were short physical performance battery (SPPB), isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) and isometric rate of force development (IRFD). The intervention was feasible and safe. Furthermore it showed significant effects (p=0.035) and medium effect size (0.43) within the IG in SPPB. SR-WBV training over four weeks with frail elderly individuals is a safe intervention method. The compliance was good and SR-WBV intervention seems to improve functional performance. Further research over a longer time frame for the strength measurements (IMVC and IRFD) is needed to detect potential intervention effects in the force measurements as well. Clinical Trial register: NTC01704976. PMID:25042993

  20. Effects of combining whole-body vibration with exercise on the consequences of detraining on muscle performance in untrained adults.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yusuke; Oguma, Yuko

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated whether whole-body vibration (WBV) coupled with low-velocity exercise (EX) for 13 weeks retains muscle performance gains after 5 weeks of subsequent detraining compared with the results of an identical EX program without WBV. Thirty-two untrained healthy adults (22-49 years of age) were randomly assigned to groups that performed EX with or without WBV (EX-WBV and EX, respectively; n = 16 per group). The following outcome variables were evaluated: countermovement jump height; maximal isometric, concentric, and eccentric knee extension strengths; local muscular endurance; and lumbar extension torque before, during, and after the 13-week training period, and after 5 weeks of detraining. Compared with the EX group, significantly higher increases in countermovement jump height and isometric and concentric knee extension strengths were detected in the EX-WBV group after the 13-week training period. However, detraining caused significant declines in these 3 muscle performance tests only in the EX-WBV group (-4.8, -10.2, and -17.2%, respectively), resulting in no significant differences between the test and control groups after the detraining period. After detraining, all examined variables showed significantly better performance compared with pretraining (p < 0.05) and did not significantly differ from midtraining (7 weeks) in both groups (p > 0.05). These results suggest that muscle strength in the lower extremities, particularly isometric and concentric contractions, and muscle power might be more susceptible to short-term detraining effects when exercise is combined with WBV. Thus, it is necessary to perform regular exercise to maximize the benefits of WBV on muscle strength and power during the early stages of training in previously untrained individuals. PMID:22739330

  1. The Effect of Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Muscle Function in Children With Cystic Fibrosis: A Pilot Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Kaitlin; Orr, Rhonda; Huang, Peite; Selvadurai, Hiran; Cooper, Peter; Munns, Craig Frank; Singh, Maria A Fiatarone

    2013-01-01

    Background To examine the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) exposure on muscle function in children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Non-randomised controlled cross-over trial. Methods The setting was home-based WBV exposure. The participants were children (8 - 15 years) with CF (n = 7). Intervention: participants served as their own controls for the first four weeks (usual care), then underwent four weeks of parentally-supervised home-based WBV exposure followed by four weeks washout (usual care). The WBV exposure consisted of 20 - 30 minutes of intermittent (1 min vibration:1 min rest) exposure on a Galileo platform (20 - 22Hz, 1 mm amplitude) 3 days/week. The primary outcome measures of absolute and relative lower body (leg extension (LE), leg press (LP)), upper body (chess press (CP)) strength and power, and power were measured at baseline, and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Secondary exploratory outcomes were cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and health-related quality of life. Results Six participants completed the training without adverse events. Muscle function changes following WBV exposure were not statistically significant. However, moderate-to-large relative effect sizes (ES) favouring WBV were evident for leg extension strength (ES = 0.66 (-0.50, 1.82)), LP relative strength (ES = 0.92 (-0.27, 2.11)), leg press peak power (ES = 0.78 (-0.50, 2.07)) and CMJ height (ES = 0.60 (-0.56 to 1.76)). Conclusions The results from this first controlled trial indicate that WBV may be a potentially effective exercise modality to safely increase leg strength and explosive power in children with CF. Potentially clinically relevant changes support continued investigation of the efficacy, mechanism and feasibility of this intervention in future large-scale studies. PMID:23671546

  2. Whole-body vibration increases upper and lower body muscle activity in older adults: potential use of vibration accessories.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Casajús, Jose A; Hazell, Tom J; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on upper and lower body muscle activity during static muscle contractions (squat and bicep curls). The use of WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform and a soft surface mat were also evaluated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured for the medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles in fourteen healthy older adults (74.8±4.5 years; mean±SD) with a WBV stimulus at an acceleration of 40 m s(-2) (30 Hz High, 2.5 mm or 46 Hz Low, 1.1 mm). WBV increased lower body (VL and MG) sEMG vs baseline (no WBV) though this was decreased with the use of the soft mat. The addition of the bicep curl with hand straps had no effect on lower body sEMG. WBV also increased BB sEMG vs baseline which was further increased when using the hand straps. There was no upper body effect of the soft mat. This study demonstrates WBV increases both lower and upper body muscle activity in healthy older adults. Moreover, WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform or a soft surface mat may be used to alter exercise intensity. PMID:22406015

  3. Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole?body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hulshof, C T J; Verbeek, J H A M; Braam, I T J; Bovenzi, M; van Dijk, F J H

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole?body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. Methods An experimental pretest/post?test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services (OHS) in the experimental group in the use of the programme. OHS in the control group were asked to deliver care as usual. In total, 15 OHS, 32 OHS professionals, 26 companies, and 260 forklift drivers were involved. Post?test measurements were carried out one year after the start of the programme. Results Baseline data before the start of the programme showed no difference between experimental and control group. Results of the outcome evaluation indicate a slight, although not statistically significant, reduction of WBV exposure in the experimental group (p?=?0.06). Process evaluation revealed a positive influence on company policy toward WBV, attitude and intended behaviour of forklift drivers, and a trend towards an increase in knowledge of OHS professionals and company managers. The number of observed control measures with a major impact (levelling of surface and reduction of speed) was rather low. In those cases where control measures had been taken, there was a significant reduction in WBV exposure. This limited effect of the programme might be caused by the short period of follow up and the dropout of participants. The feasibility and the usefulness of the programme within the OHS setting were rated good by the participants. Conclusions This programme to decrease WBV exposure was partially effective. Significant effects on intermediate objectives were observed. More research on the effectiveness of intervention in the field of WBV is needed. PMID:16551762

  4. Effect of phase on discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration and shock-Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

    2002-03-01

    An experimental study has investigated the effect of ``phase'' on the subjective responses of human subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration and shock. The stimuli were formed from two frequency components: 3 and 9 Hz for continuous vibrations and 3 and 12 Hz for shocks. The two frequency components, each having 1.0 ms-2 peak acceleration, were combined to form various waveforms. The effects of the vibration magnitude on the discomfort caused by the input stimuli were also investigated with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Various objective measurements of acceleration and force at the seat surface, the effects of different frequency weightings and second and fourth power evaluations were compared with judgments of the discomfort of the stimuli. It was found that a 6% to 12% increase in magnitude produced a statistically significant increase in discomfort with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Judgments of discomfort caused by changes in vibration magnitude were highly correlated with all of the objective measurements used in the study. The effects on discomfort of the phase between components in the continuous vibrations were not statistically significant, as predicted using evaluation methods with a power of 2. However, small changes in discomfort were correlated with the vibration dose value (VDV) of the Wb frequency-weighted acceleration. The effect of phase between frequency components within the shocks was statistically significant, although no objective measurement method used in the study was correlated with the subjective judgments.

  5. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONG-QIANG; QI, MENG-CHUN; XU, JIANG; XU, JUAN; LIU, HUA-WEI; DONG, WEI; LI, JIN-YUAN; HU, MIN

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri-implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole-body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone-to-implant contact, peri-implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4-week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

  6. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Meng-Chun; Xu, Jiang; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Dong, Wei; Li, Jin-Yuan; Hu, Min

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low?magnitude, high?frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri?implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole?body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone?to?implant contact, peri?implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4?week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri?implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

  7. Effect of whole-body vibration on lower-limb EMG activity in subjects with and without spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh-Meghrazi, Milad; Masani, Kei; Zariffa, José; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Popovic, Milos R; Craven, B Catharine

    2014-09-01

    Objective Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in substantial reductions in lower extremity muscle mass and bone mineral density below the level of the lesion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been proposed as a means of counteracting or treating musculoskeletal degradation after chronic motor complete SCI. To ascertain how WBV might be used to augment muscle and bone mass, we investigated whether WBV could evoke lower extremity electromyography (EMG) activity in able-bodied individuals and individuals with SCI, and which vibration parameters produced the largest magnitude of effect. Methods Ten male subjects participated in the study, six able-bodied and four with chronic SCI. Two different manufacturers' vibration platforms (WAVE(®) and Juvent™) were evaluated. The effects of vibration amplitude (0.2, 0.6 or 1.2 mm), vibration frequency (25, 35, or 45 Hz), and subject posture (knee angle of 140°, 160°, or 180°) on lower extremity EMG activation were determined (not all combinations of parameters were possible on both platforms). A novel signal processing technique was proposed to estimate the power of the EMG waveform while minimizing interference and artifacts from the plate vibration. Results WBV can elicit EMG activity among subjects with chronic SCI, if appropriate vibration parameters are employed. The amplitude of vibration had the greatest influence on EMG activation, while the frequency of vibration had lesser but statistically significant impact on the measured lower extremity EMG activity. Conclusion These findings suggest that WBV with appropriate parameters may constitute a promising intervention to treat musculoskeletal degradation after chronic SCI. PMID:24986541

  8. Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects sitting in four postures (feet hanging, maximum thigh contact, average thigh contact, and minimum thigh contact) both with and without a rigid vertical backrest while exposed to four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 rms) of random fore-and-aft vibration. The power absorbed by the body at the supporting seat surface when there was no backrest showed a peak around 1 Hz and another peak between 3 and 4 Hz. Supporting the back with the backrest decreased the power absorbed at the seat at low frequencies but increased the power absorbed at high frequencies. Foot support influenced both the magnitude and the frequency of the peaks in the absorbed power spectra as well as the total absorbed power. The measurements of absorbed power are consistent with backrests being beneficial during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but detrimental with high frequency fore-and-aft vibration.

  9. Specific whole-body shifts induced by frequency-modulated vibrations of human plantar soles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Kavounoudias; Régine Roll; Jean-Pierre Roll

    1999-01-01

    This study sought to analyze the postural responses induced by separately or simultaneously vibrating with different frequencies the forefoot and rear foot zones of both soles in standing subjects. Stimulating each zone separately resulted in spatially oriented body tilts; their amplitude and velocity varied linearly according to the frequency, and their direction was always opposite to the plantar site vibrated.

  10. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  11. The ISO standard: Guide for the evaluation of human exposure to whole-body vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vongierke, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The international guideline is discussed in terms of safety and human tolerance. Charts for equal subjective vibration intensity, subjective judgement of equal fatigue, and severe discomfort boundaries are included.

  12. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  13. Whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit improves aerobic fitness and muscle strength in sedentary young females.

    PubMed

    Myers, Terrence R; Schneider, Matthew G; Schmale, Matthew S; Hazell, Tom J

    2015-06-01

    Myers, TR, Schneider, MG, Schmale, MS, and Hazell, TJ. Whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit improves aerobic fitness and muscle strength in sedentary young females. J Strength Cond Res 29(6): 1592-1600, 2015-This study aimed to determine whether a time-effective whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit using only body weight exercises is as effective in improving aerobic and anaerobic fitness, as well as muscular strength and endurance as a traditional concurrent style training combining resistance and endurance training. Thirty-four sedentary females (20.9 ± 3.2 years; 167.6 ± 6.4 cm; 65.0 ± 15.2 kg) were assigned to either: (a) a combined resistance and aerobic exercise group (COMBINED; n = 17) or (b) a circuit-based whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit group (CIRCUIT; n = 17). Training was 3 days per week for 5 weeks. Pre- and post-training measures included a (Equation is included in full-text article.)test, anaerobic Wingate cycling test, and muscular strength and endurance tests. After training, (Equation is included in full-text article.)improved with CIRCUIT by 11% (p = 0.015), with no change for COMBINED (p = 0.375). Both relative peak power output and relative average power output improved with CIRCUIT by 5% (p = 0.027) and 3.2% (p = 0.006), respectively, and with COMBINED by 5.3% (p = 0.025) and 5.1% (p = 0.003). Chest and hamstrings 1 repetition maximum (1RM) improved with CIRCUIT by 20.6% (p = 0.011) and 8.3% (p = 0.022) and with COMBINED by 35.6% (p < 0.001) and 10.2% (p = 0.004), respectively. Only the COMBINED group improved back (11.7%; p = 0.017) and quadriceps (9.6%; p = 0.006) 1RM. The COMBINED group performed more repetitions at 60% of their pretraining 1RM for back (10.0%; p = 0.006) and hamstring (23.3%; p = 0.056) vs. CIRCUIT. Our results suggest that a circuit-based whole-body aerobic resistance training program can elicit a greater cardiorespiratory response and similar muscular strength gains with less time commitment compared with a traditional resistance training program combined with aerobic exercise. PMID:25486302

  14. Comparison of whole-body vibration exposures in buses: effects and interactions of bus and seat design.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Per M G; Rynell, Patrik W; Hagberg, Mats; Johnson, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Bus and seat design may be important for the drivers' whole-body vibration (WBV). WBV exposures in buses during actual operation were assessed. WBV attenuation performance between an air-suspension seat and a static pedestal seat in low-floor buses was compared; there were no differences in WBV attenuation between the seats. Air-suspension seat performance in a high-floor and low-floor bus was compared. Relative to the pedestal seat with its relatively static, limited travel seat suspension, the air-suspension seat with its dynamic, longer travel suspension provided little additional benefit. Relative to the measurement collected at the bus floor, the air-suspension seat amplified the WBV exposures in the high-floor bus. All WBV exposures were below European Union (EU) daily exposure action values. The EU Vibration Directive only allows the predominant axis of vibration exposure to be evaluated but a tri-axial vector sum exposure may be more representative of the actual health risks. PMID:25290555

  15. Psychophysical relationships characterizing human response to whole-body sinusoidal vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermore, significant differences were found to exist between discomfort and intensity subjective response for several but not all discrete frequencies investigated. The implication of these results is that ride quality criteria based upon subjective evaluation of vibration intensity should be applied cautiously in the development of criteria for human comfort.

  16. [Effect of whole body vibration on the neuromuscular performance of females 65 years and older. One-year results of the controlled randomized ELVIS study].

    PubMed

    Kemmler, W; V Stengel, S; Mayer, S; Niedermayer, M; Hentschke, C; Kalender, W A

    2010-04-01

    Sarcopenia is linked to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in the aging. Whole body vibration (WBV) exercises are currently discussed as a "gentle" alternative to conventional exercises to improve muscle mass. The present study scrutinized whether a multipurpose (exercise) training program using WBV can improve muscle mass and neuromuscular capacity, while lowering fall risk. A total of 151 postmenopausal women were randomized into three groups: exercise group (TG), exercise group with vibration (VTG), and fitness control group (CG). The TG group participated in an exercise program including leg strengthening training twice a week over 12 months, while the VTG carried out an identical program with the leg exercises performed under WBV. Despite a positive trend regarding lean body mass in the two exercise groups, there was no difference between groups. Both exercise groups showed a significant increase (vs. KG) in trunk strength. An improvement in both exercise groups was also measured with respect to leg strength, but only the VTG showed significant differences compared to the CG. In addition, a significant lower risk of falls compared with the CG was evident only in VTG. PMID:19789832

  17. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P < 0.01) from (mean ± SD (95% confidence interval)) 3098 ± 236 (2985, 3212) during MTT to 3461 ± 586 (3178, 3743) during SKI, while protein (g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) intake remained constant (MTT, 1.59 ± 0.33 (1.51, 1.66); and SKI, 1.71 ± 0.55 (1.58, 1.85)). Energy expenditure increased (P < 0.05) during SKI (6851 ± 562 (6580, 7122)) compared with MTT (5480 ± 389 (5293, 5668)) and exceeded energy intake. Protein flux, synthesis, and breakdown were all increased (P < 0.05) 24%, 18%, and 27%, respectively, during SKI compared with baseline and MTT. Whole-body protein balance was lower (P < 0.05) during SKI (-1.41 ± 1.11 (-1.98, -0.84) g·kg(-1)·10 h) than MTT and baseline. Muscle damage and soreness increased and performance decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The physiological consequences observed during short-term winter military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits. PMID:25386980

  18. Analysis of whole-body vibration during manual wheelchair propulsion: a comparison of seat cushions and back supports for individuals without a disability.

    PubMed

    DiGiovine, Carmen P; Cooper, Rory A; Wolf, Erik; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Boninger, Michael L

    2003-01-01

    Whole-body vibration exposure has been found to be detrimental to the health of humans owing to effects such as degraded comfort, disc degeneration, and lower back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if selected seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations during manual wheelchair propulsion. Ten unimpaired participants traversed an activities of daily living course using four seat cushions and four back supports. Vibrations were measured using triaxial accelerometers. The time domain and frequency domain transmissibility was used to determine if differences exist among seat cushions and back supports. Differences were found among the four seat cushions and four back supports. Seat cushion and back support manufacturers should concentrate on single-event shocks and repeated shocks, as opposed to oscillatory motions and self-generated vibrations, because the vibrations generated by these events tend to reside in the range of frequencies most sensitive to humans. Vibrations in this range of frequencies have the greatest effect on the transmission of whole-body vibration during manual wheelchair propulsion. Differences among the seat cushions and back supports appear to be due to the seat cushion/back support design and postural support. From a clinical perspective, the time domain transmissibility best describes the transmission of whole-body vibration. PMID:15137730

  19. Escape conditioning and low-frequency whole-body vibration - The effects of frequency, amplitude, and controls for noise and activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, E. L.; Wike, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Seven experiments are reported on low-frequency whole-body vibration and rats' escape conditioning in a modified Skinner box. In the first three studies, conditioning was observed but was independent of frequency. In experiment four, the number of escape responses was directly related to vibration amplitude. Experiment five was a control for vibration noise and noise termination; experiments six and seven studied vibration-induced activation. Noise termination did not produce conditioning. In experiment six, subjects made more responses when responding led to termination than when it did not. In experiment seven, subjects preferred a bar which terminated vibration to one which did not.

  20. The development of an intervention programme to reduce whole-body vibration exposure at work induced by a change in behaviour: a study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivo J. H. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whole body vibration (WBV) exposure at work is common and studies found evidence that this exposure might cause low back pain (LBP). A recent review concluded there is a lack of evidence of effective strategies to reduce WBV exposure. Most research in this field is focussed on the technical implications, although changing behaviour towards WBV exposure might be promising

  1. Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Gérard; Mistrot, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to which the driver was exposed. Typical input signals were recorded to be reproduced in the laboratory. Technical specifications are defined for the suspension. In order to evaluate the suspension vibration attenuation performance, a model of a sitting human body was developed and coupled to a seat model. The seat model combines the models of each suspension component. A linear two-degree-of-freedom model is used to describe the dynamic behaviour of the sitting driver. Model parameters are identified by fitting the computed apparent mass frequency response functions to the measured values. Model extensions are proposed to investigate postural effects involving variations in hands and feet positions and interaction of the driver's back with the backrest. Suspension design parameters are firstly optimized by computing the seat/man model response to sinusoidal acceleration. Four criteria including transmissibility, interaction force between the driver's back and the backrest and relative maximal displacement of the suspension are computed. A new suspension design with optimized features is proposed. Its performance is checked from calculations of the response of the seat/man model subjected to acceleration measured on the wheel loader during real work conditions. On the basis of the computed values of the SEAT factors, it is found possible to design a suspension that would increase the attenuation provided by the seat by a factor of two.

  2. Occupational exposure to whole-body vibration: unfavourable effects due to the use of old earth-moving machinery in mine reclamation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valentina Dentoni; Giorgio Massacci

    2012-01-01

    Long-term exposure to high levels of whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), particularly for the drivers of off-road vehicles. Based on the results of an extensive vibration survey carried out in the mine reclamation sites of the Geo-Mineral Park of Sardinia, this article analyses the effect produced by the use of old

  3. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A; Pick, C; Harrach, R; Stein, G; Bendella, H; Ozsoy, O; Ozsoy, U; Schoenau, E; Jaminet, P; Sarikcioglu, L; Dunlop, S; Angelov, D N

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system. PMID:26032204

  4. The relative importance of whole body vibration and occupational lifting as risk factors for low-back pain

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, K; Griffin, M; Syddall, H; Pannett, B; Cooper, C; Coggon, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To explore the impact of occupational exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) on low back pain (LBP) in the general population and to estimate the burden of LBP attributable to occupational WBV in comparison with that due to occupational lifting. Methods: A questionnaire including sections on WBV at work, LBP, and potential risk factors was mailed to a community sample of 22 194 men and women of working age. Sources and durations of exposure to occupational WBV were ascertained for the past week and personal vibration doses (eVDV) were estimated. Analysis was confined to subjects reporting exposures in the past week as typical of their work. Associations of LBP with eVDV, driving industrial vehicles, and occupational lifting were explored by logistic regression and attributable numbers were calculated. Results: Significant associations were found between daily lifting of weights greater than 10 kg at work and LBP, troublesome LBP (which made it difficult to put on hosiery), and sciatica (prevalence ratios 1.3 to 1.7); but the risk of these outcomes in both sexes varied little by eVDV and only weak associations were found with riding on industrial vehicles. Assuming causal associations, the numbers of cases of LBP in Britain attributable to occupational WBV were estimated to be 444 000 in men and 95 000 in women. This compared with an estimated 940 000 male cases and 370 000 female cases of LBP from occupational lifting. Conclusions: The burden of LBP in Britain from occupational exposure to WBV is smaller than that attributable to lifting at work. PMID:14504358

  5. Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

  6. Effect of 6 months of whole body vibration on lumbar spine bone density in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chung-Liang; Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Chen, Chung-Nan; Liao, Wan-Chun; Wang, Chun-Hou; Lee, Meng-Chih; Hsu, Pi-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Background The issue of osteoporosis-induced fractures has attracted the world’s attention. Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk for this type of fracture. The nonmedicinal intervention for postmenopausal women is mainly exercise. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a simple and convenient exercise. There have been some studies investigating the effect of WBV on osteoporosis; however, the intervention models and results are different. This study mainly investigated the effect of high-frequency and high-magnitude WBV on the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine in postmenopausal women. Methods This study randomized 28 postmenopausal women into either the WBV group or the control group for a 6-month trial. The WBV group received an intervention of high-frequency (30 Hz) and high-magnitude (3.2 g) WBV in a natural full-standing posture for 5 minutes, three times per week, at a sports center. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the lumbar BMD of the two groups before and after the intervention. Results Six months later, the BMD of the WBV group had significantly increased by 2.032% (P=0.047), while that of the control group had decreased by 0.046% (P=0.188). The comparison between the two groups showed that the BMD of the WBV group had increased significantly (P=0.016). Conclusion This study found that 6 months of high-frequency and high-magnitude WBV yielded significant benefits to the BMD of the lumbar spine in postmenopausal women, and could therefore be provided as an alternative exercise. PMID:24348029

  7. Contributions of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the electrooculogram to periocular potentials produced by whole-body vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Steven L.; Paillard, Aurore C.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experiment to investigate the emergence of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) during the linear vestibular ocular reflex (LVOR) evoked by whole-body vibration (WBV). OVEMP and electrooculogram (EOG) montages were employed to record periocular potentials (POPs) from six subjects during WBV in the nasooccipital (NO) axis over a range of frequencies from 0.5 to 64 Hz with approximately constant peak head acceleration of 1.0 ms?2 (i.e., 0.1 g). Measurements were made in two context conditions: a fixation context to examine the effect of gaze eccentricity (0 vs. 20°), and a visual context, where a target was either head-fixed or earth-fixed. The principal results are that from 0.5 to 2 Hz POP magnitude in the earth-fixed condition is related to head displacement, so with constant acceleration at all frequencies it reduces with increasing frequency, but at frequencies greater than 2 Hz both POP magnitude and POP gain, defined as the ratio of POP magnitude at 20 and 0°, increase with increasing frequency. By exhibiting this high-pass characteristic, a property shared with the LVOR, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the OVEMP, as commonly employed in the clinical setting, is a high-frequency manifestation of the LVOR. However, we also observed low-frequency acceleration following POPs in head-fixed conditions, consistent with a low-frequency OVEMP, and found evidence of a high-frequency visual context effect, which is also consistent with the OVEMP being a manifestation of the LVOR. PMID:22984251

  8. Muscle activity, cross-sectional area, and density following passive standing and whole body vibration: A case series.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Alizadeh-Meghrazi, Milad; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Zariffa, Jose; Moore, Cameron; Giangregorio, Lora; Popovic, Milos R; Catharine Craven, B

    2014-09-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of intermittent passive standing (PS) and whole body vibration (WBV) on the electromyography (EMG) activity, cross-sectional area, and density of lower extremity muscles in individuals with chronic motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Case series. Methods Seven adult men with chronic (?2 years), thoracic motor complete (AIS A-B) SCI completed a 40-week course of thrice-weekly intermittent PS-WBV therapy, in a flexed knee posture (160°), for 45 minutes per session at a frequency of 45 Hz and 0.6-0.7 mm displacement using the WAVE(®) Pro Plate, with an integrated EasyStand™ standing frame. EMG was measured in major lower extremity muscles to represent muscle activity during PS-WBV. The cross-sectional area and density of the calf muscles were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the widest calf cross-section (66% of the tibia length) at pre- and post-intervention. All measured variables were compared between the pre- and post-intervention measurements to assess change after the PS-WBV intervention. Results PS-WBV acutely induced EMG activity in lower extremity muscles of SCI subjects. No significant changes in lower extremity EMG activity, muscle cross-sectional area, or density were observed following the 40-week intervention. Conclusions Although acute exposure to PS-WBV can induce electrophysiological activity of lower extremity muscles during PS in men with motor complete SCI, the PS-WBV intervention for 40 weeks was not sufficient to result in enhanced muscle activity, or to increase calf muscle cross-sectional area or density. PMID:25059652

  9. The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HULSHOF, C. T. J.; VAN DER LAAN, G.; BRAAM, I. T. J.; VERBEEK, J. H. A. M.

    2002-05-01

    Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four European Union countries have decided to recognize and compensate LBP and certain spinal disorders as an occupational disease. In this paper, we review the criteria currently in use for the recognition of this occupational disease. A search of the literature was performed; additional information was obtained in work visits to national occupational disease institutes in Germany, France and Belgium, in annual reports and national statistics on occupational diseases. Belgium was the first country to add WBV injury to the official list of occupational diseases (1978), followed by Germany (1993), the Netherlands (1997), and France (1999). The incidence of newly recognized cases in 1999 varied considerably: 763 in Belgium, 269 in France, 16 in Germany, and 10 reported cases in the Netherlands. The findings of this review indicate that significant differences exist in the established and applied diagnostic and exposure criteria in the four EU countries. This is illustrated by the case of Mrs Robinson, a 41-year-old forklift driver with LBP, who would probably get recognition and compensation in the Netherlands and Belgium but would be rejected in France and Germany. The development of uniform internationally accepted criteria is recommended, also from an epidemiological point of view, as many data are collected in the process of recognition of this occupational disease.

  10. CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF LOW-BACK PAIN PRESENTING FOR MRI, WITH SPECIAL RELATION TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, KT; Harris, EC; Griffin, MJ; Bennett, J; Reading, I; Sampson, M; Coggon, D

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate risk factors for low-back pain (LBP) presenting for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with special focus on whole-body vibration (WBV). Methods A case-control approach was used. The study population comprised working-aged subjects from a catchment area for radiology services. Cases were a consecutive series referred for a lumbar MRI because of LBP. Controls were age- sex-matched subjects X-rayed for other reasons. Subjects were questioned about physical factors loading the spine, psychosocial factors, driving, personal characteristics, mental health, and certain beliefs about LBP. Exposure to WBV was assessed by six measures, including weekly duration of professional driving, hours driven at a spell, and current r.m.s. A(8). Associations with WBV were examined with adjustment for age, sex, and other potential confounders. Results Altogether, 252 cases and 820 controls were studied, including 185 professional drivers. Strong associations were found with poor mental health and belief in work as a causal factor for LBP, and with occupational sitting for ?3 hours while not driving. Associations were also seen with taller stature, consulting propensity, BMI, smoking history, fear-avoidance beliefs, frequent twisting, low decision latitude and low support at work. However, associations with the six metrics of WBV were weak and not statistically significant, and no exposure-response relationships were found. Conclusions We found little evidence of a risk from professional driving or WBV. Drivers were substantially less heavily exposed to WBV than in some earlier surveys. Nonetheless, it seems that at the population level, WBV is not an important cause of LBP referred for MRI. PMID:18853063

  11. Acute whole body UVA irradiation combined with nitrate ingestion enhances time trial performance in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Muggeridge, David J; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Grace, Fergal M; Willis, Gareth; Thornhill, Laurence; Weller, Richard B; James, Philip E; Easton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to increase nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, reduce blood pressure (BP) and enhance exercise performance. Acute exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-A light also increases NO bioavailability and reduces BP. We conducted a randomized, counterbalanced placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of UV-A light alone and in combination with nitrate on the responses to sub-maximal steady-state exercise and time trial (TT) performance. Nine cyclists (VO2max 53.1?±?4.4?ml/kg/min) completed five performance trials comprising 10?min submaximal steady-state cycling followed by a 16.1?km TT. Following a familiarization the final four trials were preceded, in random order, by either (1) Nitrate gels (NIT)?+?UV-A, (2) Placebo (PLA)?+?UV-A, (3) NIT?+?Sham light (SHAM) and (4) PLA?+?SHAM (control). The NIT gels (2?×?60?ml gels,?~8.1?mmol nitrate) or a low-nitrate PLA were ingested 2.5?h prior to the trial. The light exposure consisted of 20?J/cm(2) whole body irradiation with either UV-A or SHAM light. Plasma nitrite was measured pre- and post-irradiation and VO2 was measured continuously during steady-state exercise. Plasma nitrite was higher for NIT?+?SHAM (geometric mean (95% CI), 332 (292-377) nM; P?=?0.029) and NIT?+?UV-A (456 (312-666) nM; P?=?0.014) compared to PLA?+?SHAM (215 (167-277) nM). Differences between PLA?+?SHAM and PLA?+?UV-A (282 (248-356) nM) were small and non-significant. During steady-state exercise VO2 was reduced following NIT?+?UVA (P?=?0.034) and tended to be lower in NIT?+?SHAM (P?=?0.086) but not PLA?+?UV-A (P?=?0.381) compared to PLA?+?SHAM. Performance in the TT was significantly faster following NIT?+?UV-A (mean?±?SD 1447?±?41?s P?=?0.005; d?=?0.47), but not PLA?+?UV-A (1450?±?40?s; d?=?0.41) or NIT?+?SHAM (1455?±?47?s; d?=?0.28) compared to PLA?+?SHAM (1469?±?52?s). These findings demonstrate that exposure to UV-A light alone does not alter the physiological responses to exercise or improve performance in a laboratory setting. A combination of UV-A and NIT, however, does improve cycling TT performance in this environment, which may be due to a larger increase in NO availability. PMID:25289793

  12. An updated review of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between exposure to whole-body vibration and low back pain (1986–1997)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body\\u000a vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1997. In\\u000a a systematic search, using several databases, of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with

  13. Long-term sick leave and disability pensioning due to back disorders of tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Paulien M. Bongers

    1990-01-01

    Summary In a historical 11-year follow-up study, disability pensioning and the incidence of the first sick leave of 4 weeks or longer due to back disorders has been investigated in a group of drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV), mainly of agricultural tractors. The reference group comprised workers not or only slightly exposed to WBV from the same and another

  14. Do whole-body vibration exercise and resistance exercise modify concentrations of salivary cortisol and immunoglobulin A?

    PubMed

    Roschel, H; Barroso, R; Batista, M; Ugrinowitsch, C; Tricoli, V; Arsati, F; Lima-Arsati, Y B; Araújo, V C; Moreira, A

    2011-06-01

    A single bout of resistance exercise (RE) induces hormonal and immune responses, playing an important role in a long-term adaptive process. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has also been shown to affect hormonal responses. Evidence suggests that combining WBV with RE may amplify hormonal and immune responses due to the increased neuromuscular load. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate salivary cortisol (Scortisol) and salivary IgA (SIgA) concentrations following a RE session combined or not with WBV. Nine university students (22.9 ± 5.1 years, 175.8 ± 5.2 cm, and 69.2 ± 7.3 kg) performed five sets of squat exercise (70% one-repetition-maximum) combined (R+V30) or not (R) with WBV at 30 Hz. Saliva samples were obtained before and after exercise. Subjects also rated their effort according to the Borg CR-10 scale (RPE). Data were analyzed by a mixed model. RPE was higher after R+V30 (8.3 ± 0.7) compared to R (6.2 ± 0.7). However, Scortisol (pre: 10.6 ± 7.6 and 11.7 ± 7.6, post: 8.3 ± 6.3 and 10.2 ± 7.2 ng/mL for R and R+V30, respectively) and SIgA concentrations (pre: 98.3 ± 22.6 and 116.1 ± 51.2, post: 116.6 ± 64.7 and 143.6 ± 80.5 µg/mL for R and R+V30, respectively) were unaffected. No significant correlations were observed between Scortisol and RPE (r = 0.45, P = 0.22; r = 0.30, P = 0.42, for R and R+V30, respectively). On the basis of these data, neither protocol modified salivary cortisol or IgA, although RPE was higher after R+V30 than R. PMID:21584438

  15. The effects of passive warm-up vs. whole-body vibration on high-intensity performance during sprint cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Núbia C P; Costa, Sidney J; da Fonseca, Sueli F; Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Gripp, Fernando J; Coimbra, Cândido C; Lacerda, Ana C R

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of passive warm-up (PW), whole-body vibration (WBV), and control (C) on high-intensity performance during sprint cycle exercise. Six recreationally trained men performed a 30-second sprint cycle test after the 3 aforementioned conditions; each test was carried out on a different day after balanced-order experimental tests. The WBV consisted of 5 minutes of squats associated with WBV (45 Hz, 2 mm). The PW consisted of 30 minutes of PW using a thermal blanket on the thighs and legs (35 W). The C consisted of 30 minutes of no warm-up with the subject lying down. Motor neuron excitability from the vastus lateralis muscle, evaluated by electromyography (EMG), was determined before exercise at rest and during sprint cycle exercise. Blood lactate levels (BLs), evaluated by spectroscopy, and muscle temperature (MT) of the thigh, estimated indirectly by measuring skin temperature, were determined at following time points: before exercise at rest (before and after experimental conditions), immediately, and 3 minutes after the 30-second sprint cycle test. Peak power, relative power, relative work, time of peak power, and pedaling cadence were significantly higher in the WBV compared with that for C (p < 0.05). Although MT was significantly greater in PW compared with that in WBV and C before exercise (p < 0.01), no significant differences were observed between the experimental conditions for BL immediately after sprint cycle exercise (p = 0.35) and in EMG during sprint cycle exercise (p = 0.16). Thus, it is plausible to suggest WBV as a method for an acute increase in high-intensity performance during sprint cycle exercise for athletes immediately before competition or training. PMID:22293678

  16. Changes in Bone Biomarkers, BMC, and Insulin Resistance Following a 10-Week Whole Body Vibration Exercise Program in Overweight Latino Boys

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, David N.; Anderson, Lindsey J.; Nickles, Chun M.; Lane, Christianne J.; Weigensberg, Marc J.; Schroeder, E. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: With the childhood obesity epidemic, efficient methods of exercise are sought to improve health. We tested whether whole body vibration (WBV) exercise can positively affect bone metabolism and improve insulin/glucose dynamics in sedentary overweight Latino boys. Methods: Twenty Latino boys 8-10 years of age were randomly assigned to either a control (CON) or 3 days/wk WBV exercise (VIB) for 10-wk. Results: Significant increases in BMC (4.5±3.2%; p=0.01) and BMD (1.3±1.3%; p<0.01) were observed for the VIB group when compared to baseline values. For the CON group BMC significantly increased (2.0±2.2%; p=0.02), with no change in BMD (0.8±1.3%; p=0.11). There were no significant between group changes in BMC or BMD. No significant change was observed for osteocalcin and (collagen type I C-telopeptide) CTx for the VIB group. However, osteocalcin showed a decreasing trend (p=0.09) and CTx significantly increased (p<0.03) for the CON group. This increase in CTx was significantly different between groups (p<0.02) and the effect size of between-group difference in change was large (-1.09). There were no significant correlations between osteocalcin and measures of fat mass or insulin resistance for collapsed data. Conclusion: Although bone metabolism was altered by WBV training, no associations were apparent between osteocalcin and insulin resistance. These findings suggest WBV exercise may positively increase BMC and BMD by decreasing bone resorption in overweight Latino boys.

  17. Short-term exercise training does not improve whole-body heat loss when rate of metabolic heat production is considered

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill Stapleton; Daniel Gagnon; Glen P. Kenny

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of an 8-week exercise training program in previously sedentary individuals on whole-body heat balance\\u000a during exercise at a constant rate of metabolic heat production. Prior to and after 8 weeks of training, ten participants\\u000a performed 60-min of cycling exercise at a constant rate of heat production (~450 W) followed by 60-min of recovery, at 30°C\\u000a and 15%

  18. Influence of forest machine function on operator exposure to whole-body vibration in a cut-to-length timber harvester.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, L M; Owende, P M O; Kanali, C L; Lyons, J; Ward, S M

    2004-09-15

    The influence of machine function (tree felling and processing, and machine movement over the terrain) on operator exposure to whole-body vibration in a cut-to-length (CTL) timber harvester was evaluated. Vibrations were measured on the seat and the cabin chassis in three orthogonal (x, y, z) axes for the tree felling and processing, and during motion on a test track. It was found that the level of vibration transmitted to the operator during felling and processing was mainly affected by the tree size (diameter). For tree diameter at breast height (dbh) range of 0.25-0.35 m that was investigated, the vertical (z-axis) vibration component during processing increased by up to 300%, and increased by 50% during felling. However, the associated vibration levels were not sufficient to pose any serious health risks to the operator for an exposure limit of 8 h. Vibration at the operator seat and cabin chassis was predominant in the lateral (y-axis) and vertical (z-axis) respectively, during vehicle motion over the standard test track. Vibration peaks of approximately 0.20 and 0.17 ms(-2) occurred at 5 and 3.2 Hz respectively. PMID:15370853

  19. Assessing combined exposures of whole-body vibration and awkward posture--further results from application of a simultaneous field measurement methodology.

    PubMed

    Raffler, Nastaran; Hermanns, Ingo; Sayn, Detlef; Göres, Benno; Ellegast, Rolf; Rissler, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The drivers of ten vehicles (tram, helicopter, saloon car, van, forklift, two mobile excavators, wheel loader, tractor, elevating platform truck) were studied with regard to the combined exposures of whole-body vibration and awkward posture during occupational tasks. Seven degrees of freedom (DOFs), or body angles, were recorded as a function of time by means of the CUELA measuring system (Computer-assisted registration and long-term analysis of musculoskeletal workloads) for the purpose of posture assessment. The vibrational exposure is expressed as the vector sum of the frequency-weighted accelerations in the three Cartesian coordinates; these were recorded simultaneously with the posture measurement. Based upon the percentage of working time spent under different workloads, a scheme is proposed for classification of the two exposures into three categories. In addition, a risk of adverse health effects classified as low, possible or high can be assigned to the combination of the two exposures. With regard to posture, the most severe exposure was measured for the drivers of the wheel loader and for the tractor driver, whereas the lowest exposure was measured for the helicopter pilots and van drivers. With regard to the combination of whole-body and posture exposures, the tractor driver and the elevating platform truck driver exhibited the highest workloads. PMID:20953080

  20. Influence of tyre inflation pressure on whole-body vibrations transmitted to the operator in a cut-to-length timber harvester.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, L M; Owende, P M O; Kanali, C L; Lyons, J; Ward, S M

    2004-05-01

    The influence of tyre inflation pressure on whole-body vibrations transmitted to the operator during the movement of a cut-to-length timber harvester was evaluated. Vibration measurements were taken in three orthogonal (x, y, z) axes at tyre pressure settings of 138, 345 and 414 kPa. Vibration was predominant in the vertical (z) direction with the peak rms acceleration value for the operator seat (0.281 ms(-2)) occurring at approximately 3.2 Hz. The corresponding peak value for the operator cabin chassis was 0.425 m s(-2) at 4 Hz. At 414 kPa, there was potential health risk on the operator for exposures above 8h duration. The vibration total values recorded for the operator seat at the maximum tyre inflation pressure setting were classed as "fairly uncomfortable" (ISO standard 2631-1), and vertical seat vibration transmissibility was highest between 4 and 8 Hz at the 345 kPa tyre pressure setting. The recorded values of WBV were significantly reduced by a reduction in tyre inflation pressure which may therefore be used to moderate the magnitude of WBV on wheeled timber harvesters. PMID:15145288

  1. Comparison Between Whole-Body Vibration, Light-Emitting Diode, and Cycling Warm-up on High-Intensity Physical Performance During Sprint Bicycle Exercise.

    PubMed

    Teles, Maria C; Fonseca, Ivana A T; Martins, Jeanne B; de Carvalho, Marielle M; Xavier, Murilo; Costa, Sidney J; de Avelar, Núbia C P; Ribeiro, Vanessa G C; Salvador, Fabiano S; Augusto, Leonardo; Mendonça, Vanessa A; Lacerda, Ana C R

    2015-06-01

    Teles, MC, Fonseca, IAT, Martins, JB, de Carvalho, MM, Xavier, M, Costa, SJ, de Avelar, NCP, Ribeiro, VGC, Salvador, FS, Augusto, L, Mendonça, VA, and Lacerda, ACR. Comparison between whole-body vibration, light-emitting diode, and cycling warm-up on high-intensity physical performance during sprint bicycle exercise. J Strength Cond Res 29(6): 1542-1550, 2015-The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation and whole-body vibration (WBV) delivered either in isolation or combination (LED + WBV), warm-up (WU), and a control (C) treatment on performance during a sprint bicycle exercise. Ten cyclists performed a 30-second sprint cycle test under these conditions. The LED light was applied at 4 points bilaterally. Whole-body vibration consisted of 5 minutes of squats associated with WBV. LED + WBV consisted of WBV followed by LED therapy. Warm-up consisted of 17 minutes of moderate-intensity bicycle exercise. Control consisted of 10 minutes at rest. Blood lactate (BL) and ammonia (BA) levels and skin temperature (ST) were determined. Peak power (842 ± 117 vs. 800 ± 106 vs. 809 ± 128 W [p = 0.02 and p = 0.01]), relative power (12.1 ± 1.0 vs. 11.5 ± 0.9 vs. 11.6 ± 1.0 W·kg [p = 0.02 and p = 0.02]), and relative work (277 ± 23 vs. 263 ± 24 vs. 260 ± 23 J·kg [p = 0.02 and p = 0.003]) were higher in the WU group compared with the control and LED groups. In the LED + WBV group, peak (833 ± 115 vs. 800 ± 106 W [p = 0.02]) and relative (11.9 ± 0.9 vs. 11.5 ± 0.9 W·kg [p = 0.02]) power were higher than those in the control group, and relative work (272 ± 22 vs. 260 ± 23 J·kg [p = 0.02]) were improved compared with the LED group. There were no differences for BL, BA, and ST. The findings of this study confirmed the effectiveness of a warm-up as a preparatory activity and demonstrated that LED + WBV and WBV were as effective as WU in improving cyclist performance during a sprint bicycle exercise. PMID:25764492

  2. Whole Body Vibration Exercise Protocol versus a Standard Exercise Protocol after ACL Reconstruction: A Clinical Randomized Controlled Trial with Short Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Berschin, Gereon; Sommer, Björn; Behrens, Antje; Sommer, Hans-Martin

    2014-01-01

    The suitability and effectiveness of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise in rehabilitation after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was studied using a specially designed WBV protocol. We wanted to test the hypothesis if WBV leads to superior short term results regarding neuromuscular performance (strength and coordination) and would be less time consuming than a current standard muscle strengthening protocol. In this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, forty patients who tore their ACL and underwent subsequent ligament reconstruction were enrolled. Patients were randomized to the whole body vibration (n=20) or standard rehabilitation exercise protocol (n=20). Both protocols started in the 2nd week after surgery. Isometric and isokinetic strength measurements, clinical assessment, Lysholm score, neuromuscular performance were conducted weeks 2, 5, 8 and 11 after surgery. Time spent for rehabilitation exercise was reduced to less than a half in the WBV group. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of clinical assessment, Lysholm score, isokinetic and isometric strength. The WBV group displayed significant better results in the stability test. In conclusion, preliminary data indicate that our whole body vibration muscle exercise protocol seems to be a good alternative to a standard exercise program in ACL-rehabilitation. Despite of its significant reduced time requirement it is at least equally effective compared to a standard rehabilitation protocol. Key points In this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis if WBV leads to superior short term results regarding neuromuscular performance (strength and coordination) and would be less time consuming than a current standard muscle strengthening protocol in forty patients who underwent ACL reconstruction. Time spent for rehabilitation exercise was reduced to less than a half in the WBV group as compared to the standard exercise group. Both protocols showed no differences regarding clinical assessment, Lysholm score, isokinetic and isometric strength. Despite a more than 50% reduction in time spent for exercise sessions, the WBV group achieved significant better results in the stability test. In conclusion, the presented WBV program can be considered as a practical alternative to a standard exercise program during ACL-rehabilitation. PMID:25177185

  3. Predicting the health risks related to whole-body vibration and shock: a comparison of alternative assessment methods for high-acceleration events in vehicles.

    PubMed

    Rantaharju, Taneli; Mansfield, Neil J; Ala-Hiiro, Jussi M; Gunston, Thomas P

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, alternative assessment methods for whole-body vibration and shocks are compared by means of 70 vibration samples measured from 13 work vehicles, deliberately selected to represent periods containing shocks. Five methodologies (ISO 2631-1:1997, BS 6841:1987, ISO 2631-5:2004, DIN SPEC 45697:2012 and one specified by Gunston [2011], 'G-method') were applied to the vibration samples. In order to compare different evaluation metrics, limiting exposures were determined by calculating times to reach the upper limit thresholds given in the methods. Over 10-fold shorter times to exposure thresholds were obtained for the tri-axial VDV (BS 6841) than for the dominant r.m.s. (ISO 2631-1) when exposures were of high magnitude or contained substantial shocks. Under these exposure conditions, the sixth power approaches (ISO 2631-5, DIN SPEC, G-method) are more stringent than a fourth power VDV method. The r.m.s. method may lead to misleading outcomes especially if a lengthy measurement includes a small number of severe impacts. In conclusion, methodologies produce different evaluations of the vibration severity depending on the exposure characteristics, and the correct method must be selected. PMID:25312024

  4. Earth moving machine whole-body vibration and the contribution of Sub-1Hz components to ISO 2631-1 metrics.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Neil J; Newell, Geraldine S; Notini, Luca

    2009-08-01

    Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) is an occupational hazard for operators of industrial vehicles, such as earth-moving machines. Quantification of WBV exposure in terms of impact on health forms one aspect of the Standard ISO 2631-1 (1997). Regarding assessment of risk to health, ISO 2631-1 (1997) states that if WBV components below 1 Hz are not ;relevant nor important' then they can be excluded from the assessment. In this paper the influence of sub-1 Hz components in WBV acquired from a sample of 46 earth moving machines is evaluated in terms of their contribution to ISO 2631-1 WBV exposure dose metrics: frequency weighted r.m.s. and the vibration dose value (VDV). For the majority of machines, a high proportion of the horizontal (x- and y-axis) WBV r.m.s. and VDV values was generated by sub-1 Hz vibration components; there was a much lower proportion of the vertical (z-axis) vibration generated by such components. PMID:19672014

  5. Effects of whole-body vibration with stochastic resonance on balance in persons with balance disability and falls history - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Slavko; Hilfiker, Roger; Schenk, Adrian; Vogler, Aldo; Taeymans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify and evaluate the evidence of the efficacy of stochastic resonance whole-body vibration (SR-WBV) on static, dynamic and functional balance in the elderly and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. English and German studies were consulted in the CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ISI Web of Knowledge, PEDro and PubMed databases. Eight of 138 eligible studies were included, involving 381 participants. The included studies showed a low to high risk of bias. Three studies focused on long-term effects after SR-WBV. One study evaluated SR-WBV impact over three days while four studies examined its immediate effects. There is only limited evidence that SR-WBV may be effective in improving static, dynamic and functional balance among elderly individuals and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. In the future, more studies of high methodological quality are needed to improve the level of evidence. PMID:24950116

  6. Apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of standing subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2006-05-01

    The effects of posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the standing human body during exposure to vertical vibration have been investigated. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration over the frequency range 2.0-20 Hz at three vibration magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 m s -2 rms. Subjects stood in five different postures: upright, lordotic, anterior lean, knees bent and knees more bent. The vertical acceleration at the floor and the forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions at the floor were used to obtain the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass was significantly reduced with knees bent and knees more bent postures, but there were only minor effects on the resonance frequency by changing the position of the upper body. Considerable cross-axis apparent mass, up to about 30% of the static mass of subjects, was found. The cross-axis apparent mass was influenced by all postural changes used in the study. In all postures the resonance frequencies of the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass tended to decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear characteristic tended to be less clear in some postures in which subjects increased muscle tension.

  7. Whole-body vibration can reduce calciuria induced by high protein intakes and may counteract bone resorption: A preliminary study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cardinale; J. Leiper; P. Farajian; M. Heer

    2007-01-01

    Excess protein intake can adversely affect the bone via an increase in calcium excretion, while suitable mechanical loading promotes osteogenesis. We therefore investigated whether vibration exposure could alleviate the bone mineral losses associated with a metabolic acidosis. Ten healthy individuals aged 22 – 29 years (median = 25) underwent three 5-day study periods while monitoring their dietary intake. The study consisted of recording the

  8. Whole body scanners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hein A. M. Daanen; G. Jeroen van de Water

    1998-01-01

    Whole body scanning is a useful technique with applications in the apparel industry, human systems engineering and medical field. A worldwide review of whole body scanners describes eight commercially available systems. The scanners differ considerably in price (US$50?000–410?000), resolution (1–8mm) and speed (0.2–3s). Most scanners use laser stripe projection; other techniques are patterned light projection and stereo photogrammetry. To cover

  9. Ride quality and international standard ISO 2631 (Guide for the evaluation of human exposure to whole-body vibration)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the standard, which is aimed at promoting research and production of more data, and providing some design guidance, is outlined and its contents summarized. Some of the assumptions and information on which it is based are analyzed. Its application to vehicle ride quality is considered in the context of the safety, efficiency and comfort of crew and passengers. The importance of establishing the precise criteria against which vibration limits are required is underlined, particularly the difficulties of first defining comfort and then postulating appropriate levels. Some current and future work related to improving the standard is outlined and additional suggestions offered.

  10. Whole body vibration improves osseointegration by up-regulating osteoblastic activity but down-regulating osteoblast-mediated osteoclastogenesis via ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Guan, Xiaoxu; Liu, Tie; Wang, Xinhua; Yu, Mengfei; Yang, Guoli; Wang, Huiming

    2015-02-01

    Due to the reduction in bone mass and deterioration in bone microarchitecture, osteoporosis is an important risk factor for impairing implant osseointegration. Recently, low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration (LM: <1×g; HF: 20-90Hz) has been shown to exhibit anabolic, but anti-resorptive effects on skeletal homeostasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMHF loading, in terms of whole body vibration (WBV), may improve implant fixation under osteoporotic status. In the in vivo study, WBV treatment (magnitude: 0.3g, frequency: 40Hz, time: 30min/12h, 5days/week) was applied after hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants were inserted in the bilateral tibiae of ovariectomized rats. The bone mass and the osteospecific gene expressions were measured at 12weeks post implantation. In the in vitro study, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities were fully investigated using various experimental assays. Micro-CT examination showed that WBV could enhance osseointegration by improving microstructure parameters surrounding implants. WBV-regulated gene levels in favor of bone formation over resorption may be the reason for the favorable adaptive bone remolding on bone-implant surface. The in vitro study showed that vibration (magnitude: 0.3g, frequency: 40Hz, time: 30min/12h) up-regulated osteoblast differentiation, matrix synthesis and mineralization. However, mechanically regulated osteoclastic activity was mainly through the effect on osteoblastic cells producing osteoclastogenesis-associated key soluble factors, including RANKL and M-CSF. Osteoblasts were therefore the direct target cells during the mechanotransduction process. The ERK1/2 pathway was demonstrated to play an essential role in vibration-induced enhancement of bone formation and decreased bone resorption. Our data suggests that WBV was a helpful non-pharmacological intervention for improving osseointegration under osteoporosis. PMID:25304090

  11. Annual incidence of non-specific low back pain as an occupational disease attributed to whole-body vibration according to the National Dutch Register 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Kuijer, P Paul F M; van der Molen, Henk F; Schop, Astrid; Moeijes, Fred; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Hulshof, Carel T J

    2015-07-01

    Non-specific low back pain (nLBP) is the second most important reason for sick leave in the Netherlands, and more than 50% of the workers on sick leave attribute these complaints to their work. To stimulate recognition and prevention, an occupational disease (OD) registration-guideline was implemented for the assessment of the work-relatedness of nLBP in the Netherlands in 2005. The aim of this study is to present the annual incidence of nLBP as an OD and specifically for whole-body vibration (WBV) including patient characteristics such as age, sick leave and actions initiated by the occupational physician (OP). The data were retrieved from the National Dutch Register for 2005-2012. Each year about 118 OPs reported 509 cases (SD 139) of nLBP as an OD in a Dutch working population of 7.5 million workers (8% of all annual reported ODs). Less than 1% of these cases were attributed to WBV: 94% were men, 45% were between 51 and 60 years and 35% were on sick leave for more than 2 weeks. Most initiated actions were ergonomic interventions (35%). PMID:24823257

  12. The development of an intervention programme to reduce whole-body vibration exposure at work induced by a change in behaviour: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tiemessen, Ivo JH; Hulshof, Carel TJ; Frings-Dresen, Monique HW

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole body vibration (WBV) exposure at work is common and studies found evidence that this exposure might cause low back pain (LBP). A recent review concluded there is a lack of evidence of effective strategies to reduce WBV exposure. Most research in this field is focussed on the technical implications, although changing behaviour towards WBV exposure might be promising as well. Therefore, we developed an intervention programme to reduce WBV exposure in a population of drivers with the emphasis on a change in behaviour of driver and employer. The hypothesis is that an effective reduction in WBV exposure, in time, will lead to a reduction in LBP as WBV exposure is a proxy for an increased risk of LBP. Methods/Design The intervention programme was developed specifically for the drivers of vibrating vehicles and their employers. The intervention programme will be based on the most important determinants of WBV exposure as track conditions, driving speed, quality of the seat, etc. By increasing knowledge and skills towards changing these determinants, the attitude, social influence and self-efficacy (ASE) of both drivers and employers will be affected having an effect on the level of exposure. We used the well-known ASE model to develop an intervention programme aiming at a change or the intention to change behaviour towards WBV exposure. The developed programme consists of: individual health surveillance, an information brochure, an informative presentation and a report of the performed field measurements. Discussion The study protocol described is advantageous as the intervention program actively tries to change behaviour towards WBV exposure. The near future will show if this intervention program is effective by showing a decrease in WBV exposure. PMID:18005400

  13. Addition of synchronous whole-body vibration to body mass resistive exercise causes little or no effects on muscle damage and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Tom J; Olver, T Dylan; Hamilton, Craig D; Lemon, Peter W R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a moderate intensity whole-body vibration (WBV) body mass resistive exercise session causes additional muscle damage, soreness, and inflammation compared with the same exercise session without vibration (NoV). Ten recreationally active male university students completed 2 separate 24-hour study periods incorporating an exercise session with WBV or NoV. Muscle torque was measured (at 0, 60, and 240°·s-1 angular velocities), soreness (10-point scale) in the upper (UE [triceps]) and lower (LE [quadriceps]) extremities, and muscle inflammation markers (interleukin [IL]-1?, IL-6, IL-10) were measured at 4 time points (preexercise, immediately postexercise, 4 hours post, and 24 hours post). Diet was controlled. Compared with NoV, WBV increased (p < 0.01) muscle soreness at 24 hours postexercise in both the UE (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9) and LE (2.0 ± 1.5 vs. 0.7 ± 0.7). Muscle torque was decreased immediately postexercise (p < 0.05) in the UE and LE at 0°·s and in the UE at 240°·s, but there was no difference between exercise treatments. The exercise session caused significant but small increases in IL-1? and IL-6 but with no differences between exercise treatments. Interleukin-10 was increased with WBV (2.9 ± 2.0 to 3.6 ± 1.9 pg·ml-1; p < 0.03). These data suggest that the addition of WBV to exercise has little effect on muscle function and damage, soreness, or inflammation. PMID:23615482

  14. [Exposure to whole-body vibration of forklift truck operators in dockyards--actual exposure in Japan and evaluation by EN 13059].

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Hiroji; Taoda, Kazushi; Nishiyama, Katsuo

    2006-09-01

    Low-back disorders are well documented as occupational hazards among forklift truck operators. The potential risk factors that may lead to low-back pain include exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). In Europe, test methods were developed to evaluate WBV in industrial trucks, and the European Standard which defines the methods has been published. We measured the vibrations of forklift trucks operated in the Hanshin harbour area adopting procedures based on the CEN test and report the evaluation results. If the WBV magnitudes of the ride on forklift trucks in the workplace were less than or comparable to those in the CEN test, the CEN test could be considered useful for the risk assessment of forklift truck operators exposed to WBV. In order to verify the applicability of the CEN test to the evaluation of WBV exposure in the field, we conducted measurements of the WBV of four forklift trucks for 19 d. The trucks had already been examined by the CEN test. The truck velocity, driver position (sitting or not), and gear lever position were also measured, and video footage was obtained for the study. The results indicate that the vertical WBV magnitudes of the four forklift trucks were below the CEN test values. No dominant WBV direction was observed on any of the measurement days. The Health value (obtained by combining the values determined from the vibration in orthogonal coordinates) was comparable to that from the CEN test for one truck. The values for the other three trucks were lower. The data obtained for three forklift trucks were analyzed in each operating condition. The vertical WBV magnitudes and Health values for the three trucks were below the CEN test values when the trucks were travelling forwards with a load. The WBV in the anterior-posterior direction had the largest adverse effect on the human body of the three orthogonal directions when the trucks were used for loading and unloading. The results suggest the CEN test can be applied to the evaluation of exposure to WBV from forklift trucks operating in the vicinity of the Hanshin harbour. It was observed that the anterior-posterior WBV is considerable, mostly through exposure occurring in the lifting mode. However, the CEN test is based on the travelling mode, and further WBV measurements under real working conditions with exact descriptions of detailed work situations and operating conditions are required. PMID:17062995

  15. Effects of Whole-Body Cryotherapy vs. Far-Infrared vs. Passive Modalities on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Highly-Trained Runners

    PubMed Central

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Bieuzen, François; Pournot, Hervé; Fournier, Jean; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC), far infrared (FIR) or passive (PAS) modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post), post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS) in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being]) were recorded before, immediately after (post), post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h), while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities. PMID:22163272

  16. Impact of whole-body electromyostimulation on body composition in elderly women at risk for sarcopenia: the Training and ElectroStimulation Trial (TEST-III).

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Bebenek, Michael; Engelke, Klaus; von Stengel, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Most studies have confirmed the positive impact of resistance training on muscle mass and functional capacity in aging adults. However, due to physical limitation or a simple aversion against regular exercise, the majority of elderly subjects do not reach the exercise doses recommended for impacting strength or muscle mass. This led us to evaluate the effect of whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS), a novel, time-efficient and smooth training technology, on body composition with special regard to sarcopenia. Seventy-six lean, non-sportive women (75 ± 4 years) were randomly assigned to either a WB-EMS group (WB-EMS, n = 38) that performed 18 min of WB-EMS (bipolar, 85 Hz) 3 sessions in 14 days (1.5 sessions/week) or a semi-active control group (aCG, n = 38). Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and maximum strength was evaluated using isometric techniques for trunk and legs. After 54 weeks of intervention, significant inter-group differences were determined for appendicular skeletal muscle mass (WB-EMS, 0.4 ± 2.2 % vs. aCG, -1.5 ± 3.1 %; p = 0.009), lean body mass (WB-EMS, 0.8 ± 1.8 % vs. aCG, -0.8 ± 2.7 %; p = 0.008) and maximum isometric strength (leg extensors, 9.8 ± 12.9 % vs. 0.2 ± 10.4 %; p = 0.003; trunk extensors, 10.1 ± 12.7 vs. -1.6 ± 8.6 %; p = 0.001). Although borderline significant for abdominal fat mass (WB-EMS, -2.9 ± 8.3 vs. aCG, 1.5 ± 10.7 %; p = 0.069), differences did not reach statistically significant levels for body fat parameters. Considering the clinical effectiveness for impacting sarcopenia and the good acceptance of this technology by this non-sportive cohort of elderly women, we conclude that for elderly subjects unable or unwilling to perform dynamic strength exercises, electromyostimulation may be a less off-putting alternative to maintain lean body mass and strength. PMID:23949160

  17. The ORNL whole body counter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report is a non-technical document intended to provide an individual about to undergo a whole-body radiation count with a general understanding of the counting procedure and with the results obtained. 9 figs. (TEM)

  18. Hanford whole body counting manual

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. Moderately increased protein intake predominately from egg sources does not influence whole body, regional, or muscle composition responses to resistance training in older people

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. B. Iglay; J. W. Apolzan; D. E. Gerrard; J. K. Eash; J. C. Anderson; W. W. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Abstract  The effects of increased dietary protein on resistance training (RT)-induced changes in body composition and skeletal muscle\\u000a fiber size are uncertain in older people.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  We hypothesized that the ingestion of more animal-based foods, especially eggs, to achieve a higher protein intake would enhance\\u000a RT-induced changes in body composition.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Setting  West Lafayette, IN.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Participants  36 older people (age 61±1 y; mean ± SEM).

  20. Running up Blueberry Hill: Whole Body Interaction

    E-print Network

    Holland, Simon

    to the medium of whole body interaction. · Identify possible benefits, both to beginners and accomplished medium. · Identify and characterize new opportunities presented by whole body interaction. #12;Physical Setup · Large Atrium · Top level - powerful data projector with 45 degree mirror · Ground level

  1. High-Intensity Interval Training with Vibration as Rest Intervals Attenuates Fiber Atrophy and Prevents Decreases in Anaerobic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sandro Manuel; Aguayo, David; Zuercher, Matthias; Fleischmann, Oliver; Boutellier, Urs; Auer, Maria; Jung, Hans H.; Toigo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIT) improves cardiovascular capacity but may reduce the finite work capacity above critical power (W?) and lead to atrophy of myosin heavy chain (MyHC)-2 fibers. Since whole-body vibration may enhance indices of anaerobic performance, we examined whether side-alternating whole-body vibration as a replacement for the active rest intervals during a 4x4 min HIT prevents decreases in anaerobic performance and capacity without compromising gains in aerobic function. Thirty-three young recreationally active men were randomly assigned to conduct either conventional 4x4 min HIT, HIT with 3 min of WBV at 18 Hz (HIT+VIB18) or 30 Hz (HIT+VIB30) in lieu of conventional rest intervals, or WBV at 30 Hz (VIB30). Pre and post training, critical power (CP), W?, cellular muscle characteristics, as well as cardiovascular and neuromuscular variables were determined. W? (?14.3%, P = 0.013), maximal voluntary torque (?8.6%, P = 0.001), rate of force development (?10.5%, P = 0.018), maximal jumping power (?6.3%, P = 0.007) and cross-sectional areas of MyHC-2A fibers (?6.4%, P = 0.044) were reduced only after conventional HIT. CP, V?O2peak, peak cardiac output, and overall capillary-to-fiber ratio were increased after HIT, HIT+VIB18, and HIT+VIB30 without differences between groups. HIT-specific reductions in anaerobic performance and capacity were prevented by replacing active rest intervals with side-alternating whole-body vibration, notably without compromising aerobic adaptations. Therefore, competitive cyclists (and potentially other endurance-oriented athletes) may benefit from replacing the active rest intervals during aerobic HIT with side-alternating whole-body vibration. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01875146 PMID:25679998

  2. Vibration Training Triggers Brown Adipocyte Relative Protein Expression in Rat White Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chao; Zeng, Ruixia; Cao, Ge; Song, Zhibang; Zhang, Yibo; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, vibration training is considered as a novel strategy of weight loss; however, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, normal or high-fat diet-induced rats were trained by whole body vibration for 8 weeks. We observed that the body weight and fat metabolism index, blood glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, and free fatty acid in obesity rats decreased significantly compared with nonvibration group (n = 6). Although intrascapular BAT weight did not change significantly, vibration enhanced ATP reduction and increased protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT), PGC-1?, and UCP1 in BAT. Interestingly, the adipocytes in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) became smaller due to vibration exercise and had higher protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT), PGC-1?, and UCP1 and inflammatory relative proteins, IL-6 and TNF?. Simultaneously, ATP content and PPAR? protein level in WAT became less in rats compared with nonvibration group. The results indicated that vibration training changed lipid metabolism in rats and promoted brown fat-like change in white adipose tissues through triggering BAT associated gene expression, inflammatory reflect, and reducing energy reserve.

  3. A whole body statistical shape model for radio frequency simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Lin; Ali, Khaleda; Brizzi, Alessio; Keegan, Jennifer; Hao, Yang; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    The development of ultra low power wireless sensors for customized wearable and implantable medical devices requires patient specific models for radio frequency simulation to understand wave propagation in the body. In practice, the creation of a patient specific whole-body model is difficult and time consuming to create. It is therefore necessary to establish a method for studying a population in a statistical manner. In this paper, we present a statistical shape model for the whole body for RF simulation. It is built from 10 male and 10 female subjects of varying size and height. This model has the ability to instantiate a new surface mesh with the parameters allowed by the training set. This model would provide shapes of varying sizes for studies, without the requirement of obtaining subject specific whole body models. Results from finite-differences time-domain simulation are presented on the extreme shapes from the model and demonstrate the need for a full understanding of the range in body shapes. PMID:22255985

  4. Whole-body cryotherapy in athletes.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni; Colombini, Alessandra; Melegati, Gianluca

    2010-06-01

    Cold therapy is commonly used as a procedure to relieve pain symptoms, particularly in inflammatory diseases, injuries and overuse symptoms. A peculiar form of cold therapy (or stimulation) was proposed 30 years ago for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. The therapy, called whole-body cryotherapy (WBC), consists of exposure to very cold air that is maintained at -110 degrees C to -140 degrees C in special temperature-controlled cryochambers, generally for 2 minutes. WBC is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms caused by numerous disorders, particularly those associated with rheumatic conditions, and is recommended for the treatment of arthritis, fibromyalgia and ankylosing spondylitis. In sports medicine, WBC has gained wider acceptance as a method to improve recovery from muscle injury. Unfortunately, there are few papers concerning the application of the treatment on athletes. The study of possible enhancement of recovery from injuries and possible modification of physiological parameters, taking into consideration the limits imposed by antidoping rules, is crucial for athletes and sports physicians for judging the real benefits and/or limits of WBC. According to the available literature, WBC is not harmful or detrimental in healthy subjects. The treatment does not enhance bone marrow production and could reduce the sport-induced haemolysis. WBC induces oxidative stress, but at a low level. Repeated treatments are apparently not able to induce cumulative effects; on the contrary, adaptive changes on antioxidant status are elicited--the adaptation is evident where WBC precedes or accompanies intense training. WBC is not characterized by modifications of immunological markers and leukocytes, and it seems to not be harmful to the immunological system. The WBC effect is probably linked to the modifications of immunological molecules having paracrine effects, and not to systemic immunological functions. In fact, there is an increase in anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, and a decrease in proinflammatory cytokine IL-2 and chemokine IL-8. Moreover, the decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 supported the anti-inflammatory response. Lysosomal membranes are stabilized by WBC, reducing potential negative effects on proteins of lysosomal enzymes. The cold stimulation shows positive effects on the muscular enzymes creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, and it should be considered a procedure that facilitates athletes' recovery. Cardiac markers troponin I and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, parameters linked to damage and necrosis of cardiac muscular tissue, but also to tissue repair, were unchanged, demonstrating that there was no damage, even minimal, in the heart during the treatment. N-Terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a parameter linked to heart failure and ventricular power decrease, showed an increase, due to cold stress. However, the NT-proBNP concentrations observed after WBC were lower than those measured after a heavy training session, suggesting that the treatment limits the increase of the parameter that is typical of physical exercise. WBC did not stimulate the pituitary-adrenal cortex axis: the hormonal modifications are linked mainly to the body's adaptation to the stress, shown by an increase of noradrenaline (norepinephrine). We conclude that WBC is not harmful and does not induce general or specific negative effects in athletes. The treatment does not induce modifications of biochemical and haematological parameters, which could be suspected in athletes who may be cheating. The published data are generally not controversial, but further studies are necessary to confirm the present observations. PMID:20524715

  5. Prediction of Ground Vibration from Freight Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Block, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    Heavy freight trains emit ground vibration with predominant frequency components in the range 4-30 Hz. If the amplitude is sufficient, this may be felt by lineside residents, giving rise to disturbance and concern over possible damage to their property. In order to establish the influence of parameters of the track and rolling stock and thereby enable the design of a low vibration railway, a theoretical model of both the generation and propagation of vibration is required. The vibration is generated as a combination of the effects of dynamic forces, due to the unevenness of the track, and the effects of the track deformation under successive axle loads. A prediction scheme, which combines these effects, has been produced. A vehicle model is used to predict the dynamic forces at the wheels. This includes the non-linear effects of friction damped suspensions. The loaded track profile is measured by using a track recording coach. The dynamic loading and the effects of the moving axles are combined in a track response model. The predicted track vibration is compared to measurements. The transfer functions from the track to a point in the ground can be calculated by using a coupled track and a three-dimensional layered ground model. The propagation effects of the ground layers are important but the computation of the transfer function from each sleeper, which would be required for a phase coherent summation of the vibration in the ground, would be prohibitive. A compromise summation is used and results are compared with measurements.

  6. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: assessment of skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Moynagh, Michael R; Colleran, Gabrielle C; Tavernaraki, Katarina; Eustace, Stephen J; Kavanagh, Eoin C

    2010-03-01

    The concept of a rapid whole-body imaging technique with high resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation for the assessment of osseous metastatic disease is a desirable tool. This review article outlines the current perspective of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of skeletal metastatic disease, with comparisons made to alternative whole-body imaging modalities. PMID:20229438

  7. Measures of internal lumbar load in professional drivers - the use of a whole-body finite-element model for the evaluation of adverse health effects of multi-axis vibration.

    PubMed

    Schust, Marianne; Menzel, Gerhard; Hofmann, Jörg; Forta, Nazim Gizem; Pinto, Iole; Hinz, Barbara; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to (1) employ the method for evaluation of vibration containing multiple shocks according to ISO/CD 2631-5:2014 (Model 1) and DIN SPEC 45697:2012 in a cohort of 537 professional drivers, (2) deliver the results for a re-analysis of epidemiological data obtained in the VIBRISKS study, (3) clarify the extent to which vibration acceleration and individual variables influence risk values, such as the daily compressive dose Sed and the risk factor R, and (4) compare the results with in vivo measurements and those obtained in previous studies with similar models. The risk factor R was influenced by the acceleration, lifetime exposure duration, sitting posture, age at the start of exposure and body mass/body mass index in order of decreasing effect. Age and annual and daily exposure duration had only a marginal effect. The daily compressive dose Sed and the risk factor R showed weak linear association with the daily vibration exposure A(8) and the vibration dose value VDV. The study revealed high shear forces in the lumbar spine. PMID:25290764

  8. Whole body radiotherapy: A TBI-guideline

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Total Body Irradiation (TBI) is one main component in the interdisciplinary treatment of widely disseminated malignancies predominantly of haematopoietic diseases. Combined with intensive chemotherapy, TBI enables myeloablative high dose therapy and immuno-ablative conditioning treatment prior to subsequent transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow stem cells or peripheral blood progenitor stem cells. Jointly prepared by DEGRO and DGMP, the German Society of Radio-Oncology, and the German Association of Medical Physicists, this DEGRO/DGMP-Leitlinie Ganzkoerper-Strahlenbehandlung - DEGRO/DGMP Guideline Whole Body Radiotherapy, summarises the concepts, principles, facts and common methods of Total Body Irradiation and poses a set of recommendations for reliable and successful application of high dose large-field radiotherapy as essential part of this interdisciplinary, multi-modality treatment concept. The guideline is geared towards radio-oncologists, medical physicists, haematooncolo-gists, and all contributing to Whole Body Radiotherapy. To guide centres intending to start or actualise TBI criteria are included. The relevant treatment parameters are defined and a sample of a form is given for reporting TBI to international registries. PMID:21206634

  9. Whole body counter intercomparison study-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, A.W.; Coleman, R.L. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (US))

    1986-10-01

    During 1985 and 1986, the Tennessee Valley Authority's Radiological Health Staff conducted a two-phase intercomparison study of whole body counting systems using a phantom loaded with mixed fission and activation product sources (Ce-144, Cs-137, Co-60, Mn-54, Zn-65, and I-131). eighteen WBC systems at six utilities in the eastern United States were tested for their ability to identify the nuclides and quantify their activities. The results presented in this article show that the average bias of most of the WBC systems tested was heavily positive while the average precision of all systems was very good. The three basic WBC geometries (chair, bed, and stand-up) performed about the same; however, bed and stand-up WBCs were unable to identify Ce-144. High-purity germanium detectors were about twice as accurate and precise as sodium iodide detectors.

  10. 7 T Whole Body Imaging: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, J. Thomas; Snyder, Carl J.; DelaBarre, Lance J.; Bolan, Patrick J.; Tian, Jinfeng; Bolinger, Lizann; Adriany, Gregor; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of whole body imaging at 7 T. To achieve this objective, new technology and methods were developed. Radio frequency field distribution and specific absorption rate were first explored through numerical modeling. A body coil was then designed and built. Multi-channel transmit and receive coils were also developed and implemented. With this new technology in hand, an imaging survey of the “landscape” of the human body at 7 T was conducted. Cardiac imaging at 7 T appeared to be possible. The potential for breast imaging and spectroscopy was demonstrated. Preliminary results of the first human body imaging at 7 T suggest both promise and directions for further development. PMID:19097214

  11. Vibration Training: An Overview of the Area, Training Consequences, and Future Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew J. Jordan; Stephen R. Norris; David J. Smith; Walter Herzog

    2005-01-01

    Jordan, M.J., S.R. Norris, D.J. Smith, and W. Her- zog. Vibration training: an overview of the area, training con- sequences, and future considerations. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(2):459-466. 2005.—The effects of vibration on the human body have been documented for many years. Recently, the use of vibration for improving the training regimes of athletes has been investigated. Vibration has been

  12. Whole-body 35-GHz security scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Roger; Anderton, Rupert N.; Price, Sean; Sinclair, Gordon N.; Coward, Peter R.

    2004-08-01

    A 35GHz imager designed for Security Scanning has been previously demonstrated. That imager was based on a folded conical scan technology and was constructed from low cost materials such as expanded polystyrene and printed circuit board. In conjunction with an illumination chamber it was used to collect indoor imagery of people with weapons and contraband hidden under their clothing. That imager had a spot size of 20mm and covered a field of view of 20 x 10 degrees that partially covered the body of an adult from knees to shoulders. A new variant of this imager has been designed and constructed. It has a field of view of 36 x 18 degrees and is capable of covering the whole body of an adult. This was achieved by increasing the number of direct detection receivers from the 32 used in the previous design to 58, and by implementing an improved optical design. The optics consist of a front grid, a polarisation device which converts linear to circular polarisation and a rotating scanner. This new design uses high-density expanded polystyrene as a correcting element on the back of the front grid. This gives an added degree of freedom that allows the optical design to be diffraction limited over a very wide field of view. Obscuration by the receivers and associated components is minimised by integrating the post detection electronics at the receiver array.

  13. Whole-Body Nanoparticle Aerosol Inhalation Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter < 200 nm and a geometric standard deviation ?g < 2.5 5. The generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size 6, which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria 5. A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m3 whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm3) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m3). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpreand Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M/(Q*t), where Q is sampling flowrate (m3/min), and t is the sampling time (minute). The chamber pressure, temperature, relative humidity (RH), O2 and CO2 concentrations were monitored and controlled continuously. Nano-TiO2 aerosols collected on Nuclepore filters were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. In summary, we report that the nano-particle aerosols generated and delivered to our exposure chamber have: 1) steady mass concentration; 2) homogenous composition free of contaminants; 3) stable particle size distributions with a count-median aerodynamic diameter of 157 nm during aerosol generation. This system reliably and repeatedly creates test atmospheres that simulate occupational, environmental or domestic ENM aerosol exposures. PMID:23685643

  14. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter < 200 nm and a geometric standard deviation ?g < 2.5 (5). The generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M/(Q*t), where Q is sampling flowrate (m(3)/min), and t is the sampling time (minute). The chamber pressure, temperature, relative humidity (RH), O2 and CO2 concentrations were monitored and controlled continuously. Nano-TiO2 aerosols collected on Nuclepore filters were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. In summary, we report that the nano-particle aerosols generated and delivered to our exposure chamber have: 1) steady mass concentration; 2) homogenous composition free of contaminants; 3) stable particle size distributions with a count-median aerodynamic diameter of 157 nm during aerosol generation. This system reliably and repeatedly creates test atmospheres that simulate occupational, environmental or domestic ENM aerosol exposures. PMID:23685643

  15. Whole body vibration alters proprioception in the trunk

    E-print Network

    Li, Lu; Lamis, Farhana; Wilson, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    wore a harness across their chest to which a weight was attached by a Kevlar cable via a load cell and a pulley. The load cell recorded the tension in the cable. A small preload (0.5 kg) was applied to maintain tension in the cable. A sudden... was applied via a chest harness. A Kevlar cable, connected through a pulley and load cell, was attached to a preload base. A 4.5 kg weight was dropped 10 cm and allowed to bounce against the base creating an impulse load. Headphones with music and a...

  16. Design strategies for whole body interactive performance systems 

    E-print Network

    Lympouridis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    This practice-led research investigates a design framework within an artistic context for the implementation of Whole Body Interactive (WBI) performance systems that employ real-time motion capture technology. Following ...

  17. Development of a low-cost whole-body counter

    E-print Network

    Smith, Matthew Howard

    1990-01-01

    as the design that best met the needs of the institu- tion. This counter was assembled with the assistance of Mayo Clinic's Section of Engineering. Three main components for the whole-body counting system were designed, assembled, and calibrated... AND METHODS Whole-body counter unit Phantoms calibration External monitoring Spreadsheet Recording level Minimum detectable activity RESULTS 7 11 13 15 16 19 20 21 Energy calibration System efficiency Placement of calibration standards...

  18. A comparison between human magnetostimulation thresholds in whole-body and head\\/neck gradient coils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blaine A. Chronik; Brian K. Rutt

    2001-01-01

    Gradient coil magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in a group of 20 volunteers in both a whole-body gradient coil and a head\\/neck gradient coil. Both coils were operated using both x and y axes simultaneously (xy oblique mode). The waveform applied was a 64-lobe trapezoidal train with 1-ms flat-tops and varying rise times. Thresholds were based on the subjects' perception of

  19. Mutual Stabilization of Rhythmic Vocalization and Whole-Body Movement

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kohei; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice) in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition) that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition). The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure. PMID:25502730

  20. Comparing the performance-enhancing effects of squats on a vibration platform with conventional squats in recreationally resistance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Rønnestad, Bent R

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the performance-enhancing effects of squats on a vibration platform with conventional squats in recreationally resistance-trained men. The subjects were 14 recreationally resistance-trained men (age, 21-40 years) and the intervention period consisted of 5 weeks. After the initial testing, subjects were randomly assigned to either the "squat whole body vibration" (SWBV) group (n = 7), which performed squats on a vibration platform on a Smith Machine, or the "squat"(S) group (n = 7), which performed conventional squats with no vibrations on a Smith Machine. Testing was performed at the beginning and the end of the study and consisted of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in squat and maximum jump height in countermovement jump (CMJ). A modified daily undulating periodization program was used during the intervention period in both groups. Both groups trained at the same percentage of 1RM in squats (6-10RM). After the intervention, CMJ performance increased significantly only in the SWBV (p < 0.01), but there was no significant difference between groups in relative jump height increase (p = 0.088). Both groups showed significant increases in 1RM performance in squats (p < 0.01). Although there was a trend toward a greater relative strength increase in the SWBV group, it did not reach a significant level. In conclusion, the preliminary results of this study point toward a tendency of superiority of squats performed on a vibration platform compared with squats without vibrations regarding maximal strength and explosive power as long as the external load is similar in recreationally resistance-trained men. PMID:15574092

  1. Whole-body MRI for analysis of body composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel Kullberg

    2010-01-01

    The large variability seen in human body composition and the importance of regional adiposity makes imaging the most powerful tool in body composition assessment. MRI is often the method of choice since it has no known long-term side effects, allows large coverage, repeated acquisition, and studies of children and adolescents. Various techniques are used to acquire and analyse whole-body MR

  2. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration Modifies Experimental Asthma in Sheep

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William M. Abraham; Ashfaq Ahmed; Irakli Serebriakov; Isabel T. Lauredo; Jose A. Adams; Marvin A. Sackner

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Nitric oxide is released from vascular endothelium in response to increased pulsatile shear stress. Nitric oxide inhibits mast cell activation and is antiinflammatory and therefore might be protective in asthma. Objectives: We determined if a noninvasive motion platform that imparts periodic sinusoidal inertial forces to the whole body along the spinal axis (pGz) causing release of endothelial nitric oxide

  3. Whole-Body Dynamic Behavior and Control of Humanlike Robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oussama Khatib; Luis Sentis; James Warren

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of humanoid mechanisms and their desired capabilities, there is a pressing need for a generalized framework where a desired whole-body motion behavior can be easily specified and controlled. Our hypothesis is that human motion results from simultaneously performing multiple objectives in a hierarchical manner, and we have analogously developed a prioritized, multiple-task control framework. The oper-

  4. Age Modulates Attitudes to Whole Body Donation among Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Gary F.; Ettarh, Raj R.

    2009-01-01

    Managing a whole body donor program is necessary for facilitating a traditional dissection-based anatomy curriculum in medicine and health sciences. Factors which influence body donations to medical science can therefore affect dissection-based anatomy teaching. In order to determine whether age influences the attitudes of medical students to…

  5. Student Attitudes to Whole Body Donation Are Influenced by Dissection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin C.; Ettarh, Raj R.

    2008-01-01

    Given the important role that anatomical dissection plays in the shaping of medical student attitudes to life and death, these attitudes have not been evaluated in the context of whole body donation for medical science. First year students of anatomy in an Irish university medical school were surveyed by questionnaire before and after the initial…

  6. Human whole body motion characterization from embedded Kinect

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Human whole body motion characterization from embedded Kinect Consuelo Granata ISIR, UPMC-CNRS UMR and to interpret theirs orders. These challenging tasks can obviously benefit from considering the human body--Non-verbal communications such as kinesthetics, or body language and posture are important codes used to establish

  7. REGIONAL AND WHOLE BODY COMPOSITION AND BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE ANALYSIS (BIA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the symmetry of regional (half) body composition and then related any dissymmetry to differences in bioelectrical impedance (Z). Seventy-three volunteers (45 women, 28 men) were measured for whole body Z at 50 kHz and body composition by pencil beam dual x-ray absorptiometry. Z...

  8. BABYSCAN: a whole body counter for small children in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Ryugo S; Yamanaka, Shunji; Bronson, Frazier L; Oginni, Babatunde; Muramatsu, Isamu

    2014-09-01

    BABYSCAN, a whole body counter for small children with a detection limit for (137)Cs of better than 50 Bq/body, was developed, and the first unit has been installed at a hospital in Fukushima, to help families with small children who are very much concerned about internal exposures. The design principles, implementation details and the initial operating experience are described. PMID:25118889

  9. The development of a whole-body algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    The whole-body algorithm is envisioned as a mathematical model that utilizes human physiology to simulate the behavior of vital body systems. The objective of this model is to determine the response of selected body parameters within these systems to various input perturbations, or stresses. Perturbations of interest are exercise, chemical unbalances, gravitational changes and other abnormal environmental conditions. This model provides for a study of man's physiological response in various space applications, underwater applications, normal and abnormal workloads and environments, and the functioning of the system with physical impairments or decay of functioning components. Many methods or approaches to the development of a whole-body algorithm are considered. Of foremost concern is the determination of the subsystems to be included, the detail of the subsystems and the interaction between the subsystems.

  10. Whole body hyperthermia: effects upon canine immune and hemostatic functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J Oglesbee; K Diehl; E Crawford; R Kearns; S Krakowka

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the effects of induced whole body hyperthermia (WBH; 42.3°C for 90min) on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) phenotype distribution, in vitro blastogenic responsiveness and selected parameters of hemostasis were determined in dogs. Hyperthermia was induced by heating venous blood during extracorporeal circulation (EC); induction of WBH by peritoneal lavage (PL) and perfusion without heating (i.e. euthermic EC

  11. Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Itti, E.; Luciani, A.; Haioun, C.; Meignan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The current evidence regarding the usefulness of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in lymphoma is reviewed. DWI is capable of combining anatomical and functional information and is becoming a valuable tool in oncology, in particular for staging purposes. DWI may prove to be a useful biomarker in clinical decision making for patients with lymphoma. Large-scaled prospective studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:20880782

  12. Whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R; Sinitski, Emily H; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    The generation of whole-body angular momentum is essential in many locomotor tasks and must be regulated in order to maintain dynamic balance. However, angular momentum has not been investigated during stair walking, which is an activity that presents a biomechanical challenge for balance-impaired populations. We investigated three-dimensional whole-body angular momentum during stair ascent and descent and compared it to level walking. Three-dimensional body-segment kinematic and ground reaction force (GRF) data were collected from 30 healthy subjects. Angular momentum was calculated using a 13-segment whole-body model. GRFs, external moment arms and net joint moments were used to interpret the angular momentum results. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was greater for stair ascent relative to level walking. In the transverse and sagittal planes, the range of angular momentum was smaller in stair ascent and descent relative to level walking. Significant differences were also found in the ground reaction forces, external moment arms and net joint moments. The sagittal plane angular momentum results suggest that individuals alter angular momentum to effectively counteract potential trips during stair ascent, and reduce the range of angular momentum to avoid falling forward during stair descent. Further, significant differences in joint moments suggest potential neuromuscular mechanisms that account for the differences in angular momentum between walking conditions. These results provide a baseline for comparison to impaired populations that have difficulty maintaining dynamic balance, particularly during stair ascent and descent. PMID:24636222

  13. Whole-body gene expression pattern registration in Platynereis larvae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Digital anatomical atlases are increasingly used in order to depict different gene expression patterns and neuronal morphologies within a standardized reference template. In evo-devo, a discipline in which the comparison of gene expression patterns is a widely used approach, such standardized anatomical atlases would allow a more rigorous assessment of the conservation of and changes in gene expression patterns during micro- and macroevolutionary time scales. Due to its small size and invariant early development, the annelid Platynereis dumerilii is particularly well suited for such studies. Recently a reference template with registered gene expression patterns has been generated for the anterior part (episphere) of the Platynereis trochophore larva and used for the detailed study of neuronal development. Results Here we introduce and evaluate a method for whole-body gene expression pattern registration for Platynereis trochophore and nectochaete larvae based on whole-mount in situ hybridization, confocal microscopy, and image registration. We achieved high-resolution whole-body scanning using the mounting medium 2,2’-thiodiethanol (TDE), which allows the matching of the refractive index of the sample to that of glass and immersion oil thereby reducing spherical aberration and improving depth penetration. This approach allowed us to scan entire whole-mount larvae stained with nitroblue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (NBT/BCIP) in situ hybridization and counterstained fluorescently with an acetylated-tubulin antibody and the nuclear stain 4’6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Due to the submicron isotropic voxel size whole-mount larvae could be scanned in any orientation. Based on the whole-body scans, we generated four different reference templates by the iterative registration and averaging of 40 individual image stacks using either the acetylated-tubulin or the nuclear-stain signal for each developmental stage. We then registered to these templates the expression patterns of cell-type specific genes. In order to evaluate the gene expression pattern registration, we analyzed the absolute deviation of cell-center positions. Both the acetylated-tubulin- and the nuclear-stain-based templates allowed near-cellular-resolution gene expression registration. Nuclear-stain-based templates often performed significantly better than acetylated-tubulin-based templates. We provide detailed guidelines and scripts for the use and further expansion of the Platynereis gene expression atlas. Conclusions We established whole-body reference templates for the generation of gene expression atlases for Platynereis trochophore and nectochaete larvae. We anticipate that nuclear-staining-based image registration will be applicable for whole-body alignment of the embryonic and larval stages of other organisms in a similar size range. PMID:23199348

  14. Whole-body response to pure lateral impact.

    PubMed

    Lessley, David; Shaw, Greg; Parent, Daniel; Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Kindig, Matthew; Riley, Patrick; Purtsezov, Sergey; Sochor, Mark; Gochenour, Thomas; Bolton, James; Subit, Damien; Crandall, Jeff; Takayama, Shinichi; Ono, Koshiro; Kamiji, Koichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to provide a comprehensive characterization of human biomechanical response to whole-body, lateral impact. Three approximately 50th-percentile adult male PMHS were subjected to right-side pure lateral impacts at 4.3 ± 0.1 m/s using a rigid wall mounted to a rail-mounted sled. Each subject was positioned on a rigid seat and held stationary by a system of tethers until immediately prior to being impacted by the moving wall with 100 mm pelvic offset. Displacement data were obtained using an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system that was used to track the 3D motions of the impacting wall sled; seat sled, and reflective targets secured to the head, spine, extremities, ribcage, and shoulder complex of each subject. Kinematic data were also recorded using 3-axis accelerometer cubes secured to the head, pelvis, and spine at the levels of T1, T6, T11, and L3. Chest deformation in the transverse plane was recorded using a single chestband. Following the impact the subject was captured in an energy-absorbing net that provided a controlled non-injurious deceleration. The wall maintained nearly constant velocity throughout the impact event. One of the tested subjects sustained 16 rib fractures as well as injury to the struck shoulder while the other two tested subjects sustained no injuries. The collected response data suggest that the shoulder injury may have contributed to the rib fractures in the injured subject. The results suggest that the shoulder presents a substantial load path and may play an important role in transmitting lateral forces to the spine, shielding and protecting the ribcage. This characterization of whole-body, lateral impact response provides quantified subject responses and boundary condition interactions that are currently unavailable for whole-body, lateral impacts at impact speeds less than 6.7 m/s. PMID:21512913

  15. Development of a low-cost whole-body counter 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Matthew Howard

    1990-01-01

    Vetter (Member) John . Poston (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Development Of A Low-Cost Whole-Body Counter. (May 1990) Matthew Howard Smith, B. S. , University of Wisconsin-River Falls Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Milton E. McLain.... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the chairman of my committee, Dr. Milton McLain, and my committee members, Dr. John Poston, Dr. Dan Hightower, and Dr. Richard Vetter. I also wish to thank the staff of the Radiation Safety Office at Mayo Clinic...

  16. A high-sensitivity multidetector whole-body counter.

    PubMed

    Kalef-Ezra, J A; Valakis, S T; Soupsanas, T

    2011-03-01

    A prototype multidetector shadow-shield whole-body counter is presented to be used as a monitor of internal contamination and as a tool in clinical research. The counter is equipped with 16 NaI(Tl) detectors located in the central region of a shielded tunnel surrounding the subject to be measured. The accuracy of the counting efficacy predictions was tested in a group of adults with various body shapes and sizes using X-ray absorptiometry. The precision of the total body potassium measurements allows the use of the counter in clinical follow-up studies. PMID:21076142

  17. Physiological responses during whole body suspension of adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize responses of adult rats to one and two weeks of whole body suspension. Body weights and food and water intakes were initially reduced during suspension, but, while intake of food and water returned to presuspension levels, body weight remained depressed. Diuresis was evident, but only during week two. Hindlimb muscle responses were differential, with the soleus exhibiting the greatest atrophy and the EDL a relative hypertrophy. These findings suggest that adult rats respond qualitatively in a manner similar to juveniles during suspension.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control, performance evaluation, and accreditation is -25% to +50% and less than or equal to 40%, respectively.

  19. Vibration as an exercise modality: how it may work, and what its potential might be.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, Jörn

    2010-03-01

    Whilst exposure to vibration is traditionally regarded as perilous, recent research has focussed on potential benefits. Here, the physical principles of forced oscillations are discussed in relation to vibration as an exercise modality. Acute physiological responses to isolated tendon and muscle vibration and to whole body vibration exercise are reviewed, as well as the training effects upon the musculature, bone mineral density and posture. Possible applications in sports and medicine are discussed. Evidence suggests that acute vibration exercise seems to elicit a specific warm-up effect, and that vibration training seems to improve muscle power, although the potential benefits over traditional forms of resistive exercise are still unclear. Vibration training also seems to improve balance in sub-populations prone to fall, such as frail elderly people. Moreover, literature suggests that vibration is beneficial to reduce chronic lower back pain and other types of pain. Other future indications are perceivable. PMID:20012646

  20. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses*

    E-print Network

    Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum

  1. Whole body protein metabolism in children with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, S E; Pearson, A D; Craft, A W; Kernahan, J; Wyllie, R A; Price, L; Brock, C; Hetherington, C; Halliday, D; Bartlett, K

    1996-01-01

    Whole body protein synthesis and catabolism were measured using the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine and [1-13C]leucine primed constant infusion technique in 32 paediatric patients with cancer at different stages of treatment. Rates of synthesis (S) and catabolism (C) derived from the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine and [1-13C]leucine models were 4.7 (SD 1.3) (S) and 6.0 (1.5) (C) g/d/kg, and 5.5 (0.8) (S) and 6.8 (1.2) (C) g/d/kg, respectively. These results show that these two tracer techniques give similar results in this study population. Comparison of these values with results previously reported for groups of control children using the [ring-2H5]phenylalanine model (S = 3.69 and 3.93; C = 4.09 and 4.28 g/d/kg) and the [1-13C]leucine model (S = 4.32; C = 4.85 g/d/kg) show that rates of synthesis and catabolism were higher in cancer patients than in controls. Thus whole body protein turnover is increased in children under treatment for cancer. Other indices of metabolism such as plasma amino acids and intermediary metabolites were also measured and showed that, although subjects were in isotopic steady state, there were significant metabolic changes during the course of the primed constant infusions used to measure protein turnover. PMID:8984910

  2. Learning new parts for landmark localization in whole-body CT scans.

    PubMed

    Potesil, Vaclav; Kadir, Timor; Brady, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work is to reliably and accurately localize anatomical landmarks in 3-D computed tomography scans, particularly for the deformable registration of whole-body scans, which show huge variation in posture, and the spatial distribution of anatomical features. Parts-based graphical models (GM) have shown attractive properties for this task because they capture naturally anatomical relationships between landmarks. Unfortunately, standard GMs are learned from manually annotated training images and the quantity of landmarks is limited by the high cost of expert annotation. We propose a novel method that automatically learns new corresponding landmarks from a database of 3-D whole-body CT scans, using a limited initial set of expert-labeled ground-truth landmarks. The newly learned landmarks, called B-landmarks, are used to build enriched GMs. We compare our method of deformable registration based on such GM landmarks to a conventional deformable registration method and to a "baseline" state-of-the-art GM. The results show our method finds new relevant anatomical correspondences and improves by up to 35% the matching accuracy of highly variable skeletal and soft-tissue landmarks of clinical interest. PMID:24710153

  3. Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

  4. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  5. Integrated Whole Body MR/PET: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Whole body integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET) imaging systems have recently become available for clinical use and are currently being used to explore whether the combined anatomic and functional capabilities of MR imaging and the metabolic information of PET provide new insight into disease phenotypes and biology, and provide a better assessment of oncologic diseases at a lower radiation dose than a CT. This review provides an overview of the technical background of combined MR/PET systems, a discussion of the potential advantages and technical challenges of hybrid MR/PET instrumentation, as well as collection of possible solutions. Various early clinical applications of integrated MR/PET are also addressed. Finally, the workflow issues of integrated MR/PET, including maximizing diagnostic information while minimizing acquisition time are discussed. PMID:25598673

  6. Whole-body imaging at 7T: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J Thomas; Snyder, Carl J; DelaBarre, Lance J; Bolan, Patrick J; Tian, Jinfeng; Bolinger, Lizann; Adriany, Gregor; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of whole-body imaging at 7T. To achieve this objective, new technology and methods were developed. Radio frequency (RF) field distribution and specific absorption rate (SAR) were first explored through numerical modeling. A body coil was then designed and built. Multichannel transmit and receive coils were also developed and implemented. With this new technology in hand, an imaging survey of the "landscape" of the human body at 7T was conducted. Cardiac imaging at 7T appeared to be possible. The potential for breast imaging and spectroscopy was demonstrated. Preliminary results of the first human body imaging at 7T suggest both promise and directions for further development. PMID:19097214

  7. Visualizing gene expression by whole-body fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Moossa, A. R.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Transgene expression in intact animals now can be visualized by noninvasive techniques. However, the instruments and protocols developed so far have been formidable and expensive. We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing transgene expression in major organs of intact live mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently affordable. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed in the cells of brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, and bone, and its fluorescence is encoded in whole-body optical images. For low-magnification images, animals are illuminated atop a fluorescence light box and directly viewed with a thermoelectrically cooled color charge-coupled device camera. Higher-magnification images are made with the camera focused through an epi-fluorescence dissecting microscope. Both nude and normal mice were labeled by directly injecting 8 × 1010 plaque-forming units/ml of adenoviral GFP in 20–100 ?l PBS and 10% glycerol into either the brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, or bone marrow. Within 5–8 h after adenoviral GFP injection, the fluorescence of the expressed GFP in brain and liver became visible, and whole-body images were recorded at video rates. The GFP fluorescence continued to increase for at least 12 h and remained detectable in liver for up to 4 months. The system's rapidity of image acquisition makes it capable of real-time recording. It requires neither exogenous contrast agents, radioactive substrates, nor long processing times. The method requires only that the expressed gene or promoter be fused or operatively linked to GFP. A comparatively modest investment allows the study of the therapeutic and diagnostic potential of suitably tagged genes in relatively opaque organisms. PMID:11050247

  8. A hybrid modelling approach for predicting ground vibration from trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triepaischajonsak, N.; Thompson, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of ground vibration from trains presents a number of difficulties. The ground is effectively an infinite medium, often with a layered structure and with properties that may vary greatly from one location to another. The vibration from a passing train forms a transient event, which limits the usefulness of steady-state frequency domain models. Moreover, there is often a need to consider vehicle/track interaction in more detail than is commonly used in frequency domain models, such as the 2.5D approach, while maintaining the computational efficiency of the latter. However, full time-domain approaches involve large computation times, particularly where three-dimensional ground models are required. Here, a hybrid modelling approach is introduced. The vehicle/track interaction is calculated in the time domain in order to be able t account directly for effects such as the discrete sleeper spacing. Forces acting on the ground are extracted from this first model and used in a second model to predict the ground response at arbitrary locations. In the present case the second model is a layered ground model operating in the frequency domain. Validation of the approach is provided by comparison with an existing frequency domain model. The hybrid model is then used to study the sleeper-passing effect, which is shown to be less significant than excitation due to track unevenness in all the cases considered.

  9. Flexible Muscle Modes and Synergies in Challenging Whole-Body Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Danna-dos-Santos, Alessander; Degani, Adriana M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    We used the idea of hierarchical control to study multi-muscle synergies during a whole-body sway task performed by a standing person. Within this view, at the lower level of the hierarchy, muscles are united into groups (M-modes). At the higher level, gains at the M-modes are co-varied by the controller in a task specific way to ensure low variability of important physical variables. In particular, we hypothesized that (1) the composition of M-modes could adjust and (2) an index of M-mode co-variation would become weaker in more challenging conditions. Subjects were required to perform a whole-body sway at 0.5 Hz paced by a metronome. They performed the task with eyes open and closed, while standing on both feet or on one foot only, with and without vibration applied to the Achilles tendons. Integrated indices of muscle activation were subjected to principal component analysis to identify M-modes. An increase in the task complexity led to an increase in the number of principal components that contained significantly loaded indices of muscle activation from 3 to 5. Hence, in more challenging tasks, the controller manipulated a larger number of variables. Multiple regression analysis was used to define the Jacobian of the system mapping small changes in M-mode gains onto shifts of the center of pressure (COP) in the anterior-posterior direction. Further, the variance in the M-mode space across sway cycles was partitioned into two components, one that did not affect an average across cycles COP coordinate and the other that did (good and bad variance, respectively). Under all conditions, the subjects showed substantially more good variance than bad variance interpreted as a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing the COP trajectory. An index of the strength of the synergy was comparable across all conditions, and there was no modulation of this index over the sway cycle. Hence, our first hypothesis that the composition of M-modes could adjust under challenging conditions has been confirmed while the second hypothesis stating that the index of M-mode co-variation would become weaker in more challenging conditions has been falsified. We interpret the observations as suggesting that adjustments at the lower level of the hierarchy - in the M-mode composition - allowed the subjects to maintain a comparable level of stabilization of the COP trajectory in more challenging tasks. The findings support the (at least) two-level hierarchical control scheme of whole-body movements. PMID:18521583

  10. Symptoms of contruction workers exposed to whole body vibration and local vibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Miyashita; I. Morioka; T. Tanabe; H. Iwata; S. Takeda

    1992-01-01

    Summary To study the effects of construction machinery operation on subjective symptoms, a questionnaire survey was caried out among construction machinery operators by a self-reporting method. Subjects were 184 power shovel operators, 127 bulldozer operators, 44 forklift operators as operator groups, and 44 office workers as a control. Their ages were in a range of 30–49 years. The questionnaire contained

  11. Symptoms of construction workers exposed to whole body vibration and local vibration.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, K; Morioka, I; Tanabe, T; Iwata, H; Takeda, S

    1992-01-01

    To study the effects of construction machinery operation on subjective symptoms, a questionnaire survey was carried out among construction machinery operators by a self-reporting method. Subjects were 184 power shovel operators, 127 bulldozer operators, 44 forklift operators as operator groups, and 44 office workers as a control. Their ages were in a range of 30-49 years. The questionnaire contained 20 symptoms referring to fatigue, digestive problems, and upper or lower limbs or back problems. The prevalence rate and symptom characteristics were examined. The dominant symptoms of the operator groups were stiff shoulder, low back pain, and stomach symptoms. The prevalence rate of low back pain was significantly different between forklift operators and controls. No significant differences were found in the symptoms of upper limbs and fingers between operator groups and controls. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon was 0.5%-2.3% in the operator groups and 2.3% in the control group. PMID:1487332

  12. The effect of whole body disinfection on intraoperative wound contamination.

    PubMed

    Byrne, D J; Phillips, G; Napier, A; Cuschieri, A

    1991-06-01

    As part of a large whole body disinfection (WBD) trial two small sub-groups of patients who showered preoperatively with either a 4% chlorhexidine (CHX: N = 29) or placebo (N =27) detergent were studied to assess intraoperative wound contamination. The groups were well matched for age, sex and length of surgery. A membrane filter contact technique was used for bacterial recovery from the wounds after the initial skin incision and before wound closure. The membrane filters were incubated aerobically on blood agar plates with a CHX neutralizer for 48 h at 37 degrees C and colonies were counted. The results show a significant difference, between the bacterial counts at the start and end of surgery in the CHX and placebo groups. There was no difference in bacterial counts at the start of surgery between the CHX and placebo groups. There was a significant difference in the bacterial counts at the end of surgery between the CHX and placebo groups. These results indicate that preoperative WBD with CHX reduces intraoperative wound contamination but the effect of this on postoperative wound sepsis rates awaits the results of a large WBD trial. PMID:1678760

  13. Whole-body cryotherapy: empirical evidence and theoretical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Chris M; Bieuzen, François; Davison, Gareth W; Costello, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) involves short exposures to air temperatures below ?100°C. WBC is increasingly accessible to athletes, and is purported to enhance recovery after exercise and facilitate rehabilitation postinjury. Our objective was to review the efficacy and effectiveness of WBC using empirical evidence from controlled trials. We found ten relevant reports; the majority were based on small numbers of active athletes aged less than 35 years. Although WBC produces a large temperature gradient for tissue cooling, the relatively poor thermal conductivity of air prevents significant subcutaneous and core body cooling. There is weak evidence from controlled studies that WBC enhances antioxidant capacity and parasympathetic reactivation, and alters inflammatory pathways relevant to sports recovery. A series of small randomized studies found WBC offers improvements in subjective recovery and muscle soreness following metabolic or mechanical overload, but little benefit towards functional recovery. There is evidence from one study only that WBC may assist rehabilitation for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. There were no adverse events associated with WBC; however, studies did not seem to undertake active surveillance of predefined adverse events. Until further research is available, athletes should remain cognizant that less expensive modes of cryotherapy, such as local ice-pack application or cold-water immersion, offer comparable physiological and clinical effects to WBC. PMID:24648779

  14. Sex differences in whole body gait kinematics at preferred speeds.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Dustin A; Frimenko, Rebecca E; Goodyear, Chuck D; Bowden, David R; Fullenkamp, Adam M

    2015-02-01

    Studies on human perception have identified pelvis and torso motion as key discriminators between male and female gaits. However, while most observers would advocate that men and women walk differently, consistent findings and explanations of sex differences in gait kinematics across modern empirical studies are rare. In the present study we evaluated sex differences in whole body gait kinematics from a large sample of subjects (55 men, 36 women) walking at self selected speeds. We analyzed the data through comparisons of discrete metrics and whole curve analyses. Results showed that in the frontal plane, women walked with greater pelvic obliquity than men, but exhibited a more stable torso and head. Women had greater transverse plane pelvis and torso rotation as well as greater arm swing. Additional sex differences were noted at the hip and ankle. These kinematic results are in line with anectdotal observations and qualitative studies. In order to understand these observations and substantiate some of the explanations previously set forth in the biomechanics literature, we also explored possible reasons for dynamic sex effects, and suggested applications that may benefit from their consideration. PMID:25548119

  15. The role of whole-body MRI in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Karen L; Ditchfield, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric whole-body (WB) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established technique that, with improved accessibility and advances in technology, is being used with increasing frequency for a wide variety of applications. The advantages of WB MRI (over other imaging modalities), particularly its lack of ionizing radiation (of particular concern in pediatric imaging due to children's increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation) and the ability of MRI to image the bone marrow, solid organs, and soft tissues with superior soft-tissue contrast resolution to other techniques, promise that WB MRI has great potential in conditions that are diffuse or multifocal. There is particular interest in its role in the field of pediatric oncology (eg, lymphoma, neuroblastoma, sarcoma, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis). The main disadvantages of WB MRI are its relatively long scanning times, artifacts from motion (requiring patient cooperation or general anesthesia), and limited specificity. However, advances in hardware and imaging techniques, including additional sequences (out-of-phase imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and contrast enhancement) are reducing the impact of some of these challenges. PMID:24072253

  16. Does pulmonary function change during whole-body deep hypothermia?

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giacomo; Filippi, Luca; Cristofori, Gloria; Colnaghi, Mariarosa; Ramenghi, Luca; Agazzani, Elisa; Ronchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Patrizio; Mosca, Fabio

    2011-09-01

    Whole-body deep hypothermia (DH) could be a new therapeutic strategy for asphyxiated newborn. Aim of this study was to describe how DH (core temperature 30-33°C) modifies the respiratory function if compared with mild hypothermia (MH; core temperature 33-34°C). This is an observational study. Results were obtained from a pilot study of safety of DH and topiramate in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Fifty-seven newborns were enrolled: 29 patients in DH and 28 in MH. Recruitment criteria were moderate-severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and gestational age ?36 weeks. Mechanical ventilation was set to maintain SaO(2) between 92% and 95%. Nineteen patients in DH and 18 in MH required mechanical ventilation. Of these patients, 10 and 12, respectively, did not required oxygen. No significant differences were observed in hours of oxygen and ventilation support, respiratory rate and PaCO(2). Maximum FiO(2), peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, minute ventilation and tidal volume during hypothermia were similar. Pulmonary function with different levels of hypothermia was similar. PMID:20530109

  17. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan K Poon; Magnus L Dahlbom; William W Moses; Karthik Balakrishnan; Wenli Wang; Simon R Cherry; Ramsey D Badawi

    2012-01-01

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15–22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining

  18. Polyarteritis nodosa: MDCT as a 'One-Stop Shop' Modality for Whole-Body Arterial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, W.-L.; Tsai, I-C.; Lee Tain, E-mail: s841082@ym.edu.t [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, C.-W. [Taichung Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University, Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taiwan (China)

    2008-07-15

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare disease, which is characterized by aneurysm formation and occlusion in the arteries of multiple systems. Due to its extensive involvement, whole-body evaluation is necessary for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We report a case of polyarteritis nodosa using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as a 'one-stop shop' modality for whole-body arterial evaluation. With precise protocol design, MDCT can be used as a reliable noninvasive modality providing comprehensive whole-body arterial evaluation.

  19. Human perceptual overestimation of whole body roll tilt in hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Torin K; Newman, Michael C; Oman, Charles M; Merfeld, Daniel M; Young, Laurence R

    2015-04-01

    Hypergravity provides a unique environment to study human perception of orientation. We utilized a long-radius centrifuge to study perception of both static and dynamic whole body roll tilt in hypergravity, across a range of angles, frequencies, and net gravito-inertial levels (referred to as G levels). While studies of static tilt perception in hypergravity have been published, this is the first to measure dynamic tilt perception (i.e., with time-varying canal stimulation) in hypergravity using a continuous matching task. In complete darkness, subjects reported their orientation perception using a haptic task, whereby they attempted to align a hand-held bar with their perceived horizontal. Static roll tilt was overestimated in hypergravity, with more overestimation at larger angles and higher G levels, across the conditions tested (overestimated by ?35% per additional G level, P < 0.001). As our primary contribution, we show that dynamic roll tilt was also consistently overestimated in hypergravity (P < 0.001) at all angles and frequencies tested, again with more overestimation at higher G levels. The overestimation was similar to that for static tilts at low angular velocities but decreased at higher angular velocities (P = 0.006), consistent with semicircular canal sensory integration. To match our findings, we propose a modification to a previous Observer-type canal-otolith interaction model. Specifically, our data were better modeled by including the hypothesis that the central nervous system treats otolith stimulation in the utricular plane differently than stimulation out of the utricular plane. This modified model was able to simulate quantitatively both the static and the dynamic roll tilt overestimation in hypergravity measured experimentally. PMID:25540216

  20. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. CRANDALL; R. ZHANG; B. D. LEVINE

    Crandall, C. G., R. Zhang, and B. D. Levine. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 279: H2486-H2492, 2000.—The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of

  1. Whole-Body CT Screening--Should I or Shouldn't I Get One?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging Whole-Body CT Screening--Should I or shouldn' ... whole-body CT screening exam. More in Medical X-ray Imaging Radiography Computed Tomography (CT) Dental Cone-beam Computed ...

  2. Hemodilution and whole body oxygen balance during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass in dogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beng-Ling Liam; Walter Plöchl; David J. Cook; Thomas A. Orszulak; Richard C. Daly

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum hematocrit value that can support whole body oxygen consumption during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. The effect of hemodilution on peripheral resistance, whole body oxygen delivery, and oxygen consumption was determined over a range of hematocrit values. Methods: Measurements were obtained during 38° C cardiopulmonary bypass with progressive normovolemic hemodilution (hematocrit

  3. Statistical Analysis of the Whole Body Absorption Depending on Anatomical Human Characteristics at the

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Statistical Analysis of the Whole Body Absorption Depending on Anatomical Human Characteristics, and large and complex problems (as the computation of the SAR induced in a 3D heterogeneous human body) can on that, several studies have used 3D human body models to analyze the relationship between the whole body

  4. Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for staging malignant lymphoma in children

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Taro; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Bierings, Marc B.; Mali, Willem P.; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.

    2010-01-01

    CT is currently the mainstay in staging malignant lymphoma in children, but the risk of second neoplasms due to ionizing radiation associated with CT is not negligible. Whole-body MRI techniques and whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in particular, may be a good radiation-free alternative to CT. DWI is characterized by high sensitivity for the detection of lesions and allows quantitative assessment of diffusion that may aid in the evaluation of malignant lymphomas. This article will review whole-body MRI techniques for staging malignant lymphoma with emphasis on whole-body DWI. Furthermore, future considerations and challenges in whole-body DWI will be discussed. PMID:20676622

  5. Neuromotor Transmissibility of Horizontal Seatpan Vibration

    E-print Network

    Channamallu, Raghu Ram

    2007-12-16

    Exposure to occupational whole body vibration (WBV) is associated with low back pain disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and degeneration of spine. Transmission of vibration to the neuromotor system may play a role in the etiology...

  6. Optimization of Training Sets for Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns from Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been used for a number of years to process holography-generated characteristic patterns of vibrating structures. This technology depends critically on the selection and the conditioning of the training sets. A scaling operation called folding is discussed for conditioning training sets optimally for training feed-forward neural networks to process characteristic fringe patterns. Folding allows feed-forward nets to be trained easily to detect damage-induced vibration-displacement-distribution changes as small as 10 nm. A specific application to aerospace of neural-net processing of characteristic patterns is presented to motivate the conditioning and optimization effort.

  7. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy on recovery after hamstring damaging exercise: a crossover study.

    PubMed

    Fonda, B; Sarabon, N

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on biochemical, pain, and performance parameters during the 5-day recovery period after damaging exercise for hamstrings. Participants completed a bout of damaging exercise for the hamstring muscles on two separate occasions (control and experimental condition) separated by 10 weeks. During the control condition, subjects received no treatment after the damaging exercise. The experimental condition consisted of WBC everyday during the recovery period. WBC included single 3-min daily exposures to low temperatures (-140 to -19 °C) in the cryo-cabin. During the recovery period, subjects were tested for biochemical markers, perceived pain sensation, and physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal isometric torque production, and maximally explosive isometric torque production). Majority of the observed variables showed statistically significant time effects (P < 0.05) in control group, which indicates the presence of muscle damage. Significant interaction between the control and WBC condition was evident for the rate of torque development (P < 0.05). Pain measures substantially differed between the WBC and the control condition after the exercise. Results of this study are not completely supportive of the use of WBC for recovery enhancement after strenuous training. PMID:23614691

  8. Does whole-body cryotherapy improve vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise bout?

    PubMed

    Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; Ferreira-Junior, Joao B; Vieira, Carlos; Cleto, Vitor A; Cadore, Eduardo L; Simões, Herbert G; Carmo, Jake Do; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) has been used as a recovery strategy following different sports activities. Thus, the aim of the study reported here was to examine the effect of WBC on vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise (HIE) bout. Twelve trained men (mean ± standard deviation age = 23.9±5.9 years) were randomly exposed to two different conditions separated by 7 days: 1) WBC (3 minutes of WBC at -110°C immediately after the HIE) and 2) control (CON; no WBC after the HIE). The HIE consisted of six sets of ten repetitions of knee extensions at 60° · s(-1) concentric and 180° · s(-1) eccentric on an isokinetic dynamometer. The vertical jump test was used to evaluate the influence of HIE on lower extremity muscular performance. The vertical jump was performed on a force platform before HIE (T1) and 30 minutes after (T2) the WBC and CON conditions. As a result of HIE, jump height, muscle power, and maximal velocity (Vmax) had significant decreases between T1 and T2, however no significance was found between the WBC and CON conditions. The results indicate that one session of WBC had no effect on vertical jump following an HIE compared with a CON condition. WBC may not improve muscle-function (dependent on stretch-shortening cycle) recovery in very short periods (ie, 30 minutes) following HIE. PMID:25750548

  9. Problems associated with the establishment of a whole body counter at a university reactor 

    E-print Network

    Fairchild, Gregory R

    1999-01-01

    to establish procedures for generating radionuclides and manipulating the activities for use as a phantom source; 2) an intimate knowledge of gamma spectroscopy, including the creation of calibration efficiencies; and 3) a calibrated whole body counting system...

  10. Optimization of Whole-body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging (2013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  11. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Regarding Whole Body Donation Among Medical Professionals in a Hospital in India

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-05-05

    This article describes a survey conducted among medical practitioners in India. The study's objective was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of whole body donation among medical professionals in India. Outcomes and results are discussed.

  12. Immunofluorescence and histopathology of whole-body sagittal sections of infant mice infected with Herpesvirus platyrrhinae 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Sidney Robert

    1967-01-01

    IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE AND HISTOPATHOLOGY OF WHOLE-BODY SAGITTAL SECTIONS OF INFANT MICE INFECTED WITH HERPESVIRUS PLATYRRHINAE A Thesis By SIDNEY ROBERT JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Ma)or Subject: Veterinary Pathology IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE AND HISTOPATHOLOGY OF WHOLE-BODY SAGITTAL SECTIONS OF INFANT MICE INFECTED WITH HERPESVIRUS PLATYRRHINAE A Thesis By SIDNEY ROBERT JONES...

  13. Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) method for bone and whole-body-composition analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gersh Z. Taicher; Frank C. Tinsley; Arcady Reiderman; Mark L. Heiman

    2003-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the applicability, precision, and accuracy of the new EchoMRI quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) method for in-vitro bovine bone analysis and in-vivo whole-body-composition analysis of conscious live mice. Research methods and procedures: bovine tibia bone samples were measured by QMR and dual-energy X-ray adsorptiometry (DEXA). Repeated measures of whole-body composition were made using live and dead mice with

  14. Impact of whole-body computed tomography on mortality and surgical management of severe blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The mortality benefit of whole-body computed tomography (CT) in early trauma management remains controversial and poorly understood. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of whole-body CT compared with selective CT on mortality and management of patients with severe blunt trauma. Methods The FIRST (French Intensive care Recorded in Severe Trauma) study is a multicenter cohort study on consecutive patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to intensive care units from university hospital trauma centers within the first 72 hours. Initial data were combined to construct a propensity score to receive whole-body CT and selective CT used in multivariable logistic regression models, and to calculate the probability of survival according to the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) for 1,950 patients. The main endpoint was 30-day mortality. Results In total, 1,696 patients out of 1,950 (87%) were given whole-body CT. The crude 30-day mortality rates were 16% among whole-body CT patients and 22% among selective CT patients (p = 0.02). A significant reduction in the mortality risk was observed among whole-body CT patients whatever the adjustment method (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.34-0.99 after adjustment for baseline characteristics and post-CT treatment). Compared to the TRISS predicted survival, survival significantly improved for whole-body CT patients but not for selective CT patients. The pattern of early surgical and medical procedures significantly differed between the two groups. Conclusions Diagnostic whole-body CT was associated with a significant reduction in 30-day mortality among patients with severe blunt trauma. Its use may be a global indicator of better management. PMID:22687140

  15. [Application of GVF snake model in segmentation of whole body bone SPECT image].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunmei; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Lifei; Ye, Guangchun; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-02-01

    Limited by the imaging principle of whole body bone SPECT image, the gray value of bladder area is quite high, which affects the image's brightness, contrast and readability. In the meantime, the similarity between bladder area and focus makes it difficult for some images to be segmented automatically. In this paper, an improved Snake model, GVF Snake, is adopted to automatically segment bladder area, preparing for further processing of whole body bone SPECT images. PMID:18435250

  16. Whole-Body Motion Generation Integrating Operator's Intention and Robot's Autonomy in Controlling Humanoid Robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ee Sian Neo; Kazuhito Yokoi; Shuuji Kajita; Kazuo Tanie

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for whole-body motion generation integrating operator's control and robot's autonomous functions during online control of humanoid robots. Humanoid robots are biped machines that usually possess multiple degrees of freedom (DOF). The complexity of their structure and the difficulty in maintaining postural stability make the whole-body control of humanoid robots fundamentally different from fixed-base manipulators. Getting

  17. Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for staging malignant lymphoma in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas C. Kwee; Taro Takahara; Malou A. Vermoolen; Marc B. Bierings; Willem P. Mali; Rutger A. J. Nievelstein

    2010-01-01

    CT is currently the mainstay in staging malignant lymphoma in children, but the risk of second neoplasms due to ionizing radiation\\u000a associated with CT is not negligible. Whole-body MRI techniques and whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in particular,\\u000a may be a good radiation-free alternative to CT. DWI is characterized by high sensitivity for the detection of lesions and\\u000a allows quantitative assessment

  18. Modulation of the gut microbiota with antibiotic treatment suppresses whole body urea production in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Puiman, Patrycja; Stoll, Barbara; Mølbak, Lars; de Bruijn, Adrianus; Schierbeek, Henk; Boye, Mette; Boehm, Günther; Renes, Ingrid; Burrin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether changes in the gut microbiota induced by clinically relevant interventions would impact the bioavailability of dietary amino acids in neonates. We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the gut microbiota in neonatal pigs receiving no treatment (control), intravenously administered antibiotics, or probiotics affects whole body nitrogen and amino acid turnover. We quantified whole body urea kinetics, threonine fluxes, and threonine disposal into protein, oxidation, and tissue protein synthesis with stable isotope techniques. Compared with controls, antibiotics reduced the number and diversity of bacterial species in the distal small intestine (SI) and colon. Antibiotics decreased plasma urea concentrations via decreased urea synthesis. Antibiotics elevated threonine plasma concentrations and turnover, as well as whole body protein synthesis and proteolysis. Antibiotics decreased protein synthesis rate in the proximal SI and liver but did not affect the distal SI, colon, or muscle. Probiotics induced a bifidogenic microbiota and decreased plasma urea concentrations but did not affect whole body threonine or protein metabolism. Probiotics decreased protein synthesis in the proximal SI but not in other tissues. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by antibiotics and probiotics reduced hepatic ureagenesis and intestinal protein synthesis, but neither altered whole body net threonine balance. These findings suggest that changes in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism resulting from antibiotic- or probiotic-induced shifts in the microbiota are localized to the gut and liver and have limited impact on whole body growth and anabolism in neonatal piglets. PMID:23139222

  19. I. Savary-Auzeloux et al.Intake on whole body amino acid kinetics insheep Original article

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    across a wide range of intakes. The current study examined the responses in whole body protein flux (Pr to changes in the nutrient supply, or both. Whole body protein metabolism in larger animals, including humansI. Savary-Auzeloux et al.Intake on whole body amino acid kinetics insheep Original article Effect

  20. Protein dynamics in whole body and in splanchnic and leg tissues in type I diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, K S; Ford, G C; Ekberg, K; Fernqvist-Forbes, E; Wahren, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of insulin's anticatabolic effect in humans, protein dynamics were evaluated in the whole-body, splanchnic, and leg tissues in six C-peptide-negative type I diabetic male patients in the insulin-deprived and insulin-treated states using two separate amino acid models (leucine and phenylalanine). L-(1-13C,15N)leucine, L-(ring-2H5)phenylalanine, and L-(ring-2H2) tyrosine were infused intravenously, and isotopic enrichments of [1-13C,15N]-leucine, (13C)leucine, (13C)ketoisocaproate, (2H5)phenylalanine, [2H4]tyrosine, (2H2)tyrosine, and 13CO2 were measured in arterial, hepatic vein, and femoral vein samples. Whole-body leucine flux, phenylalanine flux, and tyrosine flux were decreased (< 0.01) by insulin treatment, indicating an inhibition of protein breakdown. Moreover, insulin decreased (< 0.05) the rates of leucine oxidation and leucine transamination (P < 0.01), but the percent rate of ketoisocaproate oxidation was increased by insulin (P < 0.01). Insulin also reduced (< 0.01) whole-body protein synthesis estimated from both the leucine model (nonoxidative leucine disposal) and the phenylalanine model (disposal of phenylalanine not accounted by its conversion to tyrosine). Regional studies demonstrated that changes in whole body protein breakdown are accounted for by changes in both splanchnic and leg tissues. The changes in whole-body protein synthesis were not associated with changes in skeletal muscle (leg) protein synthesis but could be accounted for by the splanchnic region. We conclude that though insulin decreases whole-body protein breakdown in patients with type I diabetes by inhibition of protein breakdown in splanchnic and leg tissues, it selectively decreases protein synthesis in splanchnic tissues, which accounted for the observed decrease in whole-body protein synthesis. Insulin also augmented anabolism by decreasing leucine transamination. Images PMID:7769135

  1. Training Data Optimized and Conditioned to Learn Characteristic Patterns of Vibrating Blisks and Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have been training artificial neural networks to interpret the characteristic patterns (see the leftmost image) generated from electronic holograms of vibrating structures. These patterns not only visualize the vibration properties of structures, but small changes in the patterns can indicate structural changes, cracking, or damage. Neural networks detect these small changes well. Our objective has been to adapt the neural-network, electronic-holography combination for inspecting components in Glenn's Spin Rig.

  2. Effect of whole-body and local heating on cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that alpha-adrenergic-mediated vasoconstriction is compromised during whole-body heating. The purpose of this study was to identify whether whole-body heating and/or local surface heating reduce cutaneous alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in human skin. Protocol I: Six subjects were exposed to neutral skin temperature (i.e., 34 degrees C), whole-body heating, and local heating of forearm skin to increase skin blood flow to the same relative magnitude as that observed during whole-body heating. Protocol II: In eight subjects forearm skin was locally heated to 34, 37, 40, and 42 degrees C. During both protocols, alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was assessed by local delivery of norepinephrine (NE) via intradermal microdialysis. Skin blood flow was continuously monitored over each microdialysis membrane via laser-Doppler flowmetry. In protocol I, whole-body and local heating caused similar increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). The EC50 (log NE dose) of the dose-response curves for both whole body (-4.2 +/- 0.1 M) and local heating (-4.7 +/- 0.4 M) were significantly greater (i.e., high dose required to cause 50% reduction in CVC) relative to neutral skin temperature (- 5.6 +/- 0.0 M; P<0.05 for both). In both local and whole-body heated conditions CVC did not return to pre-heating values even at the highest dose of NE. In protocol II, calculated EC50 for 34, 37, 40, and 42 degrees C local heating was - 5.5 +/- 0.4, -4.6 +/- 0.3, -4.5 +/- 0.3, - 4.2 +/- 0.4 M, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed that the EC50 for 37,40 and 42 degrees C were significantly greater than the EC50 for 34 degrees C. These results indicate that even during administration of high concentrations of NE, alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction does not fully compensate for local heating and whole-body heating induced vasodilatation in young, healthy subjects. Moreover, these data suggest that elevated local temperatures, above 37 degrees C, and whole-body heating similarly attenuate cutaneous alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction responsiveness.

  3. Whole body exposure at 2100 MHz induced by plane wave of random incidences in a population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; El Habachi, Aimad; Wiart, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, the whole body exposure induced by plane wave coming from a random direction of arrival is analyzed at 2100 MHz. This work completes previous studies on the influence of different parameters on the whole body exposure (such as morphology, frequency or usage in near field). The Visible Human phantom has been used to build a surrogate model to predict the whole body exposure depending on the highlighted surface of the phantom and on the direction of arrival of the incident plane wave. For the Visible Human, the error on the whole body averaged Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is on average 4%. The surrogate model is applied to other 3D anthropomorphic phantoms for a frontal incidence with an averaged error of 10%. The great interest of the surrogate model is the possibility to apply a Monte Carlo process to assess probability distribution function of a population. A recent French anthropometric database of more than 3500 adults is used to build the probability distribution function of the whole body SAR for a random direction of arrival.

  4. Measurements of the equivalent whole-body dose during radiation therapy by cytogenetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kawata, Tetsuya; Majima, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    1999-05-01

    Estimates of equivalent whole-body dose following partial body exposure can be performed using different biophysical models. Calculations should be compared with biodosimetry data, but measurements are complicated by mitotic selection induced in target cells after localized irradiation. In this paper we measured chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes during radiotherapy, and estimated the equivalent whole-body dose absorbed, by using the novel technique of interphase chromosome painting. Premature chromosome condensation was induced in stimulated lymphocytes by incubation in calyculin A, and slides were hybridized in situ with whole-chromosome DNA probes specific for human chromosomes 2 and 4. Reciprocal exchanges were used to estimate the equivalent whole-body dose, based on individual pre-treatment in vitro calibration curves. Equivalent whole-body dose increased as a function of the number of fractions, and reached a plateau at high fraction numbers. Chromosomal aberration yields were dependent on field size, tumour position and concurrent chemotherapy. Results suggest that interphase chromosome painting is a simple technique able to give a reliable estimate of the equivalent whole-body dose absorbed during therapeutic partial-body irradiation.

  5. Ganoderma lucidum: partial characterization of spore and whole body antigenic extracts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Pereira, B M; Singh, A B

    2000-01-01

    This study focused on the characterization of antigenic/ allergenic profiles of Ganoderma lucidum spore and whole body preparations. Whole body G. lucidum contained higher protein to carbohydrate ratio whereas it was less than one for spore extract. Isoelectric focusing showed 12 and 11 bands in acidic pH range (pI 3.5-6.5) for G. lucidum spore and whole body, respectively, while SDS-PAGE showed 8 and 23 fractions, respectively, in molecular weight range of 12.8-75.0 kD. The prominent protein fractions of G. lucidum spores were 19.4, 22.8 and 23.8 kD, whereas for G. lucidum whole body, 13.2, 14.7, 18. 7, 21.5 and 23.5 constituted major fractions. Immunoblotting with 41 individual serum samples revealed 21.8, 23.8, 19.4 and 20.0 kD to be major allergenic protein fractions of G. lucidum spores. The same using G. lucidum whole body and 26 individual serum samples identified several fractions of 17.0, 17.5, 18.5, 22.0, 23.8, 42.0, 44.0, 56.0 and 69.0 kD as major allergens. The compiled data suggest that there are common as well as specific allergenic components in two G. lucidum extracts studied. PMID:10879995

  6. Comprehensive diagnosis of whole-body acid-base and fluid-electrolyte disorders using a mathematical model and whole-body base excess.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B

    2015-08-01

    A mathematical model of whole-body acid-base and fluid-electrolyte balance was used to provide information leading to the diagnosis and fluid-therapy treatment in patients with complex acid-base disorders. Given a set of measured laboratory-chemistry values for a patient, a model of their unique, whole-body chemistry was created. This model predicted deficits or excesses in the masses of Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and H2O as well as the plasma concentration of unknown or unmeasured species, such as ketoacids, in diabetes mellitus. The model further characterized the acid-base disorder by determining the patient's whole-body base excess and quantitatively partitioning it into ten components, each contributing to the overall disorder. The results of this study showed the importance of a complete set of laboratory measurements to obtain sufficient accuracy of the quantitative diagnosis; having only a minimal set, just pH and PCO2, led to a large scatter in the predicted results. A computer module was created that would allow a clinician to achieve this diagnosis at the bedside. This new diagnostic approach should prove to be valuable in the treatment of the critically ill. PMID:25281215

  7. Characterisation of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome in French Bulldogs Using Whole-Body Barometric Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nai-Chieh; Sargan, David R.; Adams, Vicki J.; Ladlow, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) is an important health and welfare problem in several popular dog breeds. Whole-body barometric plethysmography (WBBP) is a non-invasive method that allows safe and repeated quantitative measurements of respiratory cycles on unsedated dogs. Here respiratory flow traces in French bulldogs from the pet population were characterised using WBBP, and a computational application was developed to recognise affected animals. Eighty-nine French bulldogs and twenty non-brachycephalic controls underwent WBBP testing. A respiratory functional grading system was used on each dog based on respiratory signs (i.e. respiratory noise, effort, etc.) before and after exercise. For development of an objective BOAS classifier, functional Grades 0 and I were considered to have insignificant clinical signs (termed here BOAS-) and Grades II and III to have significant signs (termed here BOAS+). A comparison between owner-perception of BOAS and functional grading revealed that 60 % of owners failed to recognise BOAS in dogs that graded BOAS+ in this study.WBBP flow traces were found to be significantly different between non-brachycephalic controls and Grade 0 French bulldogs; BOAS- and BOAS+ French bulldogs. A classifier was developed using quadratic discriminant analysis of the respiratory parameters to distinguish BOAS- and BOAS + French bulldogs, and a BOAS Index was calculated for each dog. A cut-off value of the BOAS Index was selected based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the classifier on the training group (n=69) were 0.97, 0.93, 0.95, and 0.97, respectively. The classifier was validated using a test group of French bulldogs (n=20) with an accuracy of 0.95. WBBP offers objective screening for the diagnosis of BOAS in French Bulldogs. The technique may be applied to other brachycephalic breeds affected by BOAS, and possibly to other respiratory disease in dogs. PMID:26079684

  8. Brown adipose tissue improves whole-body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Porter, Craig; Annamalai, Palam; Enerbäck, Sven; Lidell, Martin E; Saraf, Manish K; Labbe, Sebastien M; Hurren, Nicholas M; Yfanti, Christina; Chao, Tony; Andersen, Clark R; Cesani, Fernando; Hawkins, Hal; Sidossis, Labros S

    2014-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has attracted scientific interest as an antidiabetic tissue owing to its ability to dissipate energy as heat. Despite a plethora of data concerning the role of BAT in glucose metabolism in rodents, the role of BAT (if any) in glucose metabolism in humans remains unclear. To investigate whether BAT activation alters whole-body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in humans, we studied seven BAT-positive (BAT(+)) men and five BAT-negative (BAT(-)) men under thermoneutral conditions and after prolonged (5-8 h) cold exposure (CE). The two groups were similar in age, BMI, and adiposity. CE significantly increased resting energy expenditure, whole-body glucose disposal, plasma glucose oxidation, and insulin sensitivity in the BAT(+) group only. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role of BAT in whole-body energy expenditure, glucose homeostasis, and insulin sensitivity in humans, and support the notion that BAT may function as an antidiabetic tissue in humans. PMID:25056438

  9. Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: Effects of posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2008-10-01

    Lumped parameter mathematical models representing anatomical parts of the human body have been developed to represent body motions associated with resonances of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body standing in five different postures: 'upright', 'lordotic', 'anterior lean', 'knees bent', and 'knees more bent'. The inertial and geometric parameters of the models were determined from published anthropometric data. Stiffness and damping parameters were obtained by comparing model responses with experimental data obtained previously. The principal resonance of the vertical apparent mass, and the first peak in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass, of the standing body in an upright posture (at 5-6 Hz) corresponded to vertical motion of the viscera in phase with the vertical motion of the entire body due to deformation of the tissues at the soles of the feet, with pitch motion of the pelvis out of phase with pitch motion of the upper body above the pelvis. Upward motion of the body was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the pelvis. Changing the posture of the upper body had minor effects on the mode associated with the principal resonances of the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass, but the mode changed significantly with bending of the legs. In legs-bent postures, the principal resonance (at about 3 Hz) was attributed to bending of the legs coupled with pitch motion of the pelvis in phase with pitch motion of the upper body. In this mode, extension of the legs was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the upper body and the upward vertical motion of the viscera.

  10. Whole-body MRI using a sliding table and repositioning surface coil approach

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Thomas; Kibune, Satoshi; Ochiai, Reiji; Sakamoto, Tetsuro; Niwa, Tetsu; Van Cauteren, Marc; Luijten, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective To introduce and assess a new way of performing whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a non-integrated surface coil approach as available on most clinical MRI systems worldwide. Methods Ten consecutive asymptomatic subjects prospectively underwent whole-body MRI for health screening. Whole-body MRI included T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted sequences, and was performed using a non-integrated surface coil to image four different stations without patient repositioning. The four separately acquired stations were merged, creating seamless coronal whole-body T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted images. Anatomical alignment, image quality at the boundaries of adjacent stations, and overall image quality of all stations were qualitatively assessed. Results The average time (±SD) taken to change the surface coil from one station to the next station was 53.8 (±7.1) s. The average total extra examination time ± SD was 2 min 41.4 s (±15.3 s). Anatomical alignment, image quality at the boundaries of adjacent stations, and overall image quality of all stations of T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI were overall graded as “good” to “excellent”. Conclusion This study shows that a time-efficient and high-quality whole-body MRI examination can easily be performed by using a non-integrated sliding surface coil approach. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00330-009-1674-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19997846

  11. Detection and semi-quantitative measurement of lung cancer metabolic activity by whole body PET

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, K.K.M.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Alavi, J.B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Conventional radiologic and nuclear medicine techniques have been shown to have a limited role in the staging and monitoring of disease activity in patients with lung cancer. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative position emission tomography (PET) using the F-18 FDG technique have been applied to determine the clinical utility of whole body PET-FDG imaging in lung cancer. Nineteen whole body FDG PET scans were performed in 18 patients; 17 with lung cancer (15 non-small cell and 2 small cell) and 1 with squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea.

  12. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  13. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  14. Wireless vibration monitoring on human machine operator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederik Petré; Frank Bouwens; Steven Gillijns; Fabien Massé; Marc Engels; Bert Gyselinckx; Kris Vanstechelman; Christophe Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Human machine operators are often subject to extreme shocks and vibrations while operating production machines and vehicles. To assess the impact on perceived comfort objectively, a wireless vibration monitoring system is needed that measures whole-body vibrations directly on the human body. To this end, we have developed a wireless body area network consisting of low-power vibration sensor nodes that have

  15. Dynamic tread wear measurement method for train wheels against vibrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Junhua; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-06-10

    Dynamic tread wear measurement is difficult but significant for railway transportation safety and efficiency. The accuracy of existing methods is inclined to be affected by environmental vibrations since they are highly dependent on the accurate calibration of the relative pose between vision sensors. In this paper, we present a method to obtain full wheel profiles based on automatic registration of vision sensor data instead of traditional global calibrations. We adopt two structured light vision sensors to recover the inner and outer profiles of each wheel, and register them by the iterative closest point algorithm. Computer simulations show that the proposed method is insensitive to noises and relative pose vibrations. Static experiments demonstrate that our method has high accuracy and great repeatability. Dynamic experiments show that the measurement accuracy of our method is about 0.18 mm, which is a twofold improvement over traditional methods. PMID:26192824

  16. HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF TESTES IN LOCALLY AND WHOLE BODY IRRADIATED INFANTILE RATS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. V. Savkovic; D. V. Radivojevic; S. I. Hajdukovic; M. M. Radotic; S. H. Popovic; J. Karanovic

    1961-01-01

    Histological changes of testes in locally and whole-body irradiated ; infantile rats untreated and treated with cysteamine are studied. The results ; show that the testes in fertile males have normal structure. However, in sterile ; animals the testes are destroyed in most cases. Giant cells in sterile and in ; some fertile animals are observed depending on whether they

  17. Prolonged bed rest decreases skeletal muscle and whole body protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Lane, H. W.; Stuart, C. A.; Davis-Street, J.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which the loss of lean body mass and nitrogen during inactivity was due to alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Six male subjects were studied during 7 days of diet stabilization and after 14 days of stimulated microgravity (-6 degrees bed rest). Nitrogen balance became more negative (P < 0.03) during the 2nd wk of bed rest. Leg and whole body lean mass decreased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Serum cortisol, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, and testosterone values did not change. Arteriovenous model calculations based on the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine in five subjects revealed a 50% decrease in muscle protein synthesis (PS; P < 0.03). Fractional PS by tracer incorporation into muscle protein also decreased by 46% (P < 0.05). The decrease in PS was related to a corresponding decrease in the sum of intracellular amino acid appearance from protein breakdown and inward transport. Whole body protein synthesis determined by [15N]alanine ingestion on six subjects also revealed a 14% decrease (P < 0.01). Neither model-derived nor whole body values for protein breakdown change significantly. These results indicate that the loss of body protein with inactivity is predominantly due to a decrease in muscle PS and that this decrease is reflected in both whole body and skeletal muscle measures.

  18. Distribution of C?lindane in Japanese quail using autoradiography of whole body sections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Madari?; M. Fellegiová

    1977-01-01

    Information on the distribution of lindane in Japanese quails was obtained by autoradiography of whole body sections. The most part of lindane was found in fatty tissues of the animals and the distribution in the other parts of the organism was equal. A single dose of C?lindane is found in the organism of Japanese quails mainly in the gastro?intestinal tract

  19. Whole body air displacement plethysmography compared with hydrodensitometry for body composition analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odile Dewit; N J Fuller; Mary S Fewtrell; M Elia; J C K Wells

    2000-01-01

    AIMSTo assess the acceptability and feasibility of whole body air displacement plethysmography in children and to determine its precision and agreement with hydrodensitometry, an appropriate reference method.METHODSAge specific two component model equations were used to predict fat mass from body density in 22 children aged 8–12 years and in 10 adults for comparison of methods. Precision for each method was

  20. Pulmonary function assessment by whole-body plethysmography in restrained versus unrestrained mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael P DeLorme; Owen R Moss

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: The evaluation of pulmonary physiological measurements in laboratory animals is an essential tool in many biomedical and toxicological research areas. Recently, an unrestrained single chambered whole-body plethysmograph that utilizes a barometric analysis technique to quantify pulmonary physiological values has gained widespread use. However, results generated with the single chamber plethysmograph have come under increased scrutiny because airflow in the

  1. Muscle contributions to whole-body sagittal plane angular momentum during walking

    E-print Network

    Muscle contributions to whole-body sagittal plane angular momentum during walking R.R. Neptune n into swing. In human walking, the primary mechanism to regulate angular momentum is muscle force generation. Muscles accelerate body segments and generate ground reaction forces that alter angular momentum about

  2. GENERALIZED HYPEROSTOSIS INTERNA AND OSTEOSARCOMA IN WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATED MICE WITH HORMONALLY ACTIVE OVARIAN TUMORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Cottier; H. Keller; B. Roos

    1961-01-01

    Inbred mice, a Swiss albino subline, at the age of 3 months were ; submitted to a single, 600-r, whole-body dose of x radiation. Many of the ; irradiated females developed, with a peak incidence at 12 months, generalized ; hyperostosis interna as seen by replacement of the blood-forming bone marrow by ; newly formed bone of the spongiosa type.

  3. Small changes in whole-body corticosterone content affect larval Rana pipiens fitness components

    E-print Network

    Denver, Robert J.

    Small changes in whole-body corticosterone content affect larval Rana pipiens fitness components, and morphology are unknown. In the current study, we exposed pre-metamorphic Rana pipiens tadpoles to moderate. PII: S0016-6480(02)00015-1 #12;(1994) found that treatment of premetamorphic Rana pipiens tadpoles wit

  4. Partial and whole-body thermal sensation and comfort— Part I: Uniform environmental conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Arens; Hui Zhang; Charlie Huizenga

    2006-01-01

    Subjects exposed to uniform environments were polled for their local and overall (whole-body) thermal sensation and comfort. Sensation and comfort for local body parts vary greatly. In cool environments, hands and feet feel colder than other body parts. The head, insensitive to cold but sensitive to warm, feels warmer than the rest of the body in warm environments. Overall sensation

  5. Fuzzy clustering-based segmented attenuation correction in whole-body PET imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Zaidi; M. Diaz-Gomez; A. Boudraa; D. O. Slosman

    2002-01-01

    Segmented attenuation correction is now a widely accepted technique to reduce noise propagation from transmission scanning in positron emission tomography (PET). In this paper, we present a new method for segmenting transmission images in whole-body scanning. This reduces the noise in the correction maps while still correcting for differing attenuation coefficients of specific tissues. Based on the fuzzy C-means (FCM)

  6. AMPK: regulating energy balance at the cellular and whole body levels.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D Grahame; Ashford, Michael L J

    2014-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes as an adenine nucleotide sensor that maintains energy homeostasis at the cellular level. However, during evolution of more complex multicellular organisms, the system has adapted to interact with hormones so that it also plays a key role in balancing energy intake and expenditure at the whole body level. PMID:24583766

  7. Synthesis of Whole-Body Behaviors through Hierarchical Control of Behavioral Primitives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Sentis; Oussama Khatib

    2005-01-01

    To synthesize whole-body behaviors interactively, multiple behavioral primitives need to be simultaneously controlled, including those that guarantee that the constraints imposed by the robot's structure and the external environment are satisfled. Behavioral primitives are entities for the control of various movement criteria, e.g. primitives describing the behavior of the center of gravity, the behaviors of the hands, legs, and head,

  8. Whole-body averaged SAR measurement method using cylindrical scanning of external electromagnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Hikage; Yoshifumi Kawamura; Toshio Nojima

    2009-01-01

    The final goal of this study is to experimentally estimate the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) of humans using the radiation-field scanning technique and a silicone rubber phantom. Dosimetry estimations for human exposure including very numerically accurate phantom models have been reported. However, due to the difficulty of measuring the SAR over the whole human body for the purpose

  9. Evolution of whole-body enantiomorphy in the tree snail genus Amphidromus

    PubMed Central

    SUTCHARIT, C; ASAMI, T; PANHA, S

    2007-01-01

    Diverse animals exhibit left–right asymmetry in development. However, no example of dimorphism for the left–right polarity of development (whole-body enantiomorphy) is known to persist within natural populations. In snails, whole-body enantiomorphs have repeatedly evolved as separate species. Within populations, however, snails are not expected to exhibit enantiomorphy, because of selection against the less common morph resulting from mating disadvantage. Here we present a unique example of evolutionarily stable whole-body enantiomorphy in snails. Our molecular phylogeny of South-east Asian tree snails in the genus Amphidromus indicates that enantiomorphy has likely persisted as the ancestral state over a million generations. Enantiomorphs have continuously coexisted in every population surveyed spanning a period of 10 years. Our results indicate that whole-body enantiomorphy is maintained within populations opposing the rule of directional asymmetry in animals. This study implicates the need for explicit approaches to disclosure of a maintenance mechanism and conservation of the genus. PMID:17305832

  10. SYNTHESIS AND CONTROL OF WHOLE-BODY BEHAVIORS IN HUMANOID SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Sentis, Luis

    of robots in human environments, it is desirable for their motions and task behaviors to be compatibleSYNTHESIS AND CONTROL OF WHOLE-BODY BEHAVIORS IN HUMANOID SYSTEMS a dissertation submitted. To allow robots to oper- ate in human environments there is a strong need to develop new control

  11. Esophageal and rectal temperatures as estimates of core temperature during therapeutic whole-body hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Donn, Steven M; Bhagat, Indira; Dechert, Ronald E; Barks, John D

    2013-01-01

    We monitored whole-body cooling concurrently by both esophageal and rectal probes. Esophageal temperature was significantly higher compared with simultaneous rectal temperature during cooling, with a temperature gradient ranging from 0.46 to 1.03°C (median, 0.8°C; IQR, 0.6-0.8°C). During rewarming, this temperature difference disappeared. PMID:23063267

  12. Effect of cooling and re-warming on cerebral and whole body electrical impedance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara E Lingwood; Kimble R Dunster; Genevieve N Healy; Paul B Colditz

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral electrical impedance is useful for the detection of cerebral edema following hypoxia in newborn infants. Thus it may be useful for determining neurological outcome or monitoring treatment. Hypothermia is a promising new therapy currently undergoing trials, but will alter impedance measurements. This study aimed to define the relationship between temperature and both cerebral and whole body electrical impedance, and

  13. Prognostic significance of whole-body MRI in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Hillengass, J; Weber, M-A; Kilk, K; Listl, K; Wagner-Gund, B; Hillengass, M; Hielscher, T; Farid, A; Neben, K; Delorme, S; Landgren, O; Goldschmidt, H

    2014-01-01

    Radiological skeletal survey or computed tomography are currently applied to assess bone diseases in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disorders. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (whole-body MRI) allows detecting the infiltration of clonal cells in nearly the whole bone marrow compartment even before bone destruction has occurred. Those MRI results (i.e., patterns of bone marrow infiltration) have been demonstrated to be of prognostic significance in patients with symptomatic as well as asymptomatic multiple myeloma. We have therefore analyzed the findings of whole-body MRI in 137 consecutive individuals with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A focal infiltration pattern was detected in 23.4% of patients. Presence and number of focal lesions as well as value of M-Protein were of independent prognostic significance for progression into a symptomatic disease requiring systemic treatment (P=0.02; P<0.0001 and P=0.0005, respectively). Lower homogeneous signal intensities in T1-weighted images were related to a physiologically higher bone marrow cellularity in younger individuals (P=0.002). We conclude that whole-body MRI identifies patients with focal accumulations of presumably monoclonal cells in bone marrow with prognostic impact concerning the risk of progression into symptomatic disease. PMID:23958921

  14. Whole-body angular momentum in incline and decline walking$ Anne K. Silverman a,n

    E-print Network

    Whole-body angular momentum in incline and decline walking$ Anne K. Silverman a,n , Jason M. Wilken January 2012 Keywords: Biomechanics Locomotion Slope Balance Falls a b s t r a c t Angular momentum of movement. However, little is known regarding how angular momentum is regulated on irregular surfaces

  15. DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING. R Slade, J L McKee and G E Hatch. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. Reliable non-invasive markers for detecting oxidative stress in vivo are currently not available. We pr...

  16. Comparison of the effects of whole-body cooling during fatiguing exercise in males and females.

    PubMed

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Puk?nas, Kazimieras; Brazaitis, Marius

    2015-08-01

    The effects of cold stress on exercise performance and fatigue have been thoroughly investigated only in males, and thus the general understanding of these effects relates only to males. The aim of this study was to determine whether whole-body cooling has different effects on performance during fatiguing exercise in males and females. Thirty-two subjects (18 males and 14 females) were exposed to acute cold stress by intermittent immersion in 14°C water until their rectal temperature reached 35.5°C or for a maximum of 170min. Thermal responses and motor performance were monitored before and after whole-body cooling. Whole-body cooling decreased rectal, muscle and mean skin temperatures in all subjects (p<0.05), and these changes did not differ between males and females. Cold stress decreased the fatigue index (FI) of a sustained 2-min maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) only in males (p<0.05). There were no sex differences in central and peripheral fatigability, or muscle electromyographic activity. This observed sex difference (i.e., body cooling-induced decrease in the FI of a sustained MVC in males but not in females) supports the view of sex effects on performance during fatiguing exercise after whole-body cooling. PMID:25962329

  17. Movement to emotions to music: using whole body emotional expression as an interaction for electronic music

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Movement to emotions to music: using whole body emotional expression as an interaction interaction that we used in the frame of this project: using the dancer's movements to recognize the emotions he expresses, and use these emotions to generate musical audio flows evolving in real

  18. [Recent technical research hot spots and development progresses in medical whole-body positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Su, Zhihong; Xu, Jianfeng; Zou, Yirong; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-02-01

    Medical whole-body positron emission tomography (PET), one of the most successful molecular imaging technologies, has been widely used in the fields of cancer diagnosis, cardiovascular disease diagnosis and cranial nerve study. But, on the other hand, the sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-noise-ratio of the commercial medical whole-body PET systems still have some shortcomings and a great room for improvement. The sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-noise-ratio of PET system are largely affected by the performances of the scintillators and the photo detectors. The design of a PET system is usually a trade-off in cost and performance. A better image quality can be achieved by optimizing and balancing the key components which affect the system performance the most without dramatically increases in cost. With the development of the scintillator, photo-detector and high speed electronic system, the performance of medical whole-body PET system would be dramatically improved. In this paper, we report current progresses and discuss future directions of the developments of technologies in medical whole-body PET system. PMID:25997296

  19. Whole-body STIR MR imaging in suspected child abuse: An alternative to skeletal survey radiography?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enno Stranzinger; Christian Johannes Kellenberger; Sabine Braunschweig; Rachel Hopper; Thierry André Gerard Marie Huisman

    2007-01-01

    Child abuse is a major problem worldwide. An early and reliable recognition and diagnostic work up is important for the management of these children and their caregivers. Radiological skeletal surveys in combination with brain imaging are mandatory in the initial evaluation. In selected cases, repeat radiography and\\/or bone scintigraphy is necessary. The radiation dose from these studies is significant. Whole-body

  20. Variant and invariant features characterizing natural and reverse whole-body pointing movements.

    PubMed

    Chiovetto, Enrico; Patanè, Laura; Pozzo, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    Previous investigations showed that kinematics and muscle activity associated with natural whole-body movements along the gravity direction present modular organizations encoding specific aspects relative to both the motor plans and the motor programmes underlying movement execution. It is, however, still unknown whether such modular structures characterize also the reverse movements, when the displacement of a large number of joints is required to take the whole body back to a standing initial posture. To study what motor patterns are conserved across the reversal of movement direction, principal component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization were therefore applied, respectively, to the time series describing the temporal evolution of the elevation angles associated with all the body links and to the electromyographic signals of both natural and reverse whole-body movements. Results revealed that elevation angles were highly co-varying in time and that despite some differences in the global parameters characterizing the different movements (indicating differences in high-level variable associated with the selected motor plans), the level of joint co-variation did not change across movement direction. In contrast, muscle organization of the forward whole-body pointing tasks was found to be different with respect to that characterizing the reverse movements. Such results agree with previous findings, according to which the central nervous system exploits, dependently on the direction of motion, different motor plans for the execution of whole-body movements. However, in addition, this study shows how such motor plans are translated into different muscle strategies that equivalently assure a high level of co-variation in the joint space. PMID:22370741

  1. Railway noise annoyance and the importance of number of trains, ground vibration, and building situational factors.

    PubMed

    Gidlöf-Gunnarsson, Anita; Ögren, Mikael; Jerson, Tomas; Öhrström, Evy

    2012-01-01

    Internationally accepted exposure-response relationships show that railway noise causes less annoyance than road traffic and aircraft noise. Railway transport, both passenger and freight transport, is increasing, and new railway lines are planned for environmental reasons. The combination of more frequent railway traffic and faster and heavier trains will, most probably, lead to more disturbances from railway traffic in the near future. To effectively plan for mitigations against noise and vibration from railway traffic, new studies are needed to obtain a better basis of knowledge. The main objectives of the present study was to investigate how the relationship between noise levels from railway traffic and general annoyance is influenced by (i) number of trains, (ii) the presence of ground borne vibrations, and (iii) building situational factors, such as orientation of balcony/patio and bedroom window. Socio-acoustic field studies were executed in residential areas; (1) with relatively intense railway traffic; (2) with strong vibrations, and; (3) with the most intense railway traffic in the country. Data was obtained for 1695 respondents exposed to sound levels ranging from L(Aeq,24h) 45 to 65 dB. Both number of trains and presence of ground-borne vibrations, and not just the noise level per se, are of relevance for how annoying railway noise is perceived. The results imply that, for the proportion annoyed to be equal, a 5 - 7 dB lower noise level is needed in areas where the railway traffic causes strong ground-borne vibrations and in areas with a very large number of trains. General noise annoyance was twice as high among residents in dwellings with balcony / patio oriented towards the railway and about 1.5 times higher among residents with bedroom windows facing the railway. PMID:22918150

  2. Criteria for acceptable levels of the Shinkansen Super Express train noise and vibration in residential areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Kanada, S.; Tanahashi, M.; Muramatsu, T.; Yamada, S.

    1982-10-01

    A survey of 1187 housewives living in 18 areas along the Shinkansen Super Express (bullet train) railway was conducted by means of a self-administered health questionnaire (modified Cornell Medical Index). In addition, geographically corresponding measurements of noise level and vibration intensity were taken. The relationship of noise and vibration to positive responses (health complaints) related to bodily symptoms, illness and emotional disturbances was analyzed. The factors which correlated with an increase in the average number of positive responses included noise, vibration, age and health status. Such factors as marital status, educational level, part time work, duration of inhabitancy and occupation of the head of the houshold correlated poorly with the number of positive responses. Unhealthy respondents compared to healthy respondents are more frequently affected by noise and vibration. The rate of positive responses in the visual, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive and nervous systems, sleep disturbances and emotional disturbances increased accordingly as noise and vibration increased. Combined effects of noise and vibration stimuli on the total number of positive responses (an indicator of general health) were found. This study has produced results indicating that the maximum permissible noise level should not exceed 70 dB(A) in the residential areas along the Shinkansen railway.

  3. Design, fabrication and acceptance testing of a zero gravity whole body shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, E. A.; Lenda, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Recent research and development programs have established the ability of the zero gravity whole body shower to maintain a comfortable environment in which the crewman can safely cleanse and dry the body. The purpose of this program was to further advance the technology of whole body bathing and to demonstrate technological readiness including in-flight maintenance by component replacement for flight applications. Three task efforts of this program are discussed. Conceptual designs and system tradeoffs were accomplished in task 1. Task 2 involved the formulation of preliminary and final designs for the shower, while task 3 included the fabrication and test of the shower assembly. Particular attention is paid to the evaluation and correction of test anomalies during the final phase of the program.

  4. Measurement of whole-body human centers of gravity and moments of inertia.

    PubMed

    Albery, C B; Schultz, R B; Bjorn, V S

    1998-06-01

    With the inclusion of women in combat aircraft, the question of safe ejection seat operation has been raised. The potential expanded population of combat pilots would include both smaller and larger ejection seat occupants, which could significantly affect seat performance. The method developed to measure human whole-body CG and MOI used a scale, a knife edge balance, and an inverted torsional pendulum. Subjects' moments of inertia were measured along six different axes. The inertia tensor was calculated from these values, and principal moments of inertia were then derived. Thirty-eight antropometric measurements were also taken for each subject to provide a means for direct correlation of inertial properties to body dimensions and for modeling purposes. Data collected in this study has been used to validate whole-body mass properties predictions. In addition, data will be used to improve Air Force and Navy ejection seat trajectory models for the expanded population. PMID:11542768

  5. Functional Fluorescently Labeled Bithiazole ?F508-CFTR Corrector Imaged in Whole Body Slices in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Holly R.; Taylor, Stephanie; Drake, Chris; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Derichs, Nico; Yao, Chenjuan; Jones, Ella F.; Sutcliffe, Julie; Verkman, A. S.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported the identification and structure-activity analysis of bithiazole-based correctors of defective cellular processing of the cystic fibrosis-causing CFTR mutant, ?F508-CFTR. Here, we report the synthesis and uptake of a functional, fluorescently labeled bithiazole corrector. Following synthesis and functional analysis of four bithiazole-fluorophore conjugates, we found that 5, a bithazole-based BODIPY conjugate, had low micromolar potency for correction of defective ?F508-CFTR cellular misprocessing, with comparable efficacy to benchmark corrector corr-4a. Intravenous administration of 5 to mice established its stability in extrahepatic tissues for tens of minutes. By fluorescence imaging of whole-body frozen slices, fluorescent corrector 5 was visualized strongly in gastrointestinal organs, with less in lung and liver. Our results provide proof-of-concept for mapping the biodistribution of a ?F508-CFTR corrector by fluorophore labeling and fluorescence imaging of whole-body slices. PMID:22034937

  6. Effect of Whole-Body Hyperthermia on the Disposition and Metabolism of Adriamycin in Rabbits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward G. Mimnaugh; Randall W. Waring; Branimir I. Sikic; Richard L. Magin; Roger Drew; Charles L. Litterst; Theodore E. Gram; Anthony M. Guarino

    The effects of whole-body hyperthermia on the disposi tion and metabolism of Adriamycin were investigated in male New Zealand rabbits. Hyperthermia (rectal temper ature, 42.3 ±0.1°(S.D.)) was produced in nonacclima- tized, unrestrained animals by placing them in a humidity (95%)- and temperature (34 )-regulated chamber. Normo- thermic controls (rectal temperature, 39.7 ±0.1°)were maintained at ambient temperature and humidity. Adria mycin

  7. Whole-Body Proteolysis Rate Is Elevated in HIV-Associated Insulin Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominic N. Reeds; W. Todd Cade; Bruce W. Patterson; William G. Powderly; Samuel Klein; Kevin E. Yarasheski

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired glucose toler- ance (IGT) and insulin resistance with respect to glucose metabolism but not amino acid metabolism. We examined whether whole-body leucine and protein metabolism are dysregulated in HIV-infected individuals with IGT. Glucose and leucine kinetics were measured under fasting insulin conditions and during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia using primed-constant infusions of 2 H2-glucose and

  8. Imaging Characteristics of a 3Dimensional GSO Whole-Body PET Camera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suleman Surti; Joel S. Karp

    2004-01-01

    A whole-body 3-dimensional PET scanner using gadolinium oxy- orthosilicate (GSO) crystals has been designed to achieve high sensitivity and reduced patient scanning time. This scanner has a diameter of 82.0 cm and an axial field of view of 18 cm without interplane septa. The detector comprises of 4 6 20 mm3 GSO crystals coupled via an optically continuous light guide

  9. Whole-body humanoid control from upper-body task specifications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ghassan Bin Hammam; David E. Orin; Behzad Dariush

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a very efficient, modified resolved acceleration control algorithm for dynamic filtering and control of whole-body humanoid motion in response to upper-body task specifications. The dynamic filter is applicable for general upper-body motions when standing in place. It is characterized by modification of the commanded torso acceleration based on a geometric solution to produce a ZMP which is

  10. A design methodology for short, whole-body, shielded gradient coils for MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart Crozier; David M. Doddrell

    1995-01-01

    A series of designs is presented for restricted length, whole-body, shielded gradient coils. By using the real space optimization technique, simulated annealing (SA), it is possible to produce viable gradient sets with a length-to-diameter ratio (LDR) of just 1.0. Radially remote return paths for the transverse coils aid in producing such short coils. While the linear regions of such coils

  11. Daily physical activity assessment: what is the importance of upper limb movements vs whole body movements?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Kumahara; H Tanaka; Y Schutz

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The movement of the upper limbs (eg fidgeting-like activities) is a meaningful component of nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). This study examined the relationship between upper limb movements and whole body trunk movements, by simultaneously measuring energy expenditure during the course of the day.DESIGN: A cross-sectional study consisting of 88 subjects with a wide range in body mass index (17.3–32.5

  12. Effect of alcohol consumption on whole-body protein turnover in healthy adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus D. Wutzke; Helga Krentz; Gerrit Bruns

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the whole-body protein turnover, either before or after continuous, moderate ethanol-induced oxidative stress by red wine consumption over a relatively short period in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy adults received an individual regular diet over 20 days. After 10 days, the subjects consumed 0.4 ml ethanol kg day as red wine together with dinner over

  13. A Whole-body Control Framework for Humanoids Operating in Human Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Sentis; Oussama Khatib

    2006-01-01

    Tomorrow's humanoids will operate in human en- vironments, where efficient manipulation and locomotion skills, and safe contact interactions will be critical design factors. We report here our recent efforts into these issues, materialized into a whole-body control framework. This framework integrates task-oriented dynamic control and control prioritization (14) allowing to control multiple task primitives while complying with physical and movement-related

  14. MONICA: a compact, portable dual gamma camera system for mouse whole-body imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Choyke, Peter L.; Xia, Wenze; Seidel, Jurgen; Kakareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Proffitt, James; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Green, Michael V.

    2010-04-01

    Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named "MONICA" for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed ?looking up? through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using a photopeak energy window of 140 keV?10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1 cm), 2.2 mm; sensitivity, 149 cps (counts per seconds)/MBq (5.5 cps/μCi); energy resolution (FWHM, full width at half maximum), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2=0.99 for 0?185 MBq (0?5 mCi) in the field of view (FOV); spatial uniformity, <3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-min images acquired throughout the 168-h study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g., limited imaging space, portability and, potentially, cost are important.

  15. Acute severe back pain radiating to the whole body during intravenous administration of amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yiwen; Shen, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Amiodarone represents an effective antiarrhythmic drug for cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) and maintenance of sinus rhythm. Acute low back and/or epigastric pain has been reported in the medical literature as a rare side effect of amiodarone, but most cases were Europeans, one was Chinese. We present the case of a Japanese patient who experienced acute severe back pain radiating to the whole body a few minutes after intravenous (IV) infusion of amiodarone. PMID:25907175

  16. Effect of lifestyle changes on whole-body protein turnover in obese adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Balagopal; E Bayne; B Sager; L Russell; N Patton; D George

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of lifestyle changes on whole-body protein turnover (WBPT) in obese adolescents.DESIGN\\/METHODS: Randomized and controlled nonpharmacological intervention study of WBPT in obese adolescents using stable isotope dilution techniques.SUBJECTS AND MEASUREMENTS: We studied a total of 21 adolescents (11 boys and 10 girls, matched for their pubertal status) of which 15 were obese (age=15.8±0.4 y old and

  17. An automated dosimetry system for testing whole-body ultraviolet phototherapy cabinets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Currie; A. L. Evans; D. Smith; C. J. Martin; S. McCalman; D. Bilsland

    2001-01-01

    A new technique is described for automated ultraviolet dosimetry within whole-body phototherapy cabinets. A dual-head detector system has been designed, permitting simultaneous assessment of irradiance levels and radiant intensities from individual lamps. One detector is used in combination with a diffuser\\/filter system for the measurement of irradiance and the other is mounted at the end of a slit collimator to

  18. Design and operation of a whole-body monitoring system for the Goiania radiation accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. N. Oliveira; M. C. Lourenco; B. M. Dantas; E. A. Lucena

    1991-01-01

    With as many individuals involved in the Goiania 137Cs accident who had high levels of internal contamination, it was necessary to improvise a whole-body counter installation in loco. The in-vivo counting system was located in a 4.0 X 3.5 X 3.5-m room, where seven layers of 2-mm lead sheets with dimensions of 2.0 m X 1.0 m were overlaid on

  19. Compound and metabolite distribution measured by MALDI mass spectrometric imaging in whole-body tissue sections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Stoeckli; Dieter Staab; Alain Schweitzer

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the compound distribution in laboratory animal tissue in early development is a standard process in pharmaceutical research. While this information is traditionally obtained by means of whole-body autoradiography using radiolabeled compounds, this technology does not distinguish between metabolites and parent compound. The technique described in this article, termed matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging, can fill

  20. [Whole-body staging of malignant melanoma: advantages, limitations and current importance of PET-CT, whole-body MRI and PET-MRI].

    PubMed

    Pfannenberg, C; Schwenzer, N

    2015-02-01

    Cross-sectional imaging methods are currently the standard methods for staging of advanced melanoma. The former time-consuming and expensive multimodality approach is increasingly being replaced by novel whole-body (WB) staging methods, such as 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) because they offer a complete head-to-toe coverage of the patient in a single examination with an accurate and sensitive detection of tumor spread. Several studies in patients with advanced melanoma revealed that PET-CT is more sensitive and specific than conventional modalities, such as CT alone resulting in a change of management in up to 30?% of cases. Due to the limited sensitivity of PET for lesions smaller than 1 cm, PET-CT is not useful for the initial work-up of patients with stage I and II melanoma but has proven to be superior for detection of distant metastases, which is essential prior to surgical metastasectomy. If PET-CT is not available WB-CT or WB-MRI can alternatively be used and WB-MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a real alternative for staging of melanoma patients. So far, however, only few reports suffering from small numbers of cases and heterogeneous design have compared the diagnostic performance of WB-MRI and PET-CT. The preliminary results indicate a high overall diagnostic accuracy of both methods; however, these methods differ in organ-based detection rates: PET-CT was more accurate in N-staging and detection of lung and soft tissue metastases whereas WB-MRI was superior in detecting liver, bone and brain metastases. The value of PET-MRI for staging of advanced melanoma is the subject of ongoing clinical studies. PMID:25589421

  1. Retrospective respiration-gated whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography of mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Chen, Wanyi; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that has a great potential for preclinical whole-body imaging. To date, most whole-body PAT systems require multiple laser shots to generate one cross-sectional image, yielding a frame rate of <1??Hz. Because a mouse breathes at up to 3 Hz, without proper gating mechanisms, acquired images are susceptible to motion artifacts. Here, we introduce, for the first time to our knowledge, retrospective respiratory gating for whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography. This new method involves simultaneous capturing of the animal’s respiratory waveform during photoacoustic data acquisition. The recorded photoacoustic signals are sorted and clustered according to the respiratory phase, and an image of the animal at each respiratory phase is reconstructed subsequently from the corresponding cluster. The new method was tested in a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system with a hardware-limited frame rate of 0.625 Hz. After respiratory gating, we observed sharper vascular and anatomical images at different positions of the animal body. The entire breathing cycle can also be visualized at 20??frames/cycle. PMID:24395586

  2. Retrospective respiration-gated whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Chen, Wanyi; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that has a great potential for preclinical whole-body imaging. To date, most whole-body PAT systems require multiple laser shots to generate one cross-sectional image, yielding a frame rate of <1 Hz. Because a mouse breathes at up to 3 Hz, without proper gating mechanisms, acquired images are susceptible to motion artifacts. Here, we introduce, for the first time to our knowledge, retrospective respiratory gating for whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography. This new method involves simultaneous capturing of the animal's respiratory waveform during photoacoustic data acquisition. The recorded photoacoustic signals are sorted and clustered according to the respiratory phase, and an image of the animal at each respiratory phase is reconstructed subsequently from the corresponding cluster. The new method was tested in a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system with a hardware-limited frame rate of 0.625 Hz. After respiratory gating, we observed sharper vascular and anatomical images at different positions of the animal body. The entire breathing cycle can also be visualized at 20 frames/cycle.

  3. Impact of 10 Sessions of Whole Body Cryostimulation on Cutaneous Microcirculation Measured by Laser Doppler Flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Renata, Szygu?a; Tomasz, Dybek; Andrzej, Klimek; S?awomir, Tubek

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the basic and evoked blood flow in the skin microcirculation of the hand, one day and ten days after a series of 10 whole body cryostimulation sessions, in healthy individuals. The study group included 32 volunteers – 16 women and 16 men. The volunteers underwent 10 sessions of cryotherapy in a cryogenic chamber. The variables were recorded before the series of 10 whole body cryostimulation sessions (first measurement), one day after the last session (second measurement) and ten days later (third measurement). Rest flow, post-occlusive hyperaemic reaction, reaction to temperature and arterio–venous reflex index were evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry. The values recorded for rest flow, a post-occlusive hyperaemic reaction, a reaction to temperature and arterio – venous reflex index were significantly higher both in the second and third measurement compared to the initial one. Differences were recorded both in men and women. The values of frequency in the range of 0,01 Hz to 2 Hz (heart frequency dependent) were significantly lower after whole-body cryostimulation in both men and women. In the range of myogenic frequency significantly higher values were recorded in the second and third measurement compared to the first one. Recorded data suggest improved response of the cutaneous microcirculation to applied stimuli in both women and men. Positive effects of cryostimulation persist in the tested group for 10 consecutive days. PMID:23487007

  4. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in children: state of the art*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body imaging in children was classically performed with radiography, positron-emission tomography, either combined or not with computed tomography, the latter with the disadvantage of exposure to ionizing radiation. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in association with the recently developed metabolic and functional techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, has brought the advantage of a comprehensive evaluation of pediatric patients without the risks inherent to ionizing radiation usually present in other conventional imaging methods. It is a rapid and sensitive method, particularly in pediatrics, for detecting and monitoring multifocal lesions in the body as a whole. In pediatrics, it is utilized for both oncologic and non-oncologic indications such as screening and diagnosis of tumors in patients with genetic syndromes, evaluation of disease extent and staging, evaluation of therapeutic response and post-therapy follow-up, evaluation of non neoplastic diseases such as multifocal osteomyelitis, vascular malformations and syndromes affecting multiple regions of the body. The present review was aimed at describing the major indications of whole-body MRI in pediatrics added of technical considerations. PMID:25987752

  5. Whole-body imaging with single-cell resolution by tissue decolorization.

    PubMed

    Tainaka, Kazuki; Kubota, Shimpei I; Suyama, Takeru Q; Susaki, Etsuo A; Perrin, Dimitri; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Ukai, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2014-11-01

    The development of whole-body imaging at single-cell resolution enables system-level approaches to studying cellular circuits in organisms. Previous clearing methods focused on homogenizing mismatched refractive indices of individual tissues, enabling reductions in opacity but falling short of achieving transparency. Here, we show that an aminoalcohol decolorizes blood by efficiently eluting the heme chromophore from hemoglobin. Direct transcardial perfusion of an aminoalcohol-containing cocktail that we previously termed CUBIC coupled with a 10 day to 2 week clearing protocol decolorized and rendered nearly transparent almost all organs of adult mice as well as the entire body of infant and adult mice. This CUBIC-perfusion protocol enables rapid whole-body and whole-organ imaging at single-cell resolution by using light-sheet fluorescent microscopy. The CUBIC protocol is also applicable to 3D pathology, anatomy, and immunohistochemistry of various organs. These results suggest that whole-body imaging of colorless tissues at high resolution will contribute to organism-level systems biology. PMID:25417165

  6. Analysis of adipose tissue distribution using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Diana; Schwarz, Tobias; Dinkel, Julien; Delorme, Stefan; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Heimann, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem in the western world and triggers diseases like cancer, type two diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a clinically viable method to measure the amount and distribution of adipose tissue (AT) in the body. However, analysis of MRI images by manual segmentation is a tedious and time-consuming process. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic method to quantify the amount of different AT types from whole-body MRI data with less user interaction. Initially, body fat is extracted by automatic thresholding. A statistical shape model of the abdomen is then used to differentiate between subcutaneous and visceral AT. Finally, fat in the bone marrow is removed using morphological operators. The proposed method was evaluated on 15 whole-body MRI images using manual segmentation as ground truth for adipose tissue. The resulting overlap for total AT was 93.7% +/- 5.5 with a volumetric difference of 7.3% +/- 6.4. Furthermore, we tested the robustness of the segmentation results with regard to the initial, interactively defined position of the shape model. In conclusion, the developed method proved suitable for the analysis of AT distribution from whole-body MRI data. For large studies, a fully automatic version of the segmentation procedure is expected in the near future.

  7. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in children: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body imaging in children was classically performed with radiography, positron-emission tomography, either combined or not with computed tomography, the latter with the disadvantage of exposure to ionizing radiation. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in association with the recently developed metabolic and functional techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, has brought the advantage of a comprehensive evaluation of pediatric patients without the risks inherent to ionizing radiation usually present in other conventional imaging methods. It is a rapid and sensitive method, particularly in pediatrics, for detecting and monitoring multifocal lesions in the body as a whole. In pediatrics, it is utilized for both oncologic and non-oncologic indications such as screening and diagnosis of tumors in patients with genetic syndromes, evaluation of disease extent and staging, evaluation of therapeutic response and post-therapy follow-up, evaluation of non neoplastic diseases such as multifocal osteomyelitis, vascular malformations and syndromes affecting multiple regions of the body. The present review was aimed at describing the major indications of whole-body MRI in pediatrics added of technical considerations. PMID:25987752

  8. Effect of alcohol consumption on whole-body protein turnover in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D; Krentz, Helga; Bruns, Gerrit

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the whole-body protein turnover, either before or after continuous, moderate ethanol-induced oxidative stress by red wine consumption over a relatively short period in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy adults received an individual regular diet over 20 days. After 10 days, the subjects consumed 0.4 ml ethanol kg(-1) day(-1) as red wine together with dinner over a 10-day period. After 8 and 18 days, respectively, a (15)N-labelled yeast protein was administered in a dosage of 4.2 mg kg(-1) body weight. Urine and faeces were collected over 48 h, respectively. The (15)N-enrichment was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry, whereas the protein flux rates were calculated by a three-compartment model. The whole-body protein turnover without/with red wine consumption amounted to 3.73±0.6 and 3.49±0.6 g kg(-1) day(-1) (not significant), respectively. Moderate alcohol consumption does not induce significant short-term changes in the whole-body protein turnover of healthy adults. PMID:21390988

  9. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (˜15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study, was employed along with extensive Monte Carlo simulations and an initial clinical 18F-deoxyglucose patient dataset to validate and demonstrate the potential of the proposed statistical estimation methods. Both simulated and clinical results suggest that hybrid regression in the context of whole-body Patlak Ki imaging considerably reduces MSE without compromising high CNR. Alternatively, for a given CNR, hybrid regression enables larger reductions than OLS in the number of dynamic frames per bed, allowing for even shorter acquisitions of ˜30 min, thus further contributing to the clinical adoption of the proposed framework. Compared to the SUV approach, whole-body parametric imaging can provide better tumor quantification, and can act as a complement to SUV, for the task of tumor detection.

  10. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    PubMed Central

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15–20cm) of a single bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study, was employed along with extensive Monte Carlo simulations and an initial clinical FDG patient dataset to validate and demonstrate the potential of the proposed statistical estimation methods. Both simulated and clinical results suggest that hybrid regression in the context of whole-body Patlak Ki imaging considerably reduces MSE without compromising high CNR. Alternatively, for a given CNR, hybrid regression enables larger reductions than OLS in the number of dynamic frames per bed, allowing for even shorter acquisitions of ~30min, thus further contributing to the clinical adoption of the proposed framework. Compared to the SUV approach, whole body parametric imaging can provide better tumor quantification, and can act as a complement to SUV, for the task of tumor detection. PMID:24080994

  11. Effect of sway on image fidelity in whole-body digitizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corner, Brian D.; Hu, Anmin

    1998-03-01

    For 3D digitizers to be useful data collection tools in scientific and human factors engineering applications, the models created from scan data must match the original object very closely. Factors such as ambient light, characteristics of the object's surface, and object movement, among others can affect the quality of the image produced by any 3D digitizing system. Recently, Cyberware has developed a whole body digitizer for collecting data on human size and shape. With a digitizing time of about 15 seconds, the effect subject movement, or sway, on model fidelity is an important issue to be addressed. The effect of sway is best measured by comparing the dimensions of an object of known geometry to the model of the same object captured by the digitizer. Since it is difficult to know the geometry of a human body accurately, it was decided to compare an object of simple geometry to its digitized counterpart. Preliminary analysis showed that a single cardboard tube would provide the best artifact for detecting sway. A tube was attached to the subjects using supports that allowed the cylinder to stand away from the body. The stand-off was necessary to minimize occluded areas. Multiple scans were taken of 1 subject and the cylinder extracted from the images. Comparison of the actual cylinder dimensions to those extracted from the whole body images found the effect of sway to be minimal. This follows earlier findings that anthropometric dimensions extracted from whole body scans are very close to the same dimensions measured using standard manual methods. Recommendations for subject preparation and stabilization are discussed.

  12. Whole-body optical imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Sun, Fang-Xian; Li, Xiao-Ming; Li, Lingna; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Bouvet, Michael; Al-Tuwaijri, Maraya; Chishima, Takashi; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    We have imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing and metastasizing in live mice. The whole-body optical imaging system is external and noninvasive. It affords unprecedented continuous visual monitoring of malignant growth and spread within intact animals. We have established new human and rodent tumors that stably express very high levels of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transplanted these to appropriate animals. B16F0-GFP mouse melanoma cells were injected into the tail vein or portal vein of 6-week-old C57BL/6 and nude mice. Whole-body optical images showed metastatic lesions in the brain, liver, and bone of B16F0-GFP that were used for real time, quantitative measurement of tumor growth in each of these organs. The AC3488-GFP human colon cancer was surgically implanted orthotopically into nude mice. Whole-body optical images showed, in real time, growth of the primary colon tumor and its metastatic lesions in the liver and skeleton. Imaging was with either a trans-illuminated epifluorescence microscope or a fluorescence light box and thermoelectrically cooled color charge-coupled device camera. The depth to which metastasis and micrometastasis could be imaged depended on their size. A 60-?m diameter tumor was detectable at a depth of 0.5 mm whereas a 1,800-?m tumor could be visualized at 2.2-mm depth. The simple, noninvasive, and highly selective imaging of growing tumors, made possible by strong GFP fluorescence, enables the detailed imaging of tumor growth and metastasis formation. This should facilitate studies of modulators of cancer growth including inhibition by potential chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:10655509

  13. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients’ anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of whole body massage and the control group received routine care. The levels of State, Trait and overall anxiety and vital signs were assessed in both groups before and after intervention. Independent sample t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fischer exact tests were used for data analysis. Results: The baseline overall mean score of anxiety was 79.43±29.34 in the intervention group and was decreased to 50.38±20.35 after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in the overall mean anxiety in the control group during the study. The baseline diastolic blood pressure was 77.05±8.12 mmHg and was decreased to 72.18±9.19 mmHg after the intervention (p=0.004). Also, significant decreases were occurred in heart rate and respiration rate of intervention group after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in vital signs of the control group during the study. Conclusion: The results suggest that whole body massage was effective in reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. PMID:25405113

  14. Focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom

    E-print Network

    Krylov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high speed trains in the supporting ground under the condition of ground vibration boom are considered theoretically. These effects are similar to the effects of focusing of sound waves radiated by aircraft under the condition of sonic boom. In particular, if a railway track has a bend to provide the possibility of changing direction of train movement, the Rayleigh surface waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom may become focused. This results in concentration of their energy along a simple caustic line at one side of the track and in the corresponding increase in ground vibration amplitudes. The effect of focusing of Rayleigh waves may occur also if a train moves along a straight line with acceleration and its current speed is higher than Rayleigh wave velocity in the ground. The obtained results are illustrated by numerical calculations.

  15. Time-Course of Changes in Inflammatory Response after Whole-Body Cryotherapy Multi Exposures following Severe Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pournot, Hervé; Bieuzen, François; Louis, Julien; Fillard, Jean-Robert; Barbiche, Etienne; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the present investigation was to analyze the effect of two different recovery modalities on classical markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and inflammation obtained after a simulated trail running race. Endurance trained males (n?=?11) completed two experimental trials separated by 1 month in a randomized crossover design; one trial involved passive recovery (PAS), the other a specific whole body cryotherapy (WBC) for 96 h post-exercise (repeated each day). For each trial, subjects performed a 48 min running treadmill exercise followed by PAS or WBC. The Interleukin (IL) -1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), protein C-reactive (CRP) and white blood cells count were measured at rest, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, 96 h in post-exercise recovery. A significant time effect was observed to characterize an inflammatory state (Pre vs. Post) following the exercise bout in all conditions (p<0.05). Indeed, IL-1? (Post 1 h) and CRP (Post 24 h) levels decreased and IL-1ra (Post 1 h) increased following WBC when compared to PAS. In WBC condition (p<0.05), TNF-?, IL-10 and IL-6 remain unchanged compared to PAS condition. Overall, the results indicated that the WBC was effective in reducing the inflammatory process. These results may be explained by vasoconstriction at muscular level, and both the decrease in cytokines activity pro-inflammatory, and increase in cytokines anti-inflammatory. PMID:21829501

  16. Estimating whole body intermuscular adipose tissue from single cross-sectional magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiang Yan; Gallagher, Dympna; Harris, Tamara; Albu, Jeanine; Heymsfield, Steven; Kuznia, Patrick; Heshka, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    Estimating whole body intermuscular adipose tissue from single cross-sectional magnetic resonance images. Intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), a novel fat depot linked with metabolic abnormalities, has been measured by whole body MRI. The cross-sectional slice location with the strongest relation to total body IMAT volume has not been established. The aim was to determine the predictive value of each slice location and which slice locations provide the best estimates of whole body IMAT. MRI quantified total adipose tissue of which IMAT, defined as adipose tissue visible within the boundary of the muscle fascia, is a subcomponent. Single-slice IMAT areas were calculated for the calf, thigh, buttock, waist, shoulders, upper arm, and forearm locations in a sample of healthy adult women, African-American [n = 39; body mass index (BMI) 28.5 ± 5.4 kg/m2; 41.8 ± 14.8 yr], Asian (n = 21; BMI 21.6 ± 3.2 kg/m2; 40.9 ± 16.3 yr), and Caucasian (n = 43; BMI 25.6 ± 5.3 kg/m2; 43.2 ± 15.3 yr), and Caucasian men (n = 39; BMI 27.1 ± 3.8 kg/m2; 45.2 ± 14.6 yr) and used to estimate total IMAT groups using multiple-regression equations. Midthigh was the best, or near best, single predictor in all groups with adjusted R2 ranging from 0.49 to 0.84. Adding a second and third slice further increased R2 and reduced the error of the estimate. Menopausal status and degree of obesity did not affect the location of the best single slice. The contributions of other slice locations varied by sex and race, but additional slices improved predictions. For group studies, it may be more cost-effective to estimate IMAT based on one or more slices than to acquire and segment for each subject the numerous images necessary to quantify whole body IMAT. PMID:17053107

  17. A dual-layer TOF-DOI detector block for whole-body PET

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shitao Liu; Shaohui An; Hongdi Li; Chao Wang; Rocio A. Ramirez; Yuxuan Zhang; Hossain Baghaei; Wai-Hoi Wong

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dual-layer high-resolution detector block for whole-body positron-emission tomography systems. The top layer is a 13×13 array of lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals (2.85×2.85×10mm3) and the bottom layer a 13×13 array of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (LGSO) crystals (2.85×2.85×10mm3). The LGSO layer was coupled to four Hamamatsu R11194HA photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) by a photomultiplier quadrant×sharing configuration. This block has

  18. Comparative Disposition of Acrylonitrile and Methacrylonitrile: Quantitative Whole-Body Autoradiographic Studies in Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed E. Ahmed; Sam Jacob; BURHAN I. GHANAYEMt

    1996-01-01

    Following intravenous administration of an equimolar (0.216 mmol\\/kg) radioactive dose of acrylonitrile (2-[14C]VCN, 11.5 mg\\/kg) or methacrylonitrile (2-[14C]MeVCN, 14.5 mg\\/kg), the tissue distribution, covalent interaction, and elimination were compared (at 5 min to 48 hr) in male Fischer 344 rats using whole-body autoradiography (WBA). Autoradiographs obtained from freeze-dried or acid-extracted sections of animals treated with 2-[14C]VCN showed that radioactivity accumulated

  19. Absolute accuracy of the Cyberware WB4 whole-body scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanen, Hein A. M.; Taylor, Stacie E.; Brunsman, Matthew A.; Nurre, Joseph H.

    1997-03-01

    The Cyberware WB4 whole body scanner is one of the first scanning systems in the world that generates a high resolution data set of the outer surface of the human body. The Computerized Anthropometric Research and Design (CARD) Laboratory of Wright-Patterson AFB intends to use the scanner to enable quick and reliable acquisition of anthropometric data. For this purpose, a validation study was initiated to check the accuracy, reliability and errors of the system. A calibration object, consisting of two boxes and a cylinder, was scanned in several locations in the scanning space. The object dimensions in the resulting scans compared favorably to the actual dimensions of the calibration object.

  20. Waveform-Sampling Electronics for a Whole-Body Time-of-Flight PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Ashmanskas, W. J.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Newcomer, F. M.; Panetta, J. V.; Ryan, W. A.; Van Berg, R.; Wiener, R. I.; Karp Fellow, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Waveform sampling is an appealing technique for instruments requiring precision time and pulse-height measurements. Sampling each PMT waveform at oscilloscope-like rates of several gigasamples per second enables one to process PMT signals digitally, which in turn makes it straightforward to optimize timing resolution and amplitude (energy and position) resolution in response to calibration effects, pile-up effects, and other systematic sources of waveform variation. We describe a system design and preliminary implementation that neatly maps waveform-sampling technology onto the LaPET prototype whole-body time-of-flight PET scanner that serves as the platform for testing this new technology. PMID:25484379

  1. Effective dose estimation in whole-body multislice CT in paediatric trauma patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin D. Munk; Peter C. Strohm; Ulrich Saueressig; Joern Zwingmann; Markus Uhl; Norbert P. Südkamp; Elmar Kotter; Mathias Langer; Thorsten A. Bley

    2009-01-01

    Background  The number of multislice CT (MSCT) scans performed in polytraumatized children has increased rapidly. There is growing concern\\u000a regarding the radiation dose in MSCT and its long-term consequences, especially in children.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To determine the effective dose to polytraumatized children who undergo whole-body MSCT.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A total of 51 traumatized children aged 0–16 years underwent a polytrauma protocol CT scan between

  2. Whole-body effective half-lives for radiolabeled antibodies and related issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.L.; Carsten, A.L.; Baum, J.W.; Barber, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (RABs) are being developed and used in medical imaging and therapy in rapidly increasing numbers. Data on the whole body half effective half-lives were calculated from external dose rates obtained from attending physicians and radiation safety officers at participating institutions. Calculations were made using exponential regression analysis of data from patients receiving single and multiple administrations. Theses data were analyzed on the basis of age, sex, isotope label, radiation energy, antibody type, disease treated, administration method, and number of administrations.

  3. Whole-body MRI as an unconventional diagnostic tool in a pediatric patient with systemic infection

    PubMed Central

    Picco, Paolo; Pala, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Damasio, Beatrice; Buoncompagni, Antonella; Martini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tickborne infection usually manifesting as fever, malaise, cytopenia, spleen enlargement, and hepatitis. Herein, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HGA whose whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an unusual picture characterized by small, widespread punctuate millimetric nodules, hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on STIR sequences. This firstly reported finding may represent an alternative tool for identifying atypical infectious diseases. PMID:25535572

  4. Calibration and assessment of a unique standup moving detector whole body counter

    E-print Network

    Mallett, Michael Wesley

    1990-01-01

    cavities and then was not completely removed when rinsed. Therefore, two short-lived radionuclides, Br (35. 3 h) and ~Tc (6. 0 h), were used for calibrating geometries other than lung deposition. The combined photon energy spectrum for these two isotopes... the detector is offered as one solution to this problem. The Universal Body Counter is compared to other counters having similar features. Those whole body counters considered are the Canberra Accuscan II, the Helgeson Do-It-Yourself, and the Nuclear Data...

  5. Performance Characteristics of a Positron Projection Imager For Mouse Whole-body Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Jurgen; Xi, Wenze; Kakareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Jagoda, Elaine M.; Green, Michael V.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We describe a prototype positron projection imager (PPI) for visualizing the whole-body biodistribution of positron-emitting compounds in mouse-size animals. The final version of the PPI will be integrated into the MONICA portable dual-gamma camera system to allow the user to interchangeably image either single photon or positron-emitting compounds in a shared software and hardware environment. Methods A mouse is placed in the mid-plane between two identical, opposed, pixelated LYSO arrays separated by 21.8-cm and in time coincidence. An image of the distribution of positron decays in the animal is formed on this mid-plane by coincidence events that fall within a small cone angle to the perpendicular to the two detectors and within a user-specified energy window. We measured the imaging performance of this device with phantoms and in tests performed in mice injected with various compounds labeled with positron-emitting isotopes. Results Representative performance measurements yielded the following results (energy window 250–650 keV, cone angle 3.5-degrees): resolution in the image mid-plane, 1.66-mm (FWHM), resolution ±1.5-cm above and below the image plane, 2.2-mm (FWHM), sensitivity: 0.237-cps/kBq (8.76-cps/?Ci) 18F (0.024% absolute). Energy resolution was 15.9% with a linear-count-rate operating range of 0–14.8 MBq (0–400 ?Ci) and a corrected sensitivity variation across the field-of-view of <3%. Whole-body distributions of [18F] FDG and [18F] fluoride were well visualized in mice of typical size. Conclusion Performance measurements and field studies indicate that the PPI is well suited to whole-body positron projection imaging of mice. When integrated into the MONICA gamma camera system, the PPI may be particularly useful early in the drug development cycle where, like MONICA, basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors (e.g., available imaging space, non-portability, and cost) may be limitations. PMID:23402672

  6. Active Scheduling of Organ Detection and Segmentation in Whole-Body Medical Images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiqiang Zhan; Xiang Sean Zhou; Zhigang Peng; Arun Krishnan

    2008-01-01

    \\u000a With the advance of whole-body medical imaging technologies, computer aided detection\\/diagnosis (CAD) is being scaled up to\\u000a deal with multiple organs or anatomical structures simultaneously. Multiple tasks (organ detection\\/segmentation) in a CAD\\u000a system are often highly dependent due to the anatomical context within a human body. In this paper, we propose a method to\\u000a schedule multi-organ detection\\/segmentation based on information

  7. Forearm cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses to whole body passive heat stress in young smokers.

    PubMed

    Moyen, Nicole E; Anderson, Hannah M; Burchfield, Jenna M; Tucker, Matthew A; Gonzalez, Melina A; Robinson, Forrest B; Ganio, Matthew S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare smokers and nonsmokers' sudomotor and cutaneous vascular responses to whole body passive heat stress. Nine regularly smoking (SMK: 29 ± 9 yr; 10 ± 6 cigarettes/day) and 13 nonsmoking (N-SMK: 27 ± 8 yr) males were passively heated until core temperature (TC) increased 1.5°C from baseline. Forearm local sweat rate (LSR) via ventilated capsule, sweat gland activation (SGA), sweat gland output (SGO), and cutaneous vasomotor activity via laser-Doppler flowmetry (CVC) were measured as mean body temperature increased (?Tb) during passive heating using a water-perfused suit. Compared with N-SMK, SMK had a smaller ?Tb at the onset of sweating (0.52 ± 0.19 vs. 0.35 ± 0.14°C, respectively; P = 0.03) and cutaneous vasodilation (0.61 ± 0.21 vs. 0.31 ± 0.12°C, respectively; P < 0.01). Increases in LSR and CVC per °C ?Tb (i.e., sensitivity) were similar in N-SMK and SMK (LSR: 0.63 ± 0.21 vs. 0.60 ± 0.40 ?mg/cm(2)/min/°C ?Tb, respectively, P = 0.81; CVC: 82.5 ± 46.2 vs. 58.9 ± 23.3 ?%max/°C ?Tb, respectively; P = 0.19). However, the plateau in LSR during whole body heating was higher in N-SMK vs. SMK (1.00 ± 0.13 vs. 0.79 ± 0.26 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P = 0.03), which was likely a result of higher SGO (8.94 ± 3.99 vs. 5.94 ± 3.49 ?g·gland(-1)·min(-1), respectively; P = 0.08) and not number of SGA (104 ± 7 vs. 121 ± 9 glands/cm(2), respectively; P = 0.58). During whole body passive heat stress, smokers had an earlier onset for forearm sweating and cutaneous vasodilation, but a lower local sweat rate that was likely due to lower sweat output per gland. These data provide insight into local (i.e., forearm) thermoregulatory responses of young smokers during uncompensatory whole body passive heat stress. PMID:25924880

  8. Effects of whole-body and local thermal stress on hydrostatic volume changes in the human calf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fumio Yamazaki; Chitose Okuno; Shoko Nagamatsu; Ryoko Sone

    2002-01-01

    .   In the present study, we examined the effect of thermal stress on the magnitude and pattern of change in leg volume during\\u000a orthostatic stress and thigh occlusion in humans. Ten healthy volunteers underwent whole-body thermal stress produced by a\\u000a cool- or hot-water-perfused suit and local heat stress of the calf. During whole-body thermal stress, changes of calf circumference\\u000a during

  9. Hologic QDR 2000 whole-body scans: A comparison of three combinations of scan modes and analysis software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Spector; A. LeBlanc; L. Shackelford

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the short-term in vivo precision and absolute measurements of three combinations of whole-body scan modes and analysis software using a Hologic QDR 2000 dual-energy X-ray densito-meter. A group of 21 normal, healthy volunteers (11 male and 10 female) were scanned six times, receiving one pencil-beam and one array whole-body scan on three occasions approximately 1 week

  10. IV radionuclide total-body arteriography: a new noninvasive whole-body screening procedure--a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, D.C.; Gould, L.; Yee, W.K.; Patel, D.; Giovanniello, J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently the authors introduced a new technique of intravenous (IV) radionuclide total-body arteriography. The major arterial system, multiple organs of the whole body, and cardiac function can be evaluated with one small IV injection in the arm. After analyzing more than 1000 cases, they have found that many pathologies can be detected and/or confirmed in this procedure. This new technique may be used as a general whole-body screening test for those patients at high risk for disease.

  11. Effects of whole-body irradiation on the development of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Travassos, 1914) Lane, 1923, in rats

    E-print Network

    Gatlin, Gilbert Wayne

    1966-01-01

    EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS BSASILIENSIS (SSAVASSOS, 1414) LANE, 1923, IN RATS A Thesis By Gilbert Wayne Gatlin Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject Zoolocay EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS ~SSASIEIEN IS (IlViVASSOS, 19144 LANE, 1923, IN RATS A Thesis By Gilbert Wayne Gatlin...

  12. Between-country comparison of whole-body SAR from personal exposure data in Urban areas.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Frei, Patrizia; Röösli, Martin; Vermeeren, Günter; Bolte, John; Thuróczy, György; Gajšek, Peter; Tr?ek, Tomaž; Mohler, Evelyn; Juhász, Péter; Finta, Viktoria; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), personal radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements were performed in different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoors using the same exposure meters. From the mean personal field exposure levels (excluding mobile phone exposure), whole-body absorption values in a 1-year-old child and adult male model were calculated using a statistical multipath exposure method and compared for the five countries. All mean absorptions (maximal total absorption of 3.4?µW/kg for the child and 1.8?µW/kg for the adult) were well below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) basic restriction of 0.08?W/kg for the general public. Generally, incident field exposure levels were well correlated with whole-body absorptions (SAR(wb) ), although the type of microenvironment, frequency of the signals, and dimensions of the considered phantom modify the relationship between these exposure measures. Exposure to the television and Digital Audio Broadcasting band caused relatively higher SAR(wb) values (up to 65%) for the 1-year-old child than signals at higher frequencies due to the body size-dependent absorption rates. Frequency Modulation (FM) caused relatively higher absorptions (up to 80%) in the adult male. PMID:22674152

  13. Optimization of whole-body zebrafish sectioning methods for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly A; Daniels, Gabrielle J; Fournie, John W; Hemmer, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the MSI literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (ZF; Danio rerio), a model organism routinely used in developmental, toxicity, and carcinogenicity studies. The optimal medium for embedding and cryosectioning a whole organism or soft-tissue specimen for histological examination is a synthetic polymer mixture that is incompatible with MSI as a result of ion suppression. We describe the optimal methods and results for embedding and cryosectioning whole-body ZF for MALDI-MSI. We evaluated 13 distinct embedding media formulations and found a supportive hydrogel with the consistency of cartilage to be the optimal embedding medium. The hydrogel medium does not interfere with MSI data collection, aids in tissue stability, is readily available for purchase, and is easy to prepare and handle during cryosectioning. Additionally, we decreased the matrix cluster interference commonly caused by ?-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid by adding ammonium phosphate to the solvent spray solution. The optimized methods developed in our laboratory produced high-quality cryosections, as well as high-quality mass spectral images of sectioned ZF. PMID:23997659

  14. Consequences of Lethal-Whole-Body Gamma Radiation and Possible Ameliorative Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Mihandoost, Ehsan; Shirazi, Alireza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Gamma radiation induces the generation of free radicals, leading to serious cellular damages in biological systems. Radioprotectors act as prophylactic agents that are administered to shield normal cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiation. Melatonin synergistically acts as an immune-stimulator and antioxidant. We investigated the possible radioprotective role of melatonin (100?mg/kg i.p.) against lethal-whole-body radiation- (10?Gy) induced sickness, body weight loss, and mortality in rats. Results of the present study suggest that exposure to lethal-whole-body radiation incurred mortality, body weight loss, and apoptosis and it also depleted the immunity and the antioxidant status of the rats. Our results show that melatonin pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced mortality, oxidative stress, and immune-suppression. The melatonin pretreated irradiated rats showed less change in body weight as compared to radiation only group. On the other hand, melatonin appeared to have another radioprotective role, suggesting that melatonin may reduce apoptosis through a caspase-3-mediated pathway by blocking caspase-3 activity. PMID:25431791

  15. Consequences of lethal-whole-body gamma radiation and possible ameliorative role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Mihandoost, Ehsan; Shirazi, Alireza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Gamma radiation induces the generation of free radicals, leading to serious cellular damages in biological systems. Radioprotectors act as prophylactic agents that are administered to shield normal cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiation. Melatonin synergistically acts as an immune-stimulator and antioxidant. We investigated the possible radioprotective role of melatonin (100 mg/kg i.p.) against lethal-whole-body radiation- (10 Gy) induced sickness, body weight loss, and mortality in rats. Results of the present study suggest that exposure to lethal-whole-body radiation incurred mortality, body weight loss, and apoptosis and it also depleted the immunity and the antioxidant status of the rats. Our results show that melatonin pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced mortality, oxidative stress, and immune-suppression. The melatonin pretreated irradiated rats showed less change in body weight as compared to radiation only group. On the other hand, melatonin appeared to have another radioprotective role, suggesting that melatonin may reduce apoptosis through a caspase-3-mediated pathway by blocking caspase-3 activity. PMID:25431791

  16. Influence of ambient temperature on whole body and segmental bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, G.; Bausch, R.; Ismail, A. H.; Cordes, A.; Pikkemaat, R.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurements are easy to implement and could be used for continuous monitoring. However, several factors (e.g. environment temperature) influence the measurements limiting the accuracy of the technology. Changes in skin temperature produced by changes in ambient temperature are related with changes in skin blood flow and skin impedance. It is assumed that skin impedance change is responsible for the error observed in whole body and segmental measurements. Measurements including body parts more distant from the torso seem to be more affected. In the present article skin and segment impedance have been performed on healthy subjects under extreme changes in environment temperature (13-39 °C). A commercial BIS device with a range between 5 kHz and 1 MHz has been used for the measurements. The results indicate that not only skin impedance, but also impedance of deeper tissue (e.g. muscle) may be responsible for the influence of environment temperature on BIS measurements. Segmental (knee-to-knee) BIS measurements show a relative change of only 2 %, while forearm and whole body impedance changed 14 % and 8 % respectively.

  17. Application and results of whole-body autoradiography in distribution studies of organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, K.

    1983-01-01

    With the growing concern for the health hazards of occupational exposure to toxic substances attention has been focused on the organic solvents, which are associated with both deleterious nervous system effects and specific tissue injuries. Relatively little is known about the distribution of organic solvents and their metabolites in the living organism. Knowledge of the specific tissue localizations and retention of solvents and solvent metabolites is of great value in revealing and understanding the sites and mechanisms of organic solvent toxicity. Whole-body autoradiography has been modified and applied to distribution studies of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, styrene, methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene and carbon disulfide. The high volatility of these substances has led to the development of cryo-techniques. Whole-body autoradiographic techniques applicable to the study of volatile substances are reviewed. The localizations of nonvolatile solvent metabolites and firmly bound metabolites have also been examined. The obtained results are discussed in relation to toxic effects and evaluated by comparison with other techniques used in distribution studies of organic solvents and their metabolites.

  18. Whole body MRI: improved lesion detection and characterization with diffusion weighted techniques.

    PubMed

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  19. Whole body MRI: Improved Lesion Detection and Characterization With Diffusion Weighted Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  20. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for Whole Body Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Orval R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-08-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for whole body counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable BOMAB manufactured by DOE as INL2006 BOMAB containing Eu-154, Eu-155, Eu-152, Sb-125 and Y-88 with energies from 27 keV to 1836 keV with a reference date of 11/29/2006. The actual usable energy range was 86.5 keV to 1597 keV on 4/21/2011. The BOMAB was constructed inside the Accuscan II counting 'tub' in the order of legs, thighs, abdomen, thorax/arms, neck, and head. Each piece was taped to the backwall of the counter. The arms were taped to the thorax. The phantom was constructed between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using the INL2006 BOMAB. The calibrations were performed with the detectors in the scanning mode. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for whole body counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  1. Estimation and implications of random errors in whole-body dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flux, Glenn D.; Guy, Matthew J.; Beddows, Ruth; Pryor, Matthew; Flower, Maggie A.

    2002-09-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapy, the level of activity to be administered is often determined from whole-body dosimetry performed on a pre-therapy tracer study. The largest potential source of error in this method is due to inconsistent or inaccurate activity retention measurements. The main aim of this study was to develop a simple method to quantify the uncertainty in the absorbed dose due to these inaccuracies. A secondary aim was to assess the effect of error propagation from the results of the tracer study to predictive absorbed dose estimates for the therapy as a result of using different radionuclides for each. Standard error analysis was applied to the MIRD schema for absorbed dose calculations. An equation was derived to describe the uncertainty in the absorbed dose estimate due solely to random errors in activity-time data, requiring only these data as input. Two illustrative examples are given. It is also shown that any errors present in the dosimetry calculations following the tracer study will propagate to errors in predictions made for the therapy study according to the ratio of the respective effective half-lives. If the therapy isotope has a much longer physical half-life than the tracer isotope (as is the case, for example, when using 123I as a tracer for 131I therapy) the propagation of errors can be significant. The equations derived provide a simple means to estimate two potentially large sources of error in whole-body absorbed dose calculations.

  2. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically acceptable sampling schedules examined. The framework was also applied to six FDG PET patient studies, demonstrating clinical feasibility. Both simulated and clinical results indicated enhanced contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) for Ki images in tumor regions with notable background FDG concentration, such as the liver, where SUV performed relatively poorly. Overall, the proposed framework enables enhanced quantification of physiological parameters across the whole body. In addition, the total acquisition length can be reduced from 45 to ˜35 min and still achieve improved or equivalent CNR compared to SUV, provided the true Ki contrast is sufficiently high. In the follow-up companion paper, a set of advanced linear regression schemes is presented to particularly address the presence of noise, and attempt to achieve a better trade-off between the mean-squared error and the CNR metrics, resulting in enhanced task-based imaging.

  3. The effects of vibration on explosive and reactive strength when applying individualized vibration frequencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riccardo Di Giminiani; Jozsef Tihanyi; Sandor Safar; Renato Scrimaglio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 8 weeks of whole-body vibrations on explosive and reactive leg strength. Thirty-three physically active students took part in the study and were randomly assigned to an individualized-vibration group, a fixed-vibration group or a control group. The frequency of vibration was set to 30 Hz for the fixed-vibration group, whereas the

  4. Low Intensity, High Frequency Vibration Training to Improve Musculoskeletal Function in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Susan A.; Mader, Tara L.; Greising, Angela G.; Lin, Angela S.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Warren, Gordon L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if low intensity, high frequency vibration training impacted the musculoskeletal system in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, relative to healthy mice. Three-week old wildtype (n?=?26) and mdx mice (n?=?22) were randomized to non-vibrated or vibrated (45 Hz and 0.6 g, 15 min/d, 5 d/wk) groups. In vivo and ex vivo contractile function of the anterior crural and extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively, were assessed following 8 wks of vibration. Mdx mice were injected 5 and 1 days prior to sacrifice with Calcein and Xylenol, respectively. Muscles were prepared for histological and triglyceride analyses and subcutaneous and visceral fat pads were excised and weighed. Tibial bones were dissected and analyzed by micro-computed tomography for trabecular morphometry at the metaphysis, and cortical geometry and density at the mid-diaphysis. Three-point bending tests were used to assess cortical bone mechanical properties and a subset of tibiae was processed for dynamic histomorphometry. Vibration training for 8 wks did not alter trabecular morphometry, dynamic histomorphometry, cortical geometry, or mechanical properties (P?0.34). Vibration did not alter any measure of muscle contractile function (P?0.12); however the preservation of muscle function and morphology in mdx mice indicates vibration is not deleterious to muscle lacking dystrophin. Vibrated mice had smaller subcutaneous fat pads (P?=?0.03) and higher intramuscular triglyceride concentrations (P?=?0.03). These data suggest that vibration training at 45 Hz and 0.6 g did not significantly impact the tibial bone and the surrounding musculature, but may influence fat distribution in mice. PMID:25121503

  5. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Jonathan K.; Dahlbom, Magnus L.; Moses, William W.; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2012-07-01

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15-22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 93 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with a large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with 20 mm thick detectors resulted in performance gains of 25-31 times higher NECR relative to the current Siemens Biograph mCT scanner configuration.

  6. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Moses, William W; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-07-01

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15-22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 93 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with a large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with 20 mm thick detectors resulted in performance gains of 25-31 times higher NECR relative to the current Siemens Biograph mCT scanner configuration. PMID:22678106

  7. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components also produced variations in the temporal pattern of responses as a function of rotation direction. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a vestibulorecipient region of the PBN and KF integrates signals from the vestibular nuclei and relay information about changes in whole-body orientation to pathways that produce homeostatic and affective responses.

  8. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned above. The most striking result preliminarily is that both strains of mice show a greater number of genes changing at the lowest dose of exposure for their respective pathways.

  9. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Moses, William W; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2013-01-01

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15–22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging, or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 90 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with 20 mm thick detectors resulted in performance gains of 25–31 times higher NECR relative to the current Siemens Biograph mCT scanner configuration. PMID:22678106

  10. Vanilloid receptors – Do they have a role in whole body metabolism? Evidence from TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    With increasing lifespan, therapeutic interventions for the treatment of disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus are in great demand. Despite billions of dollars invested to reduce the symptoms and complications due to diabetes mellitus, current treatments (e.g., insulin replacements, sensitization) remain inadequate, justifying the search for novel therapeutic approaches or alternative solutions, including dietary supplementation, for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in every age group. The involvement of the vanilloid system in the regulation of metabolism has been identified, and the emerging role of its receptors, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), in diabetes was recently demonstrated. Indeed, beneficial effects of dietary capsaicin, an agonist of TRPV1 receptors, were identified for improving glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 levels. Recent findings regarding TRPV1 receptors in association with whole body metabolism including glucose homeostasis will be reviewed in this article. PMID:23332888

  11. Analysis of whole-body doses received by occupationally exposed workers in Ireland (1996-1999).

    PubMed

    Currivan, L; Donnelly, H; Dawson, D; Spain, D; Colgan, P A

    2001-01-01

    The work described in this paper is based on the results of routine whole-body measurements carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland Dosimetry Service from 1996 to 1999. Data on the occupational radiation exposures of monitored personnel are examined and have been found to follow the skewed distribution reported by UNSCEAR. The annual average effective dose for each major work practice over the 4 years is given and compared with the UNSCEAR reference value of 1.1 mSv per year for all occupations. Evidence suggests that improvements in procedures and the use of better equipment have resulted in a reduction in the numbers of workers receiving measurable doses. PMID:11586754

  12. Application of whole-body personal TL dosemeters in mixed field beta-gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ciupek, K; Aksamit, D; Wo?oszczuk, K

    2014-11-01

    Application of whole-body personal TL dosemeters based on a high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) in mixed field beta-gamma radiation has been characterised. The measurements were carried out with (90)Sr/(90)Y, (85)Kr and (137)Cs point sources to calculate the energy response and linearity of the TLD response in a dose range of 0.1-30 mSv. From the result, calibration curves were obtained, enabling the readout of individual dose equivalent Hp(10) from gamma radiation and Hp(0.07) from beta radiation in mixed field beta-gamma. Limitation of the methodology and its application are presented and discussed. PMID:25009188

  13. Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Leininger, R.W.; Vimy, M.J.; Lorscheider, F.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1990-11-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) released from dental silver amalgam tooth fillings into human mouth air is uncertain. A previous report about sheep revealed uptake routes and distribution of amalgam Hg among body tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the bodily distribution of amalgam Hg in a monkey whose dentition, diet, feeding regimen, and chewing pattern closely resemble those of humans. When amalgam fillings, which normally contain 50% Hg, are made with a tracer of radioactive {sup 203}Hg and then placed into monkey teeth, the isotope appears in high concentration in various organs and tissues within 4 wk. Whole-body images of the monkey revealed that the highest levels of Hg were located in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and jaw. The dental profession's advocacy of silver amalgam as a stable tooth restorative material is not supported by these findings.

  14. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. PMID:22894495

  15. Intercomparison of whole-body averaged SAR in European and Japanese voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter J.; Hirata, Akimasa; Nagaoka, Tomoaki

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides an intercomparison of the HPA male and female models, NORMAN and NAOMI with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) male and female models, TARO and HANAKO. The calculations of the whole-body SAR in these four phantoms were performed at the HPA, at NICT and at the Nagoya Institute of Technology (NIT). These were for a plane wave with a vertically aligned electric field incident upon the front of the body from 30 MHz to 3 GHz for isolated conditions. As well as investigating the general differences through this frequency range, particular emphasis was placed on the assumptions of how dielectric properties are assigned to tissues (particularly skin and fat) and the consequence of using different algorithms for calculating SAR at the higher frequencies.

  16. Attitudes of the medical profession to whole body and organ donation.

    PubMed

    Green, Connor; Bowden, Dermot; Molony, Diarmuid; Burke, Neil; Felle, Patrick; Dudeney, Sean

    2014-04-01

    Cadaveric dissection remains an important part of undergraduate medical education in anatomy. In a concerted effort to rise the number of doctors in practice in Ireland the amount of medical school placements has been increased steadily since 1995. This poses a problem as the number of cadavers has remained unchanged despite an overall increase in the population Ireland over the last twenty years. The medical profession plays a central part in raising public awareness of living and post-mortem organ donation. Previous studies have examined the attitudes of medical students to whole body donation, however to our knowledge this is the first study that evaluates the attitudes of medical professionals. We assess the opinions of junior and senior doctors at the time of their dissection experience and in their current practice. We show that their attitudes have changed as their clinical experience grows. PMID:23932670

  17. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  18. ALARA considerations for the whole body neutron irradiation facility source removal project at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick T

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the activities that were involved with the safe removal of fourteen PuBe sources from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Whole Body Neutron Irradiation Facility (WBNIF). As part of a Department of Energy and BNL effort to reduce the radiological inventory, the WBNIF was identified as having no future use. In order to deactivate the facility and eliminate the need for nuclear safety management and long-term surveillance, it was decided to remove the neutron sources and dismantle the facility. In addition, the sources did not have DOT Special Form documentation so they would need to be encapsulated once removed for offsite storage or disposal. The planning and the administrative as well as engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to safely remove and encapsulate the sources while keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). PMID:16404183

  19. Whole-Body Lifetime Occupational Lead Exposure and Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Coon , Steven; Stark, Azadeh; Peterson, Edward; Gloi, Aime; Kortsha, Gene; Pounds, Joel G.; Chettle, D. R.; Gorell, Jay M.

    2006-12-01

    We enrolled 121 PD patients and 414 age-, sex-, and race-, frequency-matched controls in a case–control study. As an indicator of chronic Pb exposure, we measured concentrations of tibial and calcaneal bone Pb stores using 109Cadmium excited K-series X-ray fluorescence. As an indicator of recent exposure, we measured blood Pb concentration. We collected occupational data on participants from 18 years of age until the age at enrollment, and an industrial hygienist determined the duration and intensity of environmental Pb exposure. We employed physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to combine these data, and we estimated whole-body lifetime Pb exposures for each individual. Logistic regression analysis produced estimates of PD risk by quartile of lifetime Pb exposure.

  20. Optimal self-calibration of tomographic reconstruction parameters in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    In tomographic optoacoustic imaging, multiple parameters related to both light and ultrasound propagation characteristics of the medium need to be adequately selected in order to accurately recover maps of local optical absorbance. Speed of sound in the imaged object and surrounding medium is a key parameter conventionally assumed to be uniform. Mismatch between the actual and predicted speed of sound values may lead to image distortions but can be mitigated by manual or automatic optimization based on metrics of image sharpness. Although some simple approaches based on metrics of image sharpness may readily mitigate distortions in the presence of highly contrasting and sharp image features, they may not provide an adequate performance for smooth signal variations as commonly present in realistic whole-body optoacoustic images from small animals. Thus, three new hybrid methods are suggested in this work, which are shown to outperform well-established autofocusing algorithms in mouse experiments in vivo. PMID:25431756

  1. Optimal self-calibration of tomographic reconstruction parameters in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In tomographic optoacoustic imaging, multiple parameters related to both light and ultrasound propagation characteristics of the medium need to be adequately selected in order to accurately recover maps of local optical absorbance. Speed of sound in the imaged object and surrounding medium is a key parameter conventionally assumed to be uniform. Mismatch between the actual and predicted speed of sound values may lead to image distortions but can be mitigated by manual or automatic optimization based on metrics of image sharpness. Although some simple approaches based on metrics of image sharpness may readily mitigate distortions in the presence of highly contrasting and sharp image features, they may not provide an adequate performance for smooth signal variations as commonly present in realistic whole-body optoacoustic images from small animals. Thus, three new hybrid methods are suggested in this work, which are shown to outperform well-established autofocusing algorithms in mouse experiments in vivo. PMID:25431756

  2. Imaging Therapeutic Response in Human Bone Marrow Using Rapid Whole-Body MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ballon, Douglas; Watts, Richard; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Lis, Eric; Morris, Michael J.; Scher, Howard I.; Ulug, Aziz M.; Jakubowski, Ann A.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-body imaging of therapeutic response in human bone marrow was achieved without introduced contrast agents using diffusion-weighted echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging of physiologic water. Bone marrow disease was identified relative to the strong overlying signals from water and lipids in other anatomy through selective excitation of the water resonance and generation of image contrast that was dependent upon differential nuclear relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients. Three-dimensional displays were generated to aid image interpretation. The geometric distortion inherent in echo-planar imaging techniques was minimized through the acquisition of multiple axial slices at up to 12 anatomic stations over the entire body. Examples presented include the evaluation of therapeutic response in bone marrow during cytotoxic therapy for leukemia and metastatic prostate cancer and during cytokine administration for marrow mobilization prior to stem cell harvest. PMID:15562475

  3. Imaging therapeutic response in human bone marrow using rapid whole-body MRI.

    PubMed

    Ballon, Douglas; Watts, Richard; Dyke, Jonathan P; Lis, Eric; Morris, Michael J; Scher, Howard I; Ulu?, Aziz M; Jakubowski, Ann A

    2004-12-01

    Whole-body imaging of therapeutic response in human bone marrow was achieved without introduced contrast agents using diffusion-weighted echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging of physiologic water. Bone marrow disease was identified relative to the strong overlying signals from water and lipids in other anatomy through selective excitation of the water resonance and generation of image contrast that was dependent upon differential nuclear relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients. Three-dimensional displays were generated to aid image interpretation. The geometric distortion inherent in echo-planar imaging techniques was minimized through the acquisition of multiple axial slices at up to 12 anatomic stations over the entire body. Examples presented include the evaluation of therapeutic response in bone marrow during cytotoxic therapy for leukemia and metastatic prostate cancer and during cytokine administration for marrow mobilization prior to stem cell harvest. PMID:15562475

  4. Skeletal muscle response to spaceflight, whole body suspension, and recovery in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrowski, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 7-day spaceflight (SF), 7- and 14-day-long whole body suspension (WBS), and 7-day-long recovery on the muscle weight and the morphology of the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats were investigated. It was found that the effect of 7-day-long SF and WBS were highly comparable for both the soleus and the EDL, although the soleus muscle from SF rats showed greater cross-sectional area reduction than that from WBS rats. With a longer duration of WBS, there was a continued reduction in cross-sectional fast-twitch fiber area. Muscle plasticity, in terms of fiber and capillary responses, showed differences in responses of the two types of muscles, indicating that antigravity posture muscles are highly susceptible to unloading.

  5. Whole-body three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matthew; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-11-01

    We develop a system for three-dimensional whole-body optoacoustic tomography of small animals for applications in preclinical research. The tomographic images are obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) are rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezocomposite transducers. Two pulsed lasers operating in the near-IR spectral range (755 and 1064 nm) with an average pulsed energy of about 100 mJ, a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 15 to 75 ns are used as optical illumination sources. During the scan, the mouse is illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. The system is capable of generating images of individual organs and blood vessels through the entire body of a mouse with spatial resolution of ~0.5 mm.

  6. Optoacoustic 3D whole-body tomography: experiments in nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matt; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, André; Liopo, Anton; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a 3D whole-body optoacoustic tomography system for applications in preclinical research on mice. The system is capable of generating images with resolution better than 0.6 mm. Two pulsed lasers, an Alexandrite laser operating at 755 nm and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 1064nm were used for light delivery. The tomographic images were obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. During the scan, the mouse was illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. Illumination at 532 nm showed superficial vasculature, but limited penetration depth at this wavelength prevented the detection of deeper structures. Illumination at 755 and 1064 nm showed organs and blood vessels, respectively. Filtering of the optoacoustic signals using high frequency enhancing wavelets further emphasized the smaller blood vessels.

  7. AMPK: positive and negative regulation, and its role in whole-body energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D Grahame

    2015-04-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of energy status that, when activated by metabolic stress, maintains cellular energy homeostasis by switching on catabolic pathways and switching off ATP-consuming processes. Recent results suggest that activation of AMPK by the upstream kinase LKB1 in response to nutrient lack occurs at the surface of the lysosome. AMPK is also crucial in regulation of whole body energy balance, particularly by mediating effects of hormones acting on the hypothalamus. Recent crystal structures of complete AMPK heterotrimers have illuminated its complex mechanisms of activation, involving both allosteric activation and increased net phosphorylation mediated by effects on phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Finally, AMPK is negatively regulated by phosphorylation of the 'ST loop' within the catalytic subunit. PMID:25259783

  8. Whole body FDG PET imaging for staging of malignant melanoma: Is it cost effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W.J.; Hoh, C.K.; Glaspy, J.A. [John Wayne Cancer Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Whole Body FDG PET imaging (WBPET) was performed in a total of 51 patients for staging of malignant melanoma. In 31/51 patients, concurrent conventional imaging (CI) modalities, typically CT of chest, abdomen and pelvis and MRI of the brain, were also performed for staging. The clinical cost effectiveness of WBPET as a single imaging modality was compared to CI for evaluating the extent of metastatic disease and the overall imaging cost. Two WBPET imaging protocols were used: 17/31 patients (Group I) had a standard WBPET acquisition of 45 min/bed position, and 14/31 patients (Group II) had an additional dedicated brain acquisition of 30 min with attenuation correction. All patients received 10 mCi of FDG and were imaged using the previously described WBPET imaging technique. In the two groups WBPET and CI were compared as a revealing same (=), more(>), or less (<) extensive disease.

  9. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    PubMed

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently. PMID:22494369

  10. Relationships Between Urinary Inositol Excretions and Whole Body Glucose Tolerance and Skeletal Muscle Insulin Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stull, April J.; Thyfault, John P.; Haub, Mark D.; Ostlund, Richard E.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of urinary D-chiro-inositol and myo-inositol excretions to indices of whole body glucose tolerance and total content and tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (activation) in skeletal muscle of older, non-diabetic subjects. 15 adults (age 65 ± 8 y; BMI 27.9 ± 3.3 kg/m2; mean ± SD) completed duplicate assessments of oral (75-g OGTT) and intravenous (300 mg/kg body weight IVGTT) glucose tolerance challenges and 24-h urinary D-chiro-inositol and myo-inositol excretions. Skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies were obtained at min 60 of the OGTTs. Subjects with higher urinary D-chiro-inositol excretion had higher insulin (Rho = 0.51, P ? 0.05) and C-peptide (Rho = 0.56, P ? 0.05) area under the curves, and lower insulin sensitivity index (Rho = -0.60, P ? 0.05) during the IVGTT. The urinary myo / D-chiro-inositol ratio was also inversely related to insulin area under the curve (Rho = -0.59, P ? 0.05). Urinary D-chiro-inositol (Rho = -0.60, P ? 0.05) and myo-inositol (Rho = -0.60, P ? 0.05) were inversely related to tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (tyrosines 1162/1163), but not total content of the insulin receptor during the OGTT. The apparent relationships were modestly weakened when adjustments were made for sex. These findings support previous research linking higher urinary D-chiro-inositol excretion with a progressive decline in whole body glucose tolerance. This is the first report to link higher urinary D-chiro-inositol excretion to a blunted activation of skeletal muscle insulin receptor signaling in older, non-diabetic subjects. PMID:18940392

  11. Amino acid supplementation does not alter whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in Arabian geldings.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Kristine L; Geor, Raymond J; Hanigan, Mark D; Harris, Pat A

    2012-03-01

    Stable isotope infusion methods have not been extensively used in horses to study protein metabolism. The objectives were to develop infusion and sampling methodologies for [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and apply these methods to determine whether the addition of supplemental amino acids to a control diet affected whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in mature horses. Arabian geldings were studied using a 6-h primed (9 ?mol/kg), constant (6 ?mol?·?kg(-1)?·?h(-1)) i.v. infusion of L-[1-(13)C] phenylalanine, with blood and breath sampled every 30 min, to measure whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in response to receiving the control diet (n = 12) or the control diet supplemented with equimolar amounts of glutamate (+Glu; 55 mg?·?kg(-1)?·?d(-1); n = 5), leucine (+Leu; 49 mg?·?kg(-1)?·?d(-1); n = 5), lysine (+Lys; 55 mg?·?kg(-1)?·?d(-1); n = 5), or phenylalanine (+Phe; 62 mg?·?kg(-1)?·?d(-1); n = 6). The plasma concentrations of the supplemented amino acid in horses receiving the +Leu, +Lys, and +Phe diets were 58, 53, and 36% greater, respectively, than for the control treatment (P < 0.05). Isotopic plateau was attained in blood [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and breath (13)CO(2) enrichments by 60 and 270 min, respectively. Phenylalanine flux (+20%) and oxidation (+110%) were greater (P < 0.05) in horses receiving the +Phe treatment than in those fed the control diet. There was no effect of treatment diet on nonoxidative phenylalanine disposal or phenylalanine release from protein breakdown. The developed methods are a valuable way to study protein metabolism and assess dietary amino acid adequacy in horses and will provide a useful tool for studying amino acid requirements in the future. PMID:22259192

  12. Thermophysiological consequences of whole body resonant RF exposure (100 MHz) in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Adair, Eleanor R; Mylacraine, Kevin S; Allen, Stewart J

    2003-10-01

    Thermophysiological responses of heat production and heat loss were measured in seven adult volunteers (six males and one female, aged 31-74 years) during 45 min dorsal exposures of the whole body to 100 MHz continuous wave (CW) radio frequency (RF) energy. Three power densities (PD) (average PD = 4, 6, and 8 mW/cm(2); whole body specific absorption rate [SAR] = 0.068 [W/kg]/[mW/cm(2)]) were tested in each of three ambient temperatures (T(a) = 24, 28, and 31 degrees C), as well as in T(a) controls (no RF). A standardized protocol (30 min baseline, 45 min RF or sham exposure, 10 min baseline) was used. Measured responses included esophageal and seven skin temperatures, metabolic heat production, local sweat rate, and local skin blood flow. No changes in metabolic heat production occurred under any test condition. Unlike published results of similar exposures at 450 and 2450 MHz, local skin temperatures, even those on the back that were irradiated directly, changed little or not at all during 100 MHz exposures. The sole exception was the temperature of the ankle skin, which increased by 3-4 degrees C in some subjects at PD = 8 mW/cm(2). During the 45 min RF exposure, esophageal temperature showed modest changes (range = -0.15 to 0.13 degrees C) and never exceeded 37.2 degrees C. Thermoregulation was principally controlled by appropriate increases in evaporative heat loss (sweating) and, to a lesser extent, by changes in skin blood flow. Because of the deep penetration of RF energy at this frequency, effectively bypassing the skin, these changes must have been stimulated by thermal receptors deep in the body rather than those located in the skin. PMID:12955754

  13. Oral branched-chain amino acids decrease whole-body proteolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Williams, B. D.; Stuart, C. A.; Lane, H. W.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study reports the effects of ingesting branched-chain amino acids (leucine, valine, and isoleucine) on protein metabolism in four men. METHODS: To calculate leg protein synthesis and breakdown, we used a new model that utilized the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine and the sampling of the leg arterial-venous difference and muscle biopsies. In addition, protein-bound enrichments provided for the direct calculation of muscle fractional synthetic rate. Four control subjects ingested an equivalent amount of essential amino acids (threonine, methionine, and histidine) to discern the effects of branched-chain amino acid nitrogen vs the effects of essential amino acid nitrogen. Each drink also included 50 g of carbohydrate. RESULTS: Consumption of the branched-chain and the essential amino acid solutions produced significant threefold and fourfold elevations in their respective arterial concentrations. Protein synthesis and breakdown were unaffected by branched-chain amino acids, but they increased by 43% (p < .05) and 36% (p < .03), respectively, in the group consuming the essential amino acids. However, net leg balance of phenylalanine was unchanged by either drink. Direct measurement of protein synthesis by tracer incorporation into muscle protein (fractional synthetic rate) revealed no changes within or between drinks. Whole-body phenylalanine flux was significantly suppressed by each solution but to a greater extent by the branched-chain amino acids (15% and 20%, respectively) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that branched-chain amino acid ingestion suppresses whole-body proteolysis in tissues other than skeletal muscle in normal men.

  14. Fully automated shape model positioning for bone segmentation in whole-body CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, A.; Sumkauskaite, M.; Hillengass, J.; Bäuerle, T.; Bendl, R.

    2014-03-01

    Analysing osteolytic and osteoblastic bone lesions in systematically affected skeletons, e.g. in multiple myeloma or bone metastasis, is a complex task. Quantification of the degree of bone destruction needs segmentation of all lesions but cannot be managed manually. Automatic bone lesion detection is necessary. Our future objective is comparing modified bones with healthy shape models. For applying model based strategies successfully, identification and position information of single bones is necessary. A solution to these requirements based on bone medullary cavities is presented in this paper. Medullary cavities are useful for shape model positioning since they have similar position and orientation as the bone itself but can be separated more easily. Skeleton segmentation is done by simple thresholding. Inside the skeleton medullary cavities are segmented by a flood filling algorithm. The filled regions are considered as medullary cavity objects. To provide automatic shape model selection, medullary cavity objects are assigned to bone structures with pattern recognition. To get a good starting position for shape models, principal component analysis of medullary cavities is performed. Bone identification was tested on 14 whole-body low-dose CT scans of multiple myeloma patients. Random forest classification assigns medullary cavities of long bones to the corresponding bone (overall accuracy 90%). Centroid and first principal component of medullary cavity are sufficiently similar to those of bone (mean centroid difference 21.7 mm, mean difference angle 1.54° for all long bones of one example patient) and therefore suitable for shape model initialization. This method enables locating long bone structures in whole-body CT scans and provides useful information for a reasonable shape model initialization.

  15. Compact whole-body fluorescent imaging of nude mice bearing EGFP expressing tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Chu, Jun; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Issue of tumor has been a hotspot of current medicine. It is important for tumor research to detect tumors bearing in animal models easily, fast, repetitively and noninvasivly. Many researchers have paid their increasing interests on the detecting. Some contrast agents, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma red fluorescent protein (Dsred) were applied to enhance image quality. Three main kinds of imaging scheme were adopted to visualize fluorescent protein expressing tumors in vivo. These schemes based on fluorescence stereo microscope, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) or camera as imaging set, and laser or mercury lamp as excitation light source. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes. The authors set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a Kodak digital camera (model DC290), fluorescence filters(B and G2;HB Optical, Shenyang, Liaoning, P.R. China) and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply (U-LH50HG;Olympus Optical, Japan) as excitation light source. The EGFP was excited directly by mercury lamp with D455/70 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with 520nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For half a year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging for fluorescent expressing tumors in nude mouse is an ideal tool for antitumor, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis drug screening.

  16. Abatacept improves whole-body insulin sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; Letizia Hribal, Marta; Mauro, Daniele; Savarino, Francesca; Bruno, Caterina; Tripolino, Cesare; Rubino, Mariangela; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by increased insulin resistance, a well-known risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of abatacept on insulin sensitivity in RA patients with moderate to severe disease despite treatment with methotrexate.Fifteen RA patients were recruited for the present study. Patients were evaluated at time 0 and after 6 months of the treatment with i.v. abatacept at the dosage recommended for weight range. Evaluation included oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at both time points. Insulin sensitivity was estimated with insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by Matsuda, a measure of whole-body insulin sensitivity.ISI significantly increased after the treatment with abatacept from 3.7?±?2.6 to 5.0?±?3.2 (P?=?0.003) with a mean difference of 1.23. Analysis of glucose and insulin values during OGTT revealed a reduction of both glucose (303.9?±?73.4?mg/dL?min versus 269.2?±?69.5?mg/dL?min, P?=?0.009) and insulin (208.4?±?119.7?mg/dL?min versus 158.0?±?95.3?mg/dL?min, P?=?0.01) area under the curves (AUCs). Accordingly also glycated hemoglobin significantly improved (5.5?±?0.4% versus 5.3?±?0.3%, P?=?0.04). No significant differences were found for measures of ?-cell function insulinogenic index (1.11?±?1.19 versus 1.32?±?0.82, P?=?0.77) and oral disposition index (2.0?±?5.4 versus 6.0?±?6.0, P?=?0.25).Treatment with abatacept seems to be able to improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in RA patients without affecting ?-cell function. PMID:26020396

  17. Detection of myeloma in skeleton of mice by whole-body optical fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Oyajobi, Babatunde O; Muñoz, Steve; Kakonen, Rami; Williams, Paul J; Gupta, Anjana; Wideman, Christi L; Story, Beryl; Grubbs, Barry; Armstrong, Allison; Dougall, William C; Garrett, I Ross; Mundy, Gregory R

    2007-06-01

    Development of new therapies for myeloma has been hindered by the lack of suitable preclinical animal models of the disease in which widespread tumor foci in the skeleton can be detected reliably. Traditional means of detecting skeletal tumor infiltration such as histopathology are cumbersome and labor-intensive and do not allow temporal monitoring of tumor progression or regression in response to therapy. To resolve this problem, we modified the Radl 5TGM1 model of myeloma bone disease such that fluorescent myeloma tumors can be optically imaged in situ. Here, we show that murine myeloma 5TGM1 tumor cells, engineered to express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP; 5TGM1-eGFP cells), can be imaged in a temporal fashion using a fluorescence illuminator and a charge-coupled device camera in skeletons of live C57BL/KaLwRij mice. High-resolution, whole-body images of tumor-bearing mice revealed that myeloma cells homed almost exclusively to the skeleton, with multiple focal tumor foci in the axial skeleton, consistent with myeloma tumor distribution in humans. Finally, the tested antitumor treatment effect of Velcade (bortezomib), a proteasome inhibitor used clinically in myeloma, was readily detected by GFP imaging, suggesting the power of the technique in combination with the Radl 5TGM1-eGFP model for rapid preclinical assessment and sensitive monitoring of novel and potential therapeutics. Whole-body GFP imaging is practical, convenient, inexpensive, and rapid, and these advantages should enable a high throughput when evaluating in vivo efficacy of new potential antimyeloma therapeutics and assessing response to treatment. PMID:17541032

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Whole-Body Tumor Burden in Adult Patients with Neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Scott R.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Cai, Wenli; Kassarjian, Ara; Harris, Gordon J.; Esparza, Sonia; Merker, Vanessa L.; Munn, Lance L.; Muzikansky, Alona; Askenazi, Manor; Nguyen, Rosa; Wenzel, Ralph; Mautner, Victor F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), NF2, and schwannomatosis are at risk for multiple nerve sheath tumors and premature mortality. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has limited ability to assess disease burden accurately. The aim of this study was to establish an international cohort of patients with quantified whole-body internal tumor burden and to correlate tumor burden with clinical features of disease. Methods We determined the number, volume, and distribution of internal nerve sheath tumors in patients using whole-body MRI (WBMRI) and three-dimensional computerized volumetry. We quantified the distribution of tumor volume across body regions and used unsupervised cluster analysis to group patients based on tumor distribution. We correlated the presence and volume of internal tumors with disease-related and demographic factors. Results WBMRI identified 1286 tumors in 145/247 patients (59%). Schwannomatosis patients had the highest prevalence of tumors (P?=?0.03), but NF1 patients had the highest median tumor volume (P?=?0.02). Tumor volume was unevenly distributed across body regions with overrepresentation of the head/neck and pelvis. Risk factors for internal nerve sheath tumors included decreasing numbers of café-au-lait macules in NF1 patients (P?=?0.003) and history of skeletal abnormalities in NF2 patients (P?=?0.09). Risk factors for higher tumor volume included female gender (P?=?0.05) and increasing subcutaneous neurofibromas (P?=?0.03) in NF1 patients, absence of cutaneous schwannomas in NF2 patients (P?=?0.06), and increasing age in schwannomatosis patients (p?=?0.10). Conclusion WBMRI provides a comprehensive phenotype of neurofibromatosis patients, identifies distinct anatomic subgroups, and provides the basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with unique disease manifestations. PMID:22558206

  19. Clinical value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in health screening of general adult population

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Richter, Antje; Karlinger, Kinga; Berczi, Viktor; Pickuth, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) and angiography (WB-MRA) has become increasingly popular in population-based research. We evaluated retrospectively the frequency of potentially relevant incidental findings throughout the body. Materials and methods 22 highly health-conscious managers (18 men, mean age 47±9 years) underwent WB-MRI and WB-MRA between March 2012 and September 2013 on a Discovery MR750w wide bore 3 Tesla device (GE Healthcare) using T1 weighted, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) acquisitions according to a standardized protocol. Results A suspicious (pararectal) malignancy was detected in one patient which was confirmed by an endorectal sonography. Incidental findings were described in 20 subjects, including hydrocele (11 patients), benign bony lesion (7 patients) and non-specific lymph nodes (5 patients). Further investigations were recommended in 68% (ultrasound: 36%, computed tomography: 28%, mammography: 9%, additional MRI: 9%). WB-MRA were negative in 16 subjects. Vascular normal variations were reported in 23%, and a 40% left proximal common carotid artery stenosis were described in one subject. Conclusions WB-MRI and MRA lead to the detection of clinically relevant diseases and unexpected findings in a cohort of healthy adults that require further imaging or surveillance in 68%. WB-MR imaging may play a paramount role in health screening, especially in the future generation of (epi)genetic based screening of malignant and atherosclerotic disorders. Our study is the first which involved a highly selected patient group using a high field 3-T wide bore magnet system with T1, STIR, MRA and whole-body DWI acquisitions as well. PMID:25810696

  20. Whole-body angular momentum during stair walking using passive and powered lower-limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Wilken, Jason M; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Neptune, Richard R; Silverman, Anne K

    2014-10-17

    Individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation have a greater risk of falling compared to able-bodied individuals, and falling on stairs can lead to serious injuries. Individuals with transtibial amputations have lost ankle plantarflexor muscle function, which is critical for regulating whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance. Recently, powered prostheses have been designed to provide active ankle power generation with the goal of restoring biological ankle function. However, the effects of using a powered prosthesis on the regulation of whole-body angular momentum are unknown. The purpose of this study was to use angular momentum to evaluate dynamic balance in individuals with a transtibial amputation using powered and passive prostheses relative to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent and descent. Ground reaction forces, external moment arms, and joint powers were also investigated to interpret the angular momentum results. A key result was that individuals with an amputation had a larger range of sagittal-plane angular momentum during prosthetic limb stance compared to able-bodied individuals during stair ascent. There were no significant differences in the frontal, transverse, or sagittal-plane ranges of angular momentum or maximum magnitude of the angular momentum vector between the passive and powered prostheses during stair ascent or descent. These results indicate that individuals with an amputation have altered angular momentum trajectories during stair walking compared to able-bodied individuals, which may contribute to an increased fall risk. The results also suggest that a powered prosthesis provides no distinct advantage over a passive prosthesis in maintaining dynamic balance during stair walking. PMID:25213178

  1. A study to define a set of requirements for cleansing agents for use in the Space Station whole body shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to define a set of requirements for a whole body cleansing agent to be used in the Space Station Whole Body Shower System. In addition, cleansing agent candidates are to be identified that are likely to satisfy requirements defined in the first part of the study. It is understood that the main reason for having a Whole Body Shower is to satisfy the physiological, psychological and social needs of the crew throughout the duration of duty in the Space Station. The cleansing agent must also be compatible with the vortex water/gas separator and the water reclamation system. To accomplish these goals the study was divided into six tasks.

  2. NOTE: The use of a simulated body shape for determination of patient dosimetry within whole body ultraviolet treatment cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McG Clarkson, D.; Franks, L.

    2006-02-01

    Details are described of a simulated body shape utilized to determine patient dosimetry within whole body ultraviolet treatment cabinets. The body shape was designed to have a shape characteristic of the patient group undergoing treatment and was utilized in several Waldmann whole body treatment cabinets and with irradiance measurements undertaken using a Bentham DM150C spectroradiometer. It was considered that the rigid defined structure of the body shape allowed satisfactory reproducibility of measurements in such cabinets and also allowed additional parameters to be identified for evaluation of performance of such units.

  3. The use of a simulated body shape for determination of patient dosimetry within whole body ultraviolet treatment cabinets.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, D McG; Franks, L

    2006-02-21

    Details are described of a simulated body shape utilized to determine patient dosimetry within whole body ultraviolet treatment cabinets. The body shape was designed to have a shape characteristic of the patient group undergoing treatment and was utilized in several Waldmann whole body treatment cabinets and with irradiance measurements undertaken using a Bentham DM150C spectroradiometer. It was considered that the rigid defined structure of the body shape allowed satisfactory reproducibility of measurements in such cabinets and also allowed additional parameters to be identified for evaluation of performance of such units. PMID:16467574

  4. Hologic QDR 2000 whole-body scans: a comparison of three combinations of scan modes and analysis software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spector, E.; LeBlanc, A.; Shackelford, L.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the short-term in vivo precision and absolute measurements of three combinations of whole-body scan modes and analysis software using a Hologic QDR 2000 dual-energy X-ray densitometer. A group of 21 normal, healthy volunteers (11 male and 10 female) were scanned six times, receiving one pencil-beam and one array whole-body scan on three occasions approximately 1 week apart. The following combinations of scan modes and analysis software were used: pencil-beam scans analyzed with Hologic's standard whole-body software (PB scans); the same pencil-beam analyzed with Hologic's newer "enhanced" software (EPB scans); and array scans analyzed with the enhanced software (EA scans). Precision values (% coefficient of variation, %CV) were calculated for whole-body and regional bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), fat mass, lean mass, %fat and total mass. In general, there was no significant difference among the three scan types with respect to short-term precision of BMD and only slight differences in the precision of BMC. Precision of BMC and BMD for all three scan types was excellent: < 1% CV for whole-body values, with most regional values in the 1%-2% range. Pencil-beam scans demonstrated significantly better soft tissue precision than did array scans. Precision errors for whole-body lean mass were: 0.9% (PB), 1.1% (EPB) and 1.9% (EA). Precision errors for whole-body fat mass were: 1.7% (PB), 2.4% (EPB) and 5.6% (EA). EPB precision errors were slightly higher than PB precision errors for lean, fat and %fat measurements of all regions except the head, although these differences were significant only for the fat and % fat of the arms and legs. In addition EPB precision values exhibited greater individual variability than PB precision values. Finally, absolute values of bone and soft tissue were compared among the three combinations of scan and analysis modes. BMC, BMD, fat mass, %fat and lean mass were significantly different between PB scans and either of the EPB or EA scans. Differences were as large as 20%-25% for certain regional fat and BMD measurements. Additional work may be needed to examine the relative accuracy of the scan mode/software combinations and to identify reasons for the differences in soft tissue precision with the array whole-body scan mode.

  5. Comparison of selective head cooling therapy and whole body cooling therapy in newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: short term results

    PubMed Central

    At?c?, Aytu?; Çelik, Yalç?n; Güla??, Selvi; Turhan, Ali Haydar; Okuyaz, Çetin; Sungur, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to investigate which method was superior by applying selective head cooling or whole body cooling therapy in newborns diagnosed with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Materials and Method: Newborns above the 35th gestational age diagnosed with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were included in the study and selective head cooling or whole body cooling therapy was performed randomly. The newborns who were treated by both methods were compared in terms of adverse effects in the early stage and in terms of short-term results. Ethics committee approval was obtained for the study (06.01.2010/35). Results: Fifty three babies diagnosed with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were studied. Selective head cooling was applied to 17 babies and whole body cooling was applied to 12 babies. There was no significant difference in terms of adverse effects related to cooling therapy between the two groups. When the short-term results were examined, it was found that the hospitalization time was 34 (7–65) days in the selective head cooling group and 18 (7–57) days in the whole body cooling group and there was no significant difference between the two groups (p=0.097). Four patients in the selective head cooling group and two patients in the whole body cooling group were discharged with tracheostomy because of the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation and there was no difference between the groups in terms of discharge with tracheostomy (p=0.528). Five patients in the selective head cooling group and three patients in the whole body cooling group were discharged with a gastrostomy tube because they could not be fed orally and there was no difference between the groups in terms of discharge with a gastrostomy tube (p=0.586). One patient who was applied selective head cooling and one patient who was applied whole body cooling died during hospitalization and there was no difference between the groups in terms of mortality (p=0.665). Conclusions: There is no difference between the methods of selective head cooling and whole body cooling in terms of adverse effects and short-term results.

  6. A modular distributed source phantom for whole-body counter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Liqiang

    'Fuzzy' is the radically new whole-body counter phantom concept that is based on how the human whole-body counter (HWBC) 'sees' the inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution within the 3D shape of the human body. 'Fuzzy' is used in conjunction with locally placed external detectors. 'Fuzzy' is placed on a plastic board 1.91 m long and 0.64 m wide that is divided into 75 equal squares (163 cm2 each) which are organized in five columns (A-E) and fifteen rows from head to toe (1-15). To comply with the two fold symmetry of the human body, 'Fuzzy' is divided by the Golden section (37.5% as measured from the cranial side) to match with the position of human umbilicus. A radio-active source containing 1.2?Ci65Zn was divided into 12 equal activities and distributed in conical cups (height, 9.5 cm, bottom diameter d1 = 9.0 cm; top diameter d2 = 11.0 cm) containing 0.50L of radioactive solution and placed in positions C1, B3, D3, C4, B5, D5, C6, B7, D7, C9, C10, and C12 which vaguely outlines the contour of the human body. The other positions were filled with identical cups containing SuperQ water only. The 'Fuzzy' behaved (1) linearly in the HWBC when 65Zn cups were, sequentially, either added or removed from the board, and (2) homogeneously, i.e., it gave the same number of counts when any single site- specific 65Zn cup was substituted with a cup containing SuperQ water only. The USDA, ARS, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center HWBC consists of two 16- detector beds, each of which provides 0.4 x 2.0 m2 of detector surface. Evidently, the HWBC 'sees' the 'Fuzzy' as a uniform radiation source. This allows for the simultaneous use of the same 'Fuzzy' phantom as a calibration standard for the external detectors and hence quantitative assessment of the regional activity.

  7. Whole-body proton irradiation causes long-term damage to hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Luo, Yi; Allen, Antiño R; Koturbash, Igor; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2015-02-01

    Space flight poses certain health risks to astronauts, including exposure to space radiation, with protons accounting for more than 80% of deep-space radiation. Proton radiation is also now being used with increasing frequency in the clinical setting to treat cancer. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to better understand the biological effects of proton radiation on the body. Such improved understanding could also lead to more accurate assessment of the potential health risks of proton radiation, as well as the development of improved strategies to prevent and mitigate its adverse effects. Previous studies have shown that exposure to low doses of protons is detrimental to mature leukocyte populations in peripheral blood, however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Some of these detriments may be attributable to damage to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that have the ability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into different lineages of blood cells through hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). The goal of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of low-dose proton irradiation on HSCs. We exposed C57BL/6J mice to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation (150 MeV) and then studied the effects of proton radiation on HSCs and HPCs in the bone marrow (BM) 22 weeks after the exposure. The results showed that mice exposed to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation had a significant and persistent reduction of BM HSCs compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in BM HPCs after proton irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated HSCs and their progeny exhibited a significant impairment in clonogenic function, as revealed by the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) and colony-forming cell assays, respectively. These long-term effects of proton irradiation on HSCs may be attributable to the induction of chronic oxidative stress in HSCs, because HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant increase in NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) mRNA expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In addition, the increased production of ROS in HSCs was associated with a significant reduction in HSC quiescence and an increase in DNA damage. These findings indicate that exposure to proton radiation can lead to long-term HSC injury, probably in part by radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:25635345

  8. Relative role of motion and PSF compensation in whole-body oncologic PET-MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Petibon, Yoann; Syrkina, Aleksandra [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Huang, Chuan; Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges, E-mail: elfakhri@pet.mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Reese, Timothy G. [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States) [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 Thirteenth Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States) [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion and partial-volume effects are the two main sources of image degradation in whole-body PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR allows measurement of respiratory motion using MRI while collecting PET events. Improved PET images may be obtained by modeling respiratory motion and point spread function (PSF) within the PET iterative reconstruction process. In this study, the authors assessed the relative impact of PSF modeling and MR-based respiratory motion correction in phantoms and patient studies using a whole-body PET-MR scanner. Methods: An asymmetric exponential PSF model accounting for radially varying and axial detector blurring effects was obtained from point source acquisitions performed in the PET-MR scanner. A dedicated MRI acquisition protocol using single-slice steady state free-precession MR acquisitions interleaved with pencil-beam navigator echoes was developed to track respiratory motion during PET-MR studies. An iterative ordinary Poisson fully 3D OSEM PET reconstruction algorithm modeling all the physical effects of the acquisition (attenuation, scatters, random events, detectors efficiencies, PSF), as well as MR-based nonrigid respiratory deformations of tissues (in both emission and attenuation maps) was developed. Phantom and{sup 18}F-FDG PET-MR patient studies were performed to evaluate the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods. Results: The phantom experiment results showed that PSF modeling significantly improved contrast recovery while limiting noise propagation in the reconstruction process. In patients with soft-tissue static lesions, PSF modeling improved lesion contrast by 19.7%–109%, enhancing the detectability and assessment of small tumor foci. In a patient study with small moving hepatic lesions, the proposed reconstruction technique improved lesion contrast by 54.4%–98.1% and reduced apparent lesion size by 21.8%–34.2%. Improvements were particularly important for the smallest lesion undergoing large motion at the lung-liver interface. Heterogeneous tumor structures delineation was substantially improved. Enhancements offered by PSF modeling were more important when correcting for motion at the same time. Conclusions: The results suggest that the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods can significantly enhance the performance of tumor diagnosis and staging as compared to conventional methods. This approach may enable utilization of the full potential of the scanner in oncologic studies of both the lower abdomen, with moving lesions, as well as other parts of the body unaffected by motion.

  9. Effect of Scan Time on Oncologic Lesion Detection in Whole-Body PET.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Oktay, M Bugrahan; Casey, Michael E; Hamill, James J

    2012-10-01

    Lesion-detection performance in oncologic PET depends in part upon count statistics, with shorter scans having higher noise and reduced lesion detectability. However, advanced techniques such as time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling can improve lesion detection. This work investigates the relationship between reducing count levels (as a surrogate for scan time) and reconstructing with PSF model and TOF. A series of twenty-four whole-body phantom scans was acquired on a Biograph mCT TOF PET/CT scanner using the experimental methodology prescribed for the Utah PET Lesion Detection Database. Six scans were acquired each day over four days, with up to 23 (68)Ge shell-less lesions (diam. 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 mm) distributed throughout the phantom thorax and pelvis. Each scan acquired 6 bed positions at 240 s/bed in listmode format. The listmode files were then statistically pruned, preserving Poisson statistics, to equivalent count levels for scan times of 180 s, 120 s, 90 s, 60 s, 45 s, 30 s, and 15 s per bed field-of-view, corresponding to whole-body scan times of 1.5-24 min. Each dataset was reconstructed using ordinary Poisson line-of-response (LOR) OSEM, with PSF model, with TOF, and with PSF+TOF. Localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) analysis was then performed using the channelized non-prewhitened (CNPW) observer. The results were analyzed to delineate the relationship between scan time, reconstruction method, and strength of post-reconstruction filter. Lesion-detection performance degraded as scan time was reduced, and progressively stronger filters were required to maximize performance for the shorter scans. PSF modeling and TOF were found to improve detection performance, but the degree of improvement for TOF was much larger than for PSF for the large phantom used in this study. Notably, the images using TOF provided equivalent lesion-detection performance to the images without TOF for scan durations 40% shorter, suggesting that TOF may offset, at least in part, the need for longer scan times in larger patients. PMID:23293380

  10. Relative role of motion and PSF compensation in whole-body oncologic PET-MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Ouyang, Jinsong; Reese, Timothy G.; Li, Quanzheng; Syrkina, Aleksandra; Chen, Yen-Lin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion and partial-volume effects are the two main sources of image degradation in whole-body PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR allows measurement of respiratory motion using MRI while collecting PET events. Improved PET images may be obtained by modeling respiratory motion and point spread function (PSF) within the PET iterative reconstruction process. In this study, the authors assessed the relative impact of PSF modeling and MR-based respiratory motion correction in phantoms and patient studies using a whole-body PET-MR scanner. Methods: An asymmetric exponential PSF model accounting for radially varying and axial detector blurring effects was obtained from point source acquisitions performed in the PET-MR scanner. A dedicated MRI acquisition protocol using single-slice steady state free-precession MR acquisitions interleaved with pencil-beam navigator echoes was developed to track respiratory motion during PET-MR studies. An iterative ordinary Poisson fully 3D OSEM PET reconstruction algorithm modeling all the physical effects of the acquisition (attenuation, scatters, random events, detectors efficiencies, PSF), as well as MR-based nonrigid respiratory deformations of tissues (in both emission and attenuation maps) was developed. Phantom and 18F-FDG PET-MR patient studies were performed to evaluate the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods. Results: The phantom experiment results showed that PSF modeling significantly improved contrast recovery while limiting noise propagation in the reconstruction process. In patients with soft-tissue static lesions, PSF modeling improved lesion contrast by 19.7%–109%, enhancing the detectability and assessment of small tumor foci. In a patient study with small moving hepatic lesions, the proposed reconstruction technique improved lesion contrast by 54.4%–98.1% and reduced apparent lesion size by 21.8%–34.2%. Improvements were particularly important for the smallest lesion undergoing large motion at the lung-liver interface. Heterogeneous tumor structures delineation was substantially improved. Enhancements offered by PSF modeling were more important when correcting for motion at the same time. Conclusions: The results suggest that the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods can significantly enhance the performance of tumor diagnosis and staging as compared to conventional methods. This approach may enable utilization of the full potential of the scanner in oncologic studies of both the lower abdomen, with moving lesions, as well as other parts of the body unaffected by motion. PMID:24694156

  11. Maximal muscular vascular conductances during whole body upright exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, J A L; Jensen-Urstad, M; van Hall, G; Holmberg, H -C; Rosdahl, H; Saltin, B

    2004-01-01

    That muscular blood flow may reach 2.5 l kg?1 min?1 in the quadriceps muscle has led to the suggestion that muscular vascular conductance must be restrained during whole body exercise to avoid hypotension. The main aim of this study was to determine the maximal arm and leg muscle vascular conductances (VC) during leg and arm exercise, to find out if the maximal muscular vasodilatory response is restrained during maximal combined arm and leg exercise. Six Swedish elite cross-country skiers, age (mean ± s.e.m.) 24 ± 2 years, height 180 ± 2 cm, weight 74 ± 2 kg, and maximal oxygen uptake (V?O2,max) 5.1 ± 0.1 l min?1 participated in the study. Femoral and subclavian vein blood flows, intra-arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, as well as blood gases in the femoral and subclavian vein, right atrium and femoral artery were determined during skiing (roller skis) at ?76% of V?O2,max and at V?O2,max with different techniques: diagonal stride (combined arm and leg exercise), double poling (predominantly arm exercise) and leg skiing (predominantly leg exercise). During submaximal exercise cardiac output (26–27 l min?1), mean blood pressure (MAP) (?87 mmHg), systemic VC, systemic oxygen delivery and pulmonary V?O2 (?4 l min?1) attained similar values regardless of exercise mode. The distribution of cardiac output was modified depending on the musculature engaged in the exercise. There was a close relationship between VC and V?O2 in arms (r = 0.99, P < 0.001) and legs (r = 0.98, P < 0.05). Peak arm VC (63.7 ± 5.6 ml min?1 mmHg?1) was attained during double poling, while peak leg VC was reached at maximal exercise with the diagonal technique (109.8 ± 11.5 ml min?1 mmHg?1) when arm VC was 38.8 ± 5.7 ml min?1 mmHg?1. If during maximal exercise arms and legs had been vasodilated to the observed maximal levels then mean arterial pressure would have dropped at least to 75–77 mmHg in our experimental conditions. It is concluded that skeletal muscle vascular conductance is restrained during whole body exercise in the upright position to avoid hypotension. PMID:15121799

  12. Design, fabrication and acceptance testing of a zero gravity whole body shower, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The effort to design whole body shower for the space station prototype is reported. Clothes and dish washer/dryer concepts were formulated with consideration given to integrating such a system with the overall shower design. Water recycling methods to effect vehicle weight savings were investigated and it was concluded that reusing wash and/or rinse water resulted in weight savings which were not sufficient to outweigh the added degree of hardware complexity. The formulation of preliminary and final designs for the shower are described. A detailed comparison of the air drag vs. vacuum pickup method was prepared that indicated the air drag concept results in more severe space station weight penalties; therefore, the preliminary system design was based on utilizing the vacuum pickup method. Tests were performed to determine the optimum methods of storing, heating and sterilizing the cleansing agent utilized in the shower; it was concluded that individual packages of pre-sterilized cleansing agent should be used. Integration features with the space station prototype system were defined and incorporated into the shower design as necessary.

  13. Luminescent proteins for high-speed single-cell and whole-body imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kenta; Chang, Y-F; Horikawa, Kazuki; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Higuchi, Yuriko; Hashida, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Yu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized our understanding of biological processes. However, the requirement for external illumination precludes their universal application to the study of biological processes in all tissues. Although light can be created by chemiluminescence, light emission from existing chemiluminescent probes is too weak to use this imaging modality in situations when fluorescence cannot be used. Here we report the development of the brightest luminescent protein to date, Nano-lantern, which is a chimera of enhanced Renilla luciferase and Venus, a fluorescent protein with high bioluminescence resonance energy transfer efficiency. Nano-lantern allows real-time imaging of intracellular structures in living cells with spatial resolution equivalent to fluorescence and sensitive tumour detection in freely moving unshaved mice. We also create functional indicators based on Nano-lantern that can image Ca2+, cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenosine 5?-triphosphate dynamics in environments where the use of fluorescent indicators is not feasible. These luminescent proteins allow visualization of biological phenomena at previously unseen single-cell, organ and whole-body level in animals and plants. PMID:23232392

  14. Whole-body imaging of whole-organ, subresolution, basic functional unit (BFU) perfusion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-08-01

    A BFU is an organ's smallest assembly of diverse cells that functions like the organ, such as the liver's hepatic lobules. There are approximately 107 BFUs in a human organ. These 100-200 ?m structures are perfused by capillaries fed by a terminal arteriole (15?m diameter). BFU sizes, function and number per organ vary with disease, either by loss of BFUs and/or their decrease in function. The BFU is the upper limit of a spherical assembly of cells, immersed in a suitably nutrient medium, which can survive without its own blood supply. However, each BFU has its own blood supply to support the extra energy and/or solutes needed for providing its physiological function (e.g., contraction or secretion). A BFU function is best evaluated by its micro-perfusion, which can be readily evaluated with whole-body CT. Resolution of individual BFUs within in-situ organs, using clinical imaging devices, would require high radiation doses and/or the intolerably long scan-durations needed for suitable signal-to-noise image-data. However, it is possible to obtain a statistical description of the BFU number, size and function from wholebody CT by way of a model. In this study we demonstrate this capability by using the distribution of myocardial terminal arteriolar perfusion territories by way of a nested, multiple, regions-of-interest analysis of the heart wall imaged during transient opacification of its blood supply.

  15. A Double End-Cap Birdcage RF Coil for Small Animal Whole Body Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulsen, Gultekin; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2002-06-01

    Proper design of a birdcage coil plays a very important role in obtaining high-resolution small animal magnetic resonance imaging. The RF field homogeneity and the coil filling factor directly affect the signal-to-noise ratio ( S/ N) and therefore limit the resolution. It has been shown that a conductive end-cap placed on one side of the coil can improve the RF field inhomogeneity near this area. This also contributes to an increase in the S/ N by reducing the length of the RF coil. While this is true near the end-cap, the distal half of the coil still suffers from poor homogeneity and S/ N. Consequently, such a shortfall may hinder small animal whole body imaging. In order to improve the coil performance for a larger imaging volume, we designed a new small animal birdcage RF coil by adding a detachable second end-cap to the open end. The performance of single end and double end RF coils was compared experimentally. The results indicate that the double end-cap can provide superior uniformity along the long axis of the coil. Furthermore, if one wishes to obtain the same homogeneity within a given volume, a double end-cap would have less than half of the length of the single end-cap coil leading to a superior S/ N performance.

  16. Constrained non-rigid registration for whole body image registration: method and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2007-03-01

    3D intra- and inter-subject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include measurements and quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, deriving population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. A number of methods have been proposed to tackle this problem but few of them have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the vast majority of registration algorithms have been applied. To solve this problem, we have previously proposed an approach, which initializes an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm with a point based registration technique [1, 2]. In this paper, we introduce new constraints into our non-rigid registration algorithm to prevent the bones from being deformed inaccurately. Results we have obtained show that the new constrained algorithm leads to better registration results than the previous one.

  17. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  18. Whole body correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA by intracerebrospinal fluid gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haurigot, Virginia; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Garcia, Miguel; Ruzo, Albert; Villacampa, Pilar; Ayuso, Eduard; Añor, Sònia; Andaluz, Anna; Pineda, Mercedes; García-Fructuoso, Gemma; Molas, Maria; Maggioni, Luca; Muñoz, Sergio; Motas, Sandra; Ruberte, Jesús; Mingozzi, Federico; Pumarola, Martí; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    For most lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) affecting the CNS, there is currently no cure. The BBB, which limits the bioavailability of drugs administered systemically, and the short half-life of lysosomal enzymes, hamper the development of effective therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is an autosomic recessive LSD caused by a deficiency in sulfamidase, a sulfatase involved in the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparan sulfate. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) administration of serotype 9 adenoassociated viral vectors (AAV9s) encoding sulfamidase corrects both CNS and somatic pathology in MPS IIIA mice. Following vector administration, enzymatic activity increased throughout the brain and in serum, leading to whole body correction of GAG accumulation and lysosomal pathology, normalization of behavioral deficits, and prolonged survival. To test this strategy in a larger animal, we treated beagle dogs using intracisternal or intracerebroventricular delivery. Administration of sulfamidase-encoding AAV9 resulted in transgenic expression throughout the CNS and liver and increased sulfamidase activity in CSF. High-titer serum antibodies against AAV9 only partially blocked CSF-mediated gene transfer to the brains of dogs. Consistently, anti-AAV antibody titers were lower in CSF than in serum collected from healthy and MPS IIIA–affected children. These results support the clinical translation of this approach for the treatment of MPS IIIA and other LSDs with CNS involvement. PMID:23863627

  19. Anthropometric Characteristics and Sex Influence Magnitude of Skin Cooling following Exposure to Whole Body Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, L. E.; Cuttell, S.; Nunley, P.; Meyler, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether anthropometric measures influence magnitude of skin cooling following exposure to whole body cryotherapy (WBC). Height, weight, body fat percentage, and lean mass were measured in 18 male and 14 female participants. Body surface area, body surface area to mass ratio, body mass index, fat-free mass index, and fat mass index were calculated. Thermal images were captured before and after WBC (?60°C for 30 seconds, ?110°C for 2 minutes). Skin temperature was measured at the chest, arm, thigh, and calf. Mean skin temperature before and after WBC and change in mean skin temperature (?Tsk) were calculated. ?Tsk was significantly greater in females (12.07 ± 1.55°C) than males (10.12 ± 1.86°C; t(30) = ?3.09, P = .004). A significant relationship was observed between body fat percentage and ?Tsk in the combined dataset (P = .002, r = .516) and between fat-free mass index and ?Tsk in males (P = .005, r = .622). No other significant associations were found. Skin response of individuals to WBC appears to depend upon anthropometric variables and sex, with individuals with a higher adiposity cooling more than thinner individuals. Effects of sex and anthompometrics should be considered when designing WBC research or treatment protocols. PMID:25061612

  20. Whole-body autoradiography of 204Tl in embryos, fetuses and placentas of mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I; Jonsen, J

    1982-01-01

    Whole-body autoradiography was used to study thallium uptake and retention in mice during gestation. Fifteen minutes after an intraperitoneal injection of 50 microCi 204Tl2SO4 into a 15-day pregnant mouse, thallium could be seen within the fetuses. Maximum fetal accumulation occurred 2-4 h after injection, and minimum at the last observation 4 days after injection. The fetal concentration of 204Tl was constantly lower than the placental. Uptake of 204Tl in embryos, fetuses and placentas of mice with gestation ages varying from 5 days to 16 days indicated that thallium crosses the placental barriers throughout gestation. Thallium was retained by the visceral yolk sac placenta during early gestation, by the visceral yolk sac, chorioallantoic placenta and amnion during late gestation. Over a period of time placental transfer and embryonic/fetal retention of small amounts of thallium may be hazardous to the offspring due to the high cumulative toxicity of this metal. PMID:7123568

  1. Whole-body cryostimulation increases parasympathetic outflow and decreases core body temperature.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Pawel; Bitner, Anna; S?omko, Joanna; Szrajda, Justyna; Klawe, Jacek J; Tafil-Klawe, Malgorzata; Newton, Julia L

    2014-10-01

    The cardiovascular, autonomic and thermal response to whole-body cryostimulation exposure are not completely known. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate objectively and noninvasively autonomic and thermal reactions observed after short exposure to very low temperatures. We examined 25 healthy men with mean age 30.1 ± 3.7 years and comparable anthropomorphical characteristic. Each subject was exposed to cryotherapeutic temperatures in a cryogenic chamber for 3 min (approx. -120 °C). The cardiovascular and autonomic parameters were measured noninvasively with Task Force Monitor. The changes in core body temperature were determined with the Vital Sense telemetric measurement system. Results show that 3 min to cryotherapeutic temperatures causes significant changes in autonomic balance which are induced by peripheral and central blood volume changes. Cryostimulation also induced changes in core body temperature, maximum drop of core temperature was observed 50-60 min after the stimulation. Autonomic and thermal reactions to cryostimulation were observed up to 6 h after the exposure and were not harmful for examined subjects. PMID:25436954

  2. Whole-body kinetic image of a redox probe in mice using Overhauser-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Kosem, Nuttavut; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Phumala Morales, Noppawan; Yasukawa, Keiji; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Utsumi, Hideo

    2012-07-15

    Overhauser-enhanced MRI (OMRI) enables visualization of free radicals in animals based on dynamic nuclear polarization. Real-time data of tissue redox status gathered from kinetic images of redox-sensitive nitroxyl radical probes using OMRI provided both anatomic and physiological information. Phantom experiments demonstrated the linear correlation between the enhancement factor and the concentration of a membrane-impermeable probe, carboxy-PROXYL (3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl- pyrrolidine-1-oxyl). Whole-body OMRI images illustrated the in vivo kinetics of carboxy-PROXYL for 25 min. Initial distribution was observed in lung, heart, liver, and kidney, but not brain, corresponding to its minimal lipophilicity. Based on these images (pixel size, 1.33 × 1.33 mm; slice thickness, 50mm), a time-concentration curve with low coefficient of variance (<0.21) was created to assess pharmacokinetic behaviors. A biexponential curve showed a distribution phase from 1 to 10 min and an elimination phase from 15 to 25 min. The ? rate constant was greater than the ? rate constant in ROIs, confirming that its pharmacokinetics obeyed a two-compartment model. As a noninvasive technique, combining OMRI imaging with redox probes to monitor tissue redox status may be useful in acquiring valuable information regarding organ function for preclinical and clinical studies of oxidative diseases. PMID:22579576

  3. Determination of mean whole body intracellular pH in unanesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Albers, C; Saborowski, F; Usinger, W; Scholand, C

    1975-01-01

    In order to determine mean whole body pHi in unanesthetized dogs, assumptions on the urinary and intestinal excretion of DMO, the total loss of an injected single dose of [14C] DMO, and the distribution kinetics of DMO were tested experimentally. Urinary excretion of DMO was almost negligible. The best assumption on the total loss of DMO was based on the exponential decay observed over a period of 1 to 4 weeks. The biological half-life of DMO was 5 days, the time constant being --0.14 d-1. The extracellular distribution of DMO was considered to equal that of [3H] inulin. Between 1 and 7 hours after an injection of inulin in nephrectomized dogs the distribution volume increased linearly from 16% of the body weight after 2 hours to 21% after 6 hours. Based on these experimental results, pHi was determined in 16 unanesthetized dogs. 120 min after the injection of DMO pHi was 7.05 and 430 min after the injection pHi was 7.11. It is concluded that the assumption made allow the estimation of pHi in unanesthetized dogs over a period of 1 to 7 hours. PMID:236590

  4. Contaminant concentrations in whole-body fish and shellfish from US estuaries.

    PubMed

    Harvey, James; Harwell, Linda; Summers, J Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Persistent bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) pollutants are chemical contaminants that pose risks to ecosystems and human health. For these reasons, available tissue contaminant data from the US EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's National Coastal Assessment were examined to estimate to what areal extent PBTs are found in US estuarine resources. The data document composite, whole-body tissue chemical concentrations for 736 sampling sites across Northeast, Southeast, Gulf of Mexico, and West Coast estuaries. Tissue chemical concentrations were compared to US EPA non-cancer risk guidelines for recreational fishers, because of a lack of ecological guidelines for these chemical concentrations. Samples were analyzed for 23 PAH compounds, 21 PCB congeners, 6 DDT derivatives and metabolites, 14 chlorinated pesticides (other than DDT) and 13 metals, including mercury. Total PCBs were found to exceed recreational fisher guidelines most frequently (31% of samples evaluated), followed by mercury (29%), total PAHs (21%), and DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE (11%). Toxaphene, cadmium and dieldrin were found but in fewer than 1% of the samples. PMID:17564799

  5. Attention to emotional scenes including whole-body expressions in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumihiro; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Real-life situations provide rich sets of cues that viewers evaluate in terms of their emotional significance. In this study, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) viewed a movie depicting naturalistic scenes involving the whole-body expressions of conspecifics to examine how nonhuman primates perceived the combination of these cues and how each cue contributed to the overall perception. Viewing time was measured while the chimpanzees watched movie clips without sound. Among scenes depicting neutrality, general excitement, agonism, and playfulness, chimpanzees looked longest at those depicting agonism. This bias toward agonistic scenes may indicate an attentional sensitivity toward threat/fear-related negative situations among chimpanzees. The effect disappeared when the images were scrambled, ruling out the possible effect of pixel-level properties on the results. In addition, the follow-up analyses revealed that the effect was independent of the presentation order and of the number of individuals in each clip. The manipulation of playback speeds had little effect on the looking times. The elimination of facial cues slightly influenced the looking times but did not change the strong bias toward agonistic scenes. This robustness of the main effect against image manipulations may indicate that the chimpanzees attended directly to the contextual information implied by the cues rather than to the cues per se (e.g., facial expressions, speed of movements). PMID:20695660

  6. Environmental Assessment for the new Whole Body Counter facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to construct and operate a new in-vivo counting facility at the Savannah River Site for the monitoring of employees for internal radionuclides. The proposed facility, titled the new Whole Body Counter (WBC) facility, would house both the existing and additional new invivo counting equipment and facility support operations. The proposed facility would be sited and located in an area of the SRS in which background radiation levels are sufficiently low to assure accurate in-vivo counts and a location that would assure ease of access for occupational workers. This Environmental Assessment has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CPR Parts 1500-1508). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. The proposed action has independent utility to the Savannah River operations and will be necessary to support plant activities regardless of the makeup of the future mission at the site. As such, the proposed new WBC facility is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ``No Action`` alternative.

  7. Pioglitazone Increases Whole Body Insulin Sensitivity in Obese, Insulin-Resistant Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tozzo, Effie; Bhat, Gowri; Cheon, Kyeongmi; Camacho, Raul C.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps are considered the "gold standard" for assessing whole body insulin sensitivity. When used in combination with tracer dilution techniques and physiological insulin concentrations, insulin sensitization can be dissected and attributed to hepatic and peripheral (primarily muscle) effects. Non-human primates (NHPs), such as rhesus monkeys, are the closest pre-clinical species to humans, and thus serve as an ideal model for testing of compound efficacy to support translation to human efficacy. We determined insulin infusion rates that resulted in high physiological insulin concentrations that elicited maximal pharmacodynamic responses during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. These rates were then used with [U-13C]-D-glucose, to assess and document the degrees of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance between healthy and insulin-resistant, dysmetabolic NHPs. Next, dysmetabolic NHPs were treated for 28 days with pioglitazone (3 mg/kg) and again had their insulin sensitivity assessed, illustrating a significant improvement in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. This coincided with a significant increase in insulin clearance, and normalization of circulating adiponectin. In conclusion, we have determined a physiological clamp paradigm (similar to humans) for assessing glucose turnover in NHPs. We have also demonstrated that insulin-resistant, dysmetabolic NHPs respond to the established insulin sensitizer, pioglitazone, thus confirming their use as an ideal pre-clinical translational model to assess insulin sensitizing compounds. PMID:25954816

  8. A video-optical system for time-resolved whole-body measurement on vascular segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Katia

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental setup to get the three-dimensional (3-D) whole-body deformation of arterial segments under finite inflation and extension. A simple one camera/one shot arrangement allows non-contacting, full-field, real-time measurements to be performed. A concave conical mirror mounted coaxially to the camera provides the whole 360° field view of a large number of closely spaced micro-spheres affixed to the sample surface. Then, on the basis of radial metrology concepts, each single frame of the loading sequence is automatically processed to track 3-D marker positions and, thus, to obtain sample deformation at the camera frame acquisition rate. Preliminary tests are run to evaluate measurement accuracy and to calibrate the system for in-vitro testing in physiological solution. Then, pressure-diameter tests at various levels of axial extension are performed on an excised porcine arterial segment using a specially designed in-vitro rig. Experimental data demonstrate that the present method can provide either global parameters to be used within standard constitutive frameworks and important full-field information on the eventual in-homogeneity of deformation. To better illustrate the latter achievement, results related to the 'bend buckling' of a straight porcine vascular vessel tested at low axial stretch are reported. Remarkably, the experimental apparatus can be adapted to a large variety of test protocols and sample geometries.

  9. Automated prostate segmentation in whole-body MRI scans for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habes, Mohamad; Schiller, Thilo; Rosenberg, Christian; Burchardt, Martin; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The whole prostatic volume (PV) is an important indicator for benign prostate hyperplasia. Correlating the PV with other clinical parameters in a population-based prospective cohort study (SHIP-2) requires valid prostate segmentation in a large number of whole-body MRI scans. The axial proton density fast spin echo fat saturated sequence is used for prostate screening in SHIP-2. Our automated segmentation method is based on support vector machines (SVM). We used three-dimensional neighborhood information to build classification vectors from automatically generated features and randomly selected 16 MR examinations for validation. The Hausdorff distance reached a mean value of 5.048 ± 2.413, and a mean value of 5.613 ± 2.897 compared to manual segmentation by observers A and B. The comparison between volume measurement of SVM-based segmentation and manual segmentation of observers A and B depicts a strong correlation resulting in Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (?) of 0.936 and 0.859, respectively. Our automated methodology based on SVM for prostate segmentation can segment the prostate in WBI scans with good segmentation quality and has considerable potential for integration in epidemiological studies.

  10. Whole Body Muscle Activity during the FIFA 11+ Program Evaluated by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Junsuke; Inaki, Anri; Mochizuki, Takafumi; Toratani, Tatsuhiro; Kosaka, Masahiro; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Taki, Junichi; Yahata, Tetsutaro; Kinuya, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effect of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program on whole body muscle activity using positron emission tomography. Methods Ten healthy male volunteers were divided into a control group and a group that performed injury prevention exercises (The 11+). The subjects of the control group were placed in a sitting position for 20 min and 37 MBq of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was injected intravenously. The subjects then remained seated for 45 min. The subjects of the exercise group performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, after which FDG was injected. They then performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, and rested for 25 min in a sitting position. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography images were obtained 50 min after FDG injection in each group. Regions of interest were defined within 30 muscles. The standardized uptake value was calculated to examine the FDG uptake of muscle tissue per unit volume. Results FDG accumulation within the abdominal rectus, gluteus medius and minimus were significantly higher in the exercise group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion The hip abductor muscles and abdominal rectus were active during part 2 of the FIFA 11+ program. PMID:24066082

  11. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  12. Assessment of Routine Procedure Effect on Breathing Parameters in Mice by Using Whole-Body Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Ra?id, Orhan; Chirita, Daniel; Iancu, Adina D; Stavaru, Crina; Radu, Dorel L

    2012-01-01

    We used whole-body plethysmography to investigate the effect of restraint, ear marking, tail vein and retroorbital blood sampling, and tail clipping on respiration in Balb/c × TCR-HA+/– F1 hybrid mice (F1h). Baseline values of breathing parameters were determined. During the experiment, mice experienced a procedure and then plethysmographic recordings were obtained immediately and at 4, 24, and 48 h afterward. Baseline breathing parameters showed significant differences between sexes. Restraint affected minute volume differently than did handling in male mice and to a lesser extent in female mice. Ear marking significantly changed minute volume compared with handling but not restraint in male mice and in the opposite manner in female mice. Tail vein blood sampling changed minute volume in a significant manner compared with restraint but not compared with handling in both sexes. Retroorbital blood sampling significantly changed minute volume compared with values for both handling and restraint in male mice but only compared with handling in female mice. Tail clipping modified minute volume significantly compared with handling in male mice and compared with restraint in both sexes. Analysis of data showed that routine procedures affect minute volume in mice depending on invasiveness of maneuver and in a sex-biased manner for as long as 24 h after the procedure. Our experiment shows that procedures performed on laboratory mice can change respiratory parameters and can be investigated by plethysmography. PMID:23043813

  13. A Monte Carlo calibration of a whole body counter using the ICRP computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Isaksson, Mats

    2015-03-01

    A fast and versatile calibration of a whole body counter (WBC) is presented. The WBC, consisting of four large plastic scintillators, is to be used for measurements after accident or other incident involving ionising radiation. The WBC was calibrated using Monte Carlo modelling and the ICRP computational phantoms. The Monte Carlo model of the WBC was made in GATE, v6.2 (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) and MATLAB. The Monte Carlo model was verified by comparing simulated energy spectrum and simulated counting efficiency with experimental energy spectrum and experimental counting efficiency for high-energy monoenergetic gamma-emitting point sources. The simulated results were in good agreement with experimental results except when compared with experimental results from high dead-time (DT) measurements. The Monte Carlo calibration was made for a heterogeneous source distribution of (137)Cs and (40)K, respectively, inside the ICRP computational phantoms. The source distribution was based on the biokinetic model for (137)Cs. PMID:25147249

  14. Evaluation of 2-PI liquid scintillation whole body counter using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles-Garcia, Fernando

    The 2-pi liquid scintillation whole body counter (WBC) at the University of Missouri-Columbia has been evaluated using MCNP-4A (a general Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon transport code, Version 4A). This facility is of importance to a wide variety of applications, such as determination of body fat content in human and animal subjects and measurement of radioactive tracers in animals. Phantoms and mathematical models were used in this research to upgrade the calibration procedures of the WBC. Since the existing protocol assumes a simple efficiency calibration based only upon body mass, it does not account for body shape and gives no methodology for placement of the subject below the detectors. Mathematical models were developed to calculate geometry efficiency for a variety of subjects and geometries utilizing the MCNP-4A transport code. Comparison of the results from simulation with experimental data shows excellent agreement not only in the shape of the curves as a function of subject position but also in absolute magnitude. In the case of the WBC and a phantom consisting of 40 liters of water containing 800 grams of sp+K the error in the magnitude is within 6%, which is easily attributable to the experimental calibration of the detectors. The efficiency of the WBC has been calculated for different weights for modified Adam-E through Adam-L model geometries; hence weight and shape can be modeled carefully and correction can be applied to actual human measurements based upon this work.

  15. Whole-body cortisol response of zebrafish to acute net handling stress

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Jennifer M.; Feist, Grant W.; Varga, Zoltán M.; Westerfield, Monte; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, are frequently handled during husbandry and experimental procedures in the laboratory, yet little is known about the physiological responses to such stressors. We measured the whole-body cortisol levels of adult zebrafish subjected to net stress and air exposure at intervals over a 24 h period; cortisol recovered to near control levels by about 1 h post-net-stress (PNS). We then measured cortisol at frequent intervals over a 1 h period. Cortisol levels were more than 2-fold higher in net stressed fish at 3 min PNS and continued to increase peaking at 15 min PNS, when cortisol levels were 6-fold greater than the control cortisol. Mean cortisol declined from 15 to 60 min PNS, and at 60 min, net-stressed cortisol was similar to control cortisol. Because the age of fish differed between studies, we examined resting cortisol levels of fish of different ages (3, 7, 13, and 19 months). The resting cortisol values among tanks with the same age fish differed significantly but there was no clear effect of age. Our study is the first to report the response and recovery of cortisol after net handling for laboratory-reared zebrafish. PMID:25587201

  16. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy duration on thermal and cardio-vascular response.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Borut; De Nardi, Massimo; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-05-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is the exposure of minimally dressed participants to very cold air, either in a specially designed chamber (cryo-chamber) or cabin (cryo-cabin), for a short period of time. Practitioners are vague when it comes to recommendations on the duration of a single session. Recommended exposure for cryo-chamber is 150s, but no empirically based recommendations are available for a cryo-cabin. Therefore the aim of this study was to examine thermal and cardio-vascular responses after 90, 120, 150 and 180s of WBC in a cryo-cabin. Our hypothesis was that skin temperature would be significantly lower after longer exposers. Twelve male participants (age 23.9±4.2 years) completed four WBC of different durations (90, 120, 150 and 180s) in a cryo-cabin. Thermal response, heart rate and blood pressure were measured prior, immediately after, 5min after and 30min after the session. Skin temperature differed significantly among different durations, except between 150 and 180s. There was no significant difference in heart rate and blood pressure. Thermal discomfort during a single session displayed a linear increase throughout the whole session. Our results indicate that practitioners and clinicians using cryo-cabin for WBC do not need to perform sessions longer than 150s. We have shown that longer sessions do not substantially affect thermal and cardio-vascular response, but do increase thermal discomfort. PMID:24802149

  17. An automated dosimetry system for testing whole-body ultraviolet phototherapy cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, G. D.; Evans, A. L.; Smith, D.; Martin, C. J.; McCalman, S.; Bilsland, D.

    2001-02-01

    A new technique is described for automated ultraviolet dosimetry within whole-body phototherapy cabinets. A dual-head detector system has been designed, permitting simultaneous assessment of irradiance levels and radiant intensities from individual lamps. One detector is used in combination with a diffuser/filter system for the measurement of irradiance and the other is mounted at the end of a slit collimator to provide a measurement which can be related to the radiant intensities of the individual lamps. These quantities are derived from 800 separate measurements made during rotation of the detector head around a 360° circle at a fixed height and position within the cabinet under remote computer software control. The device has advantages compared with standard techniques, enabling measurements to be made without the need for a person to be present in the cabinet. A full set of measurements is made with minimal switching of the power supply to the lamps. This simplifies the assessment and reduces the uncertainty from variation in output after the lamps are switched on. Variations in irradiance with orientation for the smaller phototherapy cabinets are clearly demonstrated. Plots of data from the collimated detector show peaks corresponding to the lamps and the surrounding reflectors. The plots enable failed lamps to be detected and peak values can be related to radiant intensities of individual lamps.

  18. Predictive value of longitudinal whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Merz, M; Hielscher, T; Wagner, B; Sauer, S; Shah, S; Raab, M S; Jauch, A; Neben, K; Hose, D; Egerer, G; Weber, M A; Delorme, S; Goldschmidt, H; Hillengass, J

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the relevance of focal lesions (FL) in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (wb-MRI) at the initial workup of patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of longitudinal wb-MRIs on progression into multiple myeloma (MM). Sixty-three patients with SMM were analyzed who received at least two wb-MRIs for follow-up before progression into MM. Radiological progressive disease (MRI-PD) was defined as detection of new FL or increase in diameter of existing FL and a novel or progressive diffuse infiltration. Radiological stable disease (MRI-SD) was defined by no change compared with the prior MRI. Patients were followed-up every 3-6 months, including a serological and clinical evaluation. One Hundred and eighty-two wb-MRIs were analyzed. MRI-PD occurred in 31 patients (49%), and 25 (40%) patients developed MM. MRI-PD was highly significantly associated with progression into MM, regardless of findings at the initial MRI. In multivariate analysis, MRI-PD remained a risk factor, independent of relevant baseline parameters like serum monoclonal protein or ?95% aberrant plasma cells in the bone marrow. Patients with MRI-SD had no higher risk of progression, even when FL were present at the initial MRI. Therefore, MRI is suitable for the follow-up of patients with SMM. PMID:24535407

  19. Fast Dixon Whole-Body MRI for Detecting Distant Cancer Metastasis: A Preliminary Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Costelloe, Colleen M.; Kundra, Vikas; Ma, Jingfei; Chasen, Beth A.; Rohren, Eric M.; Bassett, Roland L.; Madewell, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of fast Dixon whole-body (WB) MRI for detecting bone and liver metastasis in clinical patients and to compare its performance with skeletal scintigraphy (SS) for detecting bone metastases using reference imaging with > 1 year followup as gold standard. Materials and Methods Twenty-nine patients with bone metastases prospectively underwent WB MRI and SS. WB MRI included coronal T2, axial T1 with and without intravenous gadolinium (including triphasic liver sequences), and axial diffusion-weighted imaging, plus spinal sagittal post-contrast T1-weighted images. The skeleton was divided into 16 segments. Reviewers blinded to other images identified up to 5 lesions per segment and rated them using a five-point confidence scale for metastatic disease. Sensitivities and specificities were compared using the McNemar test. Results The sensitivity of WB MRI and SS in detecting bone metastases was 70.8% and 59.6% (P = 0.003), respectively; specificity was 89.1% and 98.7% (P < 0.0001). WB MRI detected all livers with metastases (n= 8). One focal nodular hyperplasia was classified as a metastasis on WB MRI. Conclusion Fast Dixon WB MRI is feasible in clinical patients, highly specific and more sensitive than SS in detecting bone metastases, and can detect metastases of the liver. PMID:21990095

  20. Loss of Ia-bearing splenic adherent cells after whole body ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Letvin, N.L.; Nepom, J.T.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-12-01

    Daily uv irradiation of mice results in a marked decrease in the antigen-presenting capability of SAC from these mice after 1 wk of uv exposure. To directly examine this cell population, we developed a technique for purifying SAC that involves passing mouse splenocytes through two cycles of glass adherence with an intervening incubation on rabbit anti-mouse Ig-coated dishes. SAC from externally uv irradiated mice prepared by this method, when pulsed with antigen, activate primed T cells to proliferate much less efficiently than SAC from normal mice. Both the proportion and absolute number of Ia-bearing cells in this purified SAC population from uv irradiated mice are considerably smaller than that seen in similarly prepared populations from normal mice. Previous adjuvant immunization was shown to override functional defects elicited by external uv irradiation. This demonstration of a uv irradiation induced selective loss of Ia bearing splenic adherent cells and the functional consequences of this loss provide further evidence for the importance of Ia-bearing accessory cells in antigen presentation of T dependent antigens, and provides insight into the origin of the immunologic defects induced by whole body uv irradiation.

  1. Thermophysiological responses of human volunteers during controlled whole-body radio frequency exposure at 450 MHz.

    PubMed

    Adair, E R; Kelleher, S A; Mack, G W; Morocco, T S

    1998-01-01

    Thermoregulatory responses of heat production and heat loss were measured in seven adult volunteers (four women and three men, aged 21-57 yr) during 45-min dorsal exposures of the whole body to 450 MHz continuous wave radio frequency (RF) fields. Two power densities (PD) (local peak PD = 18 and 24 mW/cm2; local peak specific absorption rate = 0.320 [W/kg]/[mW/cm2]) were tested in each of three ambient temperatures (Ta = 24, 28, and 31 degrees C) plus Ta controls (no RF). No changes in metabolic heat production occurred under any exposure conditions. Vigorous increases in sweating rate on back and chest, directly related to both Ta and PD, cooled the skin and ensured efficient regulation of the deep body (esophageal) temperature to within 0.1 degrees C of the normal level. Category judgments of thermal sensation, comfort, sweating, and thermal preference usually matched the measured changes in physiological responses. Some subtle effects related to gender were noted that confirm classic physiological data. Our results indicate that dorsal exposures of humans to a supraresonant frequency of 450 MHz at local peak specific absorption rates up to 7.68 W/kg are mildly thermogenic and are counteracted efficiently by normal thermophysiologic heat loss mechanisms, principally sweating. PMID:9581966

  2. Determination of whole-body rotenone residues in the brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis).

    PubMed

    Mauldin, R E; Furcolow, C A; Johnston, J J; Kimball, B A

    2000-06-01

    The brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis) is an introduced pest in Guam, responsible for extensive agricultural damage, the extinction of several bird species, and severe and frequent electrical power outages. Rotenone, a naturally occurring pesticide, has been investigated as a possible chemical control agent. An analytical method was developed to assess whole body rotenone residues ranging in concentration from 0.035 to 250 microg g(-)(1) in snakes. The method employed ethyl acetate extraction of 2 g samples of cryogenically frozen, pulverized snakes, followed by silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cleanup. Extract analysis was performed using a high-performance liquid chromatography system employing a cyanopropyl analytical column. Tissues fortified to concentrations of 0.035, 4.82, and 250 microg g(-)(1) yielded analyte recoveries of 85.1, 85.6, and 83.5%, respectively. The linear response of rotenone standard solutions was assessed from 0. 025 to 0.25 microg mL(-)(1) (r(2) = 0.9968) and from 0.250 to 125 microg mL(-)(1) (r(2) = 0.9999). The method was simple, rugged, and reliable. PMID:10888529

  3. Hematological and TGF-beta variations after whole-body proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on five bone-marrow-derived cell types and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) were examined and compared to the effects of photons (60Co). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy (0.4 Gy/min) protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at entry (E), or 60Co and euthanized on days 0.5-17 thereafter. 60Co-irradiated animals had decreased erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit at 12 hours post-exposure; depression was not noted in proton (SOBP or E)-irradiated groups until day 4. Significantly decreased leukocyte counts were observed at this same time in all irradiated groups, with lymphocyte loss being greater than that of monocytes, and the depression was generally maintained. In contrast, the levels of neutrophils and thrombocytes fluctuated, especially during the first week; significant differences were noted among irradiated groups in neutrophil levels. Plasma TGF-beta 1 was elevated on day 7 in the 60Co, but not proton, irradiated mice. Collectively, the data show that dramatic and persistent changes occurred in all irradiated groups. However, few differences in assay results were seen between animals exposed to protons (SOBP or E) or photons, as well as between the groups irradiated with either of the two regions of the proton Bragg curve.

  4. Development of an LSI for Tactile Sensor Systems on the Whole-Body of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroyama, Masanori; Makihata, Mitsutoshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Matsuzaki, Sakae; Yamada, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ui; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nonomura, Yutaka; Fujiyoshi, Motohiro; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    We have developed a network type tactile sensor system, which realizes high-density tactile sensors on the whole-body of nursing and communication robots. The system consists of three kinds of nodes: host, relay and sensor nodes. Roles of the sensor node are to sense forces and, to encode the sensing data and to transmit the encoded data on serial channels by interruption handling. Relay nodes and host deal with a number of the encoded sensing data from the sensor nodes. A sensor node consists of a capacitive MEMS force sensor and a signal processing/transmission LSI. In this paper, details of an LSI for the sensor node are described. We designed experimental sensor node LSI chips by a commercial 0.18µm standard CMOS process. The 0.18µm LSIs were supplied in wafer level for MEMS post-process. The LSI chip area is 2.4mm × 2.4mm, which includes logic, CF converter and memory circuits. The maximum clock frequency of the chip with a large capacitive load is 10MHz. Measured power consumption at 10MHz clock is 2.23mW. Experimental results indicate that size, response time, sensor sensitivity and power consumption are all enough for practical tactile sensor systems.

  5. Model based predictive design of post patient collimation for whole body CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Prakhar; Boudry, John

    2015-03-01

    Scatter presents as a significant source of image artifacts in cone beam CT (CBCT) and considerable effort has been devoted to measuring the magnitude and influence of scatter. Scatter management includes both rejection and correction approaches, with anti-scatter grids (ASGs) commonly employed as a scatter rejection strategy. This work employs a Geant41,2 driven Monte Carlo model to investigate the impact of different ASG designs on scatter rejection performance across a range of scanner coverage along the patient axis. Scatter rejection is quantified in terms of scatter to primary ratio (SPR). One-dimensional (1D) ASGs (grid septa running parallel to patient axis) are compared across a range of septa height, septa width and septa material. Results indicate for a given septa width and patient coverage, SPR decreases with septa height but demonstrates diminishing returns for larger height values. For shorter septa heights, higher Z materials (e.g., Tungsten) exhibit superior scatter rejection to relatively lower Z materials (e.g., Molybdenum). For taller septa heights, the material difference is not as significant. SPR has a relatively weak dependence on septa width, with thicker septa giving lower SPR values at a given scanner coverage. The results are intended to serve as guide for designing post patient collimation for whole body CT scanners. Since taller grids with high Z materials pose a significant manufacturing cost, it is necessary to evaluate optimal ASG designs to minimize material and machining costs and to meet scatter rejection specifications at given patient coverage.

  6. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of 40K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Car...

  7. Post-continuous whole body exposure of rabbits to 650 MHz electromagnetic fields: effects on liver, spleen, and brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrizia Tarantino; Remigio Lanubile; Giovanni Lacalandra; Luigi Abbro; Luciana Dini

    2005-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of post (12 or 18 months) whole body continuous (2 years) exposure of rabbits to 650 MHz electromagnetic fields (EMF) that are characteristic of those produced by broadcasting stations, on body weight and body mass, on the morphology of liver, spleen and brain, and on apoptosis rates and glycogen distribution in the liver. Two groups of rabbits

  8. Effect of route of administration on the disposition of acrylonitrile: quantitative whole-body autoradiographic study in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sam Jacob; Ahmed E Ahmed

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies on the effect of route of administration on acrylonitrile (VCN) toxicity in animal models indicated high rates of metabolism in rats that received an oral dose than those received an i.p. VCN dose. To evaluate the role of route of administration on the distribution of VCN, a quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBA) and elimination studies were conducted. Equimolar doses

  9. The whole-body shortening reflex of the medicinal leech: motor pattern, sensory basis, and interneuronal pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. K. Shaw; W. B. Kristan Jr

    1995-01-01

    The leech whole-body shortening reflex consists of a rapid contraction of the body elicited by a mechanical stimulus to the anterior of the animal. We used a variety of reduced preparations — semi-intact, body wall, and isolated nerve cord — to begin to elucidate the neural basis of this reflex in the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis. The motor pattern of

  10. Gradient-induced acoustic and magnetic field fluctuations in a 4T whole-body MR imager

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuhua Wu; Blaine A. Chronik; Chris Bowen; Chris K. Mechefske; Brian K. Rutt

    2000-01-01

    Both the acoustic and magnetic fluctuation frequency response functions for a Siemens AS25 body gradient coil inside a 4 Tesla whole-body MR system were measured and analyzed in this study. In an attempt to correlate the acoustic noise inside the gradient coil with magnetic field oscillations, triangular and trap- ezoidal gradient impulses of varying amplitudes and widths were used to

  11. Evaluation of a Neck-Shield for Use During Neurological Studies with a Whole-Body PET Scanner

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Chris

    Evaluation of a Neck-Shield for Use During Neurological Studies with a Whole-Body PET Scanner C J Thompson1 Member IEEE, S Kecani2 and S Boelen3 Montreal Neurological Institute1 and Dept. of Physics2 Mc with their slice-defining septa retracted. Additional shielding can be employed during neurological studies since

  12. Whole body optical imaging in small animals and its translation to the clinic: Intra-operative optical imaging guided surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. G. M. Löwik; E. Kaijzel; I. Que; A. Vahrmeijer; P. Kuppen; J. Mieog; C. Van de Velde

    2009-01-01

    Whole body optical imaging using bioluminescence or fluorescence is one of the most rapidly emerging technologies to non-invasively follow all kinds of molecular and cellular processes in small animals. Using tomographic approaches it is now also possible to get better quantitative data. Due to its sensitivity and simplicity it is now also widely used in drug development and drug screening.

  13. Development of Swimming Human Simulation Model Considering Rigid Body Dynamics and Unsteady Fluid Force for Whole Body

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motomu Nakashima; Ken Satou; Yasufumi Miura

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a swimming human simulation model considering rigid body dynamics and unsteady fluid force for the whole body, which will be utilized to analyze various dynamical problems in human swimming. First, the modeling methods and their formulations for the human body and the fluid force are respectively described. Second, experiments to identify the

  14. Acute IGF-I infusion stimulates whole body protein synthesis but does not reduce proteolysis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis increases in response to a physiological rise in total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in neonatal pigs. To determine the response of whole body protein synthesis and degradation to IGF-I, fasted 7-day-old pigs (n=4/dose) were infused with IGF-I (0, 20, or 50 ...

  15. The public whole body counting program following the Three Mile Island accident. Technical report, April-September 1979

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Gotchy; R. J. Bores

    1980-01-01

    In early April, 1979 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory instituted a program to determine whether any radioactivity released as a result of the March 28, 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island Unit-2 was accumulating in members of the general public living near Unit-2. The program used a device called a whole body counter which has the capability of measuring very

  16. Whole-body positron emission tomography in clinical oncology: comparison between attenuation-corrected and uncorrected images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank M. Bengel; Sibylle I. Ziegler; Norbert Avril; Wolfgang Weber; Christian Laubenbacher; Markus Schwaiger

    1997-01-01

    The clinical need for attenuation correction of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) images is controversial, especially because of the required increase in imaging time. In this study, regional tracer distribution in attenuation-corrected and uncorrected images was compared in order to delineate the potential advantages of attenuation correction for clinical application. An ECAT EXACT scanner and a protocol including five to

  17. Automated quantification of adipose and skeletal muscle tissue in whole-body MRI data for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Diana; Teucher, Birgit; Dinkel, Julien; Kaaks, Rudolf; Delorme, Stefan; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Heimann, Tobias

    2012-03-01

    The ratio between the amount of adipose and skeletal muscle tissue is an important determinant of metabolic health. Recent developments in MRI technology allow whole body scans to be performed for accurate assessment of body composition. In the present study, a total of 194 participants underwent a 2-point Dixon MRI sequence of the whole body. A fully automated image segmentation method quantifies the amount of adipose and skeletal muscle tissue by applying standard image processing techniques including thresholding, region growing and morphological operators. The adipose tissue is further divided into subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue by using statistical shape models. All images were visually inspected. The quantitative analysis was performed on 44 whole-body MRI data using manual segmentations as ground truth data. We achieved 3.3% and 6.3% of relative volume difference between the manual and automated segmentation of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, respectively. The validation of skeletal muscle tissue segmentation resulted in a relative volume difference of 7.8 +/- 4.2% and a volumetric overlap error of 6.4 +/- 2.3 %. To our knowledge, we are first to present a fully automated method which quantifies adipose and skeletal muscle tissue in whole-body MRI data. Due to the fully automated approach, results are deterministic and free of user bias. Hence, the software can be used in large epidemiological studies for assessing body fat distribution and the ratio of adipose to skeletal muscle tissue in relation to metabolic disease risk.

  18. WHOLE-BODY DOSIMETRY OF MICROWAVE RADIATION IN SMALL ANIMALS: THE EFFECT OF BODY MASS AND EXPOSURE GEOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole-body absorption of 2450-MHz radiation was measured in rats that ranged from 6 to 440 grams and mice that ranged from 30 to 50 grams. Simultaneous exposure of groups of animals in varying numbers and various configurations were made under free-field conditions in an electric...

  19. Influence of whole-body pitch tilt and kinesthetic cues on the perceived gravity-referenced eye level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Bringoux; K. Tamura; M. Faldon; M. A. Gresty; A. M. Bronstein

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of whole body tilt and lifting the arm against gravity on perceptual estimates of the Gravity-Referenced Eye Level (GREL), which corresponds to the subjective earth-referenced horizon. The results showed that the perceived GREL was influenced by body tilt, that is, lowered with forward tilt and elevated with backward tilt of the body. GREL estimates obtained by

  20. Head movements produced during whole body rotations and their sensitivity to changes in head inertia in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J S; Gdowski, G T

    2008-05-01

    The head's inertia produces forces on the neck when the body moves. One collective function of the vestibulocollic and cervicocollic reflexes (VCR and CCR) is thought to be to stabilize the head with respect to the trunk during whole body movements. Little is known as to whether their head-movement kinematics produced by squirrel monkeys during whole body rotations are similar to those of cats and humans. Prior experiments with cats and human subjects have shown that yaw head-movement kinematics are unaffected by changes in the head's inertia when the whole body is rotated. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the combined actions of the VCR and CCR accommodate for changes in the head's inertia. To test this hypothesis in squirrel monkeys, it was imperative to first characterize the behavior of head movements produced during whole body rotation and then investigate their sensitivity to changes in the head's inertia. Our behavioral studies show that squirrel monkeys produce only small head movements with respect to the trunk during whole body rotations over a wide range of stimulus frequencies and velocities (0.5-4.0 Hz; 0-100 degrees /s). Similar head movements were produced when only small additional changes in the head's inertia occurred. Electromyographic recordings from the splenius muscle revealed that an active process was utilized such that increases in muscle activation occurred when the inertia of the head was increased. These results are consistent with prior cat and human studies, suggesting that squirrel monkeys have a similar horizontal VCR and CCR. PMID:18305086

  1. Comparison of the effects of partial- or whole-body exposures to ¹?O particles on cognitive performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Bernard M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty L; Gomes, Stacey M

    2014-03-01

    Studies using a ground-based system (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory) to examine the effects of exposure to high-energy charged particles or HZE particles on cognitive performance have interchangeably used whole-body exposures or exposures restricted to the head of the subject. For this study, we hypothesized that different types of exposure such as whole body vs. head only vs. body only might modulate the impact of irradiation on cognitive performance in different ways with the resulting cognitive performance outcomes being either independent of exposure type or strongly dependent on exposure type with each producing performance outcomes. To test these possibilities, three groups of rats were exposed to ¹?O particles (1,000 MeV/n): (1) head only; (2) body only; (3) whole body. Cognitive performance was measured using the elevated plus-maze, novel object recognition, spatial location memory and operant responding on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule. The results indicated that the performance of the rats on the spatial location memory task was markedly different when they received head-only irradiation compared to whole-body exposure. For the operant responding task, irradiation of the whole body resulted in a more severe performance decrement than exposures restricted to the head. The results are discussed in terms of nontargeted effects of HZE particles and the findings suggest that studies that utilize different patterns of exposure may not be directly comparable and that astronauts may be at a greater risk for HZE particle-induced cognitive deficits than previously thought. PMID:24611658

  2. Perchlorate exposure does not modulate temporal variation of whole-body thyroid and androgen hormone content in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Alison M; Dillon, Danielle M; Smayda, Lauren C; von Hippel, Frank A; Cresko, William A; Postlethwait, John H; Buck, C Loren

    2015-08-01

    Previously we showed that exposure of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to the endocrine disruptor perchlorate results in pronounced structural changes in thyroid and gonad, while surprisingly, whole-body thyroid hormone concentrations remain unaffected. To test for hormone titer variations on a finer scale, we evaluated the interactive effects of time (diel and reproductive season) and perchlorate exposure on whole-body contents of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in captive stickleback. Adult stickleback were exposed to 100ppm perchlorate or control water and sampled at 4-h intervals across the 24-hday and at one time-point (1100h) weekly across the reproductive season (May-July). Neither whole-body T3 nor T4 concentration significantly differed across the day in control or perchlorate treated stickleback. Across the reproductive season, whole-body T3 concentration remained stable while T4 significantly increased. However, neither hormone concentration was significantly affected by perchlorate, verifying our previous studies. The concentration of whole-body 11-KT, a major fish androgen, displayed significant diel variation and also steadily declined across the reproductive season in untreated males; perchlorate exposure did not influence the concentration of 11-KT in either diel or reproductive season schedules. Diel and reproductive season variations in 11-KT content in male stickleback are likely related to reproductive physiology and behavior. The observed increase in T4 content across the reproductive season may be reflective of increased energy investment in reproduction near the end of the life cycle. PMID:25733204

  3. Comparative disposition of acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile: quantitative whole-body autoradiographic studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A E; Jacob, S; Ghanayem, B I

    1996-09-01

    Following intravenous administration of an equimolar (0.216 mmol/kg) radioactive dose of acrylonitrile (2-[14C]VCN, 11.5 mg/kg) or methacrylonitrile (2-[14C]MeVCN, 14.5 mg/kg), the tissue distribution, covalent interaction, and elimination were compared (at 5 min to 48 hr) in male Fischer 344 rats using whole-body autoradiography (WBA). Autoradiographs obtained from freeze-dried or acid-extracted sections of animals treated with 2-[14C]VCN showed that radioactivity accumulated in the liver, lung, bone marrow, adipose tissues, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and spleen. In animals treated with 2-[14C]MeVCN, the respiratory tissues contained high levels of 14C at an early period (5 min), while the gastrointestinal mucosa, adrenal cortex, liver, and kidney contained high levels of radioactivity at later periods (8, 24, and 48 hr). Quantitatively, lower uptake and irreversible interactions of 14C were observed in autoradiographs of rats treated with 2-[14C]MeVCN compared with those treated with 2-[14C]VCN. Rats given 2-[14C]VCN eliminated only 27% of administered radioactivity (exhaled air, urine, and feces), whereas rats treated with 2-[14C]MeVCN eliminated, by all routes, 65% of the total radioactive dose. Both WBA and elimination studies indicated that 2-[14C]VCN and/or its metabolites were rapidly distributed, extensively bound, and slowly eliminated from tissues. 2-[14C]MeVCN and/or its metabolites, however, were rapidly distributed and eliminated, mostly via the lung. The study indicated that the substitution of a methyl group on the alpha-carbon of the alpha-beta unsaturated aliphatic nitrile VCN, to form MeVCN, imparted qualitative and quantitative differences in the disposition of these two compounds. PMID:8812221

  4. Intramyocardial capillary blood volume estimated by whole-body CT: validation by micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue; Beighley, Patricia E.; Eaker, Diane R.; Zamir, Mair; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-03-01

    Fast CT has shown that myocardial perfusion (F) is related to myocardial intramuscular blood volume (Bv) as Bv=A*F+B*F 1/2 where A,B are constant coefficients. The goal of this study was to estimate the range of diameters of the vessels that are represented by the A*F term. Pigs were placed in an Electron Beam CT (EBCT) scanner for a perfusion CT scan sequence over 40 seconds after an IV contrast agent injection. Intramyocardial blood volume (Bv) and flow (F) were calculated in a region of the myocardium perfused by the LAD. Coefficients A and B were estimated over the range of F=1-5ml/g/min. After the CT scan, the LAD was injected with Microfil (R) contrast agent following which the myocardium was scanned by micro-CT at 20?m, 4?m and 2.5 ?m cubic voxel resolutions. The Bv of the intramyocardial vessels was calculated for diameter ranges d=0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20?m, etc. EBCT-derived data were presented so that it could be directly compared the micro-CT data. The results indicated that the blood in vessels less than 10?m in lumen diameter occupied 0.27-0.42 of total intravascular blood volume, which is in good agreement with EBCT-based values 0.28-0.48 (R2 =0.96). We conclude that whole-body CT image data obtained during the passage of a bolus of IV contrast agent can provide a measure of the intramyocardial intracapillary blood volume.

  5. Human Ghrelin Mitigates Intestinal Injury and Mortality after Whole Body Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Weng Lang; Jacob, Asha; Aziz, Monowar; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of ionizing radiation has led to the realization of the danger associated with radiation exposure. Although studies in radiation countermeasures were initiated a half century ago, an effective therapy for a radiomitigator has not been identified. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone, and administration of ghrelin is protective in animal models of injuries including radiation combined injury. To test whether ghrelin can be protective in whole body irradiaton (WBI) alone, male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were treated with human ghrelin (20 nmol/rat) daily for 6 days starting at either 24 h or 48 h after 10 Gray (Gy) WBI and survival outcome was examined. The 10 Gy WBI produced a LD70/30 model in SD rats (30% survival in 30 days). The survival rate in rats treated with ghrelin starting at 24 h was significantly improved to 63% and when treatment was initiated at 48 h, the survival remained at 61%. At 7 days post WBI, plasma ghrelin was significantly reduced from the control value. Ghrelin treatment starting at 24 h after WBI daily for 6 days improved histological appearance of the intestine, reduced gut permeability, serum endotoxin levels and bacterial translocation to the liver by 38%, 42% and 61%, respectively at day 7 post WBI. Serum glucose and albumin were restored to near control levels with treatment. Ghrelin treatment also attenuated WBI-induced intestinal apoptosis by 62% as evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-xl was decreased by 38% in the vehicle and restored to 75% of the control with ghrelin treatment. Increased expression of intestinal CD73 and pAkt were observed with ghrelin treatment, indicating protection of the intestinal epithelium after WBI. These results indicate that human ghrelin attenuates intestinal injury and mortality after WBI. Thus, human ghrelin can be developed as a novel mitigator for radiation injury. PMID:25671547

  6. The effects of whole-body compression garments on prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Sear, Joshua A; Hoare, Trent K; Scanlan, Aaron T; Abt, Grant A; Dascombe, Benjamin J

    2010-07-01

    The current study investigated the effects of wearing whole-body compression garments (WBCGs) on prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise (PHIIE) performance. Eight male team-sport athletes ([X +/- SD] 20.6 +/- 1.2 years; 72.9 +/- 5.9 kg; 57.5 +/- 3.7 ml.kg.min) completed a prescribed 45-minute PHIIE protocol on a nonmotorized treadmill in randomly assigned WBCG and control (typical soccer apparel) conditions. Subjects were given verbal and visual cues for movement categories, and they followed set target speeds, except when instructed of a variable run or sprint where the aim was to run as fast as possible. Total distance, velocity-specific distance, and high-intensity self-paced running speeds were taken as performance indicators. Heart rate, VO(2), tissue oxygenation index (TOI), and tissue hemoglobin index (nTHi) were continuously monitored across the protocol. Blood-lactate concentration ([BLa(-)]) was measured every 15 minutes. Magnitude-based inferences suggested that wearing WBCGs provided moderate strength likely improvements in total distance covered (5.42 +/- 0.63 vs. 5.88 +/- 0.64 km; 88:10:2%; and eta = 0.6) and low-intensity activity distance (4.21 +/- 0.51 vs. 4.56 +/- 0.57 km; 83:14:3%; and eta = 0.6) compared with the control. A similar likely increase was also observed in the average TOI of the WBCG condition (53.5 +/- 8.3% vs. 55.8 +/- 7.2%; 87:11:2%; and eta = 0.6). The current data demonstrated that wearing WBCGs likely increased physical performance, possibly because of improvements in muscle oxygenation and associated metabolic benefits. Therefore, wearing WBCGs during PHIIE may benefit the physical performance of team-sport athletes by likely metabolic changes within the muscle between high-intensity efforts. PMID:20555284

  7. Bipedalism in lizards: whole-body modelling reveals a possible spandrel.

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Peter; Van Damme, Raoul; D'Août, Kristiaan; Van Hooydonck, Bieke

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates how simple mechanical models based on morphological, ethological, ecological and phylogenetic data can add to discussions in evolutionary biology. Bipedal locomotion has evolved on numerous occasions in lizards. Traits that appear repeatedly in independent evolutionary lines are often considered adaptive, but the exact advantages of bipedal locomotion in lizards remain debated. Earlier claims that bipedalism would increase maximal running speed or would be energetically advantageous have been questioned. Here, we use 'whole body' mechanical modelling to provide an alternative solution to the riddle. The starting point is the intermittent running style combined with the need for a high manoeuvrability characterizing many small lizard species. Manoeuvrability benefits from a caudal shift of the centre of mass of the body (body-COM), because forces to change the heading and to align the body to this new heading do not conflict with each other. The caudally situated body-COM, however, might result in a lift of the front part of the body when accelerating (intermittent style), thus resulting in bipedal running bouts. Based on a momentum-impulse approach the effect of acceleration is quantified for a mechanical model, a virtual lizard (three segments) based on the morphometrics of Acanthodactylus erythrurus (a small lacertid lizard). Biologically relevant input (dimensions, inertial properties, step cycle information, etc.) results in an important lift of the front part of the body and observable distances passively covered bipedally as a consequence of the acceleration. In this way, no functional explanation of the phenomenon of lizard bipedalism is required and bipedalism can probably be considered non-adaptive in many cases. This does not exclude, however, some species that may have turned this consequence to their benefit. For instance, instantaneous manipulation of the position of the centre of the body-COM allows stable, persisting bipedal running. Once this was achieved, the bipedal spandrel could be exploited further. PMID:14561343

  8. mTOR complex 2 in adipose tissue negatively controls whole-body growth

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, Nadine; Polak, Pazit; Auwerx, Johan; Rüegg, Markus A.; Hall, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a highly conserved protein kinase that controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients and growth factors, is found in 2 structurally and functionally distinct multiprotein complexes termed mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. mTORC2, which consists of rictor, mSIN1, mLST8, and mTOR, is activated by insulin/IGF1 and phosphorylates Ser-473 in the hydrophobic motif of Akt/PKB. Though the role of mTOR in single cells is relatively well characterized, the role of mTOR signaling in specific tissues and how this may contribute to overall body growth is poorly understood. To examine the role of mTORC2 in an individual tissue, we generated adipose-specific rictor knockout mice (rictorad?/?). Rictorad?/? mice are increased in body size due to an increase in size of nonadipose organs, including heart, kidney, spleen, and bone. Furthermore, rictorad?/? mice have a disproportionately enlarged pancreas and are hyperinsulinemic, but glucose tolerant, and display elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGF1 binding protein 3 (IGFBP3). These effects are observed in mice on either a high-fat or a normal diet, but are generally more pronounced in mice on a high-fat diet. Our findings suggest that adipose tissue, in particular mTORC2 in adipose tissue, plays an unexpectedly central role in controlling whole-body growth. PMID:19497867

  9. Temperature Profile and Outcomes of Neonates Undergoing Whole Body Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; McDonald, Scott A.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Tyson, Jon E.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Das, Abhik; Sant’Anna, Guilherme; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Bara, Rebecca; Walsh, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Decreases below target temperature were noted among neonates undergoing cooling in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network Trial of whole body hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVE To examine the temperature profile and impact on outcome among ? 36 week gestation neonates randomized at ? 6 hours of age targeting esophageal temperature of 33.5°C for 72 hours. DESIGN/SETTING/PATIENTS Infants with intermittent temperatures recorded < 32.0°C during induction and maintenance of cooling were compared to all other cooled infants and relationship with outcome at 18 months was evaluated. RESULTS There were no differences in stage of encephalopathy, acidosis, or 10 minute Apgar scores between infants with temperatures < 32.0°C during induction (n=33) or maintenance (n=10) and all other infants who were cooled (n=58); however birth weight was lower and need for blood pressure support higher among infants with temperatures < 32.0 °C compared to all other cooled infants. No increase in acute adverse events were noted among infants with temperatures < 32.0 °C and hours spent < 32°C were not associated with the primary outcome of death or moderate/severe disability or the Bayley II Mental Developmental Index at 18 months. CONCLUSION Term infants with a lower birth weight are at risk for decreasing temperatures < 32.0°C while undergoing body cooling using a servo controlled system. This information suggests extra caution during the application of hypothermia as these lower birth weight infants are at risk for overcooling. Our findings may assist in planning additional trials of lower target temperature for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:21499182

  10. Discrimination among spawning aggregations of lake herring from Lake Superior using whole-body morphometric characters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    The lake herring (Coregonus artedi) was one of the most commercially and ecologically valuable Lake Superior fishes, but declined in the second half of the 20th century as the result of overharvest of putatively discrete stocks. No tools were previously available that described lake herring stock structure and accurately classified lake herring to their spawning stocks. The accuracy of discriminating among spawning aggregations was evaluated using whole-body morphometrics based on a truss network. Lake herring were collected from 11 spawning aggregations in Lake Superior and two inland Wisconsin lakes to evaluate morphometrics as a stock discrimination tool. Discriminant function analysis correctly classified 53% of all fish from all spawning aggregations, and fish from all but one aggregation were classified at greater rates than were possible by chance. Discriminant analysis also correctly classified 66% of fish to nearest neighbor groups, which were groups that accounted for the possibility of mixing among the aggregations. Stepwise discriminant analysis showed that posterior body length and depth measurements were among the best discriminators of spawning aggregations. These findings support other evidence that discrete stocks of lake herring exist in Lake Superior, and fishery managers should consider all but one of the spawning aggregations as discrete stocks. Abundance, annual harvest, total annual mortality rate, and exploitation data should be collected from each stock, and surplus production of each stock should be estimated. Prudent management of stock surplus production and exploitation rates will aid in restoration of stocks and will prevent a repeat of the stock collapses that occurred in the middle of the 20th century, when the species was nearly extirpated from the lake.

  11. Whole body vibration compared to conventional physiotherapy in patients with gonarthrosis: a protocol for a randomized, controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregor Stein; Peter Knoell; Christoph Faymonville; Thomas Kaulhausen; Jan Siewe; Christina Otto; Peer Eysel; Kourosh Zarghooni

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative arthropathy. Load-bearing joints such as knee and hip are more often affected than spine or hands. The prevalence of gonarthrosis is generally higher than that of coxarthrosis. Because no cure for OA exists, the main emphasis of therapy is analgesic treatment through either mobility or medication. Non-pharmacologic treatment is the first step,

  12. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important for controlling postural reflexes and constructing a central percept of body orientation and movement in space.

  13. Measurement of caesium-137 in the human body using a whole body counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elessawi, Elkhadra Abdulmula

    Gamma radiation in the environment is mainly due to naturally occurring radionuclides. However, there is also a contribution from anthropogenic radionuclides such as 137Cs which originate from nuclear fission processes. Since 1986, the accident at the Chernobyl power plant has been a significant source of artificial environmental radioactivity. In order to assess the radiological impact of these radionuclides, it is necessary to measure their activities in samples drawn from the environment and in plants and animals including human populations. The whole body counter (WBC) at the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff makes in vivo measurements of gamma emitting radionuclides using a scanning ring of six large-volume thallium-doped sodium iodide (Nal(Tl)) scintillation detectors. In this work the WBC was upgraded by the addition of two high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The performance and suitability of the detection systems were evaluated by comparing the detection limits for Cs. Sensitivities were measured using sources of known activity in a water filled anthropomorphic phantom and theoretical minimum detectable count-rates were estimated from phantom background pulse height spectra. The theoretical minimum detectable activity was about 24 Bq for the combination of six Nal(Tl) detectors whereas for the individual HPGe detectors it was 64 Bq and 65 Bq, despite the much improved energy resolution Activities of 137Cs in the human body between 1993 and 2007 were estimated from the background Nal(Tl) spectra of 813 patients and compared with recent measurements in 14 volunteers. The body burden of Cs in Cardiff patients increased from an average of about 60 Bq in the early and mid 1990s to a maximum of about 100 Bq in 2000. By 2007 it had decreased to about 40 Bq. This latter value was similar to that of Cardiff residents at the time of the Chernobyl accident and to that of the volunteers measured in 2007 (51 Bq). However, it was less than the mean activity of Cardiff residents in 1988 (130 Bq) indicating an overall decrease over a period of about 20 years. The variation in the in vivo activity is probably due to complex inter-relationships between a number of factors such as the removal of deposited 137Cs into the sea by rainfall, individual dietary choices, the imposition and removal of restrictions on foodstuffs from Chernobyl-affected areas and travel to countries that suffered greater initial fall-out than the UK.

  14. Breath biomarkers of whole-body gamma irradiation in the Göttingen minipig.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Cataneo, Renee N; Chaturvedi, Anirudh; Kaplan, Peter D; Libardoni, Mark; Mundada, Mayur; Patel, Urvish; Thrall, Karla D; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-05-01

    There is widespread interest in the development of tools to estimate radiation exposures. Exhaled breath provides a novel matrix for assessing biomarkers that could be correlated with exposures. The use of exhaled breath for estimating radiation exposure is warranted, as studies have shown that external exposure to ionizing radiation causes oxidative stress that accelerates lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, liberating alkanes and alkane metabolites that are excreted in the breath as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). As a proof of principle study, small groups (n = 4) of Göttingen minipigs were whole-body irradiated with gamma rays delivered by a 60Co source at absorbed doses of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 2, and 4 Gy. Additional groups (n = 4) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), with and without concurrent 60Co exposure, at an absorbed dose of 1 Gy. Breath and background air VOC samples were collected on days -3, -2, -1, 0 pre-irradiation, then at 0.25, 24, 48, 72, and 168 h post-irradiation. VOCs were analyzed by automated thermal desorption with two-dimensional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATD GCxGC TOF MS). The results show significant changes in 58 breath VOCs post-irradiation, mainly consisting of methylated and other derivatives of alkanes, alkenes, and benzene. Using a multivariate combination of these VOCs, a radiation response function was constructed, which was significantly elevated at 15 min post irradiation and remained elevated throughout the study (to 168 h post irradiation). As a binary test of radiation absorbed doses ? 0.25 Gy, the radiation response function distinguished irradiated animals from shams (0 Gy) with 83-84% accuracy. A randomly derived radiation response function was robust: When half of the biomarkers were removed, accuracy was 75%. An optimally derived function with two biomarkers was 82% accurate. As a binary test of radiation absorbed doses ? 0.5 Gy, the radiation response function identified irradiated animals with an accuracy of 87% at 15 min post irradiation and 75.5% at 168 h post irradiation. Treatment with LPS and G-CSF did not affect the radiation response function. This proof-of-principle study supports the hypothesis that breath VOCs may be used for estimating radiation exposures. Further studies will be required to validate the sensitivity and specificity of these potential biomarkers. PMID:25811151

  15. Thermal and hemodynamic response to whole-body cryostimulation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Pawel; Klawe, Jacek J; Pawlak, Joanna; Tafil-Klawe, Malgorzata; Newton, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is an increasing applied cryotherapeutic method, that involves application of a cryotherapeutic factor to stimulate the body by the means of intense hypothermia of virtually the body's entire area. This method is still not well recognized in Western Europe. However in recent years it is becoming increasingly popular in sports medicine and also in clinical application. Cryotherapeutic agents used in WBC are considered to be a strong stress stimulus which is associated with a variety of changes in functional parameters, particularly of the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous systems. However, such strong influence upon the entire body could be associated with the risk of unexpected reactions which might be dangerous for homeostasis. The present study evaluated the complex hemodynamic physiological reactions in response to WBC exposure in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male volunteers participated. Each subject was exposed to WBC (-120°C) for 3-min. None of the participants had been exposed to such conditions previously. The research was conducted with modern and reliable measurements techniques, which assessed complex hemodynamic reactions and skin temperature changes non-invasively. All measurements were performed four times (before WBC, after WBC, WBC+3h and WBC+6h) with a Task Force Monitor (TFM - CNSystems, Medizintechnik, Gratz, Austria). Body superficial temperature was measured by infrared thermographic techniques - infra-red camera Flir P640 (Flir Systems Inc., Sweden). Our results show a significant decrease in heart rate, cardiac output, and increase in stroke volume, total peripheral resistance and baroreceptors reflex sensitivity. These changes were observed just after WBC exposure. At stages WBC+3h and WBC+6h there was observed a significant drop in baroreceptors reflex sensitivity due to increased thermogenesis. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that WBC strongly stimulates the baroreceptor cardiac reflex in response to body fluid changes which sequentially modulate HR and BP control in supine and resting healthy subjects. The study was performed on randomized and homogenic group of young healthy subjects. Our findings are important for WBC safety determination in research and clinical studies. PMID:23535554

  16. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    SciTech Connect

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as effective as promptly administered Ca-EDTA.

  17. Ustur whole body case 0269: demonstrating effectiveness of i.v. CA-DTPA for Pu.

    PubMed

    James, A C; Sasser, L B; Stuit, D B; Glover, S E; Carbaugh, E H

    2007-01-01

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol 'mist'. Chelation treatment with intravenously (i.v.) Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2.5 y with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation) and continuing for 37 y. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 y after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive data set has been applied to derive 'chelation-enhanced' transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially, all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modelling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as effective as promptly administered Ca-EDTA. PMID:18227077

  18. Solitary focus in the liver in a thyroid cancer patient after a whole body scan with 131 iodine.

    PubMed

    Pena Pardo, F J; Crespo de la Jara, A; Fernández Morejón, F J; Sureda González, M; Forteza Vila, J; Brugarolas Masllorens, A

    2007-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed with follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma underwent a total thyroidectomy followed four weeks later by an ablative dose of 3.7 GBq of 131I. A whole body scan 5 days after ablation showed an intense uptake within the thyroid bed and a focal uptake located in the right lung base or liver dome. Computed tomography examination revealed a hypodense hepatic node in segment VII resembling a liver metastasis. Histological examination after ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration characterized the lesion as a liver abscess. The abscess regressed after antibiotic therapy. Liver metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma are uncommon. On the other hand, false positive findings of 131I whole body scans have been described. A focal hepatic uptake might represent a metastasis (rare in papillary carcinomas) or be related to other causes (cysts, inflammation or infection, non-thyroidal neoplasms, etc.). PMID:17910838

  19. Self-protective whole body motion for humanoid robots based on synergy of global reaction and local reflex.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Saegusa, Ryo; Ikemoto, Shuhei; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Metta, Giorgio

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a self-protective whole body motor controller to enable life-long learning of humanoid robots. In order to reduce the damages on robots caused by physical interaction such as obstacle collision, we introduce self-protective behaviors based on the adaptive coordination of full-body global reactions and local limb reflexes. Global reactions aim at adaptive whole-body movements to prepare for harmful situations. The system incrementally learns a more effective association of the states and global reactions. Local reflexes based on a force-torque sensing function to reduce the impact load on the limbs independently of high-level motor intention. We examined the proposed method with a robot simulator in various conditions. We then applied the systems on a real humanoid robot. PMID:22377658

  20. Whole-body (99m)Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT to detect occult tumor inducing paraneoplastic osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Napoleão Ramalho; Calich, Ana Luisa; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Ichiki, Wilson Andre; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Amstalden, Elaine Maria Ingrid; de Sa Etchebehere, Elba Cristina

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with progressive myalgia, bone pain, fatigue, insufficiency hip fractures, high urine phosphate, and low serum phosphate and vitamin D levels. These findings were suggestive of oncogenic osteomalacia. A whole-body Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT showed uptake on a sclerotic intramedullary lesion in the left medial tibia plateau. MRI depicted a solid lesion. The lesion was surgically removed; the patient became asymptomatic, and follow-up laboratory results normalized. Histopathologic examination revealed a vascular hemangiopericytoma-like tumor, positive for somatostatin receptor (SSR-2). Whole-body Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT may detect occult oncogenic osteomalacia tumors. PMID:24458181

  1. Study report on interfacing major physiological subsystem models: An approach for developing a whole-body algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjerrell, D. G.; Grounds, D. J.; Leonard, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Using a whole body algorithm simulation model, a wide variety and large number of stresses as well as different stress levels were simulated including environmental disturbances, metabolic changes, and special experimental situations. Simulation of short term stresses resulted in simultaneous and integrated responses from the cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory subsystems and the accuracy of a large number of responding variables was verified. The capability of simulating significantly longer responses was demonstrated by validating a four week bed rest study. In this case, the long term subsystem model was found to reproduce many experimentally observed changes in circulatory dynamics, body fluid-electrolyte regulation, and renal function. The value of systems analysis and the selected design approach for developing a whole body algorithm was demonstrated.

  2. Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS): features and potential applications in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Taro; Ochiai, Reiji; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.; Luijten, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) provides functional information and can be used for the detection and characterization of pathologic processes, including malignant tumors. The recently introduced concept of “diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression” (DWIBS) now allows acquisition of volumetric diffusion-weighted images of the entire body. This new concept has unique features different from conventional DWI and may play an important role in whole-body oncological imaging. This review describes and illustrates the basics of DWI, the features of DWIBS, and its potential applications in oncology. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00330-008-0968-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18446344

  3. False-positive uptake on radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy: physiologic and pathologic variants unrelated to thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), which takes advantage of the high avidity of radioiodine in the functioning thyroid tissues, has been used for detection of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radioiodine is a sensitive marker for detection of thyroid cancer; however, radioiodine uptake is not specific for thyroid tissue. It can also be seen in healthy tissue, including thymus, breast, liver, and gastrointestinal tract, or in benign diseases, such as cysts and inflammation, or in a variety of benign and malignant non-thyroidal tumors, which could be mistaken for thyroid cancer. In order to accurately interpret radioiodine scintigraphy results, one must be familiar with the normal physiologic distribution of the tracer and frequently encountered physiologic and pathologic variants of radioiodine uptake. This article will provide a systematic overview of potential false-positive uptake of radioiodine in the whole body and illustrate how such unexpected findings can be appropriately evaluated. PMID:23133823

  4. Establishment and testing of a whole body counter for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center 

    E-print Network

    Baca, Bernadette Doris

    1997-01-01

    deviation using the whole body counter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comparison between HPGe and NaI performance testing activities. . 39 Comparison of the calculated average MDAs and associated nuclide ALI... with similar energies, the different energy events of the radiation within the crystal are seen as the same energy because of the poor resolution (Knoll 19g9). Deciphering a majority of the identifying or key gamma rays for individual nuclides can be a...

  5. Whole-body nitrogen and tyrosine metabolism in surgical patients receiving branched-chain amino acid solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Desai; B. R. Bistrian; L. L. Moldawer; G. L. Blackburn

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity received preoperatively a standard crystalline amino acid solution containing 15.6% branched-chain amino acids. During the first five postoperative days, the patients were randomized to receive one of three amino acid solutions of different branched-chain amino acid content. Whole-body amino acid appearance and oxidation were estimated using a continuous intravenous infusion of

  6. Coordination of Wing and Whole-Body Development at Developmental Milestones Ensures Robustness against Environmental and Physiological Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marisa M.; Shingleton, Alexander W.; Mirth, Christen K.

    2014-01-01

    Development produces correctly patterned tissues under a wide range of conditions that alter the rate of development in the whole body. We propose two hypotheses through which tissue patterning could be coordinated with whole-body development to generate this robustness. Our first hypothesis states that tissue patterning is tightly coordinated with whole-body development over time. The second hypothesis is that tissue patterning aligns at developmental milestones. To distinguish between our two hypotheses, we developed a staging scheme for the wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae using the expression of canonical patterning genes, linking our scheme to three whole-body developmental events: moulting, larval wandering and pupariation. We used our scheme to explore how the progression of pattern changes when developmental time is altered either by changing temperature or by altering the timing of hormone synthesis that drives developmental progression. We found the expression pattern in the wing disc always aligned at moulting and pupariation, indicating that these key developmental events represent milestones. Between these milestones, the progression of pattern showed greater variability in response to changes in temperature and alterations in physiology. Furthermore, our data showed that discs from wandering larvae showed greater variability in patterning stage. Thus for wing disc patterning, wandering does not appear to be a developmental milestone. Our findings reveal that tissue patterning remains robust against environmental and physiological perturbations by aligning at developmental milestones. Furthermore, our work provides an important glimpse into how the development of individual tissues is coordinated with the body as a whole. PMID:24945255

  7. Relationships between urinary inositol excretions and whole-body glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle insulin receptor phosphorylation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    April J. Stull; John P. Thyfault; Mark D. Haub; Richard E. Ostlund; Wayne W. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of urinary d-chiro-inositol and myo-inositol excretions to indices of whole-body glucose tolerance and total content and tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (activation) in skeletal muscle of older nondiabetic subjects. Fifteen adults (age, 65 ± 8 years; body mass index, 27.9 ± 3.3 kg\\/m2 [mean ± SD]) completed duplicate assessments of oral (75-g oral glucose

  8. Cutaneous vasoconstriction during whole-body and local cooling in grafted skin five to nine months postsurgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott L; Shibasaki, Manabu; Low, David A; Cui, Jian; Keller, David M; Purdue, Gary F; Hunt, John L; Arnoldo, Brett D; Kowalske, Karen J; Crandall, Craig G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that skin grafting (5-9 months after surgery) impairs sympathetically mediated cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness. Skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was assessed in grafted skin and adjacent healthy control skin in fourteen subjects (seven male, seven female) during indirect whole-body cooling (ie, cooling the entire body, except the area where skin blood flow was assessed), as well as local cooling (ie, only cooling the area where skin blood flow was assessed). Whole-body cooling was performed by perfusing 5 degrees C water through a water perfusion suit for 3 minutes. Local cooling was performed on a separate visit using a custom Peltier cooling device, which decreased local skin temperature from 39 degrees C to 19 in 5 degrees C decrements in 15-minute stages. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure. Indirect whole-body cooling decreased CVC from baseline (DeltaCVC) similarly (P = 0.17) between grafted skin (DeltaCVC = -0.23 +/- 0.04 au/mm Hg) and adjacent healthy skin (DeltaCVC = -0.16 +/- 0.02 au/mm Hg). Likewise, decreasing local skin temperature from 39 to 19 degrees C resulted in similar decreases (P = .82) in CVC between grafted skin (DeltaCVC = -1.11 +/- 0.18 au/mm Hg) and adjacent healthy skin (DeltaCVC = -1.06 +/- 0.18 au/mm Hg). Appropriate cutaneous vasoconstriction in grafted skin to both indirect whole-body and local cooling indicates re-innervation of the cutaneous vasoconstrictor system at the graft site. These data suggest that persons with significant skin grafting may have a normal capacity to regulate body temperature during cold exposure by cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:18182895

  9. Whole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose for staging of lymphoma: effectiveness and comparison with computed tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. M. Stumpe; M. Urbinelli; H. C. Steinert; C. Glanzmann; A. Buck; G. K. von Schulthess

    1998-01-01

    .   The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole-body positron emission tomography (WB-PET) as a staging modality in Hodgkin’s\\u000a disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to compare it with computed tomography (CT) in a retrospective study. Seventy-one\\u000a WB-PET studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 49 CT examinations were performed in 19 women and 31 men. Transaxial images\\u000a were acquired

  10. Absorption of intradermally injected horse gamma globulin, a foreign protein, in rabbits following whole body gamma irradiation 

    E-print Network

    Pryor, William Harold

    1965-01-01

    with slight penetration to the under- lying tissues. The skin dose is likewise high with cobalt irradiation, but due to the penetrating ability of the gamma rays the internal struc- tures also receive a large dose. 2) Additionally, past studies of re...ABSORPTION OF INTRADERMALLY INJECTED HORSE GAMMA GLOBULIN, A FOREIGN PROTEIN, IN RABBITS FOLLOWING WHOLE BODY GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis By WILLIAM HAROLD PRYOR, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial...

  11. Whole-body 18 FDG positron emission tomography in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Th. Bury; A. Dowlati; P. Paulus; J. L. Corhay; R. Hustinx; B. Ghaye; M. Radermecker; P. Rigo

    1997-01-01

    Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with lung cancer are found to have nonresectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within yr of surgery. We performed a prospective study in 109 patients to compare the accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 deoxyglucose (18FDG) and conventional imaging (CI) methods for the staging of non-small cell lung

  12. Variations in recovery and readaptation to load bearing conditions after space flight and whole body suspension in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Stepke, B.

    1991-01-01

    Result are presented on studies of the effects of space flight and simulated microgravity on the cardiovascular and electrolyte characteristics, the adrenal gland weight, and hormonal responses of rats flown aboard Cosmos-605 and -782 or exposed to whole-body tail suspension. Results indicate an age-independent decrease in circulating antinatriuretic factor (ANF) in suspended rats, indicating that ANF may not significantly contribute to the sustained elevated bariuresis and diuresis observed in chronic head-down-suspended rats.

  13. Effect of human skin grafts on whole-body heat loss during exercise heat stress: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ganio, Matthew S; Gagnon, Daniel; Stapleton, Jill; Crandall, Craig G; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    When exposed to heat stress, increases in cutaneous blood flow and sweating in well-healed grafted skin are severely attenuated, which could impair whole-body heat loss if skin grafts cover a large portion of total body surface area (TBSA). It is unknown to what extent whole-body heat loss is impaired when skin grafts cover a significant (eg, >50%) proportion of TBSA. The authors examined whole-body heat exchange during and after 60 min of cycling exercise in the heat (35°C; 25% relative humidity), at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (~400 W) in a woman (age, 36 years; mass, 78.2 kg) with well-healed (17+ years) skin grafts covering 75% of TBSA. Her responses were compared with two noninjured control subjects. Whole-body evaporative and dry heat exchange were measured by direct calorimetry. While exercising in the same ambient conditions and at the same rate of heat production, relative evaporative heat loss of nongrafted skin in the grafted subject (ie, evaporative heat loss per m) was nearly twice that of the control subjects. However, total rate of evaporative heat loss reached only 59% of the amount required for heat balance in the skin-grafted subject compared with 92 ± 3% in controls. Thus, the increase in core temperature was 2-fold greater for the grafted (1.22°C) vs control (0.61 ± 0.19°C) individuals. This case study demonstrates that a large area of grafted skin greatly diminishes maximum evaporative heat loss during exercise in the heat, making a compensable environment for control subjects uncompensable for skin-grafted individuals. PMID:23202874

  14. Galvanic stimulation of the vestibular periphery in guinea pigs during passive whole body rotation and self-generated head movement

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K.; Dye, J.; King, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Irregular vestibular afferents exhibit significant phase leads with respect to angular velocity of the head in space. This characteristic and their connectivity with vestibulospinal neurons suggest a functionally important role for these afferents in producing the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR). A goal of these experiments was to test this hypothesis with the use of weak galvanic stimulation of the vestibular periphery (GVS) to selectively activate or suppress irregular afferents during passive whole body rotation of guinea pigs that could freely move their heads. Both inhibitory and excitatory GVS had significant effects on compensatory head movements during sinusoidal and transient whole body rotations. Unexpectedly, GVS also strongly affected the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during passive whole body rotation. The effect of GVS on the VOR was comparable in light and darkness and whether the head was restrained or unrestrained. Significantly, there was no effect of GVS on compensatory eye and head movements during volitional head motion, a confirmation of our previous study that demonstrated the extravestibular nature of anticipatory eye movements that compensate for voluntary head movements. PMID:22262827

  15. Comparison of two anthropomorphic phantoms as a calibration tool for whole-body counter using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Manohari, M; Mathiyarasu, R; Rajagopal, V; Venkatraman, B

    2015-04-01

    The whole-body counting facility at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research uses an in-house built Masonite cut-sheet phantom for the calibration of whole-body monitors. Recently, an Indian Adult BOMAB phantom was procured as an additional utility to augment the facility. The present study is to generate full-energy peak efficiencies (FEPE) of the shielded chair (SC) whole-body counting system using the new BOMAB phantom through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The values are compared with that of the Masonite phantom. First, the SC was modelled along with the Masonite phantom to estimate the FEPE values and Compton scattering factors (CSFs) for different energies. The simulated values were validated against the measurements using the Masonite cut-sheet phantom (Masonite phantom). The validated SC model was used along with the Indian adult BOMAB phantom to estimate the FEPEs and the CSFs. The simulated BOMAB phantom values were compared with the simulated Masonite phantom values. The maximum deviation for both the FEPEs and CSFs was ±10 % validating the use of the Masonite phantom as a calibration tool representing an Indian adult. PMID:25406363

  16. Efficient inverse isoparametric mapping algorithm for whole-body computed tomography registration using deformations predicted by nonlinear finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

    2014-08-01

    Biomechanical modeling methods can be used to predict deformations for medical image registration and particularly, they are very effective for whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration because differences between the source and target images caused by complex articulated motions and soft tissues deformations are very large. The biomechanics-based image registration method needs to deform the source images using the deformation field predicted by finite element models (FEMs). In practice, the global and local coordinate systems are used in finite element analysis. This involves the transformation of coordinates from the global coordinate system to the local coordinate system when calculating the global coordinates of image voxels for warping images. In this paper, we present an efficient numerical inverse isoparametric mapping algorithm to calculate the local coordinates of arbitrary points within the eight-noded hexahedral finite element. Verification of the algorithm for a nonparallelepiped hexahedral element confirms its accuracy, fast convergence, and efficiency. The algorithm's application in warping of the whole-body CT using the deformation field predicted by means of a biomechanical FEM confirms its reliability in the context of whole-body CT registration. PMID:24828796

  17. Whole-body-averaged SAR from 50 MHz to 4 GHz in the University of Florida child voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter; Bolch, Wesley

    2007-11-01

    The University of Florida (UF) Series B paediatric phantoms were developed for medical and radiation protection photon dosimetry. The series includes a 9 month male, a 4 year female, an 8 year female, an 11 year male and a 14 year male. In this paper they have been adapted to calculate the whole-body-averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in children for plane wave exposure from 50 MHz to 4 GHz. The consideration of children is important in the application of the ICNIRP public exposure reference levels above ~1 GHz. The uniformly scaled models of NORMAN and NAOMI suggest that the ICNIRP reference level does not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body-averaged SAR restriction for 5 year and 1 year old models. Comparison is made with the previous linearly scaled versions of NORMAN and NAOMI for calculations at 2 mm resolution. Further FDTD calculations were performed at resolutions of 1 and 0.7 mm above 900 MHz to elucidate the effects of grid resolution on SAR. A comparison is made between the calculated external electric fields required to produce the basic restriction on the whole-body-averaged SAR and the ICNIRP reference levels for public exposure.

  18. Identification of Possible Candidate Biomarkers for Local or Whole Body Radiation Exposure in C57BL/6 Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Minyoung [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo [Laboratory of Radiation Cytogenetics and Epidemiology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeoung, Dooil [Division of Life Sciences, Kangwon National University College of Natural Sciences, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sangwoo [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Specific genes expressed as a result of whole body exposure to {gamma}-radiation have been previously identified. In this study, we examined the genes further as possible biomarkers for the blood lymphocytes of C57BL/6 mice after whole body or local irradiation of the thorax, abdomen, and left subphrenic area. Methods and Materials: We performed reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of genes encoding platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb, protein tyrosine kinase, sialyltransferase, and Cu/ZnSOD in blood lymphocytes, lung tissue, spleen, and intestines. The protein expression in blood lymphocytes was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Results: The expression of platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb, protein tyrosine kinase, sialyltransferase, and Cu/ZnSOD was significantly greater after 3 days as a result of 1 Gy of whole body irradiation. Moreover, local irradiation to the thorax, abdomen, or left subphrenic area, which are frequently exposed to therapeutic radiation doses, showed a tendency toward radiation-induced increased expression of these genes in both the blood and the locally irradiated organs. Western blot analysis also corroborated these results. Conclusion: Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb, protein tyrosine kinase, sialyltransferase, and Cu/ZnSOD might be candidates for biomarkers of radiation exposure. However, additional experiments are required to reveal the relationship between the expression levels and the prognostic effects after irradiation.

  19. Ground-borne vibration due to static and dynamic axle loads of InterCity and high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2009-01-01

    In predictions of railway-induced vibrations, a distinction is generally made between the quasi-static and dynamic excitation. The quasi-static excitation is related to the static component of the axle loads. The dynamic excitation is due to dynamic train-track interaction, which is generated by a large number of excitation mechanisms, such as the spatial variation of the support stiffness and the wheel and track unevenness. In the present paper, the quasi-static excitation and the dynamic excitation due to random track unevenness are evaluated by means of numerical predictions. A solution strategy is presented that allows for the evaluation of the second-order statistics of the response due to dynamic excitation based on the power spectral density function of the track unevenness. Due to the motion of the train, the second-order statistics of the response at a fixed point in the free field are non-stationary and an appropriate solution procedure is required. The quasi-static and dynamic contribution to the track and free-field response are analysed for the case of InterCity and high-speed trains running at a subcritical train speed. It is shown how the train speed affects the quasi-static and dynamic contribution. Finally, results of numerical predictions for different train speeds are compared with field measurements that have been performed at a site along the high-speed line L2 Brussels-Köln within the frame of homologation tests.

  20. Technical note: Criterion validity of whole body surface area equations: a comparison using 3D laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Daniell, Nathan; Olds, Timothy; Tomkinson, Grant

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of whole body surface area (WBSA) have important applications in numerous fields including biological anthropology, clinical medicine, biomechanics, and sports science. Currently, WBSA is most often estimated using predictive equations due to the complex and time consuming methods required for direct measurement. The main aim of this study was to identify whether there were significant and meaningful differences between WBSA measurements taken using a whole body three-dimensional (3D) scanner (criterion measure) and the estimates derived from each WBSA equation identified from a systematic review. The study also aimed to determine whether differences varied according to body mass index (BMI), sex, or athletic status. Fifteen WBSA equations were compared with direct measurements taken on 1,714 young adult subjects, aged 18-30 years, using the Vitus Smart 3D whole body scanner, including 1,452 subjects (753 males, 699 females) from the general Australian population and 262 rowers (148 males, 114 females). Mixed-design analysis of variances determined significant differences and accuracy was quantified using Bland-Altman analysis and effect sizes. Thirteen of the 15 equations overestimated WBSA. With a few exceptions, equations were accurate with a low-systematic error (bias ?2%) and low-random error (standard deviation of the differences 1.5-3.0%). However, BMI did have a substantial impact with the accuracy of some WBSA equations varying between the four BMI categories. The Shuter and Aslani: Eur J Appl Physiol 82 (2000) 250-254 equation was identified as the most accurate equation and should be used for Western populations 18-30 years of age. Care must be taken when deciding which equation to use when estimating WBSA. PMID:22460277

  1. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  2. The influence of single whole body cryostimulation treatment on the dynamics and the level of maximal anaerobic power

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej T. Klimek; Anna Lubkowska; Zbigniew Szygu?a; Barbara Fr?czek; Monika Chudecka

    2011-01-01

    Objectives  The objective of this work was to determine the dynamics of maximal anaerobic power (MAP) of the lower limbs, following a\\u000a single whole body cryostimulation treatment (WBC), in relation to the temperature of thigh muscles.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  The subjects included 15 men and 15 women with an average age (±SD) of 21.6±1.2 years. To evaluate the level of anaerobic\\u000a power,

  3. Organohalogen and metabolically-derived contaminants and associations with whole body constituents in Norwegian Arctic glaucous gulls.

    PubMed

    Verreault, J; Shahmiri, S; Gabrielsen, G W; Letcher, R J

    2007-08-01

    Comprehensive surveys of organohalogen contaminants have been conducted in various tissues and blood of glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus), a top scavenger-predator species in Svalbard in the Norwegian Arctic. However, the physico-chemical properties of organohalogens (e.g., type and degree of halogenation and the presence or absence of additional phenyl group substituents) that may influence toxicokinetics, and subsequently tissue-specific accumulation, have yet to be studied in this species. We investigated the concentrations, total body burdens, and compositional patterns of legacy chlorinated compounds (PCBs and chlordanes (CHLs)), metabolically-derived PCBs (methylsulfonyl (MeSO(2))- and OH-PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), total-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)), and PBDE metabolites and/or naturally-occurring compounds with similar structures (MeO- and OH-PBDEs) in liver, blood and whole body homogenate samples of adult glaucous gulls (n=19) from Svalbard. Further, we examined the distribution of these organohalogens and metabolites in relation to whole body composition of glaucous gulls, i.e., the total water, protein, lipid and mineral contents in whole homogenate carcasses. The total body burden of organohalogens and metabolites in glaucous gulls ranged between 3.3 and 33.0 mg. Compound class distribution showed that the relative proportions of sum (Sigma) OH-PCB and SigmaOH-PBDE to the total organohalogen concentrations were significantly highest in blood. Conversely, the SigmaCHL and SigmaPCB showed generally higher proportions in the lipid-rich liver as well as in whole body homogenates. No significant difference in the compositional patterns of individual congeners/compounds was found among tissues/blood, with the exception of the classes comprised of less polar brominated compounds (PBDEs, PBBs and total-(alpha)-HBCD). Total proteins isolated from the whole body homogenates of glaucous gulls were significantly associated to the proportions of SigmaOH-PCB and SigmaPBDE. A non-significant positive association was found between total lipids and the SigmaPCB proportions. The present study suggests that both protein association and lipid solubility are important concomitant factors to be considered in the toxicokinetics and fate of contaminants as a function of chemical structure and properties, e.g., chlorination, bromination and the presence of other phenyl substituents such as OH group. An enhanced, selective retention of these organohalogen classes in given tissues/body compartments may thus lead to site-specific toxicological actions and adverse effects in the highly-contaminated Svalbard glaucous gulls. PMID:17467797

  4. Effects of whole body (56)Fe radiation on contextual freezing and Arc-positive cells in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Rosi, Susanna; Sharma, Sourabh; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J; Fike, John R

    2013-06-01

    The space radiation environment contains high-energy charged particles such as (56)Fe, which could pose a significant hazard to hippocampal function in astronauts during and after the mission(s). The mechanisms underlying impairments in cognition are not clear but might involve alterations in the percentage of neurons in the dentate gyrus expressing the plasticity-related immediate early gene Arc. Previously, we showed effects of cranial (56)Fe irradiation on hippocampus-dependent contextual freezing and on the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed, but not free, blade. Because it is unclear whether whole body (56)Fe irradiation causes similar effects on these markers of hippocampal function, in the present study we quantified the effects of whole body (56)Fe irradiation (600MeV, 0.5 or 1Gy) on hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent cognitive performance and determined whether these effects were associated with changes in Arc expression in the enclosed and free blades of the dentate gyrus. Whole body (56)Fe irradiation impacted contextual but not cued fear freezing and the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In mice tested for contextual freezing, there was a correlation between Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In addition, in mice irradiated with 0.5Gy, contextual freezing in the absence of aversive stimuli correlated with the percentage of Arc-positive cells in the enclosed blade. In mice tested for cued freezing, there was no correlation between Arc-positive cells in the enclosed and free blades. In contrast, cued freezing in the presence or absence of aversive stimuli correlated with Arc-positive cells in the free blade. In addition, in mice irradiated with 1Gy cued freezing in the absence of aversive stimuli correlated with the percentage of Arc-positive neurons in the free blade. These data indicate that while whole body (56)Fe radiation affects contextual freezing and Arc-positive cells in the dentate gyrus, the enclosed blade might be more important for contextual freezing while the free blade might be more important for cued freezing. PMID:23454674

  5. The utility of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for delineating regions of interest in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackledge, M. D.; Koh, D. M.; Collins, D. J.; Chua, S.; Leach, M. O.

    2013-02-01

    In this technological report, we investigate the utility of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI) as a prior for defining regions of interest (ROI) in PET data. Due to its comparatively high resolution and excellent lesion-to-background ratio, semi-automatic segmentation is possible in WBDWI. Following rigid registration of PET to WBDWI, a simple, fast and automatic algorithm can be used to define ROIs in PET data. This approach is applied to a test cohort of patients diagnosed with lymphoma who underwent both 18FDG-PET/CT and WBDWI studies to demonstrate its potential application.

  6. Multifocal hot spots demonstrated by whole-body 131I scintigraphy and SPECT/CT after transaxillary endoscopic thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Seong; Kim, Seok Hwi; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Byung-Tae; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-03-01

    A 35-year-old woman received open thyroidectomy for a thyroid nodule that was confirmed as papillary carcinoma. Whole-body 131I scintigraphy during thyroid ablation demonstrated high uptake in the thyroid bed and multiple focal hot spots in the thorax. SPECT/CT localized the hot spots to the right chest wall and axilla, as well as to the left chest wall. The surgeon recognized these sites to concur with the transaxillary tract used during endoscopic thyroidectomy for nodular hyperplasia 8 years previously. Thus, this case illustrates how thyroidal tissue fragments seeded during endoscopic thyroidectomy can be mistaken for thyroid cancer metastasis on 131I scintigraphy. PMID:25642914

  7. GPR measurements and estimation for road subgrade damage caused by neighboring train vibration load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Lu, Gang; Ge, Shuangcheng

    2015-04-01

    Generally, road can be simplified as a three-layer structure, including subgrade, subbase and pavement. Subgrade is the native material underneath a constructed road. It is commonly compacted before the road construction, and sometimes stabilized by the addition of asphalt, lime or other modifiers. As the mainly supporting structure, subgrade damage would lead in pavement settlement, displacement and crack. Assessment and monitoring of the subgrade condition currently involves trial pitting and subgrade sampling. However there is a practical limit on spatial density at which trail pits and cores can be taken. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been widely used to characterize highway pavement profiling, concrete structure inspection and railroad track ballast estimation. GPR can improve the economics of road maintenance. Long-term train vibration load might seriously influence the stability of the subgrade of neighboring road. Pavement settlement and obvious cracks have been found at a municipal road cross-under a railway with culvert box method. GPR test was conducted to estimate the subgrade and soil within 2.0 m depth for the further road maintenance. Two survey lines were designed in each lane, and total 12 GPR sections have been implemented. Considering both the penetrating range and the resolution, a antenna with a 500 MHz central frequency was chosen for on-site GPR data collection. For data acquisition, we used the default operating environment and scanning parameters for the RAMAC system: 60kHz transmission rate, 50 ns time window, 1024 samples per scan and 0.1 m step-size. Continuous operation was used; the antenna was placed on the road surface and slowly moved along the road. The strong surrounding disturbance related to railroad and attachments, might decrease the reliability of interpretation results. Some routine process methods (including the background removing, filtering) have been applied to suppress the background noise. Additionally, attribute analysis is an important tool that focused on the multi-properties of the signal. Here, cross-correlation attribute analysis has been applied for GPR profile interpretation. It compares one trace with surrounding traces to determine degrees of similar, and improves the difference between the reflected wave from detection target and its surrounding mediums, which makes it easy to detect the anomaly that couldn't be found in original GPR time profile. It's possible to identify sections of subgrade in good or worse condition, which may require specific maintenance or trail pitting investigation.

  8. An anatomically realistic voxel model of the pregnant woman and numerical dosimetry for a whole-body exposure to RF electromagnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Nagaoka; T. Togashi; K. Saito; M. Takahashi; K. Ito; T. Ueda; H. Osada; H. Ito; S. Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    The numerical dosimetry of pregnant women is one of the most important issues in electromagnetic-field safety. We have recently developed a whole-body numerical female model of an adult Japanese (non-pregnant) average figure. Therefore, a new fetus model including inherent tissues of pregnant women was constructed based on abdominal MRI data of a 7-month pregnant woman. A whole-body pregnant woman model

  9. Human whole-body reaching in normal gravity and microgravity reveals a strong temporal coordination between postural and focal task components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerome Patron; Paul Stapley; Thierry Pozzo

    2005-01-01

    Previous experiments by our group in normal gravity (1 G) have revealed spatial relationships between postural and focal components of whole-body reaching and pointing movements. We suggested that these relationships could be explained partly through the use of gravity to displace the CoM and attain the object or target position. In this study we compared human whole-body reaching in 1 G and

  10. Diagnostic and therapeutic impact of whole body positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose in children with chronic granulomatous disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Güngör; I Engel-Bicik; G Eich; U V Willi; D Nadal; J P Hossle; R A Seger; H C Steinert

    2001-01-01

    AIMSTo compare whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) with computed tomography (CT) in detecting active infective foci in children with chronic granulomatous disease.METHODSWe performed 22 whole body FDG PET studies in seven children with X linked (n = 6) or autosomal recessive (n = 1) CGD. All had clinical signs of infection and\\/or were evaluated prior to

  11. Vibration on board and health effects.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anker; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2014-01-01

    There is only limited knowledge of the exposure to vibrations of ships' crews and their risk of vibration-induced health effects. Exposure to hand-arm vibrations from the use of vibrating tools at sea does not differ from that in the land-based trades. However, in contrast to most other work places, seafarers are also exposed to vibrations to the feet when standing on vibrating surfaces on board. Anecdotal reports have related the development of "white feet" to local exposure to vibration, e.g. in mining, but this connection has not been investigated in the maritime setting. As known from studies of the health consequences of whole body vibrations in land-transportation, such exposure at sea may affect ships' passengers and crews. While the relation of back disorders to high levels of whole body vibration has been demonstrated among e.g. tractor drivers, there are no reported epidemiological evidence for such relation among seafarers except for fishermen, who, however, are also exposed to additional recognised physical risk factors at work. The assessment and reduction of vibrations by naval architects relates to technical implications of this impact for the ships' construction, but has limited value for the estimation of health risks because they express the vibration intensity differently that it is done in a medical context. PMID:25231326

  12. Purification, stereoisomeric analysis and quantification of sex pheromone precursors in female whole body extracts from pine sawfly species.

    PubMed

    Bång, Joakim; Hedenström, Erik; Sjödin, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    A GC-MS method to analyze the stereoisomeric composition of chiral secondary alcohols found in whole body extracts of pine sawfly females was developed. The tested alcohols were derivatized with optically pure (S)-2-acetoxypropionyl chloride prior to GC-MS analysis. Baseline separation was obtained for all sixteen stereoisomers of 3,7,9-trimethyltridecan-2-ol and for the four 3-methylpentadecan-2-ol stereoisomers. For 3,7-dimethyltridecan-2-ol, 3,7-dimethyltetradecan-2-ol and 3,7-dimethylpentadecan-2-ol baseline separation was obtained for 6 of the possible 8 stereoisomers. When a mixture of 16 stereoisomers of 3,7,11-trimethyltridecan-2-ol was tested, baseline separation of 7 peaks out of 16 possible was obtained. The investigated alcohols are pheromone precursors for some pine sawfly species that are severe defoliators of pine. Females from several Diprion, Neodiprion, Macrodiprion, Microdiprion, and Gilpinia species emit esters of such secondary alcohols as sex pheromones that attract males for mating. To quantify the small amounts of the precursor alcohol and its stereoisomeric composition found in whole body extracts from female pine sawflies, a purification method was optimized. An extract of 20 females of D. pini contained about 8 ng of (2S,3R,7R)-3,7-dimethyltridecan-2-ol per female, and three extracts of 18, 20, and 90 females of N. sertifer contained between 5 and 13 ng of (2S,3S,7S)-3,7-dimethylpentadecan-2-ol per female. PMID:21110221

  13. FDTD analysis of body-core temperature elevation in children and adults for whole-body exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2008-09-01

    The temperature elevations in anatomically based human phantoms of an adult and a 3-year-old child were calculated for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. Thermoregulation in children, however, has not yet been clarified. In the present study, we developed a computational thermal model of a child that is reasonable for simulating body-core temperature elevation. Comparison of measured and simulated temperatures revealed thermoregulation in children to be similar to that of adults. Based on this finding, we calculated the body-core temperature elevation in a 3-year-old child and an adult for plane-wave exposure at the basic restriction in the international guidelines. The body-core temperature elevation in the 3-year-old child phantom was 0.03 °C at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 0.08 W kg-1, which was 35% smaller than in the adult female. This difference is attributed to the child's higher body surface area-to-mass ratio.

  14. Comparison between whole-body MRI and Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET or PET/CT in oncology: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberto, Mario; Maggi, Fabio; Treglia, Giorgio; Padovano, Federico; Calandriello, Lucio; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the article is to systematically review published data about the comparison between positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) in patients with different tumours. Methods A comprehensive literature search of studies published in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus and Embase databases through April 2012 and regarding the comparison between FDG-PET or PET/CT and WB-MRI in patients with various tumours was carried out. Results Forty-four articles comprising 2287 patients were retrieved in full-text version, included and discussed in this systematic review. Several articles evaluated mixed tumours with both diagnostic methods. Concerning the specific tumour types, more evidence exists for lymphomas, bone tumours, head and neck tumours and lung tumours, whereas there is less evidence for other tumour types. Conclusions Overall, based on the literature findings, WB-MRI seems to be a valid alternative method compared to PET/CT in oncology. Further larger prospective studies and in particular cost-effectiveness analysis comparing these two whole-body imaging techniques are needed to better assess the role of WB-MRI compared to FDG-PET or PET/CT in specific tumour types. PMID:24133384

  15. Revisiting the body-schema concept in the context of whole-body postural-focal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory-motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability. PMID:25741274

  16. Whole-body irradiation of deuterated mice by the 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, D N; Stoner, R D; Gremme, A M; Fairchild, R G; Laissue, J A

    1983-01-01

    Specific pathogen-free mice, 8-12 wk of age, were supplied with either acidified tap water or acidified 30 atom % 2H2O in tap water. Thirteen days later, when body water deuterium was about 20 atom %, mice were irradiated either by neutrons or by x-rays after intraperitoneal injection of boric acid. Mortality from whole-body neutron-boron radiation, unlike mortality from whole-body x-radiation, was not lowered by such deuteration. Time intervals to death of neutron-irradiated mice were compatible with the gastrointestinal syndrome. Neither species nor numbers of colonic bacteria were measurably altered by deuteration alone. Because the toxic, nonlethal range of deuterium substitution for aqueous hydrogen in mammals is approximately 1/5th to 1/3rd, these results indicate that partial deuteration of human tissues would improve neutron capture therapy of deep tumors. Neutron penetration would be enhanced and damage to normal tissues from photons would be decreased. The number of deuterium recoils due to neutron capture by hydrogen would also be decreased. PMID:6344086

  17. Cutaneous noradrenaline measured by microdialysis in complex regional pain syndrome during whole-body cooling and heating.

    PubMed

    Terkelsen, Astrid J; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Petersen, Lars J; Knudsen, Lone; Christensen, Niels J; Kehr, Jan; Yoshitake, Takashi; Madsen, Caspar S; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf; Jensen, Troels S

    2013-09-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterised by autonomic, sensory, and motor disturbances. The underlying mechanisms of the autonomic changes in CPRS are unknown. However, it has been postulated that sympathetic inhibition in the acute phase with locally reduced levels of noradrenaline is followed by an up-regulation of alpha-adrenoceptors in chronic CRPS leading to denervation supersensitivity to catecholamines. This exploratory study examined the effect of cutaneous sympathetic activation and inhibition on cutaneous noradrenaline release, vascular reactivity, and pain in CRPS patients and in healthy volunteers. Seven patients and nine controls completed whole-body cooling (sympathetic activation) and heating (sympathetic inhibition) induced by a whole-body thermal suit with simultaneous measurement of the skin temperature, skin blood flow, and release of dermal noradrenaline. CRPS pain and the perceived skin temperature were measured every 5 min during thermal exposure, while noradrenaline was determined from cutaneous microdialysate collected every 20 min throughout the study period. Cooling induced peripheral sympathetic activation in patients and controls with significant increases in dermal noradrenaline, vasoconstriction, and reduction in skin temperature. The main findings were that the noradrenaline response did not differ between patients and controls or between the CRPS hand and the contralateral unaffected hand, suggesting that the evoked noradrenaline release from the cutaneous sympathetic postganglionic fibres is preserved in chronic CRPS patients. PMID:23357619

  18. Disentangling neural processes of egocentric and allocentric mental spatial transformations using whole-body photos of self and other.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Shanti; van Schie, Hein T; Cross, Emily S; de Lange, Floris P; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2015-08-01

    Mental imagery of one's body moving through space is important for imagining changing visuospatial perspectives, as well as for determining how we might appear to other people. Previous neuroimaging research has implicated the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) in this process. It is unclear, however, how neural activity in the TPJ relates to the rotation perspectives from which mental spatial transformation (MST) of one's own body can take place, i.e. from an egocentric or an allocentric perspective. It is also unclear whether TPJ involvement in MST is self-specific or whether the TPJ may also be involved in MST of other human bodies. The aim of the current study was to disentangle neural processes involved in egocentric versus allocentric MSTs of human bodies representing self and other. We measured functional brain activity of healthy participants while they performed egocentric and allocentric MSTs in relation to whole-body photographs of themselves and a same-sex stranger. Findings indicated higher blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response in bilateral TPJ during egocentric versus allocentric MST. Moreover, BOLD response in the TPJ during egocentric MST correlated positively with self-report scores indicating how awkward participants felt while viewing whole-body photos of themselves. These findings considerably advance our understanding of TPJ involvement in MST and its interplay with self-awareness. PMID:25976923

  19. Whole-body pre-cooling does not alter human muscle metabolism during sub-maximal exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Booth, J; Wilsmore, B R; Macdonald, A D; Zeyl, A; Mcghee, S; Calvert, D; Marino, F E; Storlien, L H; Taylor, N A

    2001-06-01

    Muscle metabolism was investigated in seven men during two 35 min cycling trials at 60% peak oxygen uptake, at 35 degrees C and 50% relative humidity. On one occasion, exercise was preceded by whole-body cooling achieved by immersion in water during a reduction in temperature from 29 to 24 degrees C, and, for the other trial, by immersion in water at a thermoneutral temperature (control, 34.8 degrees C). Pre-cooling did not alter oxygen uptake during exercise (P > 0.05), whilst the change in cardiac frequency and body mass both tended to be lower following pre-cooling (0.05 < P < 0.10). When averaged over the exercise period, muscle and oesophageal temperatures after pre-cooling were reduced by 1.5 and 0.6 degrees C respectively, compared with control (P < 0.05). Pre-cooling had a limited effect on muscle metabolism, with no differences between the two conditions in muscle glycogen, triglyceride, adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate, creatine or lactate contents at rest, or following exercise. These data indicate that whole-body pre-cooling does not alter muscle metabolism during submaximal exercise in the heat. It is more likely that thermoregulatory and cardiovascular strain are reduced, through lower muscle and core temperatures. PMID:11482556

  20. Transient torsional vibrations control in the geared drive trains of the hot rolling mills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul V. Krot

    2009-01-01

    The excessive dynamic loads and shock vibration are particular for the hot rolling mills equipment. An attempt to reduce torque amplification factor (TAF) has been done for the roughing stands of a wide strip hot rolling mill. Drive acceleration method was used in order to close the open backlashes gaps before transient process begins. This method is usually implemented for