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1

Whole-body vibration training: Metabolic cost of synchronous, side-alternating or no vibrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration training improves strength and can increase maximal oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O2max). No study has compared the metabolic demand of synchronous and side-alternating whole-body vibration. We measured [Vdot]O2 and heart rate during a typical synchronous or side-alternating whole-body vibration session in 10 young female sedentary participants. The 20-min session consisted of three sets of six 45-s exercises, with 15 s recovery

Boris Gojanovic; Yves Henchoz

2012-01-01

2

Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Vibration Exposure and Biodynamic Responses during Whole-Body Vibration Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 10, pp. 1794-1800, 2007. Purpose: Excessive, chronic whole-body vibration (WBV) has a number of negative side effects on the human body, including disorders of

ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

2007-01-01

3

Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

DELECLUSE, C., M. ROELANTS, and S. VERSCHUEREN. Strength Increase after Whole-Body Vibration Compared with Resistance Training. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 35, No. 6, pp. 1033-1041, 2003. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effect of a 12-wk period of whole-body vibration training and resistance training on human knee-extensor strength. Methods: Sixty-seven untrained females

CHRISTOPHE DELECLUSE; MACHTELD ROELANTS; SABINE VERSCHUEREN

2003-01-01

4

Strength-training with whole-body vibration in long-distance runners: a randomized trial.  

PubMed

A parallel group randomized trial was designed to analyze the impact of 6 weeks of strength training programs performed with or without whole-body vibration on muscular and endurance performance parameters in long-distance runners. 22 endurance runners were allocated into strength with whole-body vibration (n=8), without (n=8), and control (n=6) groups. Before and after the experimental period the subjects performed the following tests: a) maximum dynamic strength test, b) maximal incremental treadmill test, and c) time to exhaustion at velocity corresponding to maximal oxygen uptake. The fractions of the aerobic and anaerobic contribution in time to exhaustion test were also calculated. Both strength trained groups showed a similar increase in maximum dynamic strength (~18%). The aerobic contribution was enhanced for strength training group without whole-body vibration (~25%) after experimental period. No statistical differences were observed in any other variable. These results suggest that 6 weeks of strength training performed with or without whole-body vibration improve similarly the maximum dynamic strength in long-distance runners. In addition, both training modes studied had no deleterious effects on the traditional parameters of endurance performance, traditional strength training program results in increased aerobic contribution during high-intensity aerobic exercise. PMID:23559412

Bertuzzi, R; Pasqua, L A; Bueno, S; Damasceno, M V; Lima-Silva, A E; Bishop, D; Tricoli, V

2013-04-04

5

Effects of whole body vibration training on postural control in older individuals: A 1 year randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

This randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of a 12 month whole body vibration training program on postural control in healthy older adults. Two hundred and twenty people were randomly assigned to a whole body vibration group (n = 94), a fitness group (n = 60) or a control group (n = 66). Thewhole body vibration and fitness groups trained

An Bogaerts; Sabine Verschueren; Christophe Delecluse; Albrecht L. Claessens; Steven Boonen

2007-01-01

6

Accelerometry-based study of body vibration dampening during whole-body vibration training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of our study was to characterize the vibration delivered by a whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise platform and quantify the acceleration transmissibility through- out the body during different WBV exercises. Our accelerometry- based experimental setup, includes materials and methods for assessing vibration frequencies and corresponding magnitudes both at the side-alternating vibration platform and on multiple anatomic landmarks of the

Hugo Silva; Andre Lourenco; Rita Tomas; Vinson Lee; Scott Going

2011-01-01

7

Effects of whole body vibration training on dynamic balance in healthy adult volunteers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMotor performance depends on the integration and utilisation of a range of different abilities, such as muscle strength, flexibility, and balance. Improving these abilities is thus important for improving motor performance. Training using whole body vibration (WBV) comprises one of these new methods.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of WBV training in comparison with conventional training

H Amano; K Nakata; T Mae; H Kohda; K Shimomura; M Satoh; K Shino; H Yoshikawa

2011-01-01

8

Effects of whole body vibration training on body composition in adolescents with Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after 20 weeks of WBV training. Repeated measures of ANOVA adjusting by height, weight and Tanner stage were used to analyze possible group by time interactions on body composition. The adjusted percentages of change in body composition were also compared between control and WBV groups. No group by time interactions were found for any variable, but the WBV group showed a higher reduction in body fat at the upper limbs (p<0.05), and a tendency toward higher percent increase in whole body lean body mass. Overall, a 20-week WBV training is not enough by itself for increasing lean body mass in adolescents with DS, but it might be helpful for improving body composition in this population. Its relationship with health and autonomy enhances the importance of these results. PMID:23474995

González-Agüero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

2013-03-05

9

Strength Training with Superimposed Whole Body Vibration Does Not Preferentially Modulate Cortical Plasticity  

PubMed Central

Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate 4?wks of leg strength training with and without whole body vibration (WBV) on corticospinal excitability and short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI). Participants (n = 12) were randomly allocated to either a control or experimental (WBV) group. All participants completed 12 squat training sessions either with (WBV group) or without (control group) exposure to WBV (f = 35?Hz, A = 2.5?mm). There were significant (P < 0.05) increases in squat strength and corticospinal excitability and significant (P < 0.05) reductions in SICI for both groups following the 4?wk intervention. There were no differences detected between groups for any dependant variable (P > 0.05). It appears that WBV training does not augment the increase in strength or corticospinal excitability induced by strength training alone.

Weier, Ashleigh T.; Kidgell, Dawson J.

2012-01-01

10

Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training on Body Composition in Adolescents with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study aimed to determine the effect of 20 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) on the body composition of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescent with DS were divided into two groups: control and WBV. Whole body, upper and lower limbs body fat and lean body mass were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)…

Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Matute-Llorente, Angel; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Casajus, Jose A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, German

2013-01-01

11

Effects of different amplitudes (high vs. low) of whole-body vibration training in active adults.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different amplitudes of whole-body vibrations on the development of strength, mechanical power of the lower limb, and body composition. Thirty-eight recreationally active participants took part in the study. Participants were divided in two experimental groups (low amplitude group [GL] = 2 mm; high amplitude group [GH] = 4 mm) and a control group. The experimental groups performed an incremental vibratory training, 2 days per week during 6 weeks. The frequency of vibration (50 Hz), time of work (60 seconds), and time of rest (60 seconds) were constant for GL and GH groups. All the participants were on the platform in a static semi-squat position. Maximum isokinetic strength, body composition, and performance in vertical jumps (squat and countermovement jumps) were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the training cycle. A significant increase of isokinetic strength was observed in GL and GH at angular velocities of 60°.s(-1), 180°.s(-1) and 270°.s(-1). Total lean mass was significantly increased in GH (0.9 ± 1.0 kg). There were no significant changes in the total fat mass in any of the groups. Significant changes were not observed in different variables (height, peak power, and rate of force development) derived from the vertical jumps for any of the groups submitted to study. The vibration training, whatever the amplitude, produced significant improvements in isokinetic strength. However, high vibration amplitude training presents better adaptations for hypertrophy than the training with low vibration amplitude. In this sense, GH would be a better training if the practitioners want to develop both strength and hypertrophy of the lower limbs. PMID:23096064

Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Alcaraz, Pedro E

2013-07-01

12

Stochastic Resonance Whole-Body Vibration, Musculoskeletal Symptoms, and Body Balance: A Worksite Training Study  

PubMed Central

Background Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training (SR-WBV) was tested to reduce work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Methods Participants were 54 white-collar employees of a Swiss organization. The controlled crossover design comprised two groups each given 4 weeks of exercise and no training during a second 4-week period. Outcome was daily musculoskeletal well-being, musculoskeletal pain, and surefootedness. In addition, participants performed a behavioral test on body balance prior to when SR-WBV started and after 4 weeks of SR-WBV. Results Across the 4-week training period, musculoskeletal well-being and surefootedness were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas musculoskeletal pain was significantly reduced only in those who reported low back pain during the last 4 weeks prior to the study (p < 0.05). Body balance was significantly increased by SR-WBV (p < 0.05). Conclusion SR-WBV seems to be an efficient option in primary prevention of musculoskeletal complaints and falls at work.

Elfering, Achim; Arnold, Sibille; Schade, Volker; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

13

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance.Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the

D J Cochrane; S R Stannard

2005-01-01

14

Effects of whole body vibration training on balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to determine whether a whole body vibration training program (WBV) is able to improve static standing balance in adolescents with and without Down syndrome (DS). Thirty adolescents with DS aged 11-20 years (DSG) and 27 adolescent, age/sex matched, without DS (CG) joined the study. Participants of each group were divided into two comparable groups, those who performed WVB (in DSG: VDSG; in CG: VCG) and those who did not perform WVB (in DSG: nVDSG; in CG: nVCG). Static-standing-balance under four conditions (C1: openeyes/fixed-foot-support; C2: closed-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C3: openeyes/compliant-foot-support; C4: closed-eyes/compliant-foot-support) was examine, before and after a 20-week WBV training program. For balance study, Postural-Parameters (PPs), based on center of pressure (COP) oscillations (anterior/posterior and medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity), and PPs ratios among the four conditions were calculated. After WBV training, no significant differences were found in any parameter in the VCG and nVCG and neither in the nVDSG, but there was a decrease of mean values in the analyzed PPs under C4, with significant differences in medial/lateral COP excursion and COP mean velocity, and a significant decrease in the ratio C4/C1 of the mean velocity in VDSG. Therefore, WBV training had positive effects in the balance of DS adolescents although only under specific conditions, with vision and somatosensory input altered. The positive results of this study are encouraging and open a wide field of research, looking for the most efficient program for this population. PMID:23872530

Villarroya, M Adoración; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Moros, Teresa; Gómez-Trullén, Eva; Casajús, José A

2013-07-19

15

The effects of 11 weeks whole body vibration training on jump height, contractile properties and activation of human knee extensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether 11 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) training applied in a way that is commonly seen in practice, i.e. without additional loads, would improve muscle activation and\\/or contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles and counter movement jump height in healthy subjects. Ten subjects belonging to the experimental group trained three

C. J. de Ruiter; S. M. van Raak; J. V. Schilperoort; A. P. Hollander; A. de Haan

2003-01-01

16

Effects of resistance training with whole-body vibration on muscle fitness in untrained adults.  

PubMed

The effects of resistance training (RT) combined with whole-body vibration (WBV) on muscle fitness, particularly muscle hypertrophy and neuromuscular performance, are not well understood. We investigated the effects of WBV in healthy, untrained participants after a 13-week RT course by performing magnetic resonance imaging and by measuring maximal isometric (with electromyography) and isokinetic knee extension strengths, isometric lumbar extension torque, countermovement-jump, knee extension endurance, and sit-ups. Thirty-two individuals (22-49 years old) were randomly assigned to RT groups with (RT-WBV, n=16) or without WBV (RT, n=16). Following the RT course, significantly higher increases in the cross-sectional areas of m. psoas major (vs baseline values) and erector spinae muscle (vs the RT group) were observed in the RT-WBV group (+10.7%, P<0.05; +8.7%, P<0.05) compared with the RT group (+3.8%, P=0.045; 0.0%). Higher increases from baseline were also observed in maximal isometric force, concentric knee extension torque, countermovement-jump, and maximal isometric lumbar extension torque in RT-WBV (+63.5%; +76.7%, +15.0%, and +51.5%, respectively; P<0.05) than in those of RT (+25.6%, P=0.001; +17.8%, P=0.18; +11.3%, P=0.001; and +26.4%, P<0.001, respectively). The WBV-induced increases in muscle hypertrophy and isometric lumbar extension torque suggest a potential benefit of incorporating WBV into slow-velocity RT programs involving exercises of long duration. PMID:21812821

Osawa, Y; Oguma, Y

2011-08-03

17

Local metabolic rate during whole body vibration.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) platforms are currently used for muscle training and rehabilitation. However, the effectiveness of WBV training remains elusive, since scientific studies vary largely in the vibration parameters used. The origin of this issue may be related to a lack in understanding of the training intensity that is imposed on individual muscles by WBV. Therefore, this study evaluates the training intensity in terms of metabolic rate of two lower-extremity muscles during WBV under different vibration parameters. Fourteen healthy male subjects were randomly exposed to 0 (control)-, 10-, 17-, and 28-Hz vibrations while standing upright on a vibration platform. A near-infrared spectrometer was used to determine the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles' metabolic rates during arterial occlusion. The metabolic rates during each vibration condition were significantly higher compared with control for both muscles (P < 0.05). Each increase in vibration frequency translated into a significantly higher metabolic rate than the previous lower frequency (P < 0.05) for both muscles. The current study showed that the local metabolic rate during WBV at 28 Hz was on average 5.4 times (GM) and 3.7 times (VL) of the control metabolic rate. The substantial changes in local metabolic rate indicate that WBV may represent a significant local training stimulus for particular leg muscles. PMID:23493356

Friesenbichler, Bernd; Nigg, Benno M; Dunn, Jeff F

2013-03-14

18

Ten-week Whole-body Vibration Training Improves Body Composition and Muscle Strength in Obese Women  

PubMed Central

This work explored the short-term effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on anthropometry, body composition and muscular strength in obese women. Fifty obese women (age=46.8±7.81[SD]y; BMI=35.1±3.55kg/m2) were assigned to a ten-week WBV training period, two times a week (in each session, 14min vibration training, 5min rest; vibration amplitude 2.0-5.0mm, frequency 40-60Hz), with (n=18) or without (n=17) radiofrequency, or to a non-exercise control group (n=15). Subjects were instructed not to change their habitual lifestyle. Before and after the ten-week experimental period, anthropometric measurements, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the leg press, leg curl and leg extension strength tests were carried out. All changes in the two groups of WBV training, with or without radiofrequency, were similar and these groups were combined in a single WBV intervention group. As compared to controls, subjects submitted to WBV training had significantly lower BMI, total body and trunk fat, sum of skinfolds and body circumferences. On the other hand, lower limb strength tests were increased in the WBV group. These preliminary results suggest that WBV training may improve body composition and muscular strength in obese women and may be a useful adjuvant to lifestyle prescriptions.

Milanese, Chiara; Piscitelli, Francesco; Zenti, Maria Grazia; Moghetti, Paolo; Sandri, Marco; Zancanaro, Carlo

2013-01-01

19

The effects of whole-body vibration in isolation or combined with strength training in female athletes.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to assess the behavior of a vibrating platform under different conditions and to compare the effects of an 8-week periodized training program with whole-body vibration (WBV) alone or in combination with conventional strength training (ST). Vibrating frequencies, displacements, and peak accelerations were tested through a piezoelectric accelerometer under different conditions of load and subjects' position. Eighteen national-level female athletes were assigned to 1 of 3 different groups performing WBV, conventional ST, or a combination of the 2 (WBV + ST). Isometric maximal voluntary contraction, dynamic maximal concentric force, and vertical jump tests were performed before and after the conditioning program. Vibrating displacements and maximum accelerations measured on the device were not always consistent with their expected values calculated from the display and manufacturers' information (sinusoidal waveforms). The WBV alone or in combination with low-intensity resistance exercise did not seem to induce significant enhancements in force and power when compared with ST. It appears that WBV cannot substitute parts of ST loading in a cohort of young female athletes. However, vibration effects might be limited by the behavior of the commercial platforms as the one used in the study. More studies are needed to analyze the performances of devices and the effectiveness of protocols. PMID:22067255

Preatoni, Ezio; Colombo, Alessandro; Verga, Monica; Galvani, Christel; Faina, Marcello; Rodano, Renato; Preatoni, Ennio; Cardinale, Marco

2012-09-01

20

EFFECTS OF 6-WEEK WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON THE REFLEX RESPONSE OF THE ANKLE MUSCLES: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL  

PubMed Central

Background: The ligament sprain of the lateral ankle is the most frequent injury that occurs when participating in sports. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a training method that has been recently introduced as a rehabilitative tool for treatment of athletes. It has been hypothesized that the transmission of mechanical oscillations from the vibrating platform may lead to physiological changes in muscle spindles, joint mechanoreceptors, as well as improve balance. Propose: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 6?week WBV training program on the reflex response mechanism of the peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB) and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles in ankle inversion at 30º from horizontal, in a static position. Methods: This study was a single?blinded and randomized controlled trial. Forty?four healthy, physically active participants were randomly split into two groups: the experimental group (n = 26) (the WBV training) and control group (n = 18). Reaction time (RT), maximum electromyographic (EMG) peak (peak EMG), time to the maximum peak EMG (peak EMG time) and reflex electrical activity of all the muscles were assessed before and after the WBV training through surface EMG. Results: After 6?weeks WBV training, there were no significant changes in the variables analysed for all the muscles involved. Conclusion: A 6?week WBV training does not improve the reflex response mechanism of the lateral stabilizing muscles of the ankle. Level of evidence: 1b

Rubio, Jacobo A.; Ramos, Domingo J.; Esteban, Paula; Mendizabal, Susana; Jimenez, Fernando

2013-01-01

21

Whole-body vibration training increases muscle strength and mass in older women: a randomized-controlled trial.  

PubMed

To determine whether 10 weeks of whole-body vibration (WBV) training has a significant effect on strength, muscle mass, muscle power, and mobility in older women, 26 subjects were randomly assigned to a WBV training group (n=13; mean age 79 years) and a control (CON) group (n=13; mean age 76 years). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) increased 38.8% in the WBV group, without changes in the CON group. Electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis (VM), the vastus lateralis, and the biceps femoris (BF) did not change in either group. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased significantly after training in VM (8.7%) and BF (15.5%). Muscle power at 20%, 40%, and 60% MVIC decreased from pre-test to post-test in the CON group; however, WBV training prevented the decrease in the WBV group. Consequently, mobility, measured by the Timed Up and Go test, increased significantly after training (9.0%) only in the WBV group. Ten weeks of lower limb WBV training in older women produces a significant increase in muscle strength induced by thigh muscle hypertrophy, with no change in muscle power. The adaptations to WBV found in the present study may be of use in counteracting the loss of muscle strength and mobility associated with age-induced sarcopenia. PMID:19422657

Machado, A; García-López, D; González-Gallego, J; Garatachea, N

2009-04-20

22

Whole-body vibration training reduces arterial stiffness, blood pressure and sympathovagal balance in young overweight/obese women.  

PubMed

Obesity is associated with early cardiovascular dysfunction and reduced muscle strength. Whole-body vibration (WBV) training may improve arterial function and muscle strength. The effects of WBV training on arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, baPWV), wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx), brachial systolic blood pressure (bSBP), aortic systolic blood pressure (aSBP), heart rate variability, and muscle strength (one-repetition maximum, 1RM) were examined in 10 young (21 ± 2 year) overweight/obese women (body mass index, BMI = 29.9 ± 0.8 kg m(-2)). Participants were randomized to a 6-week WBV training or non-exercising control (CON) period in a crossover design. WBV training (3 days × week) consisted of static and dynamic squats and calf raises with vibration intensity at 25-30 Hz and 1-2 mm amplitude (2.83-4.86 G). There were significant (P<0.05) decreases in baPWV (-0.9 ± 0.3 m s(-1)), AIx (-8.0 ± 2.2 %), bSBP (-5.3 ± 1.5 mm Hg), aSBP (-5.2 ± 2.1 mm Hg), low-frequency power (-0.13 ± 0.05 nu) and sympathovagal balance (LF/HF, -0.42 ± 0.16) after WBV training compared with CON. Significant (P<0.05) increases in high-frequency power (HF, 0.19 ± 0.04 nu) and leg extension 1RM (8.2 ± 2.3 kg) occurred after WBV training compared with CON. Six weeks of WBV training decreased systemic arterial stiffness and aSBP via improvements in wave reflection and sympathovagal balance in young overweight/obese normotensive women. WBV training may benefit arterial function and muscle strength in deconditioned individuals who cannot perform conventional exercise. PMID:22357522

Figueroa, Arturo; Gil, Ryan; Wong, Alexei; Hooshmand, Shirin; Park, Song Y; Vicil, Florence; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A

2012-02-23

23

Effect of 6Month Whole Body Vibration Training on Hip Density, Muscle Strength, and Postural Control in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-frequency mechanical strain seems to stimulate bone strength in animals. In this random- ized controlled trial, hip BMD was measured in postmenopausal women after a 24-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program. Vibration training significantly increased BMD of the hip. These findings suggest that WBV training might be useful in the prevention of osteoporosis. Introduction: High-frequency mechanical strain has been

Sabine MP Verschueren; Machteld Roelants; Christophe Delecluse; Stephan Swinnen; Dirk Vanderschueren; Steven Boonen

2004-01-01

24

Electrocorticogram During Whole Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies in the conscious monkey have shown that during low frequency vibration (4.5-19.5 c/sec) rhythms at the vibration frequency appear intermittently in the ECoG. These rhythms are commonly dissociated between recordings from different but adjacent are...

A. N. Nicholson J. C. Guignard

1965-01-01

25

Impact of Whole-Body Vibration Training Versus Fitness Training on Muscle Strength and Muscle Mass in Older Men: A 1Year Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 1-year whole-body vibration (WBV) training on isometric and explosive muscle strength and muscle mass in community-dwelling men older than 60 years. Methods. Muscle characteristics of the WBV group (n ¼31, 67.3 6 0.7 years) were compared with those of a fitness (FIT) group (n ¼ 30, 67.4 6 0.8 years) and

An Bogaerts; Christophe Delecluse; Albrecht L. Claessens; Walter Coudyzer; Steven Boonen; Sabine M. P. Verschueren

2007-01-01

26

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

PubMed Central

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance. Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the control, the same six exercises were performed at 0 Hz, whilst cycling was performed at 50 W. Each intervention was 5 min in duration with ACMVJ, grip strength, and flexibility measurements being conducted pre and post intervention. Results: There was a positive interaction effect (interventionxpre-post) of enhanced ACMVJ (p<0.001) and flexibility (p<0.05) parameters following WBV; however no changes were observed after the control and cycling interventions. There was no interaction effect for grip strength following the three interventions. Conclusions: Acute WBV causes neural potentiation of the stretch reflex loop as shown by the improved ACMVJ and flexibility performance. Additionally, muscle groups less proportionally exposed to vibration do not exhibit physiological changes that potentiate muscular performance.

Cochrane, D; Stannard, S

2005-01-01

27

Whole body vibration training improves leg blood flow and adiposity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

This study aimed at examined the effect of a 12-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program on leg blood flow and body composition in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty participants were randomly assigned to either a WBV training group (WBV; n = 20) or usual-care control group (CON; n = 20). Body composition [waist circumference, waist to hip ratio (WHR), weight, height, percentage of body fat and fat-free mass], heart rate, and blood flow [femoral artery diameter, maximum systolic velocity, maximum diastolic velocity (DV), time averaged mean, pulsatility index and resistance index (RI), mean velocity (V med), and peak blood velocities (PBV)] were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. There were significant increases in the blood flow (p = 0.046), V med (p = 0.050), and DV (p = 0.037) after WBV compared with CON. Within-group analysis showed significant differences in V med, PBV, and DV in the WBV group. Significant decreases after the intervention in weight (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p < 0.001), WHR (p < 0.05), and body fat (p < 0.05) were also found, with significant between-groups decreases in all these outcomes in the WBV group. Significant correlations existed between changes in percent body fat and blood flow [blood flow (-0.761), V med (-0.607), PBV (-0.677), and RI (0.0510)]. WBV training can be considered an effective means to increase leg blood flow and to reduce adiposity in patients with T2DM. PMID:23657766

Sañudo, Borja; Alfonso-Rosa, Rosa; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesus; Galiano, Delfín; Figueroa, Arturo

2013-05-09

28

Reducing whole body vibration in forklift drivers.  

PubMed

Forklift drivers in warehouses are often exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) during the total day. There is however an association between working as a forklift operator and the development of low back pain. In this study the exposure to WBV was measured in five forklift drivers who performed a standardised order picking task during 10 minutes. The effect of driving surface (uneven concrete vs. new flat concrete), driving speed (15 km/h vs. 8 km/h) and seat suspension (mechanical suspension vs. air suspension) was investigated. Improving the driving surface was the most effective preventive measure by reducing the whole body vibration with 39%, from 1.14 to 0.69 m/s2. Lowering the speed limit resulted in a reduction of WBV with 26% (1.05 vs. 0.78 m/s2). An air suspension seat was 22% more effective compared to mechanical suspension (1.02 vs. 0.80 m/s2). On uneven concrete an air suspension seat performed even better by reducing the WBV by 29% (1.33 vs. 0.95 m/s2). A combination of a new driving surface, limiting the maximum speed and the introduction of an air suspension seat reduced the whole body vibrations below the action limit of 0.5 m/s2 as mentioned in the European directive. None of the interventions were effective enough on their own. PMID:22317090

Motmans, R

2012-01-01

29

Whole body vibration and dynamic restraint.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify changes due to whole body vibration in peroneus longus (PL) activation following ankle inversion perturbation. Participants were 22 (age 22.1 +/- 1.8 yrs, ht 168.8 +/- 8.2 cm, mass 65.5 +/- 11.2 kg) physically active male and female students with no recent history of lower extremity injury. Measurements of PL electromechanical delay (EMD), reaction time, and muscle activation were collected from two groups (WBV and control) over 3 time intervals (pretreatment, posttreatment, and 30 min posttreatment). Two-way ANOVAs were used to compare groups over time for all dependent variables. No group x time interactions were detected (p < 0.05) for any of the dependent variables. Whole body vibration did not alter PL EMD, reaction time, peak EMG, or average EMG. The use of WBV for enhancing ankle dynamic stability was not supported by this study. However, more data are needed to determine if WBV is an effective intervention in other areas of injury prevention or rehabilitation. These data were not consistent with the hypothesis that WBV enhances muscle spindle sensitivity. PMID:17879889

Hopkins, T; Pak, J O; Robertshaw, A E; Feland, J B; Hunter, I; Gage, M

2007-09-18

30

Whole-body vibration alters proprioception in the trunk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational whole-body vibration has long been associated with low back injuries. However, the mechanism of these injuries is not well understood. In this paper, the effect of whole-body vibration on proprioception and dynamic stability was examined. Subjects exposed to 20min of vertical, seated, whole-body vibration were found to have a 1.58-fold increase in position-sense errors after vibration relative to controls

Lu Li; Farhana Lamis; Sara E. Wilson

2008-01-01

31

Whole-Body-Vibration Training Increases Knee-Extension Strength and Speed of Movement in Older Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: The fi rst long-term study on the effects of Power-Plate training in older women clearly demonstrates that strength and speed of movement increases after 24 weeks of trai- ning on the Power-Plate. Power-Plate training proves to be a safe, suitable, and effi cient strength-training method for the aging population. The fi ndings of this study show that Power-Plate training

Machteld Roelants; Christophe Delecluse; Sabine M. Verschueren

32

Subjective Reaction to Whole-Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ten male volunteers were utilized in a study of the perception of vibration. Four subjective reaction levels: perceptible, mildly annoying, extremely annoying, and alarming were established. The Boeing Human Vibration facility, modified since previous tes...

R. E. Chaney

1964-01-01

33

Psychophysical Assessment of Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the methods of magnitude estimation and intensity matching, curves of equal subjective vibration intensity were constructed over the frequency range from 3.5 to 20 Hz. Twenty subjects made magnitude estimations of the intensity of vibration at 0.08, 0.16, 0.24, 0.40, 0.48, and 0.56 gz with vibration at 0.32 gz serving as a standard. These intensities were judged at each

Richard W. Shoenberger; C. Stanley Harris

1971-01-01

34

Whole-Body-Vibration–Induced Increase in Leg Muscle Activity During Different Squat Exercises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Roelants, M., S.M.P. Verschueren, C. Delecluse, O. Levin, and V. Stijnen. Whole-body-vibration-induced increase in leg muscle activity during different squat exercises. J. Strength Cond. Res. 20(1):124-129. 2006.—This study analyzed leg mus- cle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV) training. Sub- jects performed standard unloaded isometric exercises on a vi- brating platform (Power Plate): high squat (HS), low squat (LS), and 1-legged

Machteld Roelants; Sabine M. P. Verschueren; Christophe Delecluse; Oron Levin; Valère Stijnen

2006-01-01

35

Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Muscle Activity, Strength, and Power  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cormie, P., R.S. Deane, N.T. Triplett, and J.M. McBride. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on muscle activ- ity, strength, and power. J. Strength Cond. Res. 20(2):257-261. 2006.—The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a single bout of whole-body vibration on isometric squat (IS) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance. Nine moder- ately resistance-trained men were tested for

Prue Cormie; Russell S. Deane; N. Travis Triplett; Jeffrey M. McBride

2006-01-01

36

Whole-Body Vibration and Aircrew Performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of aircraft vibration on vision and manual control performance were studied. Twenty-eight experiments, 16 investigating effects on vision and 12 investigating effects on manual control performance are summarized.

M. J. Griffin R. W. Mcleod M. J. Moseley C. H. Lewis

1986-01-01

37

Whole-Body Vibration and Aircrew Performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A program of experimental research concerned with the effects of aircraft vibration on vision and manual control performance has been completed. Twenty-eight experiments were conducted, 16 investigating effects on vision and 12 investigating effects on ma...

M. J. Griffin R. W. McLeod M. J. Moseley C. H. Lewis

1986-01-01

38

Whole-Body Vibration of Locomotive Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibration of the seat and the body of a diesel locomotive and an electric locomotive were measured while driving on the railways of Eastern Finland. At the speed of 120 km\\/h for the diesel locomotive and 140 km\\/h for the electric locomotive (the greatest permissible speeds) the vibration of the seat was tangent to the “fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary” of the

Esko Sorainen; Esko Rytkönen

1999-01-01

39

Whole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of whole-body vibration dosage on leg blood flow was investigated. Nine healthy young adult males completed a set of 14 random vibration and non-vibration exercise bouts whilst squatting on a Galileo 900 plate. Six vibration frequencies ranging from 5 to 30 Hz (5 Hz increments) were used in combination with a 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm amplitude to

Noel Lythgo; Prisca Eser; Patricia de Groot; Mary Galea

2009-01-01

40

Visual-Motor Performance During Whole-Body Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seven male employees of the Boeing Company were tested in the Company's human vibration facility to determine the effect of whole body vibration on visual-motor performance. Six controls: a large and a small knob; a horizontal and a vertical lever; and a ...

R. E. Chaney D. L. Parks

1964-01-01

41

The Subjective Magnitude of Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments have been performed to investigate the relation between the level of whole-body vertical a vibration and the degree of discomfort it produces. The first experiment, which employed botli magnitude estimation and magnitude production methods, suggested that the relation between discomfort, ? and vibration level, ?, could be adequately expressed in the form ?=k?. However, the value of n

L. C. FOTHEHGUL; M. J. GRIFEXN

1977-01-01

42

Individual Variability in Human Response to Whole-body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports an experiment to obtain an equal sensation contour for whole-body vibration using an entirely new, but demonstrably valid and reliable, paradigm. Instead of requiring subjects to equate variable vibration stimuli of different frequencies with a fixed standard stimulus, the paradigm employed a series of matching tasks with the standard stimulus being produced by the subject in the

D. J. OBORNE; D. A. HUMPHREYS

1976-01-01

43

Wireless Network for Measurement of Whole-Body Vibration  

PubMed Central

This article presents the development of a system integrated to a ZigBee network to measure whole-body vibration. The developed system allows distinguishing human vibrations of almost 400Hz in three axes with acceleration of almost 50g. The tests conducted in the study ensured the correct functioning of the system for the project's purpose.

Koenig, Diogo; Chiaramonte, Marilda S.; Balbinot, Alexandre

2008-01-01

44

Oxygen Uptake in Whole-Body Vibration Exercise: Influence of Vibration Frequency, Amplitude, and External Load  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibration exercise (VbX) is a new type of physical training to increase muscle power. The present study was designed to assess the influence of whole-body VbX on metabolic power. Specific oxygen uptake (sVO2) was assessed, testing the hypotheses that sVO2 increases with the frequency of vibration (tested in 10 males) and with the amplitude (tested in 8 males), and that

J. Rittweger; J. Ehrig; K. Just; M. Mutschelknauss; K. A. Kirsch; D. Felsenberg

2002-01-01

45

Effect of whole body vibration applied on upper extremity muscles.  

PubMed

The acute residual effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on upper extremity muscles and testosterone secretion was studied. Eight highly (G1), nine moderately trained gymnasts (G2) and seven physically active persons (CG) were recruited for the investigation. The intervention occurred in push-up position with the elbow flexed at 90°. G1 and G2 received 30 s, 30 Hz and 6 mm amplitude vibration repeated five times. Subjects were tested before and after one and ten minutes intervention in push-up movement. Contact time (Tc), fly time (Tf), TF/Tc ratio and impulse was measured from the ground reaction force-time curves recorded during self-selected (SSRM) and full range of motion (FRM). Testosterone level in urine was also determined. Tf increased significantly in SSRM for G1 and decreased in SSRM and FRM for G2. Tf/Tc ratio in FRM and impulse in SSRM increased significantly for G1 only. No significant alteration in testosterone level was observed. We concluded that WBV is a reasonable training modality for influencing dynamic work of upper extremity muscle, but the reaction to WBV is training and individual dependent. It seems that WBV do not influence dynamic work through increased testosterone secretion because of the relatively low mass of the involved muscles. PMID:23232701

Gyulai, G; Rácz, L; Giminiani, R; Tihanyi, József

2013-03-01

46

Hormonal responses to whole-body vibration in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute responses of blood hormone concentrations and neuromuscular performance following\\u000a whole-body vibration (WBV) treatment. Fourteen male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4.6)?years] were exposed to vertical sinusoidal\\u000a WBV, 10 times for 60?s, with 60?s rest between the vibration sets (a rest period lasting 6?min was allowed after 5 vibration\\u000a sets). Neuromuscular

Carmelo Bosco; M. Iacovelli; O. Tsarpela; M. Cardinale; M. Bonifazi; J. Tihanyi; M. Viru; A. De Lorenzo; A. Viru

2000-01-01

47

Absorption of energy during vertical whole-body vibration exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorbed power (PAbs) during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration in a sitting posture was measured on 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0.5–1.4ms-2) and frequency (2–100Hz), body weight (54–93kg) and, relaxed and erected upper body positions. Results show that PAbs was strongly related to the frequency of the vibration, peaking within

Ronnie Lundström; Patrik Holmlund; Lennart Lindberg

1998-01-01

48

ABSORPTION OF ENERGY DURING WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EXPOSURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorbed power,PAbs, during exposure to vertical and horizontal whole-body vibration in sitting posture was measured using 15 male and 15 female subjects. Different experimental conditions were applied, such as vibration level (0·25–1·4 m\\/s2), frequency (1·13–80 Hz), body weight (54–93 kg), relaxed and erect upper body posture. Results show thatPAbswas strongly related to frequency of the vibration peaking, within the range

R. Lundstrom; P. Holmlund

1998-01-01

49

Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Lower Body Flexibility and Strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method designed to improve muscle strength and mobility that has become an increasing popular mode of alternative training in European athletes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of WBV training on flexibility, heart rate, and peak isokinetic torque. Methods: Twenty healthy adults (12 males, 8 females), untrained

Patricia A. Burns; Kristina S. Beekhuizen; Patrick L. Jacobs

2004-01-01

50

Whole body vibration in cystic fibrosis - a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: In cystic fibrosis (CF), bone mass deficits as well as a lack of muscle mass and force have been described. The bone mass deficits are thought to be at least in part secondary to the reduced muscle mass. Whole body vibration has recently been suggested as an effective technique to increase muscle force and power. The aim of this

J. Roth; M. Wust; R. Rawer; D. Schnabel; G. Armbrecht; G. Beller; I. Rembitzki; U. Wahn; D. Felsenberg; D. Staab

2008-01-01

51

On human response to prolonged repeated whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experiment was aimed at investigating human response to different doses of whole-body vibration (WBV), at checking adaptation to repeated exposures, at further evaluating the frequency weighting, and at examining the effect of a distinct interruption of prolonged exposure. Eight male seated subjects were exposed for 3 h to sinusoidal WBV in the z-axis with the frequencies 4 Hz and

H. SEIDEL; R. BASTEK; D. BRÄUER; Ch. BUCHHOLZ; A. MEISTER; A.-M. METZ; R. ROTHE

1980-01-01

52

Whole-body vibration and disorders of the spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study is based on interviews and medical examinations of 352 operators of earth-moving machines who had been exposed to whole-body vibrations for at least three years. In addition, available X-rays showing different parts of the spines of 251 machine operators who had been exposed to vibration for at least ten years were used for evaluation. One hundred and

H. Dupuis; G. Zerlett

1987-01-01

53

Evaluation of Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration in 100 different vehicles has been measured, evaluated and assessed according to British Standard BS 6841 (1987) and International Standard ISO 2631 (1997). Vibration was measured in 14 categories of vehicle including cars, lift trucks, tractors, lorries, vans and buses. In each vehicle, the vibration was measured in five axes: vertical vibration beneath the seat, fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration on the seat pan and fore-and-aft vibration at the backrest. The alternative methods of evaluating the vibration (use of different frequency weightings, different averaging methods, the inclusion of different axes, vibration dose values and equivalent r.m.s. acceleration) as defined in the standards have been compared. BS 6841 (1987) suggests that an equivalent acceleration magnitude is calculated using vibration measured at four locations around the seat (x -, y -, z -seat and x -backrest); ISO 2631 (1997) suggests that vibration is measured in the three translational axes only on the seat pan but only the axis with the most severe vibration is used to assess vibration severity. Assessments made using the procedure defined in ISO 2631 tend to underestimate any risks from exposure to whole-body vibration compared to an evaluation made using the guidelines specified in BS 6841; the measurements indicated that the 17 m/s1.75 ``health guidance caution zone'' in ISO 2631 was less likely to be exceeded than the 15 m/s1.75 ``action level'' in BS 6841. Consequently, ISO 2631 ``allows'' appreciably longer daily exposures to whole-body vibration than BS 6841. . All rights reserved.

Paddan, G. S.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

54

Whole-body vibration and low-back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review presents a critical evaluation of the literature on health effects in long-term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration. To assess the relative weight of each epidemiologic study, a scoring procedure has been used, according to the quality of exposure data, effect data, study design and methodology. The most frequently reported adverse effects are: low-back pain, early degeneration of the

Carel Hulshof; Brinio Veldhuijzen van Zanten

1987-01-01

55

Acute whole-body vibration elicits post-activation potentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) leads to a rapid increase in intra-muscular temperature and enhances muscle power. The power-enhancing\\u000a effects by WBV can, at least in part, be explained by intra-muscular temperature. However, this does not exclude possible\\u000a neural effects of WBV occurring at the spinal level. The aim of this study was to examine if muscle twitch and patellar reflex\\u000a properties

Darryl J. Cochrane; Stephen R. Stannard; Elwyn C. Firth; Jörn Rittweger

2010-01-01

56

Whole body vibration exposure of surface coal mining machine operators  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat pad accelerometer were made on 61 surface coal mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. Those data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of those machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria in ISO 2631, ''A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration.'' The comparison showed that about half of all surface coal mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only 7% to 22% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. Detailed exposure statistics are presented and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remmington, P.J.; Andersen, D.W.; Bartholomae, R.; Redmond, G.

1984-02-01

57

Acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV) training to identify possible explanations for preventive effects against musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this quasi-experimental pilot study. Acute physiological and psychological effects of SR-WBV training were examined using electromyography of descending trapezius (TD) muscle, heart rate variability (HRV), different skin parameters (temperature, redness and blood flow) and self-report questionnaires. All subjects conducted a sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (2 Hz with noise level 0) and a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (6 Hz with noise level 4). They were tested before, during and after the training. Conclusions were drawn on the basis of analysis of variance. RESULTS: Twenty-three healthy, female students participated in this study (age = 22.4 ± 2.1 years; body mass index = 21.6 ± 2.2 kg/m2). Muscular activity of the TD and energy expenditure rose during verum SR-WBV compared to baseline and sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). Muscular relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than at baseline and after sham SR-WBV (all P < 0.05). During verum SR-WBV the levels of HRV were similar to those observed during sham SR-WBV. The same applies for most of the skin characteristics, while microcirculation of the skin of the middle back was higher during verum compared to sham SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Skin redness showed significant changes over the three measurement points only in the middle back area (P = 0.022). There was a significant rise from baseline to verum SR-WBV (0.86 ± 0.25 perfusion units; P = 0.008). The self-reported chronic pain grade indicators of pain, stiffness, well-being, and muscle relaxation showed a mixed pattern across conditions. Muscle and joint stiffness (P = 0.018) and muscular relaxation did significantly change from baseline to different conditions of SR-WBV (P < 0.001). Moreover, muscle relaxation after verum SR-WBV was higher than after sham SR-WBV (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Verum SR-WBV stimulated musculoskeletal activity in young healthy individuals while cardiovascular activation was low. Training of musculoskeletal capacity and immediate increase in musculoskeletal relaxation are potential mediators of pain reduction in preventive trials.

Elfering, Achim; Zahno, Jasmine; Taeymans, Jan; Blasimann, Angela; Radlinger, Lorenz

2013-01-01

58

Guidelines for Whole-Body Vibration Health Surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is strong epidemiological evidence that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. A prototype health surveillance scheme for WBV is presented in this paper. Surveillance is the collection, analysis, and dissemination of data for the purpose of prevention. The aims are to assess health status and diagnose vibration-induced disorders at an early stage, to inform the workers on the potential risk associated with vibration exposure, to give preventive advice to employers and employees and to control whether preventive measures which have been taken, were successful. It is suggested that a pre-placement health examination should be offered to each worker who will be exposed to WBV so as to make the worker aware of the hazards, to obtain baseline health data, and to identify medical conditions that may increase the risk due to WBV. The case history should focus on personal history, work history, and leisure activities involving driving of vehicles. The personal medical history should detail back pain complaints, disorders in the spine, any injuries or surgery to the musculoskeletal system. A physical examination on the lower back should be performed on workers who have experienced LBP symptoms over the past 12 months. The preplacement examination should be followed by periodic health reassessment with a regular interval according to the legislation of the country. It is suggested that periodic medical examination should be made available at least every 2 years to all workers who are exposed to WBV. Any change in vibration exposure at the workplace should be reported by the employer. If an increase in vibration exposure or a change in health status have occurred, the medical re-examination should be offered at shorter intervals at the discretion of the attending physician. There should be a periodic medical examination, which includes recording any change in exposure to WBV. The findings for the individual should be compared with previous examinations. Group data should also be compiled periodically. Medical removal may be considered along with re-placement in working practices without exposure to WBV. This paper presents opinions on health surveillance for whole-body vibration developed within a working group of partners funded on a European Community Network (BIOMED2 concerted action BMH4-CT98-3251: Research network on detection and prevention of injuries due to occupational vibration exposures). The health surveillance protocol and the draft questionnaire with explanation comments are presented for wider consideration by the science community and others before being considered appropriate for implementation. . All rights reserved.

Pope, M.; Magnusson, M.; Lundström, R.; Hulshof, C.; Verbeek, J.; Bovenzi, M.

2002-05-01

59

Lower limbs power and stiffness after whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The interest in whole-body vibration (WBV) for the enhancement of neuromuscular performance has received considerable attention. However, scientific evidence supporting the optimal prescription of WBV settings is lacking. This study investigated the acute effect of WBV combining high frequency/high peak-to-peak displacement (HH) or low frequency/low peak-to-peak displacement (LL) vs. sham intervention (SHAM) on lower limb muscle power and stiffness. A total of 223 volunteers were randomly assigned to either the HH, LL or SHAM group. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, maximal and average power, maximal and average lower limbs stiffness obtained during a hopping test were recorded before and after the respective intervention. After the intervention, the HH group showed an increase of 4.64% in CMJ height (p<0.001) whereas the values of both the LL and SHAM groups did not change. In addition, maximal and average power of the lower limbs were significantly increased in all groups (p<0.001; 10.89% and 12.82%, respectively) while no effect on lower limbs stiffness was observed. Our data show that high frequency combined with high peak-to-peak displacement is the most optimal WBV setting for CMJ height enhancement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBV on lower limbs stiffness. PMID:23143701

Colson, S S; Petit, P-D

2012-11-09

60

Neuromuscular fatigue induced by whole-body vibration exercise.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and the origin of neuromuscular fatigue induced by half-squat static whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise, and to compare it to a non-WBV condition. Nine healthy volunteers completed two fatiguing protocols (WBV and non-WBV, randomly presented) consisting of five 1-min bouts of static half-squat exercise with a load corresponding to 50 % of their individual body mass. Neuromuscular fatigue of knee and ankle muscles was investigated before and immediately after each fatiguing protocol. The main outcomes were maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, voluntary activation, and doublet peak torque. Knee extensor MVC torque decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and to the same extent after WBV (-23 %) and non-WBV (-25 %), while knee flexor, plantar flexor, and dorsiflexor MVC torque was not affected by the treatments. Voluntary activation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles was unaffected by the two fatiguing protocols. Doublet peak torque decreased significantly and to a similar extent following WBV and non-WBV exercise, for both knee extensors (-25 %; P < 0.01) and plantar flexors (-7 %; P < 0.05). WBV exercise with additional load did not accentuate fatigue and did not change its causative factors compared to non-WBV half-squat resistive exercise in recreationally active subjects. PMID:23344670

Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Saugy, Jonas; Cardinale, Marco; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Place, Nicolas

2013-01-24

61

Gastrocnemius Medialis and Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation during Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

CARDINALE, M., M. FERRARI, and V. QUARESIMA. Gastrocnemius Medialis and Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation during Whole- Body Vibration Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 694-700, 2007. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different whole-body vibration (WBV) frequencies on oxygenation of vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles during static squatting

MARCO CARDINALE; MARCO FERRARI; VALENTINA QUARESIMA

2007-01-01

62

Acute whole-body vibration does not affect static jump performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, whole-body vibration is being used to promote enhanced performance. Many coaches and athletes believe that it can acutely enhance explosive performance and power output. However, the scientific literature is unclear as to whether this enhancement occurs. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of whole-body vibration on static jump performance, including jump height, peak force,

Ashley Kavanaugh; Michael W. Ramsey; William A. Sands; G. Gregory Haff; Michael H. Stone

2011-01-01

63

ON THE HEALTH RISK OF THE LUMBAR SPINE DUE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION—THEORETICAL APPROACH, EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND EVALUATION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The guidance on the effects of vibration on health in standards for whole-body vibration (WBV) does not provide quantitative relationships between WBV and health risk. The paper aims at the elucidation of exposure–response relationships. An analysis of published data on the static and dynamic strength of vertebrae and bone, loaded with various frequencies under different conditions, provided the basis for

H. Seidel; R. Blüthner; B. Hinz; M. Schust

1998-01-01

64

An acute bout of whole-body vibration on skeleton start and 30-m sprint performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maximal 30-m upright sprinting and bent over, skeleton push performance were examined in five female national team skeleton athletes before and 10 min after an acute bout of whole-body vibration or no vibration. The whole-body vibration was applied at a frequency of 45 Hz with 4-mm displacement for 3×1-min treatments separated by 1 min. All changes in 30-m sprint and

Nicola Bullock; David T. Martin; Angus Ross; Doug Rosemond; Matthew J. Jordan; Frank E. Marino

2009-01-01

65

Effect of whole body vibration on stereotypy of young children with autism  

PubMed Central

The objective of this case was report on the effects of acute whole body vibration exposure on stereotyped behaviour of young children with autism. Four young boys (ages 4–5 years) diagnosed with autism participated. The children were participants in an early intensive behavioural intervention clinic and during downtimes stood on a whole body vibration platform with the machine turned off (control condition) and on (treatment condition) for three to four, 30 s periods (frequency=28 Hz; amplitude 0.97 mm). The outcome measure was frequency of stereotypic behaviour, which was evaluated for 5 min before and after standing on the vibration platform. The results revealed that whole body vibration was not able to uniformly decrease the rates of all types of stereotypy; that is, some stereotypy decreased while others were unchanged. Subjectively, the children enjoyed whole body vibration which was easy to integrate into the behavioural programme.

Bressel, Eadric; Gibbons, Mandi W; Samaha, Andrew

2011-01-01

66

Effects of a short-term whole body vibration intervention on bone mass and structure in elderly people.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to clarify whether a short-term whole body vibration training has a beneficial effect on bone mass and structure in elderly men and women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. METHODS: A total of 49 non-institutionalised elderly (20 men and 29 women) volunteered to participate in the study. Participants who met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to one of the study groups (whole body vibration or control). A total of 24 elderly trained squat positioned on a vibration platform 3 times per week for 11 weeks. Bone-related variables were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Two-way repeated measures one-way analysis of variance (group by time) was used to determine the effects of the intervention on the bone-related variables and also to determinate the changes within group throughout the intervention period. Analysis of covariance was used to test the differences between groups for bone-related variables in pre- and post-training assessments and in the percentage of change between groups. All analysis were carried out including age, height, subtotal lean mass and daily calcium intake as covariates. RESULTS: 11 weeks of whole body vibration training led to no changes in none of the bone mineral content and bone mineral density parameters measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry through the skeleton. At the tibia, total, trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral density decreased significantly in the whole body vibration group (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A short-term whole body vibration therapy is not enough to cause any changes on bone mineral content or bone mineral density and it only produces a slight variation on bone structure among elderly people. PMID:23711620

Gómez-Cabello, Alba; González-Agüero, Alejandro; Morales, Silvia; Ara, Ignacio; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

2013-05-24

67

EVALUATION OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration in 100 different vehicles has been measured, evaluated and assessed according to British Standard BS 6841 (1987) and International Standard ISO 2631 (1997). Vibration was measured in 14 categories of vehicle including cars, lift trucks, tractors, lorries, vans and buses. In each vehicle, the vibration was measured in five axes: vertical vibration beneath the seat, fore-and-aft, lateral and

G. S. PADDAN; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

68

Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABERCROMBY, A. F. J., W. E. AMONETTE, C. S. LAYNE, B. K. MCFARLIN, M. R. HINMAN, and W. H. PALOSKI. Variation in Neuromuscular Responses during Acute Whole-Body Vibration Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 39, No. 9, pp. 1642-1650, 2007. Purpose: Leg muscle strength and power are increased after whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise. These effects may result from increased neuromuscular

ANDREW F. J. ABERCROMBY; WILLIAM E. AMONETTE; CHARLES S. LAYNE; BRIAN K. MCFARLIN; MARTHA R. HINMAN; WILLIAM H. PALOSKI

2007-01-01

69

Whole-body vibration as a method of recovery for soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine whether superimposed whole-body vibration could improve the recovery-related effects of a traditional cool-down in high-level soccer players. Sixteen high-level junior soccer players performed a repeated-sprint ability test, after which they performed a traditional cool-down, with (experimental group) or without (control group) superimposed whole-body vibration. Functional recovery was measured through vertical jump height

Pedro J. Marin; Raúl Zarzuela; Fernando Zarzosa; Azael J. Herrero; Nuria Garatachea; Matthew R. Rhea; David García-López

2012-01-01

70

Whole-body vibration as a method of recovery for soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine whether superimposed whole-body vibration could improve the recovery-related effects of a traditional cool-down in high-level soccer players. Sixteen high-level junior soccer players performed a repeated-sprint ability test, after which they performed a traditional cool-down, with (experimental group) or without (control group) superimposed whole-body vibration. Functional recovery was measured through vertical jump height

Pedro J. Marin; Raúl Zarzuela; Fernando Zarzosa; Azael J. Herrero; Nuria Garatachea; Matthew R. Rhea; David García-López

2011-01-01

71

Whole-body vibration during manual wheelchair propulsion with selected seat cushions and back supports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the exposure to whole-body vibrations (WBV) has been shown to be detrimental to seated humans, the effects of wheelchairs and seating systems on the transmission of vibration to an individual have not been thoroughly examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if the selected wheelchair seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations. Thirty-two wheelchair

Carmen P. DiGiovine; Rory A. Cooper; Shirley G. Fitzgerald; Michael L. Boninger; Erik J. Wolf; Songfeng Guo

2003-01-01

72

Lumbar back muscle activity of helicopter pilots and whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have attributed the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in helicopter pilots mainly to poor posture in-flight and whole-body vibration, with the latter hypothesis particularly related to a cyclic response of the erector spine (ES) muscle to vibration. This work aims to determine if helicopter vibration and the pilot's normal posture during flight have significant effects on the

Carlos Gomes de Oliveira; David Martin Simpson; Jurandir Nadal

2001-01-01

73

Power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have quantified the power absorbed in the seated human body during exposure to vibration but have not investigated the effects of body posture or the power absorbed at the back and the feet. This study investigated the effects of support for the feet and back and the magnitude of vibration on the power absorbed during whole-body vertical vibration.

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2010-01-01

74

An overview of strategies to reduce whole-body vibration exposure on drivers: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) at the workplace cost a lot. These MSD, low back pain in particular, can be caused by exposure to whole body vibration (WBV). Preventive strategies to reduce vibration exposure may contribute to a decrease in MSD. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore which evidence-based preventive strategies reduce vibration exposure on drivers. A systematic literature

Ivo J. Tiemessen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2007-01-01

75

Synchronous whole-body vibration increases V O 2 during and following acute exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single bout whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise has been shown to produce small but significant increases in oxygen consumption\\u000a (VO2). How much more a complete whole-body exercise session (multiple dynamic exercises targeting both upper and lower body muscles)\\u000a can increase VO2 is unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify VO2 during and for an extended time period (24 h) following

Tom J. HazellPeter; Peter W. R. Lemon

76

Acute effects of whole-body vibration on peak isometric torque, muscle twitch torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors: Acute effects of whole-body vibration on muscle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) with a static squat on resting muscle twitch torque, peak isometric torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors during an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty- four healthy, strength-trained males were recruited for this randomized, cross-over design investigation. The WBV treatment consisted of

M. Jordan; S. Norris; D. Smith; W. Herzog

2009-01-01

77

Validity of self reported occupational exposures to hand transmitted and whole body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo assess the accuracy with which workers report their exposure to occupational sources of hand transmitted (HTV) and whole body vibration (WBV).METHODS179 Workers from various jobs involving exposure to HTV or WBV completed a self administered questionnaire about sources of occupational exposure to vibration in the past week. They were then observed at work over 1 hour, after which they

Keith T Palmer; Barbara Haward; Michael J Griffin; Holly Bendall; David Coggon

2000-01-01

78

The use of an Intensity Matching Technique to Evaluate Human Response to Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous whole-body vibration intensity matching experiments have been reviewed and some of the different experimental methods and findings are discussed. An experiment has been conducted to investigate ‘ between ’ and ‘ within ’ subject variability in such experiments and to determine the effect of varying the frequency of the standard vibration against which other frequencies are matched. Although subjects

L. C. FOTHERGILL; M. J. GRIFFIN

1977-01-01

79

The Evaluation of Discomfort Produced by Multiple Frequency Whole-Body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discomfort produced by multiple frequency whole-body vertical vibration has been studied in three expriments. Subjects were required to adjust the level of a 10 Hz sinusoidal vibration such that it produced a degree of discomfort equivalent to that caused by a variety of multiple frequency stimuli including motions containing predominant beats and up to four sinusoidal components. The levels

L. C. FOTHERGILL; M. J. GRIFFIN

1977-01-01

80

Self-reported back pain in tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A postal questionnaire on symptoms of ill health and exposure to whole-body vibration was completed by 577 workers (response rate 79%) who were employed in certain functions by two companies 11 years before. The relation between the occupational history of driving vibrating vehicles (mainly agricultural tractors) and back pain has been analyzed. The prevalence of reported back pain is

Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Paulien M. Bongers; Carel T. J. Hulshof

1990-01-01

81

The Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on the Cross-Transfer of Strength  

PubMed Central

This study investigated whether the use of superimposed whole-body vibration (WBV) during cross-education strength training would optimise strength transfer compared to conventional cross-education strength training. Twenty-one healthy, dominant right leg volunteers (21 ± 3 years) were allocated to a strength training (ST, m = 3, f = 4), a strength training with WBV (ST + V, m = 3, f = 4), or a control group (no training, m = 3, f = 4). Training groups performed 9 sessions over 3 weeks, involving unilateral squats for the right leg, with or without WBV (35?Hz; 2.5?mm amplitude). All groups underwent dynamic single leg maximum strength testing (1RM) and single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) prior to and following training. Strength increased in the trained limb for the ST (41%; ES = 1.14) and ST + V (55%; ES = 1.03) groups, which resulted in a 35% (ES = 0.99) strength transfer to the untrained left leg for the ST group and a 52% (ES = 0.97) strength transfer to the untrained leg for the ST + V group, when compared to the control group. No differences in strength transfer between training groups were observed (P = 0.15). For the untrained leg, no differences in the peak height of recruitment curves or SICI were observed between ST and ST + V groups (P = 1.00). Strength training with WBV does not appear to modulate the cross-transfer of strength to a greater magnitude when compared to conventional cross-education strength training.

Goodwill, Alicia M.; Kidgell, Dawson J.

2012-01-01

82

Musculoskeletal disorders in dumper operators exposed to whole body vibration at Indian mines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dumper operators are exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) in the course of their work. The exposure to WBV in a coal mine in Central India was investigated through measurement of the magnitude of vibration and exposure time. The vibration magnitude along the dominant Z-axis ranged from 0.644 to 1.82 m\\/s in terms of root mean square acceleration. When evaluated in

B. B. Mandal; A. K. Srivastava

2010-01-01

83

Biodynamics of the human body under whole-body vibration: Synthesis of the reported data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of most probable ranges of biodynamic responses of the human body exposed to whole-body vibration is essential for developing effective integrated human-machine system design tools, improved vibration mitigation devices and frequency-weighting for exposure assessment. The international standard, ISO-5982 (2001), defines such ranges for very limited conditions, namely for body seated without a back support and exposed to vertical vibration.

S. Rakheja; R. G. Dong; S. Patra; P.-É. Boileau; P. Marcotte; C. Warren

2010-01-01

84

Electromyography Activity of Vastus Lateralis Muscle During Whole-Body Vibrations of Different Frequencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to analyze electromyography (EMG) responses of vastus lateralis muscle to different whole-body vibration frequencies. For this purpose, 16 pro- fessional women volleyball players (age, 23.9 6 3.6 years; height, 182.5 6 11.1 cm; weight, 78.4 6 5.6 kg) voluntarily participated in the study. Vibration treatment was adminis- tered while standing on a vibrating platform

Marco Cardinale; Jon Lim

2003-01-01

85

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

Microsoft Academic Search

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey

Eckardt Johanning; Paul Landsbergis; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Raymond Luhrman

2006-01-01

86

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25–25Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting

N. Nawayseh; M. J Griffin

2003-01-01

87

The interaction of whole body vibration and noise on the cochlea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structural and functional effects of separate and combined exposure to noise and whole body vibration were studied in 40 guinea pigs. The animals were divided into control (N=10) and study groups (N=30). The study group was subdivided into three sub-groups: noise (N), vibration (V) and noise and vibration (N&V). Apart from the control group, the other sub-groups were exposed

S Soliman; M El-Atreby; S Tawfik; E Holail; N Iskandar; A Abou-Setta

2003-01-01

88

Localised Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Dynamic Exercise With Whole Body Vibration  

PubMed Central

Abstract Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings. Key points Whole body vibration affects tissue oxygenation of the lateral gastrocnemius. The underlying mechanism could be either increased blood flow or a vasospastic response in the feet. The local metabolic cost of heel raise activity on the lateral gastrocnemius does not appear to be increased by whole body vibration.

Robbins, Daniel; Elwell, Clare; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

2012-01-01

89

Loading and Concurrent Synchronous Whole-Body Vibration Interaction Increases Oxygen Consumption During Resistance Exercise  

PubMed Central

Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key Points Synchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel squat. While the application of synchronous whole body vibration had no effect on recovery oxygen, under bot vibratory and non-vibratory conditions, the heavier the external load the greater the recovery oxygen consumption levels. Regardless of vibratory condition, during the squatting exercise bout 40% BW produced higher heart rates than 20%BW or 0% BW, and 20% BW produced higher heart rates than 0% BW. There were strong trends toward higher heart rates in both vibratory conditions (50 Hz, 5-6mm; 35 Hz, 2-3 mm) than in the non-vibratory condition regardless of external loading.

Serravite, Daniel H.; Edwards, David; Edwards, Elizabeth S.; Gallo, Sara E.; Signorile, Joseph F.

2013-01-01

90

Determination of optimal whole body vibration amplitude and frequency parameters with plyometric exercise and its influence on closed-chain lower extremity acute power output and EMG activity in resistance trained males  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimal combination of Whole body vibration (WBV) amplitude and frequency has not been established. Purpose. To determine optimal combination of WBV amplitude and frequency that will enhance acute mean and peak power (MP and PP) output EMG activity in the lower extremity muscles. Methods. Resistance trained males (n = 13) completed the following testing sessions: On day 1, power spectrum testing of bilateral leg press (BLP) movement was performed on the OMNI. Days 2 and 3 consisted of WBV testing with either average (5.8 mm) or high (9.8 mm) amplitude combined with either 0 (sham control), 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz frequency. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), bicep femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles for EMG analysis. MP and PP output and EMG activity of the lower extremity were assessed pre-, post-WBV treatments and after sham-controls on the OMNI while participants performed one set of five repetitions of BLP at the optimal resistance determined on Day 1. Results. No significant differences were found between pre- and sham-control on MP and PP output and on EMG activity in RF, VL, BF and GA. Completely randomized one-way ANOVA with repeated measures demonstrated no significant interaction of WBV amplitude and frequency on MP and PP output and peak and mean EMGrms amplitude and EMG rms area under the curve. RF and VL EMGrms area under the curve significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude, whereas low amplitude significantly decreased GA mean and peak EMGrms amplitude and EMGrms area under the curve. VL mean EMGrms amplitude and BF mean and peak EMGrms amplitudes were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude when compared to sham-control. WBV frequency significantly decreased (p < 0.05) VL mean and peak EMGrms amplitude. WBV frequency at 30 and 40 Hz significantly decreased (p < 0.05) GA mean EMGrms amplitude and 20 and 30 Hz significantly decreased GA peak EMGrms amplitude. MP and PP output was not significantly effected by either treatment. Conclusions. It is concluded that WBV combined with plyometric exercise does not induce alterations in subsequent MP and PP output and EMGrms activity of the lower extremity. Future studies need to address the time of WBV exposure and magnitude of external loads that will maximize strength and/or power output.

Hughes, Nikki J.

91

Whole-body vibration and postural stress among operators of construction equipment: A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Operators of construction equipment perform various duties at work that expose them to a variety of risk factors that may lead to health problems. A few of the health hazards among operators of construction equipment are: (a) whole-body vibration, (b) awkward postural requirements (including static sitting), (c) dust, (d) noise, (e) temperature extremes, and (f) shift work. It has

N. Kumar Kittusamy; Bryan Buchholz

2004-01-01

92

Whole-Body Vibration Assessment of the M1070 Heavy Equipment Transporter. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An evaluation of all new tactical vehicles and aircraft is required to assess potential whole-body vibration (WBV) health hazards to crewmembers. As requested by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA), a health hazard assessment (HHA) was per...

T. L. Simmons B. P. Butler N. M. Alem B. S. Erickson

1994-01-01

93

The effect of occupational whole-body vibration on standing balance: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adverse health effects from exposure to occupational whole-body vibration (WBV) are common among drivers. In particular some researchers consider that there is kinaesthetic and balance disturbance from WBV exposure in the workplace and this might be one of the aetiological factors responsible for occupational low back pain in drivers. The purpose of this study was to undertake a critical review

Ramakrishnan Mani; Stephan Milosavljevic; S. John Sullivan

2010-01-01

94

Comparing the effects of various whole-body vibration accelerations on counter-movement jump performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

While it seems that whole body vibration (WBV) might be an effective modality to enhance physical performance, the proper prescription of WBV for performance enhancement remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the imme- diate effect of various WBV accelerations on counter movement jump (CMJ) height, the duration of any effect, and differences between men and women.

David M. Bazett-Jones; Holmes W. Finch; Eric L. Dugan

95

Reducing whole-body vibration and musculoskeletal injury with a new car seat design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new car seat design, which allows the back part of the seat (BPS) to lower down while a protruded cushion supports the lumbar spine, was quantitatively tested to determine its effectiveness and potentials in reducing whole-body vibration (WBV) and musculoskeletal disorders in automobile drivers. Nine subjects were tested to drive with the seat in: 1) the conventional seating arrangement

M. Makhsous; R. Hendrix; Z. Crowther; E. Nam; F. Lin

2005-01-01

96

Retrospective assessment of occupational exposure to whole-body vibration for a case-control study.  

PubMed

Occupational whole-body vibration is often studied as a risk factor for conditions that may arise soon after exposure, but only rarely have studies examined associations with conditions arising long after occupational exposure has ceased. We aimed to develop a method of constructing previous occupational whole-body vibration exposure metrics from self-reported data collected for a case-control study of Parkinson's disease. A detailed job history and exposure interview was administered to 808 residents of British Columbia, Canada (403 people with Parkinson's disease and 405 healthy controls). Participants were prompted to report exposure to whole-body vibrating equipment. We limited the data to exposure reports deemed to be above background exposures and used the whole-body vibration literature (typically reporting on seated vector sum measurements) to assign intensity (acceleration) values to each type of equipment reported. We created four metrics of exposure (duration of exposure, most intense equipment exposure, and two dose metrics combining duration and intensity) and examined their distributions and correlations. We tested the role of age and gender in predicting whole-body vibration exposure. Thirty-six percent of participants had at least one previous occupational exposure to whole-body vibrating equipment. Because less than half of participants reported exposure, all continuous metrics exhibited positively skewed distributions, although the distribution of most intense equipment exposure was more symmetrically distributed among the exposed. The arithmetic mean of duration of exposure among those exposed was 14.0 (standard deviation, SD: 14.2) work years, while the geometric mean was 6.8 (geometric SD, GSD: 4.5). The intensity of the most intense equipment exposure (among the exposed) had an arithmetic mean of 0.9 (SD: 0.3) m·s(-2) and a geometric mean of 0.8 (GSD: 1.4). Male gender and older age were both associated with exposure, although the effect of age was attenuated after adjustment for gender. The methods developed allowed us to create continuous metrics of whole-body vibration retrospectively, displaying useful variance for epidemiologic studies. PMID:22571854

Harris, M Anne; Cripton, Peter A; Teschke, Kay

2012-01-01

97

Changes in postural sway frequency and complexity in altered sensory environments following whole body vibrations.  

PubMed

Studies assessing whole body vibration (WBV) have produced largely positive effects, with some neutral, on postural control with frequencies between 25 and 40 Hz. However no conclusive evidence indicates that 25-40 Hz elicits the optimal beneficial effects. To address this issue, a larger range of vibration intensity (10-50 Hz at peak-to-peak amplitudes of 2 and 5mm) was employed while increasing the postural complexity (altered somatosensory and/or visual information) to assess acute effects of 4-min of WBV on postural control. Twelve healthy young adults underwent postural assessment at four time intervals (prior to, immediately following and 10 and 20 min post WBV). Findings revealed both postural sway frequency and sway complexity/regularity were affected by WBV. Baseline posture demonstrated increased sway frequency (p=.04) following WBV with no changes in sway complexity. When the support surface was altered, changes in both the frequency and complexity of sway were elicited (p=.027, .002, respectively). When both somatosensory and visual information were altered delayed improvements in postural control were elicited (p=.05 and .01, for frequency and complexity, respectively). Given the differential acute effects as a function of postural task complexity, future longitudinal studies could determine the overall training effect on sway frequency and complexity. PMID:22516837

Dickin, D Clark; McClain, Matthew A; Hubble, Ryan P; Doan, Jon B; Sessford, David

2012-04-17

98

Whole-body vibration in the skeleton: Development of a resonance-based testing device  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to have a strong influence on physiological systems, ranging from severely\\u000a destructive to potentially beneficial. Unfortutely, the study of WBV in a controlled manner is commonly constrained by space\\u000a and budgetary factors, particularly where vibration in the low frequency range is considered. In the work presented here,\\u000a a small, low-cost device for performing WBV

J. Chris Fritton; Clinton T. Rubin; Yi-Xian Qin; Kenneth J. McLeod

1997-01-01

99

The effects of random whole-body-vibration on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that applying vibrations to men influences multiple physiological functions. The authors analysed post effects of whole-body-vibration (WBV) on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sixty-eight persons with PD were randomly subdivided into one experimental and one control group. Motor symptoms were assessed by the UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) motor score. A cross over design

S Turbanski; K Kessler; D Schmidtbleicher

2006-01-01

100

Back disorders in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In The Netherlands so far little research has been carried out to investigate the health effects of exposure to whole-body vibration at work. In a retrospective (10-year) follow-up study, the incidence of permanent work disabilities in crane operators exposed to vibration was compared to that of a control group. The emphasis in this presentation is on disablement because of back

Paulien M. Bongers; Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Agaath P. Koemeester

1988-01-01

101

Whole-body vibration: Evaluation of emission and exposure levels arising from agricultural tractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to quantify whole-body vibration (WBV) emission and estimated exposure levels found upon a range of modern, state-of-the-art agricultural tractors, when operated in controlled conditions (traversing ISO ride vibration test tracks and performing selected agricultural operations) and whilst performing identical tasks during ‘on-farm’ use. The potential consequences of operator WBV exposure limitations, as prescribed by the European

A. J. Scarlett; J. S. Price; R. M. Stayner

2007-01-01

102

Treatment of Chronic Lower Back Pain with Lumbar Extension and Whole-Body Vibration Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Design. A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was conducted. Objective. To compare lumbar extension exercise and whole-body vibration exercise for chronic lower back pain. Summary of Background Data. Chronic lower back pain involves muscular as well as connective and neural systems. Different types of physiotherapy are applied for its treatment. Industrial vibration is regarded as a

A Randomized Controlled Trial; Jorn Rittweger; Karsten Just; Katja Kautzsch; Peter Reeg; Dieter Felsenberg

103

Triaxial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body vertical vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

During exposure of seated subjects to vertical whole-body vibration, forces in the fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical directions at the seat and backrest have been measured. The responses at the seat have been compared with those measured previously on a seat without a backrest. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25–20Hz. The subjects sat

N. Nawayseh; M. J. Griffin

2004-01-01

104

The effects of random whole-body-vibration on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that applying vibrations to men influences multiple physiological functions. The authors analysed post effects of whole-body-vibration (WBV) on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sixty-eight persons with PD were randomly subdivided into one experimental and one control group. Motor symptoms were assessed by the UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) motor score. A cross-over design was

Christian T. Haas; Stephan Turbanski; Kirn Kessler; Dietmar Schmidtbleicher

105

EMG activity during whole body vibration: motion artifacts or stretch reflexes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The validity of electromyographic (EMG) data recorded during whole body vibration (WBV) is controversial. Some authors ascribed\\u000a a major part of the EMG signal to vibration-induced motion artifacts while others have interpreted the EMG signals as muscular\\u000a activity caused at least partly by stretch reflexes. The aim of this study was to explore the origin of the EMG signal during

Ramona Ritzmann; Andreas Kramer; Markus Gruber; Albert Gollhofer; Wolfgang Taube

2010-01-01

106

Nonlinear subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the magnitude of fore-and-aft and lateral vibration on the subjective and mechanical responses of seated subjects has been investigated experimentally using simultaneous measurements of relative discomfort and apparent mass. Twelve male subjects were exposed to sinusoidal vibration at nine frequencies (between 1.6 and 10 Hz) at four magnitudes (in the range 0.125-1.0 m s-2 r.m.s.) in both horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral). The method of magnitude estimation was used to estimate discomfort relative to that caused by a 4 Hz reference vibration in the same axis. The apparent mass was calculated from the acceleration and the applied force so as to quantify the mechanical response of the body. With each direction of excitation, the apparent mass was normalised by dividing it by the apparent mass obtained at 4 Hz, so that the mechanical responses could be compared with the subjective responses. The relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass were similarly affected by the frequency and magnitude of vibration, with significant correlations between the relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass. The results indicate that the discomfort caused by horizontal whole-body vibration is associated with the apparent mass in a frequency range where motion of the whole body is dominant. In this frequency range, the nonlinear subjective responses may be attributed, at least in part, to the nonlinear dynamic responses to horizontal whole-body vibration.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Nawayseh, N.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2009-03-01

107

The effects of whole-body vibration on muscle strength and power: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Exercise with whole-body vibration (WBV) is becoming popular as an alternative to conventional training or as supplementary training. However, despite increasing research efforts in this field, additive effects of WBV on muscle performance remain unclarified. In this review, we investigated the additive effects of long-term WBV on muscle strength and power. This meta-analysis was restricted to randomized controlled trials lasting for at least 5 weeks comparing exercise with and without WBV, or comparing only WBV exposure and control. Data from a total of 314 participants in 10 studies on knee extension muscle strength, and 249 participants in 7 studies on countermovement jump height were pooled using random-effect models. Meta-analysis showed significant additional effects of WBV on muscle strength (standardized mean difference [SMD]=0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.21-1.32; p=0.007) and countermovement jump (SMD=0.87, 95% CI=0.29-1.46; p=0.003). Based on these findings, we concluded that the use of WBV would lead to greater improvements in both knee extension muscle strength and countermovement jump than under identical conditions without WBV. PMID:23989260

Osawa, Y; Oguma, Y; Ishii, N

2013-09-01

108

Magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is currently assumed that the same frequency weightings, derived from studies of vibration discomfort, can be used to evaluate the severity of vibration at all vibration magnitudes from the threshold of vibration perception to the vibration magnitudes associated with risks to health. This experimental study determined equivalent comfort contours for the whole-body vibration of seated subjects over the frequency

Miyuki Morioka; Michael J. Griffin

2006-01-01

109

Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n ?=? 15) or control (n ?=? 17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in attenuating DOMS in athletes.

Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

2011-01-01

110

On auditory evoked potentials and heart rate in man during whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Auditory evoked brain potentials and heart rate were recorded from three healthy male subjects during sinusoidal whole-body vibration exposure in the longitudinal (±az) direction (two intensities: I1=0.57 ms–2 r.m.s., I2=3.2 ms–2 r.m.s., frequency: 4 Hz) and under no-vibration control conditions according to a change-over design. All conditions were performed at a constant noise level. The part of vibration-synchronous activity contaminating

P. Ullsperger; H. Seidel

1980-01-01

111

Predicting discomfort from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting with an inclined backrest.  

PubMed

Current methods for evaluating seat vibration to predict vibration discomfort assume the same frequency weightings and axis multiplying factors can be used at the seat surface and the backrest irrespective of the backrest inclination. This experimental study investigated the discomfort arising from whole-body vertical vibration when sitting on a rigid seat with no backrest and with a backrest inclined at 0° (upright), 30°, 60°, and 90° (recumbent). Within each of these five postures, 12 subjects judged the discomfort caused by vertical sinusoidal whole-body vibration (at frequencies from 1 to 20 Hz at magnitudes from 0.2 to 2.0 m s(-2) r.m.s.) relative to the discomfort produced by a reference vibration (8 Hz at 0.4 m s(-2) r.m.s.). With 8-Hz vertical vibration, the subjects also judged vibration discomfort with each backrest condition relative to the vibration discomfort with no backrest. The locations in the body where discomfort was experienced were determined for each frequency at two vibration magnitudes. Equivalent comfort contours were determined for the five conditions of the backrest and show how discomfort depends on the frequency of vibration, the presence of the backrest, and the backrest inclination. At frequencies greater than about 8 Hz, the backrest increased vibration discomfort, especially when inclined to 30°, 60°, or 90°, and there was greater discomfort at the head or neck. At frequencies around 5 and 6.3 Hz there was less vibration discomfort when sitting with an inclined backrest. PMID:23190680

Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

2012-11-26

112

Whole-body vibration in underground load-haul-dump vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibrations (WBV) were measured at the seatpan of load-haul-dump (LHD) vehicles of 3.5-, 5-, 6- and 8-yard capacity at two underground mines. Twenty-two sets of measurements were made involving 11 vehicles, 8 operators and 4 work locations. In each set frequency-weighted rms and peak accelerations were measured in the x, y and z directions, as defined by the ISO

J. VILLAGE; J. B. MORRISON; D. K. N. LEONG

1989-01-01

113

Effects of whole-body vibration in patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine whether a whole-body vibration (mechanical oscillations) in comparison to a placebo administration leads to better postural control, mobility and balance in patients with multiple sclerosis.Design: Double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Setting: Outpatient clinic of a university department of physical medicine and rehabilitation.Subjects: Twelve multiple sclerosis patients with moderate disability (Kurtzke's Expanded Disability Status Scale 2.5-5) were allocated either to

Othmar Schuhfried; Christian Mittermaier; Tatjana Jovanovic; Karin Pieber; Tatjana Paternostro-Sluga

2005-01-01

114

Long-term effects of whole-body vibration: a critical survey of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relevant literature on the long-term effects of whole-body vibration (wbv) was analyzed in order to obtain condensed information concerning a possibly higher health risk due to long-term exposure, the relationships between the quality of exposure (intensity, duration, frequency) and pathological effects, the significance of individual factors, conclusions for standard setting, and medical health care of workers exposed to wbv.

Helmut Seidel; Renate Heide

1986-01-01

115

POSSIBLE MECHANISMS OF LOW BACK PAIN DUE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigators describe their multifaceted approach to the study of the relationship between whole-body vibration and low back pain.In vitroexperiments, using percutaneous pin-mounted accelerometers have shown that the natural frequency is at 4·5 Hz. The frequency response was affected by posture, seating, and seat-back inclination. The response appears to be largely determined by the rocking of the pelvis. Electromyographic studies

M. H. Pope; D. G. Wilder; M. Magnusson

1998-01-01

116

Effects of random whole-body vibration on postural control in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated spontaneous effects of random whole-body vibration (rWBV) on postural control in Parkinsonian subjects. Effects were examined in biomechanical tests from a total of 52 patients divided equally into one experimental and one control group. Postural control was tested pre- and post-treatment in two standardized conditions (narrow standing and tandem standing). The intervention was based on rWBV (y: 3

Stephan Turbanski; Christian T. Haas; Dietmar Schmidtbleicher; Antje Friedrich; Petra Duisberg

2005-01-01

117

Oxygen uptake during whole-body vibration exercise: comparison with squatting as a slow voluntary movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   In this study we investigated metabolic power during whole-body vibration exercise (VbX) compared to mild resistance exercise.\\u000a Specific oxygen consumption (\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a ) and subjectively perceived exertion (rating of perceived exertion, RPE; Borg scale) were assessed in 12 young healthy subjects\\u000a (8 female and 4 male). The outcome parameters were assessed during the last minute of a 3-min exercise bout,

Jörn Rittweger; Hans Schiessl; Dieter Felsenberg

2001-01-01

118

On the Relationship between Whole-body Vibration Exposure and Spinal Health Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual framework provides the possibility to identify factors determining the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spine and the internal stress-strain relationships. Epidemiological studies were critically evaluated with respect to their significance for the derivation of quantitative exposure-effect relationships. The approach of deriving such relationships from a comparison with self-generated accelerations during daily activities was considered as unsuited.

Helmut SEIDEL

2005-01-01

119

Effects of sinusoidal whole-body vibration on the lumbar spine: the stress-strain relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this experimental study was to estimate the strain in the lumbar spine due to whole-body vibration (WBV). Four male subjects were exposed to vertical sinusoidal WBV with frequencies ranging from 1 to 15 Hz at two intensities (I1 = 1.5 ms-2 rms; I2 = 3.0 ms-2 rms). The compressive forces acting on the disc L3-4 during the

Helmut Seidel; Ralph Bluethner; Barbara Hinz

1986-01-01

120

Effect of four-month vertical whole body vibration on performance and balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

TORVINEN, S., P. KANNUS, H. SIEVANEN, T. A. JARVINEN, M. PASANEN, S. KONTULAINEN, T. L. JARVINEN, M. JARVINEN, P. OJA, and I. VUORI. Effect of four-month vertical whole body vibration on performance and balance. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 34, No. 9, pp. 1523-1528, 2002. Purpose: This randomized controlled study was designed to investigate the effects of a 4-month whole

SAILA TORVINEN; PEKKA KANNUS; MATTI PASANEN; SAIJA KONTULAINEN; PEKKA OJA; ILKKA VUORI

2002-01-01

121

The rate of muscle temperature increase during acute whole-body vibration exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the rate of muscle temperature (T\\u000a m) increase during acute whole-body vibration (WBV), to that of stationary cycling and passive warm-up. Additionally we wanted\\u000a to determine if the purported increase in counter-movement jump and peak power cycling from acute WBV could be explained by\\u000a changes in muscle temperature. Eight active participants volunteered for the study, which involved

D. J. Cochrane; S. R. Stannard; A. J. Sargeant; J. Rittweger

2008-01-01

122

Whole-Body Vibration and Rehabilitation of Chronic Diseases: A Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

The objectives of the study were to review the current literature and findings on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training method on performance and its ability to aid in the rehabilitation of chronic diseases (neurological, musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions). Six electronic databases were searched. The combination of the search terminology used included WBV and several neurological, musculoskeletal and metabolic conditions. Twenty six papers were found to be relevant for this review and were included for critical evaluation with regards to sample characteristics, research intervention and methodology. Most studies were conducted on patients diagnosed with neurological conditions (n = 15) while less were performed on patients suffering from musculoskeletal (n = 7) or metabolic (n = 4) disorders. Comparisons were difficult to draw on because of the different pathologies and the differences in the methodology of each study. Some of the observed methodological flaws included limitations in relation to insufficient randomisation, lack of sample homogeneity (size, age variability) and poor blinding in most studies. No consensus could be reached as to whether WBV is more effective than other interventions or no intervention at all, while the additional effects that WBV may have in relation to other interventions could not be assumed. Nevertheless, chronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic but not from neurological conditions. Although WBV did not prove to be more effective compared to other training methods, it can be used, in some cases, as a less fatiguing and less time-consuming method to enhance physical capabilities. Future research should focus on the effectiveness of WBV in relation to no treatment at all, and to age. Key pointsChronic WBV training seems to only improve strength in neurological patients while balance and mobility improves only in patients suffering from musculoskeletal or metabolic conditions.WBV did not prove to be more effective than other interventions, while the positive effects of WBV in relation to no intervention at all could not be established.No consensus could be reached as to which vibration type is more effective.WBV training could be used as a safe, less fatiguing and less time-consuming type of exercise for patients with neurologic conditions instead of other more demanding interventions.

Chanou, Konstantina; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Jamurtas, Athanasios

2012-01-01

123

Effects of whole-body vibration exercise on the endocrine system of healthy men.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration is reported to increase muscle performance, bone mineral density and stimulate the secretion of lipolytic and protein anabolic hormones, such as GH and testosterone, that might be used for the treatment of obesity. To date, as no controlled trial has examined the effects of vibration exercise on the human endocrine system, we performed a randomized controlled study, to establish whether the circulating concentrations of glucose and hormones (insulin, glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, GH, IGF-1, free and total testosterone) are affected by vibration in 10 healthy men [age 39 +/- 3, body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 +/- 0.5 kg/m2, mean +/- SEM]. Volunteers were studied on two occasions before and after standing for 25 min on a ground plate in the absence (control) or in the presence (vibration) of 30 Hz whole body vibration. Vibration slightly reduced plasma glucose (30 min: vibration 4.59 +/- 0.21, control 4.74 +/- 0.22 mM, p=0.049) and increased plasma norepinephrine concentrations (60 min: vibration 1.29 +/- 0.18, control 1.01 +/- 0.07 nM, p=0.038), but did not change the circulating concentrations of other hormones. These results demonstrate that vibration exercise transiently reduces plasma glucose, possibly by increasing glucose utilization by contracting muscles. Since hormonal responses, with the exception of norepinephrine, are not affected by acute vibration exposure, this type of exercise is not expected to reduce fat mass in obese subjects. PMID:15233550

Di Loreto, C; Ranchelli, A; Lucidi, P; Murdolo, G; Parlanti, N; De Cicco, A; Tsarpela, O; Annino, G; Bosco, C; Santeusanio, F; Bolli, G B; De Feo, P

2004-04-01

124

Triaxial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical forces on a seat and a backrest have been investigated with 12 male subjects exposed to random fore-and-aft whole-body vibration (0.25–10Hz) at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2rms). Subjects sat in each of four sitting postures having varying foot heights, so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat.The fore-and-aft forces on

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2005-01-01

125

The apparent mass of the seated human exposed to single-axis and multi-axis whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most workplaces where workers are exposed to whole-body vibration involves simultaneous motion in the fore-and-aft (x-), lateral (y-) and vertical (z-) directions. Previous studies reporting the biomechanical response of people exposed to vibration have almost always used single-axis vibration stimuli. This paper reports a study where apparent masses of 15 subjects were measured whilst exposed to single-axis and tri-axial whole-body

Neil J. Mansfield; Setsuo Maeda

2007-01-01

126

Whole-body vibration applied during upper body exercise improves performance.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has exercisers perform static and dynamic resistance training exercises on a ground-based platform. Exposure to WBV exposure has demonstrated benefits and no effect on lower body strength, power, and performance. The aim of this study was to determine if WBV exposure (50 Hz, 2.51 mm) has any potentiating effects postexercise by measuring the kinematic variables of a set of upper body elbow-extensor exercise (70% one-repetition maximum [1RM]) to volitional exhaustion. Sixteen recreationally active students (12 male and 4 female) performed 3 different experimental conditions on separate days. Each condition had the subjects perform 1 set of elbow-extension exercise to fatigue with 1 of 3 WBV treatments: WBV simultaneously during the set (AE); 60 seconds after application of WBV for 30 seconds (RE); and no WBV (CTRL). Kinematic parameters of each repetition were monitored by linking a rotary encoder to the highest load plate. The mean velocity and acceleration throughout the set and perceived exertion were analyzed. A significant increase (p < 0.05) was observed in the mean velocity for the whole set in the AE condition vs. the CTRL condition. The mean acceleration was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the AE condition in comparison with RE (increased by 45.3%) and CTRL (increased by 50.4%) conditions. The positive effect induced by WBV on upper-limb performance is only achieved when the stimulus is applied during the exercise. However, WBV applied 60 seconds before upper body exercise results in no benefit. PMID:23085972

Marín, Pedro J; Herrero, Azael J; Milton, John G; Hazell, Tom J; García-López, David

2013-07-01

127

The feasibility of whole body vibration in institutionalised elderly persons and its influence on muscle performance, balance and mobility: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN62535013  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fatigue or lack of interest can reduce the feasibility of intensive physical exercise in nursing home residents. Low-volume exercise interventions with similar training effects might be an alternative. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the feasibility of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) in institutionalised elderly, and its impact on functional capacity and muscle performance. METHODS: Twenty-four

Ivan Bautmans; Ellen Van Hees; Jean-Claude Lemper; Tony Mets

2005-01-01

128

Whole body vibration and posture as risk factors for low back pain among forklift truck drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the risks from whole-body vibration and posture demands for low back pain (LBP) among forklift truck (forklift) drivers. Using a validated questionnaire, information about health history was obtained over a period of two weeks in face-to-face interviews. The forklift drivers were observed in respect of their sitting posture, including frequency with which different positions were adopted (bending, leaning and twisting) and postural analyses were conducted using the OWAS and RULA techniques. Forklift vibrations at the seat (exposure) were measured in the three orthogonal axes (x-fore and aft, y-lateral and z-vertical) under actual working conditions according to the recommendations of ISO 2631-1. The results showed that LBP was more prevalent amongst forklift drivers than among non-drivers and driving postures in which the trunk is considerably twisted or bent forward associated with greatest risk. Furthermore, forklift drivers showed to be exposed to acceptable levels of vibration in the x- and y-directions (i.e., below the EU Physical Agents Directive on Vibration Exposure recommended action level—0.5 m/s2), but not in the z-direction. There were indications that whole-body vibration acts associatively with other factors (not independently) to precipitate LBP.

Hoy, J.; Mubarak, N.; Nelson, S.; Sweerts de Landas, M.; Magnusson, M.; Okunribido, O.; Pope, M.

2005-06-01

129

Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Whole Body Vibration on Glycaemia Control in Type 2 Diabetic Males  

PubMed Central

Purpose aerobic exercise has been identified as the main treatment for type 2 diabetic patients. Such an exercise, however, is usually repined by some of patients who suffer from lack of stamina. Therefore, whole body vibration has recently been introduced as a passive intervention. The present study aimed at comparing how aerobic exercise and whole body vibration affect glycaemia control in type 2 diabetic males. Methods Thirty diabetic males were divided into three groups, namely aerobic exercise (AE), whole body vibration (WBV), and control. Aerobic exercise schedule consisted of three walking sessions a week, each for 30-60 minutes and in 60-70% of maximum stock heartbeat. Vibration exercise was composed of 8-12-min stand-up and semi-squat positioning in frequency of 30 Hz and amplitude of 2 mm. Concentrations of fasting glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, and insulin were measured in the beginning of the trial, after the fourth week, and after the eighth week. Results After 8 weeks of exercise, no significant difference was detected in concentrations of fasting glycosylated hemoglobin and insulin between the groups (P=0.83, P=0.12). There were no significant differences in any of the variables between AE and WBV (P>0.05). But a more significant decrease in fasting glucose was observed in exercise groups (AE and WBV) compared with control group (P=0.02). Conclusion The present study showed that AE and WBV identically stimulate metabolic system. Thus, it can be concluded that type 2 diabetic patients lacking stamina for aerobic exercise can opt for vibration exercise as an effective substitute.

Behboudi, Lale; Azarbayjani, Mohammad-Ali; Aghaalinejad, Hamid; Salavati, Mahyar

2011-01-01

130

Preliminary recognition of whole body vibration risk in private farmers' working environment.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was the preliminary recognition of whole body mechanical vibration risk among farmers in the rural work environment. The study covered 15 farms using cultivated land of the size of over 10 ha, carrying out mixed production (plant-animal), equipped with agricultural tractors, and a basic set of tractor-mounted agricultural machinery, with a partial contribution of self-propelled agricultural machines. The scope of the study covered the measurements of effective vibration RMS acceleration (equivalent, maximum, minimum, peak) frequency corrected on the seats of agricultural vehicles in the three spatial directions of vibration (X, Y, Z). These measurements were realized while performing various field and transport work activities during the period of the whole year. A analysis of the peak, maximum and minimum vibration accelerations confirms that in the agricultural occupational environment there occurs a considerable variation of the vibration values registered. This is also evidenced by high values of the Crest Factor, sometimes exceeding a score of 10. Analysis of the registered equivalent values of vibration acceleration (frequency corrected) from the hygienic aspect showed that vibration occurring on the seats may create risk for farmers' health while performing such work activities as: tending and raking of hay, fertilizers spreading, soil aggregation, grass mowing and cultivation. Analysis of the spatial distribution of the measured, frequency corrected vibration accelerations indicates that considerably the highest acceleration values occur in the vertical plane (direction-Z). Literature data clearly confirm an unfavourable effect of whole body vibration present in agricultural vehicles on discomfort and the occurrence of back pain in the operators, especially in the low back region (lumbar spine), as well as degenerative changes in the spine. PMID:18247468

Solecki, Leszek

2007-12-01

131

Controlled Whole Body Vibration to Decrease Fall Risk and Improve Health-Related Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. Bruyere O, Wuidart M-A, Di Palma E, Goulay M, Ethgen O, Richy F, Reginster J-Y. Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related qual- ity of life of nursing home,residents. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2005;86:303-7. Objective: To investigate the effects of whole body vibra-

Olivier Bruyere; Marc-Antoine Wuidart; Margaret Gourlay; Olivier Ethgen; Florent Richy; Jean-Yves Reginster

2005-01-01

132

Measurement of whole-body vibration exposure from speed control humps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of speed control humps is to introduce shocks and high vibration levels when a car passes over them if its speed is higher than the allowable limit. Hump geometry is a major factor in altering the level of these shocks and specifying the speed limit. However, there is no study of the relationship between whole body vibration due to passing over a speed control hump and lower back pain or occupational diseases. In this study, an experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate health risks associated with different geometry speed control humps. Vibration levels and shocks are measured by a seat pad accelerometer placed under the driver's seat to evaluate hazard risks on the human body's lower back. The assessment is based on two standard methods of measuring whole body vibration: the British standard BS 6841 and the new ISO/DIS standard 2631-5. These methods are used to assess the effects of vehicle type, passenger location in the vehicle, vehicle speed, and speed control hump geometry. It was found that circular speed control humps currently installed on many public roads should be modified in order to eliminate hazards. Two newly designed speed humps were proved to be less hazardous than circular speed control humps.

Khorshid, E.; Alkalby, F.; Kamal, H.

2007-07-01

133

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone?  

PubMed Central

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45 Hz, 0.3 g, 15 minutes/days, 5 days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8 weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies.

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

2013-01-01

134

Therapeutic impact of low amplitude high frequency whole body vibrations on the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse bone.  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by extremely brittle bone. Currently, bisphosphonate drugs allow a decrease of fracture by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone mass but with possible long term side effects. Whole body mechanical vibrations (WBV) treatment may offer a promising route to stimulate bone formation in OI patients as it has exhibited health benefits on both muscle and bone mass in human and animal models. The present study has investigated the effects of WBV (45Hz, 0.3g, 15minutes/days, 5days/week) in young OI (oim) and wild type female mice from 3 to 8weeks of age. Vibration therapy resulted in a significant increase in the cortical bone area and cortical thickness in the femur and tibia diaphysis of both vibrated oim and wild type mice compared to sham controls. Trabecular bone was not affected by vibration in the wild type mice; vibrated oim mice, however, exhibited significantly higher trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia. Femoral stiffness and yield load in three point bending were greater in the vibrated wild type mice than in sham controls, most likely attributed to the increase in femur cortical cross sectional area observed in the ?CT morphology analyses. The vibrated oim mice showed a trend toward improved mechanical properties, but bending data had large standard deviations and there was no significant difference between vibrated and non-vibrated oim mice. No significant difference of the bone apposition was observed in the tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone for both the oim and wild type vibrated mice by histomorphometry analyses of calcein labels. At the mid diaphysis, the cortical bone apposition was not significantly influenced by the WBV treatment in both the endosteum and periosteum of the oim vibrated mice while a significant change is observed in the endosteum of the vibrated wild type mice. As only a weak impact in bone apposition between the vibrated and sham groups is observed in the histological sections, it is possible that WBV reduced bone resorption, resulting in a relative increase in cortical thickness. Whole body vibration appears as a potential effective and innocuous means for increasing bone formation and strength, which is particularly attractive for treating the growing skeleton of children suffering from brittle bone disease or low bone density pathologies without the long term disadvantages of current pharmacological therapies. PMID:23352925

Vanleene, Maximilien; Shefelbine, Sandra J

2013-01-22

135

Whole-body vibration improves functional recovery in spinal cord injured rats.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a relatively novel form of exercise used to improve neuromuscular performance in healthy individuals. Its usefulness as a therapy for patients with neurological disorders, in particular spinal cord injury (SCI), has received little attention in clinical settings and, surprisingly, even less in animal SCI models. We performed severe compression SCI at a low-thoracic level in Wistar rats followed by daily WBV starting 7 (10 rats) or 14 (10 rats) days after injury (WBV7 and WBV14, respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Rats with SCI but no WBV training (sham, 10 rats) and intact animals (10 rats) served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, WBV did not improve BBB score, plantar stepping, or ladder stepping during the 12-week period. Accordingly, WBV did not significantly alter plantar H-reflex, lesion volume, serotonergic input to the lumbar spinal cord, nor cholinergic or glutamatergic inputs to lumbar motoneurons at 12 weeks after SCI. However, compared to sham, WBV14, but not WBV7, significantly improved body weight support (rump-height index) during overground locomotion and overall recovery between 6-12 weeks and also restored the density of synaptic terminals in the lumbar spinal cord at 12 weeks. Most remarkably, WBV14 led to a significant improvement of bladder function at 6-12 weeks after injury. These findings provide the first evidence for functional benefits of WBV in an animal SCI model and warrant further preclinical investigations to determine mechanisms underpinning this noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily delivered potential rehabilitation therapy for SCI. PMID:23157611

Wirth, Felicitas; Schempf, Greta; Stein, Gregor; Wellmann, Katharina; Manthou, Marilena; Scholl, Carolin; Sidorenko, Malina; Semler, Oliver; Eisel, Leonie; Harrach, Rachida; Angelova, Srebrina; Jaminet, Patrick; Ankerne, Janina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schubert, Harald; Abdulla, Diana; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Schönau, Eckhard

2013-04-03

136

Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bruyere O, Wuidart M-A, Di Palma E, Goulay M, Ethgen O, Richy F, Reginster J-Y. Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents.

Olivier Bruyere; Marc-Antoine Wuidart; Elio Di Palma; Margaret Gourlay; Olivier Ethgen; Florent Richy; Jean-Yves Reginster

2005-01-01

137

Isolated and combined effects of prolonged exposures to noise and whole-body vibration on hearing, vision and strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This study was carried out in order: (1) to examine the effects of isolated and combined prolonged exposures to noise and whole-body vibration on hearing, vision and subjectively experienced strain, and (2) to check the combined effects with repeated exposures. Six male subjects were exposed twice to noise (N) at 92 dBA, whole-body vibration (V) in the Z-axis at

Helmut Seidel; Barbara Harazin; Kristina Pavlas; Christine Sroka; Jörg Richter; Ralph Bliithner; Udo Erdmann; Jan Grzesik; Barbara Hinz; Reinhard Rothe

1988-01-01

138

MYOELECTRIC RESPONSE OF BACK MUSCLES TO VERTICAL RANDOM WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION WITH DIFFERENT MAGNITUDES AT DIFFERENT POSTURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m\\/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat

R. Blüthner; H. Seidel; B. Hinz

2002-01-01

139

Application of finite-element models to predict forces acting on the lumbar spine during whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To predict forces acting on the spine during whole-body vibration for a variety of boundary conditions – body mass, height and posture.Design. Representative anthropometric data and models for an upright, relaxed and bent forward sitting posture were used to derive model families with 30 variants of a finite-element model.Background. A given exposure to whole-body vibration can cause a variable

H Seidel; R Blüthner; B Hinz

2001-01-01

140

Equal sensation curves for whole-body vibration expressed as a function of driving force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies have shown that the seated human is most sensitive to whole-body vertical vibration at about 5 Hz. Similarly, the body shows an apparent mass resonance at about 5 Hz. Considering these similarities between the biomechanical and subjective responses, it was hypothesized that, at low frequencies, subjective ratings of whole-body vibration might be directly proportional to the driving force. Twelve male subjects participated in a laboratory experiment where subjects sat on a rigid seat mounted on a shaker. The magnitude of a test stimulus was adjusted such that the subjective intensity could be matched to a reference stimulus, using a modified Bruceton test protocol. The sinusoidal reference stimulus was 8-Hz vibration with a magnitude of 0.5 m/s2 rms (or 0.25 m/s2 rms for the 1-Hz test); the sinusoidal test stimuli had frequencies of 1, 2, 4, 16, and 32 Hz. Equal sensation contours in terms of seat acceleration showed data similar to those in the literature. Equal sensation contours in terms of force showed a nominally linear response at 1, 2, and 4 Hz, but an increasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. This is in agreement with a model derived from published subjective and objective fitted data. .

Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

2005-06-01

141

Varying whole body vibration amplitude differentially affects tendon and ligament structural and material properties.  

PubMed

Whole Body Vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular for helping to maintain bone mass and strengthening muscle. Vibration regimens optimized for bone maintenance often operate at hypogravity levels (<1G) and regimens for muscle strengthening often employ hypergravity (>1G) vibrations. The effect of vibratory loads on tendon and ligament properties is unclear though excessive vibrations may be injurious. Our objective was to evaluate how tendon gene expression and the mechanical/histological properties of tendon and ligament were affected in response to WBV in the following groups: no vibration, low vibration (0.3G peak-to-peak), and high vibration (2G peak-to-peak). Rats were vibrated for 20 min a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. Upon sacrifice, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), patellar tendon (PT), and the Achilles Tendon (AT) were isolated with insertion sites intact. All tissues were tensile tested to determine structural and material properties or used for histology. Patellar tendon was also subjected to quantitative RT-PCR to evaluate expression of anabolic and catabolic genes. No differences in biomechanical data between the control and the low vibration groups were found. There was evidence of significant weakness in the MCL with high vibration, but no significant effect on the PT or AT. Histology of the MCL and PT showed a hypercellular tissue response and some fiber disorganization with high vibration. High vibration caused an increase in collagen expression and a trend for an increase in IGF-1 expression suggesting a potential anabolic response to prevent tendon overuse injury. PMID:23623311

Keller, Benjamin V; Davis, Matthew L; Thompson, William R; Dahners, Laurence E; Weinhold, Paul S

2013-04-25

142

Myoelectric reactions to ultra-low frequency and low-frequency whole body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  5 healthy males were exposed to vertical sinusoidal whole body vibration (WBV) at 5 frequencies (F1=0.315 Hz, F2=0.63 Hz, F3=1.25 Hz, F4=2.5 Hz, F5=5.0 Hz) and 2 intensities (11=1.2 ms–2 rms, F1-F5; I2=2.0 ms–2 rms, F2–F5). Erector spinae EMGs were derived at the levels of the first thoracic (T1) and third lumbar (L3) spinous processes, rectified and synchronously averaged, as

Helmut Seidel

1988-01-01

143

Effect of whole-body vibration on BMD: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Our systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining whole-body vibration (WBV) effect\\u000a on bone mineral density (BMD) found significant but small improvements in hip areal BMD (aBMD) in postmenopausal women and\\u000a in tibia and spine volumetric BMD in children\\/adolescents, but not in other BMD measurements in postmenopausal women and young\\u000a adults.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  Animal experiments report anabolic bone changes

L. Slatkovska; S. M. H. Alibhai; J. Beyene; A. M. Cheung

2010-01-01

144

Three-dimensional modeling of supine human and transport system under whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

The development of predictive computer human models in whole-body vibration has shown some success in predicting simple types of motion, mostly for seated positions and in the uniaxial vertical direction. The literature revealed only a handful of papers that tackled supine human modeling in response to vertical vibration. The objective of this work is to develop a predictive, multibody, three-dimensional human model to simulate the supine human and underlying transport system in response to multidirectional whole-body vibration. A three-dimensional dynamic model of a supine human and its underlying transport system is presented in this work to predict supine-human biodynamic response under three-dimensional input random whole-body vibration. The proposed supine-human model consists of three interconnected segments representing the head, torso-arms, and pelvis-legs. The segments are connected via rotational and translational joints that have spring-damper components simulating the three-dimensional muscles and tissuelike connecting elements in the three x, y, and z directions. Two types of transport systems are considered in this work, a rigid support and a long spinal board attached to a standard military litter. The contact surfaces between the supine human and the underlying transport system are modeled using spring-damper components. Eight healthy supine human subjects were tested under combined-axis vibration files with a magnitude of 0.5?m/s2 (rms) and a frequency content of 0.5-16?Hz. The data from seven subjects were used in parameter identification for the dynamic model using optimization schemes in the frequency domain that minimize the differences between the magnitude and phase of the predicted and experimental transmissibility. The predicted accelerations in the time and frequency domains were comparable to those gathered from experiments under different anthropometric, input vibration, and transport conditions under investigation. Based on the results, the proposed dynamic model has the potential to be used to provide motion data to drive a detailed finite element model of a supine human for further investigation of muscle forces and joint dynamics. The predicted kinematics of the supine human and transport system would also benefit patient safety planners and vibration suppression designers in their endeavors. PMID:23699722

Wang, Yang; Rahmatalla, Salam

2013-06-01

145

Musculoskeletal Response to Whole-Body Vibration During Fracture Healing in Intact and Ovariectomized Rats  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the effect of vibration on bone healing and muscle in intact and ovariectomized rats. Thirty ovariectomized (at 3 months of age) and 30 intact 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral metaphyseal osteotomy of tibia. Five days later, half of the ovariectomized and of the intact rats were exposed to whole-body vertical vibration (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration) for 15 min twice a day during 30 days. The other animals did not undergo vibration. After decapitation of rats, one tibia was used for computed tomographic, biomechanical, and histological analyses; the other was used for gene expression analyses of alkaline phosphatase (Alp), osteocalcin (Oc), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 1, and insulinlike growth factor 1. Serum Alp and Oc were measured. Mitochondrial activity, fiber area and distribution, and capillary densities were analyzed in M. gastrocnemius and M. longissimus. We found that vibration had no effect on body weight and food intake, but it improved cortical and callus densities (97 vs. 99%, 72 vs. 81%), trabecular structure (9 vs. 14 trabecular nodes), blood supply (1.7 vs. 2.1 capillaries/fiber), and oxidative metabolism (17 vs. 23 pmol O2/s/mg) in ovariectomized rats. Vibration generally increased muscle fiber size. Tibia biomechanical properties were diminished after vibration. Oc gene expression was higher in vibrated rats. Serum Alp was increased in ovariectomized rats. In ovariectomized rats, vibration resulted in an earlier bridging; in intact rats, callus bridging occurred later after vibration. The chosen vibration regimen (90 Hz, 0.5 mm, 4 × g acceleration, 15 min twice a day) was effective in improving musculoskeletal tissues in ovariectomized rats but was not optimal for fracture healing.

Stuermer, Ewa K.; Werner, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Kolios, Leila; Sehmisch, Stephan; Tezval, Mohammad; Utesch, Clara; Mangal, Orzala; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dullin, Christian; Stuermer, Klaus M.

2010-01-01

146

Six-degree-of-freedom whole-body vibration exposure levels during routine skidder operations.  

PubMed

This research focuses on quantifying six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure levels that occur in Northern Ontario skidders during routine field operating tasks. 6-DOF vibration running root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration levels at the operator/seat interface were determined for eight skidders while driving loaded, driving unloaded, picking up a load, dropping off a load and ploughing logs under field operating conditions. The acceleration data were weighted in accordance with ISO 2631-1:1997 and evaluated for both health and comfort outcomes. The mean running RMS weighted translational and rotational accelerations all exceeded 0.36 m/s(2) and 0.14 rad/s(2). The greatest average accelerations occurred while driving unloaded with this condition displaying translational vibration total values (VTV) that exceeded the upper limit of the ISO 2631-1:1997 health caution zone within an average of 2.3 h. Utilizing 6-DOF VTV, virtually all operating conditions would be designated as uncomfortable. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study provides one of the most comprehensive reports on vibration exposures in seated vehicle operators. The results are geared towards ergonomists with discussions on health effects and measurement concerns, while providing the raw vibration exposure data that will be useful to vehicle, component and vibration sensor designers. PMID:20432089

Jack, R J; Oliver, M; Dickey, J P; Cation, S; Hayward, G; Lee-Shee, N

2010-05-01

147

The influence of classical dance training on preferred supporting leg and whole body turning bias  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rightward turning bias has been more frequently noted during adult classical dance practice than during spontaneous rotations. Training could play a role in inducing a preferred direction. We observed the preferred direction for executing four spontaneous whole-body full turns (pirouettes), with eyes open or closed, in pre-pubertal untrained girls and classical dance students. Of untrained girls, 58% showed a

E. Golomer; F. Rosey; H. Dizac; C. Mertz; J. Fagard

2009-01-01

148

Tri-axial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During exposure of seated subjects to vertical whole-body vibration, forces in the fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical directions at the seat and backrest have been measured. The responses at the seat have been compared with those measured previously on a seat without a backrest. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-20Hz. The subjects sat on a rigid seat with a rigid backrest and were exposed to a 16 different conditions: four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms-2 r.m.s.) and four sitting postures (with varying thigh contact with the seat). Although the excitation was vertical, considerable dynamic forces were found in the fore-and-aft direction on both the seat and the backrest. In the vertical direction on the backrest, and in the lateral direction on the seat and the backrest, the forces were low. At both the seat and the backrest, forces in all directions showed a non-linear behaviour. The presence of the backrest modified the forces on the seat in both the vertical and fore-and-aft directions: in all four postures there was an increase in the resonance frequency of the apparent mass when using the backrest. The effect of the backrest on fore-and-aft forces on the seat depended on whether the feet were supported or not. The results show the importance of considering the backrest when studying the response of the human body to whole-body vertical vibration.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2004-10-01

149

Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to the spinal column. This model has the spinal column and the support structures such as the muscles of the back and the abdomen. The spinal column is made by the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks that are considered the rigid body and the rotational spring and damper respectively. The parameter of this model is decided by the literature and the body type of the subject with respect to the mass and the model structure. And stiffness and damping parameters are searched by fitting the model simulation results to the experimental measured data with respect to the vibration transmissibilities from the seat surface to the spinal column and the head and with respect to the driving-point apparent mass. In addition, the natural modes of the model compare with the result of experimental modal analysis. The influence of the abdomen and the muscles of the back are investigated by comparing three models with respect to above vibration characteristics. Three model are the proposed model, the model that has the spinal column and the model that has the muscles of the back in addition to the spinal column.

Tamaoki, Gen; Yoshimura, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kaoru; Nakai, Kazuma

150

Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure. PMID:22814094

Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

2012-07-06

151

Whole-Body Vibration Exposure Study in U.S. Railroad Locomotives—An Ergonomic Risk Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exposure of locomotive engineers and the vibration attenuation of seats in 22 U.S. locomotives (built between 1959 and 2000) was studied during normal revenue service and following international measurement guidelines. Triaxial vibration measurements (duration mean 155 min, range 84–383 min) on the seat and on the floor were compared. In addition to the basic vibration evaluation (aw rms),

Eckardt Johanning; Siegfried Fischer; Eberhard Christ; Benno Göres; Paul Landsbergis

2002-01-01

152

EFFECT OF MUSCLE TENSION ON NONLINEARITIES IN THE APPARENT MASSES OF SEATED SUBJECTS EXPOSED TO VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

In subjects exposed to whole-body vibration, the cause of non-linear dynamic characteristics with changes in vibration magnitude is not understood. The effect of muscle tension on the non-linearity in apparent mass has been investigated in this study. Eight seated male subjects were exposed to random and sinusoidal vertical vibration at five magnitudes (0·35–1·4 m\\/s2 r.m.s.). The random vibration was presented

Y. Matsumoto; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

153

A COMPARISON OF STANDARDIZED METHODS FOR PREDICTING THE HAZARDS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND REPEATED SHOCKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods of measuring, evaluating and assessing whole-body vibration and repeated shock are offered in ISO 2631 (1974, 1985), BS 6841 (1987), and ISO 2631 (1997). This paper presents a comparison of guidance on the health effects of vibration and repeated shock given in these standards. International Standard 2631 (1974,1985) offered a set of exposure limits. British Standard 6841 (1987) defines

M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

154

Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2012-01-01

155

Combined whole-body vibration, resistance exercise, and sustained vascular occlusion increases PGC-1? and VEGF mRNA abundances.  

PubMed

We previously reported that high load resistance exercise with superimposed whole-body vibration and sustained vascular occlusion (vibroX) markedly improves cycling endurance capacity, increases capillary-to-fibre ratio and skeletal muscle oxidative enzyme activity in untrained young women. These findings are intriguing, since increases in oxidative muscle phenotype and endurance capacity are typically induced by endurance but not heavy resistance exercise. Here, we tested the hypothesis that vibroX activates genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis. Eight healthy, recreationally resistance-trained young men performed either vibroX or resistance exercise (RES) in a randomised, cross-over design. Needle biopsies (M. vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and 3 h post-exercise. Changes in relative gene expression levels were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. After vibroX, vascular endothelial growth factor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator 1? mRNA abundances increased to 2- and 4.4-fold, respectively, but did not significantly change above resting values after RES. Other genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were not affected by either exercise modality. While vibroX increased the expression of hexokinase II, xanthine dehydrogenase, and manganese superoxide dismutase mRNA, there were no changes in these transcripts after RES. This study demonstrates that high load resistance exercise with superimposed whole-body vibration and sustained vascular occlusion activates metabolic and angiogenic gene programs, which are usually activated after endurance but not resistance exercise. Thus, targeted modification of high load resistance exercise by vibration and vascular occlusion might represent a novel strategy to induce endurance-type muscle adaptations. PMID:23086295

Item, Flurin; Nocito, Antonio; Thöny, Sandra; Bächler, Thomas; Boutellier, Urs; Wenger, Roland H; Toigo, Marco

2012-10-20

156

Whole-body vibration and ergonomic study of US railroad locomotives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

US locomotive operators have exposure to multi-axis whole-body vibration (WBV) and shocks while seated. This study assessed operator-related and ergonomic seating design factors that may have confounding or mitigating influence on WBV exposure and its effects. Vibration exposure was measured according to international guidelines (ISO 2631-1; 1997); ergonomic work place factors and vibration effects were studied with a cross-sectional survey instrument distributed to a randomly selected group of railroad engineers (n=2546) and a control group; and during vehicle inspections. The survey response rate was 47% for the RR engineers (n=1195) and 41% for the controls (n=323). Results of the mean basic vibration measurements were for the x, y, z-direction and vector sum 0.14, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.49 m/s2 respectively; almost all crest factors (CF), MTVV and VDV values were above the critical ratios given in ISO 2631-1. The prevalence of serious neck and lower back disorders among locomotive engineers was found to be nearly double that of the sedentary control group without such exposure. Railroad engineers rated their seats mostly unacceptable regarding different adjustment and comfort aspects (3.02 3.51; scale 1=excellent to 4=unacceptable), while the control group rated their chairs more favorably (1.96 3.44). Existing cab and seat design in locomotives can result in prolonged forced awkward spinal posture of the operator combined with WBV exposure. In a logistic regression analysis, time at work being bothered by vibration (h/day) was significantly associated with an increased risk of low back pain, shoulder and neck pain, and sciatic pain among railroad engineers. Customized vibration attenuation seats and improved cab design of the locomotive controls should be further investigated.

Johanning, Eckardt; Landsbergis, Paul; Fischer, Siegfried; Christ, Eberhard; Göres, Benno; Luhrman, Raymond

2006-12-01

157

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms-2r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2003-11-01

158

Short-term effects of whole-body vibration on maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor force and rate of force rise  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Whole-Body vibration (WBV) may lead to muscle contractions via reflex activation of the primary muscle spindle (Ia) fibres.\\u000a WBV has been reported to increase muscle power in the short term by improved muscle activation. The present study set out\\u000a to investigate the acute effects of a standard WBV training session on voluntary activation during maximal isometric force\\u000a production (MVC)

C. J. de Ruiter; R. M. van der Linden; M. J. A. van der Zijden; A. P. Hollander; A. de Haan

2003-01-01

159

Whole-body vibration effects on the muscle activity of upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing in recreational baseball hitters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the muscle recruitment of selected upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing. Participants were recreationally trained males (n = 16, 22 ± 2 years, 181.4 ± 7.4 cm, 84.7 ± 9.0 kg), with previous baseball experience. Subjects participated in three randomized sessions on separate days, consisting of three sets of five swings off

Gabriel F. “Cisco” Reyes; D. Clark Dickin; Nolan J. K. Crusat; Dennis G. Dolny

2011-01-01

160

Whole body vibration exposure in heavy earth moving machinery operators of metalliferrous mines.  

PubMed

As mining operations get mechanized, the rate of profit generation increases and so do the rate of occupational hazards. This study deals with one such hazard - occupational vibration. The present study was carried out to determine the whole body vibration (WBV) exposure of the heavy earth moving machinery (HEMM) operators in two types of metalliferous mines in India, when they were engaged in the mining activity. Cross-comparison was done of the vibration dose value (VDV) for HEMM operators as well as each type of mine. The VDV for the shovel operator in bauxite mine was observed to be 13.53 +/- 5.63 m/s(7/4) with 25% of the readings higher than the prescribed limit whereas in iron ore mine VDV for dumper operator was 10.81 +/- 3.44 m/s(7/4) with 14.62% readings on the higher side. Cross-comparison of the VDV values for bauxite and iron ore mines revealed that it was 9.57 +/- 4.93 and 8.21 +/- 5.12 m/s(7/4) with 21.28 and 14.95% of the readings on the higher side respectively. The Student's t test level was found to be insignificant for both type of mines, indicating that the WBV exposure is not dependent on the type of mine but is dependent on the working condition and type of HEMM in operation. PMID:17874194

Vanerkar, A P; Kulkarni, N P; Zade, P D; Kamavisdar, A S

2007-09-15

161

The influence of whole body vibration on the plantarflexors during heel raise exercise.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) during exercise offers potential to augment the effects of basic exercises. However, to date there is limited information on the basic physiological and biomechanical effects of WBV on skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WBV (40Hz, 1.9mm synchronous vertical displacement) on the myoelectrical activity of selected plantarflexors during heel raise exercise. 3D motion capture of the ankle, synchronised with sEMG of the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus, was obtained during repetitive heel raises carried out at 0.5Hz on 10 healthy male subjects (age 27±5 years, height 1.78±0.04m, weight 75.75±11.9kg). During both vibration and non vibration the soleus activation peaked earlier than that of the lateral gastrocnemius. The results indicate that WBV has no effect on the timing of exercise completion or the amplitude of the lateral gastrocnemius activity, however significant increases in amplitudes of the soleus muscle activity (77.5-90.4% MVC P<0.05). WBV had no significant effect on median frequencies of either muscle. The results indicate that the greatest effect of WBV during heel raise activity is in the soleus muscles during the early phases of heel raise. PMID:23261083

Robbins, D; Goss-Sampson, M

2012-12-21

162

Effect of Seating on Exposures to Whole-Body Vibration in Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration isolation efficiency of seating has been evaluated in 100 work vehicles in 14 categories (cars, vans, lift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, dumpers, excavators, helicopters, armoured vehicles, mobile cranes, grass rollers, mowers and milk floats). Seat isolation efficiency, expressed by the SEAT value, was determined for all seats (67 conventional seats and 33 suspension seats) from the vertical acceleration measured on the floors and on the seats of the vehicles. For most categories of vehicle, the average SEAT value was less than 100%, indicating that the average seat provided some attenuation of vibration. However, there were large variations in SEAT values between vehicles within categories. Two alternative vibration frequency weightings (Wb from BS 6841, 1987; Wk from ISO 2631, 1997) yielded SEAT values that differed by less than 6%. Overall, the SEAT values determined by two alternative methods (the ratio of r.m.s. values and the ratio of vibration dose values) differed by less than 4.5% when using weighting Wb, although larger differences may be expected in some situations. The median SEAT value for the suspension seats was 84.6% the median SEAT value for the conventional seats was 86.9% (based on weighting Wb and the ratio of r.m.s. values). Predicted SEAT values were obtained assuming that each seat could be interchanged between vehicles without altering its transmissibility. The calculations suggest that 94% of the vehicles investigated might benefit from changing the current seat to a seat from one of the other vehicles investigated. Although the predictions are based on assumptions that will not always apply, it is concluded that the severity of whole-body vibration exposures in many work environments can be lessened by improvements to seating dynamics. . All rights reserved.

Paddan, G. S.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

163

EFFECT OF MAGNITUDE OF VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION ON ABSORBED POWER FOR THE SEATED HUMAN BODY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power absorbed by 12 male subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration at six magnitudes of random vibration (0·25, 0·5, 1·0, 1·5, 2·0 and 2·5 ms?2r.m.s.) has been measured in the laboratory. All subjects showed greatest absorbed power at about 5 Hz, but the frequency of this peak in the absorbed power reduced with increasing vibration magnitude. The total

N. J. Mansfield; M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

164

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seated subjects have participated in two experiments with fore-and-aft whole-body vibration to investigate dynamic responses at the seat and footrest in the direction of vibration and in other directions. In the first experiment, 12 males were exposed to fore-and-aft random vibration (0.25–20Hz) at four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25ms?2 rms) while sitting on a seat with no backrest in

N. Nawayseh; M. J. Griffin

2005-01-01

165

Effects of display vibration and whole-body vibration on visual performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen subjects performed a numeral reading task during (a) vibration of the display, (b) vibration of the subject, (c) simultaneous vibration of both subject and display. Sinusoidal motion at eleven frequencies (0·5 to 5·0 Hz) was presented at five acceleration magnitudes (1·0 to 2·5ms r.m.s.). Measures of reading time and reading error showed that for all except the highest frequencies,

M. J. MOSELEY; M. J. GREFFIN

1986-01-01

166

Mathematical models for the apparent masses of standing subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linear lumped parameter models of the apparent masses of human subjects in standing positions when exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been developed. Simple models with a single degree-of-freedom (d.o.f.) and with two (d.o.f.) were considered for practical use. Model parameters were optimised using both the mean apparent mass of 12 male subjects and the apparent masses of individual subjects measured in a previous study. The calculated responses of two (d.o.f.) models with a massless support structure showed best agreement with the measured apparent mass and phase, with errors less than 0.1 in the normalised apparent mass (i.e., corresponding to errors less than 10% of the static mass) and errors less than 5° in the phase for a normal standing posture. The model parameters obtained with the mean measured apparent masses of the 12 subjects were similar to the means of the 12 sets of parameters obtained when fitting to the individual apparent masses. It was found that the effects of vibration magnitude and postural changes on the measured apparent mass could be represented by changes to the stiffness and damping in the two (d.o.f.) models.

Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2003-02-01

167

Human head-neck models in whole-body vibration: effect of posture.  

PubMed

This work presents passive and muscle-based models to predict the biodynamical response of the human head-neck under fore-aft and combined-axis whole-body vibration considering four head-neck postures: neutral, flexion, lateral flexion, and lateral rotation. The passive model consists of one link, a three-rotational-degrees-of-freedom joint, and traditional spring-mass-damper elements. The muscle-based model is similar to the passive model but has additional muscle components. The additional muscle component comprises spring-mass-damper elements to capture the effects of changes in displacement, velocity, acceleration, and jerk. Eleven male participants were tested under white-noise random vibration input signals at the seat level with a frequency range of 0.5-10Hz and magnitudes of 1.5m/s(2) RMS for the fore-aft condition and 1.0m/s(2) RMS in each direction for the combined-axis condition. The proposed models were able to reasonably predict the frequency content and acceleration of the head-neck for the postures under investigation, with the muscle-based model performing better. PMID:23290314

Wang, Yang; Rahmatalla, Salam

2013-01-03

168

The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. METHODS: A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension

Finn Tüchsen; Helene Feveile; Karl B Christensen; Niklas Krause

2010-01-01

169

Effects of whole body vibration on motor unit recruitment and threshold  

PubMed Central

Whole body vibration (WBV) has been suggested to elicit reflex muscle contractions but this has never been verified. We recorded from 32 single motor units (MU) in the vastus lateralis of 7 healthy subjects (34 ± 15.4 yr) during five 1-min bouts of WBV (30 Hz, 3 mm peak to peak), and the vibration waveform was also recorded. Recruitment thresholds were recorded from 38 MUs before and after WBV. The phase angle distribution of all MUs during WBV was nonuniform (P < 0.001) and displayed a prominent peak phase angle of firing. There was a strong linear relationship (r = ?0.68, P < 0.001) between the change in recruitment threshold after WBV and average recruitment threshold; the lowest threshold MUs increased recruitment threshold (P = 0.008) while reductions were observed in the higher threshold units (P = 0.031). We investigated one possible cause of changed thresholds. Presynaptic inhibition in the soleus was measured in 8 healthy subjects (29 ± 4.6 yr). A total of 30 H-reflexes (stimulation intensity 30% Mmax) were recorded before and after WBV: 15 conditioned by prior stimulation (60 ms) of the antagonist and 15 unconditioned. There were no significant changes in the relationship between the conditioned and unconditioned responses. The consistent phase angle at which each MU fired during WBV indicates the presence of reflex muscle activity similar to the tonic vibration reflex. The varying response in high- and low-threshold MUs may be due to the different contributions of the mono- and polysynaptic pathways but not presynaptic inhibition.

Woledge, Roger C.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Newham, Di J.

2012-01-01

170

Assessment of the influence of whole body vibration on Cochlear function  

PubMed Central

Background Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potentially harmful consequence resulting from the dissipation of energy by industrial machineries. The result of WBV exposure on the auditory system remains unknown. The objective of the present research was to evaluate the influence of WBV on cochlear function, in particular outer hair cell function. It is hypothesized that WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in decreased Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) levels (Ldp) in rabbits subjected to WBV. Methods Twelve rabbits were equally divided into vibration and control groups. Animals in vibration group were exposed to 1.0?ms-2 r.m.s vertical WBV at 4–8?Hz for 8?h/day during 5 consecutive days. Outer hair cell function was assessed by comparing repeated-measurements of DPOAE levels (Ldp) across a range of f2 frequencies in rabbits both exposed and unexposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts (LSdp) were compared across ears, frequencies, groups, and times. Results No differences were seen over time in DPOAE levels in the non-exposed rabbits (p?=?0.082). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were significantly increased at all test frequencies in both ears compared to baseline measures (p?=?0.021). The greatest increase in Ldp following exposure was seen at 5888.5?Hz (mean shift?=?13.25?dB). Post-exposure Ldp in rabbits exposed to WBV were not significantly different between the right and left ears (p?=?0.083). Conclusion WBV impairs cochlear function resulting in increased DPOAE responses in rabbits exposed to WBV. DPOAE level shifts occurred over a wide range of frequencies following prolonged WBV in rabbits.

2012-01-01

171

Loads on a spinal implant measured in vivo during whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

After spinal surgery, patients often want to know whether driving a car or using public transportation can be dangerous for their spine. In order to answer this question, a clinically proven vertebral body replacement (VBR) has been modified. Six load sensors and a telemetry unit were integrated into the inductively powered implant. The modified implant allows the measurement of six load components. Telemeterized devices were implanted in five patients; four of them agreed to exposure themselves to whole-body vibration. During the measurements, the patients sat on a driver seat fixed to a hexapod. They were exposed to random single-axis vibrations in X, Y, and Z directions as well as in multi-axis XYZ directions with frequencies between 0.3 and 30 Hz. Three intensity levels (unweighted root mean square values of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m/s(2)) were applied. Three postures were studied: sitting freely, using a vertical backrest, and a backrest declined by an angle of 25 degrees . The patients held their hands on their thighs. As expected, the maximum force on the VBR increased with increasing intensity and the number of axes. For the highest intensity level and multi-axis vibration, the maximum forces increased by 89% compared to sitting relaxed. Leaning at the backrest as well as lower intensity levels markedly decreased the implant loads. Driving a car or using public transportation systems-when the patient leans towards the backrest-leads to lower implant loads than walking, and can therefore be allowed already shortly after surgery. PMID:20186440

Rohlmann, Antonius; Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph; Graichen, Friedmar; Bergmann, Georg

2010-02-27

172

Effect of whole-body vibration exercise and muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on walking ability in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was conducted to determine the beneficial effect of whole- body vibration (WBV) exercise in addition to muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on the walking ability in the elderly. Sixty-seven elderly participants were divided into two groups; the WBV exercise plus routine exercises group (n=40) and the routine ex- ercises alone group (n=27). WBV exercise was performed

Kazuhiro Kawanabe; Akira Kawashima; Issei Sashimoto; Tsuyoshi Takeda; Yoshihiro Sato; Jun Iwamoto

2007-01-01

173

AN UPDATED REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND LOW BACK PAIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1996. In a systematic search of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with exposure to WBV,

M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

1998-01-01

174

DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOCOL FOR EPIDEMIOLOGAL STUDIES OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS OF THE LOWER BACK  

Microsoft Academic Search

It seems evident from a large number of studies that there is a positive relationship between exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and the occurrence of low back pain. There are existing standards for evaluating the human exposure to WBV, which are based on other factors than the effect of musculoskeletal disorders. Several national and international standards also exist for

M. L. Magnusson; M. H. Pope; C. T. J. Hulshof; M. Bovenzi

1998-01-01

175

The influence of a 5-wk whole body vibration on electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb spinal motoneurons.  

PubMed

The study aimed at determining the influence of a whole body vibration (WBV) on electrophysiological properties of spinal motoneurons. The WBV training was performed on adult male Wistar rats, 5 days a week, for 5 wk, and each daily session consisted of four 30-s runs of vibration at 50 Hz. Motoneuron properties were investigated intracellularly during experiments on deeply anesthetized animals. The experimental group subjected to the WBV consisted of seven rats, and the control group of nine rats. The WBV treatment induced no significant changes in the passive membrane properties of motoneurons. However, the WBV-evoked adaptations in excitability and firing properties were observed, and they were limited to fast-type motoneurons. A significant decrease in rheobase current and a decrease in the minimum and the maximum currents required to evoke steady-state firing in motoneurons were revealed. These changes resulted in a leftward shift of the frequency-current relationship, combined with an increase in slope of this curve. The functional relevance of the described adaptive changes is the ability of fast motoneurons of rats subjected to the WBV to produce series of action potentials at higher frequencies in a response to the same intensity of activation. Previous studies proved that WBV induces changes in the contractile parameters predominantly of fast motor units (MUs). The data obtained in our experiment shed a new light to possible explanation of these results, suggesting that neuronal factors also play a substantial role in MU adaptation. PMID:23486208

Baczyk, M; Ha?uszka, A; Mrówczy?ski, W; Celichowski, J; Krutki, P

2013-03-13

176

Effect of seat surface angle on forces at the seat surface during whole-body vertical vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve male subjects have been exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration so as to investigate the effect of seat surface angle, vibration magnitude and contact with a backrest on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ (calculated from forces normal to the seat surface and vertical acceleration) and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ (calculated from forces parallel to the seat surface and vertical acceleration).

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2005-01-01

177

Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to

Gérard Fleury; Pierre Mistrot

2006-01-01

178

Magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is currently assumed that the same frequency weightings, derived from studies of vibration discomfort, can be used to evaluate the severity of vibration at all vibration magnitudes from the threshold of vibration perception to the vibration magnitudes associated with risks to health. This experimental study determined equivalent comfort contours for the whole-body vibration of seated subjects over the frequency range 2 315 Hz in each of the three orthogonal axes (fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical). The contours were determined at vibration magnitudes from the threshold of perception to levels associated with severe discomfort and risks to health. At frequencies greater than 10 Hz, thresholds for the perception of vertical vibration were lower than thresholds for fore-and-aft and lateral vibration. At frequencies less than 4 Hz, thresholds for vertical vibration were higher than thresholds for fore-and-aft and lateral vibration. The rate of growth of sensation with increasing vibration magnitude was highly dependent on the frequency and axis of vibration. Consequently, the shapes of the equivalent comfort contours depended on vibration magnitude. At medium and high vibration magnitudes, the equivalent comfort contours were reasonably consistent with the frequency weightings for vibration discomfort in current standards (i.e. Wb and Wd). At low vibration magnitudes, the contours indicate that relative to lower frequencies the standards underestimate sensitivity at frequencies greater than about 30 Hz. The results imply that no single linear frequency weighting can provide accurate predictions of discomfort caused by a wide range of magnitudes of whole-body vibration.

Morioka, Miyuki; Griffin, Michael J.

2006-12-01

179

Computation of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability in whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body vibration has been indicated as a risk factor in back disorders. Proper prevention and treatment management, however, requires a sound knowledge of associated muscle forces and loads on the spine. Previous trunk model studies have either neglected or over-simplified the trunk redundancy with time-varying unknown muscle forces. Trunk stability has neither been addressed. A novel iterative dynamic kinematics-driven approach was employed to evaluate muscle forces, spinal loads and system stability in a seated subject under a random vertical base excitation with ˜±1 g peak acceleration contents. This iterative approach satisfied equations of motion in all directions/levels while accounting for the nonlinear passive resistance of the ligamentous spine. The effect of posture, co-activity in abdominal muscles and changes in buttocks stiffness were also investigated. The computed vertical accelerations were in good agreement with measurements. The input base excitation, via inertial and muscle forces, substantially influenced spinal loads and system stability. The flexed posture in sitting increased the net moment, muscle forces and passive spinal loads while improving the trunk stability. Similarly, the introduction of low to moderate antagonistic coactivity in abdominal muscles increased the passive spinal loads and improved the spinal stability. A trade-off, hence, exists between lower muscle forces and spinal loads on one hand and more stable spine on the other. Base excitations with larger peak acceleration contents substantially increase muscle forces/spinal loads and, hence, the risk of injury.

Bazrgari, B.; Shirazi-Adl, A.; Kasra, M.

2008-12-01

180

Two way assessment of other physical work demands while measuring the whole body vibration magnitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct observation, instead of using self-administered questionnaires might give more reliable and specific information about physical work demands at the workplace. This information is of use in a population already at risk of developing low back pain (LBP) due to whole body vibration (WBV) exposure. The aims of this study are to assess the WBV exposure in an exposed population and to assess other physical work demands in two ways, by direct observation and with the use of a self-administered questionnaire. We therefore assessed the WBV magnitude and 5 WBV-related physical work demands by using the PalmTrac system and a self-administered questionnaire in a group of drivers (N=10). The main findings are 7 out of 10 drivers are exceeding the EU action value. About 50% of the drivers under-estimated the time ‘bending’, 60% the time ‘walking+standing’ and 60% over-estimated the time when ‘lifting.’ We concluded that 7 drivers from this group are at risk of developing LBP and substantial differences exists for the 5 physical work demands comparing the PalmTrac method with the questionnaire. Direct observational assessment in WBV measurements yields extra information. This is useful for preventive activities necessary as drivers are exceeding the EU action value.

Tiemessen, Ivo J. H.; Hulshof, Carel T. J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

2008-03-01

181

Whole body vibration induces forepaw and hind paw behavioral sensitivity in the rat.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) has been linked to neck and back pain, but the biomechanical and physiological mechanisms responsible for its development and maintenance are unknown. A rodent model of WBV was developed in which rats were exposed to different WBV paradigms, either daily for 7 consecutive days (repeated WBV) or two single exposures at Day 0 and 7 (intermittent WBV). Each WBV session lasted for 30?min and was imposed at a frequency of 15?Hz and RMS platform acceleration of 0.56?±?0.07?g. Changes in the withdrawal response of the forepaw and hind paw were measured, and were used to characterize the onset and maintenance of behavioral sensitivity. Accelerations and displacements of the rat and deformations in the cervical and lumbar spines were measured during WBV to provide mechanical context for the exposures. A decrease in withdrawal threshold was induced at 1 day after the first exposure in both the hind paw and forepaw. Repeated WBV exhibited a sustained reduction in withdrawal threshold in both paws and intermittent WBV induced a sustained response only in the forepaw. Cervical deformations were significantly elevated which may explain the more robust forepaw response. Findings suggest that a WBV exposure leads to behavioral sensitivity. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1739-1744, 2013. PMID:23832376

Baig, Hassam A; Guarino, Benjamin B; Lipschutz, Daniel; Winkelstein, Beth A

2013-07-07

182

Variations in Neuromuscular Activity of Thigh Muscles During Whole-Body Vibration in Consideration of Different Biomechanical Variables  

PubMed Central

The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years) voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications. Key Points WBV leads to a higher muscle activity of the quadriceps femoris than of the hamstrings. The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitude and high frequency. The knee angle only significantly affects the quadriceps femoris. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity.

Perchthaler, Dennis; Horstmann, Thomas; Grau, Stefan

2013-01-01

183

Variations in neuromuscular activity of thigh muscles during whole-body vibration in consideration of different biomechanical variables.  

PubMed

The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years) voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications. Key PointsWBV leads to a higher muscle activity of the quadriceps femoris than of the hamstrings.The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitude and high frequency.The knee angle only significantly affects the quadriceps femoris.Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:24149149

Perchthaler, Dennis; Horstmann, Thomas; Grau, Stefan

2013-09-01

184

Acute physiological effects of exhaustive whole-body vibration exercise in man  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Vibration exercise (VE) is a new neuromuscular training method which is applied in athletes as well as in prevention and therapy of osteoporosis. The present study explored the physiological mechanisms of fatigue by VE in 37 young healthy subjects. Exercise and cardiovascular data were compared to progressive bicycle ergometry until exhaustion. VE was performed in two sessions, with a

J. Rittweger; G. Beller; D. Felsenberg

2000-01-01

185

Quantitative evaluation of distortion in sketching under mono and dual axes whole body vibration.  

PubMed

Performance of sedentary activities such as reading and writing, in trains is known to be affected by the vibrations. An experimental study was therefore initiated to investigate the interference perceived in sketching task under low frequency random vibration in both mono and dual axes. Thirty healthy male subjects participated in the study. Random vibration stimuli were excited in various axes in frequency range of 1-20 Hz at magnitudes of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 m/s(2). The task required the subjects to sketch the given geometric figures such as circle, rectangle and triangle under vibration environment in two subject postures (sketch pad on lap and on table). Three performance methods were used to measure the effect of vibration stimuli and posture. They consisted of two specifically designed objective methods for percentage distortion measurement and one subjective method using Borg CR10 scale. The results revealed that the percentage distortion and difficulty in sketching increased with an increase in vibration magnitude and was found to be higher for vibration in Y- and Z-axis. Similar trend was observed for percentage distortion and difficulty in sketching for dual axes also. The perceived difficulty and impairment in sketching performance was greater while sketching on lap for X-axis, while the effect was just the reverse for other axes. PMID:21697628

Bhiwapurkar, M K; Saran, V H; Harsha, S P

2011-06-21

186

Low-volume whole-body vibration lasting 3 or 6 months does not affect biomarkers in blood serum of rats.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration training (WBV) has been reported to improve both, bone strength and neuromuscular performance. Although changes in hormonal and immunological parameters following vibration exercises were reported, there are still few studies concerning the immune response with respect to different duration of WBV. In our study, we aimed to establish whether three and six months of specific, short-lasting WBV (four bouts lasting 30 s, 1 min rest intervals) influences blood cell counts as well as some immunological parameters in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to two groups trained for three (WBV3mo) or six (WBV6mo) months and results were compared to the age matched control group (C). After the training period, red and white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, as well as interleukin-1b, interleukin-10, interleukin-6, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were determined. No significant differences between WBV3mo, WBV6mo, and C groups in complete blood counts or in immunological parameters were found, indicating that the whole-body vibration training used in this study did not disturb the balance of examined indices, directly or indirectly involved in inflammatory processes. PMID:23232704

Pawlak, Matthias; Kaczmarek, D; Nowak, A; Krutki, P

2013-03-01

187

Effects of muscular strength, exercise order, and acute whole-body vibration exposure on bat swing speed.  

PubMed

The purposes for this study were to investigate effects of acute whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure and exercise order on bat speed and to examine relationship between muscular strength and bat speed. All participants were recreationally trained men (n = 16; 22 ± 2 years; 181.4 ± 7.4 cm; 84.7 ± 9 kg), with previous baseball experience and were tested for 1 repetitive maximum (1RM) strength in squat and bench press. Subjects then participated in 4 randomized sessions on separate days, each consisting of 3 sets of 5 bat swings. Exercises (upper and lower body dynamic and static movements related to bat swing) with or without WBV exposure were performed after sets 1 and 2. Trials were as follows: no-exercise Control (CTRL), upper body followed by lower body exercises without WBV (Arm-Leg NOVIB), upper body followed by lower body exercises with WBV (Arm-Leg VIB), and lower body followed by upper body exercises with WBV (Leg-Arm VIB). Bat speed was recorded during each swing and averaged across sets. Statistical analyses were performed to assess differences across sets and trials. Linear regressions analyzed relationship between strength and bat speed. A significant relationship existed between bat speed and lower body strength (r = 0.406, p = 0.008) but not for upper body strength. The exercise order of Arm-Leg VIB significantly increased bat speed by 2.6% (p = 0.02). Performing identical order of exercises without vibration (Arm-Leg NOVIB) significantly decreased bat speed by 2% (p = 0.039). It was concluded that adding vibration exposure to total-body exercises can provide acute enhancements in bat speed. Additionally, leg strength was shown to influence bat speed suggesting that increasing leg strength may enhance bat speed. PMID:21088545

Reyes, G F Cisco; Dickin, D Clark; Dolny, Dennis G; Crusat, Nolan J K

2010-12-01

188

The Acute Effect of Whole Body Vibration on Repeated Shuttle-Running in Young Soccer Players.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on Repeated Sprint Ability (RSA). Seventeen male soccer players (16.71±0.47 y) performed three RSA tests (Randomized crossover study design). The second RSA test was done with WBV (RSA2) to assess the effect of WBV. The studied variables were: best time (BT), worst time (WT), total time (TT), the fatigue index (FI) of RSA, and post-test blood lactate (BLa). ANOVA with repeated measures showed no differences between RSA1 and RSA3, while there were significant differences in all variables studied. TT= [RSA2 0.93% and 1.68% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.05], BLa= [RSA2 16.97% and 14.73% greater than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.001], WT= [RSA2 1.90% and 2.93% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.01], and FI = [RSA2 30.64% and 40.15% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.0001]. When comparing individual sprints, WBV showed a significant effect at the 5th sprint: RSA2 2.29 % and 2.95% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively (p<0.005), while at the 6th sprint: RSA2 2.75% and 4.09% lower than RSA1 and RSA3 respectively; p<0.005. In conclusion, when applying WBV during the recovery periods of Repeated Sprint Ability efforts, most of the performance variables improved. PMID:23780902

Padulo, J; Di Giminiani, R; Ibba, G; Zarrouk, N; Moalla, W; Attene, G; M Migliaccio, G; Pizzolato, F; Bishop, D; Chamari, K

2013-06-18

189

The influence of classical dance training on preferred supporting leg and whole body turning bias.  

PubMed

A rightward turning bias has been more frequently noted during adult classical dance practice than during spontaneous rotations. Training could play a role in inducing a preferred direction. We observed the preferred direction for executing four spontaneous whole-body full turns (pirouettes), with eyes open or closed, in pre-pubertal untrained girls and classical dance students. Of untrained girls, 58% showed a leftward turning bias (LTB) and 42% a rightward turning bias (RTB), independently of vision, lateral preferences, and supporting leg. Only one dancer showed a consistent LTB while the majority showed a RTB, with a tendency to use the left leg to turn towards the right. These results suggest that the role of the vestibular and visual systems is minimal for untrained girls, and suggest a training influence for dancers. The dance students' choice of a supporting leg for turning may exploit some biomechanical properties facilitating the pirouette. PMID:18720209

Golomer, E; Rosey, F; Dizac, H; Mertz, C; Fagard, J

2008-08-11

190

Assessment of whole body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 1. Whole-body vibration exposure of surface-coal-mining machine operators. Open file report, November 1979-July 1984  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat-pad accelerometer were made on 61 surface-coal-mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. These data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of these machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Standard 2631, A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration. The comparison showed that about one-half of all surface-coal-mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue-decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only on the order of 15% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. Detailed exposure statistics are presented and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remington, P.J.; Stahr, J.; Andersen, D.

1983-07-01

191

Assessment of whole-body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 2. Whole-body vibration exposure of underground coal mining machine operators. Open File report, November 1979-July 1084  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements utilizing a seat-pad accelerometer were made on 25 underground-coal-mining machines in order to quantify the vibration levels experienced by the operators. These data were combined with information on the statistics of the operating times of these machines in order to compare the operator's vibration exposure to the criteria of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Standard 2631, A Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration. The comparison showed that about 30% to 40% of all underground-coal mining machine operators can be expected to be exposed to vibration exceeding the fatigue-decreased proficiency criterion, whereas only 10% to 15% would be expected to experience vibration exceeding the exposure limit. The primary sources of the exposure are shuttle cars and possibly scoop trams. Detailed exposure statistics are presented, and the implications of the results are discussed.

Remington, P.J.; Andersen, D.A.; Alakel, M.N.

1984-03-01

192

Effects of combining whole-body vibration with exercise on the consequences of detraining on muscle performance in untrained adults.  

PubMed

This study investigated whether whole-body vibration (WBV) coupled with low-velocity exercise (EX) for 13 weeks retains muscle performance gains after 5 weeks of subsequent detraining compared with the results of an identical EX program without WBV. Thirty-two untrained healthy adults (22-49 years of age) were randomly assigned to groups that performed EX with or without WBV (EX-WBV and EX, respectively; n = 16 per group). The following outcome variables were evaluated: countermovement jump height; maximal isometric, concentric, and eccentric knee extension strengths; local muscular endurance; and lumbar extension torque before, during, and after the 13-week training period, and after 5 weeks of detraining. Compared with the EX group, significantly higher increases in countermovement jump height and isometric and concentric knee extension strengths were detected in the EX-WBV group after the 13-week training period. However, detraining caused significant declines in these 3 muscle performance tests only in the EX-WBV group (-4.8, -10.2, and -17.2%, respectively), resulting in no significant differences between the test and control groups after the detraining period. After detraining, all examined variables showed significantly better performance compared with pretraining (p < 0.05) and did not significantly differ from midtraining (7 weeks) in both groups (p > 0.05). These results suggest that muscle strength in the lower extremities, particularly isometric and concentric contractions, and muscle power might be more susceptible to short-term detraining effects when exercise is combined with WBV. Thus, it is necessary to perform regular exercise to maximize the benefits of WBV on muscle strength and power during the early stages of training in previously untrained individuals. PMID:22739330

Osawa, Yusuke; Oguma, Yuko

2013-04-01

193

Long-term sickness absence due to back disorders in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In a retrospective (10-year) follow-up study, the incidence of at least one spell of sickness absenteeism of 28 d or longer in crane operators exposed to whole-body vibration and a control group was investigated. In contrast to a previous study on permanent work disability in the same groups, no difference was observed in long-term sickness absenteeism because of lumbar

Paulien M. Bongers; Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. HulshoF; Agaath P. Koemeester

1988-01-01

194

Whole-body vibration and low back pain: a systematic, critical review of the epidemiological literature 1992–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A previous extensive review of the literature including that from the middle of 1992 concluded that whole-body vibrations\\u000a may contribute to low back pain, but that the exposure-response relationship had not been clarified. We reviewed the literature\\u000a of the past 7?years to find out: (i) whether there is evidence in the recent epidemiological literature for a causal association\\u000a between

S. Lings; C. Leboeuf-Yde

2000-01-01

195

Short-term effects of whole-body vibration on postural control in unilateral chronic stroke patients: preliminary evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The short-term effects of whole-body vibration as a novel method of somatosensory stimulation on postural control were investigated in 23 chronic stroke patients. While standing on a commercial platform, patients received 30-Hz oscillations at 3 mm of amplitude in the frontal plane. Balance was assessed four times at 45-min intervals with a dual-plate force platform, while quietly standing with the

Ilse J. W. van Nes; Alexander C. H. Geurts; Henk T. Hendricks; Jacques Duysens

2004-01-01

196

A model analysis of internal loads, energetics, and effects of wobbling mass duringthe whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal loads, energetics, and the effects of wobbling mass during the whole-body vibration are studied in terms of analysis and comparison of two models: one is a system of four degrees-of-freedom with rigid and wobbling masses in both lower body and upper body (Model A), while the other one (Model B) is a system of three degrees-of-freedom with a

Z. Yue; J. Mester

2002-01-01

197

Functional changes in cerebral and paraspinal muscle physiology of healthy women during exposure to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on multiple tissues simultaneously in fourteen healthy women. On three separate days, participants were exposed to frequencies, 3, 4.5, or 6Hz (at 0.9gr.m.s acceleration in vertical direction) per day on a simulator for 16min. While sitting ‘with’ and ‘without’ backrest support, participants also performed handgrip contractions for

Rammohan V. Maikala; Yagesh N. Bhambhani

2008-01-01

198

Vehicle Design Influences Whole Body Vibration Exposures: Effect of the Location of the Front Axle Relative to the Cab  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway

Ryan P. Blood; Patrik W. Rynell; Peter W. Johnson

2011-01-01

199

Effects of whole body vibration on bone mineral density and falls: results of the randomized controlled ELVIS study with postmenopausal women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  We determined whether the effect of exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) and falls can be enhanced by whole body vibration\\u000a (WBV). In summary, the multi-purpose exercise training was effective to increase lumbar BMD but added WBV did not enhance\\u000a this effect. However, falls were lowest in the exercise program combined with WBV.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  WBV is a new approach to reduce

S. von Stengel; W. Kemmler; K. Engelke; W. A. Kalender

2011-01-01

200

Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV is a promising treatment method for patients with acute unstable inversion ankle sprains. Trial registration NCT01702597

2013-01-01

201

The impact of self-reported exposure to whole-body-vibrations on the risk of disability pension among men: a 15 year prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Whole-body-vibrations are often associated with adverse health effect but the long term effects are less known. This study investigates the association between occupational exposures to whole-body vibrations, and subsequent transition to disability pension. Methods A total of 4215 male employees were followed up for subsequent disability pension retirement. Exposure to whole-body-vibration was self-reported while new cases of disability pension were retrieved from a national register. Results The hazard ratio (HR) for disability pension retirement among men exposed to whole-body-vibrations was 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.40) after adjustment for age, smoking habits, BMI, physical job demands and awkward work postures. In our model, with the available explanatory variables, 5.6% of the male disability pension cases were attributable to whole-body-vibrations. Conclusions Exposure to whole-body-vibrations predicts subsequent disability pension retirement. Continued reduction of whole-body-vibrations may reduce the number of new cases of disability pension.

2010-01-01

202

Effect of whole-body vibration on neuromuscular performance and body composition for females 65 years and older: a randomized-controlled trial.  

PubMed

We examined whether the effect of multipurpose exercise can be enhanced by whole-body vibration (WBV). One hundred and fifty-one post-menopausal women (68.5 ± 3.1 years) were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) a training group (TG); (2) training including vibration (VTG); and (3) a wellness control group (CG). TG and VTG performed the same training program twice weekly (60 min), consisting of aerobic and strength exercises, with the only difference that leg strength exercises (15 min) were performed with (VTG) or without (TG) vibration. CG performed a low-intensity "wellness" program. At baseline and after 18 months, body composition was determined using dual-X-ray-absorptiometry. Maximum isometric strength was determined for the legs and the trunk region. Leg power was measured by countermovement jumps using a force-measuring plate. In the TG lean body mass, total body fat, and abdominal fat were favorably affected, but no additive effects were generated by the vibration stimulus. However, concerning muscle strength and power, there was a tendency in favor of the VTG. Only vibration training resulted in a significant increase of leg and trunk flexion strength compared with CG. In summary, WBV embedded in a multipurpose exercise program showed minor additive effects on body composition and neuromuscular performance. PMID:20500555

von Stengel, S; Kemmler, W; Engelke, K; Kalender, W A

2010-05-24

203

Effect of phase on discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration and shock-Experimental investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study has investigated the effect of ``phase'' on the subjective responses of human subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration and shock. The stimuli were formed from two frequency components: 3 and 9 Hz for continuous vibrations and 3 and 12 Hz for shocks. The two frequency components, each having 1.0 ms-2 peak acceleration, were combined to form various waveforms. The effects of the vibration magnitude on the discomfort caused by the input stimuli were also investigated with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Various objective measurements of acceleration and force at the seat surface, the effects of different frequency weightings and second and fourth power evaluations were compared with judgments of the discomfort of the stimuli. It was found that a 6% to 12% increase in magnitude produced a statistically significant increase in discomfort with both the continuous vibrations and the shocks. Judgments of discomfort caused by changes in vibration magnitude were highly correlated with all of the objective measurements used in the study. The effects on discomfort of the phase between components in the continuous vibrations were not statistically significant, as predicted using evaluation methods with a power of 2. However, small changes in discomfort were correlated with the vibration dose value (VDV) of the Wb frequency-weighted acceleration. The effect of phase between frequency components within the shocks was statistically significant, although no objective measurement method used in the study was correlated with the subjective judgments.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

2002-03-01

204

Changes of cerebral vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-and somatostatin-like immunoreactivity induced by noise and whole-body vibration in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

To clarify the role of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and somatostatin, somatropin-release inhibiting factor, (SRIF) neurons in the response to organisms to noise or whole-body vibration stress, VIP and SRIF-like immunoreactivity were determined in various regions of the rat brain following exposure for 90 min to noise (broad band, 102 dB) or whole-body vibration (20 Hz, 4.0 g). Both noise

Hiroyuki Nakamura; Takashi Moroji; Hirofumi Nagase; Takao Okazawa; Akira Okada

1994-01-01

205

EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT POST ACTIVATION POTENTIATION PROTOCOLS WITH AND WITHOUT WHOLE BODY VIBRATION ON JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE ATHLETES.  

PubMed

This study examined the acute effects of different parallel squat post activation potentiation protocols with and without whole body vibration on jumping performance in college athletes. Fifteen males (20.3± 1.3 years, 179.50±5.3 cm, 81.0 ±10.8 kg) performed 3 repetitions of a countermovement jump and best drop jump after three conditions: (i) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum without vibration (NV-PS) (ii) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum on a whole body vibration platform (WBV-PS) (1.963 mm amplitude and 40 Hz) and (iii) control (C). Each condition was performed under both low (1 set of 3 repetitions) and high (3 sets of 3 repetitions) volume protocols that were followed by both 1 min and 4 min rest periods. Significant improvements were observed for the countermovement jump height (p=0.005) after 4 min of recovery and the low volume protocol (p=0.015) regardless of the condition. Additionally, for the WBV-PS condition, a significantly lower drop jump height was observed after 1 min (p=0.0022) following both low (p=0.022) and high volume (0.010) protocols. In conclusion 4 min of recovery was adequate for improving countermovement jump height after a low volume protocol regardless of the condition and restoring drop jump height performance after WBV-PS regardless of the protocol in male college athletes. PMID:23591951

Naclerio, Fernando; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie; Friedman, Paul; Ross, Ryan E

2013-04-15

206

Evaluation of Frequency Weighting (iso 2631-1) for Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Gastric Motility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and the ISO 2631/1-1997 frequency weighting on gastric motility. The gastric motility was measured by electrogastrography (EGG) in nine healthy volunteers. Sinusoidal vertical vibration at a frequency of 4, 6.3, 8, 12, 16, 31.5, or 63 Hz was given to the subjects for 10 min. The magnitude of exposure at 4 Hz was 1.0m/s2 (r.m.s.). The magnitudes of the other frequencies gave the same frequency-weighted acceleration according to ISO 2631/1-1997. The pattern of the dominant frequency histogram (DFH) was changed to a broad distribution pattern by vibration exposure. Vibration exposure had the effect of significantly reducing the percentage of time for which the dominant component had a normal rhythm and increasing the percentage of time for which there was tachygastria (p<0.05). Vibration exposure generally reduced the mean percentage of time with the dominant frequency in normal rhythm component. There was a significant difference between the condition of no vibration and exposure to 4 and 6.3 Hz of vibration frequency (p<0.05). The frequency weighting curve given in ISO 2631/1-1997 was not adequate for use in evaluating the physiological effects of WBV exposure on gastric motility. . All rights reserved.

Ishitake, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Noguchi, R.; Ando, H.; Matoba, T.

2002-05-01

207

Influence of Sine, and Random, Whole-Body Vibration on Visual Acuity Einfluss Sinusfoermiger und Regelloser Ganzkoerperschwingungen Auf die Visuelle Informationsaufnahme.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The far, visual acuity of people subjected to vertical whole-body vibration (different vibration types and loads) was tested. A total of 110 subjects of both sexes, either exposed to sine vibration in the range from 2 to 18 cycles/sec or to random vibrati...

N. May

1979-01-01

208

SURVEY OF TECHNICAL PREVENTATIVE MEASURES TO REDUCE WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EFFECTS WHEN DESIGNING MOBILE MACHINERY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineering solutions to minimize the effects on operators of vibrating mobile machinery can be conveniently grouped into three areas: •Reduction of vibration at source by improvement of the quality of terrain, careful selection of vehicle or machine, correct loading, proper maintenance, etc.•Reduction of vibration transmission by incorporating suspension systems (tyres, vehicle suspensions, suspension cab and seat) between the operator and

P. Donati

2002-01-01

209

Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft (x), vertical (z), and combined fore-aft and vertical (x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to uncorrelated multi-axis whole-body vibration could be developed using the power-spectral-density based Hv estimator.

Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

2011-08-01

210

Extremely low volume, whole-body aerobic-resistance training improves aerobic fitness and muscular endurance in females.  

PubMed

The current study evaluated changes in aerobic fitness and muscular endurance following endurance training and very low volume, whole-body, high-intensity, interval-style aerobic-resistance training. Subjects' enjoyment and implementation intentions were also examined prior to and following training. Subjects (22 recreationally active females (20.3 ± 1.4 years)) completed 4 weeks of exercise training 4 days per week consisting of either 30 min of endurance treadmill training (~85% maximal heart rate; n = 7) or whole-body aerobic-resistance training involving one set of 8 × 20 s of a single exercise (burpees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, or squat thrusts) separated by 10 s of rest per session (n = 7). A third group was assigned to a nontraining control group (n = 8). Following training, [Formula: see text]O(2peak) was increased in both the endurance (~7%) and interval (~8%) groups (p < 0.05), whereas muscle endurance was improved (p < 0.05) in the interval group (leg extensions, +40%; chest presses, +207%; sit-ups, +64%; push-ups, +135%; and back extensions, +75%). Perceived enjoyment of, and intentions to engage in, very low volume, high-intensity, whole-body interval exercise were both increased following training (p < 0.05). No significant changes were observed for any variable in the control (nontraining) group. These data demonstrate that although improvements in cardiovascular fitness are induced by both endurance and extremely low volume interval-style training, whole-body aerobic-resistance training imparted addition benefit in the form of improved skeletal muscle endurance. PMID:22994393

McRae, Gill; Payne, Alexa; Zelt, Jason G E; Scribbans, Trisha D; Jung, Mary E; Little, Jonathan P; Gurd, Brendon J

2012-09-20

211

Inter-cycle variation in whole-body vibration exposures of operators driving track-type loader machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body vibration (WBV) measurements are an important aspect of performing risk assessments for those exposed to vibration. A large array of variables affect the outcome of a vibration measurement and its extrapolation to a daily dose measure: e.g. variability in driving style, road surface roughness, loading. The variability in vibration emission is an inherent property for most vibrating environments and there is a risk that a vibration measurement might not be representative of the long-term exposures. It is important to acknowledge the variation inherent to WBV exposure to help understand how this variation will affect health risk assessments. A field investigation was conducted in order to characterise the variation of WBV magnitudes between work cycles of track-type loaders. Six different track-type loaders were measured at four different work sites. The vibrations were measured at the operators seat in three translational axes (x-, y-, and z-axis) in accordance with ISO 2631-1 (1997). The findings indicate the worst axis of vibration for the track-type loaders was predominantly the fore-and-aft (x-axis), for most operations. The most severe emission values were measured for machine C at site 2 (1.12 ms-2 rms) and machine D at site 2 (1.03 ms-2 rms). These machines would exceed the action value of the Physical Agents (Vibration) Directive within 2 h of exposure. All of the machines measured would exceed the exposure action value of the Directive within an 8 h working period. The lateral (y-axis) produced the greatest amount of variability between work cycles (coefficient of variation up to 20%). It is concluded that the inherent variability between work cycles and tasks reinforces the requirement to perform a full task analysis prior to measuring WBV exposures to ensure that all tasks are measured and that adequate cycles are measured to obtain a reliable indication of the vibration emission.

Newell, Geraldine S.; Mansfield, Neil J.; Notini, Luca

2006-12-01

212

Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15 8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5 2.0 m s-2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5 2.0 m s-2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic responses associated with the principal body response within the range 3.15 8 Hz. The nonlinearity in discomfort at these frequencies may be partially caused by the nonlinear dynamic response of the body and is sufficient to require consideration in methods of predicting discomfort caused by vertical whole-body vibration.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-11-01

213

Apparent Mass and Absorbed Power during Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration and Repeated Shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exposure to mechanical shocks might pose a greater health risk than exposure to continuous vibration. Previous studies have investigated subjective responses, muscle activity or transmission of vibration to the spine or head during shock. If there is a difference between biomechanic responses of the seated body to shocks when compared to continuous vibration, then this may indicate a more, or less, hazardous vibration waveform. This paper presents measurements of apparent mass and absorbed power during exposure to random vibration, repeated shocks and combinations of shocks and random vibration. Eleven male and 13 female subjects were exposed to 15 vibration conditions generated using an electro-dynamic shaker. Subjects were exposed to five 20 s acceleration waveforms with nominally identical power spectra (random vibration, equally spaced shocks, unequally spaced shocks, random combined with equally spaced shocks, random combined with unequally spaced shocks) at each of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m/s2r.m.s. The general shapes of the apparent mass or absorbed power curves were not affected by stimulus type, indicating that the biomechanical response of the body is fundamentally the same when exposed to shocks or random vibration. Two non-linear effects were observed: apparent mass resonance frequencies were slightly higher for exposure to shocks; apparent mass and absorbed power resonance frequencies decreased with increases in vibration magnitude for each stimulus type. It is concluded that the two non-linear mechanisms operate simultaneously: a stiffening effect during exposure to shocks and a softening effect as vibration magnitudes increase. Total absorbed powers were greatest for shock stimuli and least for random vibration.

Mansfield, N. J.; Holmlund, P.; Lundström, R.

2001-11-01

214

On the Cardiovascular Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Part II. Lateral Effects: Statistical Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lateral vibrations of vessels generate relative lateral motions between red blood cells and plasma. These relative motions would cause additional transport of longitudinal momentum between different layers and therefore would increase the viscosity. Particularly for arterioles, which play the major role for the total peripheral resistance (TPR), the lateral vibration would destroy the cell-free plasma layer near the wall if

Z. Yue; H. Kleinöder; M. de Marées; U. Speicher; P. Wahl; J. Mester

2007-01-01

215

Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects sitting in four postures (feet hanging, maximum thigh contact, average thigh contact, and minimum thigh contact) both with and without a rigid vertical backrest while exposed to four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) of random fore-and-aft vibration. The power absorbed by the body at the supporting seat surface when there was no backrest showed a peak around 1 Hz and another peak between 3 and 4 Hz. Supporting the back with the backrest decreased the power absorbed at the seat at low frequencies but increased the power absorbed at high frequencies. Foot support influenced both the magnitude and the frequency of the peaks in the absorbed power spectra as well as the total absorbed power. The measurements of absorbed power are consistent with backrests being beneficial during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but detrimental with high frequency fore-and-aft vibration.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2012-01-01

216

Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seated subjects have participated in two experiments with fore-and-aft whole-body vibration to investigate dynamic responses at the seat and footrest in the direction of vibration and in other directions. In the first experiment, 12 males were exposed to fore-and-aft random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) at four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) while sitting on a seat with no backrest in four postures with varying foot heights to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). In the second experiment, six subjects were exposed to three vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625 m s-2 rms) in the average thigh contact posture, both with and without a rigid backrest. Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the supporting seat surface (in the first experiment) and in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions at the footrest (in the second experiment). On the seat, there were three vibration modes in the fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat at frequencies below 10 Hz in all postures (around 1 Hz, between 1 and 3 Hz, and between 3 and 5 Hz); large vertical forces were dependent on foot support while lateral forces were relatively small. At the feet, the fore-and-aft apparent mass showed a resonance between 3 and 5 Hz, which increased in frequency and magnitude when a backrest was used. The fore-and-aft vibration produced high vertical forces at the footrest. At frequencies below resonance, the backrest reduced vertical and fore-and-aft forces at the footrest. On the seat and the footrest, the forces showed a nonlinear characteristic that varied between postures. The presence of appreciable vertical forces indicate that during fore-and-aft excitation the body moved in two dimensions. It is concluded that forces in directions other than the direction of excitation should be taken into account when considering biodynamic responses to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration.

Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

2005-04-01

217

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s-2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25 20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s-2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s-2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical (x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal (z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s-2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s-2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

218

Effects Related to Random Whole-Body Vibration and Posture on a Suspended Seatwith and Without Backrest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WBV-exposures are often linked with forced postures as prolonged sitting, bent forward sitting, or sitting without a backrest. No quantitative data are available to describe the exposure-effect relationships for different conditions of seating, posture, and the biological variability of workers. Experiments and subsequent predictions of forces acting within the spine during WBV can help to improve the assessment of the health risk. An experimental study was performed with 39 male subjects sitting on a suspension seat with or with no backrest contact. They were exposed to random whole-body vibration with a weighted r.m.s. value of 0.6 m/s2 at a relaxed or a forward bending posture. A two-dimensional finite element model was used for the calculation of the internal spinal load. The model simulates the human response on a suspension driver seat. Individual exposure conditions were considered by including the transfer functions between the seat cushion and the seat base as well as between the backrest and the seat base for the calculation of the vibration input to the buttocks and to the back respectively. The average peak seat transmissibility was higher for the seat with the backrest, but the peak seat-to-head transmissibility was higher for the seat without the backrest for both postures. The peak transmissibilities between the accelerations at the seat base and the compressive forces at L5/S1 were highest for the seat without the backrest during the bending posture. Various biological effects can result from identical exposures combined with different backrest contact and postures. The backrest contact and posture conditions should not be neglected in the assessment of health risk caused by whole-body vibration. . All rights reserved.

Hinz, B.; Seidel, H.; Menzel, G.; Blüthner, R.

2002-05-01

219

Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

220

Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25 20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms-2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25 20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms-2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms-2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal (z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical (x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms-2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms-2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2008-04-01

221

Analysis of Whole-Body Vibration During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion: A Comparison of Seat Cushions and Back Supports for Individuals Without a Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body vibration exposure has been found to be detrimental to the health of humans owing to effects such as degraded comfort, disc degeneration, and lower back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if selected seat cushions and back supports minimize the transmission of vibrations during manual wheelchair propulsion. Ten unimpaired participants traversed an activities of daily living

Carmen P. DiGiovine; Rory A. Cooper; Erik Wolf; Shirley G. Fitzgerald; Michael L. Boninger

2003-01-01

222

Whole-body vibration as potential intervention for people with low bone mineral density and osteoporosis: a review.  

PubMed

Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are health concerns among older adults and individuals with physical, neurological, and/or mobility impairments. Detrimental changes in bone density and bone architecture occurring in these individuals may be due in part to the reduction/cessation of physical activity and the accompanying reduction of mechanical strain on bone. Changes in bone architecture predispose these individuals to fragility fractures during low-trauma events. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been examined as an intervention for maintaining or improving bone mass among people with low BMD, because it may emulate the mechanical strains observed during normal daily activities. This article provides an overview of WBV including terminology, safety considerations, and a summary of the current literature; it is intended for rehabilitation healthcare providers considering WBV as a potential therapy for individuals with osteoporosis. PMID:19882487

Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Giangregorio, Lora M; Craven, B Catharine

2009-01-01

223

The Determination of Equal Comfort Zones for Whole-body Vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the assumption that equal ratings along a rating line indicate an equivalence of subjective sensation, equal sensation contours were obtained from 12 subjects who rated 75 vibration stimuli of 11 different frequencies. In a second experiment, the stimuli used in Experiment I were presented to 14 further subjects, who were required to ascribe semantic ‘ comfort ’ labels to

D. J. OBORNE; M. J. CLARKE

1974-01-01

224

EFFECT OF SEATING ON EXPOSURES TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vibration isolation efficiency of seating has been evaluated in 100 work vehicles in 14 categories (cars, vans, lift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, dumpers, excavators, helicopters, armoured vehicles, mobile cranes, grass rollers, mowers and milk floats). Seat isolation efficiency, expressed by the SEAT value, was determined for all seats (67 conventional seats and 33 suspension seats) from the vertical acceleration

G. S. PADDAN; M. J. GRIFFIN

2002-01-01

225

Back pain and exposure to whole body vibration in helicopter pilots  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a questionnaire survey the prevalence of back pain in 163 helicopter pilots was compared to that in a control group of 297 non-flying air force officers who underwent the same pre-employment medical examination. Since pilots document their hours of flight in a personal flight log, an accurate estimate of the duration of exposure could be made. In addition, vibration

P. M. BONGERS; C. T. J. HULSHOF; L. DlJKSTRA; H. C. BOSHUIZEN; H. J. M. GROENHOUT; E. VALKEN

1990-01-01

226

INDIVIDUAL OPTIMAL FREQUENCY IN WHOLE BODY VIBRATION: EFFECT OF PROTOCOL, JOINT ANGLE AND FATIGUING EXERCISE.  

PubMed

Recent studies have shown the importance of individualizing the vibration intervention in order to produce greater effects on the neuromuscular system in less time. The purpose of this study was to assess theindividualoptimalvibration frequency (O.V.F.)corresponding to the highestmuscle activation (RMSmax) duringvibrationat differentfrequencies, comparing different protocols. Twenty-nine university students underwent 3 Continuous (C) and 2 Random (R) different vibrating protocols, maintaining a squat position on a vibration platform. The C protocol lasted 50 seconds and involved the succession of ascending frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz, every 5 seconds. The same protocol was performed twice, having the knee angle at 120° (C) and 90° (C90), in order to assess the effect of joint angle, and after a fatiguing squatting exercise (CF) to evaluate the influence of fatigue on O.V.F. assessment. In therandomprotocols vibration time was 20 seconds with a 2-minute (R2) and a 4-minute (R4) pauses between tested frequencies. Muscle activation and O.V.F. values did not differ significantly in the C, R2 and R4 protocols. RMSmax was higher in C90 (p< 0.001) and in CF (p = 0.04) compared to the Cprotocol. Joint angle and fatiguing exercise had no effect on optimalvibration frequency. In conclusion, the shorter C protocol produced similar myoelectrical activity in the R2 and the R4 protocols and therefore could be equally valid in identifying the O.V.F. with considerable time efficiency. Knee joint angle and fatiguing exercise had an effect on sEMG response during vibration but did not affect significantly O.V.F. identification. PMID:23588483

Carlucci, Flaminia; Felici, Francesco; Piccinini, Alberto; Haxhi, Jonida; Sacchetti, Massimo

2013-04-12

227

Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0.7, 1.0 and 1.4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented. The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary. . All rights reserved.

Blüthner, R.; Seidel, H.; Hinz, B.

2002-05-01

228

Effect of seat surface angle on forces at the seat surface during whole-body vertical vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twelve male subjects have been exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration so as to investigate the effect of seat surface angle, vibration magnitude and contact with a backrest on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ (calculated from forces normal to the seat surface and vertical acceleration) and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ (calculated from forces parallel to the seat surface and vertical acceleration). At each of four seat surface angles (0°, 5°, 10°, and 15°), the subjects were exposed to four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms) in the frequency range 0.25 15 Hz. The ‘vertical apparent mass’ and ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ on the seat surface suggested resonances in the vicinity of 5 and 4 Hz, respectively. At all seat angles, both with and without a backrest, the resonance frequency in the ‘vertical apparent mass’ was greater than the resonance frequency in the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’. Within subjects, the two resonance frequencies were not correlated in any condition. Seat angles up to 15° had a negligible effect on the ‘vertical apparent mass’ but a considerable effect on the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ on the seat surface, where ‘cross-axis apparent mass’ increased with increasing seat angle. At all seat angles, increasing the vibration magnitude decreased the resonance frequency in both directions. The least significant decrease in resonance frequency with increasing vibration magnitude occurred in the ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ at the maximum seat angle of 15°. At low frequencies, the backrest reduced the forces in both directions, with the reduction greatest in the ‘fore-and-aft’ direction. The ‘fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass’ at resonance was correlated with subject mass and subject stature.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-06-01

229

Low-magnitude whole-body vibration does not enhance the anabolic skeletal effects of intermittent PTH in adult mice.  

PubMed

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a low-magnitude mechanical stimulus that may be anabolic for bone, yet we recently found that WBV did not improve bone properties in adult mice. Because intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) enhances the anabolic effects of high-magnitude skeletal loading, we sought to determine the skeletal effects of WBV in combination with PTH. Seven-month-old male BALB/c mice were assigned to six groups (n = 13-14/group) based on magnitude of applied acceleration (0 or 0.3 G) and PTH dose (0, 10, or 40 µg/kg/day). Mice were exposed to WBV (0.3 G, 90 Hz, sine wave) or sham loading (0 G) for 15 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks. Vehicle or hPTH (1-34) was administered prior to each WBV session. Whole-body bone mineral content increased by ~ 5% from 0 to 8 weeks in the 40 µg/kg PTH group only, independent of WBV loading. Similarly, PTH treatment increased tibial cortical bone volume by ~5% from 0 to 8 weeks, independent of WBV loading. Neither PTH nor WBV stimulated trabecular bone formation. Consistent with the cortical bone effect, tibias from the 40 µg/kg PTH group had significantly greater ultimate force and energy to failure than tibias in the 0 and 10 µg/kg PTH groups, independent of WBV treatment. In summary, 8 weeks of intermittent PTH treatment increased cortical bone volume and strength in adult male BALB/c mice. Daily exposure to low-magnitude WBV by itself did not improve skeletal properties and did not enhance the PTH effect. No WBV-PTH synergy was found in this preclinical study. PMID:21337386

Lynch, Michelle A; Brodt, Michael D; Stephens, Abby L; Civitelli, Roberto; Silva, Matthew J

2010-11-08

230

Tri-axial forces at the seat and backrest during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical forces on a seat and a backrest have been investigated with 12 male subjects exposed to random fore-and-aft whole-body vibration (0.25-10 Hz) at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s-2 rms). Subjects sat in each of four sitting postures having varying foot heights, so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat. The fore-and-aft forces on the seat depended on whether the feet were supported on a footrest: peaks were found at two frequencies when the feet were not supported, compared to only one peak when the feet were supported. The fore-and-aft forces at the backrest were high, with their peak magnitudes correlated with subject mass. Vertical forces were high on the seat but not on the backrest. Lateral forces were relatively low on both the seat and the backrest. In all directions, forces on the seat and the backrest showed a nonlinear behaviour. In comparison with a previous study undertaken with no backrest, it was found that the backrest reduced forces on the seat at low frequencies (in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions) but increased these forces at high frequencies.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2005-03-01

231

Vehicle design influences whole body vibration exposures: effect of the location of the front axle relative to the cab.  

PubMed

Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway segment, a city street segment with stop-and-go driving (traffic lights), and a city street segment without traffic lights. A portable WBV data acquisition system collected tri-axial time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 standards. Simultaneous global positioning system (GPS) data were also collected to compare vehicle speeds. The GPS data indicated that there were no speed differences between the two vehicles. However, average and impulsive z-axis vibration levels were significantly higher for the cab-over design than for the non-cab-over design. In addition, significant WBV exposure differences between road types were found, with the freeway segments having the lowest exposures and the city street segments without traffic lights having the highest exposures. Vehicle type and the associated WBV exposures should be considered when purchasing vehicles to be used by full-time professional vehicle operators. PMID:21623531

Blood, Ryan P; Rynell, Patrik W; Johnson, Peter W

2011-06-01

232

Predictive discomfort of non-neutral head-neck postures in fore-aft whole-body vibration.  

PubMed

It seems obvious that human head-neck posture in whole-body vibration (WBV) contributes to discomfort and injury risk. While current mechanical measures such as transmissibility have shown good correlation with the subjective-reported discomfort, they showed difficulties in predicting discomfort for non-neutral postures. A new biomechanically based methodology is introduced in this work to predict discomfort due to non-neutral head-neck postures. Altogether, 10 seated subjects with four head-neck postures--neutral, head-up, head-down and head-to-side--were subjected to WBV in the fore-aft direction using discrete sinusoidal frequencies of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 Hz and their subjective responses were recorded using the Borg CR-10 scale. All vibrations were run at constant acceleration of 0.8 m/s² and 1.15 m/s². The results have shown that the subjective-reported discomfort increases with head-down and decreases with head-up and head-to-side postures. The proposed predictive discomfort has closely followed the reported discomfort measures for all postures and rides under investigation. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Many occupational studies have shown strong relevance between non-neutral postures, discomfort and injury risk in WBV. With advances in computer human modelling, the proposed predictive discomfort may provide efficient ways for developing reliable biodynamic models. It may also be used to assess discomfort and modify designs inside moving vehicles. PMID:21390956

Rahmatalla, Salam; Deshaw, Jonathan

2011-03-01

233

Numerical assessment of fore-and-aft suspension performance to reduce whole-body vibration of wheel loader drivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While driving off-road vehicles, operators are exposed to whole-body vibration acting in the fore-and-aft direction. Seat manufacturers supply products equipped with fore-and-aft suspension but only a few studies report on their performance. This work proposes a computational approach to design fore-and-aft suspensions for wheel loader seats. Field tests were conducted in a quarry to analyse the nature of vibration to which the driver was exposed. Typical input signals were recorded to be reproduced in the laboratory. Technical specifications are defined for the suspension. In order to evaluate the suspension vibration attenuation performance, a model of a sitting human body was developed and coupled to a seat model. The seat model combines the models of each suspension component. A linear two-degree-of-freedom model is used to describe the dynamic behaviour of the sitting driver. Model parameters are identified by fitting the computed apparent mass frequency response functions to the measured values. Model extensions are proposed to investigate postural effects involving variations in hands and feet positions and interaction of the driver's back with the backrest. Suspension design parameters are firstly optimized by computing the seat/man model response to sinusoidal acceleration. Four criteria including transmissibility, interaction force between the driver's back and the backrest and relative maximal displacement of the suspension are computed. A new suspension design with optimized features is proposed. Its performance is checked from calculations of the response of the seat/man model subjected to acceleration measured on the wheel loader during real work conditions. On the basis of the computed values of the SEAT factors, it is found possible to design a suspension that would increase the attenuation provided by the seat by a factor of two.

Fleury, Gérard; Mistrot, Pierre

2006-12-01

234

Whole body vibration compared to conventional physiotherapy in patients with gonarthrosis: a protocol for a randomized, controlled study  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative arthropathy. Load-bearing joints such as knee and hip are more often affected than spine or hands. The prevalence of gonarthrosis is generally higher than that of coxarthrosis. Because no cure for OA exists, the main emphasis of therapy is analgesic treatment through either mobility or medication. Non-pharmacologic treatment is the first step, followed by the addition of analgesic medication, and ultimately by surgery. The goal of non-pharmacologic and non-invasive therapy is to improve neuromuscular function, which in turn both prevents formation of and delays progression of OA. A modification of conventional physiotherapy, whole body vibration has been successfully employed for several years. Since its introduction, this therapy is in wide use at our facility not only for gonarthrosis, but also coxarthrosis and other diseases leading to muscular imbalance. Methods/Design This study is a randomized, therapy-controlled trial in a primary care setting at a university hospital. Patients presenting to our outpatient clinic with initial symptoms of gonarthrosis will be assessed against inclusion and exclusion criteria. After patient consent, 6 weeks of treatment will ensue. During the six weeks of treatment, patients will receive one of two treatments, conventional physiotherapy or whole-body-vibration exercises of one hour three times a week. Follow-up examinations will be performed immediately after treatment and after another 6 and 20 weeks, for a total study duration of 6 months. 20 patients will be included in each therapy group. Outcome measurements will include objective analysis of motion and ambulation as well as examinations of balance and isokinetic force. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and SF-12 scores, the patients' overall status, and clinical examinations of the affected joint will be carried out. Discussion As new physiotherapy techniques develop for the treatment of OA, it is important to investigate the effectiveness of competing strategies. With this study, not only patient-based scores, but also objective assessments will be used to quantify patient-derived benefits of therapy. Trial registration Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS) DRKS00000415 Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01037972 EudraCT 2009-017617-29

2010-01-01

235

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF-ADMINISTERED QUESTIONNAIRE TO ASSESS EXPOSURES TO HAND-TRANSMITTED AND WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND THEIR HEALTH EFFECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large British survey is being conducted to identify sources of occupational exposure to hand-transmitted and whole-body vibration, and to estimate the approximate extent of such exposures and their health effects. The principal information on exposures and morbidity will be derived from responses to a postal questionnaire specially developed by the Medical Research Council and the Institute of Sound and

K. Palmer; D. Coggon; B. Pannett; M. Griffin

1998-01-01

236

A laboratory study to quantify the biomechanical responses to whole-body vibration: The influence on balance, reflex response, muscular activity and fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the sensorimotor system and potentially on the stability of the spine, different biomechanical responses were tested before and after 60min of sitting, with and without vertical WBV, on four different days. Postures adopted while sitting and the simulated WBV exposure corresponded to large mining load haul dump (LHD) vehicles as

Brenda R. Santos; Christian Larivière; Alain Delisle; André Plamondon; Paul-Émile Boileau; Daniel Imbeau

2008-01-01

237

Resistance training reduces whole-body protein turnover and improves net protein retention in untrained young males.  

PubMed

It is thought that resistance exercise results in an increased need for dietary protein; however, data also exists to support the opposite conclusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance exercise training on protein metabolism in novices with the hypothesis that resistance training would reduce protein turnover and improve whole-body protein retention. Healthy males (n = 8, 22 +/- 1 y, BMI = 25.3 +/- 1.8 kg.m(-2)) participated in a progressive whole-body split routine resistance-training program 5d/week for 12 weeks. Before (PRE) and after (POST) the training, oral [15N]-glycine ingestion was used to assess nitrogen flux (Q), protein synthesis (PS), protein breakdown (PB), and net protein balance (NPB = PS-PB). Macronutrient intake was controlled over a 5d period PRE and POST, while estimates of protein turnover and urinary nitrogen balance (N(bal) = N(in) - urine N(out)) were conducted. Bench press and leg press increased 40% and 50%, respectively (p < 0.01). Fat- and bone-free mass (i.e., lean muscle mass) increased from PRE to POST (2.5 +/- 0.8 kg, p < 0.05). Significant PRE to POST decreases (p <0.05) occurred in Q (0.9 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.6 +/- 0.1 g N.kg(-1).d(-1)), PS (4.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.3 g.kg(-1).d(-1)), and PB (4.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.2 g.kg(-1).d(-1)). Significant training-induced increases in both NPB (PRE = 0.22 +/- 0.13 g.kg(-1).d(-1); POST = 0.54 +/- 0.08 g.kg(-1).d(-1)) and urinary nitrogen balance (PRE = 2.8 +/- 1.7 g N.d(-1); POST = 6.5 +/- 0.9 g N.d(-1)) were observed. A program of resistance training that induced significant muscle hypertrophy resulted in reductions of both whole-body PS and PB, but an improved NPB, which favoured the accretion of skeletal muscle protein. Urinary nitrogen balance increased after training. The reduction in PS and PB and a higher NPB in combination with an increased nitrogen balance after training suggest that dietary requirements for protein in novice resistance-trained athletes are not higher, but lower, after resistance training. PMID:17111010

Hartman, Joseph W; Moore, Daniel R; Phillips, Stuart M

2006-10-01

238

DOSE–RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AND LUMBAR DISK DISEASE—A FIELD STUDY ON 388 DRIVERS OF DIFFERENT VEHICLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a longitudinal study, the dose–response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a

S. Schwarze; G. Notbohm; H. Dupuis; E. Hartung

1998-01-01

239

Description of the relation between the forces acting in the lumbar spine and whole-body vibrations by means of transfer functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The purpose of this study was to display the relationships between the forces transmitted in the spine and the accelerations of the vibrating seat.Background. Investigations reveal that exposure to whole-body vibration can induce degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. Elevated spinal forces are probably the crucial component in the pathogenesis of this disease.Design and methods. The spinal forces are

Martin Fritz

2000-01-01

240

Whole-body vibration experienced by haulage truck operators in surface mining operations: A comparison of various analysis methods utilized in the prediction of health risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole body vibration (WBV) was measured on eight surface haulage trucks in three size classes (35, 100, 150ton haul capacities). Vibration was measured at the seat\\/operator interface in accordance with the ISO 2631-1 standard during 1h of normal operation. Highest acceleration readings were observed in the z-axis (vertical). Estimated equivalent daily exposure values in the range of 0.44–0.82 ms?2 were

Martin P. H. Smets; Tammy R. Eger; Sylvain G. Grenier

2010-01-01

241

Evaluation of reaction time performance and subjective workload during whole-body vibration exposure while seated in upright and twisted postures with and without armrests  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little knowledge on performance during vibration exposure combined with occupational hazards such as bent or twisted postures. In addition, little information is available on the effective use of armrests during performance-related tasks. This paper investigates the influence of sitting in different working postures on the reaction time and perceived workload of subjects exposed to whole-body vibration. Twenty-one subjects

Geraldine S. Newell; Neil J. Mansfield

2008-01-01

242

Occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and Parkinson's disease: results from a population-based case-control study.  

PubMed

Mechanical stress producing head injury is associated with Parkinson's disease, suggesting that relations with other physical hazards such as whole-body vibration (WBV) should be tested. In this study, the authors evaluated the relation between occupational exposure to WBV and Parkinson's disease. A population-based case-control study with 403 cases and 405 controls was conducted in British Columbia, Canada, between 2001 and 2008. From detailed occupational histories and published measurements, metrics of occupational WBV exposure were constructed and tested for associations with Parkinson's disease using logistic regression and adjusting for age and sex first, and then also for smoking and history of head injury. While ever being occupationally exposed to WBV was inversely associated with Parkinson's disease (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval: 0.48, 0.94), higher intensities had consistently elevated odds ratios, with a statistically significant effect being noted for intermediate intensities when exposures were restricted to the 10 years or more prior to diagnosis. Possible mechanisms of an inverse relation between low levels of WBV exposure and Parkinson's disease could include direct protective effects or correlation with other protective effects such as exercise. Higher intensities of WBV could result in micro-injury, leading to vascular or inflammatory pathology in susceptible neurons. PMID:22798480

Harris, M Anne; Marion, Stephen A; Spinelli, John J; Tsui, Joseph K C; Teschke, Kay

2012-07-12

243

Wavelet analysis of lumbar muscle oxygenation signals during whole-body vibration: implications for the development of localized muscle fatigue.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on lumbar muscle oxygenation oscillations in healthy men based on the wavelet transform of near-infrared spectroscopy signals. Twelve healthy participants were exposed to WBV at frequencies of 3, 4.5 and 6 Hz while muscle oxygenation signal was monitored before, during and recovery from WBV. With spectral analysis based on wavelet transform of NIR signal, six frequency intervals were identified (I, 0.005-0.0095 Hz; II, 0.0095-0.02 Hz; III, 0.02-0.06 Hz; IV, 0.06-0.16 Hz; V, 0.16-0.40 Hz and VI, 0.40-2.0 Hz). It was found that the muscle oxygenation oscillations at 4.5 Hz in the frequency intervals I, II and III was lower during WBV compared with that of at 3 Hz. Present results demonstrated WBV at 4.5 Hz induced lower oscillatory activities than that of at 3 Hz. The lower oscillatory activities might indicate a decrease in the efficiency of oxygen supply to the oxygenated tissue and such mechanism might contribute to the development of local muscle fatigue. PMID:22210560

Li, Zengyong; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Guoqiang; Luo, Site; Liu, Feifei; Li, Jianping

2012-01-01

244

[Regulating effects of whole-body vibration on protein expression of p-GSK3? in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats. Thirty-six healthy 3-month old female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into the following three groups by body weight: sham-operation (Sham), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX whole-body vibration (WBV) groups. Ten weeks after ovariectomization, the rats of WBV group received vibration treatment (90 Hz, 15 min) twice per day. At the end of 8-week vibration, the whole-body bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition were detected by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in vivo. The protein expressions of ?-catenin and p-GSK3? in both bone marrow cells and bone marrow stromal cells were detected by Western blot. The results showed that, compared with OVX group, WBV group showed decreased fat mass and fat mass content, as well as increased lean body mass content. The BMD of the proximal tibia in WBV group was significantly higher than that in OVX group, however, there was no difference of BMD in whole-body and other positions between the two groups. The ?-catenin expression in bone marrow stromal cells showed no difference between OVX and WBV groups. The p-GSK3? expression of bone marrow cells was increased in WBV group compared with that in OVX group, whereas bone marrow stromal cells from two groups did not exhibit the difference of the p-GSK3? expression. These results suggest that whole body vibration can stimulate the protein expression of p-GSK3? in bone marrow cells of ovariectomized osteoporosis rats, which could improve the bone loss induced by ovariectomization. PMID:23598872

Wang, Yu-Han; Bu, Shu-Min; Wang, Jian-Hong

2013-04-25

245

Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

2011-12-01

246

Comparison of the apparent masses and cross-axis apparent masses of seated humans exposed to single- and dual-axis whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humans are exposed to whole-body vibration in many types of environment. In almost all cases, the vibration to which the human is exposed comprises multi-axis vibration, such that vibration occurs in all directions simultaneously. Despite the complex nature of vibration to which humans are exposed in the workplace, almost all laboratory studies investigating the biomechanical response of the person have been completed using single-axis simulators. This paper presents a study whereby 15 male subjects were exposed to single-axis whole-body vibration in the x-, y- and z-directions and dual-axis vibration in the xy-, xz-, and yz-directions using a 6 degree-of-freedom vibration simulator. All vibration magnitudes were 0.4 ms-2 rms in each axis. Acceleration and force was measured in the x-, y-, and z-direction during all trials. Subjects sat in two postures (‘back-on’ and ‘back-off’) on a flat rigid seat. Apparent masses measured using single-axis and dual-axis vibration stimuli showed comparable results; similarly, cross-axis apparent masses (i.e. the ratio of the force in one direction to the acceleration in another direction) were almost identical for the single- and dual-axis vibration stimuli. All results were in agreement with data previously published using single-axis vibration. In most cases, the peaks in the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass occurred at a slightly lower frequency for the dual-axis vibration than for the single-axis vibration. It is hypothesised that this change is due to a nonlinear effect, analogous to that which occurs with increasing vibration magnitude for single-axis vibration.

Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

2006-12-01

247

Effects of Posture and Vibration Magnitude on Apparent Mass and Pelvis Rotation during Exposure to Whole-Body Vertical Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of variations in posture and vibration magnitude on apparent mass and seat-to-pelvis pitch transmissibility have been studied with vertical random vibration over the frequency range 1.0-20 Hz. Each of 12 subjects was exposed to 27 combinations of three vibration magnitudes (0.2, 1.0 and 2.0m/s2 r.m.s.) and nine sitting postures (``upright'', ``anterior lean'', ``posterior lean'', ``kyphotic'', ``back-on'', ``pelvis support'', ``inverted SIT-BAR'' (increased pressure beneath ischial tuberosities), ``bead cushion'' (decreased pressure beneath ischial tuberosities) and ``belt'' (wearing an elasticated belt)). Peaks in the apparent masses were observed at about 5 and 10 Hz, and in the seat-to-pelvis pitch transmissibilities at about 12 Hz. In all postures, the resonance frequencies in the apparent mass and transmissibility decreased with increased vibration magnitude, indicating a non-linear softening system. There were only small changes in apparent mass or transmissibility with posture, although peaks were lower for the apparent mass in the ``kyphotic'' posture and were lower for the transmissibility in the ``belt'' posture. The changes in apparent mass and transmissibility caused by changes in vibration magnitude were greater than the changes caused by variation in posture. . All rights reserved.

Mansfield, N. J.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

248

Skeletal site-specific effects of whole body vibration in mature rats: from deleterious to beneficial frequency-dependent effects.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) is receiving increasing interest as an anti-osteoporotic prevention strategy. In this context, selective effects of different frequency and acceleration magnitude modalities on musculoskeletal responses need to be better defined. Our aim was to investigate the bone effects of different vibration frequencies at constant g level. Vertical WBV was delivered at 0.7 g (peak acceleration) and 8, 52 or 90 Hz sinusoidal vibration to mature male rats 10 min daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Peak accelerations measured by skin or bone-mounted accelerometers at L2 vertebral and tibia crest levels revealed similar values between adjacent skin and bone sites. Local accelerations were greater at 8 Hz compared with 52 and 90 Hz and were greater in vertebra than tibia for all the frequencies tested. At 52 Hz, bone responses were mainly seen in L2 vertebral body and were characterized by trabecular reorganization and stimulated mineral apposition rate (MAR) without any bone volume alteration. At 90 Hz, axial and appendicular skeletons were affected as were the cortical and trabecular compartments. Cortical thickness increased in femur diaphysis (17%) along with decreased porosity; trabecular bone volume increased at distal femur metaphysis (23%) and even more at L2 vertebral body (32%), along with decreased SMI and increased trabecular connectivity. Trabecular thickness increased at the tibia proximal metaphysis. Bone cellular activities indicated a greater bone formation rate, which was more pronounced at vertebra (300%) than at long bone (33%). Active bone resorption surfaces were unaffected. At 8 Hz, however, hyperosteoidosis with reduced MAR along with increased resorption surfaces occurred in the tibia; hyperosteoidosis and trend towards decreased MAR was also seen in L2 vertebra. Trabecular bone mineral density was decreased at femur and tibia. Thus the most favorable regimen is 90 Hz, while deleterious effects were seen at 8 Hz. We concluded that the skeleton is frequency-scalable, thus highlighting the importance of WBV regimen conditions and suggesting that cautions are required for frequencies less than 10 Hz, at least in rats. PMID:23545229

Pasqualini, Marion; Lavet, Cédric; Elbadaoui, Mohamed; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Laroche, Norbert; Gnyubkin, Vasily; Vico, Laurence

2013-03-29

249

Factors affecting perception thresholds of vertical whole-body vibration in recumbent subjects: Gender and age of subjects, and vibration duration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some factors that may affect human perception thresholds of the vertical whole-body vibrations were investigated in two laboratory experiments with recumbent subjects. In the first experiment, the effects of gender and age of subjects on perception were investigated with three groups of 12 subjects, i.e., young males, young females and old males. For continuous sinusoidal vibrations at 2, 4, 8, 16, 31.5 and 63 Hz, there were no significant differences in the perception thresholds between male and female subjects, while the thresholds of young subjects tended to be significantly lower than the thresholds of old subjects. In the second experiment, the effect of vibration duration was investigated by using sinusoidal vibrations, at the same frequencies as above, modulated by the Hanning windows with different lengths (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 s) for 12 subjects. It was found that the peak acceleration at the threshold tended to decrease with increasing duration of vibration. The perception thresholds were also evaluated by the running root-mean-square (rms) acceleration and the fourth power acceleration method defined in the current standards. The differences in the threshold of the transient vibrations for different durations were less with the fourth power acceleration method. Additionally, the effect of the integration time on the threshold was investigated for the running rms acceleration and the fourth power acceleration. It was found that the integration time that yielded less differences in the threshold of vibrations for different durations depended on the frequency of vibration.

Matsumoto, Y.; Maeda, S.; Iwane, Y.; Iwata, Y.

2011-04-01

250

The Fate of Mrs Robinson: Criteria for Recognition of Whole-Body Vibration Injury as AN Occupational Disease  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several recently published critical reviews conclude that there is strong epidemiological evidence for a relationship between occupational exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV), low back pain (LBP) and back disorders. Whether this exposure is only a modest or a substantial risk factor for the onset and recurrence of LBP is still a matter of debate. In spite of this controversy, four European Union countries have decided to recognize and compensate LBP and certain spinal disorders as an occupational disease. In this paper, we review the criteria currently in use for the recognition of this occupational disease. A search of the literature was performed; additional information was obtained in work visits to national occupational disease institutes in Germany, France and Belgium, in annual reports and national statistics on occupational diseases. Belgium was the first country to add WBV injury to the official list of occupational diseases (1978), followed by Germany (1993), the Netherlands (1997), and France (1999). The incidence of newly recognized cases in 1999 varied considerably: 763 in Belgium, 269 in France, 16 in Germany, and 10 reported cases in the Netherlands. The findings of this review indicate that significant differences exist in the established and applied diagnostic and exposure criteria in the four EU countries. This is illustrated by the case of Mrs Robinson, a 41-year-old forklift driver with LBP, who would probably get recognition and compensation in the Netherlands and Belgium but would be rejected in France and Germany. The development of uniform internationally accepted criteria is recommended, also from an epidemiological point of view, as many data are collected in the process of recognition of this occupational disease. . All rights reserved.

Hulshof, C. T. J.; van der Laan, G.; Braam, I. T. J.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.

2002-05-01

251

Assessment of whole-body vibration levels of coal miners. Volume 3. Low-frequency vibration exposure and seat performance. Open File report, November 1979-April 1985  

SciTech Connect

The field data gathered as part of the measurements described in Volumes I and II were reanalyzed in the low frequency regime (.1 Hz to 1 Hz) where motion sickness normally occurs. These data were compared to the International Standard 2631 Addendum 2: Evaluation of exposure to whole-body Z-axis vertical vibration in the frequency range of 0.1 to 1.0 Hz. For both underground mining machines and surface-mining machines, the results showed that one would not expect motion sickness to be a severe problem. New field data were gathered on the vibration reduction performance of various seat designs found on surface-coal-mining machines. The vibration during normal operation was simultaneously measured on the seat using the standard seat-pad accelerometer packaged described in the previous two volumes, and on the floor of the machine at the base of the seat. Preliminary indications are that the so-called high performance seats used for operator vibration reduction do not offer significant improvement over conventional seats.

Remington, P.J.

1984-11-01

252

A summary of current Bureau research into the effects of whole-body vibration and shock on operators of underground mobile equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses current research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock on underground mobile equipment operators. The highlights of a comprehensive literature review of WBV, shock, and seating are presented. Factors discussed include health and physiological effects, comfort, performance, and fatigue. Vibration data were collected from shuttle cars and ramcars at several underground coal mines in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois. The data were formatted so that they could be used to drive the Bureau's motion platform, and to compare them with ANSI S3-1979, Guide for the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration. Human subject testing in the Bureau's vibration research laboratory evaluated the effects of two different seat angles and of the presence or absence of vibration and of foam padding on heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective discomfort. Only vibration significantly increased heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressures. Vibration and a steel seat had a significant effect on subjective discomfort. The apparatus used for these tests and the experimental procedures are described in detail. Recommendations are made for additional research on the exposure of underground mining machine operators to WBV and shock.

Love, A.C.; Unger, R.L.; Bobick, T.G.; Fowkes, R.S.

1992-01-01

253

An updated review of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between exposure to whole-body vibration and low back pain (1986–1997)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to update the information on the epidemiologic evidence of the adverse health effects of whole-body\\u000a vibration (WBV) on the spinal system by means of a review of the epidemiologic studies published between 1986 and 1997. In\\u000a a systematic search, using several databases, of epidemiologic studies of low back pain (LBP) disorders and occupations with

M. Bovenzi; C. T. J. Hulshof

1999-01-01

254

MOVEMENT OF THE UPPER-BODY OF SEATED SUBJECTS EXPOSED TO VERTICAL WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AT THE PRINCIPAL RESONANCE FREQUENCY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic responses of eight male subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration have been measured at eight locations of the body in three directions within the sagittal plane: in the vertical, fore-and-aft and pitch axes. The motions were measured on the body surface at the first, fifth and tenth thoracic vertebra (T1, T5, T10), at the first, third and fifth

Y. Matsumoto; M. J. Griffin

1998-01-01

255

Long-term sick leave and disability pensioning due to back disorders of tractor drivers exposed to whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In a historical 11-year follow-up study, disability pensioning and the incidence of the first sick leave of 4 weeks or longer due to back disorders has been investigated in a group of drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV), mainly of agricultural tractors. The reference group comprised workers not or only slightly exposed to WBV from the same and another

Hendriek C. Boshuizen; Carel T. J. Hulshof; Paulien M. Bongers

1990-01-01

256

Studies of combined effects of sinusoidal whole body vibrations and noise of varying bandwidths and intensities on TTS 2 in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyses the data from three laboratory experiments concerning the separate and combined effects on temporary threshold shifts in hearing (TTS2) of sinusoidal low-frequency (5 Hz — 2.12 m\\/s2 and 10 Hz —2.65 m\\/s2), whole body vibration (along the Z-axis), and continuous (white) noise with eight different bandwidths and intensity levels of 85 dB(A), 90 dB(A) and 98 dB(A).

Olavi Manninen

1983-01-01

257

A model of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The apparent mass of the human body reflects gross movements caused by whole-body vibration and can be used to predict the influence of body dynamics on seat transmissibility. With vertical excitation, various models fit the measured vertical apparent mass of the human body, but experiments also show high fore-and-aft forces on the seat (the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass) that have

Naser Nawayseh; Michael J. Griffin

2009-01-01

258

Combined effects of whole-body vibration, resistance exercise, and vascular occlusion on skeletal muscle and performance.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a new high-intensity training modality comprised of vibration exercise with superimposed resistance exercise and vascular occlusion (vibroX) on skeletal muscle and performance. Young untrained women were randomized to either train in a progressive mode on 3 days per week for 5 weeks ( N=12) or to maintain a sedentary lifestyle ( N=9). VibroX increased peak cycling power (+9%, P=0.001), endurance capacity (+57%, P=0.002), ventilatory threshold (+12%, P<0.001), and end-test torque (+15%, P=0.002) relative to the sedentary group. Training load increased by 84.5% ( P<0.001) after vibroX. The increases were paralleled by increases in myosin heavy chain type 1 vastus lateralis muscle fiber cross-sectional area (+14%, P=0.031) and proportion (+17%, P=0.015), thigh lean mass (+4%, P=0.001), capillary-to-fiber ratio (+14%, P=0.003), and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Conversely, maximal values for oxygen consumption, cardiac output, isokinetic leg extension power and jumping power remained unaffected. Notably, vastus lateralis muscle adaptations were achieved with a very low weekly training volume. We conclude that vibroX quickly increases muscle (fiber) size, capillarization, and oxidative potential, and markedly augments endurance capacity in young women. PMID:21870317

Item, F; Denkinger, J; Fontana, P; Weber, M; Boutellier, U; Toigo, M

2011-08-25

259

Effect of Muscle Tension on Non-Linearities in the Apparent Masses of Seated Subjects Exposed to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In subjects exposed to whole-body vibration, the cause of non-linear dynamic characteristics with changes in vibration magnitude is not understood. The effect of muscle tension on the non-linearity in apparent mass has been investigated in this study. Eight seated male subjects were exposed to random and sinusoidal vertical vibration at five magnitudes (0.35-1.4 m/s2 r.m.s.). The random vibration was presented for 60 s over the frequency range 2.0-20 Hz; the sinusoidal vibration was presented for 10 s at five frequencies (3.15, 4.0, 5.0, 6.3 and 8.0 Hz). Three sitting conditions were adopted such that, in two conditions, muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. It was assumed that, in these two conditions, involuntary changes in muscle tension would be minimized. The force and acceleration at the seat surface were used to obtain apparent masses of subjects. With both sinusoidal and random vibration, there was statistical support for the hypothesis that non-linear characteristics were less clear when muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. With increases in the magnitude of random vibration from 0.35 to 1.4 m/s2 r.m.s., the apparent mass resonance frequency decreased from 5.25 to 4.25 Hz with normal muscle tension, from 5.0 to 4.38 Hz with the buttocks muscles tensed, and from 5.13 to 4.5 Hz with the abdominal muscles tensed. Involuntary changes in muscle tension during whole-body vibration may be partly responsible for non-linear biodynamic responses. . All rights reserved.

Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2002-05-01

260

Efficacy of a whole-body vibration intervention to effect exercise tolerance and functional performance of the lower limbs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory condition characterised by dyspnoea, excessive sputum production, chronic cough, bronchitis and emphysema. Functionally, exercise tolerance is poor for people with COPD and is linked to difficulty in performing daily tasks. More specifically, exercise difficulties are due partly to dyspnoea and lower limb skeletal muscle dysfunction. The benefit of exercise that does not exacerbate the disease while improving exercise tolerance is salient. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a mode of physical activity known to improve muscular function of the lower limbs, yet efficacy has not been investigated for a WBV intervention conducted in a home-based setting for people with COPD. Methods/design This clinically registered trial is a non-randomised placebo cross-over intervention based in the home of each participant (ACTRN12612000508875). Participants diagnosed with COPD will complete a six-week WBV intervention and then after a two-week washout period, will complete a six-week placebo training intervention. Participants will complete sessions twice a week. The duration of the trial is 14 weeks. Community-dwelling older adults with COPD will provide informed voluntary consent to participate. Outcome measures will include immediate, acute, and long-term responses to exercise. Discussion Quantifying responses to WBV among people with COPD will allow discussion of efficacy of WBV as a mode of physical activity. The skill required by the participant to perform physical activity with WBV is not demanding and may enhance habitual sustainability. The results of this trial could be used to support further research in both clinical and community settings. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR12612000508875)

2012-01-01

261

Acute effects of whole body vibration on directionality and reaction time latency of trunk muscles: the importance of rest and implications for spine stability.  

PubMed

Workplace exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) has been identified as one of the major physical risk factors encountered by the population. There are indications that, subsequent to a perturbation, impaired reflex response could allow for destabilization of the spine, possibly leading to injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate if WBV alters reflex response of trunk muscles and if the direction of perturbation (flexion or extension or lateral) and delay between exposure and perturbation influences the response. The results indicate that EMG latency was increased more in the vibration condition than in sitting without vibration. Significant effects with respect to directionality were observed in Erector Spinae muscles. The EMG latency reduced from the effect of perturbation after a 20s rest period. Even though the EMG latency did not fully return to its Pre-test state, the present results still show that recovery from the acute effects of WBV is possible with a rest period. PMID:23218963

Arora, Neha; Grenier, Sylvain G

2012-12-05

262

Hanford whole body counting manual  

SciTech Connect

This document, a reprint of the Whole Body Counting Manual, was compiled to train personnel, document operation procedures, and outline quality assurance procedures. The current manual contains information on: the location, availability, and scope of services of Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the administrative aspect of the whole body counting operation; Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the step-by-step procedure involved in the different types of in vivo measurements; the detectors, preamplifiers and amplifiers, and spectroscopy equipment; the quality assurance aspect of equipment calibration and recordkeeping; data processing, record storage, results verification, report preparation, count summaries, and unit cost accounting; and the topics of minimum detectable amount and measurement accuracy and precision. 12 refs., 13 tabs.

Palmer, H.E.; Brim, C.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Rhoads, M.C.

1987-05-01

263

Whole-body vibration attenuates the increase in leg arterial stiffness and aortic systolic blood pressure during post-exercise muscle ischemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exercise with whole-body vibration (WBV) decreases brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of systemic arterial\\u000a stiffness. To examine the effect of WBV on arterial responses, 12 young men underwent three experimental trials: (1) no-exercise\\u000a control (CON), (2) static squat with WBV, and (3) static squat without WBV (no-WBV). Bilateral baPWV and femoral-ankle PWV\\u000a (faPWV), carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV), augmentation index

Arturo Figueroa; Ryan Gil; Marcos A. Sanchez-Gonzalez

2011-01-01

264

Metrics of whole-body vibration and exposure–response relationship for low back pain in professional drivers: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between alternative measures of exposure to whole-body vibration\\u000a (WBV) and low back pain (LBP) in professional drivers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The incidence of 12-month LBP, high pain intensity (numerical rating scale score > 5), and disability in the lower back (Roland\\u000a and Morris disability scale score ? 12) was investigated in a cohort of 537 drivers over

Massimo Bovenzi

2009-01-01

265

[The effect of whole-body vibration on the electrical activity and oxidative metabolism in different brain structures].  

PubMed

Chronic experiments on rabbits were performed to study the bioelectric activity, oxygen consumption and succinate dehydrogenase (DG) activity in different parts of the cortex and subcortex (mesencephalic reticular formation, lateral vestibular nucleus, thalamus posteroventrolateral nucleus), as well as the compound electric activity of the neck muscles, and rythm adoption. The phase character and different vibration sensitivity of the brain structures depending on the duration of vibration were revealed. At the initial phase, the following vibration effects were examined: reaction of activation on encephalogram, growing EMG and DG activity, increased oxygen consumption, and rythm adoption high frequency shifting. Prolonged vibration caused a vivid violation of the intracentral correlation between the cortex and subcortex. Correlation was also identified between electric activity and the brain structures' oxidation metabolism against the vibration dynamics levels. PMID:2628219

Minasian, S M; Baklavadzhian, O G; Saakian, S G

1989-01-01

266

High-frequency and low-magnitude whole body vibration with rest days is more effective in improving skeletal micro-morphology and biomechanical properties in ovariectomised rodents.  

PubMed

We explored the optimal regime in preventing or treating bone loss, using ovariectomised rodents loaded by mechanical stimuli with rest days during the loading cycle. Eighty-four Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 months, were randomly divided into 7 groups after bilateral ovariectomy. Mechanical vibration with 1-day rest (ML1R), with 3-day rest (ML3R), with 5-day rest (ML5R), with 7-day rest (ML7R), daily loading (DL), comparing the ovariectomised group (OVX) with baseline (BCL) measurements. After a recovery of one week, all the rodents were loaded daily by whole body vibration at 35 Hz and 0.25 g for 15 minutes. Eight weeks later, a three-point bending test of the radius and micro-CT scanning of the femoral head were performed after animal sacrifice. Large improvements in biomechanical properties occurred in all the experimental groups for failure load, elastic modulus and deflection, while a significantly enhanced efficacy was detected in ML7R compared with daily loading (p<0.05). In micro-CT scanning, bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, number and separation were improved by the regime in all experimental groups, while ML7R showed a significant improvement over daily loading (p<0.05). Early bone loss in human subjects may be improved by high-frequency and low-magnitude whole body vibration with rest days or daily stimuli. Mechanical stimulus with a 7-day rest was more effective in improving biomechanical properties and micro-morphology compared with daily loading. This may have clinical implications in relation to the prevention and treatment of hip fractures, and in postoperative management following hip arthroplasty. PMID:22344486

Ma, Renshi; Zhu, Dong; Gong, He; Gu, Guishan; Huang, Xu; Gao, Jia zi; Zhang, Xizheng

267

Apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of standing subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the standing human body during exposure to vertical vibration have been investigated. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration over the frequency range 2.0 20 Hz at three vibration magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 m s-2 rms. Subjects stood in five different postures: upright, lordotic, anterior lean, knees bent and knees more bent. The vertical acceleration at the floor and the forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions at the floor were used to obtain the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass was significantly reduced with knees bent and knees more bent postures, but there were only minor effects on the resonance frequency by changing the position of the upper body. Considerable cross-axis apparent mass, up to about 30% of the static mass of subjects, was found. The cross-axis apparent mass was influenced by all postural changes used in the study. In all postures the resonance frequencies of the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass tended to decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear characteristic tended to be less clear in some postures in which subjects increased muscle tension.

Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

2006-05-01

268

Nonlinearity in apparent mass and transmissibility of the supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resonance frequencies evident in the apparent mass and the transmissibility of the human body decrease with increasing vibration magnitude, but the mechanisms responsible for this nonlinearity have not been established. This experiment was designed to explore the effects of body location on the nonlinearity of the body in supine postures. In a group of 12 male subjects, the apparent mass and transmissibility to the sternum, upper abdomen, and lower abdomen were measured in three postures (relaxed semi-supine, flat supine and constrained semi-supine) with vertical random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at seven vibration magnitudes (nominally 0.0313, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 ms-2 rms). In all three postures, the apparent mass resonance frequencies and the primary peak frequencies in the transmissibilities to the upper and lower abdomen decreased with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.25 to 1.0 ms-2 rms. Nonlinearity generally apparent in transmissibility to the abdomen was less evident in transmissibility to the sternum and less evident in transmissibilities to the abdomen at vibration magnitudes less than 0.125 ms-2 rms. The nonlinearity was more apparent in the flat supine posture than in the semi-supine postures. The findings are consistent with the nonlinearity being associated with the response of soft tissues, more likely a consequence of passive thixotropy than muscle activity.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2009-07-01

269

L-carnitine as an ergogenic aid for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease submitted to whole-body and respiratory muscle training programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of adding L-carnitine to a whole-body and respiratory training program were determined in moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Sixteen COPD pa- tients (66 ± 7 years) were randomly assigned to L-carnitine (CG) or placebo group (PG) that received either L-carnitine or saline solution (2 g\\/day, orally) for 6 weeks (forced expiratory volume on first second was

A. Borghi-Silva; V. Baldissera; L. M. M. Sampaio; V. A. Pires-DiLorenzo; M. Jamami; A. Demonte; J. S. Marchini; D. Costa

2006-01-01

270

Acute changes in neuromuscular excitability after exhaustive whole body vibration exercise as compared to exhaustion by squatting exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The effects of hard squatting exercise with (VbX+) and without (VbX)) vibration on neuromuscular function were tested in 19 healthy young volunteers. Before and after the exercise, three different tests were performed: maximum serial jumping for 30 s, electromyography during isometric knee extension at 70% of the maximum voluntary torque, and the quantitative analysis of the patellar tendon reflex.

Jorn Rittweger; Marcus Mutschelknauss; Dieter Felsenberg

2003-01-01

271

Whole-body vibration experienced by haulage truck operators in surface mining operations: a comparison of various analysis methods utilized in the prediction of health risks.  

PubMed

Whole body vibration (WBV) was measured on eight surface haulage trucks in three size classes (35, 100, 150ton haul capacities). Vibration was measured at the seat/operator interface in accordance with the ISO 2631-1 standard during 1h of normal operation. Highest acceleration readings were observed in the z-axis (vertical). Estimated equivalent daily exposure values in the range of 0.44-0.82 ms(-2) were observed using the frequency-weighted r.m.s method and 8.7-16.4ms(-1.75) using the vibration dose value method. Assessment was carried out using ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5. Operators of surface haulage trucks are regularly exposed to WBV levels that exceed safety limits as dictated by the ISO 2631-1 standard. However, according to ISO 2631-5 the probability of an adverse health effect remains low. These findings confirm an apparent disagreement between the two analysis methods. PMID:20185120

Smets, Martin P H; Eger, Tammy R; Grenier, Sylvain G

2010-02-24

272

The effect of whole body vibration on the H-reflex, the stretch reflex, and the short-latency response during hopping.  

PubMed

The effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on reflex responses is controversially discussed in the literature. In this study, three different modalities of reflex activation with increased motor complexity have been selected to clarify the effects of acute WBV on reflex activation: (1) the electrically evoked H-reflex, (2) the mechanically elicited stretch reflex, and (3) the short-latency response (SLR) during hopping. WBV-induced changes of the H-reflex, the stretch reflex, and the SLR during hopping were recorded in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles and were analyzed before, during (only the H-reflex), immediately after, 5 min and 10 min after WBV. The main findings were that (1) the H-reflexes were significantly reduced during and at least up to 5 min after WBV, (2) the stretch reflex amplitudes were also significantly reduced immediately after WBV but recovered to their initial amplitudes within 5 min, and (3) the SLR during hopping showed no vibration-induced modulation. With regard to the modalities with low motor complexities, the decreased H- and stretch reflex responses are assumed to point toward a reduced Ia afferent transmission during and after WBV. However, it is assumed that during hopping, the suppression of reflex sensitivity is compensated by facilitatory mechanisms in this complex motor task. PMID:23802287

Ritzmann, R; Kramer, A; Gollhofer, A; Taube, W

2013-06-01

273

Chronic effects of whole-body vibration on jumping performance and body balance using different frequencies and amplitudes with identical acceleration load.  

PubMed

Previous studies on vibration training have all been based on protocols at different combinations of frequencies and amplitudes without controlling the loading intensity. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effect of an 8-week vibration training program, under identical acceleration loads with various frequencies and amplitudes, on jumping performance, muscle activation and body balance. DESIGN: Fifty young adults were randomly assigned to an high-frequency (32Hz, 1mm, and 4g), low-frequency (18Hz, 3mm, and 4g), or a control group. The high-frequency and low-frequency groups underwent 60s of squats exercise on the specific vibration platform three times a week, whereas the control group was trained without vibration. METHODS: A force platform was used to measure the center of pressure of a static single leg stance, and the heights and impulse of two consecutive countermovement jumps before and after intervention. The activation of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris were also measured synchronously by surface electromyography. RESULTS: The heights and impulse of both the first and second countermovement jumps were significantly increased and the area of center of pressure was significantly decreased after training in both the high-frequency and low-frequency groups (P<.05). Consequently, activation of the rectus femoris during the first countermovement jump was significantly lower than the pre-training value in the HF group but increased in the low-frequency group after training (P<.05). CONCLUSION: An 8-week identical acceleration vibration training regimen with various frequencies and amplitudes can significantly improve jumping performance and body balance, but the specific neuromuscular adaptation is possibly induced by different training settings. PMID:23523540

Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Liu, Chiang; Chuang, Long-Ren; Chung, Pao-Hung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

2013-03-21

274

Addition of synchronous whole-body vibration to body mass resistive exercise causes little or no effects on muscle damage and/or inflammation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if a moderate intensity whole-body vibration (WBV) body mass resistive exercise session causes additional muscle damage, soreness and inflammation compared to the same exercise session without vibration (NoV). Ten recreationally active male university students completed two separate 24 h study periods incorporating an exercise session with WBV or NoV. Muscle torque was measured (at 0, 60, and 240°·s angular velocities), soreness (10 point scale) in the upper [UE (triceps)] and lower [LE (quadriceps)] extremities, and muscle inflammation markers (interleukin 1?, 6, 10) were measured at 4 time points (pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 4 h post, and 24 h post). Diet was controlled. Compared to NoV, WBV increased (P<0.01) muscle soreness at 24 h post-exercise in both the UE (2.2±1.7 vs 0.6±0.9) and LE (2.0±1.5 vs 0.7±0.7). Muscle torque was decreased immediately post-exercise (P<0.05) in the UE and LE at 0°·s and in the UE at 240°·s, but there was no difference between exercise treatments. The exercise session caused significant but small increases in IL-1? and IL-6 but with no differences between exercise treatments. IL-10 was increased with WBV (2.9±2.0 to 3.6±1.9 pg·ml; P<0.03). These data suggest the addition of WBV to exercise has little effect on muscle function/damage, soreness, or inflammation. PMID:23615482

Hazell, Tom J; Olver, T Dylan; Hamilton, Craig D; Lemon, Peter W R

2013-04-23

275

Effects of isolated and combined exposures to whole-body vibration and noise on auditory-event related brain potentials and psychophysical assessment.  

PubMed

Auditory event-related brain potentials (ERP) in response to two different tone stimuli (1.1 kHz or 1 kHz, 80 dB, 50 ms; given by headphones at a regular interstimulus interval of 5 s with a probability distribution of 70:30) were recorded from 12 healthy male subjects (Ss) during four different conditions with two repetitions: A-60 dBA white noise (wN), no whole-body vibration (WBV); B-60 dBA wN plus sinusoidal WBV in the az-direction with a frequency of 2.01 Hz and acceleration of 2 m.s-2 root mean square; C-80 dBA wN, no WBV; D-80 dBA wN plus WBV. Each condition consisted of two runs of about 11 min interrupted by a break of 4 min. During the break with continuing exposure, but without auditory stimuli, Ss judged the difficulty of the tone-detection task and intensity of noise by means of cross-modality matching (CMM). Vibration-synchronous activity in the electrocardiogram was eliminated by a subtraction-technique. Noise caused an attenuation of the N1 and P2 amplitudes and prolongation of P3 latencies. The WBV did not cause systematic ERP effects. Condition B was associated with higher N1 and smaller P3 amplitudes. The factor "condition" had a significant effect on the peak latencies of P3 to target stimuli and the task difficulty judged by CMM. Both effects exhibited significant linear increases in the sequence of conditions A, B, C, D. For the evaluation of exposure conditions at work, it can be suggested that noise has a strong systematic effect which can be enhanced by WBV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1425639

Seidel, H; Blüthner, R; Martin, J; Menzel, G; Panuska, R; Ullsperger, P

1992-01-01

276

Whole body metabolic effects of prolonged endurance training in combination with erythropoietin treatment in humans: a randomized placebo controlled trial.  

PubMed

Erythropoietin (Epo) administration improves aerobic exercise capacity and insulin sensitivity in renal patients and also increases resting energy expenditure (REE). Similar effects are observed in response to endurance training. The aim was to compare the effects of endurance training with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) treatment in healthy humans. Thirty-six healthy untrained men were randomized to 10 wk of either: 1) placebo (n = 9), 2) ESA (n = 9), 3) endurance training (n = 10), or 4) ESA and endurance training (n = 8). In a single-blinded design, ESA/placebo was injected one time weekly. Training consisted of biking for 1 h at 65% of wattmax three times per week. Measurements performed before and after the intervention were as follows: body composition, maximal oxygen uptake, insulin sensitivity, REE, and palmitate turnover. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) mRNA levels were assessed in skeletal muscle. Fat mass decreased after training (P = 0.003), whereas ESA induced a small but significant increase in intrahepatic fat (P = 0.025). Serum free fatty acid (FFA) levels and palmitate turnover decreased significantly in response to training, whereas the opposite pattern was found after ESA. REE corrected for lean body mass increased in response to ESA and training, and muscle UCP2 mRNA levels increased after ESA (P = 0.035). Insulin sensitivity increased only after training (P = 0.011). In conclusion: 1) insulin sensitivity is not improved after ESA treatment despite improved exercise capacity, 2) the calorigenic effects of ESA may be related to increased UCP2 gene expression in skeletal muscle, and 3) training and ESA exert opposite effects on lipolysis under basal conditions, increased FFA levels and liver fat fraction was observed after ESA treatment. PMID:23921143

Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte; Larsen, Mads S; Thams, Line; Sieljacks, Peter; Vestergaard, Poul F; Bibby, Bo Martin; Vissing, Kristian; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen B; Møller, Niels; Nielsen, Søren; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L

2013-08-06

277

A model of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body during vertical whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The apparent mass of the human body reflects gross movements caused by whole-body vibration and can be used to predict the influence of body dynamics on seat transmissibility. With vertical excitation, various models fit the measured vertical apparent mass of the human body, but experiments also show high fore-and-aft forces on the seat (the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass) that have not influenced current models. This paper defines a model that predicts the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical excitation. A three degree-of-freedom model with vertical, fore-and-aft and rotational (i.e. pitch) degrees of freedom has been developed with twelve model parameters (representing inertia, stiffness, damping, and geometry) optimised to the measured vertical apparent mass and the measured fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the body. The model provides close fits to the moduli and phases for both median data and the responses of 12 individual subjects. The optimum model parameters found by fitting to the median apparent mass of 12 subjects were similar to the medians of the same parameters found by fitting to the individual apparent masses of the same 12 subjects. The model suggests the seated human body undergoes fore-and-aft motion on a seat when exposed to vertical excitation, with the primary resonance frequency of the apparent mass arising from vertical motion of the body. According to the model, changes in the vertical, fore-and-aft, or rotational degree of freedom have an effect on the resonance in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass.

Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

2009-01-01

278

Long-term effects of 6-week whole-body vibration on balance recovery and activities of daily living in the postacute phase of stroke: a randomized, controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The long-term effects of 6-weeks whole-body vibration, as a novel method of somatosensory stimulation, on postural control and activities of daily living were compared with those of 6 weeks of exercise therapy on music of the same intensity in the postacute phase of stroke. METHODS: Fifty-three patients with moderate to severe functional disabilities were randomized within 6

I. J. W. van Nes; H. Latour; F. Schils; R. Meijer; A. van Kuijk; A. C. H. Geurts

2006-01-01

279

Early Adolescence: Whole Body Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Whole body" denotes using the entire body to sense and experience a concept or idea. Typical whole body learning activities involve use of several senses: muscle sense, temperature, pain, pressure, and sense of equilibrium. Four whole body science activities are described, including identifying trees by touch. (Author/JN)

Cannon, Roger K., Jr.; Padilla, Michael J.

1982-01-01

280

Vibration training: benefits and risks.  

PubMed

The main results of our recent several studies, i.e. the measurements of vibration training results for single case and group studies as well as the cardiovascular parameter measurements during vibrations and the corresponding hydrodynamic analysis, are summarized. Our studies and previous work all confirm that vibration training is an effective training method in order to improve maximal strength and flexibility as well as various other factors if the training is properly designed. Some recommendations regarding the proper ranges of frequencies, amplitudes and exposure duration of vibration training are made based on the existing vibration training practice and mechanism analysis, although much work remains to be carried out in order to set up clear rules for various groups of people so that maximal training results could be expected and in the meantime potential dangerous effects could be avoided. Cardiovascular parameter measurements confirm that total peripheral resistance (TPR) to the blood flow is increased during body vibration. Hydrodynamic analysis offers the mechanism for the increase of TPR through the deformation of vessels. As a reaction of compensation, more capillaries are probably opened in order to keep a necessary level of cardiac output needed for the body, resulting in more efficient gas and material metabolism between the blood and muscle fibres. This might be one of the reasons for the various potential beneficial effects of vibration training. PMID:15869759

Mester, J; Kleinöder, H; Yue, Z

2006-01-01

281

L-carnitine as an ergogenic aid for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease submitted to whole-body and respiratory muscle training programs.  

PubMed

The effects of adding L-carnitine to a whole-body and respiratory training program were determined in moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Sixteen COPD patients (66 +/- 7 years) were randomly assigned to L-carnitine (CG) or placebo group (PG) that received either L-carnitine or saline solution (2 g/day, orally) for 6 weeks (forced expiratory volume on first second was 38 +/- 16 and 36 +/- 12%, respectively). Both groups participated in three weekly 30-min treadmill and threshold inspiratory muscle training sessions, with 3 sets of 10 loaded inspirations (40%) at maximal inspiratory pressure. Nutritional status, exercise tolerance on a treadmill and six-minute walking test, blood lactate, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory muscle strength were determined as baseline and on day 42. Maximal capacity in the incremental exercise test was significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.05). Blood lactate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and heart rate at identical exercise levels were lower in CG after training (P < 0.05). Inspiratory muscle strength and walking test tolerance were significantly improved in both groups, but the gains of CG were significantly higher than those of PG (40 +/- 14 vs 14 +/- 5 cmH2O, and 87 +/- 30 vs 34 +/- 29 m, respectively; P < 0.05). Blood lactate concentration was significantly lower in CG than in PG (1.6 +/- 0.7 vs 2.3 +/- 0.7 mM, P < 0.05). The present data suggest that carnitine can improve exercise tolerance and inspiratory muscle strength in COPD patients, as well as reduce lactate production. PMID:16612469

Borghi-Silva, A; Baldissera, V; Sampaio, L M M; Pires-DiLorenzo, V A; Jamami, M; Demonte, A; Marchini, J S; Costa, D

2006-04-03

282

Whole body lexical decision.  

PubMed

When a person standing upright raises an arm on cue, muscles of the left and right sides of the body exhibit changes prior to and specific to the responding arm. We had standing participants perform a visual lexical decision task ("is this letter string a word?"), responding yes by raising one arm and no by raising the other arm. We recorded onset of the arm movement and onset of electromyographic activity in thigh, trunk, and shoulder muscles. We observed the expected responding arm specificity and found that the onset difference favoring word decisions was evident in similar magnitude at all measurement sites, with the difference at the levels of thigh, trunk and shoulder muscles available 225, 189, and 120 ms, respectively, prior to its manifestation at the level of arm movement. We discuss including (a) whole body reaction time along with event-related potentials in determining the decision-response, brain-body temporal relation and (b) response execution along with response initiation in investigating mental chronometry. PMID:21184808

Moreno, Miguel A; Stepp, Nigel; Turvey, M T

2010-12-22

283

Whole-Body MRA.  

PubMed

Vascular diseases today constitute a serious health burden, ranking atherosclerosis as number one in the morbidity and mortality statistics of developed countries, with a still-growing incidence. Different treatment options are available for all vascular territories, ranging from conservative pharmacological treatment and catheter-based interventions up to surgical methods with remodelling of the vessels or bypass implantation. For treatment planning, all listed procedures have in common that they rely on initial diagnostic imaging to assess the degree and extent of stenoses. In this respect, imaging of the arterial system from the head down to the feet seems to be reasonable. Up to now no imaging technique allowed the assessment of the complete arterial system in only one exam within a reasonable time and without limiting factors like invasiveness and ionizing radiation. However, recent developments in magnetic resonance (MR) hardware and software, such as dedicated whole-body MR systems with specially designed surface coils, the movement to higher field strength and the implementation of parallel acquisition techniques (PAT), have helped to overcome the long-standing limitations of MR angiography (MRA), like reduced spatial resolution, long acquisition time, the restriction to body parts and only one field of view of a maximum 50 cm. PMID:18491112

Kramer, Harald; Quick, Harald H; Tombach, Bernd; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Barkhausen, Joerg

2008-05-20

284

Effects of whole-body cryotherapy vs. far-infrared vs. passive modalities on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in highly-trained runners.  

PubMed

Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC), far infrared (FIR) or passive (PAS) modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post), post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS) in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being]) were recorded before, immediately after (post), post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h), while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities. PMID:22163272

Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Bieuzen, François; Pournot, Hervé; Fournier, Jean; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Brisswalter, Jeanick

2011-12-07

285

A comparison of whole body vibration and moist heat on lower extremity skin temperature and skin blood flow in healthy older individuals  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Tissue healing is an intricate process that is regulated by circulation. Heat modalities have been shown to improve skin circulation. Recent research supports that passive vibration increases circulation without risk of burns. Study purpose is to compare and determine effects of short duration vibration, moist heat, and a combination of the two on skin blood flow (SBF) and skin temperature (ST) in elderly, non-diabetic individuals following short-term exposure. Material/Methods Ten subjects, 3 female and 7 male (55–73 years of age), received two interventions over three days: 1 – Active vibration, 2 – passive vibration, 3 – moist heat, 4 – moist heat combined with passive vibration (MHPV), 5 – a commercial massaging heating pad, and 6 – no intervention. SBF and ST were measured using a MOOR Laser Doppler before and after the intervention and the third measurement were taken 10 minutes following. Results Mean SBF following a ten-minute intervention were significantly different in the combination of moist heat and passive vibration from the control, active vibration, and the commercial massaging heating pad. Compared to baseline measurements, this resulted in mean SBF elevation to 450% (at conclusion of 10 minutes of intervention) and 379% (10 minutes post). MHPV (p=0.02) showed significant changes in ST from the commercial massaging heating pad, passive vibration, and active vibration interventions. Conclusions SBF in the lower legs showed greatest increase with MHPV. Interventions should be selected that are low risk while increasing lower extremity skin blood flow.

Lohman, Everett B.; Sackiriyas, Kanikkai Steni Balan; Bains, Gurinder S.; Calandra, Giovanni; Lobo, Crystal; Nakhro, Daniel; Malthankar, Gauri; Paul, Sherwine

2012-01-01

286

Effect of voluntary periodic muscular activity on nonlinearity in the apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical random whole-body vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principal resonance frequency in the driving-point impedance of the human body decreases with increasing vibration magnitude—a nonlinear response. An understanding of the nonlinearities may advance understanding of the mechanisms controlling body movement and improve anthropodynamic modelling of responses to vibration at various magnitudes. This study investigated the effects of vibration magnitude and voluntary periodic muscle activity on the apparent mass resonance frequency using vertical random vibration in the frequency range 0.5 20 Hz. Each of 14 subjects was exposed to 14 combinations of two vibration magnitudes (0.25 and 2.0 m s-2 root-mean square (rms)) in seven sitting conditions: two without voluntary periodic movement (A: upright; B: upper-body tensed), and five with voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending; D: folding-stretching arms from back to front; E: stretching arms from rest to front; F: folding arms from elbow; G: deep breathing). Three conditions with voluntary periodic movement significantly reduced the difference in resonance frequency at the two vibration magnitudes compared with the difference in a static sitting condition. Without voluntary periodic movement (condition A: upright), the median apparent mass resonance frequency was 5.47 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.39 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. With voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending), the resonance frequency was 4.69 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.59 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. It is concluded that back muscles, or other muscles or tissues in the upper body, influence biodynamic responses of the human body to vibration and that voluntary muscular activity or involuntary movement of these parts can alter their equivalent stiffness.

Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

2006-12-01

287

Delivery drivers and low-back pain: A study of the exposures to posture demands, manual materials handling and whole-body vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exposures of drivers to posture demands, manual materials handling (MMH) and vibration as risk factors for LBP were investigated. A validated questionnaire was used to obtain information about driving experience, driving (sitting) posture, MMH, and health history among 64 drivers in short-haul delivery jobs. Twelve persons were observed and videotaped during their work and vibration measurements were obtained for

Olanrewaju O. Okunribido; Marianne Magnusson; Malcolm Pope

2006-01-01

288

Effects of Whole-Body Cryotherapy vs. Far-Infrared vs. Passive Modalities on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Highly-Trained Runners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC), far infrared (FIR) or passive (PAS) modalities in hastening muscular

Christophe Hausswirth; Julien Louis; François Bieuzen; Hervé Pournot; Jean Fournier; Jean-Robert Filliard; Jeanick Brisswalter

2011-01-01

289

The ORNL whole body counter  

SciTech Connect

This report is a non-technical document intended to provide an individual about to undergo a whole-body radiation count with a general understanding of the counting procedure and with the results obtained. 9 figs. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-01-01

290

Dynamic and subjective responses of seated subjects exposed to simultaneous vertical and fore-and-aft whole-body vibration: The effect of the phase between the two single-axis components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to simultaneous vertical and fore-and-aft sinusoidal whole-body vibration were investigated. The effect of the phase difference between the vertical and the fore-and-aft vibration on the responses was of a particular interest in this study. Fifteen subjects were exposed to dual-axis vibrations at six frequencies (2.5 8 Hz) and at eight phases between the two single-axis components (0 315°). The magnitude of vibration in each axis was constant at 0.7 m s-2 rms. Discomfort caused by vibration was measured by the method of magnitude estimation. The motion of the body were measured at the head and three locations along the spine with accelerometers attached to the body surface. The most significant effect of the phase between the two single-axis components on the discomfort was observed at 5 Hz: about 40% difference in the median discomfort estimate caused by changing the phase. The transmissibilities from vertical seat vibration to vertical motions of the spine varied from 0.5 to 2.0 by changing the phase between the two single-axis components at frequencies from 2.5 to 5 Hz. The effect of the phase observed in the dynamic response was not predicted by the superposition of the responses to each single-axis vibration. The discomfort caused by the dual-axis vibration tended to be correlated better with the combinations of the dynamic responses measured in the two axes than with the dynamic responses in a single axis.

Matsumoto, Yasunao; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Saito, Tetsuro

2006-12-01

291

Effects of vibration and resistance training on neuromuscular and hormonal measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim was to study whether whole body vibration (WBV) combined with conventional resistance training (CRT) induces a higher\\u000a increase in neuromuscular and hormonal measures compared with CRT or WBV, respectively. Twenty-eight young men were randomized\\u000a in three groups; squat only (S), combination of WBV and squat (S+V) and WBV only (V). S+V performed six sets with eight repetitions\\u000a with

Thue Kvorning; Malene Bagger; Paolo Caserotti; Klavs Madsen

2006-01-01

292

Systematically Controlling for the Influence of Age, Sex, Hertz and Time Post-Whole-Body Vibration Exposure on Four Measures of Physical Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Cross-Over Study  

PubMed Central

Though popular, there is little agreement on what whole-body vibration (WBV) parameters will optimize performance. This study aimed to clarify the effects of age, sex, hertz and time on four physical function indicators in community-dwelling older adults (N = 32). Participants were exposed to 2?min WBV per session at either 2?Hz or 26?Hz and outcome measures were recorded at 2, 20 and 40?min post-WBV. Timed get up-and-go and chair sit-and-reach performances improved post-WBV for both sexes, were significantly different between 2?Hz and 26?Hz treatments (P ? 0.05) and showed statistically significant interactions between age and gender (P ? 0.01). Counter movement jump and timed one-legged stance performances showed a similar but non-significant response to 2?Hz and 26?Hz treatments, though male subjects showed a distinct trended response. Age and gender should be statistically controlled and both 2?Hz and 26?Hz exert a treatment effect.

Merriman, Harold L.; Brahler, C. Jayne; Jackson, Kurt

2011-01-01

293

21 CFR 892.1130 - Nuclear whole body counter.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body counter. 892.1130 ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...892.1130 Nuclear whole body counter. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body counter is a device...

2013-04-01

294

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device...

2013-04-01

295

Performance parameters of a whole body counter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Techniques for the assessment of internally incorporated radionuclides are essential for monitoring potentially exposed workers to radiation as well as for the preparedness of response in the case of Radiological Emergencies. The Whole Body Counter at Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear (ITN), Portugal, provides a direct way of measuring the activity of internally incorporated radionuclides in possibly contaminated persons. This equipment

J. Bento; P. Teles; L. Silva; P. Nogueira; M. Neves; P. Vaz

2010-01-01

296

Humanoid Teleoperation for Whole Body Manipulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results of successful telemanipulation of large, heavy objects by a humanoid robot. Using a sin- gle joystick the operator controls walking and whole body manipulation along arbitrary paths for up to ten minutes of continuous execution. The robot grasps, walks, pushes, pulls, turns and re-grasps a 55kg range of loads on casters. Our telemanipulation framework changes reference frames

Mike Stilman; Koichi Nishiwaki; Satoshi Kagami

2008-01-01

297

Radiation exposure in whole body CT screening.  

PubMed

Using a technology that "takes a look" at people's insides and promises early warnings of cancer, cardiac disease, and other abnormalities, clinics and medical imaging facilities nationwide are touting a new service for health conscious people: "Whole body CT screening" this typically involves scanning the body from the chin to below the hips with a form of x-ray imaging that produces cross-sectional images. In USA direct-to-consumer marketing of whole body CT is occurring today in many metropolitan areas. Free standing CT screening centres are being sited in shopping malls and other high density public areas, and these centres are being advertised in the electronic and print media. In this context the present article discussed the pros and cons of having such centres in India with the advent of multislice CT leading to fast scan times. PMID:22187800

Suresh, Pamidighantam; Ratnam, S V; Rao, K V J

2011-04-01

298

MRI Composing for Whole Body Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging application gaining vast clinical interest during the last years. Although recent technological advances shortened the longish acquisition time, this is still the limiting factor avoiding its wide-spread clinical usage. The acquisition of images with large field-of-view helps to relieve this drawback, but leads to significantly distorted images. In this paper, a novel scheme for MRI composing is presented. The approach is based on simultaneous registration of two MRI volumes to their linear weighted average. The method successfully compensates for the distortions and allows to generate high-resolution whole body images. Results on several in-vivo data sets are presented.

Glocker, B.; Wachinger, C.; Zeltner, J.; Paragios, N.; Komodakis, N.; Hansen, M.; Navab, N.

299

Nonaxial whole-body instant imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate that whole-body, single-shot imaging is practical for imaging out of the central plane, including oblique axes. The technique is illustrated by images of the heart in the cardiac long- and short-axis and by coronal images of the brain. Secondary gradients can produce additional image distortion and ghosting in these images. These artifacts are a direct consequence, predictable by

R. M. Weisskoff; M. S. Cohen; R. R. Rzedzian

1993-01-01

300

Whole-body dose from tomotherapy delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To measure whole-body dose in tomotherapy of the head and neck region resulting from internal patient scatter and linear accelerator leakage.Methods and Materials: Treatments are performed using a commercial computer-controlled intensity modulated radiation therapy planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) and a 6-MV linear accelerator (Clinac 6\\/100, Varian Corp.). The patient dose outside the treatment field is measured

Sasa Mutic; DanielA Low

1998-01-01

301

Hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body irradiation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this investigation was to study hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body gamma irradiation. Two groups of nine male beagle dogs were irradiated with a single whole body dose of 4- and 8-Gy cobalt-60 photons. Each animal was injected with 2 mCi Tc-99m DISIDA and scintigraphic studies were obtained with a gamma camera with a parallel hole multipurpose collimator. The parameters studied included: peak activity of the liver and gall bladder and gall bladder and intestinal visualization from the time of Tc-99m DISIDA administration. Total and indirect bilirubin, LDH, SGOT, and SGPT determined as baseline studies before irradiation and at different time intervals after irradiation were not changed in irradiated animals. Whole body Co-60 irradiation with 4 and 8 Gy produced no significant changes in the Tc-99m DISIDA visualization of the gall bladder or in the peak activity in the gall bladder or the liver 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Intestinal visualization occurred significantly earlier in 8 Gy Co-60 irradiated animals on both day 1 and day 7 post irradiation, compared to baseline values where it was never observed before 195.0 minutes. Gall bladder emptying is significantly accelerated after 8 Gy but not after 4-Gy Co-60 gamma irradiation. These observations suggest that gamma irradiation stimulates gall bladder contractility without modifying intrahepatic biliary kinetics.

Durakovic, A.

1986-09-01

302

Complex effects of stable noise, sinusoidal vs stochastic low frequency whole-body vibration and dynamic muscular work in temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTS) at a dry-bulb temperature of 30/sup 0/C  

SciTech Connect

In the metal industry occupational loss of hearing occurred twice as often among those working with vibrating equipment than among those not exposed to vibration. Occupational loss of hearing also occurred frequently in miners. In the same pits, hearing loss occurred less often among those engaged in pit-propping and among other specialist workers. The generation and development of occupational hearing loss in miners is, in fact, said to depend critically upon vibration, to the effects of which coal-face workers are particularly exosed when drilling. No absolute conclusions can, however, be drawn from these observations, since in many cases the number of different environmental factors prevailing in production life is very large and varies in each stage of production. The aim of this study was, therefore, to examine under controlled laboratory conditions the temporary hearing thresholds (TTS) of subjects who, during dynamic muscular work, are exposed at slightly elevated ambient temperature to either noise or vibration separately or to combinations of these factors.

Manninen, O.

1982-01-01

303

Vibration Training: An Overview of the Area, Training Consequences, and Future Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan, M.J., S.R. Norris, D.J. Smith, and W. Her- zog. Vibration training: an overview of the area, training con- sequences, and future considerations. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(2):459-466. 2005.—The effects of vibration on the human body have been documented for many years. Recently, the use of vibration for improving the training regimes of athletes has been investigated. Vibration has been

Matthew J. Jordan; Stephen R. Norris; David J. Smith; Walter Herzog

2005-01-01

304

Whole-body subcellular multicolor imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important goal for in vivo imaging is to be able to non-invasively image single cells. The Olympus IV100 Laser Scanning Microscope, with ultra-thin microscope objectives ("stick objectives"), was used for three-color whole-body imaging of individual two-color cancer cells interacting with the GFP-expressing stromal cells. Cellular dynamics were non-invasively imaged including mitotic and apoptotic tumor cells, stromal cells interacting with the tumor cells, tumor vasculature, and tumor blood flow. This imageable model should lead to a new paradigm of in vivo cancer cell biology and to new visible real-time targets for cancer drug discovery.

Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Hoffman, Robert M.

2007-03-01

305

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2009-04-01

306

21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a wide-aperture...

2010-04-01

307

Whole body radiotherapy: A TBI-guideline.  

PubMed

Total Body Irradiation (TBI) is one main component in the interdisciplinary treatment of widely disseminated malignancies predominantly of haematopoietic diseases. Combined with intensive chemotherapy, TBI enables myeloablative high dose therapy and immuno-ablative conditioning treatment prior to subsequent transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow stem cells or peripheral blood progenitor stem cells. Jointly prepared by DEGRO and DGMP, the German Society of Radio-Oncology, and the German Association of Medical Physicists, this DEGRO/DGMP-Leitlinie Ganzkoerper-Strahlenbehandlung - DEGRO/DGMP Guideline Whole Body Radiotherapy, summarises the concepts, principles, facts and common methods of Total Body Irradiation and poses a set of recommendations for reliable and successful application of high dose large-field radiotherapy as essential part of this interdisciplinary, multi-modality treatment concept. The guideline is geared towards radio-oncologists, medical physicists, haematooncolo-gists, and all contributing to Whole Body Radiotherapy. To guide centres intending to start or actualise TBI criteria are included. The relevant treatment parameters are defined and a sample of a form is given for reporting TBI to international registries. PMID:21206634

Quast, Ulrich

2006-01-01

308

Theoretical and experimental study of vibration, generated by monorail trains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monorail transport as all other city transport vehicles is the source of high noise and vibration levels. It is less widespread than cars or underground transport but its influence in modern cities enhances. Now in Moscow the first monorail road with trains on tires is designed, therefore the problem of vibration and noise assessments and prediction of its impact on

Samuil A. Rybak; Sergey A. Makhortykh; Stanislav A. Kostarev

2002-01-01

309

GUIDELINES FOR WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION HEALTH SURVEILLANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is strong epidemiological evidence that occupational exposure to WBV is associated with an increased risk of low back pain (LBP), sciatic pain, and degenerative changes in the spinal system, including lumbar intervertebral disc disorders. A prototype health surveillance scheme for WBV is presented in this paper. Surveillance is the collection, analysis, and dissemination of data for the purpose of

M. Pope; M. Magnusson; R. Lundström; C. T. J. Hulshof; J. H. A. M. Verbeek; M. Bovenzi

2002-01-01

310

Diffusion-weighted whole-body MR screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion-weighted sequence (DWI) of the entire body is a new promising technique feasible to evaluate multifocal disease. DWI has revealed great potential in the evaluation of patients with cancer or benign disease, as it supplies both quantitative and qualitative information of the whole body. The technical aspects of the diffusion-weighted whole body (DWWB) MR sequence are described with special emphasis

Joan C. Vilanova; Joaquim Barceló

2008-01-01

311

Whole-body vertical biodynamic response characteristics of the seated vehicle driver  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vertical driving-point mechanical impedance characteristics applicable to seated vehicle drivers are measured in the 0.625–10Hz frequency range with excitation amplitudes ranging from 1.0 to 2.0ms?2 using a whole-body vehicular vibration simulator. The measurements are performed for seated subjects with feet supported and hands held in a driving position. Variations in the seated posture, backrest angle, and nature and amplitude

P.-É. Boileau; S. Rakheja

1998-01-01

312

Theoretical and experimental study of vibration, generated by monorail trains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monorail transport as all other city transport vehicles is the source of high noise and vibration levels. It is less widespread than cars or underground transport but its influence in modern cities enhances. Now in Moscow the first monorail road with trains on tires is designed, therefore the problem of vibration and noise assessments and prediction of its impact on the residential region appears. To assess the levels of generated vibration a physical model of interaction in the system wagon-tire-road coating-viaduct-soil has been proposed and then numerically analyzed. The model is based on the known from publications facts of automobile transport vibration and our own practice concerning underground trains vibration generation. To verify computer simulation results and adjust model parameters the series of measurements of noise and vibration near experimental monorail road was carried out. In the report the results of calculations and measurements will be presented and some outcomes of possible acoustical ecologic situation near monorail roads will be proposed.

Rybak, Samuil A.; Makhortykh, Sergey A.; Kostarev, Stanislav A.

2002-11-01

313

Effects of the whole-body cryotherapy on NTproBNP, hsCRP and troponin I in athletes.  

PubMed

Whole-body cryotherapy refers to brief exposure to very cold air for treating symptoms of various illnesses. In sports medicine, whole-body cryotherapy is administered to improve recovery from muscular trauma. As specific studies are lacking, we measured cardiac markers in 10 top-level rugby players of the Italian National team before and after a 1-week course of daily sessions of whole-body cryotherapy. All subjects continued with the same training workload as that of the previous weeks. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels increased but remained within the normal range, whilst troponin I (TnI) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were unchanged. Whole-body cryotherapy did not impair cardiac function in this sample of elite athletes. PMID:18835219

Banfi, Giuseppe; Melegati, Gianluca; Barassi, Alessandra; d'Eril, Gianlodovico Melzi

2008-10-02

314

Age Modulates attitudes to Whole Body Donation Among Medical Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study to understand the effect of medical student age on the attitude towards whole body donation. Outcomes discussed include the shift in attitude toward the nature of body donation (family member, self, unrelated stranger).

2009-07-01

315

Diffusion-weighted whole-body MR screening.  

PubMed

Diffusion-weighted sequence (DWI) of the entire body is a new promising technique feasible to evaluate multifocal disease. DWI has revealed great potential in the evaluation of patients with cancer or benign disease, as it supplies both quantitative and qualitative information of the whole body. The technical aspects of the diffusion-weighted whole body (DWWB) MR sequence are described with special emphasis on the processing and analysis of the imaging. DWWB MR sequence should be used combined with the other standard sequences such as FSE T1-weighted and STIR images. A complete whole-body MR imaging protocol including the DWI can be performed in less than 40 min. The possibilities, limitations and the preliminary clinical results of the whole-body MR imaging using a DWI of the entire body are reviewed. PMID:18430538

Vilanova, Joan C; Barceló, Joaquim

2008-04-21

316

Dose esclation in radioimmunotherapy based on projected whole body dose  

SciTech Connect

A variety of approaches have been utilized in conducting phase I radioimmunotherapy dose-escalation trials. Escalation of dose has been based on graded increases in administered mCi; mCi/kg; or mCi/m2. It is also possible to escalate dose based on tracer-projected marrow, blood or whole body radiation dose. We describe our results in performing a dose-escalation trial in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma based on escalating administered whole-body radiation dose. The mCi dose administered was based on a patient-individualized tracer projected whole-body dose. 25 patients were entered on the study. RIT with 131 I anti-B-1 was administered to 19 patients. The administered dose was prescribed based on the projected whole body dose, determined from patient-individualized tracer studies performed prior to RIT. Whole body dose estimates were based on the assumption that the patient was an ellipsoid, with 131 antibody kinetics determined using a whole-body probe device acquiring daily conjugate views of 1 minute duration/view. Dose escalation levels proceeded with 10 cGy increments from 25 cGy whole-body and continues, now at 75 cGy. The correlation among potential methods of dose escalation and toxicity was assessed. Whole body radiation dose by probe was strongly correlated with the blood radiation dose determined from sequential blood sampling during tracer studies (r=.87). Blood radiation dose was very weakly correlated with mCi dose (r=.4) and mCi/kg (r=.45). Whole body radiation dose appeared less well-correlated with injected dose in mCi (r=.6), or mCi/kg (r=.64). Toxicity has been infrequent in these patients, but appears related to increasing whole body dose. Non-invasive determination of whole-body radiation dose by gamma probe represents a non-invasive method of estimating blood radiation dose, and thus of estimating bone marrow radiation dose.

Wahl, R.L.; Kaminski, M.S.; Regan, D. [Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

1994-05-01

317

A simple model to predict train-induced vibration: theoretical formulation and experimental validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

No suitable handy tool is available to predict train-induced vibration on environmental impact assessment. A simple prediction model is proposed which has been calibrated for high speed trains. The model input data are train characteristics, train speed and track properties; model output data are soil time-averaged velocity and velocity level. Model results have been compared with numerous vibration data retrieved

Federico Rossi; Andrea Nicolini

2003-01-01

318

Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting  

SciTech Connect

Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition.

James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

1987-09-01

319

Feasibility of differential phase contrast CT for whole body imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase contrast based imaging techniques have shown improved contrast in certain biological materials. This has led to an increased interest for the potential of preclinical and clinical imaging systems that incorporate phase sensitive imaging techniques. However, the interplay between the phase contrast mechanism and the so-called small-angle scattering or dark-field mechanism is often not considered. In this work we explore the potential for phase-sensitive whole body imaging by imaging a freshly euthanized specimen. The results suggest that when extrapolating phantom and ex vivo results to whole body imaging, one must consider the complex anatomy of the entire body and its effect on each contrast mechanism.

Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas B.; Zambelli, Joseph N.; Chen, Guang-Hong

2012-07-01

320

Heat load tests of superconducting magnets vibrated electromagnetically for the Maglev train  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superconducting magnets on Maglev trains vibrate due to harmonic ripples of electromagnetic flux generated by ground coils. Heat load caused by vibration in the magnet amounted to several tens of watts in the electromagnetic vibration test. This was mainly because a.c. loss was induced in the helium vessel housing the superconducting coil, due to relative vibration between the aluminium thermal

J. Ohmori; H. Nakao; T. Yamashita; Y. Sanada; M. Shudou; M. Kawai; M. Fujita; M. Terai; A. Miura

1997-01-01

321

Conceptual design of a whole body pet machine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors are designing a whole body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) machine based on a new type of large area sodium iodide (NaI) detector. As pointed out in earlier publications, a tomograph based on these new detectors can have several advantages over conventional PET machines, which are based on small Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors. Monte Carlo computer simulations have been

J. G. Rogers; R. Harrop; P. E. Kinahan; N. A. Wilkinson; G. H. Coombes; P. W. Doherty; D. P. Saylor

1988-01-01

322

REGIONAL AND WHOLE BODY COMPOSITION AND BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE ANALYSIS (BIA)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study determined the symmetry of regional (half) body composition and then related any dissymmetry to differences in bioelectrical impedance (Z). Seventy-three volunteers (45 women, 28 men) were measured for whole body Z at 50 kHz and body composition by pencil beam dual x-ray absorptiometry. Z...

323

Adaptive, segmented attenuation correction for whole-body PET imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique is presented for segmented attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) based on the local thresholding technique (LTS) described previously. To accommodate the substantially different body sections encountered in whole-body PET, an adaptive thresholding has been added to yield more uniform results throughout the body. By evaluating the intensity distribution of a set of transverse transmission images, the

M. Xu; P. D. Cutler; W. K. Luk

1996-01-01

324

Whole body bone mineral accretion in healthy children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on accretion in bone size and bone mineral content (BMC) are needed to evaluate bone mineralisation during childhood. Whole body bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area (BA) were determined by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (Hologic 1000\\/W) with a one year interval in healthy girls (n = 192) and boys (n = 140) aged 6–19 years. Annual accretion

Christian Mølgaard; Birthe Lykke Thomsen; Kim Fleischer Michaelsen

1999-01-01

325

THE EOSINOPHIL LEUCOCYTES AFTER FRACTIONATED SHORT PERIOD WHOLE BODY IRRADIATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author indicates the blood picture changes by means of average ; values that have been found with 20 rats after undergoing fractionated short-time ; irradiations of the whole body of doses that amounted to 50 r five tlmes, and ; were applied within 14 days. The special sensibility of the eosinophil ; leucocytes, even towards fractionated irradiation, is stressed.

Widmann

1958-01-01

326

Superconducting magnets for whole body magnetic resonance imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superconducting magnets have achieved preeminence in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) industry. Further growth in this market will depend on reducing system costs, extending medical applications, and easing the present siting problem. New magnet designs from Oxford address these issues. Compact magnets are economical to build and operate. Two 4 Tesla whole body magnets for research in magnetic resonance spectroscopy

M. F. Murphy

1989-01-01

327

Live time controlled scanning rate for a whole body counter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scanning whole body counters tend to sacrifice sensitivity and introduce ; measurement error through the use of constant drive rate mechanisms which do not ; readily compensate for excessive electronic dead time or subject height. An ; electronic drive rate cont rol has been developed at Battelle --Northwest ; Laboratory which largely eliminates these problems. The control is eastly ;

M. E. Sveum; P. E. Bramson; C. A. Willis

1972-01-01

328

Methods for improving image quality in whole body PET scanning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors discuss optimization of some of the scanning parameters for whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to achieve best possible image quality. The detection efficiency of the PET system can be improved by using more coincidence plane combinations in addition to the conventional direct and cross planes. The effect of acquiring an additional set of coincidence planes with a

Magnus Dahlbom; Dan-Chu Yu; Simon R. Cherry; Arion Chatziioannou; Edward J. Hoffman

1992-01-01

329

Lesion segmentation in whole-body images of PET  

Microsoft Academic Search

In PET, identification of lesion boundaries in general is not a trivial problem as whole-body images exhibit inhomogeneity. Manual segmentation methods in current commercial software packages to identify lesion boundaries and to quantify in terms of standard uptake value (SUV) are very laborious and tedious. They discourage physicians from taking advantage of the inherently quantitative data and compel them to

O. Demirkaya

2003-01-01

330

Motion Planning for Whole Body Tasks by Humanoid Robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present motion planning for tasks that require whole body motion of a humanoid robot. We address two such typical tasks, stepping over obstacles and manipulating an object, with the help of resolved momentum control (RMC) to guarantee the robot stability. For the first task, we plan the trajectories of the feet and the waist according to

Eiichi Yoshida; Yisheng Guan; Neo Ee Sian; Vincent Hugel; Pierre Blazevic; Abderrahmane Kheddar; Kazuhito Yokoi

2005-01-01

331

Hand trajectory formation during whole body reaching movements in man  

Microsoft Academic Search

End-effector trajectory formation was studied during a reaching movement using the whole body. The movements of various parts of the body were measured with the optoelectronic ELITE system. Wrist reaching movement paths showed noticeable curvatures. The analysis of various marker onset latencies revealed that the wrist was the last to move, always after the head, knee or trunk, suggesting a

Thierry Pozzo; Joseph McIntyre; Guy Cheron; Charalambos Papaxanthis

1998-01-01

332

Exploiting Task Intervals for Whole Body Robot Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a whole body motion algorithm and shows some steps towards its feasibility in complex scenarios. We employ the framework of Liegeois, (1977) which solves the redundant inverse kinematics problem on velocity level. To make the controller suitable for a variety of different applications, task descriptors for the relative effector positions as well as a one-and two-dimensional attitude

Michael Gienger; Herbert Janssen; Christian Goerick

2006-01-01

333

Field experiment of subgrade vibration induced by passing train in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibration characteristics and attenuation of the subgrade caused by passing trains in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing, China are investigated. Three field experiments were conducted during different times through the year, in normal, freezing and thawing periods, respectively, and the influence of the season, train speed and train type, is described in this paper. The results show that: (1) the vertical component is the greatest among the three components of the measured vibration near the rail track, and as the distance to the railway track increases, the dominant vibration depends on the season. (2) Compared with the vibration in the normal period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations increase while the lateral vibration decreases in the freezing period. However, in the thawing period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations decrease, and the lateral vibration increases. (3) As train speeds increase, the subgrade vibration increases. (4) The vibration induced by a freight train is greater than by a passenger train. These observations provide a better understanding of the vibration and dynamic stability of the subgrade and may be useful in developing criteria for railway and building construction in cold regions.

Ling, Xianzhang; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Zhanyuan; Ding, Lin; Hu, Qingli

2009-03-01

334

WHOLE BODY SCANNING IN MEDICINE. II. CLINICAL ASPECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body scans were conducted in 439 patients using I¹³¹, Fe\\/sup ; 59\\/, Cu⁶⁴, Sr⁸⁵, \\/Ca⁴⁷, or I¹³¹-label ed 5-; iododexyuridine. With I¹³¹, functioning metastases were demonstrated in 11 ; of 26 patients with follicular or papillary thyroid cancer. Fe⁵⁹ scans ; demonstiatecl extramedullary, hematopoiesis in patients with polycythemia vera, ; myelofibrosis, and myelophthisic anemia. Cu⁶⁴ studies showed abnormal ; concentration

W. J. K. Simpson; A. D. Rotenberg; R. G. Baker

1962-01-01

335

Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging in lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Abstract The current evidence regarding the usefulness of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in lymphoma is reviewed. DWI is capable of combining anatomical and functional information and is becoming a valuable tool in oncology, in particular for staging purposes. DWI may prove to be a useful biomarker in clinical decision making for patients with lymphoma. Large-scaled prospective studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

Itti, E.; Luciani, A.; Haioun, C.; Meignan, M.

2010-01-01

336

Effects of hypoosmolality on whole-body lipolysis in man.  

PubMed

Changes in extracellular osmolality, and thus in the cellular hydration state, appear to directly influence cell metabolism. The metabolic changes associated with cell swelling are inhibition of glycogenolysis, glycolysis, and proteolysis. Recent studies in our laboratory demonstrated diminished whole-body protein breakdown in humans during an acute hypoosmolar state. Because of the close interrelationship between carbohydrate and fat metabolism, we speculated that adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation are regulated by changes in extracellular osmolality. Therefore, we investigated the effect of artificially induced hypoosmolality on whole-body lipolysis and fat oxidation in seven healthy young men. Hypoosmolality was induced by intravenous administration of desmopressin, liberal ingestion of water, and infusion of hypotonic (0.45%) saline solution. Lipolysis was assessed by a stable-isotope method (2-[13C]-glycerol infusion). The glycerol rate of appearance (Ra), reflecting whole-body lipolysis, was higher under hypoosmolar compared with isoosmolar conditions (2.35+/-0.40 v 1.68+/-0.21 micromol/kg/min, P=.03). This was even more pronounced when lipolysis was suppressed during hyperinsulinemia and euglycemic clamping (0.90+/-0.08 v 0.61+/-0.03 micromol/kg/min, P=.002). However, plasma free fatty acid (FFA), glycerol, ketone body, insulin, and glucagon concentrations and carbohydrate and lipid oxidation measured by indirect calorimetry were not significantly altered by hypoosmolality. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were lower under hypoosmolar conditions (P<.01 v control). In conclusion, hypoosmolality in vivo results in increased whole-body lipolysis, which is not due to changes in major lipolysis regulating hormones. PMID:10206440

Bilz, S; Ninnis, R; Keller, U

1999-04-01

337

Whole body bone mineral content in healthy children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from healthy children are needed to evaluate bone mineralisation during childhood. Whole body bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area were examined by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (Hologic 1000\\/W) in healthy girls (n=201) and boys (n=142) aged 5–19 years. Centile curves for bone area for age, BMC for age, bone area for height, and BMC for bone area

Christian Mølgaard; Birthe Lykke Thomsen; Ann Prentice; Tim J Cole; Kim Fleischer Michaelsen

1997-01-01

338

Automatic Inter-subject Registration of Whole Body Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

3D inter-subject registration of image volumes is important for tasks such as atlas-based segmentation, deriving population\\u000a averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. A number of methods have been proposed to tackle this problem but few of\\u000a them have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These\\u000a image volumes typically contain

Xia Li; Todd E. Peterson; John C. Gore; Benoit M. Dawant

2006-01-01

339

MR relaxometry on a whole-body imager: quality control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term monitoring of the average proton relaxation time T2 of phantoms measured on a Siemens MR whole-body imager showed very good repeatability and reproducibility. The repeatability (short-term precision) and reproducibility (long-term precision) of the average values of a relaxation time T2 ? 81 ms, obtained by a standard 16-echo CPMG pulse sequence, were 2.6% and 9.7%, respectively. The Siemens Vision

Milan Hájek; Milan Babiš; V??t Herynek

1999-01-01

340

Vibration as an exercise modality: how it may work, and what its potential might be.  

PubMed

Whilst exposure to vibration is traditionally regarded as perilous, recent research has focussed on potential benefits. Here, the physical principles of forced oscillations are discussed in relation to vibration as an exercise modality. Acute physiological responses to isolated tendon and muscle vibration and to whole body vibration exercise are reviewed, as well as the training effects upon the musculature, bone mineral density and posture. Possible applications in sports and medicine are discussed. Evidence suggests that acute vibration exercise seems to elicit a specific warm-up effect, and that vibration training seems to improve muscle power, although the potential benefits over traditional forms of resistive exercise are still unclear. Vibration training also seems to improve balance in sub-populations prone to fall, such as frail elderly people. Moreover, literature suggests that vibration is beneficial to reduce chronic lower back pain and other types of pain. Other future indications are perceivable. PMID:20012646

Rittweger, Jörn

2009-12-12

341

Electromyographic assessment of muscle fatigue during isometric vibration training at varying frequencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resistance exercise is essential to improve or maintain muscle performance. Vibration training has been suggested as an alternative option for muscle conditioning, aiming especially at improving muscle strength and power. Several studies link the effects of vibration training to enhanced neuromuscular stimulation, measured by electromyography (EMG) and typically ascribed to involuntary reflex mechanisms. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear,

M. Mischi; C. Rabotti; M. Cardinale

2010-01-01

342

Coincidence timing of finger, arm, and whole body movements.  

PubMed

Two experiments investigated the effects of different types of movement responses on coincidence timing skill. The view was taken that the sensory-motor integration of the movement responses would be reflected in the accuracy and consistency of anticipation timing. A Bassin anticipation timer provided a light stimulus velocity of 3 mph for both experiments and the movements studied included a simple key press using a finger, an arm movement to a key press, and whole body movements culminating with a kick or step to a target. The experiments were modelled closely on the seminal study by Grose (1967). The results of Exp. 1 supported our prediction by demonstrating superiority of the finger task over the two larger movements for all measures of coincidence timing ability. The purpose of Exp. 2 was to compare the slightly different versions of the whole body task-that used in the first experiment and that used by Grose (1967). The results confirmed the close similarity of the two movement tasks and re-affirmed the results of Exp. 1. Exp. 2 also investigated sex effects on coincidence timing ability and, in contrast to previous evidence indicating that females perform with less accuracy and consistency than do males, no significant differences were found. Analysis of practice effects showed that, although there were no significant improvements over trial blocks in Exp. 1, there were significant improvements in Exp. 2. Comparisons with other research suggests that repeated practice in solving a coincident timing problem using whole body movements can lead to improved performance. In general, the findings are consistent with the constructs of action theory and emphasize the roles perceptual and movement variables have in defining situational constraints. Also, findings indicate that proficiency in coincidence anticipation appears to be influenced by the planning and organisation required for movement execution. PMID:11361318

Williams, L R; Jasiewicz, J M; Simmons, R W

2001-04-01

343

Five-Day Whole-Body Cryostimulation, Blood Inflammatory Markers, and Performance in High-Ranking Professional Tennis Players  

PubMed Central

Context Tournament season can provoke overreaching syndrome in professional tennis players, which may lead to deteriorated performance. Thus, appropriate recovery methods are crucial for athletes in order to sustain high-level performance and avoid injuries. We hypothesized that whole-body cryostimulation could be applied to support the recovery process. Objective To assess the effects of 5 days of whole-body cryostimulation combined with moderate-intensity training on immunologic, hormonal, and hematologic responses; resting metabolic rate; and tennis performance in a posttournament season. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting National Olympic Sport Centre. Patients or Other Participants Twelve high-ranking professional tennis players. Intervention(s) Participants followed a moderate-intensity training program. A subgroup was treated with the 5-day whole-body cryostimulation (?120°C) applied twice a day. The control subgroup participated in the training only. Main Outcome Measure(s) Pretreatment and posttreatment blood samples were collected and analyzed for tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 6, testosterone, cortisol, and creatine kinase. Resting metabolic rate and performance of a tennis drill were also assessed. Results Proinflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor ?) decreased and pleiotropic cytokine (interleukin 6) and cortisol increased in the group exposed to cryostimulation. In the same group, greater stroke effectiveness during the tennis drill and faster recovery were observed. Neither the training program nor cryostimulation affected resting metabolic rate. Conclusions Professional tennis players experienced an intensified inflammatory response after the completed tournament season, which may lead to overreaching. Applying whole-body cryostimulation in conjunction with moderate-intensity training was more effective for the recovery process than the training itself. The 5-day exposure to cryostimulation twice a day ameliorated the cytokine profile, resulting in a decrease in tumor necrosis factor ? and an increase in interleukin 6.

Ziemann, Ewa; Olek, Robert Antoni; Kujach, Sylwester; Grzywacz, Tomasz; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Garsztka, Tomasz; Laskowski, Radoslaw

2012-01-01

344

Superconducting magnets for whole body magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting magnets have achieved preeminence in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) industry. Further growth in this market will depend on reducing system costs, extending medical applications, and easing the present siting problem. New magnet designs from Oxford address these issues. Compact magnets are economical to build and operate. Two 4 Tesla whole body magnets for research in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are now in operation. Active-Shield magnets, by drastically reducing the magnetic fringe fields, will allow MRI systems with superconducting magnets to be located in previously inaccessible sites.

Murphy, M.F.

1989-03-01

345

Integrating Cellular Metabolism into a Multiscale Whole-Body Model  

PubMed Central

Cellular metabolism continuously processes an enormous range of external compounds into endogenous metabolites and is as such a key element in human physiology. The multifaceted physiological role of the metabolic network fulfilling the catalytic conversions can only be fully understood from a whole-body perspective where the causal interplay of the metabolic states of individual cells, the surrounding tissue and the whole organism are simultaneously considered. We here present an approach relying on dynamic flux balance analysis that allows the integration of metabolic networks at the cellular scale into standardized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models at the whole-body level. To evaluate our approach we integrated a genome-scale network reconstruction of a human hepatocyte into the liver tissue of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of a human adult. The resulting multiscale model was used to investigate hyperuricemia therapy, ammonia detoxification and paracetamol-induced toxication at a systems level. The specific models simultaneously integrate multiple layers of biological organization and offer mechanistic insights into pathology and medication. The approach presented may in future support a mechanistic understanding in diagnostics and drug development.

Krauss, Markus; Schaller, Stephan; Borchers, Steffen; Findeisen, Rolf; Lippert, Jorg; Kuepfer, Lars

2012-01-01

346

Whole body autoradiographic distribution of exogenously administered renin in mice  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of exogenously administered renin was investigated using whole body autoradiography. Purified renin from mouse submaxillary gland (SR) was labeled with radioactive iodine (/sup 125/I). This labeled renin (/sup 125/I-SR) and Na/sup 125/I were administered into the tail vein of male ddY mice, in doses of 10.2 and 16.4 mu Ci/30 g body weight, respectively. Mice were killed by an overdose of ether, and autoradiography was performed on whole body sections. To separate free /sup 125/I liberated from /sup 125/I-SR, sections were treated with perchloric acid. A major accumulation of /sup 125/I-SR, acid-insoluble, was evident in the renal cortex, whereas the hepatic accumulation of /sup 125/I-SR was minor. Radioactivity in the thyroid and submaxillary glands, in the stomach, and in urine was also apparent, but disappeared after acid treatment, except in the thyroid glands. Radioactivity in the brain, intestinal content, spleen, and adrenal glands was nil. These autoradiograms provide the first evidence that exogenously administered renin is mainly distributed in the renal cortex.

Iwao, H.; Nakamura, N.; Ikemoto, F.; Yamamoto, K.

1983-06-01

347

Suspension osteopenia in mice: Whole body electromagnetic field effects  

SciTech Connect

Whole-body fields were tested for their efficacy in preventing the osteopenia caused by tail suspension in mice. The fields had fundamental frequencies corresponding to the upper range of predicted endogenous impact-generated frequencies (0.25--2.0 kHz) in the long bones. Three distinct whole-body EMFs were applied for 2 weeks on growing mice. Structural, geometric, and material properties of the femora, tibiae, and humeri of suspended mice were altered compared to controls. Comparison of suspended mice and mice subjected to caloric restriction indicates that the changes in caloric intake do not explain either the suspension or the field-induced effects. In agreement with past studies, rather, unloading appears to cause the suspension effects and to be addressed by the EMFs. The EMF effects on bone properties were apparently frequency dependent, with the lower two fundamental frequencies (260 and 910 Hz) altering, albeit slightly, the suspension-induced bone effects. The fields are not apparently optimized for frequency, etc., with respect to therapeutic potential; however, suspension provides a model system for further study of the in vivo effects of EMFs.

Simske, S.J.; Luttges, M.W. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-08-01

348

Comparison of Whole Body Reaction Time between Japanese Men with and without Metabolic Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the relation between metabolic syndrome and whole body reaction time. We used data for 169 men with metabolic syndrome and 398 men without. Metabolic syndrome was defi ned by a new criteria developed in Japan. Whole body reaction time was also measured by THP-15 (Sakai, Tokyo, Japan). Whole body reaction time in men with metabolic syndrome was signifi

Nobuyuki Miyatake; Motohiko Miyachi; Hidetaka Nishikawa; Takeshi Saito; Takeyuki Numata

2007-01-01

349

Conceptual design of a whole body pet machine  

SciTech Connect

The authors are designing a whole body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) machine based on a new type of large area sodium iodide (NaI) detector. As pointed out in earlier publications, a tomograph based on these new detectors can have several advantages over conventional PET machines, which are based on small Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors. Monte Carlo computer simulations have been used to compare some of the performance parameters of a tomograph based on the new detectors to similar parameters of conventional small crystal machines. Three different variants of prototype detectors have been constructed and many tests performed, including measurements of transverse spatial resolution, depth-of-interaction resolution, energy resolution, time resolution, and high counting-rate capabilities.

Rogers, J.G.; Harrop, R.; Kinahan, P.E.; Wilkinson, N.A.; Coombes, G.H.; Doherty, P.W.; Saylor, D.P.

1988-02-01

350

Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research  

SciTech Connect

The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

1982-01-01

351

Biophysical study of mice blood after whole body irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immediate of whole body fractionated doses of 137Cs gamma rays totalling 13 Gy on mice as well as the late effects of accumulative dose of 10 Gy (8 days after exposure) were studied. Changes due to gamma irradiation in hemoglobin conductivity and buffer capacity indicate the appearance of hydrophobic groups and changes in hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio. These changes demonstrate different degrees of unfolding and refolding of the hemoglobin molecule. The viscosity coefficient of hemoglobin is found to increase at fractionated doses of 7 and 13 Gy. Such effect seems to be due to aggregation of the protein part of hemoglobin. The fractionated dose of 13 Gy causes changes in the electronic state of oxyhemoglobin indicated by an increase in methemoglobin which reduces biological activity.

El Din, Alsha A. Saad; Desouky, Omar S.; El Behay, Amin Z.; El Sayed, Anwar A.

1996-05-01

352

Vestibular Labyrinth Contributions to Human Whole-Body Motion Discrimination  

PubMed Central

To assess the contributions of the vestibular system to whole-body motion discrimination in the dark, we measured direction-recognition thresholds as a function of frequency for yaw rotation, superior-inferior translation (“z-translation”), inter-aural translation (“y-translation”), and roll-tilt for 14 normal subjects and for three patients following total bilateral vestibular ablation. The patients had significantly higher average threshold measurements than normal (p<0.01) for yaw-rotation (depending upon frequency, 5.4× to 15.7× greater), z-translation (8.3× to 56.8× greater), y-translation (1.7× to 4.5× greater), and roll tilt (1.3× to 3.0× greater) – establishing the predominant contributions of the vestibular system for these motions in the dark.

Valko, Yulia; Lewis, Richard F.; Priesol, Adrian J.; Merfeld, Daniel M.

2012-01-01

353

Vestibular labyrinth contributions to human whole-body motion discrimination.  

PubMed

To assess the contributions of the vestibular system to whole-body motion discrimination in the dark, we measured direction recognition thresholds as a function of frequency for yaw rotation, superior-inferior translation ("z-translation"), interaural translation ("y-translation"), and roll tilt for 14 normal subjects and for 3 patients following total bilateral vestibular ablation. The patients had significantly higher average threshold measurements than normal (p < 0.01) for yaw rotation (depending upon frequency, 5.4× to 15.7× greater), z-translation (8.3× to 56.8× greater), y-translation (1.7× to 4.5× greater), and roll tilt (1.3× to 3.0× greater)--establishing the predominant contributions of the vestibular system for these motions in the dark. PMID:23015443

Valko, Yulia; Lewis, Richard F; Priesol, Adrian J; Merfeld, Daniel M

2012-09-26

354

Whole body bone mineral content in healthy children and adolescents  

PubMed Central

Accepted 23 July 1996? Data from healthy children are needed to evaluate bone mineralisation during childhood. Whole body bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area were examined by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (Hologic 1000/W) in healthy girls (n=201) and boys (n=142) aged 5-19 years. Centile curves for bone area for age, BMC for age, bone area for height, and BMC for bone area were constructed using the LMS method. Bone mineral density calculated as BMC/bone area is not useful in children as it is significantly influenced by bone size. Instead, it is proposed that bone mineralisation is assessed in three steps: height for age, bone area for height, and BMC for bone area. These three steps correspond to three different causes of reduced bone mass: short bones, narrow bones, and light bones.??

Molgaard, C.; Thomsen, B. L.; Prentice, A.; Cole, T.; Michaelsen, K. F.

1997-01-01

355

Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for staging malignant lymphoma in children  

PubMed Central

CT is currently the mainstay in staging malignant lymphoma in children, but the risk of second neoplasms due to ionizing radiation associated with CT is not negligible. Whole-body MRI techniques and whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in particular, may be a good radiation-free alternative to CT. DWI is characterized by high sensitivity for the detection of lesions and allows quantitative assessment of diffusion that may aid in the evaluation of malignant lymphomas. This article will review whole-body MRI techniques for staging malignant lymphoma with emphasis on whole-body DWI. Furthermore, future considerations and challenges in whole-body DWI will be discussed.

Takahara, Taro; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Bierings, Marc B.; Mali, Willem P.; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.

2010-01-01

356

Modelling and simulation of an infant's whole body plethysmograph.  

PubMed

In this paper, we describe a computational model dedicated to building an apnoea monitoring system for newborn babies. The proposed model is based on whole body plethysmography, which involves non-invasive measurement of lung ventilation indirectly from the pressure deflections generated when a subject breathes inside a chamber of fixed volume (Bert in C R Soc Biol Paris 20:22-23, 1868). The computational model simulates thermal and environmental flow conditions occurring in the neonate chamber, especially steady state flow with heat transfer and carbon dioxide (CO2) transport during the exhalation phase. This permits the variance of all critical parameters and the analysis of their effects on the distributions of interest. The main objective is to study thermal and air quality comfort conditions under which infants can be monitored for long-term periods. The method deploys computational fluid dynamics techniques and parametric modelling which, by allowing input parameters to be modulated, represent a more efficient and flexible analytical tool than previous experimental techniques. Simulation data reveal that the largest flow rates occur in areas near the openings with slight formation of air recirculation zones; temperature distribution shows signs of stratification, with higher temperatures than the supplied air, CO2 distribution presents acceptable air quality level and predicted mean vote index affords a relatively acceptable thermal comfort level. This analytical approach can be considered as innovative, and can find a new application in clinical infant apnoea monitoring in a way that allows determination of the optimal location for placing a sensor to detect respiration activity without any contact with the infant's body, and without any risk, in contrast to available whole body plethysmography techniques previously tested in infants (Fleming et al. in J Appl Physiol 55:1924-1931, 1983). PMID:16941102

Amezzane, Ilham; Awada, Ali; Sawan, Mohamad; Bellemare, François

2006-08-29

357

Combined effect of noise and vibration produced by high-speed trains on annoyance in buildings.  

PubMed

The effects of noise and vibration on annoyance in buildings during the passage of a nearby high-speed train have been investigated in a laboratory experiment with recorded train noise and 20 Hz vibration. The noises included the effects of two types of fac?ade: windows-open and windows-closed. Subjects were exposed to six levels of noise and six magnitudes of vibration, and asked to rate annoyance using an 11-point numerical scale. The experiment consisted of four sessions: (1) evaluation of noise annoyance in the absence of vibration, (2) evaluation of total annoyance from simultaneous noise and vibration, (3) evaluation of noise annoyance in the presence of vibration, and (4) evaluation of vibration annoyance in the absence of noise. The results show that vibration did not influence ratings of noise annoyance, but that total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration was considerably greater than the annoyance caused by noise alone. The noise annoyance and the total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration were associated with subject self-ratings of noise sensitivity. Two classical models of total annoyance due to combined noise sources (maximum of the single source annoyance or the integration of individual annoyance ratings) provided useful predictions of the total annoyance caused by simultaneous noise and vibration. PMID:23556582

Lee, Pyoung Jik; Griffin, Michael J

2013-04-01

358

A theoretical study on the influence of the track on train-induced ground vibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation is presented on the nature of train-induced ground vibration propagation. It is based on a theoretical model for the track and a layered ground. Results are given of the responses of the ground and track to a moving harmonic or quasi-static load on the rails. The dispersion characteristics of the propagating modes of vibration in the track and

X. Sheng; C. J. C. Jones; D. J. Thompson

2004-01-01

359

Analysis theory of spatial vibration of high-speed train and slab track system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The motor and trailer cars of a high-speed train were modeled as a multi-rigid body system with two suspensions. According\\u000a to structural characteristic of a slab track, a new spatial vibration model of track segment element of the slab track was\\u000a put forward. The spatial vibration equation set of the high-speed train and slab track system was then established on

Jun Xiang; Dan He; Qing-yuan Zeng

2008-01-01

360

Effect of cross-wind on spatial vibration responses of train and track system  

Microsoft Academic Search

By taking cross-wind forces acting on trains into consideration, a dynamic analysis method of the cross-wind and high-speed\\u000a train and slab track system was proposed on the basis of the analysis theory of spatial vibration of high-speed train and\\u000a slab track system. The corresponding computer program was written by FORTRAN language. The dynamic responses of the high-speed\\u000a train and slab

Jun Xiang; Dan He; Qing-yuan Zeng

2009-01-01

361

Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) during complex whole body motor skill learning.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to investigate tDCS effects on motor skill learning in a complex whole body dynamic balance task (DBT). We hypothesized that tDCS over the supplementary motor area (SMA), a region that is known to be involved in the control of multi-joint whole body movements, will result in polarity specific changes in DBT learning. In a randomized sham-controlled, double-blinded parallel design, we applied 20min of tDCS over the supplementary motor area (SMA) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) while subjects performed a DBT. Anodal tDCS over SMA with the cathode placed over contralateral PFC impaired motor skill learning of the DBT compared to sham. This effect was still present on the second day of training. Reversing the polarity (cathode over SMA, anode over PFC) did not affect motor skill learning neither on the first nor on the second day of training. To better disentangle whether the impaired motor skill learning was due to a modulation of SMA or PFC, we performed an additional control experiment. Here, we applied anodal tDCS over SMA together with a larger and presumably more ineffective electrode (cathode) over PFC. Interestingly this alternative tDCS electrode setup did not affect the outcome of DBT learning. Our results provide novel evidence that a modulation of the (right) PFC seems to impair complex multi-joint motor skill learning. Hence, future studies should take the positioning of both tDCS electrodes into account when investigating complex motor skill learning. PMID:23933205

Kaminski, Elisabeth; Hoff, Maike; Sehm, Bernhard; Taubert, Marco; Conde, Virginia; Steele, Christopher J; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

2013-08-07

362

Thromboxane and prostacyclin synthesis following whole body irradiation in rats  

SciTech Connect

The effect of radiation on the mechanism and source of in vivo thromboxane B/sub 2/ (TxB/sub 2/) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F/sub 1..cap alpha../ (6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha..) synthesis was evaluated. Rats were irradiated with 2, 10, or 20 gray (Gy) whole body gamma irradiation and showed an increase in urine TxB/sup 2/ after either 10 or 20 Gy. Urine 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was elevated only after exposure to 20 Gy. Irradiation did not alter urine volume and osmolarity, nor was there a correlation between urine osmolarity and the urinary concentration of TxB/sup 2/ or 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. Rats were pretreated with indomethacin to determine if radiation-induced alterations in urine TxB/sup 2/ and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ could be suppressed. Pretreatment with indomethacin significantly decreased urine TxB..cap alpha.. and 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ in both irradiated and nonirradiated animals. Finally, the sources of urinary cyclooxygenase products were investigated using an isogravitometric cross-perfusion system. These experiments demonstrated that urine TxB..cap alpha.. is derived from extrarenal sources, whereas 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha.. is synthesized primarily by the kidney. It may be concluded that radiation exposure increases in vivo cyclooxygenase pathway activity by both renal and ultrarenal tissues.

Schneidkraut, M.J.; Kot, P.A.; Ramwell, P.W.; Rose, J.C.

1984-01-01

363

The effect of whole-body tilt on sound lateralization.  

PubMed

The effect of passive whole-body tilt in the frontal plane on the lateralization of dichotic sound was investigated in human subjects. Pure-tone pulses (1 kHz, 100 ms duration) with various interaural time differences were presented via headphones while the subject was in an upright position or tilted 45 degrees or 90 degrees to the left or right. Subjects made two-alternative forced-choice (left/right) judgements on the intracranial sound image. During body tilt, the auditory median plane of the head, computed from the resulting psychometric functions, was always shifted to the upward ear, indicating a shift of the auditory percept to the downward ear, that is, in the direction of gravitational linear acceleration. The mean maximum magnitude of the auditory shift obtained with 90 degrees body tilt was 25 micro s. On the one hand, these findings suggest a certain influence of the otolith information about body position relative to the direction of gravity on the representation of auditory space. However, in partial contradiction to previous work, which had assumed existence of a significant 'audiogravic illusion', the very slight magnitude of the present effect rather reflects the excellent stability in the neural processing of auditory spatial cues in humans. Thus, it might be misleading to use the term 'illusion' for this quite marginal effect. PMID:12270052

Lewald, Jörg; Karnath, Hans-Otto

2002-08-01

364

[512 x 2048 matrix whole body scintigraphy with laser imaging system].  

PubMed

Although we could acquire a detailed 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scintigraphy, the 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scintigraphy was divided to the upper and lower half of the body, because a many of CRT system displayed only 1024 x 1024 matrix with non interlace mode. We made 12 dots of normal vertical image distance to 0 dot with laser imaging system (Li-10 Konica medical inc.), and we printed these divided whole body images in the four partition of the film. The lead bar phantom (interval from 6 mm to 3 mm) filled with 99mTcO4- was studied by both 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scanning mode and 256 x 1024 whole body scanning mode in the basic study. And the distance between the lead bar phantom and the gamma camera was changed from 10 mm to 100 mm. We studied 41 patients with metastatic bone tumor (14 breast cancer, 7 lung cancer, 7 prostate cancer, 5 others, 6 unknown origin) clinically. However the 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scan was better quality of images than 256 x 1024 matrix whole body scan at 100 mm distance in the basic study. The abnormal uptake of metastatic sites was shown equally in both 512 x 2048 and 256 x 1024 matrix whole body scintigraphy. The 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scan was better quality of images than 256 x 1024 matrix whole body scan in 26 out of 41 patients, equal in 10 out of 41 patients and worse in 3 out of 41 patients. The matrix size of 512 x 2048 matrix whole body scintigraphy (0.98 mm2) was smaller than that of 256 x 1024 matrix whole body scintigraphy (1.95 mm2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8377303

Adachi, I; Sugioka, Y; Saiga, Y; Namba, R; Nakata, K; Tatsu, Y; Nishigaki, H; Hiraishi, K; Utsunomiya, K; Sueyoshi, K

1993-07-01

365

Polyarteritis nodosa: MDCT as a 'One-Stop Shop' Modality for Whole-Body Arterial Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare disease, which is characterized by aneurysm formation and occlusion in the arteries of multiple systems. Due to its extensive involvement, whole-body evaluation is necessary for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We report a case of polyarteritis nodosa using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as a 'one-stop shop' modality for whole-body arterial evaluation. With precise protocol design, MDCT can be used as a reliable noninvasive modality providing comprehensive whole-body arterial evaluation.

Tsai, W.-L.; Tsai, I-C.; Lee Tain, E-mail: s841082@ym.edu.t [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, C.-W. [Taichung Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University, Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taiwan (China)

2008-07-15

366

Initial experience with FSE STIR whole-body MR imaging for staging lymphoma in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our objective was to compare fast spin-echo (FSE) short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) whole-body MR imaging with standard procedures in staging children with lymphoma. Eight children (age range, 2–16 years) underwent multi-station FSE STIR whole-body MR at initial staging ( n=5) or for restaging following completion of therapy ( n=5). Whole-body MR and conventional staging procedures, including CT (

Christian J. Kellenberger; Stephen F. Miller; Mustafa Khan; David L. Gilday; Sheila Weitzman; Paul S. Babyn

2004-01-01

367

On-Line Vibration Source Detection of Running Trains Based on Acceleration Measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ensure safety of railway operation, it is important to regularly check railway conditions such as deformation of the rails. To monitor rail deformation, this paper presents a method for detecting sources of vibrations of a running train on-line by measuring accelerations, which include the train bogie's lateral acceleration, and the crossbeam's lateral and vertical accelerations. A series of detection

Chengyou Wang; Qiugen Xiao; Hua Liang; Xin Chen; Xuanping Cai; Yunhui Liu

2006-01-01

368

Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis  

PubMed Central

Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production) although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis). An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure.

Scott, Christopher B

2005-01-01

369

Entrepreneurial ventures and whole-body donations: a regional perspective from the United States.  

PubMed

Human cadavers are crucial to medical science. While the debate on how to secure sufficient cadavers has focused primarily on donors' behaviors, procuring organizations' roles in increasing donations remain less explored. The United States offers a unique setting in which to examine this question since entrepreneurial ventures supplying cadavers for medical science have recently emerged alongside traditional academic-housed programs, raising both hopes and fears about their impact on whole-body donations. To assess their potential impact, an archival survey of voluntary, in-state whole-body donors to two programs procuring in the same U.S. state was conducted. The programs' specimen recipients were also analyzed. One program is academic-housed and the other is an entrepreneurial venture. Both offered equal levels of financial support to donating parties. Eighty donations and 120 specimen shipping invoices from 2005 were analyzed in each program. Donations to the two programs did not significantly differ in terms of donors' sex, marital status, maximum educational level, and estimated hourly wage. The entrepreneurial venture's donors were, however, significantly younger, more likely to be from a minority group, and more likely to have died from cancer. For-profit organizations, continuing medical training organizations, and medical device companies were more likely recipients of the entrepreneurial venture's specimens. Non-profit and academic organizations were more likely recipients of the academic-housed program's specimens. These findings suggest that although the programs procured from a somewhat similar pool of donors, they also complemented one another. The entrepreneurial program procured donations that the academic-housed program often did not attract. Specimen recipients' distinct demands partly explain these procurement behaviors. Thus, organizational efforts to meet demands seem to shape the supply. Examining organizations alongside donors might provide new answers to secure donations. PMID:18158205

Anteby, Michel; Hyman, Mikell

2007-12-26

370

Theoretical modeling and characteristic analysis of moving-train induced ground vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An integrated train-track-subsoil dynamic interaction model of moving-train induced ground vibration is developed on the basis of vehicle dynamics, track dynamics and the Green's functions of subsoil. The model takes account of the vibrations of vehicle components, the quasi-static axle loads and the dynamic excitations between the wheels and track. The analyzed results from an example show that the ground vibration characteristics have a close relationship with train speed and soil properties; the dynamic responses excited by wheel-track irregularity have big influence on the high frequency components of ground vibration; with the increase of distance to the track, the ground acceleration has the tendency of decrease, and the relevance of acceleration curves and train excitation becomes less obvious; the intersections of moving load speed-lines and subsoil dispersion curves are some resonance frequencies that cause the amplification of ground vibrations; there exists a critical speed for moving train that is close to the minimum velocity of the Rayleigh's wave in the subsoil.

Xia, H.; Cao, Y. M.; de Roeck, G.

2010-03-01

371

Effects of a whole body compression garment on markers of recovery after a heavy resistance workout in men and women.  

PubMed

The primary purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of a whole body compression garment on recovery from a typical heavy resistance training workout in resistance-trained men and women. Eleven men (mean +/- SD: age, 23.0 +/- 2.9 years) and 9 women (mean +/- SD: age 23.1 +/- 2.2 years) who were highly resistance trained gave informed consent to participate in the study. A within-group (each subject acted as their own control), balanced, and randomized treatment design was used. Nutritional intakes, activity, and behavioral patterns (e.g., no pain medications, ice, or long showers over the 24 hours) were replicated 2 days before each test separated by 72 hours. An 8-exercise whole body heavy resistance exercise protocol using barbells (3 sets of 8-10 repetition maximum, 2.0- to 2.5-minute rest) was performed after which the subject showered and put on a specific whole body compression garment one designed for women and one for men (CG) or just wore his/her normal noncompression clothing (CON). Subjects were then tested after 24 hours. Dependent measures included sleep quality, vitality rating, resting fatigue rating, muscle soreness, muscle swelling via ultrasound, reaction movement times, bench throw power, countermovement vertical jump power, and serum concentrations of creatine kinase (CK) measured from a blood sample obtained via venipuncture of an arm vein. We observed significant (p < or = 0.05) differences between CG and CON conditions in both men and women for vitality (CG > CON), resting fatigue ratings (CG < CON), muscle soreness (CG < CON), ultrasound measure swelling (CG < CON), bench press throw (CG > CON), and CK (CG < CON). A whole body compression garment worn during the 24-hour recovery period after an intense heavy resistance training workout enhances various psychological, physiological, and a few performance markers of recovery compared with noncompressive control garment conditions. The use of compression appears to help in the recovery process after an intense heavy resistance training workout in men and women. PMID:20195085

Kraemer, William J; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Fragala, Maren S; Earp, Jacob E; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Ho, Jen-Yu; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Solomon-Hill, Glenn; Penwell, Zachary R; Powell, Matthew D; Wolf, Megan R; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Maresh, Carl M

2010-03-01

372

Whole-body MR imaging in children: principles, technique, current applications, and future directions.  

PubMed

In whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the entire body from the vertex to the toes is imaged in one or more planes with one or multiple sequences to allow evaluation of multisystem diseases in a single examination. Whole-body MR imaging is particularly useful for examining children because it does not involve exposure to radiation and allows a complete work-up for disease staging within a single session of sedation or anesthesia. At whole-body MR imaging with a sliding table platform, a body coil may be used, but the resultant images have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and low resolution; use of a combination of phased-array coils results in images with an improved SNR and higher resolution. As whole-body MR imaging techniques undergo further refinement, the role of the modality in oncologic and nononcologic imaging continues to expand. Its use in the staging of lymphoma and other malignancies has been studied extensively. Whole-body MR imaging does not provide functional information and cannot yet be used to differentiate benign from malignant lymphadenopathy. However, whole-body MR imaging performed with integrated diffusion-weighted sequences may complement or replace positron emission tomography, which involves substantial radiation exposure. Other promising avenues for future research include whole-body MR imaging at 3 T and the combination of molecular imaging or positron emission tomography with whole-body MR imaging. PMID:21997993

Chavhan, Govind B; Babyn, Paul S

2011-10-01

373

Whole-body motion planning for pivoting based manipulation by humanoids  

Microsoft Academic Search

ó This paper emphasizes on the capacity of a hu- manoid robot to perform tasks that are difcult for other types of robots. It deals with manipulation of bulky objects. Such tasks require complicated manipulations involving the whole-body and ne coordination between legs, arms and torso motions. We introduce here a whole-body motion planner that allows a humanoid robot to

Eiichi Yoshida; Mathieu Poirier; Jean-paul Laumond; Oussama Kanoun; Florent Lamiraux; Rachid Alami; Kazuhito Yokoi

2008-01-01

374

Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for staging malignant lymphoma in children.  

PubMed

CT is currently the mainstay in staging malignant lymphoma in children, but the risk of second neoplasms due to ionizing radiation associated with CT is not negligible. Whole-body MRI techniques and whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in particular, may be a good radiation-free alternative to CT. DWI is characterized by high sensitivity for the detection of lesions and allows quantitative assessment of diffusion that may aid in the evaluation of malignant lymphomas. This article will review whole-body MRI techniques for staging malignant lymphoma with emphasis on whole-body DWI. Furthermore, future considerations and challenges in whole-body DWI will be discussed. PMID:20676622

Kwee, Thomas C; Takahara, Taro; Vermoolen, Malou A; Bierings, Marc B; Mali, Willem P; Nievelstein, Rutger A J

2010-07-30

375

Damped vibration of engine valve train by recent transfer matrix and matrix procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Damped vibrations of engine valve systems have been investigated by multiple degree of freedom models and the recent transfer matrix techniques and complex eigenvalue analysis procedures. The numerical results obtained were compared with the other available procedures including an exact continuous model solution. The multiple degree of freedom models were found to be superior, especially, in predicting forces acting on the engine valve train. The present application of the transfer matrix method with recent developments, gives accurate estimation of the vibration characteristics and harmonic response of engine valve trains. Complex matrix method analysis also supports the obtained results.

Karadag, Vedat

1991-05-01

376

Heart Rate and Arterial Pressure Changes during Whole-Body Deep Hypothermia  

PubMed Central

Whole-body deep hypothermia (DH) could be a new therapeutic strategy for asphyxiated newborn. This retrospective study describes how DH modified the heart rate and arterial blood pressure if compared to mild hypothermia (MH). Fourteen in DH and 17 in MH were cooled within the first six hours of life and for the following 72 hours. Hypothermia criteria were gestational age ?36 weeks; birth weight ?1800?g; clinical signs of moderate/severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Rewarming was obtained in the following 6–12 hours (0.5°C/h) after cooling. Heart rates were the same between the two groups; there was statistically significant difference at the beginning of hypothermia and during rewarming. Three babies in the DH group and 2 in the MH group showed HR < 80?bpm and QTc > 520?ms. Infant submitted to deep hypothermia had not bradycardia or Qtc elongation before cooling and after rewarming. Blood pressure was significantly lower in DH compared to MH during the cooling, and peculiar was the hypotension during rewarming in DH group. Conclusion. The deeper hypothermia is a safe and feasible, only if it is performed by a well-trained team. DH should only be associated with a clinical trial and prospective randomized trials to validate its use.

Cavallaro, Giacomo; Filippi, Luca; Raffaeli, Genny; Cristofori, Gloria; Schena, Federico; Agazzani, Elisa; Amodeo, Ilaria; Griggio, Alice; Boccacci, Simona; Fiorini, Patrizio; Mosca, Fabio

2013-01-01

377

Influence of vision and motor imagery styles on equilibrium control during whole-body rotations.  

PubMed

To investigate the influence of vision and motor imagery styles on equilibrium control, displacements of the supporting foot during spontaneous whole-body rotations ("pirouette") by expert female ballet dancers were analyzed using three-dimensional kinematics. Four turn types were defined according to direction (clockwise, CW vs. counterclockwise, CCW) and supporting foot (SF, left vs. right). Visual influences were examined by including two visual conditions (blindfolded vs. full-vision). Motor imagery styles were determined using the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire (VMIQ) (Kinesthetic, n = 4 vs. Visual/Kinesthetic, n = 6). Turning direction preference was assessed by a closed-response questionnaire in which all dancers indicated that they preferred CW turn direction. Kinesthetic dancers showed more SF displacement during CCW (non-preferred direction) than CW (preferred direction) pirouettes. However, Visual/Kinesthetic dancers showed no significant effect of turn direction. Furthermore, Kinesthetic dancers showed no significant effect of vision on SF displacement whereas Visual/Kinesthetic dancers showed significantly higher SF displacement when vision was occluded. Thus there appears to be a selective effect of vision on Visual/Kinesthetic dancers, and a selective effect of turn direction on Kinesthetic dancers. These results suggest that perceptual styles should be taken into consideration when training tasks that require fine equilibrium control because the factors that perturb balance differ depending on perceptual style. PMID:20047511

Golomer, Eveline M E; Gravenhorst, Robynne M; Toussaint, Yann

2009-12-01

378

Effects of whole-body cryotherapy on recovery after hamstring damaging exercise: A crossover study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on biochemical, pain, and performance parameters during the 5-day recovery period after damaging exercise for hamstrings. Participants completed a bout of damaging exercise for the hamstring muscles on two separate occasions (control and experimental condition) separated by 10 weeks. During the control condition, subjects received no treatment after the damaging exercise. The experimental condition consisted of WBC everyday during the recovery period. WBC included single 3-min daily exposures to low temperatures (-140 to -195?°C) in the cryo-cabin. During the recovery period, subjects were tested for biochemical markers, perceived pain sensation, and physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal isometric torque production, and maximally explosive isometric torque production). Majority of the observed variables showed statistically significant time effects (P?training. PMID:23614691

Fonda, B; Sarabon, N

2013-04-25

379

Whole-body predictors of wrist shot accuracy in ice hockey: a kinematic analysis.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify joint angular kinematics that corresponds to shooting accuracy in the stationary ice hockey wrist shot. Twenty-four subjects participated in this study, each performing 10 successful shots on four shooting targets. An eight-camera infra-red motion capture system (240 Hz), along with passive reflective markers, was used to record motion of the joints, hockey stick, and puck throughout the performance of the wrist shot. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine whole-body kinematic variables with accuracy scores as the dependent variable. Significant accuracy predictors were identified in the lower limbs, torso and upper limbs. Interpretation of the kinematics suggests that characteristics such as a better stability of the base of support, momentum cancellation, proper trunk orientation and a more dynamic control of the lead arm throughout the wrist shot movement are presented as predictors for the accuracy outcome. These findings are substantial as they not only provide a framework for further analysis of motor control strategies using tools for accurate projection of objects, but more tangibly they may provide a comprehensive evidence-based guide to coaches and athletes for planned training to improve performance. PMID:21560748

Michaud-Paquette, Yannick; Magee, Patrick; Pearsall, David; Turcotte, René

2011-03-01

380

Current Bibliographies in Medicine: Whole-Body Irradiation, January 1944 through December 1974 (229 Citations).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A literature search was performed to identify all English language publications from 1944 - 1974 possibly involving whole-body irradiation. A review of this literature was then made by the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments and experiments ...

L. J. Klein P. J. Perentesis

1995-01-01

381

Optimization of Whole-body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging (2013)  

EPA Science Inventory

Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

382

Mouse whole-body organ mapping by non-rigid registration approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Automatic small animal whole-body organ registration is challenging because of subject's joint structure, posture and position difference and loss of reference features. In this paper, an improved 3D shape context based non-rigid registration method is applied for mouse whole-body skeleton registration and lung registration. A geodesic path based non-rigid registration method is proposed for mouse torso skin registration. Based on the above registration methods, a novel non-rigid registration framework is proposed for mouse whole-body organ mapping from an atlas to new scanned CT data. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the method on lung and skin registration. A whole-body organ mapping was performed on three target data and the selected organs were compared with the manual outlining results. The robust of the method has been demonstrated.

Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Green, Heather; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

2011-03-01

383

Evolution of whole-body enantiomorphy in the tree snail genus Amphidromus  

PubMed Central

Diverse animals exhibit left–right asymmetry in development. However, no example of dimorphism for the left–right polarity of development (whole-body enantiomorphy) is known to persist within natural populations. In snails, whole-body enantiomorphs have repeatedly evolved as separate species. Within populations, however, snails are not expected to exhibit enantiomorphy, because of selection against the less common morph resulting from mating disadvantage. Here we present a unique example of evolutionarily stable whole-body enantiomorphy in snails. Our molecular phylogeny of South-east Asian tree snails in the genus Amphidromus indicates that enantiomorphy has likely persisted as the ancestral state over a million generations. Enantiomorphs have continuously coexisted in every population surveyed spanning a period of 10 years. Our results indicate that whole-body enantiomorphy is maintained within populations opposing the rule of directional asymmetry in animals. This study implicates the need for explicit approaches to disclosure of a maintenance mechanism and conservation of the genus.

SUTCHARIT, C; ASAMI, T; PANHA, S

2007-01-01

384

The effect of a cycling stage race on whole-body protein turnover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marked energy expenditure, independent of energy balance, could change whole-body protein turnover. The aims of the present study were to determine the effect of participation in a 6-day, 10-stage cycling stage tour on whole-body protein turnover in elite male cyclists, and to determine whether energy and protein turnover are related to fatigue and over-reaching. C-leucine was used to determine 18-h

Anna K. Rolleston; Nancy J. Rehrer; Ien J. Hellemans; Elaine Rush; Cheryl Murphy; Benjamin F. Miller

2010-01-01

385

Whole-Body Motion Generation Integrating Operator's Intention and Robot's Autonomy in Controlling Humanoid Robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a framework for whole-body motion generation integrating operator's control and robot's autonomous functions during online control of humanoid robots. Humanoid robots are biped machines that usually possess multiple degrees of freedom (DOF). The complexity of their structure and the difficulty in maintaining postural stability make the whole-body control of humanoid robots fundamentally different from fixed-base manipulators. Getting

Ee Sian Neo; Kazuhito Yokoi; Shuuji Kajita; Kazuo Tanie

2007-01-01

386

Enhanced Levels of Whole-body Protein Turnover in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

A substantial number of patients with chronic obstructive pulmo- nary disease (COPD) are characterized by fat-free mass wasting and altered muscle and plasma amino acid levels, suggesting changes in protein metabolism. In the present study, we examined whether whole-body protein breakdown (PB) and synthesis (PS) differ between 14 stable patients with COPD and 8 healthy con- trols. Whole-body PB, PS,

MARIËLLE P. K. J. ENGELEN; NICOLAAS E. P. DEUTZ; EMIEL F. M. WOUTERS; ANNEMIE M. W. J. SCHOLS

2000-01-01

387

Non-rigid image registration for temporal subtraction of whole-body nuclear emission images  

Microsoft Academic Search

A non-rigid registration algorithm for application to whole-body emission images of the same patient is presented. Rigid registration is generally insufficient to properly register whole-body images, a certain amount of deformation needs to be applied to obtain a good correspondence. This deformation should not change the size or shape of lesions, bones and the general anatomy. In our approach, non-rigid

Raf Claessens; Johan Nuyts; Sigrid Stroobants; Patrick Dupont; F. Maeswork

2003-01-01

388

Involvement patterns in myotilinopathy and desminopathy detected by a novel neuromuscular whole-body MRI protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) has been successfully applied for oncologic and cardiovascular diagnostics, whereas imaging in myopathies\\u000a usually employs dedicated protocols restricted to areas of specific interest. In this study, we propose a comprehensive neuromuscular\\u000a WB-MRI protocol. Eighteen patients with degenerative and inflammatory muscle diseases were included. Whole-body imaging was\\u000a performed on a 1.5-T MR system using parallel imaging. Examination time

Nicolai Schramm; Christine Born; Sabine Weckbach; Peter Reilich; Maggie C. Walter; Maximilian F. Reiser

2008-01-01

389

A switching command-based whole-body operation method for humanoid robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a switching command-based whole-body operation method for humanoid robots. Humanoid robots are biped machines possessing multiple degrees of freedom (DOF). Due to the complexity of their multi-DOF structure, and the difficulty in maintaining postural stability, whole-body operation of humanoid robots is fundamentally different from traditional fixed-base manipulators or stable-base mobile manipulators. By studying the shifts in locus

Ee Sian Neo; Kazuhito Yokoi; Shuuji Kajita; Fumio Kanehiro; Kazuo Tanie

2005-01-01

390

Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo

2010-09-01

391

Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}  

SciTech Connect

Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mougey, E.H. [Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01

392

Heat load tests of superconducting magnets vibrated electromagnetically for the Maglev train  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superconducting magnets on Maglev trains vibrate due to harmonic ripples of electromagnetic flux generated by ground coils. Heat load caused by vibration in the magnet amounted to several tens of watts in the electromagnetic vibration test. This was mainly because a.c. loss was induced in the helium vessel housing the superconducting coil, due to relative vibration between the aluminium thermal shield and the coil. The heat load caused by vibration should be strictly restricted to less than 4W due to limited cryogenic refrigeration capacity. The heat load was tested using electromagnetic flux ripples for a superconducting magnet model of one coil which corresponds to 1/4 of an actual magnet. The flux ripples simulated the 6th harmonic of the actual ground levitation coil. Some ideas to reduce the heat load were tried for the magnet model, such as applying high resistance thermal radiation shielding, increasing rigidity of the vacuum vessel, and using high purity copper plating on the helium vessel. These ideas proved effective, and the maximum heat load due to vibration was held to less than 4 W per magnet for the one coil magnet model.

Ohmori, J.; Nakao, H.; Yamashita, T.; Sanada, Y.; Shudou, M.; Kawai, M.; Fujita, M.; Terai, M.; Miura, A.

393

The Effects of Tai Chi Chuan Combined with Vibration Training on Balance Control and Lower Extremity Muscle Power  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to determine whether performing Tai Chi Chuan on a customized vibration platform could enhance balance control and lower extremity muscle power more efficiently than Tai Chi Chuan alone in an untrained young population. Forty-eight healthy young adults were randomly assigned to the following three groups: a Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training group (TCV), a Tai Chi Chuan group (TCC) or a control group. The TCV group underwent 30 minutes of a reformed Tai Chi Chuan program on a customized vibration platform (32 Hz, 1 mm) three times a week for eight weeks, whereas the TCC group was trained without vibration stimuli. A force platform was used to measure the moving area of a static single leg stance and the heights of two consecutive countermovement jumps. The activation of the knee extensor and flexor was also measured synchronously by surface electromyography in all tests. The results showed that the moving area in the TCV group was significantly decreased by 15.3%. The second jump height in the TCV group was significantly increased by 8.14%, and the activation of the knee extensor/flexor was significantly decreased in the first jump. In conclusion, Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control, and the positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli still remains significant because there is no cross-interaction between the two different types of training methods. Key points Eight weeks of Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control for an untrained young population. The positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli during Tai Chi Chuan movements still remains significant because of SSC mechanism. Combining Tai Chi Chuan with vibration training is more efficient and does not decrease the overall training effects due to a cross-interaction of each other.

Chung, Pao-Hung; Lin, Guan-Lun; Liu, Chiang; Chuang, Long-Ren; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

2013-01-01

394

Vibrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low frequent vibrations may cause from disturbing up to damaging effects. There is no precise distinction between structure-borne sound and vibrations. However - depending on the frequency range - measurements and predictions require different techniques. In a wide frequency range, the generation, transmission and propagation of vibrations can be investigated similar to structure-borne sound (see Chap. 9).

Guggenberger, Johannes; Müller, Gerhard

395

Psychophysical Relationships Characterizing Human Response to Whole-Body Sinusoidal Vertical Vibration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermor...

J. D. Leatherwood T. K. Dempsey

1976-01-01

396

Effect of gut retention on the effective whole body half-time of iodine-131 in thyroid cancer patients  

SciTech Connect

The whole body radiation dose resulting from iodine-131 (/sup 131/I) therapy in patients with thyroid cancer is directly related to the effective whole body half-time of /sup 131/I in those patients. In 101 studied on 64 patients referred for quantitative whole body radioiodine scans for thyroid cancer, the effective whole body half-time was found to be significantly greater when gut retention was maximal. These results indicate that gut retention is a significant contributor to the whole body half-time of /sup 131/I. The routine use of non-iodine-containing laxatives at the time of /sup 131/I studies and therapy may be useful in decreasing whole body /sup 131/I retention times and, therefore, in decreasing whole body radiation doses, and should be considered in such patients.

Maxon, R.; Thomas, S.R.; Maxon, H.

1987-03-01

397

Reciprocal influence of masticatory apparatus, craniofacial structure and whole body homeostasis.  

PubMed

There are evidences that the evolution into Homo erectus was partially induced by masticatory muscular dystrophy caused by a gene mutation, which in turn increased brain capacity and led to bipedalism. It is generally accepted that the morphology and function of mammalian skull are partially controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. Archeologic evidences support that the masticatory apparatus have influenced the mechanical stress distribution in hominin skull, and consequently changed craniofacial morphology and function. Even after evolution into H. erectus, alterations in food properties by civilization and cultural preferences have caused modification of human masticatory pattern and accordingly craniofacial structure. Since there are evidences that prehuman and human masticatory apparatus has been influenced the craniofacial and whole body morphology and function, this apparatus in turn might influence whole body homeostasis. Plausible reciprocal influencing mechanisms of the masticatory apparatus on the whole body homeostasis might be (1) direct mechanical influence on the craniofacial structure, (2) distortion of cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and/or (3) several neural/humoral routes. Based on these backgrounds, the hypothesis of the present study is that the morphology and function of masticatory apparatus influence the whole body homeostasis and these interactions are reciprocal. Therefore, human masticatory apparatus, at the present time, should be kept in its physiological status to maintain the whole body homeostasis. We recommend basic and clinical approaches to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22981594

Lee, Yong-Keun; Moon, Hyung-Joo

2012-09-13

398

Measurements of the equivalent whole-body dose during radiation therapy by cytogenetic methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of equivalent whole-body dose following partial body exposure can be performed using different biophysical models. Calculations should be compared with biodosimetry data, but measurements are complicated by mitotic selection induced in target cells after localized irradiation. In this paper we measured chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes during radiotherapy, and estimated the equivalent whole-body dose absorbed, by using the novel technique of interphase chromosome painting. Premature chromosome condensation was induced in stimulated lymphocytes by incubation in calyculin A, and slides were hybridized in situ with whole-chromosome DNA probes specific for human chromosomes 2 and 4. Reciprocal exchanges were used to estimate the equivalent whole-body dose, based on individual pre-treatment in vitro calibration curves. Equivalent whole-body dose increased as a function of the number of fractions, and reached a plateau at high fraction numbers. Chromosomal aberration yields were dependent on field size, tumour position and concurrent chemotherapy. Results suggest that interphase chromosome painting is a simple technique able to give a reliable estimate of the equivalent whole-body dose absorbed during therapeutic partial-body irradiation.

Durante, Marco; Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kawata, Tetsuya; Majima, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

1999-05-01

399

Quantitative role of the splanchnic bed in whole body leucine metabolism  

SciTech Connect

The role of the splanchnic bed in the economy of whole body leucine (leu) metabolism was assessed in 5 chronically catheterized conscious fasting mongrel dogs. Using primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)-leu and L-1-/sup 14/C-leu the metabolic fate of leu carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the splanchnic region was compared with that in the body as a whole, by measurement of isotope and substrate balance across gut and liver. Sampling was from the portal and hepatic veins and arch of aorta. Blood flow estimation was made by dye dilution. Whole body leu N and C fluxes and oxidation were (Mean +/- SEM); 453 +/ 47, 197 +/- 37 and 41 +/- 5 ..mu..mol kg-1.h-1, respectively. The splanchnic bed accounted for (% of whole body) 36 +/- 13 of leu disappearance into proteins (liver 14%; gut 22%); 24 +/- 7 of leu appearance via protein breakdown (liver 8%; gut 16%) 12 +/- 2% of leu transamination to ..cap alpha..-ketoisocaproate (KIC) (liver 7%; gut 5%); 12 +/- 3 of KIC reamination to leu (liver 7%; gut 5%) and 11 +/- 3 of leu oxidation (liver 2%; gut 9%). Hence, in the fasting state the splanchnic region accounts for a small proportion of whole body leu-KIC interconversion and oxidation, but a more significant proportion of whole body of leu for protein synthesis.

Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.; Walesreweski, J.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R.

1986-03-05

400

Anaerobic capacity and maximal oxygen uptake during arm stroke, leg kicking and whole body swimming.  

PubMed

In the present study, we determined both anaerobic capacity (the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) during arm stroke (A), leg kicking (K), and whole body swimming (S), and compared them. The subjects were six trained college swimmers (two male and four female), aged 20 +/- 1 years. To determine VO2max for A, K and S, VO2max was measured during a 6-min swim at constant water flow rates. VO2 was measured by the Douglas bag method. Anaerobic capacity was determined by accumulated oxygen deficit during exercise lasting 2-3 min according to the methods of Medbø et al. Mean values of VO2max during A, K and S were 2.53 +/- 0.37 L min-1, 2.93 +/- 0.37 L min-1, and 3.23 +/- 0.43 L min-1, respectively. Those in A and K corresponded to 78.2% and 91.0% of that in S. Mean values of anaerobic capacity during A, K and S were 2.15 +/- 0.31 L, 2.52 +/- 1.08 L and 2.99 +/- 0.52 L, respectively. Those in A and K corresponded to 73.3% and 81.7% of that in S. Both VO2max and anaerobic capacity in S were much lower than the sum of A and K, corresponding to only 59.3% and 65.9%, respectively. These results suggest that the total energy production during S is lower than simply the sum of A and K because the potentials of both the anaerobic and aerobic energy releasing processes in the muscle groups involved in A and K cannot be fully reached during S. PMID:8869726

Ogita, F; Hara, M; Tabata, I

1996-08-01

401

A non-rigid registration method for mouse whole body skeleton registration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Micro-CT/PET imaging scanner provides a powerful tool to study tumor in small rodents in response to therapy. Accurate image registration is a necessary step to quantify the characteristics of images acquired in longitudinal studies. Small animal registration is challenging because of the very deformable body of the animal often resulting in different postures despite physical restraints. In this paper, we propose a non-rigid registration approach for the automatic registration of mouse whole body skeletons, which is based on our improved 3D shape context non-rigid registration method. The whole body skeleton registration approach has been tested on 21 pairs of mouse CT images with variations of individuals and time-instances. The experimental results demonstrated the stability and accuracy of the proposed method for automatic mouse whole body skeleton registration.

Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

2010-03-01

402

Comparison of image enhancement methods for the effective diagnosis in successive whole-body bone scans.  

PubMed

Whole-body bone scan is one of the most frequent diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine. Especially, it plays a significant role in important procedures such as the diagnosis of osseous metastasis and evaluation of osseous tumor response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can also be used to monitor the possibility of any recurrence of the tumor. However, it is a very time-consuming effort for radiologists to quantify subtle interval changes between successive whole-body bone scans because of many variations such as intensity, geometry, and morphology. In this paper, we present the most effective method of image enhancement based on histograms, which may assist radiologists in interpreting successive whole-body bone scans effectively. Forty-eight successive whole-body bone scans from 10 patients were obtained and evaluated using six methods of image enhancement based on histograms: histogram equalization, brightness-preserving bi-histogram equalization, contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, end-in search, histogram matching, and exact histogram matching (EHM). Comparison of the results of the different methods was made using three similarity measures peak signal-to-noise ratio, histogram intersection, and structural similarity. Image enhancement of successive bone scans using EHM showed the best results out of the six methods measured for all similarity measures. EHM is the best method of image enhancement based on histograms for diagnosing successive whole-body bone scans. The method for successive whole-body bone scans has the potential to greatly assist radiologists quantify interval changes more accurately and quickly by compensating for the variable nature of intensity information. Consequently, it can improve radiologists' diagnostic accuracy as well as reduce reading time for detecting interval changes. PMID:20195695

Jeong, Chang Bu; Kim, Kwang Gi; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki

2011-06-01

403

Assessment of benign tumor burden by whole-body MRI in patients with neurofibromatosis 1  

PubMed Central

People with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) have multiple benign neurofibromas and a 10% lifetime risk of developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Most MPNSTs develop from benign plexiform neurofibromas, so the burden of benign tumors may be a risk factor for developing MPNST. We studied 13 NF1 patients with MPNSTs and 26 age- and sex-matched controls (NF1 patients who did not have MPNSTs) with detailed clinical examinations and whole-body MRI to characterize their body burden of internal benign neurofibromas. Internal plexiform neurofibromas were identified in 22 (56%) of the 39 NF1 patients studied. All six of the NF1 patients with MPNSTs under 30 years of age had neurofibromas visualized on whole-body MRI, compared to only 3 of 11 matched NF1 controls under age 30 (p < 0. 05). Both the median number of plexiform neurofibromas (p < 0.05) and the median neurofibroma volume (p < 0.01) on whole-body MRI were significantly greater among MPNST patients younger than 30 years of age than among controls. No significant differences in whole-body MRI findings were observed between NF1 patients with MPNSTs and controls who were 30 years of age or older. Whole-body MRI of NF1 patients allows assessment of the burden of internal neurofibromas, most of which are not apparent on physical examination. Whole-body imaging of young NF1 patients may allow those at highest risk for developing MPNST to be identified early in life. Close surveillance of these high-risk patients may permit earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of MPNSTs that develop.

Mautner, Victor-F.; Asuagbor, Florence A.; Dombi, Eva; Funsterer, Carsten; Kluwe, Lan; Wenzel, Ralf; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Friedman, Jan M.

2008-01-01

404

Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research  

SciTech Connect

The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

1991-01-01

405

Detection and semi-quantitative measurement of lung cancer metabolic activity by whole body PET  

SciTech Connect

Conventional radiologic and nuclear medicine techniques have been shown to have a limited role in the staging and monitoring of disease activity in patients with lung cancer. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative position emission tomography (PET) using the F-18 FDG technique have been applied to determine the clinical utility of whole body PET-FDG imaging in lung cancer. Nineteen whole body FDG PET scans were performed in 18 patients; 17 with lung cancer (15 non-small cell and 2 small cell) and 1 with squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea.

Tse, K.K.M.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Alavi, J.B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

1994-05-01

406

Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research  

SciTech Connect

The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

1991-12-31

407

Generating whole body motions for a biped humanoid robot from captured human dances  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study is a system for a robot to imitate human dances. This paper describes the process to generate whole body motions which can be performed by an actual biped humanoid robot. Human dance motions are acquired through a motion capturing system. We then extract symbolic representation which is made up of prim- itive motions: essential postures

Shinichiro Nakaoka; Atsushi Nakazawa; Kazuhito Yokoi; Hirohisa Hirukawa; Katsushi Ikeuchi

2003-01-01

408

Moving along the Mental Number Line: Interactions between Whole-Body Motion and Numerical Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Active head turns to the left and right have recently been shown to influence numerical cognition by shifting attention along the mental number line. In the present study, we found that passive whole-body motion influences numerical cognition. In a random-number generation task (Experiment 1), leftward and downward displacement of participants…

Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia; Mast, Fred W.

2012-01-01

409

DETECTION OF RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION-INDUCED WHOLE BODY HEATING FOLLOWING CHEMICAL IMPAIRMENT OF THERMOREGULATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Heating by radiofrequency (RF) radiation at high intensities can cause biological changes by whole-body hyperthermia or by altered thermal gradients within the body. However, there have been reports of effects at low intensities of RF radiation without evidence of increased tempe...

410

Quantitative Determination of Blood Losses by a Whole-Body Counter.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method to quantitate blood losses by determination of the exp 51 Cr whole body retention (WBR) was developed. Autologous red cells labelled with Na sub 2 O sub 4 exp 51 Cr were given intravenously. Blood losses were simulated by withdrawing blood sample...

E. M. Rochna Viola A. C. de Garreta N. Soria E. Blanco

1976-01-01

411

Combining analytical inverse kinematics with example postures to generate virtual human whole body reaching postures  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ensure the real-time interactivity and the lifelikeness, analytical inverse kinematics and the example posture library are adopted to generate whole body reaching postures. The upper limb joint angles are solved using analytical inverse kinematics and optimization. First, a new objective function to minimize the wrist joint angles is presented and the optimized swivel angel is calculated with directed searching

Shilei Li; Jiahong Liang; Guang Liu; Yong Zhang

2008-01-01

412

Use of patches and whole body sampling for the assessment of dermal exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a growing awareness of the importance of dermal exposure in recent years. A wide range of techniques are employed to measure exposure, of which surrogate skin techniques such as patch sampling and whole body sampling are frequently used. One of the problems associated with dermal sampling is that different methods often produce different results due to differences

A. Soutar; S. SEMPLE; R. J. AITKEN; A. ROBERTSON

2000-01-01

413

Multifocal non-Hodgkin lymphoma in an infant with cardiac involvement: whole-body MR imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is rare in infancy, and we present a case of aggressive NHL of T-cell lineage in an infant with\\u000a multifocal bone, cardiac, mediastinal nodal, paranasal sinus, calvarial, and soft-tissue deposits on presentation that were\\u000a detected on whole-body MRI.

Jyoti Kumar; Ashu Seith; Sameer Bakhshi; Raju Sharma; Atin Kumar

2007-01-01

414

Whole body MRI for detecting metastatic bone tumor: comparison with bone scintigrams  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of whole body MRI (WB-MRI [magnetic resonance imaging]) and bone scintigram (BS) at detecting bone metastasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: WB-MRI was performed on 16 patients for detecting bone metastasis (6 breast carcinoma, 7 prostatic carcinoma, 1 renal cell carcinoma [RCC], 1 hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], and 1 primary unknown). BS was also performed in all cases.

Katsuyuki NAKANISHI; Midori KOBAYASHI; Satoru TAKAHASHI; Saki NAKATA; Miyaji KYAKUNO; Kazunori NAKAGUCHI; Hironobu NAKAMURA

2005-01-01

415

DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING  

EPA Science Inventory

DETECTION OF WHOLE BODY OXIDATIVE STRESS IN URINE USING OXYGEN-18 LABELING. R Slade, J L McKee and G E Hatch. PTB, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. Reliable non-invasive markers for detecting oxidative stress in vivo are currently not available. We pr...

416

Determination of whole body circadian phase in lung cancer patients: Melatonin vs. cortisol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A quantifiable and reliable technique for the determination of body circadian phase applicable to non-laboratory studies would allow the evaluation of circadian dysregulation. In this study we evaluated feasible methodologies to individualize whole body circadian phase in lung cancer patients. Methods: Cortisol and melatonin serum levels were measured in blood samples collected every 4h for 24h from eleven male

Gianluigi Mazzoccoli; Francesco Giuliani; Robert B. Sothern

417

Correlation of symmetrical gaits and whole body mechanics: debunking myths in locomotor biodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Independent maturation of gait (Hildebrand) and whole body mechanics (Cavagna et al.) traditions in locomotor analyses has led to conflicting terminology. Re-evaluation of these traditions yields three primary insights. First, walking and running should be recognized by their fundamentally different mechanics. Because duty factor fails to consistently distinguish these mechanics, its use in discriminating walks from runs should be abandoned

Audrone R. Biknevicius; Stephen M. Reilly

2006-01-01

418

A Live Time Controlled Scanning Rate for a Whole Body Counter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scanning whole body counters tend to sacrifice sensitivity and introduce measurement error through the use of constant drive rate mechanisms which do not readily compensate for changes in electronic deadtime. An electronic drive rate control has been developed at Battelle-Northwest Laboratory which largely eliminates this problem. The control automatically adjusts the relative drive rate to correspond to multichannel analyzer live

M. E. Sveum; P. E. Bramson

1969-01-01

419

Blood glucose kinetics in whole body and mammary gland of lactating goats exposed to heat.  

PubMed

Whole-body and mammary kinetics of blood glucose were measured in lactating goats exposed to thermoneutral, moderate hot, and severe hot environments for 4 d. Milk yields were reduced by 3 and 13% during moderate and severe heat exposure, but heat production was unchanged during the experiment. Concentrations of plasma glucose and free fatty acids did not change during heat exposure. Concentration of thyroxine tended to decrease and concentration of prolactin increased with increasing temperature. Whole-body turnover of blood glucose decreased significantly during both moderate and severe heat exposure. Blood glucose oxidation rate and contribution of blood glucose to total carbon dioxide production were not influenced by heat exposure. Mammary glucose uptake tended to decrease during heat exposure, and this reduction may account for the decreased whole-body turnover of blood glucose. The lactose concentration in milk was decreased on the 4th d of severe heat exposure. A relatively low production of milk lactose was apparently derived from blood glucose. These results suggest that the whole-body turnover of blood glucose decreases in step with a decrease in mammary glucose uptake during heat exposure in lactating goats. PMID:4067034

Sano, H; Ambo, K; Tsuda, T

1985-10-01

420

Comparative study of representations for segmentation of whole body human motion data  

Microsoft Academic Search

In previous work, the authors have been developing a stochastic model based approach for on-line segmentation of whole body human motion patterns during human motion observation and learning, using a simplified kinematic model of the human body. In this paper, we extend the proposed approach to larger, more realistic kinematic models, which can better represent a larger variety of human

Dana Kulic; Yoshihiko Nakamura

2009-01-01

421

Effect of variable protein intake on whole-body protein turnover in young men and  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the amount of protein intake (12% and 21% of total energy intake, diet A and diet B, respectively) on nitrogen balance and whole-body protein turn- over (PT) was measured in 19 young men and 10 young women (aged 30 ± 5 and 27 ± 4 y, respectively). In young adults, mean nitrogen balance was approximately zero during

Daphne LE Pannemans; Dave Halliday; Klaas R Westerterp; Arnold DM Kester

422

New Experiences of Treatment in Multiple Tumors with HIFU Ablation and Whole Body Hyperthermia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have performed some 5000 whole body hyperthermia (WBH) treatments using far-infrared equipment (RHD 7500: Enthermics medical systems, USA) in 1000 cancer patients since 1991 at Luke Hospital & Clinic (Nakano, Japan). Hyperthermia is a natural treatment whereby patients are heated within the fever temperature range of 41-42 C. However, this therapy alone is poorly suited to advanced cancer patients,

Akira Takeuchi; Hideki Gondo; Norio Iijima; Yuantian Xia; Takashi Takeuchi

2007-01-01

423

Whole body small animal examination with a diffuse optical tomography instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a fluorescent diffuse optical tomography instrument in our laboratory to study in vivo tumour growth without any stress or damage for the animal. By taking into account optical heterogeneities, the reconstruction algorithm allows whole body small animal examination. Experimental results obtained with this system on phantoms and on mice deep lung tumours examination are presented in this paper.

Koenig, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; da Silva, Anabela; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Boutet, Jérôme; Berger, Michel; Texier, Isabelle; Peltié, Philippe; Rizo, Philippe; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc

2007-02-01

424

Design of POSICAM: A High Resolution Multislice Whole Body Positron Camera.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A high resolution (6mm), multislice (21) whole body positron camera has been designed with innovative detector and septa arrangement for 3-D imaging and tracer quantitation. An object of