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1

Genome Sequence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Strain NRRL 26406, a Fungus Causing Wilt Disease on Melon  

PubMed Central

Horizontal chromosome transfer introduces host-specific pathogenicity among members of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex and is responsible for some of the most destructive and intractable plant diseases. This paper reports the genome sequence of F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis (NRRL 26406), a causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease on melon. PMID:25081257

Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Kistler, H. Corby

2014-01-01

2

Co-infection of Wilt-Resistant Chickpeas by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica are important pathogens of chickpea. Interrelationships between Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and M. javanica were investigated on 53 Fusarium wilt-resistant chickpea genotypes in pot experiments. All of the genotypes were susceptible to M. javanica. Fusarium wilt resistance in one genotype (ICC 12275) was ineffective in the presence of M. javanica, and all the plants completely wilted. Resistance in four genotypes (ICCs 11319, 11322, 12254, 12272) was reduced in the presence of the nematode. Vascular discoloration above the collar region of the plants, an indication of susceptibility to the fungus, was observed. Wilt resistance in 48 genotypes was not modified by M. javanica. The effects of interactions between the pathogens on shoot and root weights, gall index, and galled area of root were significant only on 10-28% of the genotypes. Presence of the fungus reduced the adverse effects of nematodes on growth of 15% of the genotypes. Appraisal of wilt-resistant chickpea genotypes for their reactions to combinations of the two pathogens would help to identify and develop chickpea cultivars with wilt resistance stable in presence of M. javanica. PMID:19277336

Maheshwari, T. Uma; Sharma, S. B.; Reddy, D. D. R.; Haware, M. P.

1995-01-01

3

[Faba bean fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum )control and its mechanism in different wheat varieties and faba bean intercropping system].  

PubMed

Field experiment and hydroponic culture were conducted to investigate effects of three wheat varieties (Yunmai 42, Yunmai 47 and Mianyang 29) and faba bean intercropping on the shoot biomass, disease index of fusarium wilt, functional diversity of microbial community and the amount of Fusarium oxysporum in rhizosphere of faba bean. Contents and components of the soluble sugars, free amino acids and organic acids in the root exudates were also examined. Results showed that, compared with monocropped faba bean, shoot biomass of faba bean significantly increased by 16.6% and 13.4%, disease index of faba bean fusarium wilt significantly decreased by 47.6% and 23.3% as intercropped with Yunmai 42 and Yunmai 47, but no significant differences of both shoot biomass and disease index were found as intercropped with Mianyang 29. Compared with monocropped faba bean, the average well color development (AWCD value) and total utilization ability of carbon sources of faba bean significantly increased, the amount of Fusarium oxysporum of faba bean rhizosphere significantly decreased, and the microbial community structures of faba bean rhizosphere changed as intercropped with YM42 and YM47, while no significant effects as intercropped with MY29. Total contents of soluble sugar, free amino acids and organic acids in root exudates were in the trend of MY29>YM47>YM42. Contents of serine, glutamic, glycine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, lysine in root exudates of MY29 were significantly higher than that in YM42 and YM47. The arginine was detected only in the root exudates of YM42 and YM47, and leucine was detected only in the root exudates of MY29. Six organic acids of tartaric acid, malic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, t-aconitic acid were detected in root exudates of MY29 and YM47, and four organic acids of tartaric acid, malic acid, citric acid, fumaric acid were detected in root exudates of YM42. Malic acid content in root exudates of YM47 and MY29 was significantly higher than that of YM42. In conclusion, intercropping influenced the microbial activity and substrate utilization of soil microorganisms, altered the microbial community diversity in rhizosphere of faba bean, reduced the amount of F. oxysporum and disease index of faba bean fusarium wilt, and promoted faba bean growth. Effects of intercropping on disease control were influenced by the intercropped wheat variety, suggesting that the differences of root exudates of wheat were important factors that affected soil-borne diseases control in intercropping. PMID:25345048

Dong, Yan; Dong, Kun; Zheng, Yi; Tang, Li; Yang, Zhi-Xian

2014-07-01

4

Extracellular chitinases of fluorescent pseudomonads antifungal to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi causing carnation wilt.  

PubMed

Vascular wilt of carnation caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi (Prill. & Delacr.) W. C. Synder & H.N. Hans inflicts substantial yield and quality loss to the crop. Mycolytic enzymes such as chitinases are antifungal and contribute significantly to the antagonistic activity of fluorescent pseudomonads belonging to plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria. Fluorescent pseudomonads antagonistic to the vascular wilt pathogen were studied for their ability to grow and produce chitinases on different substrates. Bacterial cells grown on chitin-containing media showed enhanced growth and enzyme production with increased anti-fungal activity against the pathogen. Furthermore, the cell-free bacterial culture filtrate from chitin-containing media also significantly inhibited the mycelial growth. Both the strains and their cell-free culture filtrate from chitin-amended media showed the formation of lytic zones on chitin agar, indicating chitinolytic ability. Extracellular proteins of highly antagonistic bacterial strain were isolated from cell-free extracts of media amended with chitin and fungal cell wall. These cell-free conditioned media contained one to seven polypeptides. Western blot analysis revealed two isoforms of chitinase with molecular masses of 43 and 18.5 kDa. Further plate assay for mycelial growth inhibition showed the 43-kDa protein to be antifungal. The foregoing studies clearly established the significance of chitinases in the antagonism of fluorescent pseudomonads, showing avenues for possible exploitation in carnation wilt management. PMID:16550458

Ajit, Naosekpam Singh; Verma, Rajni; Shanmugam, V

2006-04-01

5

Discovery of a new source of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum, cause of Fusarium wilt in Allium fistulosum, located on chromosome 2 of Allium cepa Aggregatum group.  

PubMed

This study was carried out to evaluate the antifungal effect of Allium cepa Aggregatum group (shallot) metabolites on Fusarium oxysporum and to determine the shallot chromosome(s) related to Fusarium wilt resistance using a complete set of eight Allium fistulosum - shallot monosomic addition lines. The antifungal effects of hexane, butanol, and water extraction fractions from bulbs of shallot on 35 isolates of F. oxysporum were examined using the disc diffusion method. Only hexane and butanol fractions showed high antifungal activity. Shallot showed no symptom of disease after inoculation with F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae. The phenolic content of the roots and the saponin content of root exudates of inoculated shallot increased to much higher levels than those of the control at 3 days after inoculation. Application of freeze-dried shallot root exudates to seeds of A. fistulosum soaked in a spore suspension of F. oxysporum resulted in protection of seedlings against infection. Among eight monosomic addition lines and A. fistulosum, FF+2A showed the highest resistance to Fusarium wilt. This monosomic addition line also showed a specific saponin band derived from shallot on the thin layer chromatography profile of saponins in the eight monosomic addition lines. The chromosome 2A of shallot might possess some of the genes related to Fusarium wilt resistance. PMID:23199574

Vu, Hoa Q; El-Sayed, Magdi A; Ito, Shin-Ichi; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

2012-11-01

6

Effect of combination of bio-agents and mineral nutrients for the management of alfalfa wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. medicaginis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological and nutrient management of soil borne disease is increasingly gaining stature as a possible practical and safe approach. Inhibitory effects of fungal and bacterial antagonists were tested under in vitro conditions against the wilt pathogen of alfalfa Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. medicaginis. Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens (PI 5) were found to be effective against the alfalfa wilt pathogen.

M. Adhilakshmi; M. Karthikeyan; D. Alice

2008-01-01

7

Proteomics of Fusarium oxysporum race 1 and race 4 reveals enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and ion transport that might play important roles in banana Fusarium wilt.  

PubMed

Banana Fusarium wilt is a soil-spread fungal disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum. In China, the main virulence fungi in banana are F. oxysporum race 1 (F1, weak virulence) and race 4 (F4, strong virulence). To date, no proteomic analyses have compared the two races, but the difference in virulence between F1 and F4 might result from their differentially expressed proteins. Here we report the first comparative proteomics of F1 and F4 cultured under various conditions, and finally identify 99 protein species, which represent 59 unique proteins. These proteins are mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, post-translational modification, energy production, and inorganic ion transport. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that among the 46 proteins identified from F4 were several enzymes that might be important for virulence. Reverse transcription PCR analysis of the genes for 15 of the 56 proteins revealed that their transcriptional patterns were similar to their protein expression patterns. Taken together, these data suggest that proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and ion transport may be important in the pathogenesis of banana Fusarium wilt. Some enzymes such as catalase-peroxidase, galactosidase and chitinase might contribute to the strong virulence of F4. Overexpression or knockout of the genes for the F4-specific proteins will help us to further understand the molecular mechanism of Fusarium-induced banana wilt. PMID:25460190

Sun, Yong; Yi, Xiaoping; Peng, Ming; Zeng, Huicai; Wang, Dan; Li, Bo; Tong, Zheng; Chang, Lili; Jin, Xiang; Wang, Xuchu

2014-01-01

8

Effect of pseudobactin 358 production by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 on suppression of fusarium wilt of carnations by nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Fo47.  

PubMed

Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Fo47b10 combined with Pseudomonas putida WCS358 efficiently suppressed fusarium wilt of carnations grown in soilless culture. This suppression was significantly higher than that obtained by inoculation of either antagonistic microorganism alone. The increased suppression obtained by Fo47b10 combined with WCS358 only occurred when Fo47b10 was introduced at a density high enough (at least 10 times higher than that of the pathogen) to be efficient on its own. P. putida WCS358 had no effect on disease severity when inoculated on its own but significantly improved the control achieved with nonpathogenic F. oxysporum Fo47b10. In contrast, a siderophore-negative mutant of WCS358 had no effect on disease severity even in the presence of Fo47b10. Since the densities of both bacterial strains at the root level were similar, the difference between the wild-type WCS358 and the siderophore-negative mutant with regard to the control of fusarium wilt was related to the production of pseudobactin 358. The production of pseudobactin 358 appeared to be responsible for the increased suppression by Fo47b10 combined with WCS358 relative to that with Fo47b10 alone. PMID:1444411

Lemanceau, P; Bakker, P A; De Kogel, W J; Alabouvette, C; Schippers, B

1992-09-01

9

Genome and Transcriptome Analysis of the Fungal Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Causing Banana Vascular Wilt Disease  

PubMed Central

Background The asexual fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) causing vascular wilt disease is one of the most devastating pathogens of banana (Musa spp.). To understand the molecular underpinning of pathogenicity in Foc, the genomes and transcriptomes of two Foc isolates were sequenced. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome analysis revealed that the genome structures of race 1 and race 4 isolates were highly syntenic with those of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici strain Fol4287. A large number of putative virulence associated genes were identified in both Foc genomes, including genes putatively involved in root attachment, cell degradation, detoxification of toxin, transport, secondary metabolites biosynthesis and signal transductions. Importantly, relative to the Foc race 1 isolate (Foc1), the Foc race 4 isolate (Foc4) has evolved with some expanded gene families of transporters and transcription factors for transport of toxins and nutrients that may facilitate its ability to adapt to host environments and contribute to pathogenicity to banana. Transcriptome analysis disclosed a significant difference in transcriptional responses between Foc1 and Foc4 at 48 h post inoculation to the banana ‘Brazil’ in comparison with the vegetative growth stage. Of particular note, more virulence-associated genes were up regulated in Foc4 than in Foc1. Several signaling pathways like the mitogen-activated protein kinase Fmk1 mediated invasion growth pathway, the FGA1-mediated G protein signaling pathway and a pathogenicity associated two-component system were activated in Foc4 rather than in Foc1. Together, these differences in gene content and transcription response between Foc1 and Foc4 might account for variation in their virulence during infection of the banana variety ‘Brazil’. Conclusions/Significance Foc genome sequences will facilitate us to identify pathogenicity mechanism involved in the banana vascular wilt disease development. These will thus advance us develop effective methods for managing the banana vascular wilt disease, including improvement of disease resistance in banana. PMID:24743270

Zeng, Huicai; Fan, Dingding; Zhu, Yabin; Feng, Yue; Wang, Guofen; Peng, Chunfang; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhou, Dajie; Ni, Peixiang; Liang, Changcong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Mao, Chao

2014-01-01

10

Modified Primers for the Identification of Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Isolates That Have Biological Control Potential against Fusarium Wilt of Cucumber in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Previous investigations demonstrated that Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), which is not pathogenic to cucumbers, could serve as a biological control agent for managing Fusarium wilt of cucumber caused by Fo f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc) in Taiwan. However, thus far it has not been possible to separate the populations of pathogenic Fo from the nonpathogenic isolates that have biological control potential through their morphological characteristics. Although these two populations can be distinguished from one another using a bioassay, the work is laborious and time-consuming. In this study, a fragment of the intergenic spacer (IGS) region of ribosomal DNA from an Fo biological control agent, Fo366, was PCR-amplified with published general primers, FIGS11/FIGS12 and sequenced. A new primer, NPIGS-R, which was designed based on the IGS sequence, was paired with the FIGS11 primer. These primers were then evaluated for their specificity to amplify DNA from nonpathogenic Fo isolates that have biological control potential. The results showed that the modified primer pair, FIGS11/NPIGS-R, amplified a 500-bp DNA fragment from five of seven nonpathogenic Fo isolates. These five Fo isolates delayed symptom development of cucumber Fusarium wilt in greenhouse bioassay tests. Seventy-seven Fo isolates were obtained from the soil and plant tissues and then subjected to amplification using the modified primer pair; six samples showed positive amplification. These six isolates did not cause symptoms on cucumber seedlings when grown in peat moss infested with the isolates and delayed disease development when the same plants were subsequently inoculated with a virulent isolate of Foc. Therefore, the modified primer pair may prove useful for the identification of Fo isolates that are nonpathogenic to cucumber which can potentially act as biocontrol agents for Fusarium wilt of cucumber. PMID:23762289

Wang, Chaojen; Lin, Yisheng; Lin, Yinghong; Chung, Wenhsin

2013-01-01

11

Characterization of the formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum causing wilts of cucurbits by DNA fingerprinting with nuclear repetitive DNA sequences.  

PubMed Central

The genetic relatedness of five formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum causing wilts of cucurbit plants was determined by DNA fingerprinting with the moderately repetitive DNA sequences FOLR1 to FOLR4. The four FOLR clones were chosen from a genomic library made from F. oxysporum f. sp. lagenariae 03-05118. Total DNAs from 50 strains representing five cucurbit-infecting formae speciales, cucumerinum, melonis, lagenariae, niveum, and momordicae, and 6 strains of formae speciales pathogenic to other plants were digested with EcoRV and hybridized with 32P-labeled FOLR probes. The strains were clearly distinguishable at the formae specialis level on the basis of FOLR DNA fingerprints. Fifty-two fingerprint types were detected among the 56 strains by using all FOLR probes. These probes were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among the DNA fingerprint types by the unweighted pair group method using averages and parsimony analysis. The fingerprint types detected in each of the formae speciales cucumerinum, lagenariae, niveum, and momordicae were grouped into a single cluster. However, two different genetic groups occurred in the formae specialis melonis. The two groups also differed in pathogenicity: one group caused wilts of muskmelon and oriental melon, while the second was pathogenic only to muskmelon. The fingerprint types of different formae speciales pathogenic to plants other than cucurbits were distinguishable from one another and from the fingerprints of the cucurbit-infecting strains. These results suggest that the cucurbit-infecting formae speciales are intraspecific variants distinguishable at the DNA level and in their host range. Images PMID:8085813

Namiki, F; Shiomi, T; Kayamura, T; Tsuge, T

1994-01-01

12

Fusarium Wilt of Orchids  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium wilt of orchids is highly destructive and economically limiting to the production of quality orchids that has steadily increased in many production facilities. Important crops such as phalaenopsis, cattleyas, and oncidiums appear to be especially susceptible to certain Fusarium species. Fu...

13

Cross Pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae on Sugar Beet and Common Bean  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium wilt, also known as Fusarium yellows, is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Fusarium oxysporum is a vascular pathogen with a broad host range including common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) with formae speciales (f. sp.) defined by the ability to cause ...

14

Gene Genealogies and AFLP Analyses in the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Identify Monophyletic and Nonmonophyletic Formae Speciales Causing Wilt and Rot Disease.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The monophyletic origin of host-specific taxa in the plant-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum complex was tested by constructing nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based phylogenies for 89 strains representing the known genetic and pathogenic diversity in 8 formae speciales associated with wilt diseases and root and bulb rot. We included strains from clonal lineages of F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, lilii, lini, opuntiarum, spinaciae, and tulipae. Putatively nonpathogenic strains from carnation and lily were included and a reference strain from each of the three main clades identified previously in the F. oxysporum complex; sequences from related species were used as outgroups. DNA sequences from the nuclear translation elongation factor 1alpha and the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) ribosomal RNA genes were combined for phylogenetic analysis. Strains in vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) shared identical sequences and AFLP profiles, supporting the monophyly of the two single-VCG formae speciales, lilii and tulipae. Identical genotypes were also found for the three VCGs in F. oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae. In contrast, multiple evolutionary origins were apparent for F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, lini, and opuntiarum, although different VCGs within each of these formae speciales often clustered close together or shared identical EF-1alpha and mtSSU rDNA haplotypes. Kishino-Hasegawa analyses of constraints forcing the monophyly of these formae speciales supported the exclusive origin of F. oxysporum f. sp. opuntiarum but not the monophyly of F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, and lini. Most of the putatively nonpathogenic strains from carnation and lily, representing unique VCGs, were unrelated to F. oxysporum f. spp. dianthi and lilii, respectively. Putatively nonpathogenic or rot-inducing strains did not form exclusive groups within the molecular phylogeny. Parsimony analyses of AFLP fingerprint data supported the gene genealogy-based phylogram; however, AFLP-based phylogenies were considerably more homoplasious than the gene genealogies. The predictive value of the forma specialis naming system within the F. oxysporum complex is questioned. PMID:18944511

Baayen, R P; O'Donnell, K; Bonants, P J; Cigelnik, E; Kroon, L P; Roebroeck, E J; Waalwijk, C

2000-08-01

15

Proteomic analysis of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4-inoculated response to Fusarium wilts in the banana root cells  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium wilt of banana is one of the most destructive diseases in the world. This disease has caused heavy losses in major banana production areas. Except for molecular breeding methods based on plant defense mechanisms, effective methods to control the disease are still lacking. Dynamic changes in defense mechanisms between susceptible, moderately resistant, and highly resistant banana and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc4) at the protein level remain unknown. This research reports the proteomic profile of three banana cultivars in response to Foc4 and transcriptional levels correlated with their sequences for the design of disease control strategies by molecular breeding. Results Thirty-eight differentially expressed proteins were identified to function in cell metabolism. Most of these proteins were positively regulated after Foc4 inoculation. These differentially regulated proteins were found to have important functions in banana defense response. Functional categories implicated that these proteins were associated with pathogenesis-related (PR) response; isoflavonoid, flavonoid, and anthocyanin syntheses; cell wall strengthening; cell polarization; reactive oxygen species production and scavenging; jasmonic acid-, abscisic acid-, and auxin-mediated signaling conduction; molecular chaperones; energy; and primary metabolism. By comparing the protein profiles of resistant and susceptible banana cultivars, many proteins showed obvious distinction in their defense mechanism functions. PR proteins in susceptible ‘Brazil’ were mainly involved in defense. The proteins related to PR response, cell wall strengthening and antifungal compound synthesis in moderately resistant ‘Nongke No.1’ were mainly involved in defense. The proteins related to PR response, cell wall strengthening, and antifungal compound synthesis in highly resistant ‘Yueyoukang I’ were mainly involved in defense. 12 differentially regulated genes were selected to validate through quantitative real time PCR method. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of these selected genes corroborate with their respective protein abundance after pathogen infection. Conclusions This report is the first to use proteomic profiling to study the molecular mechanism of banana roots infected with Foc4. The differentially regulated proteins involved in different defense pathways are likely associated with different resistant levels of the three banana cultivars. PMID:24070062

2013-01-01

16

Integrated management strategies for tomato Fusarium wilt.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt is caused by the fungal pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum or Fusarium solani. It is a devastating disease that affects many important food and vegetable crops and a major source of loss to farmers worldwide. Initial strategies developed to combat this devastating plant disease include the use of cultural, physical and chemical control. None of these strategies have been able to give the best results of completely ameliorating the situation except for the cultural method which is mainly preventive. A good knowledge of the nature, behaviour and environmental conditions of growth of the disease agent is very important to controlling the disease development in that case. Biological control has been shown to be an environmentally friendly alternative. It makes use of rhizospheric and endophytic microorganisms that can survive and compete favourably well with the Fusarium wilt pathogen. They include plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. For PGPR to control or inhibit the growth of the Fusarium wilt pathogen, they make use of mechanisms such as indole acetic acid production, siderophore production, phosphate solublilization, systemic resistance induction and antifungal volatile production among others. PMID:24077535

Ajilogba, Caroline F; Babalola, Olubukola O

2013-01-01

17

Characterization of antagonistic and pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum isolates by random amplification of polymorphic DNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium oxysporum is one of the most widespread and predominant species in natural and cultivated soils among the fungal genus Fusarium. It includes saprophytes as well as plant pathogens involved in serious vascular wilts, caused by severalformae speciales and races or pathotypes (1). Morphological similarities among pathogenic and saprophytic strains of F. oxysporum hamper diagnosis and clear discrimination among formae

Q. Migheli; L. Cavallarin

1994-01-01

18

Compost induces protection against Fusarium oxysporum in sweet basil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) plants suffer frequently from wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. basilici (FOB). No efficient fungicide is currently available to control the disease. Sweet basil transplants were grown in either sphagnum peat (Europlant, Germany) or in compost, made by mixing the coarse fraction of cattle manure, chicken manure and wheat straw. The C\\/N ratio of

Reuven Reuveni; Michael Raviv; Arkady Krasnovsky; Lilya Freiman; Shlomit Medina; Anat Bar; Daniel Orion

2002-01-01

19

Disseminated Fusarium oxysporum neurospinal infection  

PubMed Central

We report a case of disseminated meningospondylodiscitis in an elderly diabetic patient caused by Fusarium oxysporum. As the clinical presentation was nonspecific, the diagnosis of the condition could only be arrived at after laboratory and imaging studies. The diagnosis of the condition requires a high index of suspicion. Patient underwent thorough surgical debridement along with a short course of variconazole and remained asymptomatic after 36 months of diagnosis. Fusarium is a large genus of filamentous fungi widely distributed in soil and in association with plants. It is known to cause local infections (nail, cornea) in healthy humans and disseminated infection only in the immunocompromised. PMID:24741147

Sreedharan Namboothiri, PE; Nair, Sreehari Narayanan; Vijayan, Krishnan; Visweswaran, VK

2014-01-01

20

Pathogenic variability in Ethiopian isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris and reaction of chickpea improved varieties to the isolates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-four isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris were isolated from wilted chickpea plants obtained from different districts and ‘wilt sickplots’ of central Ethiopia to assess variability in pathogenecity of the populations. Each isolate was tested on 10 different chickpea lines and eight improved chickpea varieties. Isolates showed highly significant variation in wilt severity on the differential lines and improved

Meki Shehabu; Seid Ahmed; Parshotam K. Sakhuja

2008-01-01

21

Control of Fusarium wilt in banana with Chinese leek  

PubMed Central

The inhibitory effects of Chinese leek(Allium tuberosum) on Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) and on Fusarium wilt incidence were studied in order to identify a potential efficient way to control the disease. Adopting the rotation system of Chinese leek-banana reduced the Fusarium wilt incidence and disease severity index by 88 %-97 % and 91 %-96 %, respectively, improved the crop value by 36 %-86 %, in an area heavily infested by Foc between 2007 and 2009. As a result of inoculation in the greenhouse, Chinese leek treatment reduced disease incidence and the disease severity index by 58 % and 62 %, respectively in the variety Baxi (AAA) and by 79 % and 81 %, respectively in the variety Guangfen NO.1 (ABB). Crude extracts of Chinese leek completely inhibited the growth of Foc race 4 on Petri dishes, suppressed the proliferation of the spores by 91 % and caused 87 % spore mortality. The findings of this study suggest that Chinese leek has the potential to inhibit Foc growth and Fusarium wilt incidence. This potential may be developed into an environmentally friendly treatment to control Fusarium wilt of banana. PMID:23144534

Huang, Y.H.; Wang, R.C.; Li, C. H.; Zuo, C.W.; Wei, Y. R.; Zhang, L.; Yi, G.J.

2012-01-01

22

Allelopathic effects of root exudates from watermelon and rice plants on Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. niveum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Root exudates have a key role in communication between plants and microbes in the rhizosphere. Fusarium wilt of watermelon,\\u000a caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fusarium oxysporum), drastically reduces watermelon yields in continuous cultivation systems, but it can be significantly alleviated using watermelon\\/aerobic\\u000a rice intercropping system as shown by the research carried out in this laboratory. It is important

Wen-ya Hao; Li-xuan Ren; Wei Ran; Qi-rong Shen

2010-01-01

23

Suppression of fusarium wilt of radish by co-inoculation of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and root-colonizing fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an earlier study, treatment of radish seed with the bacteriumPseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 suppressed fusarium wilt of radish (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp.raphani) in a commercial greenhouse [Leemanet al., 1991b, 1995a]. In this greenhouse, the areas with fusarium wilt were localized or expanded very slowly, possibly due to disease suppressiveness of the soil. To study this phenomenon, fungi were isolated from

M. Leeman; F. M. Den Ouden; J. A. Van Pelt; C. Cornelissen; A. Matamala-Garros; P. A. H. M. Bakker; B. Schippers

1996-01-01

24

A polyketide synthase gene and an aspartate kinase like gene are required for the biosynthesis of fusaric acid in Fusarium Oxysporum f. sp. Vasinfectum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A genetically unique strain of the Fusarium wilt pathogen was first recognized in wilted and dead Upland cotton seedlings in Australia in 1993. Since that time the disease spread rapidly despite stringent containment practices. The Australian biotype isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfec...

25

Identification of resistance to fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum Race 2 in citrullus lanatus var. citroides plant introductions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium wilt is a major disease of watermelon in North America and around the world. Control of this disease is difficult, because the soil-borne causal agent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), produces resilient spores that remain infectious for many years. Although various levels of resist...

26

Interaction of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Meloidogyne javanica on Cicer arietinum  

PubMed Central

Interaction of Meloidogyne javanica and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri was studied on Fusarium wilt-susceptible (JG 62 and K 850) and resistant (JG 74 and Avrodhi) chickpea cultivars. In greenhouse experiments, inoculation of M. javanica juveniles prior to F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceri caused greater wilt incidence in susceptible cultivars and induced vascular discoloration in roots of resistant cultivars. Nematode reproduction was greatest (P = 0.05) at 25 °C. Number of galls and percentage of root area galled increased when the temperature was increased from 15 °C to 25 °C. Wilt incidence was greater at 20 °C than at 25 °C. Chlorosis of leaves and vascular discoloration of plants did not occur at 15 °C. The nematode enhanced the wilt incidence in wilt-susceptible cultivars only at 25 °C. Interaction between the two pathogens on shoot and root weights was significant only at 20 °C, and F. o. ciceri suppressed the nematode density at this temperature. Wilt incidence was greater in clayey (48% clay) than in loamy sand (85% sand) soils. The nematode caused greater plant damage on loamy sand than on clayey soil. Fusarium wilt resistance in Avrodhi and JG 74 was stable in the presence of M. javanica across temperatures and soil types. PMID:19274140

Maheswari, T. Uma; Sharma, S. B.; Reddy, D. D. R.; Haware, M. P.

1997-01-01

27

Interaction of Population Levels of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and Meloidogyne incognita on Cotton  

PubMed Central

In autoclaved greenhouse soil without Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Meloidogyne incognita did not cause leaf or vascular discoloration of 59-day-old cotton plants. Plants had root galls with as few as 50 Meloidogyne larvae per plant. Root galling was directly proportional to the initial nematode population level. Fusarium wilt symptoms occurred without nematodes with 77,000 fungus propagules or more per gram of soil. As few as 50 Meloidogyne larvae accompanying 650 fungus propagules caused Fusarium wilt. With few exceptions, leaf symptoms appeared sooner as numbers of either or both organisms increased. In soils infested with both organisms, the extent of fungal invasion and colonization was well correlated with the extent of nematode galling and other indications of the Fusarium wilt syndrome. PMID:19305546

Garber, R. H.; Jorgenson, E. C.; Smith, S.; Hyer, A. H.

1979-01-01

28

Evolutionary Relationships among the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Vegetative Compatibility Groups?  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, the causal agent of fusarium wilt of banana (Musa spp.), is one of the most destructive strains of the vascular wilt fungus F. oxysporum. Genetic relatedness among and within vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense was studied by sequencing two nuclear and two mitochondrial DNA regions in a collection of 70 F. oxysporum isolates that include representatives of 20 VCGs of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense, other formae speciales, and nonpathogens. To determine the ability of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense to sexually recombine, crosses were made between isolates of opposite mating types. Phylogenetic analysis separated the F. oxysporum isolates into two clades and eight lineages. Phylogenetic relationships between F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense and other formae speciales of F. oxysporum and the relationships among VCGs and races of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense clearly showed that F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense's ability to cause disease on banana has emerged multiple times, independently, and that the ability to cause disease to a specific banana cultivar is also a polyphyletic trait. These analyses further suggest that both coevolution with the host and horizontal gene transfer may have played important roles in the evolutionary history of the pathogen. All examined isolates harbored one of the two mating-type idiomorphs, but never both, which suggests a heterothallic mating system should sexual reproduction occur. Although, no sexual structures were observed, some lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense harbored MAT-1 and MAT-2 isolates, suggesting a potential that these lineages have a sexual origin that might be more recent than initially anticipated. PMID:19482953

Fourie, Gerda; Steenkamp, E. T.; Gordon, T. R.; Viljoen, A.

2009-01-01

29

Induction of systemic resistance by Pseudomonas fluorescens in radish cultivars differing in susceptibility to fusarium wilt, using a novel bioassay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pseudomonas fluorescens-mediated induction of systemic resistance in radish against fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp.raphani) was studied in a newly developed bioassay using a rockwool system. In this bioassay the pathogen and bacterium were confirmed to be confined to spatially separate locations on the plant root, throughout the experiment. Pathogen inoculum obtained by mixing peat with microconidia and subsequent incubation

M. Leeman; J. A. van Pelt; F. M. den Ouden; M. Heinsbroek; P. A. H. M. Bakker; B. Schippers

1995-01-01

30

Development and utility of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the Fom-2 fusarium wilt resistance gene in melon (Cucumis melo L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f. sp. melonis Snyder & Hans, is a worldwide soil-borne disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Resistance to races 0 and 1 of Fusarium wilt is conditioned by the dominant gene Fom-2. To facilitate marker-assisted backcrossing with selection for Fusarium wilt resistance, we developed cleaved amplified polymorphic\\u000a sequences (CAPS) and restriction fragment length

X. Y. Zheng; D. W. Wolff; S. Baudracco-Arnas; M. Pitrat

1999-01-01

31

The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum  

PubMed Central

The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on revealing the biological nature of the suppression against Fusarium wilt disease, which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and describing the factors that may influence the fungal pathogen in the MPM system. We demonstrated that the rhizosphere microbiota that developed in the MPM system could suppress Fusarium wilt disease under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. The microbiological characteristics of the MPM system were able to control the population dynamics of F. oxysporum, but did not eradicate the fungal pathogen. The roles of the microbiological agents underlying the disease suppression and the magnitude of the disease suppression in the MPM system appear to depend on the microbial density. F. oxysporum that survived in the MPM system formed chlamydospores when exposed to the rhizosphere microbiota. These results suggest that the microbiota suppresses proliferation of F. oxysporum by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum. PMID:24311557

Fujiwara, Kazuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwai, Takashi; Aoyama, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryuya; Ando, Akinori; Ogawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Jun; Terami, Fumihiro; Takano, Masao; Shinohara, Makoto

2013-01-01

32

Water balance altered in cucumber plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum  

PubMed Central

Fusarium wilt is caused by the infection and growth of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the xylem of host plants. The physiological responses of cucumbers that are infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC) was studied in pot and hydroponic experiments in a greenhouse. The results showed that although water absorption and stem hydraulic conductance decreased markedly in infected plants, large amounts of red ink accumulated in the leaves of infected cucumber plants. The transpiration rate (E) and stomatal conductance (gs) of the infected plants were significantly reduced, but the E/gs was higher than healthy plants. We further found that there was a positive correlation between leaf membrane injury and E/gs, indicating that the leaf cell membrane injury increased the non-stomatal water loss from infected plants. The fusaric acid (FA), which was detected in the infected plant, resulted in damage to the leaf cell membranes and an increase in E/gs, suggesting that FA plays an important role in non-stomatal water loss. In conclusion, leaf cell membrane injury in the soil-borne Fusarium wilt of cucumber plants induced uncontrolled water loss from damaged cells. FA plays a critical role in accelerating the development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. PMID:25579504

Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Sun, Guomei; Liu, Xiaokang; Zhai, Luchong; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

2015-01-01

33

Water balance altered in cucumber plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt is caused by the infection and growth of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the xylem of host plants. The physiological responses of cucumbers that are infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC) was studied in pot and hydroponic experiments in a greenhouse. The results showed that although water absorption and stem hydraulic conductance decreased markedly in infected plants, large amounts of red ink accumulated in the leaves of infected cucumber plants. The transpiration rate (E) and stomatal conductance (gs) of the infected plants were significantly reduced, but the E/gs was higher than healthy plants. We further found that there was a positive correlation between leaf membrane injury and E/gs, indicating that the leaf cell membrane injury increased the non-stomatal water loss from infected plants. The fusaric acid (FA), which was detected in the infected plant, resulted in damage to the leaf cell membranes and an increase in E/gs, suggesting that FA plays an important role in non-stomatal water loss. In conclusion, leaf cell membrane injury in the soil-borne Fusarium wilt of cucumber plants induced uncontrolled water loss from damaged cells. FA plays a critical role in accelerating the development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. PMID:25579504

Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Sun, Guomei; Liu, Xiaokang; Zhai, Luchong; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

2015-01-01

34

The development and application of a plant bioassay to elucidate toxic principles directed at watermelon by Fusarium Oxysporum f. sp. niveum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum cause wilt and death of numerous agronomic crops worldwide. The objective of this research was to develop a bioassay for Fusarium toxins directed toward watermelon. Watermelon seedlings were grown to the two leaf stage; the roots were washed and trimmed. Two...

35

Potential impact of a new highly virulent race of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum in watermelon in the U.S.A.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium wilt of watermelon was first reported in the United States in 1894. Although there exists variation in virulence within the pathogen population, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum, differentiation of isolates into races did not occur for 70 years. Currently, three races (0, 1, and 2) of F. ...

36

Toxic substances produced by Fusarium . VII. Control of fusarial wilt of safflower by root exudates and extractives of Ruellia tuberosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Exudates and extractives of roots ofRuellia tuberosa, containing 2,6-dimethoxyquinone, acacetin and a C16-quinone, have been shown to produce significant protective and curative actions againstFusarium oxysporum-incited wilt of safflower. The potentiality of the root extractives as a foliar fungicide is appraised.

S. Ghosal; S. Banerjee; B. K. Chattopadhyay; R. S. Srivastava; D. K. Chakrabarti

1978-01-01

37

Fusarium wilt of pigeon pea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Manganese amendment to the soil was found to reduce pigeon pea wilt to a considerable extent. In plants grown in inoculated\\u000a soil with 80 p.p.m. Mn, the pathogen colonized only in the roots. At 100 and 200 p.p.m., there was complete exclusion of the\\u000a fungus. Foliar sprays and pre-soaking of seeds gave even more encouraging results. Tracheal fluids collected from

S. Subramanian

1963-01-01

38

Identification and evaluation of two diagnostic markers linked to Fusarium wilt resistance (race 4) in banana ( Musa spp.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium wilt caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC4) results in vascular tissue damage and ultimately death of banana (Musa spp.) plants. Somaclonal variants of in vitro micropropagated banana can hamper success in propagation of genotypes resistant\\u000a to FOC4. Early identification of FOC4 resistance in micropropagated banana plantlets is difficult, however. In this study,\\u000a we

Wei Wang; Yulin Hu; Dequan Sun; Christian Staehelin; Dawei Xin; Jianghui Xie

39

Onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum probably acquired in utero  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum has been described as a pathogen causing onychomycosis, its incidence has been increasing in immunocompetent and disseminated infection can occur in immunosuppressed individuals. We describe the first case of congenital onychomycosis in a child caused by Fusarium oxysporum. The infection being acquired in utero was proven by molecular methods with the identification of the fungus both in the nail and placenta, most probably as an ascending contamination/infection in a HIV-positive, immunosuppressed mother. PMID:25383318

Carvalho, Vania O.; Vicente, Vania A.; Werner, Betina; Gomes, Renata R.; Fornari, Gheniffer; Herkert, Patricia F.; Rodrigues, Cristina O.; Abagge, Kerstin T.; Robl, Renata; Camiña, Ricardo H

2014-01-01

40

Formation of acetic acid from cellulosic substrates by Fusarium oxysporum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four strains of Fusarium oxysporum and a strain of Monilia brunnae were screened for their ability to convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol\\/acetic acid. These strains were found to utilize cellulose and produce extracellular cellulases. However, only F. oxysporum 841 was found to convert glucose, xylose, and cellulose into ethanol and acetic acid as major end-products under microaerobic conditions. Acetic acid

P. K. R. Kumar; Ajay Singh; K. Schiigerl

1991-01-01

41

Expression of rice thaumatin-like protein gene in transgenic banana plants enhances resistance to fusarium wilt.  

PubMed

The possibility of controlling Fusarium wilt--caused by Fusarium oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4)--was investigated by genetic engineering of banana plants for constitutive expression of rice thaumatin-like protein (tlp) gene. Transgene was introduced to cauliflower-like bodies' cluster, induced from meristemic parts of male inflorescences, using particle bombardment with plasmid carrying a rice tlp gene driving by the CaMV 35S promoter. Hygromycin B was used as the selection reagent. The presence and integration of rice tlp gene in genomic DNA confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. RT-PCR revealed the expression of transgene in leaf and root tissues in transformants. Bioassay of transgenic banana plants challenged with Fusarium wilt pathogen showed that expression of TLP enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4) compared to control plants. PMID:22183565

Mahdavi, F; Sariah, M; Maziah, M

2012-02-01

42

Bacillus thuringiensis strain 199 can induce systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium wilt  

PubMed Central

The research work was performed to investigate the potential of Bacillus thuringiensis strain 199 to induce systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium wilt. Roots of two-week-old seedlings of tomato plants were primed with bacterial strain. After 10 days of transplantation, some pots of tomato seedlings were provided with inoculum of Fusarium oxysporum lycopersici according to experimental design to induce disease. After 15 days of incubation period, plants challenged with F. oxysporum lycopersici alone were having obvious symptoms of Fusarium wilt. Plants that were treated with B. thuringiensis 199 + F. oxysporum lycopersici were having significant reduction of disease severity. Quantity of total phenolics increased 1.7-fold in bacterial-treated plants as compared to nontreated. Likewise, in case of defense-related enzymes, a significant increase of 1.3-, 1.8-, and 1.4-fold in polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenyl ammonia lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (PO) was observed in comparison with untreated control. These results, hence, prove the potential of this bacterial strain for use as plant protection agent. PMID:24294498

Mahboob, Asrar; Javed, Asmat Ali

2013-01-01

43

Bacillus thuringiensis strain 199 can induce systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium wilt.  

PubMed

The research work was performed to investigate the potential of Bacillus thuringiensis strain 199 to induce systemic resistance in tomato against Fusarium wilt. Roots of two-week-old seedlings of tomato plants were primed with bacterial strain. After 10 days of transplantation, some pots of tomato seedlings were provided with inoculum of Fusarium oxysporum lycopersici according to experimental design to induce disease. After 15 days of incubation period, plants challenged with F. oxysporum lycopersici alone were having obvious symptoms of Fusarium wilt. Plants that were treated with B. thuringiensis 199 + F. oxysporum lycopersici were having significant reduction of disease severity. Quantity of total phenolics increased 1.7-fold in bacterial-treated plants as compared to nontreated. Likewise, in case of defense-related enzymes, a significant increase of 1.3-, 1.8-, and 1.4-fold in polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenyl ammonia lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (PO) was observed in comparison with untreated control. These results, hence, prove the potential of this bacterial strain for use as plant protection agent. PMID:24294498

Akram, Waheed; Mahboob, Asrar; Javed, Asmat Ali

2013-12-01

44

Effect of silicates and electrical conductivity on Fusarium wilt of hydroponically grown lettuce.  

PubMed

Silicon can stimulate natural defense mechanisms in plants, reducing foliar diseases like powdery arid downy mildew on several crops, including lettuce. The effect of silicate on Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae was evaluated under greenhouse conditions on lettuce grown in soilless systems. Silicon, as potassium silicate, was added at 100 mg L(-1) of nutrient solution at three levels of electrical conductivity; 1.5-1.6 mS cm(-1) (E.C.1), 3.0-3.2 mS cm(-1) (E.C.2) and 4-4.2 mS cm(-1) (E.C.3). Pots containing lettuce plants were first inoculated with F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae (3x10(5) chlamidospores ml(-1)) 15-20 days before transplanting. Disease severity and physiological parameters, including chlorophyll content, were analyzed weekly after transplanting. The addition of potassium silicate slightly reduced Fusarium wilt, at all levels of electrical conductivity under study, compared to the control. On the contrary, the increase of electrical conductivity of the nutrient solution showed no effect on the disease. The use of silicon was previously demonstrated to significantly reduce downy mildew on lettuce in soilless systems, and in this trial it demonstrated to slightly reduce disease severity of an important soil-borne pathogen like F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae, suggesting the possibility to apply it successfully in soilless crops. PMID:25151830

Chitarra, W; Pugliese, M; Gilardi, G; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

2013-01-01

45

[Effects of nitrogen application rate on faba bean fusarium wilt and rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity].  

PubMed

A field plot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen (N) application rates on the microbial functional diversity in faba bean rhizosphere and the relationships between the microbial functional diversity and the occurrence of faba bean fusarium wilt. Four nitrogen application rates were installed, i. e. , N0(0 kg hm-2 , N1 (56. 25 kg hm-2) , N2(112. 5 kg hm-2), and N3 (168.75 kg hm-2), and Biolog microbial analysis system was applied to study the damage of faba bean fusarium wilt and the rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity. Applying N (N1 N2, and N3) decreased the disease index of faba bean fusarium wilt and the quantity of Fusarium oxysporum significantly, and increased the quantities of bacteria and actinomyces and the ratios of bacteria/fungi and actinomyces/fungi significantly, with the peak values of bacteria and actinomyces, bacteria/fungi, and actinomyces/fungi, and the lowest disease index and F. oxysporum density in N2. As compared with N0, applying N increased the AWCD value significantly, but the effects of different N application rates on the ability of rhizospheric microbes in utilizing six types of carbon sources had definite differences. Under the application of N, the utilization rates of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids by the rhizospheric microbes were higher. Principal component analysis demonstrated that applying N changed the rhizospheric microbial community composition obviously, and the carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids were the sensitive carbon sources differentiating the changes of the microbial community induced by N application. Applying N inhibited the utilization of carbohydrates and carboxylic acids but improved the utilization of amino acids and phenolic acids by the rhizospheric microbes, which could be one of the main reasons of applying N being able to reduce the harm of faba bean fusarium wilt. It was suggested that rationally applying N could increase the quantities of rhizospheric bacteria and actinomyces, alter the microbial metabolic function, and decrease F. oxysporum density, being an effective measure to control the occurrence of faba bean fusarium wilt. PMID:23898671

Dong, Yan; Yang, Zhi-xian; Dong, Kun; Tang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Hu, Guo-bin

2013-04-01

46

Chemical constituents from endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

A new oxysporidinone analogue (1) and a new 3-hydroxyl-2-piperidinone derivative (2), along with the known compounds (-)-4,6'-anhydrooxysporidinone (3), (+)-fusarinolic acid (4), gibepyrone D (5), beauvercin (6),cerevisterol (7), fusaruside (8), and (2S,2'R,3R,3'E,4E,8E)-1-O-D-glucopyranosyl-2-N-(2'-hydroxy-3'-octadecenoyl)-3-hydroxy-9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine (9) were isolated from Fusarium oxysporum. Compounds 1-9 were evaluated for cytotoxicity using the MTT method against cancer cell lines, PC-3, PANC-1, and A549. Beauvericin showed cytotoxicity against PC-3, PANC-1, and A549 with IC(50) value of 49.5 ± 3.8, 47.2 ± 2.9, and 10.4 ± 1.6?M, respectively. Beauvericin also exhibited anti-bacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=3.125 ?g/mL) and Bacillus subtilis (MIC=3.125 ?g/mL). PMID:21497643

Wang, Quan-Xin; Li, Sai-Fei; Zhao, Feng; Dai, Huan-Qin; Bao, Li; Ding, Rong; Gao, Hao; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wen, Hua-An; Liu, Hong-Wei

2011-07-01

47

Biocontrol of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato by Paenibacillus ehimensis KWN38.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to investigate biocontrol potential of Paenibacillus ehimensis KWN38 against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici causing Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Our result showed that P. ehimensis KWN38 produced extracellular organic compounds and crude enzyme to inhibit F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici conidial germination in in vitro assays. Tomato seedlings were treated with water (W), grass medium (G), G with P. ehimensis KWN38 inoculation (GP) and G along with synthetic fungicide (GSf). Disease symptoms were was first observed in G and W at 12 days after infection (DAI) while symptoms were noticeable in the GP and GSf treatments at 20 and 24 DAI, respectively. Tomato plants treated with P. ehimensis KWN38 or fungicide significantly reduced Fusarium wilt disease incidence and severity as compared to control tomato plants treated with water and grass medium. The similar results were also found in the root mortality of tomato plants. At 25 DAI, most plants in control treatments (W and G) wilted and the brown vascular systems of infected plants was clearly differentiable from normal green vascular system of healthy plants from GP and GSf. Plants in the GP showed higher fresh and dry weights of both root and shoots than those in W and G treatments. Leaf peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities of tomato plants in G and W were higher than those in GP and GSf. Root enzyme activities showed a similar pattern but the values were higher than leaf enzyme. The results clearly demonstrated that P. ehimensis KWN38 may be considered as biocontrol agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. PMID:25384610

Naing, Kyaw Wai; Nguyen, Xuan Hoa; Anees, Muhammad; Lee, Yong Seong; Kim, Yong Cheol; Kim, Sang Jun; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kil Yong

2015-01-01

48

Root defense analysis against Fusarium oxysporum reveals new regulators to confer resistance.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting fungal pathogen that causes wilt disease on a broad range of plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Investigation of the defense response against this pathogen had primarily been conducted using leaf tissue and little was known about the root defense response. In this study, we profiled the expression of root genes after infection with F. oxysporum by microarray analysis. In contrast to the leaf response, root tissue did not show a strong induction of defense-associated gene expression and instead showed a greater proportion of repressed genes. Screening insertion mutants from differentially expressed genes in the microarray uncovered a role for the transcription factor ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR72 (ERF72) in susceptibility to F. oxysporum. Due to the role of ERF72 in suppressing programmed cell death and detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS), we examined the pub22/pub23/pub24 U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligase triple mutant which is known to possess enhanced ROS production in response to pathogen challenge. We found that the pub22/23/24 mutant is more resistant to F. oxysporum infection, suggesting that a heightened innate immune response provides protection against F. oxysporum. We conclude that root-mediated defenses against soil-borne pathogens can be provided at multiple levels. PMID:24998294

Chen, Yi Chung; Wong, Chin Lin; Muzzi, Frederico; Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Kidd, Brendan N; Schenk, Peer M

2014-01-01

49

Host perception of jasmonates promotes infection by Fusarium oxysporum formae speciales that produce isoleucine- and leucine-conjugated jasmonates.  

PubMed

Three pathogenic forms, or formae speciales (f. spp.), of Fusarium oxysporum infect the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana below ground, instigating symptoms of wilt disease in leaves above ground. In previous reports, Arabidopsis mutants that are deficient in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid or salicylic acid or insensitive to ethylene or jasmonates exhibited either more or less wilt disease, than the wild-type, implicating the involvement of hormones in the normal host response to F.?oxysporum. Our analysis of hormone-related mutants finds no evidence that endogenous hormones contribute to infection in roots. Mutants that are deficient in abscisic acid and insensitive to ethylene show no less infection than the wild-type, although they exhibit less disease. Whether a mutant that is insensitive to jasmonates affects infection depends on which forma specialis (f. sp.) is infecting the roots. Insensitivity to jasmonates suppresses infection by F.?oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans and F.?oxysporum f. sp. matthioli, which produce isoleucine- and leucine-conjugated jasmonate (JA-Ile/Leu), respectively, in culture filtrates, whereas insensitivity to jasmonates has no effect on infection by F.?oxysporum f. sp. raphani, which produces no detectable JA-Ile/Leu. Furthermore, insensitivity to jasmonates has no effect on wilt disease of tomato, and the tomato pathogen F.?oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici produces no detectable jasmonates. Thus, some, but not all, F.?oxysporum pathogens appear to utilize jasmonates as effectors, promoting infection in roots and/or the development of symptoms in shoots. Only when the infection of roots is promoted by jasmonates is wilt disease enhanced in a mutant deficient in salicylic acid biosynthesis. PMID:24387225

Cole, Stephanie J; Yoon, Alexander J; Faull, Kym F; Diener, Andrew C

2014-08-01

50

Distinct colonization patterns and cDNA-AFLP transcriptome profiles in compatible and incompatible interactions between melon and different races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  \\u000a Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Snyd. & Hans. (FOM) causes Fusarium wilt, the most important infectious disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.). The four known races of this pathogen can be distinguished only by infection on appropriate cultivars. No molecular\\u000a tools are available that can discriminate among the races, and the molecular basis of compatibility and disease progression\\u000a are

Sara Sestili; Annalisa Polverari; Laura Luongo; Alberto Ferrarini; Michele Scotton; Jamshaid Hussain; Massimo Delledonne; Nadia Ficcadenti; Alessandra Belisario

2011-01-01

51

Auxin signaling and transport promote susceptibility to the root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting fungal pathogen that causes wilt disease on a broad range of plant species, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Currently, very little is known about the molecular or physiological processes that are activated in the host during infection and the roles these processes play in resistance and susceptibility to F. oxysporum. In this study, we analyzed global gene expression profiles of F. oxysporum-infected Arabidopsis plants. Genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis as well as jasmonate-dependent defense were coordinately induced by F. oxysporum. Similarly, tryptophan pathway genes, including those involved in both indole-glucosinolate and auxin biosynthesis, were upregulated in both the leaves and the roots of inoculated plants. Analysis of plants expressing the DR5:GUS construct suggested that root auxin homeostasis was altered during F. oxysporum infection. However, Arabidopsis mutants with altered auxin and tryptophan-derived metabolites such as indole-glucosinolates and camalexin did not show an altered resistance to this pathogen. In contrast, several auxin-signaling mutants were more resistant to F. oxysporum. Chemical or genetic alteration of polar auxin transport also conferred increased pathogen resistance. Our results suggest that, similarly to many other pathogenic and nonpathogenic or beneficial soil organisms, F. oxysporum requires components of auxin signaling and transport to colonize the plant more effectively. Potential mechanisms of auxin signaling and transport-mediated F. oxysporum susceptibility are discussed. PMID:21281113

Kidd, Brendan N; Kadoo, Narendra Y; Dombrecht, Bruno; Tekeoglu, Mücella; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Aitken, Elizabeth A B; Schenk, Peer M; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

2011-06-01

52

Soil treatments against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 4  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Few economically feasible disease management options are available for California cotton producers with fields infested with race 4 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. For treating soil to reduce inoculum levels, past studies indicate that solarization and fumigation with metam-sodium may be a...

53

Multilocus analysis using putative fungal effectors to describe a population of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugar Beet  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Fusarium yellows is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae and leads to significant reductions in root yield, sucrose percentage, juice purity, and storage for sugar beet producers. F. oxysporum f. sp. betae can be highly variable and many F. oxysporum isolated from...

54

Routine mapping of Fusarium wilt resistance in BC1 populations of Arabidopsis thaliana  

PubMed Central

Background Susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease varies among wild accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Six RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM (RFO) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling the resistance of accession Columbia-0 (Col-0) and susceptibility of Taynuilt-0 to Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis matthioli (FOM) are detected in a recombinant population derived from a single backcross of the F1 hybrid (BC1). In particular, the RFO1 QTL appears to interact with three other loci, RFO2, RFO4 and RFO6, and is attributed to the gene At1g79670. Results When resistance to FOM was mapped in a new BC1 population, in which the loss-of-function mutant of At1g79670 replaced wild type as the Col-0 parent, RFO1’s major effect and RFO1’s interaction with RFO2, RFO4 and RFO6 were absent, showing that At1g79670 alone accounts for the RFO1 QTL. Resistance of two QTLs, RFO3 and RFO5, was independent of RFO1 and was reproduced in the new BC1 population. In analysis of a third BC1 population, resistance to a second pathogen, F. oxysporum forma specialis conglutinans race 1 (FOC1), was mapped and the major effect locus RFO7 was identified. Conclusions Natural quantitative resistance to F. oxysporum is largely specific to the infecting forma specialis because different RFO loci were responsible for resistance to FOM and FOC1. The mapping of quantitative disease resistance traits in BC1 populations, generated from crosses between sequenced Arabidopsis accessions, can be a routine procedure when genome-wide genotyping is efficient, economical and accessible. PMID:24172069

2013-01-01

55

First report of Fusarium yellows of sugar beet caused by F. oxysporum in Michigan.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium yellows is an important disease in the western United States, and has recently been reported in the Red River Valley. The primary causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae. In 2005, beet samples were found in Michigan with symptoms typical of Fusarium yellows. Isolates of Fusarium o...

56

Mechanistic aspects of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by several Fusarium oxysporum strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extracellular production of metal nanoparticles by several strains of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum was carried out. It was found that aqueous silver ions when exposed to several Fusarium oxysporum strains are reduced in solution, thereby leading to the formation of silver hydrosol. The silver nanoparticles were in the range of 20–50 nm in dimensions. The reduction of the metal ions

Nelson Durán; Priscyla D Marcato; Oswaldo L Alves; Gabriel IH De Souza; Elisa Esposito

2005-01-01

57

Cloning and characterization of pl1 encoding an in planta-secreted pectate lyase of Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

A pectate lyase (PL1) from the tomato vascular wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici was previously characterized, and evidence was obtained for its production in planta. The gene encoding PL1 was isolated from a genomic library of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Pl1 encodes a 240 amino-acid polypeptide with one putative N-glycosylation site and a 15 amino-acid N-terminal signal peptide. PL1 showed 89%, 67%, 55% and 56% identity with the products of the Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi pelA, pelB, pelC and pelD genes, respectively. A single copy of the gene was detected in different formae speciales of F. oxysporum. The pl1 transcript was observed during growth on polygalacturonic acid sodium salt and tomato vascular tissue, but not on pectin or glucose. RT-PCR showed pl1 expression in roots and stems of tomato plants infected by F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. PMID:10022947

Huertas-González, M D; Ruiz-Roldán, M C; García Maceira, F I; Roncero, M I; Di Pietro, A

1999-02-01

58

Eugenol oil nanoemulsion: antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and phytotoxicity on cottonseeds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current research deals with the formulation and characterization of bio-based oil-in-water nanoemulsion. The formulated eugenol oil nanoemulsion was characterized by dynamic light scattering, stability test, transmission electron microscopy and thin layer chromatography. The nanoemulsion droplets were found to have a Z-average diameter of 80 nm and TEM study reveals the spherical shape of eugenol oil nanoemulsion (EON). The size of the nanoemulsion was found to be physically stable up to more than 1-month when it was kept at room temperature (25 °C). The TEM micrograph showed that the EON was spherical in shape and moderately mono or di-dispersed and was in the range of 50-110 nm. Three concentrations of the nanoformulation were used to evalute the anti-fusarium activity both in vitro and in vivo experiments. SDS-PAGE results of total protein from the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV) isolate before and after treatment with eugenol oil nanoemulsion indicate that the content of extra cellular soluble small molecular proteins decreased significantly in EON-treated fungus. Light micrographs of mycelia and spores treated with EON showed the disruption of the fungal structures. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) for Fusarium wilt incidence indicated highly significant ( p = 0.000) effects of concentration, genotype, and their interaction. The difference in wilt incidence between concentrations and control was not the same for each genotype, that is, the genotypes responded differently to concentrations. Effects of three EON concentration on germination percentage, and radicle length, were determined in the laboratory. One very interesting finding in the current study is that cotton genotypes was the most important factors in determining wilt incidence as it accounted for 93.18 % of the explained (model) variation. In vitro experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential phytotoxic effect of three EON concentrations. Concentration, genotype and concentration x genotype interaction were all highly significant sources of variation in seed germination; however, interaction was the first in importance as a source of variation followed by the concentration, while genotype was the least important source of variation. These results suggest the potential use of eugenol oil nanoemulsion for protecting seedcotton from Fusarium wilt infection.

Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

2015-02-01

59

Eugenol oil nanoemulsion: antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and phytotoxicity on cottonseeds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current research deals with the formulation and characterization of bio-based oil-in-water nanoemulsion. The formulated eugenol oil nanoemulsion was characterized by dynamic light scattering, stability test, transmission electron microscopy and thin layer chromatography. The nanoemulsion droplets were found to have a Z-average diameter of 80 nm and TEM study reveals the spherical shape of eugenol oil nanoemulsion (EON). The size of the nanoemulsion was found to be physically stable up to more than 1-month when it was kept at room temperature (25 °C). The TEM micrograph showed that the EON was spherical in shape and moderately mono or di-dispersed and was in the range of 50-110 nm. Three concentrations of the nanoformulation were used to evalute the anti-fusarium activity both in vitro and in vivo experiments. SDS-PAGE results of total protein from the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV) isolate before and after treatment with eugenol oil nanoemulsion indicate that the content of extra cellular soluble small molecular proteins decreased significantly in EON-treated fungus. Light micrographs of mycelia and spores treated with EON showed the disruption of the fungal structures. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) for Fusarium wilt incidence indicated highly significant (p = 0.000) effects of concentration, genotype, and their interaction. The difference in wilt incidence between concentrations and control was not the same for each genotype, that is, the genotypes responded differently to concentrations. Effects of three EON concentration on germination percentage, and radicle length, were determined in the laboratory. One very interesting finding in the current study is that cotton genotypes was the most important factors in determining wilt incidence as it accounted for 93.18 % of the explained (model) variation. In vitro experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential phytotoxic effect of three EON concentrations. Concentration, genotype and concentration x genotype interaction were all highly significant sources of variation in seed germination; however, interaction was the first in importance as a source of variation followed by the concentration, while genotype was the least important source of variation. These results suggest the potential use of eugenol oil nanoemulsion for protecting seedcotton from Fusarium wilt infection.

Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

2015-01-01

60

Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum Isolated from Paprika in Korea  

PubMed Central

In the present study we first report in Korea the identification and characterization of Fusarium oxysporum isolated from rotten stems and roots of paprika (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) at Masan, Kyungsangnamdo in 2006. The fungal species produced white aerial mycelia accompanying with dark violet pigment on PDA. The optimal temperature and pH for the growth of the species was 25? and pH 7, respectively. Microscopic observation of one of isolates of the species shows that its conidiophores are unbranched and monophialides, its microconidia have oval-ellipsoidal shape with no septate and are of 3.0~11 × 1.5~3.5 µm sizes, its macroconidia are of 15~20 × 2.0~3.5 µm sizes and have slightly curved or slender shape with 2~3 septate. The results of molecular analysis show that the ITS rDNA of F. oxysporum from paprika shares 100% sequence identity with that of known F. oxysporum isolates. The identified species proved it's pathogenicity by causing rotting symptom when it was inoculated on paprika fruits. The growth of F. oxysporum from paprika was suppressed on PDA by agrochemicals such as benomyl, tebuconazole and azoxystrobin. The identified species has the ability of producing extracelluar enzymes that degrade cellobiose and pectin. PMID:24015078

Cha, Sang-Do; Jeon, Young-Jae; Ahn, Geum-Ran; Han, Jae In; Han, Kap-Hoon

2007-01-01

61

Dynamics of the Establishment of Multinucleate Compartments in Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M M; Rep, Martijn

2015-01-01

62

Effects of Varying Environmental Conditions on Biological Control of Fusarium Wilt of Tomato by Nonpathogenic Fusarium spp.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The influence of varying environmental and cropping conditions including temperature, light, soil type, pathogen isolate and race, and cultivar of tomato on biological control of Fusarium wilt of tomato by isolates of nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum (CS-20 and CS-24) and F. solani (CS-1) was evaluated in greenhouse and growth chamber experiments. Liquid spore suspensions (10(6)/ml) of the biocontrol isolates were applied to soilless potting mix at the time of tomato seeding, and the seedlings were transplanted into pathogen-infested field soil 2 weeks later. Temperature regimes ranging from 22 to 32 degrees C significantly affected disease development and plant physiological parameters. Biocontrol isolate CS-20 significantly reduced disease at all temperature regimes tested, yielding reductions of disease incidence of 59 to 100% relative to pathogen control treatments. Isolates CS-24 and CS-1 reduced disease incidence in the greenhouse and at high temperatures, but were less effective at the optimum temperature for disease development (27 degrees C). Growing plants under shade (50% of full light) versus full light affected some plant growth parameters, but did not affect the efficacy of biocontrol of any of the three bio-control isolates. Isolate CS-20 effectively reduced disease incidence (56 to 79% reduction) in four different field soils varying in texture (sandy to clayey) and organic matter content (0 to 3.2%). Isolate CS-1 reduced disease in the sandy and loamy soils (49 to 66% reduction), but was not effective in a heavy clay soil. Both CS-1 and CS-20 were equally effective against all three races of the pathogen, as well as multiple isolates of each race (48 to 66% reduction in disease incidence). Both isolates, CS-1 and CS-20, were equally effective in reducing disease incidence (66 to 80% reduction) by pathogenic races 1, 2, and 3 on eight different tomato cultivars containing varying levels of inherent resistance to Fusarium wilt (susceptible, resistant to race 1, or resistant to races 1 and 2). These results demonstrate that both these Fusarium isolates, and particularly CS-20, can effectively reduce Fusarium wilt disease of tomato under a variety of environmental conditions and have potential for further development. PMID:18944240

Larkin, Robert P; Fravel, Deborah R

2002-11-01

63

Contamination of Bananas with Beauvericin and Fusaric Acid Produced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is one of the most destructive diseases of banana. Toxins produced by Foc have been proposed to play an important role during the pathogenic process. The objectives of this study were to investigate the contamination of banana with toxins produced by Foc, and to elucidate their role in pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty isolates of Foc representing races 1 and 4 were isolated from diseased bananas in five Chinese provinces. Two toxins were consistently associated with Foc, fusaric acid (FA) and beauvericin (BEA). Cytotoxicity of the two toxins on banana protoplast was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The virulence of 20 Foc isolates was further tested by inoculating tissue culture banana plantlets, and the contents of toxins determined in banana roots, pseudostems and leaves. Virulence of Foc isolates correlated well with toxin deposition in the host plant. To determine the natural occurrence of the two toxins in banana plants with Fusarium wilt symptoms, samples were collected before harvest from the pseudostems, fruit and leaves from 10 Pisang Awak ‘Guangfen #1’ and 10 Cavendish ‘Brazilian’ plants. Fusaric acid and BEA were detected in all the tissues, including the fruits. Conclusions/Signficance The current study provides the first investigation of toxins produced by Foc in banana. The toxins produced by Foc, and their levels of contamination of banana fruits, however, were too low to be of concern to human and animal health. Rather, these toxins appear to contribute to the pathogenicity of the fungus during infection of banana plants. PMID:23922960

Kuang, Ruibin; Yang, Qiaosong; Hu, Chunhua; Sheng, Ou; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Lijun; Wei, Yuerong; Yang, Jing; Liu, Siwen; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Viljoen, Altus; Yi, Ganjun

2013-01-01

64

Characterization of Fusarium wilt resistant somaclonal variants of banana cv. Rasthali by cDNA-RAPD.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt of banana, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is counted among the most destructive diseases of crop plants in India. In the absence of any credible control measure to manage this disease, development of resistant cultivars is the best option. Somaclonal variations arising out of long term in vitro culture of plant tissues is an important source of genetic variability and the selection of somaclones having desired characteristics is a promising strategy to develop plants with improved characters. In the present study, we isolated a group of somaclonal variants of banana cv. Rasthali which showed efficient resistance towards Foc race 1 infection in repeated bioassays. cDNA-RAPD methodology using 96 decamer primers was used to characterize these somaclonal variants. Among the four differentially amplified bands obtained, one mapping to the coding region of a lipoxygenase gene was confirmed to be down regulated in the somaclones as compared to controls by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Our results correlated well with earlier studies with lipoxygenase mutants in maize wherein reduced expression of lipoxygenase led to enhanced resistance towards Fusarium infection. PMID:25160909

Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

2014-12-01

65

Ctf1, a transcriptional activator of cutinase and lipase genes in Fusarium oxysporum is dispensable for virulence.  

PubMed

Cutinolytic enzymes are secreted by fungal pathogens attacking the aerial parts of the plant, to facilitate penetration of the outermost cuticular barrier of the host. The role of cutinases in soil-borne root pathogens has not been studied thus far. Here we report the characterization of the zinc finger transcription factor Ctf1 from the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum, a functional orthologue of CTF1alpha that controls expression of cutinase genes and virulence in the pea stem pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi. Mutants carrying a Deltactf1 loss-of-function allele grown on inducing substrates failed to activate extracellular cutinolytic activity and expression of the cut1 and lip1 genes, encoding a putative cutinase and lipase, respectively, whereas strains harbouring a ctf1(C) allele in which the ctf1 coding region was fused to the strong constitutive Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter showed increased induction of cutinase activity and gene expression. These results suggest that F. oxysporum Ctf1 mediates expression of genes involved in fatty acid hydrolysis. However, expression of lip1 during root infection was not dependent on Ctf1, and virulence of the ctf1 mutants on tomato plants and fruits was indistinguishable from that of the wild-type. Thus, in contrast to the stem pathogen F. solani, Ctf1 is not essential for virulence in the root pathogen F. oxysporum. PMID:18705871

Rocha, Ana Lilia Martínez; Di Pietro, Antonio; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Roncero, M Isabel G

2008-05-01

66

Biocontrol of Fusarium wilt disease for Cucumis melo melon using bio-organic fertilizer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium wilt disease in melon (Cucumis melo L.) is widespread, responsible for serious economic losses. Pot and field experiments were performed to investigate the effects of different bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) made from organic fertilizer and different antagonistic microbes. BIOs decreased the incidence of fusarium wilt disease and increased melon yield. The disease incidence of treatments with double application (BIOs applied

Qingyun Zhao; Caixia Dong; Xingming Yang; Xinlan Mei; Wei Ran; Qirong Shen; Yangchun Xu

2011-01-01

67

Hyphal Growth of Phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum Causes Cell Lysis and Death of Murine Macrophages  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M.

2014-01-01

68

THE PATHOGENICITY AND DNA POLYMORPHISM OF FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM ORIGINATING FROM DIANTHUS CARYOPHYLLUS, GYPSOPHILA SPP. AND SOIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of Fusarium oxysporum pathogenic isolates originating from Dianthus caryophyllus, Gypsophila paniculata, G. repens and non-pathogenic strains obtained from soil was screened for pathogenicity and genetic variation. RAPD analysis con- ducted with arbitrary 10-mer primers gave 23 RAPD markers resulted from the DNA polymorphism. Clustering analysis based on RAPD fingerprint data revealed several distinct groups within F. oxysporum which

M. Werner; L. Irzykowska

69

Biochemical markers assisted screening of Fusarium wilt resistant Musa paradisiaca (L.) cv. puttabale micropropagated clones.  

PubMed

An efficient protocol was standardized for screening of panama wilt resistant Musa paradisiaca cv. Puttabale clones, an endemic cultivar of Karnataka, India. The synergistic effect of 6-benzyleaminopurine (2 to 6 mg/L) and thidiazuron (0.1 to 0.5 mg/L) on MS medium provoked multiple shoot induction from the excised meristem. An average of 30.10 +/- 5.95 shoots was produced per propagule at 4 mg/L 6-benzyleaminopurine and 0.3 mg/L thidiazuron concentrations. Elongation of shoots observed on 5 mg/L BAP augmented medium with a mean length of 8.38 +/- 0.30 shoots per propagule. For screening of disease resistant clones, multiple shoot buds were mutated with 0.4% ethyl-methane-sulfonate and cultured on MS medium supplemented with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) culture filtrate (5-15%). Two month old co-cultivated secondary hardened plants were used for screening of disease resistance against FOC by the determination of biochemical markers such as total phenol, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, oxidative enzymes like peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, catalase and PR-proteins like chitinase, beta-1-3 glucanase activities. The mutated clones of M. paradisiaca cv. Puttabale cultured on FOC culture filtrate showed significant increase in the levels of biochemical markers as an indicative of acquiring disease resistant characteristics to FOC wilt. PMID:23898552

Venkatesh; Krishna, V; Kumar, K Girish; Pradeepa, K; Kumar, S R Santosh; Kumar, R Shashi

2013-07-01

70

Induction of Systemic Resistance of Benzothiadiazole and Humic Acid in Soybean Plants Against Fusarium Wilt Disease  

PubMed Central

The ability of benzothiadiazole (BTH) and/or humic acid (HA) used as seed soaking to induce systemic resistance against a pathogenic strain of Fusarium oxysporum was examined in four soybean cultivars under greenhouse conditions. Alone and in combination the inducers were able to protect soybean plants against damping-off and wilt diseases compared with check treatment. These results were confirmed under field conditions in two different locations (Minia and New Valley governorates). The tested treatments significantly reduced damping-off and wilt diseases and increased growth parameters, except the number of branches per plant and also increased seed yield. Application of BTH (0.25 g/L) + HA (4 g/L) was the most potent in this respect. Soybean seed soaking in BTH + HA produced the highest activities of the testes of oxidative enzymes followed by BTH in the four soybean cultivars. HA treatment resulted in the lowest increases of these oxidative enzymes. Similar results were obtained with total phenol but HA increased total phenol more than did BTH in all tested cultivars. PMID:22783118

Ismail, Mamdoh Ewis; Morsy, Kadry Mohamed

2011-01-01

71

The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease  

PubMed Central

XSP10 is an abundant 10?kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant–pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical characterization of XSP10 with respect to fatty acid-binding properties is reported; a weak but significant binding to saturated fatty acids was found. Furthermore, XSP10-silenced tomato plants were engineered and it was found that these plants exhibited reduced disease symptom development upon infection with a virulent strain of Fol. Interestingly, the reduced symptoms observed did not correlate with an altered expression profile for known reporter genes of plant defence (PR-1 and WIPI). This work demonstrates that XSP10 has lipid-binding properties and is required for full susceptibility of tomato to Fusarium wilt. PMID:20974736

Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L.; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L.W.

2011-01-01

72

Changes induced by Trichoderma harzianum in suppressive compost controlling Fusarium wilt.  

PubMed

The addition of species of Trichoderma to compost is a widespread technique used to control different plant diseases. The biological control activity of these species is mainly attributable to a combination of several mechanisms of action, which may affect the microbiota involved in the suppressiveness of compost. This study was therefore performed to determine the effect of inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum) on compost, focusing on bacterial community structure (16S rRNA) and chitinase gene diversity. In addition, the ability of vineyard pruning waste compost, amended (GCTh) or not (GC) with T. harzianum, to suppress Fusarium wilt was evaluated. The addition of T. harzianum resulted in a high relative abundance of certain chitinolytic bacteria as well as in remarkable protection against Fusarium oxysporum comparable to that induced by compost GC. Moreover, variations in the abiotic characteristics of the media, such as pH, C, N and iron levels, were observed. Despite the lower diversity of chitinolytic bacteria found in GCTh, the high relative abundance of Streptomyces spp. may be involved in the suppressiveness of this growing media. The higher degree of compost suppressiveness achieved after the addition of T. harzianum may be due not only to its biocontrol ability, but also to changes promoted in both abiotic and biotic characteristics of the growing media. PMID:25149244

Blaya, Josefa; López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Lloret, Eva; Pascual, Jose Antonio; Ros, Margarita

2013-09-01

73

Molecular detection and genotyping of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. psidii isolates from different agro-ecological regions of India.  

PubMed

Twenty one isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. psidii (Fop), causing a vascular wilt in guava (Psidium guajava L.), were collected from different agro-ecological regions of India. The pathogenicity test was performed in guava seedlings, where the Fop isolates were found to be highly pathogenic. All 21 isolates were confirmed as F. oxysporum f. sp. psidii by a newly developed, species-specific primer against the conserved regions of 28S rDNA and the intergenic spacer region. RAPD and PCR-RFLP were used for genotyping the isolates to determine their genetic relationships. Fifteen RAPD primers were tested, of which five primers produced prominent, polymorphic, and reproducible bands. RAPD yielded an average of 6.5 polymorphic bands per primer, with the amplified DNA fragments ranging from 200-2,000 bp in size. A dendrogram constructed from these data indicated a 22-74% level of homology. In RFLP analysis, two major bands (350 and 220 bp) were commonly present in all isolates of F. oxysporum. These findings provide new insight for rapid, specific, and sensitive disease diagnosis. However, genotyping could be useful in strain-level discrimination of isolates from different agro-ecological regions of India. PMID:23990290

Mishra, Rupesh Kumar; Pandey, Brajesh Kumar; Singh, Vijai; Mathew, Amita John; Pathak, Neelam; Zeeshan, Mohammad

2013-08-01

74

Optimization of Biological Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles using Fusarium oxysporum  

PubMed Central

Silver nanoparticles are increasingly used in various fields of biotechnology and applications in the medicine. Objectives of this study were optimization of production of silver nanoparticles using biotransformations by Fusarium oxysporum, and a further study on the location of nanoparticles synthesis in this microorganism. The reaction mixture contained the following ingredients (final concentrations): AgNO3 (1-10 mM) as the biotransformation substrate, biomass as the biocatalyst, glucose (560 mM) as the electron donor, and phosphate buffer (pH= 7, 100 mM). The samples were taken from the reaction mixtures at different times, and the absorbance (430 nm) of the colloidal suspensions of silver nanoparticles hydrosols was read freshly (without freezing) and immediately after dilution (1:40). SEM and TEM analyses were performed on selected samples. The presence of AgNO3 (0.1 mM) in the culture as enzyme inducer, and glucose (560 mM) as electron donor had positive effects on nanoparticle production. In SEM micrographs, silver nanoparticles were almost spherical, single (25-50 nm) or in aggregates (100 nm), attached to the surface of biomass. The reaction mixture was successfully optimized to increase the yield of silver nanoparticles production. More details of the location of nanoparticles production by this fungus were revealed, which support the hypothesis that silver nanoparticles are synthesized intracellularly and not extracellularly. PMID:24250635

Korbekandi, Hassan; Ashari, Zeynab; Iravani, Siavash; Abbasi, Sajjad

2013-01-01

75

Genetic and pathogenic variability of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae isolated from onion and Welsh onion in Japan.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) causes Fusarium basal rot in onion (common onion) and Fusarium wilt in Welsh onion. Although these diseases have been detected in various areas in Japan, knowledge about the genetic and pathogenic variability of FOC is very limited. In this study, FOC was isolated from onion and Welsh onion grown in 12 locations in Japan, and a total of 55 FOC isolates (27 from onion and 28 from Welsh onion) were characterized based on their rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) and translation elongation factor-1? (EF-1?) nucleotide sequences, vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), and the presence of the SIX (secreted in xylem) homologs. Phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that these isolates were grouped into eight clades (A to H), and 20 onion isolates belonging to clade H were monophyletic and assigned to the same VCG. All the IGS-clade H isolates possessed homologs of SIX3, SIX5, and SIX7. The SIX3 homolog was located on a 4 Mb-sized chromosome in the IGS-clade H isolates. Pathogenicity tests using onion seedlings showed that all the isolates with high virulence were in the IGS-clade H. These results suggest that FOC isolates belonging to the IGS-clade H are genetically and pathogenically different from those belonging to the other IGS clades. PMID:25412011

Sasaki, Kazunori; Nakahara, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shuhei; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Ito, Shin-Ichi

2014-11-20

76

Root Exudates from Grafted-Root Watermelon Showed a Certain Contribution in Inhibiting Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum  

PubMed Central

Grafting watermelon onto bottle gourd rootstock is commonly used method to generate resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON), but knowledge of the effect of the root exudates of grafted watermelon on this soil-borne pathogen in rhizosphere remains limited. To investigate the root exudate profiles of the own-root bottle gourd, grafted-root watermelon and own-root watermelon, recirculating hydroponic culture system was developed to continuously trap these root exudates. Both conidial germination and growth of FON were significantly decreased in the presence of root exudates from the grafted-root watermelon compared with the own-root watermelon. HPLC analysis revealed that the composition of the root exudates released by the grafted-root watermelon differed not only from the own-root watermelon but also from the bottle gourd rootstock plants. We identified salicylic acid in all 3 root exudates, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in root exudates from own-root bottle gourd and grafted-root watermelon but not own-root watermelon, and abundant cinnamic acid only in own-root watermelon root exudates. The chlorogenic and caffeic acid were candidates for potentiating the enhanced resistance of the grafted watermelon to FON, therefore we tested the effects of the two compounds on the conidial germination and growth of FON. Both phenolic acids inhibited FON conidial germination and growth in a dose-dependent manner, and FON was much more susceptible to chlorogenic acid than to caffeic acid. In conclusion, the key factor in attaining the resistance to Fusarium wilt is grafting on the non-host root stock, however, the root exudates profile also showed some contribution in inhibiting FON. These results will help to better clarify the disease resistance mechanisms of grafted-root watermelon based on plant-microbe communication and will guide the improvement of strategies against Fusarium-mediated wilt of watermelon plants. PMID:23700421

Wang, Dongsheng; Mao, Jiugeng; Huang, Qiwei; Guo, Shiwei; Shen, Qirong

2013-01-01

77

Release of pea germplasm with Fusarium resistance combined with desirable yield and anti-lodging traits  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Fsp) and Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (Fop) races 1, 2 and 5, negatively impact the pea industry worldwide. Limited pea germplasm with agronomically acceptable characteristics combined with resistance to these disease...

78

Regeneration of flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) plants from anther culture and somatic tissue with increased resistance to Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to establish a protocol for the efficient production of flax plants of microspore origin. The results were compared to those obtained for plants regenerated from somatic explants from hypocotyls, cotyledons, leaves, stems and roots. All the plants obtained during the experiments were regenerated from callus that was grown for periods from a few weeks to a few months before the regeneration was achieved. Anther cultures were less effective in plant regeneration than somatic cell cultures. However, regenerants derived from anther cells showed valuable breeding features, including increased resistance to fungal wilt. The age of the donor plants and the season they grew in had a noticeable effect on their anther callusing and subsequent plant regeneration. Low temperature had a negative effect and dark pre-treatment a positive effect on callusing and plant regeneration. Different media were most effective for callus induction, shoot induction and rooting. For callus induction two carbon sources (2.5% sucrose and 2.5% glucose) were most effective; for shoots, only sucrose at lower concentration (2%) was effective. Rooting was most efficient in 1% sucrose and reduced (50%) mineral concentration in the medium. It was found that the length of in vitro cultivation significantly increases the ploidy and affects such features as regenerant morphological characteristics, petal colour, and resistance to Fusarium oxysporum-induced fungal wilt. The established plant regeneration system provides a basis for the creation of transgenic flax. PMID:12827441

Rutkowska-Krause, I; Mankowska, G; Lukaszewicz, M; Szopa, J

2003-09-01

79

Survival of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum chlamydospores under solarization temperatures  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Solarization is an effective soil treatment against race 4 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. Despite the lack of effective alternatives, solarization is rarely used in cotton because of its high cost. Use of solarization might be increased if soil temperatures could be used to predict redu...

80

Commercial detergents effective against conidia and chlamydospores of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Current containment recommendations for limiting the spread of race 4 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum in California lack non-corrosive yet effective alternatives to bleach for sanitizing equipment used in farming operations. To find an equivalent to Farmcleanse, an Australian product recomm...

81

An RFLP marker in tomato linked to the Fusarium oxysporum resistance gene I2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The locus, I2, which in tomato confers resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 2, was introgressed into Lycopersicon esculentum from the wild species L. pimpinellifolium (P.I. 126915). We searched for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) between nearly isogenic lines (NILs) in clones that map to the region introgressed from the wild species. Since I2 maps to chromosome 11,

M. Sarfatti; J. Katan; R. Fluhr; D. Zamir

1989-01-01

82

On the reliability of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum research: Do we need standardized testing methods?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. nivium (Fon) is a pathogen highly variable in aggressiveness that requires a standardized testing method to more accurately define isolate aggressiveness (races) and to identify resistant watermelon lines. Isolates of Fon vary in aggressiveness from weakly to highly aggres...

83

Dry heat and hot water treatments for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The potential of low- and high-temperature dry heat, and hot water treatments, for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum was investigated. Naturally infected seeds from Louisiana were air-heated in incubators set at temperatures of 30, 35, and 40 degrees C for up to 24 we...

84

First record of Fusarium vascular wilt on grapevine in Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the summer season of 2003 and 2004, wilt syndromes of grapevine leaves (Cv. crimson) and vascular discolouration of roots have been observed in 2-year-old grapevine plants in the field at two sides in Gharbeia Governorate, Egypt. First, symptoms of wilt began on bottom leaves borderline as chlorosis and then these turned to necrotic spots and the leaves died. Wilt

El-Sayed H. Ziedan; El-Sayed M. Embaby; Eman S. Farrag

2011-01-01

85

Sustainable Approaches for Biological Control of Fusarium Wilt in Pigeon Pea ( Cajanus cajan L. Millspaugh)  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Cajanus cajan (Pigeon pea) is an important crop of Indian subcontinent and African countries, cultivated in the tropics and subtropics.\\u000a Fusarium wilt is one of the major yield and growth-limiting factors of pigeon pea. Along with nematodes such as Meloidogyne incognita and Heterodera cajani, F. udum result in highly destructive wilt disease complex, which is a major constraint for the

Piyush Pandey; Abhinav Aeron; D. K. Maheshwari

86

Formation of fumonisins and other secondary metabolites by Fusarium oxysporum and F. proliferatum: a comparative study.  

PubMed

The principal aim of this study was to estimate the formation of fumonisins (FB(1) and FB(2)), moniliformin (MON), and ergosterol (ERG) by Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium proliferatum, while the formation of beauvericin (BEA) was estimated by the latter Fusarium species only. Moreover, the effect of temperature on the biosynthesis of mycotoxins was also evaluated. Fumonisins were formed by F. proliferatum, with the highest yield at 18 degrees C (720.0-1976.6 microg g(-1) for FB(1), 74.2-670.8 microg g(-1) for FB(2)) and only by three of four F. oxysporum strains at a very low level (0.02-4.77 microg g(-1) for FB(1), 0.02-2.15 microg g(-1) for FB(2)). The amount of MON formed by F. proliferatum was the highest (p < 0.001) at 32 degrees C (3056.87 microg g(-1)), while MON biosynthesis by F. oxysporum was lower 227.54 microg g(-1) (p < 0.001). BEA was produced by F. proliferatum with the highest level at 25 degrees C (p < 0.001). ERG-recognized as an indicator of fungal biomass development and as a consequence of mycotoxin formation-was found at the highest concentration at a biosynthesis temperature of 25 degrees C for F. proliferatum and F. oxysporum (p < 0.001). PMID:20455157

Waskiewicz, A; Golinski, P; Karolewski, Z; Irzykowska, L; Bocianowski, J; Kostecki, M; Weber, Z

2010-05-01

87

Screenhouse and field persistence of nonpathogenic endophytic Fusarium oxysporum in Musa tissue culture plants.  

PubMed

Two major biotic constraints to highland cooking banana (Musa spp., genome group AAA-EA) production in Uganda are the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus and the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis. Endophytic Fusarium oxysporum strains inoculated into tissue culture banana plantlets have shown control of the banana weevil and the nematode. We conducted screenhouse and field experiments to investigate persistence in the roots and rhizome of two endophytic Fusarium oxysporum strains, V2w2 and III4w1, inoculated into tissue-culture banana plantlets of highland cooking banana cultivars Kibuzi and Nabusa. Re-isolation of F. oxysporum showed that endophyte colonization decreased faster from the rhizomes than from the roots of inoculated plants, both in the screenhouse and in the field. Whereas rhizome colonization by F. oxysporum decreased in the screenhouse (4-16 weeks after inoculation), root colonization did not. However, in the field (17-33 weeks after inoculation), a decrease was observed in both rhizome and root colonization. The results show a better persistence in the roots than rhizomes of endophytic F. oxysporum strains V2w2 and III4w1. PMID:18058162

Paparu, Pamela; Dubois, Thomas; Gold, Clifford S; Niere, Björn; Adipala, Ekwamu; Coyne, Daniel

2008-04-01

88

Growth and disease response of soybeans from early maturity groups to ozone and Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

The single and combined effects of ozone (O(3)) and Fusarium oxysporum on growth and disease expression of soybean genotypes differing in foliar sensitivity to O(3) were studied in the greenhouse. O(3) had no effect on root and hypocotyl rot severity of PI 153.283 (O(3)-sensitive, S) or PI 189.907 (O(3)-tolerant, T) maturity group I soybean lines. Plants of both genotypes infected with F. oxysporum and exposed to O(3) had greater reductions in relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), and had more stippled leaves per plant than Fusarium-free plants exposed to O(3). O(3) alone had a greater impact on shoot dry weight, RGR, and NAR of PI 153.283 (S) than of PI 189.907 (T). O(3) alone reduced shoot and root dry weights primarily through a depression in NAR and less through reduced leaf area. F. oxysporum alone reduced root dry weight at 35 days; however, infected plants responded with increases in root dry weight from 49 to 63 days. Similarly, F. oxysporum alone lowered early RGR but subsequent RGR decline was less rapid while NAR remained high, particularly during later sampling intervals. Infection by F. oxysporum that causes root and hypocotyl rot increased soybean sensitivity to O(3) by prolonging active vegetative growth. PMID:15092691

Damicone, J P; Manning, W J; Herbert, S J; Feder, W A

1987-01-01

89

Current status of the taxonomic position of Fusarium oxysporum formae specialis cubense within the Fusarium oxysporum complex  

E-print Network

: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 2.3. Race ­ strain classification using pathogenicity towards specific host cultivars: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 2.5. The evolution of F. oxysporum:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538 3. Evolution and diversity of Foc

90

Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them. PMID:23864230

Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

2013-10-01

91

Cloning, characterization and functional expression of an alkalitolerant type C feruloyl esterase from Fusarium oxysporum  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hypothetical protein FoFaeC-12213 of Fusarium oxysporum was found to have high amino acid sequence identity with known type C feruloyl esterases (FAEs) containing a 13-amino acid\\u000a conserved region flanking the characteristic G-X-S-X-G motif of a serine esterase. The putative FAE from the genomic DNA was\\u000a successfully cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ?-factor secretion signal under the transcriptional

Maria Moukouli; Evangelos Topakas; Paul Christakopoulos

2008-01-01

92

Production and partial characterization of alkaline feruloyl esterases by Fusarium oxysporum during submerged batch cultivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Production of feruloyl esterases (FAEs) by Fusarium oxysporum was enhanced by optimization of initial pH of the culture medium, the type and concentration of nitrogen and carbon source.\\u000a Submerged batch cultivation in a laboratory bioreactor (17 l) produced activity at 82 nkat g?1 dry substrate (corn cobs) which compared favorably to those reported for the other microorganisms. Use of de-esterified

Evangelos Topakas; Paul Christakopoulos

2004-01-01

93

Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance Against Fusarium Wilt Based on Three Cotton F 2 Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium wilt (FW) is one of the most common cotton diseases in the world. Identification of QTLs conferring resistance to FW is key for the incorporation of resistance genes into elite cultivars. Two intraspecific (cross between Gossypium hirsutum L.) and one interspecific (cross between Gossypium hirsutum L. and Gossypium bardence L.) F2 populations were constructed by using a highly resistant

Pei-zheng WANG; Li-fang SHI; Li SU; Bao-min HU

2010-01-01

94

Isolation and characterization of an exopolygalacturonase from Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense race 1 and race 4  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium wilt is an economically devastating disease that affects banana production. Although Cavendish banana cultivars are resistant to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense race 1 (FOC1) and maitain banana production after Gros Michel was destructed by race 1, a new race race 4 (FOC4) was found to infect Cavendish. Results An exopolygalacturonase (PGC2) was isolated and purified from the supernatant of the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense race 4 (FOC4). PGC2 had an apparent Mr of 63 kDa by SDS-PAGE and 51.7 kDa by mass spectrometry. The enzyme was N-glycosylated. PGC2 hydrolyzed polygalacturonic acid in an exo-manner, as demonstrated by analysis of degradation products. To obtain adequate amounts of protein for functional studies between the PGC2 proteins of two races of the pathogen, pgc2 genes encoding PGC2 from race 4 (FOC4) and race 1 (FOC1), both 1395 bp in length and encoding 465 amino acids with a predicted amino-terminal signal sequence of 18 residues, were cloned into the expression vector pPICZaA and then expressed in Pichia pastoris strains of SMD1168. The recombinant PGC2 products, r-FOC1-PGC2 and r-FOC4-PGC2, were expressed and purified as active extracellular proteins. Optimal PGC2 activity was observed at 50°C and pH 5. The Km and Vmax values of purified r-FOC1-PGC2 were 0.43 mg.mL-1 and 94.34 units mg protein-1 min-1, respectively. The Km and Vmax values of purified r-FOC4-PGC2 were 0.48 mg.mL-1 and 95.24 units mg protein-1 min-1, respectively. Both recombinant PGC2 proteins could induce tissue maceration and necrosis in banana plants. Conclusions Collectively, these results suggest that PGC2 is the first exoPG reported from the pathogen FOC, and we have shown that fully functional PGC2 can be produced in the P. pastoris expression system. PMID:21920035

2011-01-01

95

Transcriptome profiling of resistant and susceptible Cavendish banana roots following inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc TR4), is considered the most lethal disease of Cavendish bananas in the world. The disease can be managed in the field by planting resistant Cavendish plants generated by somaclonal variation. However, little information is available on the genetic basis of plant resistance to Foc TR4. To a better understand the defense response of resistant banana plants to the Fusarium wilt pathogen, the transcriptome profiles in roots of resistant and susceptible Cavendish banana challenged with Foc TR4 were compared. Results RNA-seq analysis generated more than 103 million 90-bp clean pair end (PE) reads, which were assembled into 88,161 unigenes (mean size?=?554 bp). Based on sequence similarity searches, 61,706 (69.99%) genes were identified, among which 21,273 and 50,410 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. Searches in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) mapped 33,243 (37.71%) unigenes to 119 KEGG pathways. A total of 5,008 genes were assigned to plant-pathogen interactions, including disease defense and signal transduction. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis revealed large differences in the transcriptome profiles of the Foc TR4-resistant somaclonal variant and its susceptible wild-type. Expression patterns of genes involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognition, activation of effector-triggered immunity (ETI), ion influx, and biosynthesis of hormones as well as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, transcription factors, signaling/regulatory genes, cell wall modification genes and genes with other functions were analyzed and compared. The results indicated that basal defense mechanisms are involved in the recognition of PAMPs, and that high levels of defense-related transcripts may contribute to Foc TR4 resistance in banana. Conclusions This study generated a substantial amount of banana transcript sequences and compared the defense responses against Foc TR4 between resistant and susceptible Cavendish bananas. The results contribute to the identification of candidate genes related to plant resistance in a non-model organism, banana, and help to improve the current understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22863187

2012-01-01

96

Systemic acquired resistance in Cavendish banana induced by infection with an incompatible strain of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt of banana is caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). The fact that there are no economically viable biological, chemical, or cultural measures of controlling the disease in an infected field leads to search for alternative strategies involving activation of the plant's innate defense system. The mechanisms underlying systemic acquired resistance (SAR) are much less understood in monocots than in dicots. Since systemic protection of plants by attenuated or avirulent pathogens is a typical SAR response, the establishment of a biologically induced SAR model in banana is helpful to investigate the mechanism of SAR to Fusarium wilt. This paper described one such model using incompatible Foc race 1 to induce resistance against Foc tropical race 4 in an in vitro pathosystem. Consistent with the observation that the SAR provided the highest level of protection when the time interval between primary infection and challenge inoculation was 10d, the activities of defense-related enzymes such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) in systemic tissues also reached the maximum level and were 2.00-2.43 times higher than that of the corresponding controls on the tenth day. The total salicylic acid (SA) content in roots of banana plantlets increased from about 1 to more than 5 ?g g?¹ FW after the second leaf being inoculated with Foc race 1. The systemic up-regulation of MaNPR1A and MaNPR1B was followed by the second up-regulation of PR-1 and PR-3. Although SA and jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling are mostly antagonistic, systemic expression of PR genes regulated by different signaling pathways were simultaneously up-regulated after primary infection, indicating that both pathways are involved in the activation of the SAR. PMID:23702248

Wu, Yuanli; Yi, Ganjun; Peng, Xinxiang; Huang, Bingzhi; Liu, Ee; Zhang, Jianjun

2013-07-15

97

Highly Diverse Endophytic and Soil Fusarium oxysporum Populations Associated with Field-Grown Tomato Plants.  

PubMed

The diversity and genetic differentiation of populations of Fusarium oxysporum associated with tomato fields, both endophytes obtained from tomato plants and isolates obtained from soil surrounding the sampled plants, were investigated. A total of 609 isolates of F. oxysporum were obtained, 295 isolates from a total of 32 asymptomatic tomato plants in two fields and 314 isolates from eight soil cores sampled from the area surrounding the plants. Included in this total were 112 isolates from the stems of all 32 plants, a niche that has not been previously included in F. oxysporum population genetics studies. Isolates were characterized using the DNA sequence of the translation elongation factor 1? gene. A diverse population of 26 sequence types was found, although two sequence types represented nearly two-thirds of the isolates studied. The sequence types were placed in different phylogenetic clades within F. oxysporum, and endophytic isolates were not monophyletic. Multiple sequence types were found in all plants, with an average of 4.2 per plant. The population compositions differed between the two fields but not between soil samples within each field. A certain degree of differentiation was observed between populations associated with different tomato cultivars, suggesting that the host genotype may affect the composition of plant-associated F. oxysporum populations. No clear patterns of genetic differentiation were observed between endophyte populations and soil populations, suggesting a lack of specialization of endophytic isolates. PMID:25304514

Demers, Jill E; Gugino, Beth K; Jiménez-Gasco, María Del Mar

2015-01-01

98

Induced defense-related proteins in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) plants by Carnobacterium sp. SJ-5 upon challenge inoculation of Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to analyze induced expression of defense-related proteins in the soybean plants by rhizobacterial stain Carnobacterium sp. SJ-5 upon challenge inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum. Determination of the enzymatic activity of the different defense-related enzymes, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), lipoxygenase (LOX), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was performed in the major parts of Glycine max L. Merrill using spectrophotometric method. Native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the POD and PPO was employed followed by activity staining to find out the isoforms of respective enzymes. Activities of the PAL, LOX, POD and PPO were found to be highest in the bacterized root tissue of the soybean plants challenged with F. oxysporum. Isoform analysis revealed that PPO1, PPO4 and POD2 isoforms were expressed at higher levels in bacterized soybean root tissues challenge inoculated with the pathogen. Conclusively it was found that bacterial strain Carnobacterium sp. SJ-5 protect soybean plants from wilt disease caused by F. oxysporum by elicitation of the defense-related enzymes. PMID:24504695

Jain, Shekhar; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

2014-05-01

99

Purification and identification of two antifungal cyclic dipeptides from Bacillus cereus subsp. thuringiensis associated with a rhabditid entomopathogenic nematode especially against Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

The cell-free culture filtrate of Bacillus cereus subsp. thuringiensis associated with an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), Rhabditis (Oscheius) sp., exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The ethyl acetate extract of the bacterial culture filtrate was purified by silica gel column chromatography to obtain two cyclic dipeptides (CDPs). The structure and absolute stereochemistry of this compound were determined based on extensive spectroscopic analyses (FABMS, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C HMBC) and Marfey's method. The compounds were identified as cyclo(D-Pro-L-Met) and cyclo(D-Pro-D-Tyr). CDPs showed significantly higher activity than the standard fungicide bavistin against agriculturally important fungi, viz., Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Penicillium expansum. The highest activity of 2 µg/ml by cyclo(D-Pro-D-Tyr) was recorded against F. oxysporum, a plant pathogen responsible for causing fusarium wilt followed by R. solani, a pathogen that causes root rot and P. expansum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of these compounds from Rhabditis EPN bacterial strain Bacillus cereus subsp. thuringiensis. PMID:23402421

Kumar, S Nishanth; Nambisan, Bala; Mohandas, C

2014-04-01

100

Salicylic acid and salicylic acid sensitive and insensitive catalases in different genotypes of chickpea against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri.  

PubMed

Differential expression of catalase isozymes in different genotypes of chickpea resistant genotypes- A1, JG-315, JG-11, WR-315, R1-315, Vijaya, ICCV-15017, GBS-964, GBM-10, and susceptible genotypes- JG-62, MNK, ICCV-08321, ICCV-08311, KW-104, ICCV-08123, ICC-4951, ICC-11322, ICC-08116 for wilt disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum. f. sp. ciceri (Foc) was analyzed. Salicylic acid (SA) and H2O2 concentrations were determined in control as well as in plants infected with F. ciceri and found that the high and low levels of salicylic acid and H2O2 in resistant and susceptible genotypes of chickpea respectively. Catalase isozyme activities were detected in the gel and found that no induction of new catalases was observed in all the resistant genotypes and their some of the native catalase isozymes were inhibited; whereas, induction of multiple catalase isozymes was observed in all the screened susceptible genotypes and their activities were not inhibited upon Foc or SA treatments. The above results support the possible role of these isozymes as a marker to identify which genotype of chickpea is expressing systemic acquired resistance. PMID:24431522

Gayatridevi, S; Jayalakshmi, S K; Mulimani, V H; Sreeramulu, K

2013-10-01

101

Suppression of Fusarium wilt of watermelon by a bio-organic fertilizer containing combinations of antagonistic microorganisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium wilt of watermelon commonly occurs in locations where the crop has been grown for many seasons. Its occurrence results\\u000a in a severely decreased watermelon crop. The goal of this study was to assess the capability of a new product (bio-organic\\u000a fertilizer) to control the wilt in Fusarium-infested soil. Pot experiments were conducted under growth chamber and greenhouse\\u000a conditions. The

Hong-sheng Wu; Xin-ning Yang; Jia-qin Fan; Wei-guo Miao; Ning Ling; Yang-chun Xu; Qi-wei Huang; Qirong Shen

2009-01-01

102

Morphological and molecular characterization of Fusarium. solani and F. oxysporum associated with crown disease of oil palm  

PubMed Central

Crown disease (CD) is infecting oil palm in the early stages of the crop development. Previous studies showed that Fusarium species were commonly associated with CD. However, the identity of the species has not been resolved. This study was carried out to identify and characterize through morphological approaches and to determine the genetic diversity of the Fusarium species. 51 isolates (39%) of Fusarium solani and 40 isolates (31%) of Fusarium oxysporum were recovered from oil palm with typical CD symptoms collected from nine states in Malaysia, together with samples from Padang and Medan, Indonesia. Based on morphological characteristics, isolates in both Fusarium species were classified into two distinct morphotypes; Morphotypes I and II. Molecular characterization based on IGS-RFLP analysis produced 27 haplotypes among the F. solani isolates and 33 haplotypes for F. oxysporum isolates, which indicated high levels of intraspecific variations. From UPGMA cluster analysis, the isolates in both Fusarium species were divided into two main clusters with the percentage of similarity from 87% to 100% for F. solani, and 89% to 100% for F. oxysporum isolates, which was in accordance with the Morphotypes I and II. The results of the present study indicated that F. solani and F. oxysporum associated with CD of oil palm in Malaysia and Indonesia were highly variable. PMID:24516465

Hafizi, R.; Salleh, B.; Latiffah, Z.

2013-01-01

103

Chemical communication between the endophytic fungus Paraconiothyrium variabile and the phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Paraconiothyrium variabile, one of the specific endophytic fungi isolated from the host plant Cephalotaxus harringtonia, possesses the faculty to inhibit the growth of common phytopathogens, thus suggesting a role in its host protection. A strong antagonism between the endophyte P. variabile and Fusarium oxysporum was observed and studied using optic and electronic microscopies. A disorganization of the mycelium of F. oxysporum was thus noticed. Interestingly, the biological effect of the main secondary metabolites isolated from P. variabile against F. oxysporum did not account for this strong antagonism. However, a metabolomic approach of pure fungal strains and confrontation zones using the data analysis tool XCMS were analyzed and pointed out a competition-induced metabolite production by the endophyte in the presence of the phytopathogen. Subsequent MS/MS fragmentations permitted to identify one of the induced metabolites as 13-oxo-9,11-octadecadienoic acid and highlighted a negative modulation of the biosynthesis of beauvericin, one of the most potent mycotoxin of F. oxysporum, during the competition with the endophyte. PMID:23077591

Combès, Audrey; Ndoye, Idrissa; Bance, Caroline; Bruzaud, Jérôme; Djediat, Chakib; Dupont, Joëlle; Nay, Bastien; Prado, Soizic

2012-01-01

104

Chemical Communication between the Endophytic Fungus Paraconiothyrium Variabile and the Phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum  

PubMed Central

Paraconiothyrium variabile, one of the specific endophytic fungi isolated from the host plant Cephalotaxus harringtonia, possesses the faculty to inhibit the growth of common phytopathogens, thus suggesting a role in its host protection. A strong antagonism between the endophyte P. variabile and Fusarium oxysporum was observed and studied using optic and electronic microscopies. A disorganization of the mycelium of F. oxysporum was thus noticed. Interestingly, the biological effect of the main secondary metabolites isolated from P. variabile against F. oxysporum did not account for this strong antagonism. However, a metabolomic approach of pure fungal strains and confrontation zones using the data analysis tool XCMS were analyzed and pointed out a competition-induced metabolite production by the endophyte in the presence of the phytopathogen. Subsequent MS/MS fragmentations permitted to identify one of the induced metabolites as 13-oxo-9,11-octadecadienoic acid and highlighted a negative modulation of the biosynthesis of beauvericin, one of the most potent mycotoxin of F. oxysporum, during the competition with the endophyte. PMID:23077591

Combès, Audrey; Ndoye, Idrissa; Bance, Caroline; Bruzaud, Jérôme; Djediat, Chakib; Dupont, Joëlle; Nay, Bastien; Prado, Soizic

2012-01-01

105

Genetic variation of Fusarium oxysporum isolates forming fumonisin B(1) and moniliformin.  

PubMed

Thirty single-spore isolates of a toxigenic fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, were isolated from asparagus spears and identified by species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and translation elongation factor 1-? (TEF) sequence analysis. In the examined sets of F. oxysporum isolates, the DNA sequences of mating type genes (MAT) were identified. The distribution of MAT idiomorph may suggest that MAT1-2 is a predominant mating type in the F. oxysporum population. F. oxysporum is mainly recognised as a producer of moniliformin-the highly toxic secondary metabolite. Moniliformin content was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis in the range 0.05-1,007.47 ?g g(-1) (mean 115.93 ?g g(-1)) but, also, fumonisin B(1) was detected, in the concentration range 0.01-0.91 ?g g(-1) (mean 0.19 ?g g(-1)). There was no association between mating types and the mycotoxins biosynthesis level. Additionally, a significant intra-species genetic diversity was revealed and molecular markers associated with toxins biosynthesis were identified. PMID:22367665

Irzykowska, Lidia; Bocianowski, Jan; Wa?kiewicz, Agnieszka; Weber, Zbigniew; Karolewski, Zbigniew; Goli?ski, Piotr; Kostecki, Marian; Irzykowski, Witold

2012-05-01

106

[Isolation of protoplasts from vegetable tissues using extracellular lytic enzymes from fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis].  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis, a pathogen of melon (Cucumis melo L.), was grown in shaken cultures at 26 degrees C in a mineral salts medium containing glucose, xylan and apple pectin as carbon sources. The extracellular enzymic complex obtained from these cultures showed lytic activity on plant tissues, causing maceration of melon fruits, potato tubers and carrot roots. Protoplasts were isolated from melon fruits when the maceration was carried out under appropriate osmotic conditions. This fact suggest a possible relationship between the enzymes produced by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis and their pathogenicity on melon plants. PMID:8850131

Alconada, T M; Martínez, M J

1995-01-01

107

Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8? mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8? mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8? strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8? mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8? mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum. PMID:25560310

Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

2015-01-01

108

Molecular variability among isolates of Fusarium oxysporum associated with root rot disease of Agave tequilana.  

PubMed

In this study, 115 isolates of Fusarium oxysporum from roots of Agave tequilana Weber cv azul plants and soil in commercial plantations in western Mexico were characterized using morphological and molecular methods. Genetic analyses of monosporic isolates included restriction enzyme analysis of rDNA (ARDRA) using HaeIII and HinfI, and genetic diversity was determined using Box-PCR molecular markers. Box-PCR analysis generated 14 groups. The groups correlated highly with the geographic location of the isolate and sample type. These results demonstrate the usefulness of ARDRA and Box-PCR techniques in the molecular characterization of the Fusarium genus for the discrimination of pathogenic isolates. PMID:23315087

Vega-Ramos, Karla L; Uvalle-Bueno, J Xavier; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F

2013-04-01

109

The intercropping partner affects arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici interactions in tomato.  

PubMed

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their bioprotective aspects are of great interest in the context of sustainable agriculture. Combining the benefits of AMF with the utilisation of plant species diversity shows great promise for the management of plant diseases in environmentally compatible agriculture. In the present study, AMF were tested against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici with tomato intercropped with either leek, cucumber, basil, fennel or tomato itself. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) root colonisation of tomato was clearly affected by its intercropping partners. Tomato intercropped with leek showed even a 20 % higher AM colonisation rate than tomato intercropped with tomato. Positive effects of AMF expressed as an increase of tomato biomass compared to the untreated control treatment could be observed in root as well as in shoot weights. A compensation of negative effects of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici on tomato biomass by AMF was observed in the tomato/leek combination. The intercropping partners leek, cucumber, basil and tomato had no effect on F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici disease incidence or disease severity indicating no allelopathic suppression; however, tomato co-cultivated with tomato clearly showed a negative effect on one plant/pot with regard to biomass and disease severity of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Nonetheless, bioprotective effects of AMF resulting in the decrease of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici disease severity were evident in treatments with AMF and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici co-inoculation. However, these bioprotective effects depended on the intercropping partner since these effects were only observed in the tomato/leek and tomato/basil combination and for the better developed plant of tomato/tomato. In conclusion, the effects of the intercropping partner on AMF colonisation of tomato are of great interest for crop plant communities and for the influences on each other. The outcome of the bioprotective effects of AMF resulting in the decrease on F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici disease severity and/or compensation of plant biomass does not depend on the degree of AM colonisation but more on the intercropping partner. PMID:23549903

Hage-Ahmed, Karin; Krammer, Johannes; Steinkellner, Siegrid

2013-10-01

110

Induced suppressiveness to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis lycopersici in rockwool substrate used in closed soilless systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tomatoes grown in soilless systems can be seriously damaged byFusarium oxysporum Schlect f.sp.radicis lycopersici (Forl) causing Fusarium crown and root rot (FCRR). FCRR suppression can be achieved through the use of chemicals, selected substrates,\\u000a composts and artificially introduced antagonistic microorganisms. This study evaluated the natural capacity of a used rockwool\\u000a to suppress FCRR infections. New and used rockwool, sampled from

Andrea Minuto; Francesca Clematis; Maria Lodovica Gullino; Angelo Garibaldi

2007-01-01

111

First Report of Potato Stem-End Rot Caused by Fusarium oxysporum in Korea  

PubMed Central

In this study, we identified the causative agent of stem-end rot in potatoes that were grown in Gangwon alpine areas of Korea in 2013. The disease symptoms included appearance of slightly sunken circular lesion with corky rot on the potato surface at the stem-end portion. The fungal species isolated from the infected potatoes were grown on potato dextrose agar and produced white aerial mycelia with dark violet pigments. The conidiophores were branched and monophialidic. The microconidia had ellipsoidal to cylindrical shapes and ranged from 2.6~11.4 × 1.9~3.5 µm in size. The macroconidia ranged from 12.7~24.7 × 2.7~3.6 µm in size and had slightly curved or fusiform shape with 2 to 5 septate. Chlamydospores ranged from 6.1~8.1 × 5.7~8.3 µm in size and were present singly or in pairs. The causal agent of potato stem-end rot was identified as Fusarium oxysporum by morphological characterization and by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS4) regions of rRNA. Artificial inoculation of the pathogen resulted in development of disease symptoms and the re-isolated pathogen showed characteristics of F. oxysporum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that potato stem-end rot is caused by F. oxysporum in Korea. PMID:25071394

Aktaruzzaman, Md.; Xu, Sheng-Jun; Kim, Joon-Young; Woo, Jae-Hyoun; Hahm, Young-Il

2014-01-01

112

Exploiting the inter-strain divergence of Fusarium oxysporum for microbial bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol  

PubMed Central

Microbial bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol still poses challenges in terms of substrate catabolism. A targeted evolution-based study was undertaken to determine if inter-strain microbial variability could be exploited for bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol. The microorganism studied was Fusarium oxysporum because of its capacity to both saccharify and ferment lignocellulose. Strains of F. oxysporum were isolated and assessed for their genetic variability. Using optimised solid-state straw culture conditions, experiments were conducted that compared fungal strains in terms of their growth, enzyme activities (cellulases, xylanase and alcohol dehydrogenase) and yield of bioethanol and the undesirable by-products acetic acid and xylitol. Significant inter-strain divergence was recorded in regards to the capacity of studied F. oxysporum strains to produce alcohol from untreated straw. No correlation was observed between bioethanol synthesis and either the biomass production or microbial enzyme activity. A strong correlation was observed between both acetic acid and xylitol production and bioethanol yield. The level of diversity recorded in the alcohol production capacity among closely-related microorganism means that a targeted screening of populations of selected microbial species could greatly improve bioprocessing yields, in terms of providing both new host strains and candidate genes for the bioethanol industry. PMID:22420408

2012-01-01

113

Elicitation of soluble phenolics in date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera) callus by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis culture medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system using callus cultures from two cultivars of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera), resistant (BSTN) and susceptible (JHL) to ‘Bayoud disease’, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. albedinis (Foa), was established as a suitable system for this host-pathogen interaction study. De novo accumulation of phenolic compounds occurred in date palm callus in response to elicitation with filtrates from Foa cultures. Based

F Daayf; M El Bellaj; M El Hassni; F J'Aiti; I El Hadrami

2003-01-01

114

Validation of molecular markers for resistance among Pakistani chickpea germplasm to races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

DNA markers in chickpea have been identified against different races of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris (Foc), but validation of these markers is essential for their effective use in resistant breeding. In view of this, different simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were analysed in Pakistani ger...

115

A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

116

Specific PCR-based marker for detection of pathogenic groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum pathogenic groups, a specific PCR-based marker was developed. Specific random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers which identified in four pathogenic groups I, II, III, and IV were cloned into PGem-Teasy vector. Cloned fragments were sequenced, and used for developing sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) primers for detection of pathogenic groups. F.

Mousa Najafiniya; Pratibha Sharma

2011-01-01

117

Arabidopsis thaliana RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM 2 Implicates Tyrosine-Sulfated Peptide Signaling in Susceptibility and Resistance to Root Infection  

PubMed Central

In the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs), including RFO2, account for the strong resistance of accession Columbia-0 (Col-0) and relative susceptibility of Taynuilt-0 (Ty-0) to the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis matthioli. We find that RFO2 corresponds to diversity in receptor-like protein (RLP) genes. In Col-0, there is a tandem pair of RLP genes: RFO2/At1g17250 confers resistance while RLP2 does not. In Ty-0, the highly diverged RFO2 locus has one RLP gene conferring weaker resistance. While the endogenous RFO2 makes a modest contribution to resistance, transgenic RFO2 provides strong pathogen-specific resistance. The extracellular leucine-rich repeats (eLRRs) in RFO2 and RLP2 are interchangeable for resistance and remarkably similar to eLRRs in the receptor-like kinase PSY1R, which perceives tyrosine-sulfated peptide PSY1. Reduced infection in psy1r and mutants of related phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor genes PSKR1 and PSKR2 shows that tyrosine-sulfated peptide signaling promotes susceptibility. The related eLRRs in RFO2 and PSY1R are not interchangeable; and expression of the RLP nPcR, in which eLRRs in RFO2 are replaced with eLRRs in PSY1R, results in constitutive resistance. Counterintuitively, PSY1 signaling suppresses nPcR because psy1r nPcR is lethal. The fact that PSK signaling does not similarly affect nPcR argues that PSY1 signaling directly downregulates the expression of nPcR. Our results support a speculative but intriguing model to explain RFO2's role in resistance. We propose that F. oxysporum produces an effector that inhibits the normal negative feedback regulation of PSY1R, which stabilizes PSY1 signaling and induces susceptibility. However, RFO2, acting as a decoy receptor for PSY1R, is also stabilized by the effector and instead induces host immunity. Overall, the quantitative resistance of RFO2 is reminiscent of the better-studied monogenic resistance traits. PMID:23717215

Shen, Yunping; Diener, Andrew C.

2013-01-01

118

Constitutive homologous expression of phosphoglucomutase and transaldolase increases the metabolic flux of Fusarium oxysporum  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium oxysporum is among the few filamentous fungi that have been reported of being able to directly ferment biomass to ethanol in a consolidated bioprocess. Understanding its metabolic pathways and their limitations can provide some insights on the genetic modifications required to enhance its growth and subsequent fermentation capability. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis reported previously that phosphoglucomutase and transaldolase are metabolic bottlenecks in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of the F. oxysporum metabolism. Results Both enzymes were homologously overexpressed in F. oxysporum F3 using the gpdA promoter of Aspergillus nidulans for constitutive expression. Transformants were screened for their phosphoglucomutase and transaldolase genes expression levels with northern blot. The selected transformant exhibited high mRNA levels for both genes, as well as higher specific activities of the corresponding enzymes, compared to the wild type. It also displayed more than 20 and 15% higher specific growth rate upon aerobic growth on glucose and xylose, respectively, as carbon sources and 30% higher biomass to xylose yield. The determination of the relative intracellular amino and non-amino organic acid concentrations at the end of growth on glucose revealed higher abundance of most determined metabolites between 1.5- and 3-times in the recombinant strain compared to the wild type. Lower abundance of the determined metabolites of the Krebs cycle and an 68-fold more glutamate were observed at the end of the cultivation, when xylose was used as carbon source. Conclusions Homologous overexpression of phosphoglucomutase and transaldolase in F. oxysporum was shown to enhance the growth characteristics of the strain in both xylose and glucose in aerobic conditions. The intracellular metabolites profile indicated how the changes in the metabolome could have resulted in the observed growth characteristics. PMID:24649884

2014-01-01

119

Stable integration and expression of wasabi defensin gene in "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) confers resistance to Fusarium wilt and Alternaria leaf spot.  

PubMed

Production of "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) in West Africa is limited by fungal diseases, such as Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium wilt. In order to engineer "Egusi" resistant to these diseases, cotyledonary explants of two "Egusi" genotypes, 'Ejagham' and NHC1-130, were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 harbouring wasabi defensin gene (isolated from Wasabia japonica L.) in a binary vector pEKH1. After co-cultivation for 3 days, infected explants were transferred to MS medium containing 100 mg l(-l) kanamycin to select transformed tissues. After 3 weeks of culture, adventitious shoots appeared directly along the edges of the explants. As much as 19 out of 52 (36.5%) and 25 out of 71 (35.2%) of the explants in genotype NHC1-130 and 'Ejagham', respectively, formed shoots after 6 weeks of culture. As much as 74% (14 out of 19) of the shoots regenerated in genotype NHC1-130 and 72% (18 out of 25) of those produced in genotype 'Ejagham' were transgenic. A DNA fragment corresponding to the wasabi defensin gene or the selection marker nptII was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of all regenerated plant clones rooted on hormone-free MS medium under the same selection pressure, suggesting their transgenic nature. Southern blot analysis confirmed successful integration of 1-5 copies of the transgene. RT-PCR, northern and western blot analyses revealed that wasabi defensin gene was expressed in transgenic lines. Transgenic lines showed increased levels of resistance to Alternaria solani, which causes Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium oxysporum, which causes Fusarium wilt, as compared to that of untransformed plants. PMID:20552202

Ntui, Valentine Otang; Thirukkumaran, Gunaratnam; Azadi, Pejman; Khan, Raham Sher; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

2010-09-01

120

Trichoderma asperellum strain T34 controls Fusarium wilt disease in tomato plants in soilless culture through competition for iron.  

PubMed

Trichoderma asperellum strain T34 has been reported to control the disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) on tomato plants. To study the importance of iron concentration in the growth media for the activity and competitiveness of T34 and the pathogen, we tested four iron concentrations in the nutrient solution [1, 10, 100, and 1000 microM provided as EDTA/Fe(III)] in a biological control experiment with T34 and Fol in tomato plants. The reduction of the Fusarium-infected shoot by T34 was only significant at 10 microM Fe. We hypothesized that Fe competition is one of the key factors in the biocontrol activity exerted by T34 against Fol, as an increase in Fe concentration over 10 microM would lead to the suppression of T34 siderophore synthesis and thus inhibition of Fe competition with Fol. T34 significantly reduced the populations of Fol at all the doses of Fe assayed. In contrast, Fol enhanced the populations of T34 at 1 and 10 microM Fe. Nevertheless, several plant physiological parameters like net CO(2) assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)), relative quantum efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)), and efficiency of excitation energy capture by open PSII reactive centers (Fv'/Fm') demonstrated the protection against Fol damage by treatment with T34 at 100 microM Fe. The first physiological parameter affected by the disease progression was g(s). Plant dry weight was decreased by Fe toxicity at 100 and 1,000 microM. T34-treated plants had significantly greater heights and dry weights than control plants at 1,000 microM Fe, even though T34 did not reduce the Fe content in leaves or stems. Furthermore, T34 enhanced plant height even at the optimal Fe concentration (10 microM) compared to control plants. In conclusion, T. asperellum strain T34 protected tomato plants from both biotic (Fusarium wilt disease) and abiotic stress [Fe(III) toxic effects]. PMID:19536588

Segarra, Guillem; Casanova, Eva; Avilés, Manuel; Trillas, Isabel

2010-01-01

121

Outbreak of fungal endophthalmitis due to Fusarium oxysporum following cataract surgery.  

PubMed

Outbreak of exogenous Fusarium endophthalmitis after cataract surgery was evaluated. Twenty patients developed postoperative endophthalmitis. In 19 eyes, pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed, in 14 cases (74 %) with primary intraocular lens explantation. In one case, the PPV was not performed because of poor general condition of the patient. Symptoms of endophthalmitis (damaged vision, iritis, tyndallization in anterior chamber, hypopyon) occurred at intervals of 16-79 days (mean 31.3 days). Fungal etiology was documented in 12 eyes (60 %). Fusarium oxysporum was evidenced by culture and/or microscopy and confirmed by PCR and sequencing analysis. Eighteen (90 %) patients were treated with oral voriconazole (400 mg/day) for a period of 4-6 weeks. The final visual acuity was 6/15 in 1 case (5 %), 6/60 and worse in 17 eyes (85 %), and in 2 cases (10 %), enucleation had to be performed. Viscoelastic filling material was suggested the most likely source of infection. Endophthalmitis caused by Fusarium spp. are a potentially big threat for patients with serious impact on vision. Successful management of the infection is highly dependent on early diagnosis including species identification and antifungal susceptibility testing, and on aggressive and long-term treatment. PMID:24381050

Buchta, Vladimír; Feuermannová, Alena; Váša, Martin; Bašková, Lenka; Kutová, Radka; Kubátová, Alena; Vejsová, Marcela

2014-02-01

122

Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum isolates from cottonseed imported from Australia into California for dairy cattle feed  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A unique biotype of the Fusarium wilt pathogen found in Australia in 1993 is favored by neutral or alkaline heavy soils and does not require nematodes to cause disease, making it a new threat to 4-6 million acres of USA Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). In 2001-2002, several shiploads of live ...

123

Molecular defense responses in roots and the rhizosphere against Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Plants face many different concurrent and consecutive abiotic and biotic stresses during their lifetime. Roots can be infected by numerous pathogens and parasitic organisms. Unlike foliar pathogens, root pathogens have not been explored enough to fully understand root-pathogen interactions and the underlying mechanism of defense and resistance. PR gene expression, structural responses, secondary metabolite and root exudate production, as well as the recruitment of plant defense-assisting "soldier" rhizosphere microbes all assist in root defense against pathogens and herbivores. With new high-throughput molecular tools becoming available and more affordable, now is the opportune time to take a deep look below the ground. In this addendum, we focus on soil-borne Fusarium oxysporum as a pathogen and the options plants have to defend themselves against these hard-to-control pathogens. PMID:25482759

Chen, Yi Chung; Kidd, Brendan N; Carvalhais, Lilia C; Schenk, Peer M

2014-12-01

124

Response of embryo axes of germinating seeds of yellow lupine to Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Defence responses of embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Polo were studied 48-96 h after inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f.sp. lupini. The infection restricted the growth of embryo axes, the lengths of infected embryo axes 72 and 96 h after inoculation were 11 and 12 mm less in the controls, respectively, while their masses c. 0.03 g less than in the controls. The concentration of H2O2 in embryo axes of inoculated germinating seeds was higher than in the control. This was probably a consequence of oxidative burst as well as H2O2 generation by the invading necrotrophic fungal pathogen. EPR-based analyses detected the presence of free radicals with g1 and g2 values of 2.0052 +/- 0.0004 and 2.0031 +/- 0.0005, respectively. Concentrations of the radicals 72 and 96 h after inoculation were 50% higher than in the control. The values of the spectroscopic splitting coefficients suggest that they are quinone radicals. However, inoculated embryo axes possess a number of adaptive mechanisms protecting them from oxidative damage. A twofold increase in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity was evidenced in embryo axes infected with F. oxysporum Schlecht f. sp. lupini, as compared to the control 48-96 h after inoculation. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity 96 h after inoculation was 80% higher than in the control. Furthermore, EPR-based analyses revealed a higher concentration of Mn2+ ions after 72 h for inoculated embryo axes, as compared to the control. On the other hand, no increase was detected in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (products of lipid peroxidation) in infected embryo axes. The protective mechanisms induced in lupine embryo axes in response to F. oxysporum Schlecht f.sp. lupini were compared with responses to infections with pathogenic fungi elicited in other plant families. PMID:15246062

Morkunas, Iwona; Bednarski, Waldemar; Koz?owska, Monika

2004-06-01

125

The velvet complex governs mycotoxin production and virulence of Fusarium oxysporum on plant and mammalian hosts.  

PubMed

Fungal pathogens provoke devastating losses in agricultural production, contaminate food with mycotoxins and give rise to life-threatening infections in humans. The soil-borne ascomycete Fusarium oxysporum attacks over 100 different crops and can cause systemic fusariosis in immunocompromised individuals. Here we functionally characterized VeA, VelB, VelC and LaeA, four components of the velvet protein complex which regulates fungal development and secondary metabolism. Deletion of veA, velB and to a minor extent velC caused a derepression of conidiation as well as alterations in the shape and size of microconidia. VeA and LaeA were required for full virulence of F.?oxysporum on tomato plants and on immunodepressed mice. A critical contribution of velvet consists in promoting chromatin accessibility and expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster for beauvericin, a depsipeptide mycotoxin that functions as a virulence determinant. These results reveal a conserved role of the velvet complex during fungal infection on plants and mammals. PMID:23106229

López-Berges, Manuel S; Hera, Concepción; Sulyok, Michael; Schäfer, Katja; Capilla, Javier; Guarro, Josep; Di Pietro, Antonio

2013-01-01

126

Effect of Endophytic Fusarium oxysporum on Host Preference of Radopholus similis to Tissue Culture Banana Plants.  

PubMed

The burrowing nematode Radopholus similis is one of the major constraints to banana (Musa spp.) production worldwide. Resource-poor farmers can potentially manage R. similis by using naturally occurring banana endophytes, such as nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum, that are inoculated into tissue culture banana plantlets. At present, it is unclear at what stage in the R. similis infection process the endophytes are most effective. In this study, the effect of three endophytic F. oxysporum isolates (V5w2, Eny1.31i and Eny7.11o) on R. similis host preference of either endophyte-treated or untreated banana plants was investigated. No differences were observed between the proportion of nematodes attracted to either root segments excised from endophyte-treated or untreated plants, or in experiments using endophyte-treated and untreated tissue culture banana plantlets. These results imply that the early processes of banana plant host recognition by R. similis are not affected by endophyte infection. PMID:19259463

Athman, Shahasi Y; Dubois, Thomas; Coyne, Daniel; Gold, Clifford S; Labuschagne, Nico; Viljoen, Altus

2006-12-01

127

An Iron 13S-Lipoxygenase with an ?-Linolenic Acid Specific Hydroperoxidase Activity from Fusarium oxysporum  

PubMed Central

Jasmonates constitute a family of lipid-derived signaling molecules that are abundant in higher plants. The biosynthetic pathway leading to plant jasmonates is initiated by 13-lipoxygenase-catalyzed oxygenation of ?-linolenic acid into its 13-hydroperoxide derivative. A number of plant pathogenic fungi (e.g. Fusarium oxysporum) are also capable of producing jasmonates, however, by a yet unknown biosynthetic pathway. In a search for lipoxygenase in F. oxysporum, a reverse genetic approach was used and one of two from the genome predicted lipoxygenases (FoxLOX) was cloned. The enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, purified via affinity chromatography, and its reaction mechanism characterized. FoxLOX was found to be a non-heme iron lipoxygenase, which oxidizes C18-polyunsaturated fatty acids to 13S-hydroperoxy derivatives by an antarafacial reaction mechanism where the bis-allylic hydrogen abstraction is the rate-limiting step. With ?-linolenic acid as substrate FoxLOX was found to exhibit a multifunctional activity, because the hydroperoxy derivatives formed are further converted to dihydroxy-, keto-, and epoxy alcohol derivatives. PMID:23741422

Brodhun, Florian; Cristobal-Sarramian, Alvaro; Zabel, Sebastian; Newie, Julia; Hamberg, Mats; Feussner, Ivo

2013-01-01

128

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426 as a potential biocontrol agent against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae.  

PubMed

In recent years, Bacillus species have received considerable attention for the biological control of many fungal diseases. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426 was tested for its potential use against a variety of plant pathogens. Our screen for genes involved in the biosynthesis of antifungal agents revealed that the fen and bmy gene clusters are present in the Q-426 genome. Lipopeptides such as bacillomycin D, fengycin A, and fengycin B were purified from the bacterial culture broth and subsequently identified by ESI-mass spectrometry. The minimal inhibitory concentration of fengycin A against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hansen O-27 was determined to be 31.25??g?ml(-1) . However, exposure of fungal cells to 50??g?ml(-1) of fengycin A did not allow permeation of fluorescein diacetate into the cytoplasm through the cell membrane. Moreover, leakage of intracellular inorganic cations, nucleic acid and protein were also not detected, indicating that the fungal cell membrane is not the primary target of action for fengycin A. Profound morphological changes were observed in the F. oxysporum strain and spore germination was completely inhibited, suggesting that 50??g?ml(-1) of fengycin A acts, at least, as a fungistatic agent. PMID:23553741

Zhao, Pengchao; Quan, Chunshan; Wang, Yingguo; Wang, Jianhua; Fan, Shengdi

2014-05-01

129

Comparative functional characterization of a novel benzoate hydroxylase cytochrome P450 of Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

FoCYP53A19, a novel cytochrome P450 capable of performing benzoate hydroxylation, was identified and characterized from the ascomycete Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. Comparative functional analysis of FoCYP53A19 with the heterologous and homologous cytochrome P450 reductases (CPR) such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCPR), Candida albicans (CaCPR) and F. oxysporum (FoCPR) revealed novel catalytic properties. The catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity of FoCYP53A19 were significantly influenced and altered by the source of the reductase employed. The yeast reconstitution system of FoCYP53A19 with ScCPR performed the hydroxylation of benzoic acid (BA) and demethylation of 3-methoxybenzoic acid (3-MBA); but when reconstituted with CaCPR, FoCYP53A19 performed only the essential hydroxylation of fungal benzoate catabolism. Remarkably, FoCYP53A19 with its homologous reductase FoCPR, not only demonstrated the improved conversion rates of BA and 3-MBA, but also exhibited activity toward the hydroxylation of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid. The electron transfer compatibility and the coupling efficiency between the homologous FoCYP-FoCPR system are significant and it favored enhanced monooxygenase activity with broader substrate specificity. PMID:25659633

Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Jung, Eunok; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Byung-Gee; Yun, Hyungdon

2015-03-01

130

Enhanced ethanol production from brewer's spent grain by a Fusarium oxysporum consolidated system  

PubMed Central

Background Brewer's spent grain (BG), a by-product of the brewing process, is attracting increasing scientific interest as a low-cost feedstock for many biotechnological applications. BG in the present study is evaluated as a substrate for lignocellulolytic enzyme production and for the production of ethanol by the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum under submerged conditions, implementing a consolidated bioconversion process. Fermentation experiments were performed with sugar mixtures simulating the carbohydrate content of BG in order to determine the utilization pattern that could be expected during the fermentation of the cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysate of BG. The sugar mixture fermentation study focused on the effect of the initial total sugar concentration and on the effect of the aeration rate on fermenting performance of F. oxysporum. The alkali pretreatment of BG and different aeration levels during the ethanol production stage were studied for the optimization of the ethanol production by F. oxysporum. Results Enzyme yields as high as 550, 22.5, 6.5, 3225, 0.3, 1.25 and 3 U per g of carbon source of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, ?-D-glucosidase, xylanase, feruloyl esterase, ?-D-xylosidase and ?-L-arabinofuranosidase respectively, were obtained during the growth stage under optimized submerged conditions. An ethanol yield of 109 g ethanol per kg of dry BG was obtained with alkali-pretreated BG under microaerobic conditions (0.01 vvm), corresponding to 60% of the theoretical yield based on total glucose and xylose content of BG. Conclusion The enzymatic profile of the extracellular extract from F. oxysporum submerged cultures using BG and corn cob as the carbon source was proved efficient for a successful hydrolysis of BG. The fermentation study carried out using sugar mixtures simulating BG's carbohydrates content and consecutively alkali-pretreated and untreated BG, indicates that BG hydrolysis is the bottleneck of the bioconversion process. However, a considerable bioconversion yield was achieved (60% of the theoretical) making this bioprocess worthy of further investigation for a potential commercial application. PMID:19208239

Xiros, Charilaos; Christakopoulos, Paul

2009-01-01

131

Murine Model for Fusarium oxysporum Invasive Fusariosis Reveals Organ-Specific Structures for Dissemination and Long-Term Persistence  

PubMed Central

The soil-borne plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum causes life-threatening invasive fusariosis in immunocompromised individuals. The mechanism of infection in mammalian hosts is largely unknown. In the present study we show that the symptoms of disseminated fusariosis caused by F. oxysporum in immunosuppressed mice are remarkably similar to those reported in humans. Distinct fungal structures were observed inside the host, depending on the infected organ. Invasive hyphae developed in the heart and kidney, causing massive colonization of the organs. By contrast, chlamydospore-like survival structures were found in lung, spleen and liver. Systemically infected mice also developed skin and eye infections, as well as thrombosis and necrosis in the tail. We further show that F. oxysporum can disseminate and persist in the organs of immunocompetent animals, and that these latent infections can lead to lethal systemic fusariosis if the host is later subjected to immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:24587124

Schäfer, Katja; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A. R.; MacCallum, Donna

2014-01-01

132

Murine model for Fusarium oxysporum invasive fusariosis reveals organ-specific structures for dissemination and long-term persistence.  

PubMed

The soil-borne plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum causes life-threatening invasive fusariosis in immunocompromised individuals. The mechanism of infection in mammalian hosts is largely unknown. In the present study we show that the symptoms of disseminated fusariosis caused by F. oxysporum in immunosuppressed mice are remarkably similar to those reported in humans. Distinct fungal structures were observed inside the host, depending on the infected organ. Invasive hyphae developed in the heart and kidney, causing massive colonization of the organs. By contrast, chlamydospore-like survival structures were found in lung, spleen and liver. Systemically infected mice also developed skin and eye infections, as well as thrombosis and necrosis in the tail. We further show that F. oxysporum can disseminate and persist in the organs of immunocompetent animals, and that these latent infections can lead to lethal systemic fusariosis if the host is later subjected to immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:24587124

Schäfer, Katja; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; MacCallum, Donna

2014-01-01

133

Distinct colonization patterns and cDNA-AFLP transcriptome profiles in compatible and incompatible interactions between melon and different races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Snyd. & Hans. (FOM) causes Fusarium wilt, the most important infectious disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.). The four known races of this pathogen can be distinguished only by infection on appropriate cultivars. No molecular tools are available that can discriminate among the races, and the molecular basis of compatibility and disease progression are poorly understood. Resistance to races 1 and 2 is controlled by a single dominant gene, whereas only partial polygenic resistance to race 1,2 has been described. We carried out a large-scale cDNA-AFLP analysis to identify host genes potentially related to resistance and susceptibility as well as fungal genes associated with the infection process. At the same time, a systematic reisolation procedure on infected stems allowed us to monitor fungal colonization in compatible and incompatible host-pathogen combinations. Results Melon plants (cv. Charentais Fom-2), which are susceptible to race 1,2 and resistant to race 1, were artificially infected with a race 1 strain of FOM or one of two race 1,2 w strains. Host colonization of stems was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 18 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi), and the fungus was reisolated from infected plants. Markedly different colonization patterns were observed in compatible and incompatible host-pathogen combinations. Five time points from the symptomless early stage (2 dpi) to obvious wilting symptoms (21 dpi) were considered for cDNA-AFLP analysis. After successful sequencing of 627 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) differentially expressed in infected plants, homology searching retrieved 305 melon transcripts, 195 FOM transcripts expressed in planta and 127 orphan TDFs. RNA samples from FOM colonies of the three strains grown in vitro were also included in the analysis to facilitate the detection of in planta-specific transcripts and to identify TDFs differentially expressed among races/strains. Conclusion Our data suggest that resistance against FOM in melon involves only limited transcriptional changes, and that wilting symptoms could derive, at least partially, from an active plant response. We discuss the pathogen-derived transcripts expressed in planta during the infection process and potentially related to virulence functions, as well as transcripts that are differentially expressed between the two FOM races grown in vitro. These transcripts provide candidate sequences that can be further tested for their ability to distinguish between races. Sequence data from this article have been deposited in GenBank, Accession Numbers: HO867279-HO867981. PMID:21338485

2011-01-01

134

Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri Race 1 Induced Redox State Alterations Are Coupled to Downstream Defense Signaling in Root Tissues of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)  

PubMed Central

Reactive oxygen species are known to play pivotal roles in pathogen perception, recognition and downstream defense signaling. But, how these redox alarms coordinate in planta into a defensive network is still intangible. Present study illustrates the role of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceri Race1 (Foc1) induced redox responsive transcripts in regulating downstream defense signaling in chickpea. Confocal microscopic studies highlighted pathogen invasion and colonization accompanied by tissue damage and deposition of callose degraded products at the xylem vessels of infected roots of chickpea plants. Such depositions led to the clogging of xylem vessels in compatible hosts while the resistant plants were devoid of such obstructions. Lipid peroxidation assays also indicated fungal induced membrane injury. Cell shrinkage and gradual nuclear adpression appeared as interesting features marking fungal ingress. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction exhibited differential expression patterns of redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors during Foc1 progression. Network analysis showed redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors to coordinate into a well orchestrated defensive network with sugars acting as internal signal modulators. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, cationic peroxidase, vacuolar sorting receptor, polyol transporter, sucrose synthase, and zinc finger domain containing transcription factor appeared as key molecular candidates controlling important hubs of the defense network. Functional characterization of these hub controllers may prove to be promising in understanding chickpea–Foc1 interaction and developing the case study as a model for looking into the complexities of wilt diseases of other important crop legumes. PMID:24058463

Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa

2013-01-01

135

In situ Carica papaya stem matrix and Fusarium oxysporum (NCBT-156) mediated bioremediation of chromium.  

PubMed

Removal of heavy metal chromium was carried out using the fungus Fusarium oxysporum NCBT-156 strain isolated from soil of leather tanning effluent in in situ condition using potassium dichromate solution with 10 per cent Czapek-dox liquid medium. Biosorbent matrix was developed using Carica papaya plant dry stem to colonize the fungal strain to facilitate bioabsorption process. Bioabsorption of chromium was by metabolically mediated intracellular accumulation process. Maximum efficiency of chromium removal by biosorption upto 90 per cent was achieved at the end of 5th day of incubation (120 h of contact time) for 100 and 200 ppm concentration, upto 80 per cent for 300 and 400 ppm, and upto 65 per cent for 500 ppm to 1000 ppm concentrations with pH ranging from 5.8, 5.6, 5.5, 5.4 and 5.2, respectively for 100, 200, 300, 400, 500-1000 ppm concentration. SDS-PAGE protein profile showed significant difference in 34 kDa protein band after chromium absorption by the fungus. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed that the main functional groups involved in the uptake of chromium by F. oxysporium strain were carbonyl, carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl groups. PMID:22403866

Amatussalam, A; Abubacker, M N; Rajendran, R Babu

2011-12-01

136

Trichoderma asperellum Strain T34 Controls Fusarium Wilt Disease in Tomato Plants in Soilless Culture Through Competition for Iron  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trichoderma asperellum strain T34 has been reported to control the disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) on tomato plants. To study the importance of iron concentration in the growth media for the activity and competitiveness\\u000a of T34 and the pathogen, we tested four iron concentrations in the nutrient solution [1, 10, 100, and 1000?µM provided as\\u000a EDTA\\/Fe(III)] in

Guillem Segarra; Eva Casanova; Manuel Avilés; Isabel Trillas

2010-01-01

137

Down-regulation of Fusarium oxysporum endogenous genes by Host-Delivered RNA interference enhances disease resistance  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum is a devastating pathogen causing extensive yield losses in a variety of crops and development of sustainable, environmentally friendly methods to improve crop resistance is crucial. We have used Host-Delivered RNA interference (HD-RNAi) technology to partially silence three different genes (FOW2, FRP1, and OPR) in the hemi-biotrophic fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans. Expression of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules targeting fungal pathogen genes was achieved in a number of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. F. oxysporum infecting the transgenic lines displayed substantially reduced mRNA levels on all three targeted genes, with an average of 75, 83, and 72% reduction for FOW2, FRP1, and OPR, respectively. The silencing of pathogen genes had a clear positive effect on the ability of the transgenic lines to fight infection. All transgenic lines displayed enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum with delayed disease symptom development, especially FRP1 and OPR lines. Survival rates after fungal infection were higher in the transgenic lines compared to control wild type plants which consistently showed survival rates of 10%, with FOW2 lines showing 25% survival; FRP1 lines 30–50% survival and OPR between 45 and 70% survival. The down-regulation effect was specific for the targeted genes without unintended effects in related genes. In addition to producing resistant crops, HD-RNAi can provide a useful tool to rapidly screen candidate fungal pathogenicity genes without the need to produce fungal knockout mutants. PMID:25654075

Hu, Zongli; Parekh, Urvi; Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Botella, Jose R.

2015-01-01

138

Development of a mode of application of bioorganic fertilizer for improving the biocontrol efficacy to Fusarium wilt  

Microsoft Academic Search

More effective ways of applying biocontrol products should be developed based both on the characteristics of the biocontrol\\u000a agents and the normal practices of the agricultural producer. A new system was developed to improve the biocontrol efficacy\\u000a of Fusarium wilt for watermelon production, and this system was tested in pot and field experiments. Biocontrol was achieved by applying\\u000a a novel

Ning LingChao; Chao Xue; Qiwei Huang; Xingming Yang; Yangchun Xu; Qirong Shen

2010-01-01

139

Activation of salicylic acid metabolism and signal transduction can enhance resistance to Fusarium wilt in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish).  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubens (Foc) is the most serious disease that attacks banana plants. Salicylic acid (SA) can play a key role in plant-microbe interactions. Our study is the first to examine the role of SA in conferring resistance to Foc TR4 in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish), which is the greatest commercial importance cultivar in Musa. We used quantitative real-time reverse polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression profiles of 45 genes related to SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways in a susceptible banana cultivar (cv. Cavendish) and a resistant banana cultivar (cv. Nongke No. 1) inoculated with Foc TR4. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways was suppressed in a susceptible cultivar and activated in a resistant cultivar. The SA levels in each treatment arm were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. SA levels were decreased in the susceptible cultivar and increased in the resistant cultivar. Finally, we examined the contribution of exogenous SA to Foc TR4 resistance in susceptible banana plants. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways as well as SA levels were significantly increased. The results suggest that one reason for banana susceptibility to Foc TR4 is that expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and SA levels are suppressed and that the induced resistance observed in banana against Foc TR4 might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance. PMID:25277445

Wang, Zhuo; Jia, Caihong; Li, Jingyang; Huang, Suzhen; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

2015-01-01

140

Linear mitochondrial plasmids of Fusarium oxysporum contain genes with sequence similarity to genes encoding a reverse transcriptase from Neurospora spp.  

PubMed Central

Two linear mitochondrial plasmids called pFOXC1 and pFOXC2 from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum were previously described. DNA sequence comparisons indicated that the derived amino acid sequences of both plasmids exhibit similarity to the reverse transcriptase of the Mauriceville and Varkud plasmids of Neurospora spp. The derived amino acid sequence of pFOXC2 has 51% similarity and 32% identity to the Neurospora reverse transcriptase; sequence similarity was greatest for seven blocks of amino acids that are conserved in reverse transcriptases from a wide range of biological sources. Northern analysis suggests that full-length RNAs corresponding to the plasmids are found in representative isolates. PMID:9251222

Kistler, H C; Benny, U; Powell, W A

1997-01-01

141

A proteomic study of in-root interactions between chickpea pathogens: the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne artiellia and the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris race 5.  

PubMed

Fusarium wilt caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc) is the main soil-borne disease limiting chickpea production. Management of this disease is achieved mainly by the use of resistant cultivars. However, co-infection of a Foc-resistant plant by the fungus and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne artiellia (Ma) causes breakdown of the resistance and thus limits its efficacy in the control of Fusarium wilt. In this work we aimed to reveal key aspects of chickpea:Foc:Ma interactions, studying fungal- and nematode-induced changes in root proteins, using chickpea lines 'CA 336.14.3.0' and 'ICC 14216K' that show similar resistant (Foc race 5) and susceptible (Ma) responses to either pathogen alone but a differential response after co-infection with both pathogens. 'CA 336.14.3.0' and 'ICC 14216K' chickpea plants were challenged with Foc race 5 and Ma, either in single or in combined inoculations, and the root proteomes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using three biological replicates. Pairwise comparisons of treatments indicated that 47 protein spots in 'CA 336.14.3.0' and 31 protein spots in 'ICC 14216K' underwent significant changes in intensity. The responsive protein spots tentatively identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS (27 spots for 'CA 336.14.3.0' and 15 spots for 'ICC 14216K') indicated that same biological functions were involved in the responses of either chickpea line to Foc race 5 and Ma, although common as well as line-specific responsive proteins were found within the different biological functions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study at the root proteome level of chickpea response to a biotic stress imposed by single and joint infections by two major soil-borne pathogens. PMID:21640211

Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Castillo, Pablo; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M; Tena, Manuel

2011-09-01

142

Detection of Fusarium wilt pathogens of Psidium guajava L. in soil using culture independent PCR (ciPCR).  

PubMed

Traditional culturing methods take a long time for identification of pathogenic isolates. A protocol has been developed for the detection of Fusarium from soil samples in the early stage of infection. Seventeen soil samples from different locations were collected before the onset of rains to find out the presence of Fusarium spp. population present in the soil of guava orchards and to correlate its presence with incidence of wilt. A PCR based method was developed for the molecular characterization of Fusarium using Fusarium spp. specific primer. DNA extracted by this method was free from protein and other contaminations and the yield was sufficient for PCR amplification. The primer developed in this study was amplifying ?230 bp in all infected samples while not in healthy soil. The specificity and sensitivity of primer were tested on several Fusarium spp. and found that this primer was amplifying 10(-6) dilution of the fungal DNA. The present study facilitates the rapid detection of Fusarium spp. from infected soil samples of guava collected from different agroclimatic regions in India. A rapid detection method for pathogens and a diagnostic assay for disease would facilitate an early detection of pathogen and lead to more effective control strategies. PMID:23961219

Mishra, Rupesh K; Pandey, Brajesh K; Muthukumar, M; Pathak, Neelam; Zeeshan, Mohammad

2013-01-01

143

The Transcription Factor Con7-1 Is a Master Regulator of Morphogenesis and Virulence in Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Previous studies have demonstrated the essential role of morphogenetic regulation in Fusarium oxysporum pathogenesis, including processes such as cell-wall biogenesis, cell division, and differentiation of infection-like structures. We identified three F. oxysporum genes encoding predicted transcription factors showing significant identities to Magnaporthe oryzae Con7p, Con7-1, plus two identical copies of Con7-2. Targeted deletion of con7-1 produced nonpathogenic mutants with altered morphogenesis, including defects in cell wall structure, polar growth, hyphal branching, and conidiation. By contrast, simultaneous inactivation of both con7-2 copies caused no detectable defects in the resulting mutants. Comparative microarray-based gene expression analysis indicated that Con7-1 modulates the expression of a large number of genes involved in different biological functions, including host-pathogen interactions, morphogenesis and development, signal perception and transduction, transcriptional regulation, and primary and secondary metabolism. Taken together, our results point to Con7-1 as general regulator of morphogenesis and virulence in F. oxysporum. PMID:25271883

Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; González-Reyes, José Antonio; G-Roncero, M Isabel

2015-01-01

144

Volatile Substances Produced by Fusarium oxysporum from Coffee Rhizosphere and Other Microbes affect Meloidogyne incognita and Arthrobotrys conoides.  

PubMed

Microorganisms produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which mediate interactions with other organisms and may be the basis for the development of new methods to control plant-parasitic nematodes that damage coffee plants. In the present work, 35 fungal isolates were isolated from coffee plant rhizosphere, Meloidogyne exigua eggs and egg masses. Most of the fungal isolates belonged to the genus Fusarium and presented in vitro antagonism classified as mutual exclusion and parasitism against the nematode-predator fungus Arthrobotrys conoides (isolated from coffee roots). These results and the stronger activity of VOCs against this fungus by 12 endophytic bacteria may account for the failure of A. conoides to reduce plant-parasitic nematodes in coffee fields. VOCs from 13 fungal isolates caused more than 40% immobility to Meloidogyne incognita second stage juveniles (J2), and those of three isolates (two Fusarium oxysporum isolates and an F. solani isolate) also led to 88-96% J2 mortality. M. incognita J2 infectivity decreased as a function of increased exposure time to F. oxysporum isolate 21 VOCs. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis lead to the detection of 38 VOCs produced by F. oxysporum is. 21 culture. Only five were present in amounts above 1% of the total: dioctyl disulfide (it may also be 2-propyldecan-1-ol or 1-(2-hydroxyethoxy) tridecane); caryophyllene; 4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol; and acoradiene. One of them was not identified. Volatiles toxic to nematodes make a difference among interacting microorganisms in coffee rhizosphere defining an additional attribute of a biocontrol agent against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23482720

Freire, E S; Campos, V P; Pinho, R S C; Oliveira, D F; Faria, M R; Pohlit, A M; Noberto, N P; Rezende, E L; Pfenning, L H; Silva, J R C

2012-12-01

145

Volatile Substances Produced by Fusarium oxysporum from Coffee Rhizosphere and Other Microbes affect Meloidogyne incognita and Arthrobotrys conoides  

PubMed Central

Microorganisms produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which mediate interactions with other organisms and may be the basis for the development of new methods to control plant-parasitic nematodes that damage coffee plants. In the present work, 35 fungal isolates were isolated from coffee plant rhizosphere, Meloidogyne exigua eggs and egg masses. Most of the fungal isolates belonged to the genus Fusarium and presented in vitro antagonism classified as mutual exclusion and parasitism against the nematode-predator fungus Arthrobotrys conoides (isolated from coffee roots). These results and the stronger activity of VOCs against this fungus by 12 endophytic bacteria may account for the failure of A. conoides to reduce plant-parasitic nematodes in coffee fields. VOCs from 13 fungal isolates caused more than 40% immobility to Meloidogyne incognita second stage juveniles (J2), and those of three isolates (two Fusarium oxysporum isolates and an F. solani isolate) also led to 88-96% J2 mortality. M. incognita J2 infectivity decreased as a function of increased exposure time to F. oxysporum isolate 21 VOCs. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis lead to the detection of 38 VOCs produced by F. oxysporum is. 21 culture. Only five were present in amounts above 1% of the total: dioctyl disulfide (it may also be 2-propyldecan-1-ol or 1-(2-hydroxyethoxy) tridecane); caryophyllene; 4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol; and acoradiene. One of them was not identified. Volatiles toxic to nematodes make a difference among interacting microorganisms in coffee rhizosphere defining an additional attribute of a biocontrol agent against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23482720

Freire, E. S.; Campos, V. P.; Pinho, R. S. C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Faria, M. R.; Pohlit, A. M.; Noberto, N. P.; Rezende, E. L.; Pfenning, L. H.; Silva, J. R. C.

2012-01-01

146

Suppressiveness to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici in re-used perlite and perlite–peat substrates in soilless tomatoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work reports the occurrence of suppressiveness to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici (FORL) on recycled perlite and perlite–peat mix from closed and open soilless systems. Nine soilless systems were sampled from three different sites in Northern and Southern Italy and different parameters, including sampling site, growing period before sampling, electric conductivity of the nutrient solution, tomato cultivar, and

Francesca Clematis; Andrea Minuto; Maria Lodovica Gullino; Angelo Garibaldi

2009-01-01

147

Influence of Soil Fumigation on the Fusarium-Root-knot Nematode Disease Complex of Cotton in California  

PubMed Central

For control of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and the pathogenic wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, on cotton, soil fumigants were applied in the field at conventional and higher rates. Conventional rates suppressed Fusarium wilt but higher rates gave quicker early growth, better stands, less stand loss over the season, a lower percentage of plants infected with wilt, fewer plants with vascular discoloration, and fewer nematodes. The best treatment about doubled the yields of untreated controls in one experiment and quadrupled them in another. PMID:19305846

Jorgenson, E. C.; Hyer, A. H.; Garber, R. H.; Smith, Shirley N.

1978-01-01

148

Discovery of a linoleate 9S-dioxygenase and an allene oxide synthase in a fusion protein of Fusarium oxysporum[S  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum is a devastating plant pathogen that oxidizes C18 fatty acids sequentially to jasmonates. The genome codes for putative dioxygenase (DOX)-cytochrome P450 (CYP) fusion proteins homologous to linoleate diol synthases (LDSs) and the allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Aspergillus terreus, e.g., FOXB_01332. Recombinant FOXB_01332 oxidized 18:2n-6 to 9S-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid by hydrogen abstraction and antarafacial insertion of molecular oxygen and sequentially to an allene oxide, 9S(10)-epoxy-10,12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid, as judged from nonenzymatic hydrolysis products (?- and ?-ketols). The enzyme was therefore designated 9S-DOX-AOS. The 9S-DOX activity oxidized C18 and C20 fatty acids of the n-6 and n-3 series to hydroperoxides at the n-9 and n-7 positions, and the n-9 hydroperoxides could be sequentially transformed to allene oxides with only a few exceptions. The AOS activity was stereospecific for 9- and 11-hydroperoxides with S configurations. FOXB_01332 has acidic and alcoholic residues, Glu946-Val-Leu-Ser949, at positions of crucial Asn and Gln residues (Asn-Xaa-Xaa-Gln) of the AOS and LDS. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that FOXB_01332 and AOS of A. terreus differ in catalytically important residues suggesting that AOS of A. terreus and F. oxysporum belong to different subfamilies. FOXB_01332 is the first linoleate 9-DOX with homology to animal heme peroxidases and the first 9-DOX-AOS fusion protein. PMID:24082064

Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H.

2013-01-01

149

Bronze Wilt of Cotton  

E-print Network

of secondary roots. Distinguishing Bronze Wilt from Other Diseases The above-ground symptoms of bronze wilt may resemble those of Fusarium and Verticillium wilts; Macrophomina and Phymatotrichum root rots; damage from root knot, reniform, stunt or lance... with Fusarium or Verticillium wilt (Fig.11, right). Fungal root rots cause discoloration and rotting, first of the bark and then of the entire root. Rhizoctonia causes girdling of the stem at the soil line and black discoloration of the pith in both the stem...

Bell, Alois A.; Nichols, Robert L.; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-02-12

150

Evaluations of Shorter Exposures of Contact Lens Cleaning Solutions against Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex and Fusarium solani Species Complex To Simulate Inappropriate Usage?  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of Fusarium keratitis in contact lens users resulted in withdrawal of ReNu with MoistureLoc solution, although the exact cause of the outbreak remains enigmatic. We evaluated current and discontinued multipurpose cleaning solutions (MPSs; MoistureLoc, Equate, MultiPlus, and OptiFree Express) against plankton- and biofilm-derived cells of Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) and F. solani species complex (FSSC). The methods included a traditional assay based on CFU counts and a novel flow cytometry (FC) assay based on percent cell subpopulation (PCS) stained with two fluorochromes (Sytox Red and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). The tests were done with the respective manufacturers' recommended cleaning regimens (240 to 360 min) and under shorter exposures (15 to 60 min) to simulate inappropriate usage by the customers. FC assay measured PCS, which was available rapidly, in 5 to 7 h, whereas 24 to 48 h was needed for CFU counts, and there was good correlation between the two methods (r2 = 0.97). FC assays allowed identification of injured fungal cells, which are likely to be missed with growth assays. In general, a time- and inoculum-dependent survival pattern was seen for both FOSC and FSSC cells, and biofilm-derived cells were more resistant than plankton-derived cells. MultiPlus and Equate produced 100% sterilization of fungi even under shorter exposures. However, biofilm FOSC and FSSC cells survived for up to 4 h in MoistureLoc solution and up to 6 h in OptiFree Express solution under shorter exposure times. This finding was enigmatic, as OptiFree Express is not associated with any outbreak of Fusarium keratitis. This study provides additional support for possible roles that improper lens cleaning regimens and fungal biofilms could play as predisposing factors for Fusarium keratitis. PMID:21300826

Ramani, Rama; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

2011-01-01

151

Evaluations of shorter exposures of contact lens cleaning solutions against Fusarium oxysporum species complex and Fusarium solani species complex to simulate inappropriate usage.  

PubMed

An outbreak of Fusarium keratitis in contact lens users resulted in withdrawal of ReNu with MoistureLoc solution, although the exact cause of the outbreak remains enigmatic. We evaluated current and discontinued multipurpose cleaning solutions (MPSs; MoistureLoc, Equate, MultiPlus, and OptiFree Express) against plankton- and biofilm-derived cells of Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) and F. solani species complex (FSSC). The methods included a traditional assay based on CFU counts and a novel flow cytometry (FC) assay based on percent cell subpopulation (PCS) stained with two fluorochromes (Sytox Red and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). The tests were done with the respective manufacturers' recommended cleaning regimens (240 to 360 min) and under shorter exposures (15 to 60 min) to simulate inappropriate usage by the customers. FC assay measured PCS, which was available rapidly, in 5 to 7 h, whereas 24 to 48 h was needed for CFU counts, and there was good correlation between the two methods (r2=0.97). FC assays allowed identification of injured fungal cells, which are likely to be missed with growth assays. In general, a time- and inoculum-dependent survival pattern was seen for both FOSC and FSSC cells, and biofilm-derived cells were more resistant than plankton-derived cells. MultiPlus and Equate produced 100% sterilization of fungi even under shorter exposures. However, biofilm FOSC and FSSC cells survived for up to 4 h in MoistureLoc solution and up to 6 h in OptiFree Express solution under shorter exposure times. This finding was enigmatic, as OptiFree Express is not associated with any outbreak of Fusarium keratitis. This study provides additional support for possible roles that improper lens cleaning regimens and fungal biofilms could play as predisposing factors for Fusarium keratitis. PMID:21300826

Ramani, Rama; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

2011-05-01

152

Enhancement of diosgenin production in Dioscorea zingiberensis cell culture by oligosaccharide elicitor from its endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17.  

PubMed

Diosgenin accumulation in cell suspension cultures of Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright was enhanced by treatment with saccharide elicitors from its endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum isolate Dzf17. The crude oligosaccharide was prepared by partial acid hydrolysis of the isolated Dzf17 fungal cell wall fragments. Optimal elicitation of diosgenin production by the isolated Dzf17 oligosaccharide in cell suspension culture was achieved when the oligosaccharide was added to the medium at a concentration of 30 mg/L after 16-day's continuous cell suspension culture, and the cells were cultured for another 8 days before harvesting. By using these optimal conditions, the diosgenin yield of the cultured cells reached its maximum of 5.25 mg/L, which was over a three-fold increase. PMID:19967973

Zhang, Ruifen; Li, Peiqin; Xu, Lijian; Chen, Yuanquan; Sui, Peng; Zhou, Ligang; Li, Jiaru

2009-11-01

153

The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, Encoding a Putative N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase, Is Involved in Cell Wall Architecture and Virulence  

PubMed Central

With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. ?gnt2 mutants had ?alterations in cell wall properties related to terminal ?or ?-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. ?gnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity. PMID:24416097

López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M. Isabel G.

2013-01-01

154

Silver nanoparticle production by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum: nanoparticle characterisation and analysis of antifungal activity against pathogenic yeasts  

PubMed Central

The microbial synthesis of nanoparticles is a green chemistry approach that combines nanotechnology and microbial biotechnology. The aim of this study was to obtain silver nanoparticles (SNPs) using aqueous extract from the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum as an alternative to chemical procedures and to evaluate its antifungal activity. SNPs production increased in a concentration-dependent way up to 1 mM silver nitrate until 30 days of reaction. Monodispersed and spherical SNPs were predominantly produced. After 60 days, it was possible to observe degenerated SNPs with in additional needle morphology. The SNPs showed a high antifungal activity against Candida and Cryptococcus , with minimum inhibitory concentration values ? 1.68 µg/mL for both genera. Morphological alterations of Cryptococcus neoformans treated with SNPs were observed such as disruption of the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane and lost of the cytoplasm content. This work revealed that SNPs can be easily produced by F. oxysporum aqueous extracts and may be a feasible, low-cost, environmentally friendly method for generating stable and uniformly sized SNPs. Finally, we have demonstrated that these SNPs are active against pathogenic fungi, such as Candida and Cryptococcus . PMID:24714966

Ishida, Kelly; Cipriano, Talita Ferreira; Rocha, Gustavo Miranda; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Gomes, Fabio; Miranda, Kildare; Rozental, Sonia

2013-01-01

155

Extraction Optimization of Water-Extracted Mycelial Polysaccharide from Endophytic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17 by Response Surface Methodology.  

PubMed

Water-extracted mycelial polysaccharide (WPS) from the endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17 isolated from Dioscorea zingiberensis was found to be an efficient elicitor to enhance diosgenin accumulation in D. zingigerensis cultures, and also demonstrated antioxidant activity. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the extraction process of WPS from F. oxysporum Dzf17 using Box-Behnken design (BBD). The ranges of the factors investigated were 1-3 h for extraction time (X(1)), 80-100 °C for extraction temperature (X(2)), and 20-40 (v/w) for ratio of water volume (mL) to raw material weight (g) (X(3)). The experimental data obtained were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. Statistical analysis showed that the polynomial regression model was in good agreement with the experimental results with the determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9978. By solving the regression equation and analyzing the response surface contour plots, the extraction parameters were optimized as 1.7 h for extraction time, 95 °C for extraction temperature, 39 (v/w) for ratio of water volume (mL) to raw material weight (g), and with 2 extractions. The maximum value (10.862%) of WPS yield was obtained when the WPS extraction process was conducted under the optimal conditions. PMID:22754306

Li, Peiqin; Lu, Shiqiong; Shan, Tijiang; Mou, Yan; Li, Yan; Sun, Weibo; Zhou, Ligang

2012-01-01

156

Extraction Optimization of Water-Extracted Mycelial Polysaccharide from Endophytic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17 by Response Surface Methodology  

PubMed Central

Water-extracted mycelial polysaccharide (WPS) from the endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17 isolated from Dioscorea zingiberensis was found to be an efficient elicitor to enhance diosgenin accumulation in D. zingigerensis cultures, and also demonstrated antioxidant activity. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the extraction process of WPS from F. oxysporum Dzf17 using Box-Behnken design (BBD). The ranges of the factors investigated were 1–3 h for extraction time (X1), 80–100 °C for extraction temperature (X2), and 20–40 (v/w) for ratio of water volume (mL) to raw material weight (g) (X3). The experimental data obtained were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. Statistical analysis showed that the polynomial regression model was in good agreement with the experimental results with the determination coefficient (R2) of 0.9978. By solving the regression equation and analyzing the response surface contour plots, the extraction parameters were optimized as 1.7 h for extraction time, 95 °C for extraction temperature, 39 (v/w) for ratio of water volume (mL) to raw material weight (g), and with 2 extractions. The maximum value (10.862%) of WPS yield was obtained when the WPS extraction process was conducted under the optimal conditions. PMID:22754306

Li, Peiqin; Lu, Shiqiong; Shan, Tijiang; Mou, Yan; Li, Yan; Sun, Weibo; Zhou, Ligang

2012-01-01

157

Shifts in banana root exudate profiles after colonization with the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain Fo162.  

PubMed

The non-pathogenic fungus Fusorium oxysporum strain Fo162 can efficiently colonize banana roots and reduce infecting by the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis. It is assumed that the fungus triggers a systemic reaction in the plant, which is affecting the biochemical composition of the root exudates and is thus causing the reduction in nematode colonization. To characterize these shifts, a continuous flow experiment was set up to collect root metabolites on a matrix (XAD-4). Based on HPLC analysis, the extracts, collected from the XAD-4, showed no differences in the composition of the root exudates between plants colonized by the endophyte and the controls. However, the accumulation of several compounds differed significantly. When these extracts were used in a bioassay with Radopholus similis none of the sample-treatment combinations had a significant attracting or repelling effect on the nematodes. This experiment shows that non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain Fo162 is able to upregulate the synthesis of at least some, so far unidentified compounds released by banana roots under hydroponic conditions. Further studies and optimization of the experimental setup are required to determine whether or not increase in metabolite concentration can affect nematode responses in vitro and ultimately in vivo. PMID:20222617

Kurtz, Andreas; Schouten, Alexander

2009-01-01

158

Solid-state cultures of Fusarium oxysporum transform aromatic components of olive-mill dry residue and reduce its phytotoxicity.  

PubMed

The present study mainly investigated the ability of solid-state cultures of the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain BAFC 738 to transform aromatic components to reduce the phytotoxicity in olive-mill dry residue (DOR), the waste from the two-phase manufacturing process. Lignin, hemicellulose, fats and water-soluble extractives contents of DOR colonized by the fungus for 20 weeks were reduced by 16%, 25%, 71% and 13%, respectively, while the cellulose content increased by 25%. In addition, the ethyl acetate-extractable phenolic fraction of the waste was reduced by 65%. However, mass-balance ultra-filtration and size-exclusion chromatography experiments suggested that the apparent removal of that fraction, mainly including 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl alcohol and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl alcohol, was due to polymerization. Mn-peroxidase and Mn-independent peroxidase activities were found in F. oxysporum solid-state cultures, while laccase and aryl alcohol oxidase activities were not detected. Tests performed with seedlings of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.), soybean (Glycine maximum Merr.), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) grown on soils containing 6% (w/w) of bioconverted DOR (kg soil)(-1) showed that the waste's phytotoxicity was removed by 20 weeks-old fungal cultures. By contrast, the same material exhibited a high residual toxicity towards lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). PMID:17207620

Sampedro, Inmaculada; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Ocampo, Juan A; Stazi, Silvia R; García-Romera, Inmaculada

2007-12-01

159

Interaction of Pseudostellaria heterophylla with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mediated by its root exudates in a consecutive monoculture system  

PubMed Central

In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to determine the amount of Fusarium oxysporum, an important replant disease pathogen in Pseudostellaria heterophylla rhizospheric soil. Moreover, HPLC was used to identify phenolic acids in root exudates then it was further to explore the effects of the phenolic acid allelochemicals on the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla. The amount of F. oxysporum increased significantly in P. heterophylla rhizosphere soil under a consecutive replant system as monitored through qPCR analysis. Furthermore, the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mycelium was enhanced by root exudates with a maximum increase of 23.8%. In addition, the number of spores increased to a maximum of 12.5-fold. Some phenolic acids promoted the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mycelium and spore production. Our study revealed that phenolic acids in the root secretion of P. heterophylla increased long with its development, which was closely related to changes in rhizospheric microorganisms. The population of pathogenic microorganisms such as F. oxysporum in the rhizosphere soil of P. heterophylla also sharply increased. Our results on plant-microbe communication will help to better clarify the cause of problems associated with P. heterophylla under consecutive monoculture treatment. PMID:25645742

Zhao, Yongpo; Wu, Linkun; Chu, Leixia; Yang, Yanqiu; Li, Zhenfang; Azeem, Saadia; Zhang, Zhixing; Fang, Changxun; Lin, Wenxiong

2015-01-01

160

Interaction of Pseudostellaria heterophylla with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mediated by its root exudates in a consecutive monoculture system.  

PubMed

In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to determine the amount of Fusarium oxysporum, an important replant disease pathogen in Pseudostellaria heterophylla rhizospheric soil. Moreover, HPLC was used to identify phenolic acids in root exudates then it was further to explore the effects of the phenolic acid allelochemicals on the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla. The amount of F. oxysporum increased significantly in P. heterophylla rhizosphere soil under a consecutive replant system as monitored through qPCR analysis. Furthermore, the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mycelium was enhanced by root exudates with a maximum increase of 23.8%. In addition, the number of spores increased to a maximum of 12.5-fold. Some phenolic acids promoted the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. heterophylla mycelium and spore production. Our study revealed that phenolic acids in the root secretion of P. heterophylla increased long with its development, which was closely related to changes in rhizospheric microorganisms. The population of pathogenic microorganisms such as F. oxysporum in the rhizosphere soil of P. heterophylla also sharply increased. Our results on plant-microbe communication will help to better clarify the cause of problems associated with P. heterophylla under consecutive monoculture treatment. PMID:25645742

Zhao, Yongpo; Wu, Linkun; Chu, Leixia; Yang, Yanqiu; Li, Zhenfang; Azeem, Saadia; Zhang, Zhixing; Fang, Changxun; Lin, Wenxiong

2015-01-01

161

Impact of biological control agents on fusaric acid secreted from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli (Massey) Snyder and Hansen in Gladiolus grandiflorus corms.  

PubMed

Fusaric acid (FA) (5-n-butylpuridine 2-carboxyl acid), a highly toxic secondary metabolite produced by Fusarium oxysporum strains, plays a significant role in disease development. The abilities of three F. oxysporum f. sp. gladioli (Massey) Snyder and Hansen isolates (G010; 649-91; and 160-57) to produce FA in infected Gladiolus corm tissues was evaluated in vitro in relation to the presence of two biological control agents, Trichoderma harzianum T22, and Aneurinobacillus migulanus. Pathogenicity tests were used to differentiate between the abilities of the F. oxysporum strains to secrete FA. FA was identified using LC/MS and quantified using HPLC. Isolate G010 was significantly more virulent (P < 0.01) on Gladiolus grandiflorus corms; it secretes 1.8 ?M FA/g fresh weight corm into inoculated Gladiolus. Moreover, G010 was the only isolate that produced FA among the three examined isolates. There was a correlation between the corm lesion area and the FA secretion ability of F. oxysporum f. sp. gladioli (P < 0.001; r (2) = 0.96). No FA was detected in PDA cultures of F.oxysporum f. sp. gladioli isolates. The presence of T. harzianum T22 appeared to prevent FA secretion into the corms. In the presence of A. migulanus, however, the amount of FA secreted into the corm tissues increased. These results support the use of T. harzianum as an effective biological control agent against F. oxysporum f. sp. gladioli. PMID:20814727

Nosir, Walid; McDonald, Jim; Woodward, Steve

2011-01-01

162

Incidence of Fusarium wilt of cotton as affected by pathogen propagule type, age and source  

E-print Network

for field infestation, it may be of great concern in a greenhouse environment. In one study, Fusarium spores were the fifth most common fungal airborne spore, after Cladosporium, Alternaria, Penicillium and Aspergillus (31). In a study on Fusarium stem...

McEntee, James Philip

2012-06-07

163

Risk levels of invasive Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. in areas suitable for date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) cultivation under various climate change projections.  

PubMed

Global climate model outputs involve uncertainties in prediction, which could be reduced by identifying agreements between the output results of different models, covering all assumptions included in each. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. is an invasive pathogen that poses risk to date palm cultivation, among other crops. Therefore, in this study, the future distribution of invasive Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., confirmed by CSIRO-Mk3.0 (CS) and MIROC-H (MR) GCMs, was modeled and combined with the future distribution of date palm predicted by the same GCMs, to identify areas suitable for date palm cultivation with different risk levels of invasive Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., for 2030, 2050, 2070 and 2100. Results showed that 40%, 37%, 33% and 28% areas projected to become highly conducive to date palm are under high risk of its lethal fungus, compared with 37%, 39%, 43% and 42% under low risk, for the chosen years respectively. Our study also indicates that areas with marginal risk will be limited to 231, 212, 186 and 172 million hectares by 2030, 2050, 2070 and 2100. The study further demonstrates that CLIMEX outputs refined by a combination of different GCMs results of different species that have symbiosis or parasite relationship, ensure that the predictions become robust, rather than producing hypothetical findings, limited purely to publication. PMID:24340100

Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit

2013-01-01

164

Risk Levels of Invasive Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. in Areas Suitable for Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) Cultivation under Various Climate Change Projections  

PubMed Central

Global climate model outputs involve uncertainties in prediction, which could be reduced by identifying agreements between the output results of different models, covering all assumptions included in each. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. is an invasive pathogen that poses risk to date palm cultivation, among other crops. Therefore, in this study, the future distribution of invasive Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., confirmed by CSIRO-Mk3.0 (CS) and MIROC-H (MR) GCMs, was modeled and combined with the future distribution of date palm predicted by the same GCMs, to identify areas suitable for date palm cultivation with different risk levels of invasive Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., for 2030, 2050, 2070 and 2100. Results showed that 40%, 37%, 33% and 28% areas projected to become highly conducive to date palm are under high risk of its lethal fungus, compared with 37%, 39%, 43% and 42% under low risk, for the chosen years respectively. Our study also indicates that areas with marginal risk will be limited to 231, 212, 186 and 172 million hectares by 2030, 2050, 2070 and 2100. The study further demonstrates that CLIMEX outputs refined by a combination of different GCMs results of different species that have symbiosis or parasite relationship, ensure that the predictions become robust, rather than producing hypothetical findings, limited purely to publication. PMID:24340100

Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit

2013-01-01

165

Enhancement of diosgenin production in Dioscorea zingiberensis cell cultures by oligosaccharides from its endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17.  

PubMed

The effects of the oligosaccharides from the endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Dzf17 as elicitors on diosgenin production in cell suspension cultures of its host Dioscorea zingiberensis were investigated. Three oligosaccharides, DP4, DP7 and DP10, were purified from the oligosaccharide fractions DP2-5, DP5-8 and DP8-12, respectively, which were prepared from the water-extracted mycelial polysaccharide of the endophytic fungus F. oxysporum Dzf17. When the cell cultures were treated with fraction DP5-8 at 20 mg/L on day 26 and harvested on day 32, the maximum diosgenin yield (2.187 mg/L) was achieved, which was 5.65-fold of control (0.387 mg/L). When oligosaccharides DP4, DP7 and DP10 were individually added to 26-day-old D. zingiberensis cell cultures at concentrations of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 mg/L in medium, DP7 at 6 mg/L was found to significantly enhance diosgenin production, with a yield of 3.202 mg/L, which was 8.27-fold of control. When the cell cultures were treated with DP7 twice on days 24 and 26, and harvested on day 30, both diosgenin content and yield were significantly increased and reached the maximums of 1.159 mg/g dw and 4.843 mg/L, both of which were higher than those of single elicitation, and were 9.19- and 12.38-fold of control, respectively. PMID:22183887

Li, Peiqin; Mao, Ziling; Lou, Jingfeng; Li, Yan; Mou, Yan; Lu, Shiqiong; Peng, Youliang; Zhou, Ligang

2011-01-01

166

Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in Fusarium delphinoides strain GPK, a causal agent of Wilt in Chickpea.  

PubMed

Fusarium delphinoides (Ascomycota; Nectriaceae) is an indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing plant pathogen and a causal agent of wilt in chickpea. The IAA biosynthetic pathway in F. delphinoides strain GPK (FDG) was examined by analyzing metabolic intermediates and by feeding experiments. Gas chromatograph (GC) analysis of FDG culture filtrates showed the presence of metabolic intermediates of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA), indole-3-acetamide (IAM), and tryptamine (TRA) pathways. The different IAA biosynthetic pathways were further confirmed by identifying the presence of different enzymes of these pathways. Substrate specificity study of aromatic amino acid aminotransferase revealed that the enzyme is highly specific for tryptophan (Trp) and ?-ketoglutarate (?-kg) as amino group donor and acceptor, respectively. Furthermore, the concentration-dependent effect of exogenous IAA on fungal growth was established. Low concentration of exogenous IAA increases the fungal growth and at high concentration it decreases the growth of FDG. PMID:23306880

Kulkarni, Guruprasad B; Sanjeevkumar, S; Kirankumar, B; Santoshkumar, M; Karegoudar, T B

2013-02-01

167

BIOTRANSFORMATION OF 2,4,6-TRINITROTOLUENE (TNT) BY A PLANT-ASSOCIATED FUNGUS FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM  

EPA Science Inventory

The capability of a plant-associated fungus, Fusarium oxyvorum, to transform TNT in liquid cultures was investigated. TNT was transformed into 2-amino-4, 6-dinitrotoluene (2-A-DNT), 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene (4-A- DNT), and 2, 4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2, 4-DAT) via 2- and 4-hy...

168

Primary Metabolism of Chickpea Is the Initial Target of Wound Inducing Early Sensed Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race I  

PubMed Central

Background Biotrophic interaction between host and pathogen induces generation of reactive oxygen species that leads to programmed cell death of the host tissue specifically encompassing the site of infection conferring resistance to the host. However, in the present study, biotrophic relationship between Fusarium oxysporum and chickpea provided some novel insights into the classical concepts of defense signaling and disease perception where ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation followed by hypersensitive responses determined the magnitude of susceptibility or resistant potentiality of the host. Methodology/Principal Findings Microscopic observations detected wound mediated in planta pathogenic establishment and its gradual progression within the host vascular tissue. cDNA-AFLP showed differential expression of many defense responsive elements. Real time expression profiling also validated the early recognition of the wound inducing pathogen by the host. The interplay between fungus and host activated changes in primary metabolism, which generated defense signals in the form of sugar molecules for combating pathogenic encounter. Conclusions/Significance The present study showed the limitations of hypersensitive response mediated resistance, especially when foreign encounters involved the food production as well as the translocation machinery of the host. It was also predicted from the obtained results that hypersensitivity and active species generation failed to impart host defense in compatible interaction between chickpea and Fusarium. On the contrary, the defense related gene(s) played a critical role in conferring natural resistance to the resistant host. Thus, this study suggests that natural selection is the decisive factor for selecting and segregating out the suitable type of defense mechanism to be undertaken by the host without disturbing its normal metabolism, which could deviate from the known classical defense mechanisms. PMID:20140256

Gupta, Sumanti; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Sengupta, Anindita; Basu, Debabrata; Das, Sampa

2010-01-01

169

Development of a Real-Time Fluorescence Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 In Soil  

PubMed Central

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Fusarium wilt (Panama disease), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). The Foc tropical race 4 (TR4) is currently known as a major concern in global banana production. No effective resistance is known in Musa to Foc, and no effective measures for controlling Foc once banana plants have been infected in place. Early and accurate detection of Foc TR4 is essential to protect banana industry and guide banana planting. A real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RealAmp) was developed for the rapid and quantitative detection of Foc TR4 in soil. The detection limit of the RealAmp assay was approximately 0.4 pg/µl plasmid DNA when mixed with extracted soil DNA or 103 spores/g of artificial infested soil, and no cross-reaction with other relative pathogens were observed. The RealAmp assay for quantifying genomic DNA of TR4 was confirmed by testing both artificially and naturally infested samples. Quantification of the soil-borne pathogen DNA of Foc TR4 in naturally infested samples was no significant difference compared to classic real-time PCR (P>0.05). Additionally, RealAmp assay was visual with an improved closed-tube visual detection system by adding SYBR Green I fluorescent dye to the inside of the lid prior to amplification, which avoided the inhibitory effects of the stain on DNA amplification and makes the assay more convenient in the field and could thus become a simple, rapid and effective technique that has potential as an alternative tool for the detection and monitoring of Foc TR4 in field, which would be a routine DNA-based testing service for the soil-borne pathogen in South China. PMID:24376590

Pu, Jinji; Qi, Yanxiang; Yu, Qunfang; Xie, Yixian; Peng, Jun

2013-01-01

170

Development of a real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and quantitative detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 in soil.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Fusarium wilt (Panama disease), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). The Foc tropical race 4 (TR4) is currently known as a major concern in global banana production. No effective resistance is known in Musa to Foc, and no effective measures for controlling Foc once banana plants have been infected in place. Early and accurate detection of Foc TR4 is essential to protect banana industry and guide banana planting. A real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RealAmp) was developed for the rapid and quantitative detection of Foc TR4 in soil. The detection limit of the RealAmp assay was approximately 0.4 pg/µl plasmid DNA when mixed with extracted soil DNA or 10(3) spores/g of artificial infested soil, and no cross-reaction with other relative pathogens were observed. The RealAmp assay for quantifying genomic DNA of TR4 was confirmed by testing both artificially and naturally infested samples. Quantification of the soil-borne pathogen DNA of Foc TR4 in naturally infested samples was no significant difference compared to classic real-time PCR (P>0.05). Additionally, RealAmp assay was visual with an improved closed-tube visual detection system by adding SYBR Green I fluorescent dye to the inside of the lid prior to amplification, which avoided the inhibitory effects of the stain on DNA amplification and makes the assay more convenient in the field and could thus become a simple, rapid and effective technique that has potential as an alternative tool for the detection and monitoring of Foc TR4 in field, which would be a routine DNA-based testing service for the soil-borne pathogen in South China. PMID:24376590

Zhang, Xin; Zhang, He; Pu, Jinji; Qi, Yanxiang; Yu, Qunfang; Xie, Yixian; Peng, Jun

2013-01-01

171

Selection and differentiation of Bacillus spp. Antagonistic to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and Alternaria solani infecting Tomato.  

PubMed

Antagonistic Bacillus spp. displaying in vitro production of siderophore, chitinase, and ?-1,3-glucanase were identified from dual culture assays. In independent greenhouse studies, seed bacterization and soil application of Bacillus atrophaeus S2BC-2 challenge inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (FOL) and Alternaria solani (AS) recorded low percent disease index of 25.3 and 28.7, respectively, over nonbacterised pathogen control (44.3 and 56.4). The low disease incidence corroborated with tomato growth promotion with high vigor index (8,041.2) and fresh plant weight (82.5 g) on challenge inoculation with FOL. Analysis of root and leaf samples in rhizobacterial treatment challenged with FOL and AS revealed maximum induction of chitinase (1.9 and 1.7 U/mg of protein, respectively) and ?-1,3-glucanase (23.5 and 19.2 U/mg of protein, respectively). In native gel activity assays, the rhizobacterial treatment on challenge inoculation strongly expressed three high intensity PO isoforms along with one low intensity isoform. In studies on genetic diversity of the Bacillus strains by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) and amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) patterns, ARDRA was more highly discriminant than REP-PCR and allowed grouping of the strains and differentiation of the antagonistic strains from other isolates. PMID:21503737

Shanmugam, Veerubommu; Atri, Kamini; Gupta, Samriti; Kanoujia, Nandina; Naruka, Digvijay Singh

2011-03-01

172

Fusarium oxysporum induces the production of proteins and volatile organic compounds by Trichoderma harzianum T-E5.  

PubMed

Trichoderma species have been used widely as biocontrol agents for the suppression of soil-borne pathogens. However, some antagonistic mechanisms of Trichoderma are not well characterized. In this study, a series of laboratory experiments were designed to characterize the importance of mycoparasitism, exoenzymes, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by Trichoderma harzianum T-E5 for the control of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC). We further tested whether these mechanisms were inducible and upregulated in presence of FOC. The results were as follows: T-E5 heavily parasitized FOC by coiling and twisting the entire mycelium of the pathogen in dual cultures. T-E5 growing medium conditioned with deactivated FOC (T2) showed more proteins and higher cell wall-degrading enzyme activities than T1, suggesting that FOC could induce the upregulation of exoenzymes. The presence of deactivated FOC (T2') also resulted in the upregulation of VOCs that five and eight different types T-E5-derived VOCs were identified from T1' and T2', respectively. Further, the excreted VOCs in T2' showed significantly higher antifungal activities against FOC than T1'. In conclusion, mycoparasitism of T-E5 against FOC involved mycelium contact and the production of complex extracellular substances. Together, these data provide clues to help further clarify the interactions between these fungi. PMID:25135494

Zhang, Fengge; Yang, Xingming; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

2014-10-01

173

Isolation, Purification and Characterization of Vinblastine and Vincristine from Endophytic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Isolated from Catharanthus roseus  

PubMed Central

Endophytic fungi reside in a symbiotic fashion inside their host plants, mimic their chemistry and interestingly, produce the same natural products as their hosts and are thus being screened for the production of valuable compounds like taxol, camptothecin, podophyllotoxin, etc. Vinblastine and vincristine are excellent anti-cancer drugs but their current production using plants is non-abundant and expensive. In order to make these drugs readily available to the patients at affordable prices, we isolated the endophytic fungi from Catharanthus roseus plant and found a fungus AA-CRL-6 which produces vinblastine and vincristine in appreciable amounts. These drugs were purified by TLC and HPLC and characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, ESI-MS, MS/MS and 1H NMR. One liter of culture filtrate yielded 76 µg and 67 µg of vinblastine and vincristine respectively. This endophytic fungal strain was identified as Fusarium oxysporum based upon its cultural and morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. PMID:24066024

Kumar, Ashutosh; Patil, Deepak; Rajamohanan, Pattuparambil Ramanpillai; Ahmad, Absar

2013-01-01

174

Extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Bacillus sp. GP-23 and evaluation of their antifungal activity towards Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

In last few decades nanoparticles have attracted and emerged as a field in biomedical research due to their incredible applications. The current research was focused on extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using cell free culture supernatant of strain GP-23. It was found that the strain GP-23 belonged to Bacillus species by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Biosynthesis of AgNPs was achieved by addition of culture supernatant with aqueous silver nitrate solution, after 24 h it turned to brown color solution with a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the Plasmon absorbance of AgNPs by UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, XRD, HRTEM, EDX and AFM. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape with size in the range of 7-21 nm. It was stable in aqueous solution for five months period of storage at room temperature under dark condition. The biosynthesized AgNPs exhibited strong antifungal activity against plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium oxysporum at the concentration of 8 ?g ml(-1). The results suggest that the synthesized AgNPs act as an effective antifungal agent/fungicide. PMID:23376272

Gopinath, V; Velusamy, P

2013-04-01

175

Comparative study of the bioconversion process using R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene as substrates for Fusarium oxysporum 152B.  

PubMed

This study compared the bioconversion process of S-(-)-limonene into limonene-1,2-diol with the already established biotransformation of R-(+)-limonene into ?-terpineol using the same biocatalyst in both processes, Fusarium oxysporum 152B. The bioconversion of the S-(-)-isomer was tested on cell permeabilisation under anaerobic conditions and using a biphasic system. When submitted to permeabilisation trials, this biocatalyst has shown a relatively high resistance; still, no production of limonene-1,2-diol and a loss of activity of the biocatalyst were observed after intense cell treatment, indicating a complete loss of cell viability. Furthermore, the results showed that this process can be characterised as an aerobic system that was catalysed by limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase, had an intracellular nature and was cofactor-dependent because the final product was not detected by an anaerobic process. Finally, this is the first report to characterise the bioconversion of R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene by cellular detoxification using ultra-structural analysis. PMID:25529726

Molina, Gustavo; Bution, Murillo L; Bicas, Juliano L; Dolder, Mary Anne Heidi; Pastore, Gláucia M

2015-05-01

176

Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt.  

PubMed

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt. PMID:24808737

Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

2014-03-01

177

Effects of endophytic Fusarium oxysporum towards Radopholus similis activity in absence of banana.  

PubMed

Four endophytic fungi (Fusarium spp.) isolated from the cortical tissue of surface-sterilised banana as well as from tomato roots were tested for their capacity of biological control towards the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis on banana. The pathogenic and parasitic capacities of endophytic fungi towards R. similis were tested in in vitro experiments. No parasitism of fungi on R. similis was observed. However, nematode activity decreased significantly in the presence of all endophytic fungi in vitro when compared to nematodes in the absence of fungi. The effects of fungi on R. similis activities in the soil were tested in the absence of plants. Nematode activities were reduced significantly by 16-30% by endophytic fungi when compared to untreated soil. PMID:15759438

Vu, T T; Sikora, R A; Hauschild, R

2004-01-01

178

Interactions between the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis sonorensis (Nematoda: Heterorhabditidae) and the saprobic fungus Fusarium oxysporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales).  

PubMed

In this study, we assessed the effect of the saprobic fungus, Fusarium oxysporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) on the fitness of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis sonorensis (Caborca strain). Sand column assays were considered to evaluate the effect of fungal mycelia on infective juvenile (IJ) movement and host access. Additionally, we investigated the effect of fungal spores on the nematodes' ability to search for a host, its virulence, penetration efficiency and reproduction. Three application timings were considered to assess interactions between the fungus and the nematodes. In vitro assays were also considered to determine the effect of fungal extracts on the nematode's symbiotic bacteria. Our observations indicate that presence and age of fungal mycelia significantly affect IJ movement in the sand columns and their ability to establish in the host. These results were also reflected in a reduced insect mortality. In particular, treatments with the 15 days old mycelia showed a significant reduction in insect mortality and penetration efficiency. Presence of fungal spores also impacted nematode virulence and reproduction. In particular, two of the application timings tested (simultaneous [EPN and fungal spores applied at the same time] and alternate I [EPN applied first, fungus applied 24h later]) resulted in antagonistic interactions. Moreover, IJ progeny was reduced to half in the simultaneous application. In vitro assays revealed that fungal extracts at the highest concentration tested (10mg/ml) inhibited the growth of the symbiotic bacteria. Overall, these results suggest that saprobic fungi may play an important role in regulating. EPN populations in the soil, and that they may be one of the factors that impact nematode survival in the soil and their access to insect hosts. PMID:24211424

Navarro, P D; McMullen, J G; Stock, S P

2014-01-01

179

Targeting iron acquisition blocks infection with the fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

Filamentous fungi are an important cause of pulmonary and systemic morbidity and mortality, and also cause corneal blindness and visual impairment worldwide. Utilizing in vitro neutrophil killing assays and a model of fungal infection of the cornea, we demonstrated that Dectin-1 dependent IL-6 production regulates expression of iron chelators, heme and siderophore binding proteins and hepcidin in infected mice. In addition, we show that human neutrophils synthesize lipocalin-1, which sequesters fungal siderophores, and that topical lipocalin-1 or lactoferrin restricts fungal growth in vivo. Conversely, we show that exogenous iron or the xenosiderophore deferroxamine enhances fungal growth in infected mice. By examining mutant Aspergillus and Fusarium strains, we found that fungal transcriptional responses to low iron levels and extracellular siderophores are essential for fungal growth during infection. Further, we showed that targeting fungal iron acquisition or siderophore biosynthesis by topical application of iron chelators or statins reduces fungal growth in the cornea by 60% and that dual therapy with the iron chelator deferiprone and statins further restricts fungal growth by 75%. Together, these studies identify specific host iron-chelating and fungal iron-acquisition mediators that regulate fungal growth, and demonstrate that therapeutic inhibition of fungal iron acquisition can be utilized to treat topical fungal infections. PMID:23853581

Leal, Sixto M; Roy, Sanhita; Vareechon, Chairut; Carrion, Steven deJesus; Clark, Heather; Lopez-Berges, Manuel S; Di Pietro, Antonio; diPietro, Antonio; Schrettl, Marcus; Beckmann, Nicola; Redl, Bernhard; Haas, Hubertus; Pearlman, Eric

2013-01-01

180

Deep 16S rRNA Pyrosequencing Reveals a Bacterial Community Associated with Banana Fusarium Wilt Disease Suppression Induced by Bio-Organic Fertilizer Application  

PubMed Central

Our previous work demonstrated that application of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) to a banana mono-culture orchard with serious Fusarium wilt disease effectively decreased the number of soil Fusarium sp. and controlled the soil-borne disease. Because bacteria are an abundant and diverse group of soil organisms that responds to soil health, deep 16 S rRNA pyrosequencing was employed to characterize the composition of the bacterial community to investigate how it responded to BIO or the application of other common composts and to explore the potential correlation between bacterial community, BIO application and Fusarium wilt disease suppression. After basal quality control, 137,646 sequences and 9,388 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the 15 soil samples. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes and Actinobacteria were the most frequent phyla and comprised up to 75.3% of the total sequences. Compared to the other soil samples, BIO-treated soil revealed higher abundances of Gemmatimonadetes and Acidobacteria, while Bacteroidetes were found in lower abundance. Meanwhile, on genus level, higher abundances compared to other treatments were observed for Gemmatimonas and Gp4. Correlation and redundancy analysis showed that the abundance of Gemmatimonas and Sphingomonas and the soil total nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen content were higher after BIO application, and they were all positively correlated with disease suppression. Cumulatively, the reduced Fusarium wilt disease incidence that was seen after BIO was applied for 1-year might be attributed to the general suppression based on a shift within the bacteria soil community, including specific enrichment of Gemmatimonas and Sphingomonas. PMID:24871319

Ruan, Yunze; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Jian; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

2014-01-01

181

Characterization of a novel plantain Asr gene, MpAsr, that is regulated in response to infection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and abiotic stresses.  

PubMed

Asr (abscisic acid, stress, ripening induced) genes are typically upregulated by a wide range of factors, including drought, cold, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and injury; in addition to plant responses to developmental and environmental signals. We isolated an Asr gene, MpAsr, from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of cold induced plantain (Musa paradisiaca) leaves. MpAsr expression was upregulated in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infected plantain leaves, peels and roots, suggesting that MpAsr plays a role in plantain pathogen response. In addition, a 581-bp putative promoter region of MpAsr was isolated via genome walking and cis-elements involved in abiotic stress and pathogen-related responses were detected in this same region. Furthermore, the MpAsr promoter demonstrated positive activity and inducibility in tobacco under F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection and ABA, cold, dehydration and high salt concentration treatments. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MpAsr exhibited higher drought tolerance, but showed no significant decreased sensitivity to F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. These results suggest that MpAsr might be involved in plant responses to both abiotic stress and pathogen attack. PMID:20377692

Liu, Hai-Yan; Dai, Jin-Ran; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Bing; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

2010-03-01

182

Phenyl Derivative of Pyranocoumarin Precludes Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici Infection in Lycopersicon esculentum via Induction of Enzymes of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway.  

PubMed

Binding of phenyl derivative of pyranocoumarin (PDP) modulated activity of fungal endopolygalacturonase in silico. Induced fit docking study of PDP with endopolygalacturonase (1HG8) showed a bifurcated hydrogen bond interaction with the protein at Lys 244 with a docking score of -3.6 and glide energy of -37.30 kcal/mol. Docking with endopolygalacturonase II (1CZF) resulted hydrogen bond formation with Lys 258 with a docking score of -2.3 and glide energy of -30.42 kcal/mol. It was hypothesized that this modulation favors accumulation of cell wall fragments (oligogalacturonides) which act as elicitors of plant defense responses. In order to prove the same, in vivo studies were carried out using a formulation developed from PDP (PDP 5EC) on greenhouse grown Lycopersicon esculentum L. The formulation was effective at different concentrations in reduction of seed infection, improvement of vigor and control of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection in L. esculentum. At a concentration of 2 %, PDP 5EC significant reduction in seed infection (95.83 %), improvement in seed vigor (64.31 %) and control of F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection (96.15 %) were observed. Further application of PDP 5EC to L. esculentum challenged with F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici significantly increased the activity of enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, namely, peroxidase (PO), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and enhanced the total phenolic content when compared to the control. PMID:25374140

Sangeetha, S; Sarada, D V L

2014-11-01

183

FEM1, a Fusarium oxysporum glycoprotein that is covalently linked to the cell wall matrix and is conserved in filamentous fungi.  

PubMed

As part of an investigation of the cell wall structure of plant pathogenic, filamentous fungi, we set out to characterize covalently bound cell wall glycoproteins (CWPs) of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. N-terminal sequencing of an abundant 60-kDa CWP led to the cloning of the corresponding gene, which we have designated FEM1 (Fusarium extracellular matrix protein). The gene contains an ORF encoding a primary translation product of 212 amino acids, including an N-terminal 17-amino acid secretion signal sequence. Furthermore, FEM1p contains two potential N-glycosylation sites, and is rich in serine and threonine residues (29%) that could serve as O-glycosyl addition sites. At its C-terminus the protein contains a 22-amino acid sequence with the characteristics of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor addition signal. A mutant FEM1 protein lacking this GPI anchor addition signal is not retained in the fungal cell wall but released into the culture medium, indicating that in the wild-type protein this sequence functions to anchor the protein to the extracellular matrix. Southern analysis shows that FEM1 is present as a single-copy gene in all formae speciales of F. oxysporum tested and in F. solani. Database searches show that FEM1p homologous sequences are present in other filamentous fungi as well. PMID:11370861

Schoffelmeer, E A; Vossen, J H; van Doorn, A A; Cornelissen, B J; Haring, M A

2001-03-01

184

p-Coumaric Acid Influenced Cucumber Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Communities and the Growth of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum Owen  

PubMed Central

Background Autotoxicity of cucumber root exudates or decaying residues may be the cause of the soil sickness of cucumber. However, how autotoxins affect soil microbial communities is not yet fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings The aims of this study were to study the effects of an artificially applied autotoxin of cucumber, p-coumaric acid, on cucumber seedling growth, rhizosphere soil microbial communities, and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum Owen (a soil-borne pathogen of cucumber) growth. Abundance, structure and composition of rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities were analyzed with real-time PCR, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library methods. Soil dehydrogenase activity and microbial biomass C (MBC) were determined to indicate the activity and size of the soil microflora. Results showed that p-coumaric acid (0.1–1.0 µmol/g soil) decreased cucumber leaf area, and increased soil dehydrogenase activity, MBC and rhizosphere bacterial and fungal community abundances. p-Coumaric acid also changed the structure and composition of rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities, with increases in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa Firmicutes, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and fungal taxa Sordariomycete, Zygomycota, and decreases in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and fungal taxon Pezizomycete. In addition, p-coumaric acid increased Fusarium oxysporum population densities in soil. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that p-coumaric acid may play a role in the autotoxicity of cucumber via influencing soil microbial communities. PMID:23118972

Zhou, Xingang; Wu, Fengzhi

2012-01-01

185

Genetic Diversity of Human Pathogenic Members of the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Inferred from Multilocus DNA Sequence Data and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses: Evidence for the Recent Dispersion of a Geographically Widespread Clonal Lineage and Nosocomial Origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium oxysporum is a phylogenetically diverse monophyletic complex of filamentous ascomycetous fungi that are responsible for localized and disseminated life-threatening opportunistic infections in immunocom- petent and severely neutropenic patients, respectively. Although members of this complex were isolated from patients during a pseudoepidemic in San Antonio, Tex., and from patients and the water system in a Houston, Tex., hospital during the

Kerry O'Donnell; Deanna A. Sutton; Michael G. Rinaldi; Karen C. Magnon; Patricia A. Cox; Sanjay G. Revankar; Stephen Sanche; David M. Geiser; Jean H. Juba; Jo-Anne H. van Burik; Arvind Padhye; Elias J. Anaissie; Andrea Francesconi; Thomas J. Walsh; Jody S. Robinson

2004-01-01

186

Development of Quantitative Proteomics Using iTRAQ Based on the Immunological Response of Galleria mellonella Larvae Challenged with Fusarium oxysporum Microconidia  

PubMed Central

Galleria mellonella has emerged as a potential invertebrate model for scrutinizing innate immunity. Larvae are easy to handle in host-pathogen assays. We undertook proteomics research in order to understand immune response in a heterologous host when challenged with microconidia of Fusarium oxysporum. The aim of this study was to investigate hemolymph proteins that were differentially expressed between control and immunized larvae sets, tested with F. oxysporum at two temperatures. The iTRAQ approach allowed us to observe the effects of immune challenges in a lucid and robust manner, identifying more than 50 proteins, 17 of them probably involved in the immune response. Changes in protein expression were statistically significant, especially when temperature was increased because this was notoriously affected by F. oxysporum 104 or 106 microconidia/mL. Some proteins were up-regulated upon immune fungal microconidia challenge when temperature changed from 25 to 37°C. After analysis of identified proteins by bioinformatics and meta-analysis, results revealed that they were involved in transport, immune response, storage, oxide-reduction and catabolism: 20 from G. mellonella, 20 from the Lepidoptera species and 19 spread across bacteria, protista, fungi and animal species. Among these, 13 proteins and 2 peptides were examined for their immune expression, and the hypothetical 3D structures of 2 well-known proteins, unannotated for G. mellonella, i.e., actin and CREBP, were resolved using peptides matched with Bombyx mori and Danaus plexippus, respectively. The main conclusion in this study was that iTRAQ tool constitutes a consistent method to detect proteins associated with the innate immune system of G. mellonella in response to infection caused by F. oxysporum. In addition, iTRAQ was a reliable quantitative proteomic approach to detect and quantify the expression levels of immune system proteins and peptides, in particular, it was found that 104 microconidia/mL at 37°C over expressed many more proteins than other treatments. PMID:25379782

Muñoz-Gómez, Amalia; Corredor, Mauricio; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Peláez, Carlos

2014-01-01

187

Tomato Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Fusarium Wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus  

PubMed Central

Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant–pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses. PMID:24804963

Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

2014-01-01

188

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.  

PubMed

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants. PMID:23541032

Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

2013-04-24

189

Heterologous expression of Fusarium oxysporum tomatinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases its resistance to saponins and improves ethanol production during the fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul and Agave salmiana must  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the effect of the heterologous expression of tomatinase from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp lycopersici in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene FoTom1 under the control of the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1) promoter was cloned into pYES2. S. cerevisiae strain Y45 was transformed with this vector and URA3 transformant strains were selected for resistance to ?-tomatine. Two\\u000a transformants were

Luis Alberto Cira; Gloria Angélica González; Juan Carlos Torres; Carlos Pelayo; Melesio Gutiérrez; Jesús Ramírez

2008-01-01

190

Strain-specific and recessive QTLs involved in the control of partial resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1.2 in a recombinant inbred line population of melon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM) causes serious economic losses in melon (Cucumis melo L.). Two dominant resistance genes have been identified, Fom-1 and Fom-2, which provide resistance to races 0 and 2 and races 0 and 1, respectively, however FOM race 1.2 overcomes these resistance genes. A partial resistance to FOM race 1.2 that has been found in some Far East accessions is under

L. Perchepied; C. Dogimont; M. Pitrat

2005-01-01

191

Expression of NEP1 by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. erythroxyli After Gene Replacement and Overexpression Using Polyethylene Glycol-Mediated Transformation.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The necrosis inducing extracellular protein Nep1 is produced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. erythroxyli in liquid culture. NEP1, the Nep1 protein structural gene, was disrupted in F. oxysporum f. sp. erythroxyli isolate EN-4 by gene replacement using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation. NEP1 disruption was verified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot, and northern blot analysis. NEP1-disrupted transformants failed to produce Nep1 in liquid culture. NEP1 disruption did not affect the pathogenicity of isolate EN-4 toward Erythroxylum coca. Transformation of isolate EN-4 with construct pPB-FO11-45 carrying NEP1 between the trpC promoter and terminator resulted in increased production of Nep1 in potato dextrose broth plus 1% casamino acids or Czapek-Dox broth plus 1% casamino acids but not in potato dextrose broth alone. Transformation of EN-4 with construct pPB-FO11-45 was verified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Overexpression of NEP1 was confirmed by northern blot and Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. NEP1-overexpressing transformant 15 produced 64 to 128 times as much Nep1 as EN-4 wild type when grown in shake cultures. Transformants overexpressing Nep1 in liquid culture were no more or less pathogenic toward E. coca than wild-type isolates. Nep1 was not detected in E. coca seedlings infected with NEP1-overexpressing transformants or with EN-4 wild type. In large-scale fermentations of NEP1-overexpressing transformant 15, the amount of secreted protein including Nep1 was 15.1 times that of the wild-type EN-4, providing a ready source of Nep1 for future study. PMID:18942961

Bailey, B A; Apel-Birkhold, Patricia C; Luster, Douglas G

2002-08-01

192

Fusarium pathogenomics.  

PubMed

Fusarium is a genus of filamentous fungi that contains many agronomically important plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and opportunistic human pathogens. Comparative analyses have revealed that the Fusarium genome is compartmentalized into regions responsible for primary metabolism and reproduction (core genome), and pathogen virulence, host specialization, and possibly other functions (adaptive genome). Genes involved in virulence and host specialization are located on pathogenicity chromosomes within strains pathogenic to tomato (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici) and pea (Fusarium 'solani' f. sp. pisi). The experimental transfer of pathogenicity chromosomes from F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici into a nonpathogen transformed the latter into a tomato pathogen. Thus, horizontal transfer may explain the polyphyletic origins of host specificity within the genus. Additional genome-scale comparative and functional studies are needed to elucidate the evolution and diversity of pathogenicity mechanisms, which may help inform novel disease management strategies against fusarial pathogens. PMID:24024636

Ma, Li-Jun; Geiser, David M; Proctor, Robert H; Rooney, Alejandro P; O'Donnell, Kerry; Trail, Frances; Gardiner, Donald M; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

2013-01-01

193

Wound-induced pectin methylesterases enhance banana (Musa spp. AAA) susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense  

PubMed Central

Recent studies suggest that plant pectin methylesterases (PMEs) are directly involved in plant defence besides their roles in plant development. However, the molecular mechanisms of PME action on pectins are not well understood. In order to understand how PMEs modify pectins during banana (Musa spp.)–Fusarium interaction, the expression and enzyme activities of PMEs in two banana cultivars, highly resistant or susceptible to Fusarium, were compared with each other. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of PMEs and their effect on pectin methylesterification of 10 individual homogalacturonan (HG) epitopes with different degrees of methylesterification (DMs) were also examined. The results showed that, before pathogen treatment, the resistant cultivar displayed higher PME activity than the susceptible cultivar, corresponding well to the lower level of pectin DM. A significant increase in PME expression and activity and a decrease in pectin DM were observed in the susceptible cultivar but not in the resistant cultivar when plants were wounded, which was necessary for successful infection. With the increase of PME in the wounded susceptible cultivar, the JIM5 antigen (low methyestrified HGs) increased. Forty-eight hours after pathogen infection, the PME activity and expression in the susceptible cultivar were higher than those in the resistant cultivar, while the DM was lower. In conclusion, the resistant and the susceptible cultivars differ significantly in their response to wounding. Increased PMEs and thereafter decreased DMs acompanied by increased low methylesterified HGs in the root vascular cylinder appear to play a key role in determination of banana susceptibility to Fusarium. PMID:23580752

Xu, Chunxiang

2013-01-01

194

EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AND FUSARIUM WILT IN  

E-print Network

1 EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY compost as an antagonistic suppression approach to combat soil-borne disease effects on crop yields the effect of compost and lime on soil chemical properties, the soil microbial community (including Fusarium

Ma, Lena

195

The potential efficiency of irrigation management and propargyl bromide in controlling three soil pests: Tylenchulus semipenetrans, Fusarium oxysporum and Echinochloa crus-galli.  

PubMed

Propargyl bromide (3-bromopropyne, 3BP) is a potential alternative for methyl bromide. Little information is available about its efficiency in controlling pests. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the 3BP dose required for killing three pests and to compare the efficiency of water management approaches to that of fumigation. The pests, Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht (fungus), Echinochloa crus-galli (L) Beauv (grass) and Tylenchulus semipenetrans Cobb (nematode) were exposed to different 3BP concentrations in a sandy loam at 30 degrees C in a closed system. The lethal dose for killing 90% of the population (LD90) was calculated from the total applied mass, and varied from 0.3 microg g(-1) soil for the nematode, 3 microg g(-1) for the grass, and 9 microg g(-1) for the fungus. The concentration-time index for killing 90% of the population (CT90) was 11 microg g(-1) h for the nematode, 112 microg g(-1) h for the grass and 345 microg g(-1) h for the fungus. 3BP seems as efficient as other fumigant alternatives in controlling these pests. Using an open system, it was shown that the volume of soil in which the pests were controlled varied for different irrigation managements. Even 96 h after fumigation (with a concentration 10 times higher than would potentially be applied in the field), more than 20% of the soil volume had not reached the fungus and grass CT90 of the non-irrigated soil. The soil underneath the furrow and the bed reached CT90 only slowly in all irrigated treatments even though techniques for increasing efficiency were used (tarping, surface sealing with water and high application rate). PMID:15912563

Allaire, Suzanne E; Yates, Scott R; Zhang, Ping; Ernst, Fred F

2005-08-01

196

Identification and characterization of an anti-fungi Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerium protease from the Bacillus subtilis strain N7.  

PubMed

A newly discovered alkaline antifungal protease named P6 from Bacillus subtilis N7 was purified and partially characterized. B. subtilis N7 culture filtrates were purified by 30-60% (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a single band of 41.38 kDa. Peptide sequence of protease P6 was determined using a 4800 Plus MALDI TOF/TOF™ Analyzer System. Self-Formed Adaptor PCR (SEFA-PCR) was used to amplify the 1,149 bp open read frame of P6. Dimensional structure prediction using Automatic Modeling Mode software showed that the protease P6 consisted of two ?-barrel domains. Purified P6 strongly inhibited spore and mycelium growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerium (FOC) by causing hypha lysis when the concentration was 25 ?g/ml. Characterization of the purified protease indicated that it had substrate specificity for gelatin and was highly active at pH 8.0-10.6 and 70°C. The P6 protease was inhibited by EDTA (2 mmol/L), phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, 1 mmol/L), Na(+), Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+) (5 mmol/L each) and H2O2 (2%, v/v). However, protease activity was activated by Ca(2+), K(+), Mn(2+) (5 mmol/L each), mercaptoethanol (2%, v/v) and Tween 80 (1%, v/v). In addition, activity was also affected by organic solvents such as acetone, normal butanol and ethanol, but not hexane (25%, v/v each). PMID:23812816

Luo, Yi; Sun, Lifei; Zhu, Zhen; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

2013-06-01

197

Solid-state fermentation of agro-industrial wastes to produce bioorganic fertilizer for the biocontrol of Fusarium wilt of cucumber in continuously cropped soil.  

PubMed

Agro-industrial wastes of cattle dung, vinegar-production residue and rice straw were solid-state fermented by inoculation with Trichoderma harzianum SQR-T037 (SQR-T037) for production of bioorganic fertilizers containing SQR-T037 and 6-pentyl-?-pyrone (6PAP) to control Fusarium wilt of cucumber in a continuously cropped soil. Fermentation days, temperature, inoculum and vinegar-production residue demonstrated significant effects on the SQR-T037 biomass and the yield of 6PAP, based on fractional factorial design. Three optimum conditions for producing the maximum SQR-T037 biomass and 6PAP yield were predicted by central composite design and validated. Bioorganic fertilizer containing 8.46 log(10) ITS copies g(-1) dry weight of SQR-T037 and 1291.73 mg kg(-1) dry weight of 6PAP, and having the highest (p<0.05) biocontrol efficacy, was achieved at 36.7 fermentation days, 25.9°C temperature, 7.6% inoculum content, 41.0% vinegar-production residue, 20.0% rice straw and 39.0% cattle dung. This is a way to offer a high value-added use for agro-industrial wastes. PMID:21190841

Chen, Lihua; Yang, Xingming; Raza, Waseem; Luo, Jia; Zhang, Fengge; Shen, Qirong

2011-02-01

198

Comparative Genomics Yields Insights into Niche Adaptation of Plant Vascular Wilt Pathogens  

PubMed Central

The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual crop losses. The characteristic wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels, which undergo fluctuations in osmolarity. To gain insights into the mechanisms that confer the organisms' pathogenicity and enable them to proliferate in the unique ecological niche of the plant vascular system, we sequenced the genomes of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and compared them to each other, and to the genome of Fusarium oxysporum, another fungal wilt pathogen. Our analyses identified a set of proteins that are shared among all three wilt pathogens, and present in few other fungal species. One of these is a homolog of a bacterial glucosyltransferase that synthesizes virulence-related osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria. Pathogenicity tests of the corresponding V. dahliae glucosyltransferase gene deletion mutants indicate that the gene is required for full virulence in the Australian tobacco species Nicotiana benthamiana. Compared to other fungi, the two sequenced Verticillium genomes encode more pectin-degrading enzymes and other carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting an extraordinary capacity to degrade plant pectin barricades. The high level of synteny between the two Verticillium assemblies highlighted four flexible genomic islands in V. dahliae that are enriched for transposable elements, and contain duplicated genes and genes that are important in signaling/transcriptional regulation and iron/lipid metabolism. Coupled with an enhanced capacity to degrade plant materials, these genomic islands may contribute to the expanded genetic diversity and virulence of V. dahliae, the primary causal agent of Verticillium wilts. Significantly, our study reveals insights into the genetic mechanisms of niche adaptation of fungal wilt pathogens, advances our understanding of the evolution and development of their pathogenesis, and sheds light on potential avenues for the development of novel disease management strategies to combat destructive wilt diseases. PMID:21829347

Klosterman, Steven J.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Kang, Seogchan; Veronese, Paola; Gold, Scott E.; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.; Chen, Zehua; Henrissat, Bernard; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Jongsun; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D.; Barbara, Dez J.; Anchieta, Amy; de Jonge, Ronnie; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Atallah, Zahi; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Paz, Zahi; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Hayes, Ryan J.; Heiman, David I.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Engels, Reinhard; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Dobinson, Katherine F.; Ma, Li-Jun

2011-01-01

199

Stimulative effect of the fungal biocontrol agent Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. Striga on abundance of nitrifying prokaryotes in a maize rhizosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The integration of resistant crop varieties and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae (Foxy-2) strains as biological control agent (BCA) has shown to be an effective control of the weed Striga hermonthica which is parasitic to several cereals (e.g., maize) cultivated in Sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies have examined the efficacy of the BCA and its interactions with host crops, while overlooking the interplay among key microorganisms in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle. Hence, we postulated that both Foxy-2 and Striga pose threats to the indigenous plant root-associated microbial communities involved in N cycling through direct or indirect competition for nutrients and that the application of high quality organic residues would compensate these effects. The primary objective of this study was thus to assess the potential impact of Foxy-2 on indigenous nitrifying prokaryotes in maize rhizosphere cultivated on two distinct soils (sandy Ferric Alisol versus clayey Humic Nitisol) obtained from Machanga and Embu, respectively, in central Kenya. These soils were treated with or without Foxy-2 and Striga; and in combination with high quality (i.e. CN ratio; 13, lignins, 8.9 % and polyphenols, 1.7 %) organic residues (i.e., Tithonia diversifolia) as N source. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we followed at three pre-defined sampling dates (14, 28 and 42 days after planting) the responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), total bacteria and archaea in four treatments of a rhizobox experiment: (i) Foxy-2 plus Striga (F+S), (ii) Striga only (C+S), (iii) Foxy-2 plus Striga plus Tithonia diversifolia residues (F+S+T), and (iv) a non-treated control (C). Overall, the treatment effects on soil microbial populations were, in comparison to the clayey Embu soil, more pronounced in the sandy Machanga soil. Contrary to our expectations, we observed a distinct stimulative, but no resource competition effect of Foxy-2 on the abundance of AOA, as well as total archaeal and bacterial communities. AOB only showed significant increases in the Machanga soil when organic residues were added. Furthermore, there were transient detectable significant increases in total archaea and AOA due to Striga inoculation which also varied with the soil. The variation in treatment effects in the two soils was highly linked to the differences in soil properties such as dissolved organic carbon and soil pH which showed significant (P

Musyoki, Mary; Enowashu, Esther; Zimmermann, Judith; Muema, Esther; Wainright, Henry; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Cadisch, Georg; Rasche, Frank

2014-05-01

200

Control of Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Roselle under Field Conditions  

PubMed Central

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) is one of the most important medicinal crops in many parts of the world. In this study, the effects of microelements, antioxidants, and bioagents on Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, and Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogens of root rot and wilt diseases in roselle, were examined under field conditions. Preliminary studies were carried out in vitro in order to select the most effective members to be used in field control trials. Our results showed that microelements (copper and manganese), antioxidants (salicylic acid, ascorbic acid, and EDTA), a fungicide (Dithane M45) and biological control agents (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis) were significantly reduced the linear growth of the causal pathogens. Additionally, application of the previous microelements, antioxidants, a fungicide and biological control agents significantly reduced disease incidence of root rot and wilt diseases under field conditions. Copper, salicylic acid, and T. harzianum showed the best results in this respect. In conclusion, microelements, antioxidants, and biocontrol agents could be used as alternative strategies to fungicides for controlling root rot and wilt diseases in roselle. PMID:25606010

Hassan, Naglaa; Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi

2014-01-01

201

Control of Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Roselle under Field Conditions.  

PubMed

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) is one of the most important medicinal crops in many parts of the world. In this study, the effects of microelements, antioxidants, and bioagents on Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, and Macrophomina phaseolina, the causal pathogens of root rot and wilt diseases in roselle, were examined under field conditions. Preliminary studies were carried out in vitro in order to select the most effective members to be used in field control trials. Our results showed that microelements (copper and manganese), antioxidants (salicylic acid, ascorbic acid, and EDTA), a fungicide (Dithane M45) and biological control agents (Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis) were significantly reduced the linear growth of the causal pathogens. Additionally, application of the previous microelements, antioxidants, a fungicide and biological control agents significantly reduced disease incidence of root rot and wilt diseases under field conditions. Copper, salicylic acid, and T. harzianum showed the best results in this respect. In conclusion, microelements, antioxidants, and biocontrol agents could be used as alternative strategies to fungicides for controlling root rot and wilt diseases in roselle. PMID:25606010

Hassan, Naglaa; Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

2014-12-01

202

Fusarium wilt of pigeon pea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Chlorophyll, ascorbic acid, free reducing sugars and total manganese were highest in the least susceptible variety N.P. 15\\u000a and lowest in the most susceptible N.P. 24. In the latter, total carbohydrates were more in the root than in the shoot, while\\u000a in the former, the opposite trend was observed. Fe\\/Mn ratio was found to increase with increasing susceptibility. Under pathogenesis,

S. Subramanian

1963-01-01

203

Enhanced Control of Cucumber Wilt Disease by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 by Altering the Regulation of Its DegU Phosphorylation  

PubMed Central

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SQR9, isolated from the cucumber rhizosphere, suppresses the growth of Fusarium oxysporum in the cucumber rhizosphere and protects the host plant from pathogen invasion through efficient root colonization. In the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus, the response regulator DegU regulates genetic competence, swarming motility, biofilm formation, complex colony architecture, and protease production. In this study, we report that stepwise phosphorylation of DegU in B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can influence biocontrol activity by coordinating multicellular behavior and regulating the synthesis of antibiotics. Results from in vitro and in situ experiments and quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies demonstrate the following: (i) that the lowest level of phosphorylated DegU (DegU?P) (the degQ mutation) impairs complex colony architecture, biofilm formation, colonization activities, and biocontrol efficiency of Fusarium wilt disease but increases the production of macrolactin and bacillaene, and (ii) that increasing the level of DegU?P by degQ and degSU overexpression significantly improves complex colony architecture, biofilm formation, colonization activities, production of the antibiotics bacillomycin D and difficidin, and efficiency of biocontrol of Fusarium wilt disease. The results offer a new strategy to enhance the biocontrol efficacy of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9. PMID:24584252

Xu, Zhihui; Zhang, Ruifu; Wang, Dandan; Qiu, Meihua; Feng, Haichao; Zhang, Nan

2014-01-01

204

Enhanced control of cucumber wilt disease by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 by altering the regulation of Its DegU phosphorylation.  

PubMed

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SQR9, isolated from the cucumber rhizosphere, suppresses the growth of Fusarium oxysporum in the cucumber rhizosphere and protects the host plant from pathogen invasion through efficient root colonization. In the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus, the response regulator DegU regulates genetic competence, swarming motility, biofilm formation, complex colony architecture, and protease production. In this study, we report that stepwise phosphorylation of DegU in B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can influence biocontrol activity by coordinating multicellular behavior and regulating the synthesis of antibiotics. Results from in vitro and in situ experiments and quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies demonstrate the following: (i) that the lowest level of phosphorylated DegU (DegU?P) (the degQ mutation) impairs complex colony architecture, biofilm formation, colonization activities, and biocontrol efficiency of Fusarium wilt disease but increases the production of macrolactin and bacillaene, and (ii) that increasing the level of DegU?P by degQ and degSU overexpression significantly improves complex colony architecture, biofilm formation, colonization activities, production of the antibiotics bacillomycin D and difficidin, and efficiency of biocontrol of Fusarium wilt disease. The results offer a new strategy to enhance the biocontrol efficacy of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9. PMID:24584252

Xu, Zhihui; Zhang, Ruifu; Wang, Dandan; Qiu, Meihua; Feng, Haichao; Zhang, Nan; Shen, Qirong

2014-05-01

205

Wilted plant  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although this muskmelon plant has wilted from a bacterial infection, plants can wilt for other reasons and look just like this one. Plants can be over-watered and under-watered. Plants have a range of tolerance in which they can grow. Plants also have an optimum amount of water they can receive and take up. They grow best in their optimum condition.

N/A N/A (None;)

2007-07-31

206

Heterologous expression of Fusarium oxysporum tomatinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases its resistance to saponins and improves ethanol production during the fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul and Agave salmiana must.  

PubMed

This paper describes the effect of the heterologous expression of tomatinase from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp lycopersici in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene FoTom1 under the control of the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1) promoter was cloned into pYES2. S. cerevisiae strain Y45 was transformed with this vector and URA3 transformant strains were selected for resistance to alpha-tomatine. Two transformants were randomly selected for further study (designated Y45-1 and Y45-2). Control strain Y45 was inhibited at 50 muM alpha-tomatine, in contrast, transformants Y45-1 and Y45-2 did not show inhibition at 200 muM. Tomatinase activity was detected by HPLC monitoring tomatine disappearance and tomatidine appearance in the supernatants of culture medium. Maximum tomatinase activity was observed in the transformants after 6 h, remaining constant during the following 24 h. No tomatinase activity was detected in the parental strain. Moreover, the transformants were able to grow and produce ethanol in a mix of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul and Agave salmiana must, contrary to the Y45 strain which was unable to grow and ferment under these conditions. PMID:17896184

Cira, Luis Alberto; González, Gloria Angélica; Torres, Juan Carlos; Pelayo, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Melesio; Ramírez, Jesús

2008-03-01

207

Fusaric acid accelerates the senescence of leaf in banana when infected by Fusarium.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (FOC) is a causal agent of vascular wilt and leaf chlorosis of banana plants. Chloroses resulting from FOC occur first in the lowest leaves of banana seedlings and gradually progress upward. To investigate the responses of different leaf positions to FOC infection, hydroponic experiments with FOC inoculation were conducted in a greenhouse. Fusarium-infected seedlings exhibited a decrease in net photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate of all leaves. The wilting process in Fusarium-infected seedlings varied with leaf position. Measurements of the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F(V)/F(max) and visualization with transmission electron microscopy showed a positive correlation between chloroplast impairment and severity of disease symptoms. Furthermore, results of malondialdehyde content and relative membrane conductivity measurements demonstrated that the membrane system was damaged in infected leaves. Additionally, the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were increased and total soluble phenolic compounds were significantly accumulated in the leaves of infected plants. The structural and biochemical changes of infected plants was consistent with plant senescence. As the FOC was not detected in infected leaves, we proposed that the chloroplast and membrane could be damaged by fusaric acid produced by Fusarium. During the infection, fusaric acid was first accumulated in the lower leaves and water-soluble substances in the lower leaves could dramatically enhance fusaric acid production. Taken together, the senescence of infected banana plants was induced by Fusarium infection with fusaric acid production and the composition of different leaf positions largely contribute to the particular senescence process. PMID:24282097

Dong, Xian; Xiong, Yinfeng; Ling, Ning; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

2014-04-01

208

Effects of ¹?C-labelled precursor feeding on production of beauvericin, enniatins H, I, and MK1688 by Fusarium oxysporum KFCC11363P.  

PubMed

The effects of ¹?C-labelled precursor feeding on the production of cyclic hexadepsipeptides were investigated by the mycelium of F. oxysporum KFCC11363P producing beauvericin along with enniatins H, I, and MK1688. Most ¹?C-phenylalanine and ¹?C-valine were incorporated easily into the biosynthetic pathway of ¹?C-labelled beauvericin in vivo by the mycelium. However, only a small amount of ¹?C-labelled enniatins could be detected by feeding of ¹?C-valine. When L-valine was fed as a precursor to the mycelium at large scale, the level of beauvericin increased to maximum followed by enniatins H and I. Feeding of L-valine did not affect the production of enniatin MK1688. These results suggest that L-valine feeding led to the production of D-hydroxyisovaleic acid in the mycelium and specifically enhanced the production of cyclic hexadepsipeptides containing D-hydroxyisovaleic acid, such as beauvericin and enniatins H and I. PMID:22019403

Lee, Hee-Seok; Kim, Kyung-Ai; Seo, Dong-Geun; Lee, Chan

2012-01-01

209

Isolation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S20 and its application in control of eggplant bacterial wilt.  

PubMed

Bacterial strain S20 was isolated and identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain S20 inhibits the growth of Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia solanacearum. Some genes associated with the synthesis of some lipopeptides were detected in strain S20 by PCR. Iturins A were identified as the main antagonistic substrates by analysis with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/collision-induced dissociation (ESI-MS/CID). Four homologues of iturin A (C13-C16) were identified. Pot experiments showed that the application of strain S20 alone could control eggplant wilt with an efficacy of 25.3% during a 40 day experiment. If strain S20 was used with organic fertilizer, the control efficacy against eggplant wilt reached as high as 70.7%. The application of organic fertilizer alone promotes the growth of R. solanacearum, resulting in a higher wilt incidence than that observed in control plants. The application of strain S20 effectively inhibits R. solanacearum in the rhizosphere soil of eggplant. The combined use of strain S20 and organic fertilizer more effectively controlled R. solanacearum in soil than the use of strain S20 alone. The soil count of strain S20 decreased gradually during the course of the experiment after inoculation. Organic fertilizer was beneficial for the survival of the antagonistic bacterial strain S20; a higher level of these bacteria could be maintained. The application of organic fertilizer with strain S20 increased bacterial diversity in rhizosphere soil. PMID:24632400

Chen, Da; Liu, Xin; Li, Chunyu; Tian, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

2014-05-01

210

Endophytic Fusarium spp. from Roots of Lawn Grass (Axonopus compressus).  

PubMed

Fungal endophytes are found inside host plants but do not produce any noticeable disease symptoms in their host. In the present study, endophytic Fusarium species were isolated from roots of lawn grass (Axonopus compressus). A total of 51 isolates were recovered from 100 root segments. Two Fusarium species, F. oxysporum (53%) and F. solani (47%), were identified based on macroconidia and conidiogenous cell morphology. The detection of endophytic F. oxysporum and F. solani in the roots of lawn grass contributes to the knowledge of both the distribution of the two Fusarium species and the importance of roots as endophytic niches for Fusarium species. PMID:24575251

Zakaria, Latiffah; Ning, Chua Harn

2013-12-01

211

Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays indicate that F. oxysporum strains containing the LV-uORF are able to tolerate high concentrations of zinc chloride, whereas those having the alternative HVR configuration are inhibited. This work suggests that fungal mitochondria can acquire additional genes and possibly novel functions and will guide studies that aim to assess the functional roles of hypothetical mitochondrial ORFs in filamentous fungi.

Hamzah, Haider Mousa

212

Improvement of Biocontrol of Damping-off and Root Rot/Wilt of Faba Bean by Salicylic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide  

PubMed Central

Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, and Macrophomina phaseolina were found to be associated with root rott and wilt symptoms of faba bean plants collected from different fieldes in New Valley governorate, Egypt. All the obtained isolates were able to attack faba bean plants (cv. Giza 40) causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases. R. solani isolates 2 and 5, F. solani isolate 8, F. oxysporum isolate 12 and M. phaseolina isolate 14 were the more virulent ones in the pathogenicity tests. Biocontrol agents (Trichoderma viride and Bacillus megaterium) and chemical inducers (salicylic acid [SA] and hydrogen peroxide) individually or in combination were examined for biological control of damping-off and root rot/wilt and growth promoting of faba bean plants in vitro and in vivo. Both antagonistic biocontrol agents and chemical inducers either individually or in combination inhibited growth of the tested pathogenic fungi. Biocontrol agents combined with chemical inducers recorded the highest inhibited growth especially in case SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium. Under green house and field conditions, all treatments significantly reduced damping-off and root rot/wilt severity and increased of survival plants. Also, these treatments increased fresh and weights of the survival plants in pots compared with control. The combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers were more effective than used of them individually and SA + T. viride was the best treatment in this respect. Also, under field conditions, all these treatments significantly increased growth parameters (plant height and number of branches per plant) and yield components (number of pods per plant and number of seeds per plant, weight of 100 seeds and total yield per feddan) and protein content in both seasons (2010~2011 and 2011~2012). Faba bean seeds soaked in SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium were recorded the highest growth parameters and yield components. Generally, the combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers recorded the best results for controlling damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in greenhouse and field with addition improved plant growth and increased yield components in field. PMID:23610539

2013-01-01

213

Improvement of Biocontrol of Damping-off and Root Rot/Wilt of Faba Bean by Salicylic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.  

PubMed

Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum, and Macrophomina phaseolina were found to be associated with root rott and wilt symptoms of faba bean plants collected from different fieldes in New Valley governorate, Egypt. All the obtained isolates were able to attack faba bean plants (cv. Giza 40) causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases. R. solani isolates 2 and 5, F. solani isolate 8, F. oxysporum isolate 12 and M. phaseolina isolate 14 were the more virulent ones in the pathogenicity tests. Biocontrol agents (Trichoderma viride and Bacillus megaterium) and chemical inducers (salicylic acid [SA] and hydrogen peroxide) individually or in combination were examined for biological control of damping-off and root rot/wilt and growth promoting of faba bean plants in vitro and in vivo. Both antagonistic biocontrol agents and chemical inducers either individually or in combination inhibited growth of the tested pathogenic fungi. Biocontrol agents combined with chemical inducers recorded the highest inhibited growth especially in case SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium. Under green house and field conditions, all treatments significantly reduced damping-off and root rot/wilt severity and increased of survival plants. Also, these treatments increased fresh and weights of the survival plants in pots compared with control. The combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers were more effective than used of them individually and SA + T. viride was the best treatment in this respect. Also, under field conditions, all these treatments significantly increased growth parameters (plant height and number of branches per plant) and yield components (number of pods per plant and number of seeds per plant, weight of 100 seeds and total yield per feddan) and protein content in both seasons (2010~2011 and 2011~2012). Faba bean seeds soaked in SA + T. viride and SA + B. megaterium were recorded the highest growth parameters and yield components. Generally, the combination between biocontrol agents and chemical inducers recorded the best results for controlling damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in greenhouse and field with addition improved plant growth and increased yield components in field. PMID:23610539

Abdel-Monaim, Montaser Fawzy

2013-03-01

214

Sample Category Ornamental Date Submitted Sample # Host Diagnosis/ID Genus Species Sample County  

E-print Network

/4/2012 5436 Date Palms Fusarium Wilt Fusarium oxysporum Hillsborough 1/13/2012 5441 Begonia Botrytis Blight/5/2012 5605 Oleander Mushroom Root Rot unknown Hillsborough 4/6/2012 5538 Canary Island date palm False Smut Graphiola phoenicis Hillsborough 4/6/2012 5538 Canary Island date palm Fusarium Wilt Fusarium oxysporum

Jawitz, James W.

215

Native cell-death genes as candidates for developing wilt resistance in transgenic banana plants.  

PubMed

In order to feed an ever-increasing world population, there is an urgent need to improve the production of staple food and fruit crops. The productivity of important food and fruit crops is constrained by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. The cultivation of banana, which is an important fruit crop, is severely threatened by Fusarium wilt disease caused by infestation by an ascomycetes fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). Since there are no established edible cultivars of banana resistant to all the pathogenic races of Foc, genetic engineering is the only option for the generation of resistant cultivars. Since Foc is a hemibiotrophic fungus, investigations into the roles played by different cell-death-related genes in the progression of Foc infection on host banana plants are important. Towards this goal, three such genes namely MusaDAD1, MusaBAG1 and MusaBI1 were identified in banana. The study of their expression pattern in banana cells in response to Foc inoculation (using Foc cultures or fungal toxins like fusaric acid and beauvericin) indicated that they were indeed differentially regulated by fungal inoculation. Among the three genes studied, MusaBAG1 showed the highest up-regulation upon Foc inoculation. Further, in order to characterize these genes in the context of Foc infection in banana, we generated transgenic banana plants constitutively overexpressing the three genes that were later subjected to Foc bioassays in a contained greenhouse. Among the three groups of transgenics tested, transformed banana plants overexpressing MusaBAG1 demonstrated the best resistance towards Foc infection. Further, these plants also showed the highest relative overexpression of the transgene (MusaBAG1) among the three groups of transformed plants generated. Our study showed for the first time that native genes like MusaBAG1 can be used to develop transgenic banana plants with efficient resistance towards pathogens like Foc. PMID:24996429

Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

2014-01-01

216

2007 FUSARIUM WILT VARIETY PERFORMANCE RESULTS  

E-print Network

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Dr. Terry A. Wheeler Research Plant Pathologist, Texas AgriLife Research Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Service Center 1102 East Fm 1294 Lubbock, Texas 79403 (806 is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Texas AgriLife

Mukhtar, Saqib

217

TPCP: Ceratocystis wilt of Acacia mearnsii. CERATOCYSTIS WILT OF ACACIA  

E-print Network

TPCP: Ceratocystis wilt of Acacia mearnsii. CERATOCYSTIS WILT OF ACACIA MEARNSII INTRODUCTION known as Ceratocystis albofundus. Wilting of Acacia mearnsii is a common phenomenon, having been.up.ac.za/academic/fabi/tpcp/pamphlets/ceratocystis.htm (1 of 2) [2002/02/26 01:53:14] #12;TPCP: Ceratocystis wilt of Acacia mearnsii. Wood discolouration

218

Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process  

PubMed Central

Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018) and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094) were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl) acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique. PMID:24324893

Brzezi?ska-Rodak, Ma?gorzata

2013-01-01

219

Inoculation of tomato seedlings with Trichoderma Harzianum and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and their effect on growth and control of wilt in tomato seedlings  

PubMed Central

A green house study was conducted to investigate the ability of an isolate of Trichoderma harzianum (P52) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in enhancing growth and control of a wilt pathogen caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato seedlings. The plants were grown in plastic pots filled with sterilized soils. There were four treatments applied as follows; P52, AMF, AMF + P52 and a control. A completely randomized design was used and growth measurements and disease assessment taken after 3, 6 and 9 weeks. Treatments that significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced heights and root dry weights were P52, AMF and a treatment with a combination of both P52 and AMF when compared the control. The treatment with both P52 and AMF significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced all growth parameters (heights; shoot and root dry weight) investigated compared to the control. Disease severity was generally lower in tomato plants grown with isolate P52 and AMF fungi either individually or when combined together, though the effect was not statistically significant (P? 0.05). A treatment combination of P52 + AMF had less trend of severity as compared to each individual fungus. T. harzianum and AMF can be used to enhance growth in tomato seedlings. PMID:24031662

Mwangi, Margaret W.; Monda, Ethel O.; Okoth, Sheila A.; Jefwa, Joyce M.

2011-01-01

220

Comparative Genomics Reveals Mobile Pathogenicity Chromosomes in Fusarium  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, strains of F. oxysporum exhibit wide host range and are pathogenic to both plant and animal species, reflecting remarkable genetic adapta...

221

The Molecular Pathogenicity of Fusarium Keratitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose The pathogenic mechanisms of fungal infection during human keratomycosis were investigated in an ex vivo corneal model that used strains of Fusarium oxysporum differing in the production of a fungal transcription factor. Methods A pacC- loss-of-function mutant and a pacCc dominant-activating mutant were constructed from a wild-type isolate of F. oxysporum, and the three strains were characterized by in vitro growth kinetics. Twenty-seven human donor corneas maintained in tissue culture were superficially scarified and topically inoculated with the wild-type, the pacC- loss-of-function mutant, or the pacCc dominant-activating strain. Relative hyphal invasion into the stroma was compared histopathologically in corneal sections. Results F. oxysporum strains demonstrated comparable exponential growth rates in vitro. Wild-type F. oxysporum invaded into corneal tissue within one day and penetrated through the anterior stroma during the next 4 days. The pacC- loss-of-function mutant invaded explanted corneas significantly less than the wild-type on day 1 (P<0.0001) and on day 3 (P=0.0003). The pacCc dominant-activating strain adhered and penetrated explanted corneas similar to the wild-type strain. Conclusion The PacC pathway regulating the transcription of fungal genes allows fungal adaptation to the ocular surface and enables invasion of the injured cornea by F. oxysporum. PMID:20856109

Hua, Xia; Yuan, Xiaoyong; Di Pietro, Antonio; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

2010-01-01

222

Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

223

Cytotoxicity and Phytotoxicity of Trichothecene Mycotoxins Produced by Fusarium spp.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Trichothecenes, a major class of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium, Myrothecium, and Stachybotrys species, are toxic to plants, causing blights, wilts and other economically-important plant diseases, and to mammals, for example feed-refusal caused by deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin). Macrocyclic trichothec...

224

Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium  

SciTech Connect

Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, members of the F. oxysporum species complex exhibit wide host range but discontinuously distributed host specificity, reflecting remarkable genetic adaptability. To understand the molecular underpinnings of diverse phenotypic traits and their evolution in Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three economically important and phylogenetically related, yet phenotypically diverse plant-pathogenic species, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed greatly expanded lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes, accounting for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity. Experimentally, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, resulting in the conversion of a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in the F. oxysporum species complex, putting the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.

Ma, Li Jun; van der Does, H. C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Jose; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Wolochuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald; Goff, Steven; Hammond-Kossack, Kim; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. C.; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

2010-03-18

225

Identification and Characterization of Wilt and Salt Stress-Responsive MicroRNAs in Chickpea through High-Throughput Sequencing  

PubMed Central

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is the second most widely grown legume worldwide and is the most important pulse crop in the Indian subcontinent. Chickpea productivity is adversely affected by a large number of biotic and abiotic stresses. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the regulation of plant responses to several biotic and abiotic stresses. This study is the first attempt to identify chickpea miRNAs that are associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. The wilt infection that is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris is one of the major diseases severely affecting chickpea yields. Of late, increasing soil salinization has become a major problem in realizing these potential yields. Three chickpea libraries using fungal-infected, salt-treated and untreated seedlings were constructed and sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 12,135,571 unique reads were obtained. In addition to 122 conserved miRNAs belonging to 25 different families, 59 novel miRNAs along with their star sequences were identified. Four legume-specific miRNAs, including miR5213, miR5232, miR2111 and miR2118, were found in all of the libraries. Poly(A)-based qRT-PCR (Quantitative real-time PCR) was used to validate eleven conserved and five novel miRNAs. miR530 was highly up regulated in response to fungal infection, which targets genes encoding zinc knuckle- and microtubule-associated proteins. Many miRNAs responded in a similar fashion under both biotic and abiotic stresses, indicating the existence of cross talk between the pathways that are involved in regulating these stresses. The potential target genes for the conserved and novel miRNAs were predicted based on sequence homologies. miR166 targets a HD-ZIPIII transcription factor and was validated by 5? RLM-RACE. This study has identified several conserved and novel miRNAs in the chickpea that are associated with gene regulation following exposure to wilt and salt stress. PMID:25295754

Deokar, Amit Atmaram; Bhardwaj, Ankur R.; Agarwal, Manu; Katiyar-Agarwal, Surekha; Srinivasan, Ramamurthy; Jain, Pradeep Kumar

2014-01-01

226

Diversity of Fusarium Species from Highland Areas in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia. PMID:24575229

Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

2012-01-01

227

Diversity of fusarium species from highland areas in malaysia.  

PubMed

Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia. PMID:24575229

Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

2012-12-01

228

Mechanistic and structural studies of nitroalkane oxidase from Fusarium oxysporum  

E-print Network

/K data are consistent with the enzyme having an ionizable group which must be deprotonated for activity with a pKa of 6.8 and a requirement for the substrate to be protonated in the a carbon position. The enzyme activity is dependent on added oxidized...

Heasley, Carl J

2012-06-07

229

Characterization of Two ABC Transporters from Biocontrol and Phytopathogenic Fusarium oxysporus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

ABC transporter genes from four strains of Fusarium oxysporum [two biocontrol and two phytopathogenic (f. sp. lycopersici Race 1) isolates] indicated that this gene is well conserved. However, sequences of promoter regions of FoABC1 differed between 8 phytopathogenic and 11 biocontrol strains of F....

230

Studies of a New Fusarium Wilt of Spinach in Texas.  

E-print Network

Savoy, Victoria, Im- proved Thick Leaved (Viroflay), and Long Season. None of these vari- eties, however, showed any more resistance than the other. On the other hand, New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia expansa) proved to be completely resistant...

Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

1926-01-01

231

The Wor1-like protein Fgp1 regulates pathogenicity, toxin synthesis and reproduction in the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

WOR1 is a gene for a conserved fungal regulatory protein controlling the dimorphic switch and pathogenicity in Candida albicans and its ortholog in the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, called SGE1, is also required for pathogenicity and expression of plant effector proteins. F. graminearum, an imp...

232

Morphological and molecular characterization of Fusarium spp pathogenic to pecan tree in Brazil.  

PubMed

The occurrence of Fusarium spp associated with pecan tree (Carya illinoinensis) diseases in Brazil has been observed in recent laboratory analyses in Rio Grande do Sul State. Thus, in this study, we i) obtained Fusarium isolates from plants with disease symptoms; ii) tested the pathogenicity of these Fusarium isolates to pecan; iii) characterized and grouped Fusarium isolates that were pathogenic to the pecan tree based on morphological characteristics; iv) identified Fusarium spp to the species complex level through TEF-1? sequencing; and v) compared the identification methods used in the study. Fifteen isolates collected from the inflorescences, roots, and seeds of symptomatic plants (leaf necrosis or root rot) were used for pathogenicity tests. Morphological characterization was conducted using only pathogenic isolates, for a total of 11 isolates, based on the mycelial growth rate, sporulation, colony pigmentation, and conidial length and width variables. Pathogenic isolates were grouped based on morphological characteristics, and molecular characterization was performed by sequencing TEF-1? genes. Pathogenic isolates belonging to the Fusarium chlamydosporum species complex, Fusarium graminearum species complex, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium oxysporum were identified based on the TEF-1? region. Morphological characteristics were used to effectively differentiate isolates and group the isolates according to genetic similarity, particularly conidial width, which emerged as a key morphological descriptor in this study. PMID:25501150

Lazarotto, M; Milanesi, P M; Muniz, M F B; Reiniger, L R S; Beltrame, R; Harakava, R; Blume, E

2014-01-01

233

Fungal microbiota from rain water and pathogenicity of Fusarium species isolated from atmospheric dust and rainfall dust.  

PubMed

In order to determine the presence of Fusarium spp. in atmospheric dust and rainfall dust, samples were collected during September 2007, and July, August, and October 2008. The results reveal the prevalence of airborne Fusarium species coming from the atmosphere of the South East coast of Spain. Five different Fusarium species were isolated from the settling dust: Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, F. equiseti, F. dimerum, and F. proliferatum. Moreover, rainwater samples were obtained during significant rainfall events in January and February 2009. Using the dilution-plate method, 12 fungal genera were identified from these rainwater samples. Specific analyses of the rainwater revealed the presence of three species of Fusarium: F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum and F. equiseti. A total of 57 isolates of Fusarium spp. obtained from both rainwater and atmospheric rainfall dust sampling were inoculated onto melon (Cucumis melo L.) cv. Piñonet and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cv. San Pedro. These species were chosen because they are the main herbaceous crops in Almeria province. The results presented in this work indicate strongly that spores or propagules of Fusarium are able to cross the continental barrier carried by winds from the Sahara (Africa) to crop or coastal lands in Europe. Results show differences in the pathogenicity of the isolates tested. Both hosts showed root rot when inoculated with different species of Fusarium, although fresh weight measurements did not bring any information about the pathogenicity. The findings presented above are strong indications that long-distance transmission of Fusarium propagules may occur. Diseases caused by species of Fusarium are common in these areas. They were in the past, and are still today, a problem for greenhouses crops in Almería, and many species have been listed as pathogens on agricultural crops in this region. Saharan air masses dominate the Mediterranean regions. The evidence of long distance dispersal of Fusarium spp. by atmospheric dust and rainwater together with their proved pathogenicity must be taken into account in epidemiological studies. PMID:20820862

Palmero, D; Rodríguez, J M; de Cara, M; Camacho, F; Iglesias, C; Tello, J C

2011-01-01

234

FUM cluster divergence in fumonisins-producing Fusarium species.  

PubMed

Fumonisins are polyketide-derived mycotoxins, produced by several Fusarium species, and its biosynthetic pathway is controlled by the FUM cluster--a group of genes exhibiting a common expression pattern during fumonisin biosynthesis. The most common are the B analogues with fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) being the most prevalent. At least a part of the inter- and intraspecific variation in FBs synthesis level can be explained by the sequence differences inside FUM cluster. The aim of our study was to evaluate the toxin production and sequence variability in FUM genes and intergenic regions among thirty isolates of seven species reported as potential fumonisins producers: Fusarium anthophilum, Fusarium fujikuroi, Fusarium nygamai, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium subglutinans and Fusarium verticillioides, particularly with respect to FBs synthesis. Fumonisins were produced in high amounts (over 1mg g(-1)) by one isolate of F. subglutinans, three of F. verticillioides and all F. proliferatum isolates except one, regardless of the host organism. The remaining isolates produced low amounts of FBs and two F. verticillioides isolates didn't produce it at all. The lowest variation in amount of toxin produced was found among F. proliferatum isolates. Based on the translation elongation factor 1? (tef-1?) sequence of F. fujikuroi, a species-specific marker was developed. The intergenic region presents similar opportunity for F. nygamai identification. The phylogenetic reconstruction based on FUM1 gene generally reflects the scenario presented by tef-1? sequences. Although the sequence similarities for intergenic regions were lower than in coding regions, there are clearly conserved patterns enabling separation of different subsets of species, including the non-producer species. PMID:21315309

St?pie?, Lukasz; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Wa?kiewicz, Agnieszka

2011-02-01

235

Rainfall Effects on Wilting Forages  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Given the uncertainty of the weather and inherent differences between forage crops, specific recommendations for managing potential rain damage to wilting forages are difficult. However, there are a number of principles that can be applied to best manage the potential for rain damage. These science-...

236

Control of wilt disease of lentil through bio control agents and organic amendments in Tarai region of Uttarakhand, India.  

PubMed

The present work aimed at evaluating the efficacy of bioagents and organic amendments against lentil wilt pathogen. Field trials were carried out consecutively during Rabi 2010-11 and 2011-12 crop seasons in Randomized Block Design (RBD) with three replications, using 'Pant L-639' a popular cultivar. The plot size was 3.0 x 1.5 m2 with row spacing of 30 cm. Effect of selected bioagents and organic amendments on disease incidence, 1000 grain weight and yield kg ha' of lentil was recorded. It was observed that seed treatment with Trichoderma harizanum + Pseudomonas fluorescens significant by reduced 1.73% (2010-11) and 1.93% (2011-12) in Fusarium wilt disease incidence and increase in grain yield 507.6 kg ha(-1) and 496.0 kg ha(-1) respectively during both crop seasons. Among organic amendments, minimum wilt disease incidence of 1.69% (2010-11) and 1.81% (2011-12) and maximum grain yield 496.3 kg ha(-1) (2010-11) and 484.0 kg ha(-1) (2011-12) were observed in farm yard manure + spent compost treated plots. This indicates that these treatments have important roles in biologically based management strategies for controling Fusarium wilt disease under organic mode of lentil cultivation in Uttarakhand State. PMID:25522507

Garkoti, Ankita; Kumar, Vijay; Tripathi, H S

2014-11-01

237

Fusarium head blight: distribution in wheat in Latvia.  

PubMed

Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat has, in recent years, been a very important worldwide disease in intensive growing of cereal. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the occurrence of FHB in wheat in Latvia and to identify the Fusarium species involved. This paper describes the distribution of Fusarium species that were isolated from samples representing winter and spring wheat varieties in Latvia, identified both by the classical morphological analyses of J. Leslie and B. Summerell (2006) and by PCR. The FHB incidence range in winter wheat was 1-20%, in spring wheat was 1-42%. The most significant factor affecting the incidence of fusarial head blight in wheat in Latvia was heightened temperature at the time of an thesis of wheat. In winter wheat 9 Fusarium species caused FHB: F. culmorum, F. avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. equiseti, F. poae, F. oxysporum, F. cerealis, F. sporotrichoides and F. verticillioides were identified by morphological characterization, and 5 were confirmed by PCR-analysis. After experience of 5 years, it can be concluded that the most frequent in winter wheat were F. poae and F. culmorum. In spring wheat from F. culmorum was dominant among 8 Fusarium species. Among 13 varieties of spring wheat, three were sensitive ('Chamsin', 'W 166', 'Azurite') and one was resistant ('Granny') to FHB in conditions of high natural infection in 2009. The monitoring surveys demonstrate a significant presence of FHB in spring wheat in conditions of heightened temperature at the time of flowering in Latvia. PMID:21534469

Treikale, O; Priekule, I; Javoisha, B; Lazareva, L

2010-01-01

238

Identification of candidate genes for Fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage by differential expression analysis.  

PubMed

Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans is an important disease of Brassica worldwide. To identify a resistance (R) gene against Fusarium yellows in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), we analyzed differential expression at the whole genome level between resistant and susceptible inbred lines using RNA sequencing. Four hundred and eighteen genes were significantly differentially expressed, and these were enriched for genes involved in response to stress or stimulus. Seven dominant DNA markers at putative R-genes were identified. Presence and absence of the sequence of the putative R-genes, Bra012688 and Bra012689, correlated with the resistance of six inbred lines and susceptibility of four inbred lines, respectively. In F(2) populations derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible inbred lines, presence of Bra012688 and Bra012689 cosegregated with resistance, suggesting that Bra012688 and Bra012689 are good candidates for fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage. PMID:24668026

Shimizu, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ying, Hua; Pu, Zi-jing; Ebe, Yusuke; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Saeki, Natsumi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Okazaki, Keiichi

2014-06-01

239

Rhizoctonia wilt suppression of brinjal (Solanum melongena L) and plant growth activity by Bacillus BS2.  

PubMed

An antibiotic-producing and hydrogen-cyanide-producing rhizobacteria strain Bacillus BS2 showed a wide range of antifungal activity against many Fusarium sp. and brinjal wilt disease pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Seed bacterization with the strain BS2 promoted seed germination and plant growth in leguminous plants Phaseolus vulgaris and non-leguminous plants Solanum melongena L, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, B. oleraceae var. gongylodes and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill in terms of relative growth rate, shoot height, root length, total biomass production and total chlorophyll content of leaves. Yield of bacterized plants were increased by 10 to 49% compared to uninoculated control plants. Brinjal sapling raised through seed bacterization by the strain BS2 showed a significantly reduced wilt syndrome of brinjal caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Control of wilt disease by the bacterium was clue to the production of antibiotic-like substances, whereas plant growth-promotion was due to the activity of hydrogen cyanide. Root colonization study confirmed that the introduced bacteria colonized the roots and occupied 23-25% of total aerobic bacteria, which was confirmed using dual antibiotic (nalidixic acid and streptomycin sulphate) resistant mutant strain. The results obtained through this investigation suggested the potentiality of the strain BS2 to be used as a plant growth promoter and suppressor of wilt pathogen. PMID:15266911

Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

2003-06-01

240

Entomogenous Fusarium species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium species are known for their abundance in nature and their diverse associations with both living and dead plants and animals. Among animals Fusarium is found primarily in relationship with insects. This literature review of the past 50 years includes both non-pathogenic and pathogenic relationships between Fusarium and insects. Special attention is given to the host range, particularly between plant-

Gertrud H. Teetor-Barsch; Donald W. Roberts

1983-01-01

241

Fusarium commune is a new species identified by morphological and molecular phylogenetic data.  

PubMed

Fusarium commune sp. nov. was isolated from soil and Pisum sativum in Denmark and several widespread locations within the northern hemisphere from diverse substrates including white pine, Douglas fir, carnation, corn, carrot, barley and soil. Fusarium commune is characterized by and distinguished from its putative sister taxon, the F. oxysporum complex, in having long, slender monophialides and polyphialides when cultured in the dark. Based on the combined DNA sequence data from translation elongation factor 1? (EF-1?) and the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal DNA (mtSSU rDNA), the 15 isolates of F. commune analyzed formed a strongly supported clade closely related to but independent of the F. oxysporum and Gibberella fujikuroi species complexes. PMID:21148972

Skovgaard, Kerstin; Rosendahl, Søren; O'Donnell, Kerry; Nirenberg, Helgard I

2003-01-01

242

Molecular markers closely linked to fusarium resistance genes in chickpea show significant alignments to pathogenesis-related genes located on Arabidopsis chromosomes 1 and 5  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population of 131 recombinant inbred lines from a wide cross between chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L., resistant parent) and Cicer reticulatum (susceptible parent) segregating for the closely linked resistances against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri races 4 and 5 was used to develop DNA amplification fingerprinting markers linked to both resistance loci. Bulked segregant analysis revealed 19 new markers on

A.-M. Benko-Iseppon; P. Winter; B. Huettel; C. Staginnus; F. J. Muehlbauer; G. Kahl

2003-01-01

243

Hinoki ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) bark, a substrate with anti-pathogen properties that suppress some root diseases of tomato  

Microsoft Academic Search

There were no significant differences in the content of nutrient elements and the growth of tomato plants on rockwool and on hinoki bark fiber slabs. However, the incidences of fusarium crown and root rot (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici), and bacterial wilt (Pseudomonas solanacearum) were greatly reduced by hinoki bark. The populations of Fusarium or Pseudomonas were significantly lower in

J. Q Yu; H Komada

1999-01-01

244

Progress Toward Breeding for Verticillium Wilt Resistance  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Verticillium wilt is a persistent and serious problem in potato production. Host plant resistance offers an attractive long-term control method. Breeding progress depends on access to germplasm carrying resistance genes. This study was carried out to identify sources of Verticillium wilt resistan...

245

Phylogenomic and functional domain analysis of polyketide synthases in Fusarium  

SciTech Connect

Fusarium species are ubiquitous in nature, cause a range of plant diseases, and produce a variety of chemicals often referred to as secondary metabolites. Although some fungal secondary metabolites affect plant growth or protect plants from other fungi and bacteria, their presence in grain based food and feed is more often associated with a variety of diseases in plants and in animals. Many of these structurally diverse metabolites are derived from a family of related enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs). A search of genomic sequence of Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and Nectria haematococca (anamorph F. solani) identified a total of 58 PKS genes. To gain insight into how this gene family evolved and to guide future studies, we conducted a phylogenomic and functional domain analysis. The resulting genealogy suggested that Fusarium PKSs represent 34 different groups responsible for synthesis of different core metabolites. The analyses indicate that variation in the Fusarium PKS gene family is due to gene duplication and loss events as well as enzyme gain-of-function due to the acquisition of new domains or of loss-of-function due to nucleotide mutations. Transcriptional analysis indicate that the 16 F. verticillioides PKS genes are expressed under a range of conditions, further evidence that they are functional genes that confer the ability to produce secondary metabolites.

Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Baker, Scott E.; Proctor, Robert H.

2012-02-01

246

Original article Wilting effect on fermentation characteristics and  

E-print Network

Original article Wilting effect on fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of mountain the chemical characteristics and the evolution of fermentation processes in pre-wilted silages: 500 L capacity-wilting. Fermentation characteris- tics were significantly modified by wilting with an increase in pH (from 3.82 to 4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

Pathogenicity and mycotoxin production by Fusarium proliferatum isolated from onion and garlic in Serbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium proliferatum can occur on a wide range of economically important vegetable plants but its role in disease is not always well established.\\u000a In 2000 and 2001, from forty-one field samples of wilting onion and garlic plants in Serbia, F. proliferatum as the predominant fungal species was isolated from root and bulbs. Seventy isolates were firstly characterized for their\\u000a sexual

S. Stankovic; J. Levic; T. Petrovic; A. Logrieco; A. Moretti

2007-01-01

248

Influence of antifungal compounds from a soil-borne actinomycete onFusarium spp. in asparagus.  

PubMed

Asparagus decline syndrome is caused by fungal infection of asparagus roots and crowns byFusarium oxysporum f.sp.asparagi (FOA) andF. moniliforme (FM). Several soil-borne microorganisms have been found inhibitory toFusarium pathogens in other crops. A novelStreptomyces spp. (ME2-27-19A) was isolated from asparagus field soil and found to be inhibitory to FOA and FM in vitro. Solvent extraction of ME2-27-19A and Chromatographic purification of the extract yielded compound(s) that were inhibitory to FOA and FM at 40?g/ml. ME2-27-19A extract produced variable control of FOA and FM in vitro, and was phytotoxic at 1000 (?g/ml. In soil, ME2-27-19A extract reduced theFusarium population at 100?g/ml, but also reduced the asparagus shoot length. PMID:24241918

Elson, M K; Kelly, J F; Nair, M G

1994-11-01

249

Fusarium species from the cassava root rot complex in west Africa.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Fusarium species are a significant component of the set of fungi associated with cassava root rot. Yield losses due to root rot average 0.5 to 1 ton/ha but losses >3 ton/ha, an equivalent of 15 to 20% yield, often occur. This paper reviews previous work on cassava root rot and summarizes a few recent studies on Fusarium species associated with the disease. Our studies in Cameroon showed that 30% of rotted tubers were infected by Fusarium spp. 12 months after planting and represented 25% of all the fungal isolates recovered. Other commonly recovered fungi were Botryodiplodia theobromae and Armillaria spp. Numerous and diverse species of Fusarium were associated with rotted cassava roots in Nigeria and Cameroon. At least 13 distinct amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) groups of Fusarium were distinguishable, each group probably a distinct species, and many of them might represent previously undescribed Fusarium species. The two largest of the AFLP groups correspond to F. oxysporum and F. solani species complex. The distribution of Fusarium spp. varied among countries and among locations within a country, suggesting that germ plasm resistant at one location may not be resistant at another. Fusarium spp. also cause seedling blight of cassava and can be recovered from the stems of infected plants up to 1 m above the ground. Therefore, the pathogen can spread with stems cut as planting material. Fusarium spp. also can colonize Chromolaena odorata, the dominant weed in short fallows, which could further complicate management efforts by serving as an alternative host for strains that colonize cassava. PMID:18943189

Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Mwangi, Maina; Aigbe, Sylvester O; Leslie, John F

2006-06-01

250

Field response of some asparagus varieties to rust, Fusarium crown root rot, and violet root rot.  

PubMed

Research was carried out to evaluate the behaviour of some asparagus genotypes against three most important fungal diseases: 1) asparagus rust caused by Puccinia asparagi D.C.; 2) Fusarium crown and root rot caused by Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht.) f.sp. asparagi (Cohen & Heald) and Fusarium proliferatum (Matstush.) Nirenberg; 3) violet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia violacea Tul. The object of this research was also to found an eventual correlation between the plant susceptibility to asparagus rust and the sensibility to Fusarium crown root rot and violet root rot attacks. Resistant genotypes to rust should be less susceptible to attacks from F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi, F. proliferatum and R. violacea, a fungal complex causing the plant decline. Asparagus genotypes were compared in a randomized complete block experiment design, replicated four times, in order to search that ones showing the best behaviour to escape the diseases. Phytopathological observations were carried out on November when the control plots showed 100% infected plants. The pathogens were isolated and identified. The diseased plants were registered. According to symptom evaluation scales, all the plants were grouped into infection classes, calculating frequency and McKinney index. Wishing to learn something about the infection trend of F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi or R. violacea in relation to P. asparagi attack, the relative curvilinear regressions were calculated. The Italian cultivars "Marte" and "Grande" showed significantly the best behaviour in terms of resistance to asparagus rust, exhibiting 37% and 42% of diseased plants. The McKinney index was 9.1% and 15.6%, respectively. The susceptible plots showed 100% of infected plants and different McKinney index: 46% for "Eros", about 60% for "H 519", "Atlas" and "Golia", over 70% for the remainder. "Marte" and "Grande" showed good tolerance to F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi and to R. violacea exhibiting up to 100% of healthy plants. The regression between plants affected by asparagus rust and those diseased by Fusarium crown root rot showed a linear equation with a regression coefficient b = 1.186 and a correlation coefficient R2 = 0.98. The regression between infection caused by rust and that caused by violet root rot exhibited a regression coefficient b = 1.03 and a coefficient of correlation R2 = 0.9. "Marte" and "Grande" exhibited the best behaviour against the rust attacks. Plants without rust were tolerant to pathogens causing plant decline. PMID:15151301

Fiume, F; Fiume, G

2003-01-01

251

Diversity of Fusarium species and mycotoxins contaminating pineapple.  

PubMed

Pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus) is an important perennial crop in tropical and subtropical areas. It may be infected by various Fusarium species, contaminating the plant material with mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fusarium species variability among the genotypes isolated from pineapple fruits displaying fungal infection symptoms and to evaluate their mycotoxigenic abilities. Forty-four isolates of ten Fusarium species were obtained from pineapple fruit samples: F. ananatum, F. concentricum, F. fujikuroi, F. guttiforme, F. incarnatum, F. oxysporum, F. polyphialidicum, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Fumonisins B1-B3, beauvericin (BEA) and moniliformin (MON) contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in pineapple fruit tissue. Fumonisins are likely the most dangerous metabolites present in fruit samples (the maximum FB1 content was 250 ?g g(-1) in pineapple skin and 20 ?g ml(-1) in juice fraction). In both fractions, BEA and MON were of minor significance. FUM1 and FUM8 genes were identified in F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Cyclic peptide synthase gene (esyn1 homologue) from the BEA biosynthetic pathway was identified in 40 isolates of eight species. Based on the gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, none of the isolates tested were found to be able to produce trichothecenes or zearalenone. PMID:23572446

St?pie?, ?ukasz; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Wa?kiewicz, Agnieszka

2013-08-01

252

Mycotoxins biosynthesized by plant-derived Fusarium isolates.  

PubMed

There is little information on secondary metabolites produced by Fusaria infecting crop plants other than cereals. Many members of Fusarium genus have the ability to colonise perennial crops with only scarce infection or disease symptoms or with no symptoms at all while still being detectable. Even in case of such asymptomatic infection, significant mycotoxin contamination of the plant tissues is possible. The aim of this study was to characterise the spectrum of Fusarium species isolates obtained from different plant hosts (like asparagus, garlic, pineapple, banana, rhubarb, peppers, rice, maize, wheat, and oncidium) and evaluate their ability to biosynthesize the most common mycotoxins in vitro. Among the F.proliferatum isolates, up to 57 % of them biosynthesized fumonisins at very high mass fractions, amounting to above 1000 ?g g(-1), while other Fusarium species such as F. verticillioides, F. lactis, F. polyphialydicum, F. concentricum, F. temperatum, and F. fujikuroi formed fumonisins mostly at much lower level. Only F. ananatum and F. oxysporum did not produce these toxins. Co-occurrence of FBs with other mycotoxins [moniliformin (MON) and beauvericin (BEA)] was often observed and it was mainly F. proliferatum species that formed both mycotoxins (0.4 ?g g(-1) to 41.1 ?g g(-1) BEA and 0.1 ?g g(-1) to 158.5 ?g g(-1) MON). PMID:23334038

Wa?kiewicz, Agnieszka; St?pie?, ?ukasz

2012-12-01

253

EBR1 genomic expansion and its role in virulence of Fusarium species.  

PubMed

Genome sequencing of Fusarium oxysporum revealed that pathogenic forms of this fungus harbour supernumerary chromosomes with a wide variety of genes, many of which likely encode traits required for pathogenicity or niche specialization. Specific transcription factor gene families are expanded on these chromosomes including the EBR1 family (Enhanced Branching). The significance of the EBR1 family expansion on supernumerary chromosomes and whether EBR1 paralogues are functional is currently unknown. EBR1 is found as a single copy in F.graminearum and other fungi but as multiple paralogues in pathogenic F.oxysporum strains. These paralogues exhibit sequence and copy number variation among different host-specific strains and even between more closely related strains. Relative expression of the EBR1 paralogues depends on growth conditions and on the presence of the single EBR1 gene in the core genome. Deletion of EBR1 in the core genome in different F.oxysporum strains resulted in impaired growth, reduced pathogenicity and slightly reduced biocontrol capacities. To identify genes regulated by EBR1, the transcriptomes of wild-type and ?ebr1 strains were compared for both F.oxysporum and F.graminearum. These studies showed that in both species, EBR1 regulates genes involved in general metabolism as well as virulence. PMID:24237614

Jonkers, Wilfried; Xayamongkhon, Henry; Haas, Matthew; Olivain, Chantal; van der Does, H Charlotte; Broz, Karen; Rep, Martijn; Alabouvette, Claude; Steinberg, Christian; Kistler, H Corby

2014-07-01

254

Evaluation of oak wilt index based on genetic programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

We proposed a normalized oak wilt index (NWI) to extract oak wilt area from remotely sensed hyperspectral image of forest in our previous work. The NWI, which is designed based on factitious characterization of spectral profiles of oak wilt, realized satisfactory extraction performance. In this paper, we propose a genetic-programming-based search method for physically interpretable index. The search procedure consists

Kuniaki Uto; Yukio Kosugi; Toshinari Ogata

2009-01-01

255

Birth, death and horizontal transfer of the fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster during the evolutionary diversification of Fusarium.  

PubMed

Fumonisins are a family of carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by members of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) and rare strains of Fusarium oxysporum. In Fusarium, fumonisin biosynthetic genes (FUM) are clustered, and the cluster is uniform in gene organization. Here, sequence analyses indicated that the cluster exists in five different genomic contexts, defining five cluster types. In FUM gene genealogies, evolutionary relationships between fusaria with different cluster types were largely incongruent with species relationships inferred from primary-metabolism (PM) gene genealogies, and FUM cluster types are not trans-specific. In addition, synonymous site divergence analyses indicated that three FUM cluster types predate diversification of FFSC. The data are not consistent with balancing selection or interspecific hybridization, but they are consistent with two competing hypotheses: (i) multiple horizontal transfers of the cluster from unknown donors to FFSC recipients and (ii) cluster duplication and loss (birth and death). Furthermore, low levels of FUM gene divergence in F.?bulbicola, an FFSC species, and F.?oxysporum provide evidence for horizontal transfer of the cluster from the former, or a closely related species, to the latter. Thus, uniform gene organization within the FUM cluster belies a complex evolutionary history that has not always paralleled the evolution of Fusarium. PMID:23937442

Proctor, Robert H; Van Hove, François; Susca, Antonia; Stea, Gaetano; Busman, Mark; van der Lee, Theo; Waalwijk, Cees; Moretti, Antonio; Ward, Todd J

2013-10-01

256

DISEASE RESISTANCE IN TRANSGENIC COTTONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Transgenic Upland cottons (Gossypium hirsutum L.) expressing the antifungal peptide D4E1 were evaluated for tolerance to Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum (FOV) race 1 in a sandy soil field, also infected with root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita). A transgenic line...

257

Response of transgenic cucumber expressing a rice class I chitinase gene to two fungal pathogens with different infectivities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A transgenic cucumber line (CR32) over-expressing the rice class I chitinase gene exhibited resistance to Phytophthora rot ( Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica) but not to Fusarium wilt ( Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum). The infection behavior of these fungi on CR32 and nontransgenic plants was examined with an optical microscope. In zoosporangia of P. nicotianae var. parasitica, the rates of

Kyutaro Kishimoto; Masami Nakajima; Yoko Nishizawa; Yutaka Tabei; Tadaaki Hibi; Katsumi Akutsu

2003-01-01

258

Development of a PCR assay to detect the potential production of nivalenol in Fusarium poae.  

PubMed

Fusarium species can produce mycotoxins, which can contaminate cereal-based food producing adverse effects for human and animal health. In recent years, the importance of Fusarium poae has increased within the Fusarium head blight complex. Fusarium poae is known to produce trichothecenes, especially nivalenol, a potent mycotoxin able to cause a variety of toxic effects. In this study, a specific primer pair was designed based on the tri7 gene to detect potential nivalenol-producing F. poae isolates. A total of 125 F. poae, four F. cerealis, two F. culmorum, one F. langsethiae, one F. sporotrichioides and seven F. graminearum, plus F. austroamericanum, F. meridionale, F. graminearum sensu stricto and F. cortaderiae from the NRRL collection were analysed, and only F. poae isolates gave a positive result for the presence of a 296-bp partial tri7 DNA fragment. Moreover, the primer set was tested from cereal seed samples where F. poae and other Fusarium species with a negative result for the specific reaction ( F. graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. chlamydosporum, F. sporotrichioides, F. equiseti and F. acuminatum) were isolated, and the expected fragment was amplified. We developed a rapid and reliable PCR assay to detect potential nivalenol-producing F. poae isolates. PMID:22536946

Dinolfo, María I; Barros, Germán G; Stenglein, Sebastián A

2012-07-01

259

Molecular Relationships of Fungi Within the Fusarium redolens-F. hostae Clade.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The evolutionary relationships of fungi in the Fusarium redolens-F. hostae clade were investigated by constructing nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies for 37 isolates representing the known genetic and pathogenic diversity of this lineage, together with 15 isolates from putative sister groups that include the Gibberella fujikuroi and F. oxysporum species complexes and related species. Included in the analyses were 29 isolates of F. redolens from Asparagus, Convallaria, Dianthus, Fritillaria, Hebe, Helleborus, Hordeum, Linum, Pisum, Pseudotsuga, and Zea spp., and from soil. Isolates of F. hostae analyzed included two reference isolates from Hosta spp. and six isolates from Hyacinthus spp. that originally were classified as F. oxysporum f. sp. hyacinthi. DNA sequences from a portion of the nuclear translation elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) gene and the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) were analyzed individually and as a combined data set based on results of the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks Templeton combinability test. Maximum parsimony analysis of the combined data set identified the F. redolens-F. hostae clade as a sister group to a phylogenetically diverse clade in which the G. fujikuroi species complex formed the most basal lineage. Also included in this latter clade were two unnamed Fusarium spp. that are morphologically similar to F. oxysporum and putative sister taxa comprising the F. oxysporum complex and a F. nisikadoi-F. miscanthi clade. Phylogenetic diversity in F. redolens was small; all isolates were represented by only three EF-1alpha and two mtSSU rDNA haplotypes. Both the isolates of F. redolens f. sp. asparagi and those of F. redolens f. sp. dianthi were nearly evenly distributed in the combined molecular phylogeny between the two major subclades within F. redolens. PMID:18943438

Baayen, R P; O'Donnell, K; Breeuwsma, S; Geiser, D M; Waalwijk, C

2001-11-01

260

Molecular biology of Fusarium mycotoxins  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

As the 20th century ended, Fusarium mycotoxicology entered the age of genomics. With complete genomes of Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides, and several Fusarium gene expression sequence databases on hand, researchers worldwide are working at a rapid pace to identify mycotoxin biosynthetic...

261

Molecular Biology of Fusarium Mycotoxins  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

As the 20th century ended, Fusarium mycotoxicology entered the age of genomics. With complete genomes of Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides and several Fusarium gene expression sequence databases on hand, researchers worldwide are working at a rapid pace to identify mycotoxin biosynthetic ...

262

Zearalenone Production by Fusarium Species 1  

PubMed Central

One-hundred-and-thirteen isolates of Fusarium were tested for their ability to produce zearalenone on autoclaved corn. They belonged to the following species (number of producers per number tested): F. epispheria, (0/1); F. moniliforme, (0/8); Gibberella fujikuroi, (0/3); F. nivale, (0/7); F. oxysporum, (0/15); F. roseum, (31/51); F. solani, (0/9); F. tricinctum (3/19). The isolates of individual species produced the following amounts of zearalenone per gram of corn: 3 isolates of F. roseum (0.6 to 119 ?g), 3 of F. roseum “Culmorum” (1 to 210 ?g), 3 of F. roseum “Equiseti” (0.6 to 2.0 ?g), F. roseum “Gibbosum” (115 to 175 ?g), 21 of F. roseum “Graminearum” (0.2 to 230 ?g), and 3 of F. tricinctum (0.2 to 6.0 ?g). All isolates of F. roseum “Graminearum” which formed the perithecial stage of G. zeae (G. roseum) produced zearalenone. Production occurred by the wild but not the appressed cultural type. Zearalenone production by F. tricinctum was confirmed by a mouse bioassay. PMID:5456939

Caldwell, Rodney W.; Tuite, John; Stob, Martin; Baldwin, Robert

1970-01-01

263

Production of trichothecene and non-trichothecene mycotoxins by Fusarium species isolated from maize in Minnesota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-two cultures of Fusarium species isolated in 1986 from moldy maize in Minnesota were each cultured on rice for 4 weeks and found to produce the following mycotoxins: F. graminearum isolates, deoxynivalenol (DON, 4–225 µg\\/g), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON, 2–4µg\\/g), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON, 1–35 µg\\/g) and zearalenone (ZEA, 5–4350 µg\\/g); F. moniliforme, fusarin C (detectable amounts to 1000 µg\\/g); F. mòniliforme, F. oxysporum,

H. K. Abbas; C. J. Mirocha; T. Kommedahl; R. F. Vesonder; P. Golinski

1989-01-01

264

Fusarium fungi and associated metabolites presence on grapes from Slovakia.  

PubMed

Toxinogenic Fusarium species were identified on grape berries from Slovak vineyards, and their toxic metabolites were analysed by HPLC-MS/MS. F. subglutinans, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. semitectum, F. solani, F. subglutinans, and F. verticillioides were found with varying frequency. F. oxysporum and F. proliferatum, cultured in vitro on Czapek yeast autolysate agar and yeast extract sucrose agar, produced beauvericin, in the range from 3,265 to 13,400 ?g/kg, and fusaproliferin in high concentration, ranging from 49,850 to 259,500 ?g/kg. A maximum value of 2.24 ?g/kg has been observed for beauvericin in dried grape berries. Fumonisin B1, and fumonisin B2 were also identified, and the observed levels ranged from 500 to 2,040 ?g/kg. Over 2 years (namely 2008 and 2009) many other metabolites have been identified and analysed in grape berries, in particular: avenacein Y, apicidin, aurofusarin, chlamydosporol, 2-amino-14,16-dimethyloctadecan-3-ol, enniatin A, enniatin A1, enniatin B2, enniatin B3, and equisetin. PMID:23371886

Mikušová, Petra; Šrobárová, Antónia; Sulyok, Michael; Santini, Antonello

2013-05-01

265

Recovery Plan for Laurel Wilt of Avocado  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). The disease threatens commercial avocado production in Florida, as well as the National Germplasm Repository for avocado in Miami (USDA-ARS). Elsewhere in the US, major (California) and minor comm...

266

Verticillium wilt of potato: Importance and control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of Verticillium wilt of potato and its control are discussed. Among the factors considered in controlling the\\u000a disease are the role of seed tubers in disseminating the pathogen, the interaction of nematodes and fungus, chemical eradication,\\u000a the use of tolerant or resistant cultivars, and integrated control measures.

J. Krikun; D. Orion

1979-01-01

267

Two rhizobacterial strains, individually and in interactions with Rhizobium sp., enhance fusarial wilt control, growth, and yield in pigeon pea.  

PubMed

A Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, RRLJ 04, and a Bacillus cereus strain, BS 03, were tested both individually and in combination with a Rhizobium strain, RH 2, for their ability to enhance plant growth and nodulation in pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) under gnotobiotic, greenhouse and field conditions. Both of the rhizobacterial strains exhibited a positive effect on growth in terms of shoot height, root length, fresh and dry weight, nodulation and yield over the non-treated control. Co-inoculation of seeds with these strains and Rhizobium RH 2 also reduced the number of wilted plants, when grown in soil infested with Fusarium udum. Gnotobiotic studies confirmed that the suppression of wilt disease was due to the presence of the respective PGPR strains. Seed bacterization with drug-marked mutants of RRLJ 04 and BS 03 confirmed their ability to colonize and multiply along the roots. The results suggest that co-inoculation of these strains with Rhizobium strain RH 2 can be further exploited for enhanced growth, nodulation and yield in addition to control of fusarial wilt in pigeon pea. PMID:25224506

Dutta, Swarnalee; Morang, Pranjal; Kumar S, Nishanth; Dileep Kumar, B S

2014-09-01

268

Selection of potential antagonists against asparagus crown and root rot caused by Fusarium spp.  

PubMed

Crown and root rot is one of the most important diseases of asparagus crop worldwide. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. asparagi and F. proliferatum are the two species more frequently associated to this complex and their prevalence depends on the production area. The control of the disease on asparagus crop is difficult to achieve because its perennial condition and the long survival of the pathogen in the soil as chlamydospores or as mycelium in infected plant debris. Furthermore, Fusarium spp. are easily disseminated with asparagus propagation materials. Thus, control measures should aim at obtaining seedlings protection for longer than achieved with conventional pre-planting chemical treatments. The effectiveness of fungal antagonists on the control of diseases caused by soil borne fungi has been reported. The potential of Trichoderma spp. as a biological control agent against diseases caused by Fusarium spp. in tomato and asparagus has been studied . It has been suggested that microorganisms isolated from the root or rhizosphere of a specific crop may be better adapted to that crop and may provide better disease control than organisms originally isolated from other plant species. The objective of this work was the evaluation of the potential of fungal isolates from symptomless asparagus plants as biocontrol agents of Fusarium crown and root rot. PMID:19226757

Rubio-Pérez, E; Molinero-Ruiz, M L; Melero-Vara, J M; Basallote-Ureba, M J

2008-01-01

269

Identification and functional characterization of indole-3-acetamide-mediated IAA biosynthesis in plant-associated Fusarium species.  

PubMed

The plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) can be synthesized from tryptophan via the intermediate indole-3-acetamide (IAM). The two genes, IaaM (encoding tryptophan monooxygenase) and IaaH (encoding indole-3-acetamide hydrolase) that constitute the IAM pathway have been described in plant-associated bacteria. We have identified putative homologs of the bacterial IaaM and IaaH genes in four Fusarium species -Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium fujikuroi, and Fusarium oxysporum. In all four species the two genes are organized next to each other in a head to head orientation and are separated by a short non-coding region. However, the pathway is fully functional only in the orchid endophytic strain F. proliferatum ET1, which produces significant amounts of IAM and IAA. Minor amounts of IAM are produced by the corn pathogen F. verticillioides strain 149, while in the two other species, the rice pathogen F. fujikuroi strain m567 and the tomato pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici strain 42-87 the IAM pathway is inactive. Deletion of the entire gene locus in F. proliferatum ET1 resulted in drastic reduction of IAA production. Conversely, transgenic strains of F. fujikuroi over-expressing the F. proliferatum IAM genes produced elevated levels of both IAM and IAA. Analysis of the intergenic promoter region in F. proliferatum showed that transcriptional activation in direction of the IaaH gene is about 3-fold stronger than in direction of the IaaM gene. The regulation of the IAM genes and the limiting factors of IAA production via the IAM pathway are discussed. PMID:22079545

Tsavkelova, Elena; Oeser, Birgitt; Oren-Young, Liat; Israeli, Maayan; Sasson, Yehezkel; Tudzynski, Bettina; Sharon, Amir

2012-01-01

270

Production of trichothecenes and zearalenone by isolates of Fusarium spp. from Argentinian maize.  

PubMed

Fusarium cultures (27 isolates of Fusarium graminearum, 5 of F. sporotrichioides, 5 of F. semitectum, 2 of F. solani, and one isolate of F. equiseti, F. heterosporum and F. oxysporum respectively, from maize ears) were screened to determine their ability to produce different trichothecenes and zearalenone. Twenty of 27 F. graminearum isolates produced deoxynivalenol (384-5745 micrograms/kg), 7/27 produced 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (322-1840 micrograms/kg), 3/27 produced neosolaniol (199-898 micrograms/kg), 5/27 produced diacetoxyscirpenol (205-3095 micrograms/kg), 4/27 produced HT-2 toxin (278-1377 micrograms/kg) and 13/27 produced zearalenone (200-35045 micrograms/kg). No isolate of F. graminearum produced either nivalenol, 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, T-2 tosin, T-2 triol or T-2 tetraol. Only chemotype IA (deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol) was observed. F. sporotrichioides isolates produced deoxynivalenol (5/5), T-2 triol and T-2 tetraol (1/5) and zearalenone (1/5). One F. semitectum isolate produced diacetoxyscirpenol and F. equiseti and F. oxysporum isolates produced only deoxynivalenol. Thus, three of the toxins studied, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol are most likely to appear as contaminants in freshly harvested maize. PMID:9135723

Molto, G A; Gonzalez, H H; Resnik, S L; Pereyra Gonzalez, A

1997-04-01

271

Observations sur la persistance dans le sol des microconidies de Fusarium oxysporum  

E-print Network

sont mélangées avec du talc. Séché puis broyé, cet inoculum peut être conservé au sec pendant plus d was grown in shake-culture for 8 days and the propagules then washed and mixed with talc. After drying and grinding, the talc was stored dry at room temperature until use. Microscopic observations showed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Sambutoxin, a new mycotoxin produced by toxic Fusarium isolates obtained from rotted potato tubers.  

PubMed Central

Ninety-nine isolates of Fusarium species were obtained from rotted potato tubers from various parts of Korea. Of these isolates, 80 were identified as Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani, or F. sambucinum. The isolates of these species were grown on autoclaved wheat grains and examined for toxicity in a rat-feeding test. A total of 8 of 57 F. oxysporum isolates, 3 of 14 F. solani isolates, and 5 of 9 F. sambucinum isolates caused the death of the rats. Of the 16 toxic isolates, 1 isolate of F. oxysporum produced a substantial amount of moniliformin, which could account for its toxicity. None of the other 15 isolates produced trichothecenes, moniliformin, fusarochromanone, fumonisin B1, or wortmannin. F. sambucinum PZF-4 produced an unknown toxin in wheat culture. This new toxin, given the trivial name sambutoxin, caused toxic effects in rats, including body weight loss, feed refusal, hemorrhage in the stomach and intestines, and, finally, death when rats were fed diets supplemented with 0.05 and 0.1% sambutoxin. The toxin was also toxic to chicken embryos, and the 50% lethal concentration was 29.6 micrograms per egg. Sambutoxin formed as white crystals that turned purple when combined with reagents such as sulfuric acid and p-anisaldehyde. It exhibited a green color immediately after treatment with potassium ferricyanide-ferric chloride. Its UV spectrum had absorption maxima at 213, 233, and 254 nm, and its infrared spectrum showed an amide group at 1,650 and 1,560 cm-1 and a hydroxy group at 3,185 cm-1. Mass spectrometry showed that the molecular weight of the toxin was 453 and the molecular formula was C28H39NO4.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811078

Kim, J C; Lee, Y W

1994-01-01

273

Identification of a 12-gene fusaric acid biosynthetic gene cluster in Fusarium through comparative and functional genomics.  

PubMed

In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a polyketide-derived SM produced by multiple species of the fungus Fusarium. This SM is of concern because it is toxic to animals, and therefore considered a mycotoxin, and may contribute to plant pathogenesis. Preliminary descriptions of the fusaric acid biosynthetic gene (FUB) cluster have been reported in two Fusarium species: the maize pathogen F. verticillioides and the rice pathogen F. fujikuroi. The cluster consisted of five genes and did not include a transcription factor or transporter gene. Here, analysis of the FUB region in F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi and F. oxysporum, a plant pathogen with multiple hosts, indicates the FUB cluster consists of at least 12 genes (FUB1 - FUB12). Deletion analysis confirmed that nine FUB genes, including two Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factor genes, are required for production of wild-type levels of fusaric acid. Comparisons of FUB cluster homologs across multiple Fusarium isolates and species revealed insertion of non-FUB genes at one or two locations in some homologs. Although the ability to produce fusaric acid contributed to the phytotoxicity of F. oxysporum culture extracts, lack of production did not affect virulence of F. oxysporum on cactus or F. verticillioides on maize seedlings. These findings provide new insights into the genetic and biochemical processes required for fusaric acid production. PMID:25372119

Brown, Daren W; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Lee-Han; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Lee, Soohyung; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho; Busman, Mark; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Proctor, Robert H; Lee, Theresa

2014-11-01

274

MANAGEMENT OF SCLEROTINIA BLIGHT AND VERTICILLIUM WILT IN PEANUTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Some of the objectives of this research are to study the biology of economically important peanut pathogens including Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV), and to determine the role of disease resistance in managing soil-borne peanut pathogens, particularly Sclerotinia blight, Verticillium wilt, and Sou...

275

Biocontrol of fusarium crown and root rot and promotion of growth of tomato by paenibacillus strains isolated from soil.  

PubMed

In this study, bacterial strains were isolated from soils from 30 locations of Samcheok, Gangwon province. Of the isolated strains, seven showed potential plant growth promoting and antagonistic activities. Based on cultural and morphological characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, these strains were identified as Paenibacillus species. All seven strains produced ammonia, cellulase, hydrocyanic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, protease, phosphatase, and siderophores. They also inhibited the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici in vitro. The seven Paenibacillus strains enhanced a range of growth parameters in tomato plants under greenhouse conditions, in comparison with non-inoculated control plants. Notably, treatment of tomato plants with one identified strain, P. polymyxa SC09-21, resulted in 80.0% suppression of fusarium crown and root rot under greenhouse conditions. The plant growth promoting and antifungal activity of P. polymyxa SC09-21 identified in this study highlight its potential suitability as a bioinoculant. PMID:25071385

Xu, Sheng Jun; Kim, Byung Sup

2014-06-01

276

Fusarium keratitis in Brazil: genotyping, in vitro susceptibilities, and clinical outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this paper is to describe clinical characteristics and determine correlations between clinical outcomes and antifungal susceptibility among molecularly characterized ocular Fusarium isolates in Brazil. Methods Forty-one Fusarium isolates obtained from 41 eyes of 41 patients were retrieved from the ophthalmic microbiology laboratory at São Paulo Federal University and grown in pure culture. These isolates were genotyped and antifungal susceptibilities determined for each isolate using a broth microdilution method. The corresponding medical records were reviewed to determine clinical outcomes. Results The 41 isolates were genotypically classified as Fusarium solani species complex (36 isolates, 88%), Fusarium oxysporum species complex (two isolates, 5%), Fusarium dimerum species complex (one isolate, 2%) and two isolates that did not group into any of the species complexes. Final best corrected visual acuity varied from 20/20 to light perception and was on average 20/800 (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) 1.6). A history of trauma was the most common risk factor, being present in 21 patients (51%). Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was necessary in 22 patients (54%). Amphotericin B had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) value (2 ?g/mL) and voriconazole had the highest (16 ?g/mL). There was an association between a higher natamycin MIC and need for therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.005). Conclusion Trauma was the main risk factor, and therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was necessary in 54% of patients. Amphotericin B had the lowest MIC90 (2 ?g/mL) of the three antifungal agents tested. There was an association between higher natamycin MIC levels and corneal perforation, emphasizing the need for antifungal susceptibility testing and tailoring of antifungal strategies. PMID:24039389

Oechsler, Rafael A; Yamanaka, Tiago M; Bispo, Paulo JM; Sartori, Juliana; Yu, Maria Cecilia Zorat; Melo, Analy Salles A; Miller, Darlene; Hofling-Lima, Ana Luisa

2013-01-01

277

A Conserved Homeobox Transcription Factor Htf1 Is Required for Phialide Development and Conidiogenesis in Fusarium Species  

PubMed Central

Conidia are primary means of asexual reproduction and dispersal in a variety of pathogenic fungi, and it is widely recognized that they play a critical role in animal and plant disease epidemics. However, genetic mechanisms associated with conidiogenesis are complex and remain largely undefined in numerous pathogenic fungi. We previously showed that Htf1, a homeobox transcription factor, is required for conidiogenesis in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, our aim was to characterize how Htf1 homolog regulates common and also distinctive conidiogenesis in three key Fusarium pathogens: F. graminearm, F. verticillioides, and F. oxysporum. When compared to wild-type progenitors, the gene-deletion mutants in Fusarium species failed to form conventional phialides. Rather, they formed clusters of aberrant phialides that resembled elongated hyphae segments, and it is conceivable that this led to the obstruction of conidiation in phialides. We also observed that mutants, as well as wild-type Fusaria, can initiate alternative macroconidia production directly from hyphae through budding-like mechanism albeit at low frequencies. Microscopic observations led us to conclude that proper basal cell division and subsequent foot cell development of macroconidia were negatively impacted in the mutants. In F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum, mutants exhibited a 2- to 5- microconidia complex at the apex of monophialides resulting in a floral petal-like shape. Also, prototypical microconidia chains were absent in F. verticillioides mutants. F. graminearum and F. verticillioides mutants were complemented by introducing its native HTF1 gene or homologs from other Fusarium species. These results suggest that Fusarium Htf1 is functionally conserved homeobox transcription factor that regulates phialide development and conidiogenesis via distinct signaling pathways yet to be characterized in fungi. PMID:23029006

Zheng, Wenhui; Zhao, Xu; Xie, Qiurong; Huang, Qingping; Zhang, Chengkang; Zhai, Huanchen; Xu, Liping; Lu, Guodong; Shim, Won-Bo; Wang, Zonghua

2012-01-01

278

Fusarium spp. contamination of wheat, maize, soybean, and pea grain in Croatia.  

PubMed

From 2002 to 2008, 203 samples of wheat, maize, soybean, and pea were analysed for the presence of Fusarium species. Contamination with Fusarium spp., expressed as the percentage of seeds with Fusarium colonies, ranged from 5 % to 69 % for wheat, from 25 % to 100 % for maize, from 4 % to 17 % for soybean, and from 3 % to 17 % for pea. 187 isolates were collected and the following 19 species determined: F. graminearum, F. poae, F. avenaceum, F. verticillioides, F. sporotrichioides, F. heterosporum, F. crookwellense, F. tricinctum, F. semitectum, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. solani, F. equiseti, F. pseudograminearum, F. chlamydosporum, F. sambucinum, F. compactum, F. scirpi, and F. culmorum. Dominant species were F. graminearum on wheat (27 % of isolates), F. verticillioides on maize (83 % of isolates), F. sporotrichioides on soybean (34 % of isolates), and F. proliferatum on pea (29 % of isolates). Among species identified, F. heterosporum, F. crookwellense, F. pseudograminearum, F. sambucinum, and F. compactum have been reported for the first time in Croatia. PMID:20061244

Ivi?, Dario; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Peraica, Maja; Milicevi?, Tihomir; Cvjetkovi?, Bogdan

2009-12-01

279

Oak Wilt: A Threat to Red Oaks & White Oaks Species  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Oak Wilt: A Threat to Red Oaks & White Oaks Species was created by Dr. David L. Roberts at Michigan State University Extension. Dr. RobertâÂÂs concise site contains brief sections addressing oak wilt distribution, field diagnosis, management, disease cycle, and more. This guide contains extensive links to images and other informational extension sites that will help you make informed decisions regarding the health of your trees. The site compiles a great deal of research on oak wilt and is an excellent resource for students and professionals alike.

Roberts, David L.

2008-02-22

280

Fusarial wilt control and growth promotion of pigeon pea through bioactive metabolites produced by two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.  

PubMed

The bioactive metabolites produced by two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RRLJ 04 and a Bacillus cereus strain BS 03, which showed growth promotion and disease control in pigeon pea against Fusarium udum, were isolated and screened for their efficacy to control fusarial wilt of pigeon pea under gnotobiotic and nursery condition. Bioactive metabolites viz., BM 1 and BM 2 from RRLJ 04 and BM 3 from BS 03 also showed in vitro antibiosis against F. udum. Seeds treated with 50 ?l seed?¹ of BM 1, 30 ?l seed?¹ of BM 2 and 70 ?l seed?¹ of BM 3 and grown in pathogen infested soil showed suppression of wilt disease besides growth enhancement. Per cent disease control was 90 % with BM 2 application as compared to 87 and 83 %, respectively in BM 1 and BM 3 after 90 days of growth. BM 2 treated plants were more resistant to the pathogen as compared to the other fractions tested. Mycelial dry weight was found to be reduced on treatment with the bioactive metabolites. Formation of chlamydospore-like structures was observed in the pathogen mycelium treated with BM 3. The analytical studies confirmed that two of these metabolites are phenazine derivatives. PMID:24154979

Dutta, S; Morang, P; Nishanth Kumar, S; Dileep Kumar, B S

2014-03-01

281

Cytochemical Labeling for Fungal and Host Components in Plant Tissues Inoculated with Fungal Wilt Pathogens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antibodies to detect pectin in present investigations attached to distinct fibrils in vessel lumina. In carnation infected with an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., labeling of pathogen cells also occurred; in a resistant cultivar (cv.), it was coincident with proximate pectin fibrils and linked to altered fungal walls, which was the opposite in the susceptible cv., indicating that hindrance of pathogen ability to degrade pectin may be related to resistance. Labeling of the fungus in culture was nil, except in media containing pectin, showing that pectin is not native to the pathogen. Labeling of fungal walls for cellulose in elm (inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) and carnation also occurred, linked to adsorbed host wall components. The chitin probe often attached to dispersed matter, in vessel lumina, traceable to irregularly labeled fungal cells and host wall degradation products. With an anti-horseradish peroxidase probe, host and fungal walls were equally labeled, and with a glucosidase, differences of labeling between these walls were observed, depending on pH of the test solution. Fungal extracellular matter and filamentous structures, present in fungal walls, predominantly in another elm isolate (Phaeotheca dimorphospora), did not label with any of the probes used. However, in cultures of this fungus, extracellular material labeled, even at a distance from the colony margin, with an anti-fimbriae probe.

Ouellette, G. B.; Baayen, R. P.; Chamberland, H.; Simard, M.; Rioux, D.; Charest, P. M.

2004-08-01

282

1056 Plant Disease / Vol. 95 No. 9 Susceptibility to Laurel Wilt and Disease Incidence in Two Rare Plant Species,  

E-print Network

as laurel wilt caused by Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harrin., Fraedrich & Aghayeva, a fungal symbiont a vascular wilt disease similar to the wilt caused by the related Dutch elm disease fungi (Ophiostoma ulmi

Harrington, Thomas C.

283

Interactions of Fusarium species during prepenetration development.  

PubMed

Interspecies interactions between Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium poae, and Fusarium tricinctum were studied during early growth stages of isolates on model surfaces. Additionally, germination and germ tube growth of the pathogens were studied on attached and detached wheat leaves at 10 °C and 22 °C. Two-species interactions between Fusarium isolates during germination and germ tube growth were assessed after 8 hours of incubation. All species except F. tricinctum germinated and grew faster at higher than lower temperature. All species were able to germinate with more than one germ tube per conidium cell; and germination and germ tube growth were faster on leaves than on glass surface. Interactions among Fusarium species during germination and germ tube growth were predominantly competitive with macroconidia-producing species being more competitive. It is concluded that the type of conidia as well as environmental factors influence the competitiveness of Fusarium species during early stages of growth. PMID:22749170

Wagacha, John Maina; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Dehne, Heinz-Wilhelm; Steiner, Ulrike

2012-07-01

284

Antagonistic activity and mechanisms of Bacillus subtilis SB1 against Ralstonia solanacearum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in vitro experiments. In addition to Ralstonia solanacearum, strain SB1 inhibited the growth of many other plant pathogens, including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Phytoph...

285

Molecular Identification of Fusarium Species in Onychomycoses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Fusarium species are isolated from about 3% of onychomycoses in the Swiss native population. On the basis of macroscopic characters and microscopic examination of the cultures, identification of Fusarium often remains difficult or uncertain because of variations from one isolate to another and overlapping characteristics between species. Objective: To obtain information about the prevailing species of Fusarium collected from onychomycoses.

Béatrice Ninet; Isabelle Jan; Olympia Bontems; Barbara Léchenne; Olivier Jousson; Daniel Lew; Jacques Schrenzel; Renato G. Panizzon; Michel Monod

2005-01-01

286

BIOSYNTHESIS OF FUSARIUM MYCOTOXINS AND GENOMICS OF FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Trichothecenes and fumonisins are groups of mycotoxins produced by some species within the fungal genus Fusarium. These groups of toxins have markedly different biogenic origins and as a result have markedly different structures; trichothecenes are tricyclic compounds synthesized via terpenoid meta...

287

BIOSYNTHESIS OF FUSARIUM MYCOTOXINS AND GENOMICS OF FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Analyses of mycotoxin biosynthetic genes in Fusarium indicate that interspecies variation in trichothecene structures can result from differences in gene function, and interspecies variation in fumonisin production/non production can result from differences in the presence/absence of genes. Such va...

288

Lentil Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungal diseases of lentils are the most important biological constraint to productivity. Ascochyta lentis (ascochyta blight) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lentis (fusarium wilt) are the major fungal pathogens that can cause severe losses in most lentil growing regions of the world.\\u000a Fungal diseases such as botrytis grey mould (Botrytis fabae and B. cinerea), rust (Uromyces viciae-fabae), stemphylium blight (Stemphylium

Paul Taylor; Kurt Lindbeck; Weidong Chen; Rebecca Ford

289

Corolla wilting facilitates delayed autonomous self-pollination in Pedicularis dunniana (Orobanchaceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structural changes associated with corolla wilting may serve as a mechanism for effecting self-pollination. Low pollinator visitation, high seed production and a corolla that persists after anthesis indicates that Pedicularis dunniana is autogamous. Delayed autonomous self-pollination is facilitated by corolla wilting. Wilting of the upper lip (galea) brought the pollen laden anthers into contact with the stigma resulting in the

S.-G. Sun; Y.-H Guo; R. W. Gituru; S.-Q. Huang

2005-01-01

290

Molecular analyses of Fusarium isolates recovered from a cluster of invasive mold infections in a Brazilian hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Invasive fusariosis (IF) is a rare but often fatal fungal infection in immunosuppressed patients. In 2007, cases of IF above the expected epidemiologic baseline were detected in the hematology ward of a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Possible sources of infection were investigated by performing environmental sampling and patient isolate collection, followed by molecular typing. Isolates from dermatology patients with superficial fusariosis were included in the study for comparison to molecular types found in the community. Methods Environmental sampling focused on water-related sources in and around the hematology ward. Initially, we characterized 166 clinical and environmental isolates using the Fusarium translation elongation factor 1? (EF-1?) genetic locus. Isolates included 68 collected from water-related sources in the hospital environment, 55 from 18 hematology patients, and 43 from the skin/nails of 40 outpatients seen at the hospital dermatology clinic. Multi-locus sequence typing was performed on Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) species 1 and 2 isolates to investigate their relatedness further. Results Most of the hematology samples were FSSC species 2, with species type FSSC 2-d the most commonly isolated from these patients. Most of the outpatient dermatology samples were also FSSC 2, with type 2-d again predominating. In contrast, environmental isolates from water sources were mostly Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) and those from air samples mostly Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex (FIESC). A third of the environmental samples were FSSC, with species types FSSC 1-a and FSSC 1-b predominating. Conclusions Fusarium isolate species types from hematology patient infections were highly similar to those recovered from dermatology patients in the community. Four species types (FSSC 1-a, 1-b, 2-d and 2-f) were shared between hematology patients and the environment. Limitations in environmental sampling do not allow for nosocomial sources of infection to be ruled out. Future studies will focus on environmental factors that may have influenced the prevalence of FSSC fusariosis in this hematology ward. PMID:23363475

2013-01-01

291

Fusarium Keratitis - Multiple States, 2006  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated an outbreak of corneal infections caused by Fusarium involving at least 17 states as of April, 2006. Initial outbreak reports were from Singapore and Hong Kong. Preliminary results suggest that these outbreaks may be linked ...

292

Microarray Analysis of Fusarium verticillioides  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Microarrays provide a powerful tool to examine genome wide patterns of differential transcription. We are using microarrays to identify Fusarium verticillioides' structural and regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of fungal toxins, virulence factors, and other elements involved in plant pa...

293

Wheat kernel black point and fumonisin contamination by Fusarium Proliferatum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by several Fusarium species, especially Fusarium proliferatum and Fusarium verticillioides, which are common pathogens of maize worldwide. Consumption of fumonisins has been shown to cause a number of mycotoxicoses, including leucoencephalomalacia in horses, pulmon...

294

Differentiation of eleven Fusarium spp. isolated from sugar beet, using restriction fragment analysis of a polymerase chain reaction-amplified translation elongation factor 1alpha gene fragment.  

PubMed

Sugar beet in Europe is commonly grown in wheat and maize crop rotations and subsequently pile-stored for several weeks. Beet is threatened by the colonization of saprophytic as well as pathogenic Fusarium spp. A tool for reliable identification based on sequence information of the translation elongation factor 1alpha (TEF-1alpha) gene was developed for the numerous Fusarium spp. being isolated from sugar beets. In all, 65 isolates from different species (Fusarium avenaceum, F. cerealis, F. culmorum, F. equiseti, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. redolens, F. solani, F. tricinctum, and F. venenatum) were obtained from sugar beet at different developmental stages from locations worldwide. Database sequences for additional species (F. sporotrichioides, F. poae, F. torulosum, F. hostae, F. sambucinum, F. subglutinans, and F. verticillioides), isolated from sugar beets in previous studies, were included in the analysis. Molecular sequence analysis of the partial TEF-1alpha gene fragment revealed sufficient variability to differentiate between the Fusarium spp., resulting in species-dependent separation of the isolates analyzed. This interspecific divergence could be translated into a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism assay using only two subsequent restriction digests for the differentiation of 17 of 18 species. PMID:19594311

Nitschke, Elke; Nihlgard, Maria; Varrelmann, Mark

2009-08-01

295

Fusarium Laboratory Workshop Kansas State University, Manhatten, Kansas State, USA  

E-print Network

instructors and lecturers including experts in Fusarium identification, taxonomy, mycotoxin production and impact of Fusarium mycotoxins. #12;2 While the learning experience was intensive, social events also

296

Ice Nucleation Activity in Fusarium acuminatum and Fusarium avenaceum†  

PubMed Central

Twenty fungal genera, including 14 Fusarium species, were examined for ice nucleation activity at ?5.0°C, and this activity was found only in Fusarium acuminatum and Fusarium avenaceum. This characteristic is unique to these two species. Ice nucleation activity of F. avenaceum was compared with ice nucleation activity of a Pseudomonas sp. strain. Cumulative nucleus spectra are similar for both microorganisms, while the maximum temperatures of ice nucleation were ?2.5°C for F. avenaceum and ?1.0°C for the bacteria. Ice nucleation activity of F. avenaceum was stable at pH levels from 1 to 13 and tolerated temperature treatments up to 60°C, suggesting that these ice nuclei are more similar to lichen ice nuclei than to bacterial ones. Ice nuclei of F. avenaceum, unlike bacterial ice nuclei, pass through a 0.22-?m-pore-size filter. Fusarial nuclei share some characteristics with the so-called leaf-derived nuclei with which they might be identified: they are cell free and stable up to 60°C, and they are found in the same kinds of environment. Highly stable ice nuclei produced by fast-growing microorganisms have potential applications in biotechnology. This is the first report of ice nucleation activity in free-living fungi. PMID:16348770

Pouleur, Stéphan; Richard, Claude; Martin, Jean-Guy; Antoun, Hani

1992-01-01

297

RESISTANCE TO SCLEROTINIA WILT IN WILD SUNFLOWER SPECIES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) De Bary is a widespread plant pathogen affecting over 300 plant species. In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), the mycelia infect under ground plant parts causing wilt, and ascospores infect stems and heads causing stem and head rot. This study investigated the resista...

298

Laurel wilt: A global threat to avocado production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). The disease threatens commercial avocado production in Florida, as well as the National Germplasm Repository for avocado in Miami (USDA-ARS). Elsewhere in the US, major (California) and minor comm...

299

Laurel wilt: A global threat to avocado production  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Laurel wilt kills members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado. The disease has invaded much of the southeastern USA, and threatens avocado commerce and homeowner production in Florida, valuable germplasm in Miami (USDA-ARS), and major production and germplasm in California and MesoAmer...

300

Pine Wilt Disease And The Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus Xylophilus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pine wilt disease (PWD) is one of the most damaging events affecting conifer forests (in particular Pinus spp.), in the Far East (Japan, China and Korea), North America (USA and Canada) and, more recently, in the European Union\\u000a (Portugal). In Japan it became catastrophic, damaging native pine species (Pinus thunbergii and P. densiflora), and becoming the main forest problem, forcing

Manuel M. Mota; Kazuyoshi Futai; Paulo Vieira

301

Analysis of Phylogenetic Relationship of Cylindrocarpon lichenicola and Acremonium falciforme to the Fusarium solani Species Complex and a Review of Similarities in the Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections Caused by These Fungi  

PubMed Central

An emerging pattern of similarity in medical case reports led to a project to compare the phylogenetic affinities of two well-known tropical fungal opportunistic pathogens, Cylindrocarpon lichenicola and Acremonium falciforme, to members of the Fusarium solani species complex. C. lichenicola and A. falciforme, despite their deviating conidial morphologies, were shown via sequencing of the ribosomal large subunit to be well instituted within a clade mainly consisting of typical F. solani strains and other species until recently considered variants of F. solani. The original name Fusarium lichenicola C. B. Massalongo is reestablished, and the new combination F. falciforme is made. Recognition of these species as fusaria is necessary for correct interpretation of current and future molecular diagnostic tests. Reevaluation of species morphology in light of the molecular findings showed that certain features, especially elongate filiform conidiophores with integrated terminal phialides, facilitate correct microscopic classification of these atypical Fusarium species. There is a strong and underrecognized overlap in the spectra of cases caused by members of the F. solani clade, particularly ocular infections, mycetomas, and, in the neutropenic host, disseminated and other serious systemic infections. A novel synthesis of case reports shows that patients from areas with warm climates may develop a distinctive fusarial intertrigo caused by F. solani, Fusarium lichenicola, or Fusarium oxysporum. PMID:12149344

Summerbell, R. C.; Schroers, H.-J.

2002-01-01

302

Developing Fusarium head blight resistant wheat  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a major disease problem in wheat and barley around the world. During infection, F. graminearum produces trichothecene mycotoxins that act as virulence factors and cause a reduction in grain quality. Therefore, developing approaches to detoxi...

303

Insight into mycoviruses infecting Fusarium species.  

PubMed

Most of the major fungal families including plant-pathogenic fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms are infected by mycoviruses, and many double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses have been recently identified from diverse plant-pathogenic Fusarium species. The frequency of occurrence of dsRNAs is high in Fusarium poae but low in other Fusarium species. Most Fusarium mycoviruses do not cause any morphological changes in the host but some mycoviruses like Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1) cause hypovirulence. Available genomic data for seven of the dsRNA mycoviruses infecting Fusarium species indicate that these mycoviruses exist as complexes of one to five dsRNAs. According to phylogenetic analysis, the Fusarium mycoviruses identified to date belong to four families: Chrysoviridae, Hypoviridae, Partitiviridae, and Totiviridae. Proteome and transcriptome analysis have revealed that FgV1 infection of Fusarium causes changes in host transcriptional and translational machineries. Successful transmission of FgV1 via protoplast fusion suggests the possibility that, as biological control agents, mycoviruses could be introduced into diverse species of fungal plant pathogens. Research is now needed on the molecular biology of mycovirus life cycles and mycovirus-host interactions. This research will be facilitated by the further development of omics technologies. PMID:23498910

Cho, Won Kyong; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yu, Jisuk; Son, Moonil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

2013-01-01

304

Interaction between Mycotoxin Producing Fusarium Species in  

E-print Network

1 Interaction between Mycotoxin Producing Fusarium Species in Different Oat Cultivars Tania Tajrin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 #12;4 Interaction between Mycotoxin Producing Fusarium Species in different Oat Cultivars. In some oat cultivars there was a higher infection level of F. langsethiae when this species were single

305

Biological and chemical complexity of Fusarium proliferatum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium proliferatum (teleomorph Gibberella intermedia) is a genetically diverse biological and phylogenetic species with a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. F. proliferatum is a frequent component of the Fusarium ear rot complexes of maize and ...

306

Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium proliferatum (teleomorph Gibberella intermedia) is a genetically diverse biological and phylogenetic species with a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. F. proliferatum is a frequent component of the Fusarium ear rot complexes of maize and ...

307

Interaction between root lesion nematode Pratylenchus vulnus and two species of Fusarium on growth and development of maple seedlings.  

PubMed

Producing healthy seedlings and distributing them to far areas, is one of the most important factor for developing forests. Because of easy planting, rapid growth and good wood quality, Acer velutinum is the most useful species, among the softwood and hardwood trees. Growth and development of the nurseries were effected by different pests and diseases, the nematodes are one of these agents. They are not actively surveyed in the forest nurseries in Iran. On a survey of maple seedling in the forest nurseries Pratylenchus vulnus, Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum were identified. The interaction between these two fungi and nematode were studied in randomized complete block design with four replications and six treatments. For mass production and multiplication of the nematodes, they were sterilized with Streptomycin Sulfate, they were reared on carrot disc culture. The nematodes were then added to each pot. The results showed a highly significant difference (p = 0.01) between different treatments. In the treatment with nematodes alone growth of seedlings was minimum and population density of nematodes in soil and root tissue was maximum. In this treatments 75% of seedlings were died and seedling average height were 2.25 cm. In the treatments with nematode and fungi together the population of nematodes were decreased and the growth of seedlings were increased, in comparison with nematode alone. F. oxysporum showed more antagonistic effect on nematodes than F. solani. In the nematode + F. oxysporum treatment, 25% of seedlings were died and seedling average height was 12.75 cm. In the nematode + F. solani treatment, 50% of seedlings were died and the seedling average height was 5.5 cm. This is the first report of pathogenecity of Pratylenchus vulnus and its interaction whit fungi on maple seedlings in Iran. PMID:12696440

Kheiri, A; Borhani, A; Okhovat, M; Pourjam, E

2002-01-01

308

ACTIVITY OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE IN A SOLUTION OF IONS AND PH AGAINST THIELARIOPSIS BASICOLA AND FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) can be used to control pathogen propagules in irrigation water. To determine to what degree soluble inorganic ions and pH of water can interact to effect ClO2 activity, concentrations of ClO2 were mixed with equal concentrations (0 and 100 mg l-1) of nitrogen from ammonium, n...

309

Fusarium euwallaceae sp. nov.--a symbiotic fungus of Euwallacea sp., an invasive ambrosia beetle in Israel and California.  

PubMed

The invasive Asian ambrosia beetle Euwallacea sp. (Coleoptera, Scolytinae, Xyleborini) and a novel Fusarium sp. that it farms in its galleries as a source of nutrition causes serious damage to more than 20 species of live trees and pose a serious threat to avocado production (Persea americana) in Israel and California. Adult female beetles are equipped with mandibular mycangia in which its fungal symbiont is transported within and from the natal galleries. Damage caused to the xylem is associated with disease symptoms that include sugar or gum exudates, dieback, wilt and ultimately host tree mortality. In 2012 the beetle was recorded on more than 200 and 20 different urban landscape species in southern California and Israel respectively. Euwallacea sp. and its symbiont are closely related to the tea shot-hole borer (E. fornicatus) and its obligate symbiont, F. ambrosium occurring in Sri Lanka and India. To distinguish these beetles, hereafter the unnamed xyleborine in Israel and California will be referred to as Euwallacea sp. IS/CA. Both fusaria exhibit distinctive ecologies and produce clavate macroconidia, which we think might represent an adaption to the species-specific beetle partner. Both fusaria comprise a genealogically exclusive lineage within Clade 3 of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) that can be differentiated with arbitrarily primed PCR. Currently these fusaria can be distinguished only phenotypically by the abundant production of blue to brownish macroconidia in the symbiont of Euwallacea sp. IS/CA and their rarity or absence in F. ambrosium. We speculate that obligate symbiosis of Euwallacea and Fusarium, might have driven ecological speciation in these mutualists. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to describe and illustrate the novel, economically destructive avocado pathogen as Fusarium euwallaceae sp. nov. S. Freeman et al. PMID:23928415

Freeman, S; Sharon, M; Maymon, M; Mendel, Z; Protasov, A; Aoki, T; Eskalen, A; O'Donnell, K

2013-01-01

310

The effects of wilting and storage temperatures on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage.  

PubMed

In order to clarify the ensiling characteristics of stylo (Stylosanthes guianensis Swartz), the effects of wilting (no wilting, light wilting and heavy wilting) and storage temperatures (10°C, 20°C, 30°C and 40°C) on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage were investigated. Wilting had no significant influence on the contents of crude protein, ether extract and acid detergent fiber, and numbers of lactic acid bacteria, aerobic bacteria, yeasts and mold (P > 0.05). Heavy wilted material, wilted for 12 h, had higher neutral detergent fiber content and lower water-soluble carbohydrate content than unwilted and light wilted materials (P < 0.05). Wilting and storage temperatures had significant effects on pH value, acetic acid, butyric acid and NH(3) -N contents of stylo silage (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Wilting tended to reduce acetic acid and NH(3) -N contents and improve the fermentation quality of stylo silage. In all the silages, no wilting silage ensiled at 30°C had the highest butyric acid content (P < 0.05). High temperature of 40°C markedly restricted the growth of lactic acid bacteria and aerobic bacteria in silage, irrespective of wilting. The wilted silage or silage stored at low temperature had poor aerobic stability. PMID:21794013

Liu, Qinghua; Zhang, Jianguo; Shi, Shangli; Sun, Qizhong

2011-08-01

311

Activity of antibiotics against Fusarium and Aspergillus  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims To study the susceptibility of Fusarium and Aspergillus isolated from keratitis to amoxicillin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, moxifloxacin, tobramycin, and benzalkonium chloride (BAK). Methods 10 isolates of Fusarium and 10 isolates of Aspergillus from cases of fungal keratitis at Aravind Eye Hospital in South India were tested using microbroth dilution for susceptibility to amoxicillin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, moxifloxacin, tobramycin, and BAK. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) median and 90th percentile were determined. Results BAK had the lowest MIC for both Fusarium and Aspergillus. Chloramphenicol had activity against both Fusarium and Aspergillus, while moxifloxacin and tobramycin had activity against Fusarium but not Aspergillus. Conclusions The susceptibility of Fusarium to tobramycin, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, and BAK and of Aspergillus to chloramphenicol and BAK may explain anecdotal reports of fungal ulcers that improved with antibiotic treatment alone. While some of the MICs of antibiotics and BAK are lower than the typically prescribed concentrations, they are not in the range of antifungal agents such as voriconazole, natamycin, and amphotericin B. Antibiotics may, however, have a modest effect on Fusarium and Aspergillus when used as initial treatment prior to identification of the pathologic organism. PMID:18952649

Day, Shelley; Lalitha, Prajna; Haug, Sara; Fothergill, Annette W.; Cevallos, Vicky; Vijayakumar, Rajendran; Prajna, Namperumalsamy V.; Acharya, Nisha R.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.

2008-01-01

312

Fumonisin and T-2 toxin production of Fusarium spp. isolated from complete feed and individual agricultural commodities used in shrimp farming.  

PubMed

Fusarium spp. are plant pathogens producing fumonisins and trichothecenes that both affect human and animal health. In the present study, 40 fungal strains were isolated and species identified from 35 shrimp feed samples and from 61 agricultural raw materials. F. verticillioides was the predominant species (85 %) mostly found in corn and soybean meal, while no Fusarium contamination was detected in shrimp feed. Levels of 10 % of F. oxysporum were isolated from peanut and 5 % of F. equiseti contamination in corn and peanut. To determine the ability of toxin production, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polymerase chain reaction, and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were performed. All but four of the fumonisin-producing strains contained the FUM1 gene. No Fusarium synthesized T-2 toxin nor contained the Tri5 gene. This survey brings more data on mycotoxin contamination in the food chain of animal feed production, and leads to the awareness of the use of contaminated raw materials in shrimp farming. PMID:24222067

Anukul, Nampeung; Maneeboon, Thanapoom; Roopkham, Chanram; Chuaysrinule, Chananya; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa

2014-02-01

313

Brachypodium distachyon: a new pathosystem to study Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat  

PubMed Central

Background Fusarium species cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) and other important diseases of cereals. The causal agents produce trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). The dicotyledonous model species Arabidopsis thaliana has been used to study Fusarium-host interactions but it is not ideal for model-to-crop translation. Brachypodium distachyon (Bd) has been proposed as a new monocotyledonous model species for functional genomic studies in grass species. This study aims to assess the interaction between the most prevalent FHB-causing Fusarium species and Bd in order to develop and exploit Bd as a genetic model for FHB and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. Results The ability of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum to infect a range of Bd tissues was examined in various bioassays which showed that both species can infect all Bd tissues examined, including intact foliar tissues. DON accumulated in infected spike tissues at levels similar to those of infected wheat spikes. Histological studies revealed details of infection, colonisation and host response and indicate that hair cells are important sites of infection. Susceptibility to Fusarium and DON was assessed in two Bd ecotypes and revealed variation in resistance between ecotypes. Conclusions Bd exhibits characteristics of susceptibility highly similar to those of wheat, including susceptibility to spread of disease in the spikelets. Bd is the first reported plant species to allow successful infection on intact foliar tissues by FHB-causing Fusarium species. DON appears to function as a virulence factor in Bd as it does in wheat. Bd is proposed as a valuable model for undertaking studies of Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. PMID:21639892

2011-01-01

314

Identification and Chacterization of new strains of Enterobacter spp. causing Mulberry (Morus alba) wilt disease in China  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A new mulberry wilt disease (MWD) was recently identified in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China. Typical symptoms of the disease are dark brown discolorations in vascular tissues, leaf wilt, defoliation, and tree decline. Unlike the bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, the leaf w...

315

Activity of antibiotics against Fusarium and Aspergillus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/aims:To study the susceptibility of Fusarium and Aspergillus isolated from keratitis to amoxicillin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, moxifloxacin, tobramycin and benzalkonium chloride (BAK).Methods:10 isolates of Fusarium and 10 isolates of Aspergillus from cases of fungal keratitis at Aravind Eye Hospital in South India were tested using microbroth dilution for susceptibility to amoxicillin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, moxifloxacin, tobramycin and BAK. The minimum inhibitory concentration

S Day; P Lalitha; S Haug; A W Fothergill; V Cevallos; R Vijayakumar; N V Prajna; N R Acharya; S D McLeod; T M Lietman

2009-01-01

316

Fusarium and Scedosporium: Emerging Fungal Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Fusarium spp. and Scedosporium spp. have emerged as important fungal pathogens during the last decades causing significant morbidity and mortality especially\\u000a in immunocompromised patients. The two fungal genera possess several biological and clinical characteristics in common, most\\u000a notably the very high mortality of the diseases caused by them, and thus they are discussed together.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Fusarium spp. are ubiquitus fungi commonly

Emmanuel Roilides; John Dotis; Aspasia Katragkou

317

The influence of cultivar and chlorimuron application timing on spotted wilt disease and peanut yield.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Research was conducted from 2000 through 2007 at fifteen locations in Georgia to evaluate the effects of chlorimuron on the development of spotted wilt disease of peanut caused by tomato spotted wilt tospovirus. Chlorimuron at 9 g ai/ha was applied at various intervals ranging from 60 to 105 days a...

318

Factors influencing infection of Acacia mearnsii by the wilt pathogen Ceratocystis albifundus in South Africa  

E-print Network

Factors influencing infection of Acacia mearnsii by the wilt pathogen Ceratocystis albifundus by Ceratocystis albifundus, an important wilt pathogen of Acacia mearnsii in southern and eastern Africa, under field conditions. This was performed by doing controlled inoculations on Acacia mearnsii trees

319

Molecular research and genetic engineering of resistance to Verticillium wilt in cotton: A review  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Verticillium dahliae, a soil-borne pathogen, causes Verticillium wilt, one of the most serious diseases in cotton, deleteriously influencing the crop’s production and quality. Verticillium wilt has become a major obstacle in cotton production since Helicoverpa armigera, the cotton bollworm, became e...

320

Field evaluation of mint mutant and hybrid lines for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Severity of Verticillium wilt varied significantly among mint lines and cultivars in the inoculated and non-inoculated sub-plots in two field trials. Verticillium wilt was significantly less severe for mutant lines 87M0109-1, 84M0107-7, and M90-11 than for Black Mitcham in 2002 and 2003. Verticilli...

321

Polygenic inheritance of canopy wilting in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.].  

PubMed

As water demand for agriculture exceeds water availability, cropping systems need to become more efficient in water usage, such as deployment of cultivars that sustain yield under drought conditions. Soybean cultivars differ in how quickly they wilt during water-deficit stress, and this trait may lead to yield improvement during drought. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of canopy wilting in soybean using a mapping population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between KS4895 and Jackson. Canopy wilting was rated in three environments using a rating scale of 0 (no wilting) to 100 (severe wilting and plant death). Transgressive segregation was observed for the RIL population with the parents expressing intermediate wilting scores. Using multiple-loci analysis, four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on molecular linkage groups (MLGs) A2, B2, D2, and F were detected (P wilting was polygenic and environmentally sensitive and provide a foundation for future research to examine the importance of canopy wilting in drought tolerance of soybean. PMID:19471903

Charlson, Dirk V; Bhatnagar, Sandeep; King, C Andy; Ray, Jeffery D; Sneller, Clay H; Carter, Thomas E; Purcell, Larry C

2009-08-01

322

Fusarium-damaged kernels and deoxynivalenol in Fusarium-infected U.S. Winter Wheat  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease that threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in many areas worldwide. FHB infection results in Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) and deoxynivalenol (DON) that dramatically reduce grain yield and quality. More effective and accurate disease e...

323

Accumulation of beta-Fructosidase in the Cell Walls of Tomato Roots following Infection by a Fungal Wilt Pathogen.  

PubMed

Active defense in plants is associated with marked metabolic alterations, but little is known about the exact role of the reported changes in specific activity of several enzymes in infected plant tissues. beta-Fructosidase (invertase), the enzyme that converts sucrose into glucose and fructose, increases upon infection by fungi and bacteria. To understand the relationship between fungal growth and beta-fructosidase accumulation, we used an antiserum raised against a purified deglycosylated carrot cell wall beta-fructosidase to study by immunogold labeling the spatial and temporal distribution of the enzyme in susceptible and resistant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) root tissues infected with the necrotrophic fungus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. racidis-lycopersici. In susceptible plants, the enzyme started to accumulate in host cell walls about 72 hours after inoculation. Accumulation occurred only in colonized cells and was mainly restricted to areas where the walls of both partners contacted each other. In resistant plants, accumulation of beta-fructosidase was noticeable as soon as 48 hours after inoculation and appeared to reach an optimum by 72 hours after inoculation. Increase in wall-bound beta-fructosidase was not restricted to infected cells but occurred also, to a large extent, in tissues that remained uncolonized during the infection process. The enzyme also accumulated in wall appositions (papillae) and intercellular spaces. This pattern of enzyme distribution suggests that induction of beta-fructosidase upon fungal infection is part of the plant's defense response. The possible physiological role(s) of this enzyme in infected tomato plants is discussed in relation to the high demand in energy and carbon sources during pathogenesis. PMID:16668461

Benhamou, N; Grenier, J; Chrispeels, M J

1991-10-01

324

Influence of Climatic Factors on Fusarium Species Pathogenic to Cereals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium head blight of small-grain cereals, ear rot of maize, seedling blight and foot rot of cereals are important diseases throughout the world. Fusarium graminearum, F. culmorum, F. poae, F. avenaceum and Microdochium nivale (formerly known as F. nivale) predominantly cause Fusarium diseases of small-grain cereals. Maize is predominantly attacked by F. graminearum, F. moniliforme, F. proliferatum and F. subglutinans.

F. M. Doohan; J. Brennan; B. M. Cooke

2003-01-01

325

Transmission of Fusarium boothii Mycovirus via Protoplast Fusion Causes Hypovirulence in Other Phytopathogenic Fungi  

PubMed Central

There is increasing concern regarding the use of fungicides to control plant diseases, whereby interest has increased in the biological control of phytopathogenic fungi by the application of hypovirulent mycoviruses as a possible alternative to fungicides. Transmission of hypovirulence-associated double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses between mycelia, however, is prevented by the vegetative incompatibility barrier that often exists between different species or strains of filamentous fungi. We determined whether protoplast fusion could be used to transmit FgV1-DK21 virus, which is associated with hypovirulence on F. boothii (formerly F. graminearum strain DK21), to F. graminearum, F. asiaticum, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and Cryphonectria parasitica. Relative to virus-free strains, the FgV1-DK21 recipient strains had reduced growth rates, altered pigmentation, and reduced virulence. These results indicate that protoplast fusion can be used to introduce FgV1-DK21 dsRNA into other Fusarium species and into C. parasitica and that FgV1-DK21 can be used as a hypovirulence factor and thus as a biological control agent. PMID:21738738

Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yu, Jisuk; Son, Moonil; Lee, Yin-Won; Kim, Kook-Hyung

2011-01-01

326

Diversity of endophytic fungi from different verticillium-wilt-resistant Gossypium hirsutum and evaluation of antifungal activity against Verticillium dahliae in vitro.  

PubMed

Cotton plants were sampled and ranked according to their resistance to Verticillium wilt. In total, 642 endophytic fungi isolates representing 27 genera were recovered from Gossypium hirsutum root, stem, and leaf tissues, but were not uniformly distributed. More endophytic fungi appeared in the leaf (391) compared with the root (140) and stem (111) sections. However, no significant difference in the abundance of isolated endophytes was found among resistant cotton varieties. Alternaria exhibited the highest colonization frequency (7.9%), followed by Acremonium (6.6%) and Penicillium (4.8%). Unlike tolerant varieties, resistant and susceptible ones had similar endophytic fungal population compositions. In three Verticillium-wilt-resistant cotton varieties, fungal endophytes from the genus Alternaria were most frequently isolated, followed by Gibberella and Penicillium. The maximum concentration of dominant endophytic fungi was observed in leaf tissues (0.1797). The evenness of stem tissue endophytic communities (0.702) was comparatively more uniform than the other two tissues. Eighty endophytic fungi selected from 27 genera were evaluated for their inhibition activity against highly virulent Verticillium dahliae isolate Vd080 in vitro. Thirty-nine isolates exhibited fungistasis against the pathogen at varying degrees. Seven species, having high growth inhibition rates (?75%), exhibited strong antifungal activity against V. dahliae. The antifungal activity of both volatile and nonvolatile metabolites was also investigated. The nonvolatile substances produced by CEF-818 (Penicillium simplicissimum), CEF-325 (Fusarium solani), CEF-714 (Leptosphaeria sp.), and CEF-642 (Talaromyces flavus) completely inhibited V. dahliae growth. These findings deepen our understanding of cotton-endophyte interactions and provide a platform for screening G. hirsutum endophytes with biocontrol potential. PMID:24836187

Li, Zhi-Fang; Wang, Ling-Fei; Feng, Zi-Li; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, He-Qin

2014-09-01

327

Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity  

PubMed Central

Background The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. Results We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Conclusion Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during vascular wilt. PMID:19732460

Ashraf, Nasheeman; Ghai, Deepali; Barman, Pranjan; Basu, Swaraj; Gangisetty, Nagaraju; Mandal, Mihir K; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

2009-01-01

328

Characterisation of New Zealand Fusarium populations using a polyphasic approach differentiates the F. avenaceum/F. acuminatum/F. tricinctum species complex in cereal and grassland systems.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and prevalence of Fusarium species in a survey of cereal and grassland systems from the South Island of New Zealand by applying morphological and molecular techniques. Isolates were collected from soil, roots, and stems from 21 cereal and grassland sites. Ten Fusarium species were identified using morphological characters, including F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. equiseti, F. oxysporum, F. poae, F. pseudograminearum, F. sambucinum, and F. tricinctum. In general, their distribution was found to be unrelated to biogeographical location, although agricultural practice increased the overall diversity of Fusarium. Phylogenetic analyses were successfully used to identify morphologically similar isolates belonging to the F. avenaceum/F. acuminatum/F. tricinctum species complex and to resolve previously undetermined relationships amongst these species. Fifty-eight isolates classified as either F. avenaceum, F. acuminatum, or other closely related species as well as several well-characterised isolates from international culture collections were examined using DNA sequence data for ?-tubulin (?TUB), translation elongation factor 1? (EF1?), and mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA (mtSSU). Analyses of DNA sequence data from both ?TUB and EF1? discriminated among isolates of F. avenaceum, F. acuminatum, and F. tricinctum and determined that these three distinct sequence groups formed a single clade. By contrast, mtSSU was unable to differentiate F. avenaceum from F. acuminatum and other closely related species believed to be F. tricinctum. Comparison of the EF1? sequences with the international FUSARIUM-ID database supported the identification of isolates in this study. As in other studies, F. avenaceum was found to be widespread in agricultural and native ecosystems. However, F. acuminatum in New Zealand was found only on non-wheat hosts. The reason for the absence of this wheat pathogen in cereal-based ecosystems in New Zealand remains unknown. PMID:20943139

Harrow, Sally A; Farrokhi-Nejad, Reza; Pitman, Andrew R; Scott, Ian A W; Bentley, Alison; Hide, Charlotte; Cromey, Matthew G

2010-04-01

329

Keratitis by Fusarium temperatum , a novel opportunist.  

PubMed

Background Fusarium species are among the most common fungi present in the environment and some species have emerged as major opportunistic fungal infection in human. However, in immunocompromised hosts they can be virulent pathogens and can cause death. The pathogenesis of this infection relies on three factors: colonization, tissue damage, and immunosuppression. A novel Fusarium species is reported for the first time from keratitis in an agriculture worker who acquired the infection from plant material of maize. Maize plants are the natural host of this fungus where it causes stalk rot and seeding malformation under temperate and humid climatic conditions. The clinical manifestation, microbiological morphology, physiological features and molecular data are described.MethodsDiagnosis was established by using polymerase chain reaction of fungal DNA followed by sequencing portions of translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1 ¿) and beta-tubulin (BT2) genes. Susceptibility profiles of this fungus were evaluated using CLSI broth microdilution method.ResultsThe analyses of these two genes sequences support a novel opportunist with the designation Fusarium temperatum. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the reported clinical isolate was nested within the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated that the fungus had low MICs of micafungin (0.031 ¿g/ml), posaconazole (0.25 ¿g/ml) and amphotericin B (0.5 ¿g/ml).ConclusionThe present case extends the significance of the genus Fusarium as agents of keratitis and underscores the utility of molecular verification of these emerging fungi in the human host. PMID:25388601

Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Bonifaz, Alexandro; de Hoog, G; Vazquez-Maya, Leticia; Garcia-Carmona, Karla; Meis, Jacques F; van Diepeningen, Anne D

2014-11-12

330

Role of ethylene in the protection of tomato plants against soil-borne fungal pathogens conferred by an endophytic Fusarium solani strain.  

PubMed

An endophytic fungal isolate (Fs-K), identified as a Fusarium solani strain, was obtained from root tissues of tomato plants grown on a compost which suppressed soil and foliar pathogens. Strain Fs-K was able to colonize root tissues and subsequently protect plants against the root pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL), and elicit induced systemic resistance against the tomato foliar pathogen Septoria lycopersici. Interestingly, attenuated expression of certain pathogenesis-related genes, i.e. PR5 and PR7, was detected in tomato roots inoculated with strain Fs-K compared with non-inoculated plants. The expression pattern of PR genes was either not affected or aberrant in leaves. A genetic approach, using mutant tomato plant lines, was used to determine the role of ethylene and jasmonic acid in the plant's response to infection by the soil-borne pathogen F. oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL), in the presence or absence of isolate Fs-K. Mutant tomato lines Never ripe (Nr) and epinastic (epi1), both impaired in ethylene-mediated plant responses, inoculated with FORL are not protected by isolate Fs-K, indicating that the ethylene signalling pathway is required for the mode of action used by the endophyte to confer resistance. On the contrary, def1 mutants, affected in jasmonate biosynthesis, show reduced susceptibility to FORL, in the presence Fs-K, which suggests that jasmonic acid is not essential for the mediation of biocontrol activity of isolate Fs-K. PMID:18048373

Kavroulakis, Nektarios; Ntougias, Spyridon; Zervakis, Georgios I; Ehaliotis, Constantinos; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K

2007-01-01

331

Mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. associated with Fusarium head blight of wheat in Western Australia.  

PubMed

An isolated occurrence of Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat was detected in the south-west region of Western Australia during the 2003 harvest season. The molecular identity of 23 isolates of Fusarium spp. collected from this region during the FHB outbreak confirmed the associated pathogens to be F. graminearum, F. acuminatum or F. tricinctum. Moreover, the toxicity of their crude extracts from Czapek-Dox liquid broth and millet seed cultures to brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) was associated with high mortality levels. The main mycotoxins detected were type B trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol), enniatins, chlamydosporol and zearalenone. This study is the first report on the mycotoxin profiles of Fusarium spp. associated with FHB of wheat in Western Australia. This study highlights the need for monitoring not just for the presence of the specific Fusarium spp. present in any affected grain but also for their potential mycotoxin and other toxic secondary metabolites. PMID:23606046

Tan, Diana C; Flematti, Gavin R; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Chakraborty, Sukumar; Obanor, Friday; Jayasena, Kithsiri; Barbetti, Martin J

2012-05-01

332

Light affects fumonisin production in strains of Fusarium fujikuroi, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium verticillioides isolated from rice.  

PubMed

Three Fusarium species associated with bakanae disease of rice (Fusarium fujikuroi, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium verticillioides) were investigated for their ability to produce fumonisins (FB1 and FB2) under different light conditions, and for pathogenicity. Compared to darkness, the conditions that highly stimulated fumonisin production were yellow and green light in F. verticillioides strains; white and blue light, and light/dark alternation in F. fujikuroi and F. proliferatum strains. In general, all light conditions positively influenced fumonisin production with respect to the dark. Expression of the FUM1 gene, which is necessary for the initiation of fumonisin production, was in accordance with the fumonisin biosynthetic profile. High and low fumonisin-producing F. fujikuroi strains showed typical symptoms of bakanae disease, abundant fumonisin-producing F. verticillioides strains exhibited chlorosis and stunting of rice plants, while fumonisin-producing F. proliferatum strains were asymptomatic on rice. We report that F. fujikuroi might be an abundant fumonisin producer with levels comparable to that of F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, highlighting the need of deeper mycotoxicological analyses on rice isolates of F. fujikuroi. Our results showed for the first time the influence of light on fumonisin production in isolates of F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides from rice. PMID:24055868

Mati?, Slavica; Spadaro, Davide; Prelle, Ambra; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Garibaldi, Angelo

2013-09-16

333

Production of trichothecene mycotoxins by Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum on barley and wheat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wheat cultivars (Stoa, MN87150, SuMai-3, YMI-6, Wheaton) and barley cultivars (Robust, Excel, Chevron, M69) were inoculated in the field with isolates ofFusarium graminearum andF. culmorum. The diseased (Fusarium head blight) kernels were analyzed for deoxynivalenol (DON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) and nivalenol (NIV).F. culmorum produced all three trichothecenes on all cultivars tested whereasF. graminearum only produced DON and 15-ADON. There was no

C. J. Mirocha; Weiping Xie; Yichun Xu; R. D. Wilcoxson; R. P. Woodward; R. H. Etebarian; G. Behele

1994-01-01

334

Detection and quantification of Fusarium culmorumand Fusarium graminearumin cereals using PCR assays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Random amplified polymorphic DNA assays were used to identify amplification products characteristic of eitherFusarium culmorumorFusarium graminearum. Selected fragments were cloned, sequenced and primer pairs were developed which permitted specific detection ofF. culmorumorF. graminearumusing conventional PCR. Quantitative assays were developed for bothF. culmorumandF. graminearum, using competitive PCR. TheF. culmorum-specific competitive PCR assay was used to study the effect of inoculum load

P Nicholson; D. R Simpson; G Weston; H. N Rezanoor; A. K Lees; D. W Parry; D Joyce

1998-01-01

335

Nemtaode-Vector Relationships in the Pine Wilt Disease System  

PubMed Central

Pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the causal agent of pine wilt disease in North America and Japan. Dispersal stage dauer larvae are transported to new host trees on the body surface and within the tracheal system of several beetle species. Worldwide, 21 species of Cerambycidae, 1 genus of Buprestidae, and 2 species of Curculionidae are known to carry pinewood nematode dauer larvae upon emerging from nematode-infested trees. Five species of cerambycids in the genus Monochamus are known to transmit dauer larvae to new host trees, four North American species and one Japanese species. Primary transmission to healthy trees occurs through beetle feeding wounds on young branches. Secondary transmission to stressed trees or recently cut logs occurs through Monochamus oviposition sites. PMID:19290206

Linit, M. J.

1988-01-01

336

A model for multiseasonal spread of verticillium wilt of lettuce.  

PubMed

Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium dahliae, is a destructive disease in lettuce, and the pathogen is seedborne. Even though maximum seed infestation rates of <5% have been detected in commercial lettuce seed lots, it is necessary to establish acceptable contamination thresholds to prevent introduction and establishment of the pathogen in lettuce production fields. However, introduction of inoculum into lettuce fields for experimental purposes to determine its long term effects is undesirable. Therefore, we constructed a simulation model to study the spread of Verticillium wilt following pathogen introduction from seed. The model consists of four components: the first for simulating infection of host plants, the second for simulating reproduction of microsclerotia on diseased plants, the third for simulating the survival of microsclerotia, and the fourth for simulating the dispersal of microsclerotia. The simulation results demonstrated that the inoculum density-disease incidence curve parameters and the dispersal gradients affect disease spread in the field. Although a steep dispersal gradient facilitated the establishment of the disease in a new field with a low inoculum density, a long-tail gradient allowed microsclerotia to be dispersed over greater distances, promoting the disease spread in fields with high inoculum density. The simulation results also revealed the importance of avoiding successive lettuce crops in the same field, reducing survival rate of microsclerotia between crops, and the need for breeding resistance against V. dahliae in lettuce cultivars to lower the number of microsclerotia formed on each diseased plant. The simulation results, however, suggested that, even with a low seed infestation rate, the pathogen would eventually become established if susceptible lettuce cultivars were grown consecutively in the same field for many years. A threshold for seed infestation can be established only when two of the three drivers of the disease-(i) low microsclerotia production per diseased plant, (ii) long-tail dispersal gradient, and (iii) low microsclerotia survival between lettuce crops-are present. PMID:24624952

Wu, B M; Subbarao, K V

2014-09-01

337

The Brassicaceae-Specific EWR1 Gene Provides Resistance to Vascular Wilt Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Soil-borne vascular wilt diseases caused by Verticillium spp. are among the most destructive diseases worldwide in a wide range of plant species. The most effective means of controlling Verticillium wilt diseases is the use of genetic resistance. We have previously reported the identification of four activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutants which showed enhanced resistance to Verticillium wilt. Among these, one mutant also showed enhanced resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, a bacterial vascular wilt pathogen. Cloning of the activation tag revealed an insertion upstream of gene At3g13437, which we designated as EWR1 (for Enhancer of vascular Wilt Resistance 1) that encodes a putatively secreted protein of unknown function. The search for homologs of Arabidopsis EWR1 (AtEWR1) in public databases only identified homologs within the Brassicaceae family. We subsequently cloned the EWR1 homolog from Brassica oleracea (BoEWR1) and show that over-expression in Arabidopsis results in V. dahliae resistance. Moreover, over-expression of AtEWR1 and BoEWR1 in N. benthamiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, results in V. dahliae resistance, suggesting that EWR1 homologs can be used to engineer Verticillium wilt resistance in non-Brassicaceae crops as well. PMID:24505441

Yadeta, Koste A.; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan; Hanemian, Mathieu; Marco, Yves; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.

2014-01-01

338

Update: Fusarium Keratitis - United States, 2005 - 2006  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This report describes the results of a Fusarium keratitis outbreak investigation being conducted by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The epidemiological data indicate that the 2005-2006 outbreaks of corneal infections within the United States are linked to the use of on...

339

Investigating Spore killer of Fusarium verticillioides  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Maize is one of the most important crops in the world. Fusarium verticillioides may colonize maize as an endophyte or as a pathogen, causing disease at any life stage of the plant. During growth on maize, F. verticillioides can synthesis a number of mycotoxins including fumonisins, which have been l...

340

Toxicity of fumonisins, mycotoxins from Fusarium verticillioides  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium, predominantly F. verticillioides. They are present in variable amounts in corn and corn-based feeds and food products. They are suspected risk factors for esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in some human populations depending on corn as a diet s...

341

Molecular Identification and Databases in Fusarium  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

DNA sequence-based methods for identifying pathogenic and mycotoxigenic Fusarium isolates have become the gold standard worldwide. Moreover, fusarial DNA sequence data are increasing rapidly in several web-accessible databases for comparative purposes. Unfortunately, the use of Basic Alignment Sea...

342

HISTOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium head blight re-emerged as a devastating disease of wheat and barley in the 1990s in the midwestern U.S. Research efforts to control the disease have been hampered by limited knowledge of how the fungal head blight pathogens infect and damage head tissue and what natural defenses the plant h...

343

Production of Fumonisin Analogs by Fusarium Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fumonisins, a family of food-borne carcinogenic myco- toxins, were first isolated in 1988 (21) from cultures of Fusar- ium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg (previously known as Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon). During the same year, the structures of the fumonisins were elucidated (6) and fumonisin B1 was shown to cause equine leukoencephalomalacia (34). There have been numerous publications dealing with this group

John P. Rheeder; Walter F. O. Marasas; Hester F. Vismer

2002-01-01

344

Fusarium verticillioides: Talking to Friends and Enemies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium verticillioides is both a symptomless endophyte and a pathogen of maize. At some point, the fungus may synthesize fumonisins which have been linked to a variety of animal diseases including cancer in some animals. In order to minimize losses due to contaminated food or feed, we are workin...

345

Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In the past, the fungus Fusarium proliferatum has been confused with morphologically similar species. Today, F. proliferatum is well defined by morphology, its teleomorphic state (Gibberella intermedia), and DNA-based analyses. F. proliferatum has a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad ho...

346

Icebergs and species in populations of Fusarium  

Microsoft Academic Search

(Accepted for publication August 2001 and published electronically 22 October 2001) ''Why is the name of the pathogen I work on changing?'' is a common question raised by plant pathologists. Species in the genus Fusarium (and the authors of this article) often are the target for such questions. Species descriptions, even very thorough ones, usually rely on a limited set

John F. Leslie; Kurt A. Zeller; Brett A. Summerell

2001-01-01

347

Mass Spectrometric Identification of Isoforms of PR Proteins in Xylem Sap of Fungus-Infected Tomato1  

PubMed Central

The protein content of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) xylem sap was found to change dramatically upon infection with the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometric sequencing were used to identify the most abundant proteins appearing during compatible or incompatible interactions. A new member of the PR-5 family was identified that accumulated early in both types of interaction. Other pathogenesis-related proteins appeared in compatible interactions only, concomitantly with disease development. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using proteomics for the identification of known and novel proteins in xylem sap, and provides insights into plant-pathogen interactions in vascular wilt diseases. PMID:12376655

Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L.; Vossen, Jack H.; de Boer, Albert D.; Houterman, Petra M.; Speijer, Dave; Back, Jaap W.; de Koster, Chris G.; Cornelissen, Ben J.C.

2002-01-01

348

Alternatives to carbamate and organophosphate insecticides, cultural tactics, and ecological factors that affect Tomato spotted wilt virus epidemics in peanut.  

E-print Network

??Selected management tactics, including insecticides and cultural practices, against Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in peanut were evaluated. Effects of pine… (more)

Marasigan, Kathleen Monfero

2014-01-01

349

Hydrolysis of fungal and plant cell walls by enzymatic complexes from cultures of Fusarium isolates with different aggressiveness to rye (Secale cereale).  

PubMed

The efficiency of hydrolysis of fungal (Fusarium spp.) cell wall and rye root cell wall by crude enzymatic complexes from (42-day-old) cultures of three F. culmorum isolates, a plant growth-promoting rhizosphere isolate (PGPF) DEMFc2, a deleterious rhizosphere isolate (DRMO) DEMFc5, and a pathogenic isolate DEMFc37, as well as two other, pathogenic isolates belonging to F. oxysporum and F. graminearum species was studied. In the enzymatic complexes originating from the Fusarium spp. cultures, the activities of the following cell wall-degrading enzymes were identified: glucanases, chitinases, xylanases, endocellulases, exocellulases, pectinases, and polygalacturonases. The preparation originating from a culture of the PGPF isolate was the least efficient in plant cell wall (PCW) hydrolysis. There were no significant differences in the efficiency of PCW hydrolysis between preparations from cultures of the DRMO and the pathogenic isolates. PGPF was the most efficient in liberating reducing sugars and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from fungal cell walls (FCW). Xylanase activities of the enzymatic complexes were strongly positively (R > +0.9) correlated with their efficiency in hydrolyzing PCW, whereas chitinase activities were correlated with the efficiency in FCW hydrolysis. PMID:22388990

Jaroszuk-?cise?, Jolanta; Kurek, Ewa

2012-08-01

350

Fusarium keratitis and endophthalmitis associated with lens contact wear  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction\\u000a Fusarium keratitis is a severe corneal infection that is usually seen in tropical and subtropical countries after a corneal trauma.\\u000a In 2005–2006, an epidemic of Fusarium keratitis, occurring predominantly among contact lens wearers, was observed in several countries. Case report We describe the clinical course of a Fusarium keratitis which failed to respond to systemic and local voriconazole treatment,

Julia Proença-Pina; Isabelle Ssi Yan Kai; Tristan Bourcier; Monique Fabre; Hervé Offret; Marc Labetoulle

2010-01-01

351

A New Age Approach to the Management of Tomato Spotted Wilt? Effects of Plant Essential Oils and Particle Films on Tomato Spotted Wilt in Tomatoes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Because the thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus is a limiting factor in tomato production in the southern USA, we are investigating novel control methods that would be effective and environmentally non-disruptive. In laboratory choice tests, we found that three plant essential oils, geraniol, ...

352

Activities of E1210 and Comparator Agents Tested by CLSI and EUCAST Broth Microdilution Methods against Fusarium and Scedosporium Species Identified Using Molecular Methods  

PubMed Central

Fusarium (n = 67) and Scedosporium (n = 63) clinical isolates were tested by two reference broth microdilution (BMD) methods against a novel broad-spectrum (active against both yeasts and molds) antifungal, E1210, and comparator agents. E1210 inhibits the inositol acylation step in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis, resulting in defects in fungal cell wall biosynthesis. Five species complex organisms/species of Fusarium (4 isolates unspeciated) and 28 Scedosporium apiospermum, 7 Scedosporium aurantiacum, and 28 Scedosporium prolificans species were identified by molecular techniques. Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. E1210 was highly active against all of the tested isolates, with minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC90 values (?g/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B, respectively, for Fusarium of 0.12, >16, >16, >8, >8, 8, and 4 ?g/ml. E1210 was very potent against the Scedosporium spp. tested. The E1210 MEC90 was 0.12 ?g/ml for S. apiospermum, but 1 to >8 ?g/ml for other tested agents. Against S. aurantiacum, the MEC50 for E1210 was 0.06 ?g/ml versus 0.5 to >8 ?g/ml for the comparators. Against S. prolificans, the MEC90 for E1210 was only 0.12 ?g/ml, compared to >4 ?g/ml for amphotericin B and >8 ?g/ml for itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparator agents. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 doubling dilutions) was >93% for all comparisons, with the exception of posaconazole and F. oxysporum species complex (SC) (60%), posaconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%), and voriconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%). In conclusion, E1210 exhibited very potent and broad-spectrum antifungal activity against azole- and amphotericin B-resistant strains of Fusarium spp. and Scedosporium spp. Furthermore, in vitro susceptibility testing of E1210 against isolates of Fusarium and Scedosporium may be accomplished using either of the CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods, each producing very similar results. PMID:22083469

Duncanson, Frederick P.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Guarro, Josep; Jones, Ronald N.; Pfaller, Michael A.

2012-01-01

353

Activities of E1210 and comparator agents tested by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods against Fusarium and Scedosporium species identified using molecular methods.  

PubMed

Fusarium (n = 67) and Scedosporium (n = 63) clinical isolates were tested by two reference broth microdilution (BMD) methods against a novel broad-spectrum (active against both yeasts and molds) antifungal, E1210, and comparator agents. E1210 inhibits the inositol acylation step in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis, resulting in defects in fungal cell wall biosynthesis. Five species complex organisms/species of Fusarium (4 isolates unspeciated) and 28 Scedosporium apiospermum, 7 Scedosporium aurantiacum, and 28 Scedosporium prolificans species were identified by molecular techniques. Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. E1210 was highly active against all of the tested isolates, with minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC(90) values (?g/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B, respectively, for Fusarium of 0.12, >16, >16, >8, >8, 8, and 4 ?g/ml. E1210 was very potent against the Scedosporium spp. tested. The E1210 MEC(90) was 0.12 ?g/ml for S. apiospermum, but 1 to >8 ?g/ml for other tested agents. Against S. aurantiacum, the MEC(50) for E1210 was 0.06 ?g/ml versus 0.5 to >8 ?g/ml for the comparators. Against S. prolificans, the MEC(90) for E1210 was only 0.12 ?g/ml, compared to >4 ?g/ml for amphotericin B and >8 ?g/ml for itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparator agents. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 doubling dilutions) was >93% for all comparisons, with the exception of posaconazole and F. oxysporum species complex (SC) (60%), posaconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%), and voriconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%). In conclusion, E1210 exhibited very potent and broad-spectrum antifungal activity against azole- and amphotericin B-resistant strains of Fusarium spp. and Scedosporium spp. Furthermore, in vitro susceptibility testing of E1210 against isolates of Fusarium and Scedosporium may be accomplished using either of the CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods, each producing very similar results. PMID:22083469

Castanheira, Mariana; Duncanson, Frederick P; Diekema, Daniel J; Guarro, Josep; Jones, Ronald N; Pfaller, Michael A

2012-01-01

354

Biogeography and phylogeography of Fusarium : a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium is a large, complex genus that causes a wide variety of plant diseases, produces a number of mycotoxins and is becoming increasingly\\u000a recognized as a significant human pathogen. These fungi occur in ecosystems in all parts of the globe, which makes them useful\\u000a as a model to better understand biogeographic processes affecting the distribution of fungi. Here we review

Brett A. Summerell; Matthew H. Laurence; Edward C. Y. Liew; John F. Leslie

2010-01-01

355

Deoxynivalenol and other selected Fusarium toxins in Swedish oats--occurrence and correlation to specific Fusarium species.  

PubMed

Fusarium moulds frequently contaminate oats and other cereals world-wide, including those grown in Northern Europe. To investigate the presence of toxigenic Fusarium species and their toxins in oats, samples were taken during 2010 and 2011 in three geographical regions of Sweden (east, west, south). The samples were analysed by real-time PCR for the specific infection level of seven Fusarium species associated with oats and other cereals (Fusarium poae, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium langsethiae, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium tricinctum, Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium avenaceum) and with a multi-mycotoxin method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS) for the detection of many fungal metabolites, including deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxins, moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENNs). Most samples contained at least four of the seven Fusarium species analysed and F. poae, F. langsethiae and F. avenaceum were present in approximately 90-100% of all samples. The most common toxins detected were DON, NIV, BEA and ENNs, which were present in more than 90% of samples. Most Fusarium species and their toxins occurred in higher concentrations in 2010 than in 2011, with the exception of DON and its main producer F. graminearum. Significant regional differences were detected for some moulds and mycotoxins, with higher levels of F. graminearum, DON and ZEA in western Sweden than in the east (P<0.05) and higher levels of F. tricinctum and MON in the south (P<0.05). Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between many Fusarium species and toxin levels. For example, F. tricinctum was significantly correlated to F. avenaceum (r = 0.72, P<0.001), DON to ZEA (r = 0.52, P<0.001), DON to F. graminearum (r = 0.77, P<0.001) and the sum of T-2 and HT-2 to F. langsethiae (r = 0.77, P<0.001). The multi-toxin approach employed allowed simultaneous detection of many Fusarium mycotoxins in each sample. In combination with real-time PCR analysis of seven toxigenic Fusarium spp., the results gave an overall picture of the presence of Fusarium and their toxins in Swedish oats and revealed significant annual and regional differences. This is the first study of the so-called emerging mycotoxins (e.g., ENNs, MON and BEA) in oats grown in Sweden. PMID:23962918

Fredlund, Elisabeth; Gidlund, Ann; Sulyok, Michael; Börjesson, Thomas; Krska, Rudolf; Olsen, Monica; Lindblad, Mats

2013-10-15

356

Fusarium verticillioides from finger millet in Uganda.  

PubMed

Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) is a subsistence crop grown in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian Sub-continent. Fusarium species occurring on this crop have not been reported. Approximately 13% of the Fusarium isolates recovered from finger millet growing at three different locations in eastern Uganda belong to Fusarium verticillioides, and could produce up to 18,600?µg/g of total fumonisins when cultured under laboratory conditions. These strains are all genetically unique, based on AFLP analyses, and form fertile perithecia when crossed with the standard mating type tester strains for this species. All but one of the strains is female-fertile and mating-type segregates 13:20 Mat-1:Mat-2. Three new sequences of the gene encoding translation elongation factor 1-? were found within the population. These results indicate a potential health risk for infants who consume finger millet gruel as a weaning food, and are consistent with the hypothesis that F. verticillioides originated in Africa and not in the Americas, despite its widespread association with maize grown almost anywhere worldwide. PMID:22916825

Saleh, Amgad A; Esele, J P; Logrieco, Antonio; Ritieni, Alberto; Leslie, John F

2012-01-01

357

MECHANIZATION HAS CONTRIBUTED TO THE SPREAD OF BACTERIAL WILT ON FLUE-CURED TOBACCO IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bacterial wilt, caused by Ralsotnia Solanacearum, is an extremely damaging disease of flue cured tobacco. Bacterial wilt losses in South Carolina, expressed as the percentage of total crop production, have increased from 0.2% in 1981 to 7.2% in 1998. Consolidation of tobacco allotments from 24,000...

358

Evaluation of Litchi chinensis for host status to Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and susceptibility to laurel wilt disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring pest that vectors Raffaelea lauricola, the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. To date, all confirmed U.S. hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Laurac...

359

Optimization of late blight and bacterial wilt management in potato production systems in the highland tropics of Africa  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Late blight and bacterial wilt are two formidable disease constraints on potato and account for significant losses in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).In this chapter, various management techniques for late blight and bacterial wilt diseases are highlighted and discussed with examples drawn from diverse res...

360

The FvMK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase gene regulates conidiation, pathogenesis, and fumonisin production in Fusarium verticillioides.  

PubMed

Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most important fungal pathogens to cause destructive diseases of maize worldwide. Fumonisins produced by the fungus are harmful to human and animal health. To date, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with pathogenicity and fumonisin biosynthesis in F. verticillioides is limited. Because MAP kinase pathways have been implicated in regulating diverse processes important for plant infection in phytopathogenic fungi, in this study we identified and functionally characterized the FvMK1 gene in F. verticillioides. FvMK1 is orthologous to FMK1 in F. oxysporum and GPMK1 in F. graminearum. The Fvmk1 deletion mutant was reduced in vegetative growth and production of microconidia. However, it was normal in sexual reproduction and increased in the production of macroconidia. In infection assays with developing corn kernels, the Fvmk1 mutant was non-pathogenic and failed to colonize through wounding sites. It also failed to cause stalk rot symptoms beyond the inoculation sites on corn stalks, indicating that FvMK1 is essential for plant infection. Furthermore, the Fvmk1 mutant was significantly reduced in fumonisin production and expression levels of FUM1 and FUM8, two genes involved in fumonisin biosynthesis. The defects of the Fvmk1 mutant were fully complemented by re-introducing the wild type FvMK1 allele. These results demonstrate that FvMK1 plays critical roles in the regulation of vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, fumonisin biosynthesis, and pathogenicity. PMID:20887797

Zhang, Yueping; Choi, Yoon-E; Zou, Xuexiao; Xu, Jin-Rong

2011-02-01

361

Induced resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Capsicum annuum by a Fusarium crude elicitor fraction, free of proteins.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) induces resistance in pepper against the airborne pathogen Botrytis cinerea and the soil-borne pathogen Verticillium dahliae. However, its practical use is limited due to its pathogenicity to other crops. In this study we tested several fractions of a heat-sterilised crude FOL-elicitor preparation to protect pepper against B. cinerea and V. dahliae. Only the protein-free insoluble fraction of the preparation reduced B. cinerea infection. However, none of the fractions reduce V. dahliae symptoms. The insoluble protein-free fraction induced expression of defence genes in the plant, namely a chitinase (CACHI2), a peroxidase (CAPO1), a sesquiterpene cyclase (CASC1) and a basic PR1 (CABPR1). Even though the CASC1 gene was not induced directly after treatment with the insoluble fraction in the leaves, it was induced after B. cinerea inoculation, showing a priming effect. The insoluble protein-free FOL-elicitor protected pepper against the airborne pathogen through a mechanism that involves induced responses in the plant, but different to the living FOL. PMID:24112636

Veloso, J; Díaz, J

2013-11-01

362

Diversity of the Fusarium graminearum species complex on French cereals  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat and barley and Gibberella ear rot (GER) on maize, and harvested grains often are contaminated with trichothecenes such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) that are a major health and food safety concern...

363

Fusarium Species Pathogenic to Barley and Their Associated Mycotoxins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salas, B., Steffenson, B. J., Casper, H. H., Tacke, B., Prom, L. K., Fetch, T. G., Jr., and Schwarz, P. B. 1999. Fusarium species pathogenic to barley and their associated mycotoxins. Plant Dis. 83:667-674. Epidemics of Fusarium head blight (FHB) occurred on barley in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota from 1993 to 1998. The Red River Valley region was

B. Salas; B. J. Steffenson; H. H. Casper; B. Tacke; L. K. Prom; T. G. Fetch; P. B. Schwarz

1999-01-01

364

Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Fusarium dimerum Species Group  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The morphospecies Fusarium dimerum, known only from its anamorph, comprises at least 12 phylogenetically distinct species. Analyses of the large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) show they are taxa of the Nectriaceae (Hypocreales) and form a phylogenetically distinct clade within Fusarium. Accordin...

365

GENOMICS OF THE MYCOTOXIN PRODUCING FUNGUS, FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM (GIBBERELLA ZEAE)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium graminearum (sexual state: Gibberella zeae) causes head blight (also known as scab) of wheat, barley, and oats, as well as foot and crown rot of corn. A genomics approach to the study of F. graminearum is critical because for head blight, like many Fusarium diseases, effective fungicides an...

366

Variation in the Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Trichothecene mycotoxins are produced by some plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium and can contribute to its virulence on some plants. In Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: the single-gene TRI101 locus; the two-gene ...

367

CONIDIAL GERMINATION IN THE FILAMENTOUS FUNGUS FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The ascomycetous fungus Fusarium graminearum is an important plant pathogen causing Fusarium head blight disease of wheat and barley. To understand early developmental stages of this organism, we followed the germination of macroconidia microscopically to understand the timing of key events. These e...

368

BARLEY PROMOTERS FOR ORGANS SUSCEPTIBLE TO FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium Head Blight (FHB, or scab) is a fungal disease that causes significant seed yield and quality losses in barley and wheat worldwide. The fungus lowers yield and deposits toxic levels of mycotoxins. The pericarp and lemma/palea (hull) are readily infected by Fusarium graminearum. The restrict...

369

The genetic diversity of ampeloviruses in Australian pineapples and their association with mealybug wilt disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pineapple mealybug wilt-associated virus 1 (PMWaV-1), 2 (PMWaV-2) and 3 (PMWaV-3) have been detected in Australian commercial pineapple crops, along with a previously undescribed ampelovirus, forwhich\\u000a the name Pineapple mealybug wilt-associated virus 5 (PMWaV-5) is proposed. Partial sequences extending from open reading frame\\u000a 1 b through to the heat shock protein homologue were obtained for PMWaV-1, -3 and -5. Phylogenetic

C. F. GambleyA; V. SteeleA; A. D. W. GeeringA; J. E. ThomasA

2008-01-01

370

Systematic discovery of regulatory motifs in Fusarium graminearum by comparing four Fusarium genomes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Using comparative genomics, we discovered 73 candidate regulatory motifs in the promoter regions of four Fusarium species. Nearly 30% of them are highly enriched in the promoter region of Fg genes that are specifically associated with a functional category. Through the comparison to Saccharomyces ce...

371

Trichothecenes and zearalenone production by Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum species isolated from Argentinean soybean.  

PubMed

Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum represent the most abundant species in the Fusarium complex isolated from flowers, soybean pods and seeds in Argentina. The aim of the present study was to assess the production of major type A and type B trichothecenes (diacetoxyscirpenol, neosolaniol, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin, nivalenol, deoxynivalenol) and zearalenone by 40 F. equiseti and 22 F. semitectum isolates on rice culture. Mycotoxins were determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection after derivatisation with 1-anthronylnitrile for type A trichothecenes (i.e. diacetoxyscirpenol, neosolaniol, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin), by HPLC with UV detection for type B trichothecenes (i.e. nivalenol and deoxynivalenol), and by TLC for zearalenone. A total of 22 of 40 F. equiseti isolates produced diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol and ZEA alone or in combination, whereas only two of 20 F. semitectum isolates were nivalenol and ZEA producers. Both Fusarium species did not produce any deoxynivalenol, neosolaniol, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin. The variable retention in toxigenicity displayed by both fungal species suggests that these species have a saprophytic lifestyle in the soybean agroecosystem in Argentina. PMID:22830612

Barros, G; Zanon, M S Alaniz; Palazzini, J M; Haidukowski, M; Pascale, M; Chulze, S

2012-01-01

372

Adaptive Potential of Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster) Populations to the Emerging Pitch Canker Pathogen, Fusarium circinatum  

PubMed Central

There is a concern on how emerging pests and diseases will affect the distribution range and adaptability of their host species, especially due to different conditions derived from climate change and growing globalization. Fusarium circinatum, which causes pitch canker disease in Pinus species, is an exotic pathogen of recent introduction in Spain that threatens its maritime pine (P. pinaster) stands. To predict the impact this disease will have on the species, we examine host resistance traits and their genetic architecture. Resistance phenotyping was done in a clonal provenance/progeny trial, using three-year-old cuttings artificially inoculated with the pathogen and maintained under controlled environmental conditions. A total number of 670 ramets were assessed, distributed in 10 populations, with a total of 47 families, 2 to 5 half-sibs per family, and 3–7 ramets per clone. High genetic variation was found at the three hierarchical levels studied: population, family and clone, being both additive and non-additive effects important. Narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates were relatively high, with respective values of 0.43–0.58 and 0.51–0.8, depending on the resistance traits measured (lesion length, lesion length rate, time to wilting, and survival). These values suggest the species' high capacity of evolutionary response to the F. circinatum pathogen. A population originated in Northern Spain was the most resistant, while another from Morocco was the most susceptible. The total number of plants that did not show lesion development or presented a small lesion (length<30 mm) was 224 out of 670, indicating a high proportion of resistant trees in the offspring within the analyzed populations. We found large differences among populations and considerable genetic variation within populations, which should allow, through natural or artificial selection, the successful adaptation of maritime pine to pitch canker disease. PMID:25500822

Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Majada, Juan; Alia, Ricardo; Raposo, Rosa

2014-01-01

373

Adaptive potential of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) populations to the emerging pitch canker pathogen, Fusarium circinatum.  

PubMed

There is a concern on how emerging pests and diseases will affect the distribution range and adaptability of their host species, especially due to different conditions derived from climate change and growing globalization. Fusarium circinatum, which causes pitch canker disease in Pinus species, is an exotic pathogen of recent introduction in Spain that threatens its maritime pine (P. pinaster) stands. To predict the impact this disease will have on the species, we examine host resistance traits and their genetic architecture. Resistance phenotyping was done in a clonal provenance/progeny trial, using three-year-old cuttings artificially inoculated with the pathogen and maintained under controlled environmental conditions. A total number of 670 ramets were assessed, distributed in 10 populations, with a total of 47 families, 2 to 5 half-sibs per family, and 3-7 ramets per clone. High genetic variation was found at the three hierarchical levels studied: population, family and clone, being both additive and non-additive effects important. Narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates were relatively high, with respective values of 0.43-0.58 and 0.51-0.8, depending on the resistance traits measured (lesion length, lesion length rate, time to wilting, and survival). These values suggest the species' high capacity of evolutionary response to the F. circinatum pathogen. A population originated in Northern Spain was the most resistant, while another from Morocco was the most susceptible. The total number of plants that did not show lesion development or presented a small lesion (length<30 mm) was 224 out of 670, indicating a high proportion of resistant trees in the offspring within the analyzed populations. We found large differences among populations and considerable genetic variation within populations, which should allow, through natural or artificial selection, the successful adaptation of maritime pine to pitch canker disease. PMID:25500822

Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Majada, Juan; Alia, Ricardo; Raposo, Rosa

2014-01-01

374

Development of TaqMan assays for the quantitative detection of Fusarium avenaceum/Fusarium tricinctum and Fusarium poae esyn1 genotypes from cereal grain.  

PubMed

Fungi of the genus Fusarium are important plant pathogens and contaminants of cereal grains producing different types of mycotoxins. Enniatins are a group of mycotoxins with ionophoric properties frequently detected in North European grains. Within the Fusarium complex responsible for grain infection, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium poae and Fusarium tricinctum are the most potential enniatins producers. This study presents the development of two quantitative TaqMan MGB (Minor Groove Binder) assays for the specific quantification of F. avenaceum/F. tricinctum and F. poae esyn1 genotypes, respectively. Two sets of genotype-specific primers/probes were designed on the basis of esyn1 gene homologues encoding multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase. The specificity of the assays developed has been tested successfully on 111 Fusarium isolates from different geographical origins. The detection limits for F. avenaceum/F. tricinctum esyn1 genotype and F. poae genotype were 19 and 0.3?pg, respectively. The application of the assays developed on asymptomatic wheat grain samples revealed significant positive correlations between the enniatins levels and the amount of F. avenaceum/F. tricinctum esyn1 genotype (R=0.61) and F. poae esyn1 genotype (R=0.42). PMID:21059180

Kulik, Tomasz; Jestoi, Marika; Okorski, Adam

2011-01-01

375

Fusarium pathogenesis investigated using Galleria mellonella as a heterologous host  

PubMed Central

Members of the fungal genus Fusarium are capable of manifesting in a multitude of clinical infections, most commonly in immunocompromised patients. In order to better understand the interaction between the fungus and host, we have developed the larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, as a heterologous host for fusaria. When conidia are injected into the hemocoel of this Lepidopteran system, both clinical and environmental isolates of the fungus are able to kill the larvae at 37°C, although killing occurs more rapidly when incubated at 30°C. This killing was dependent on several other factors besides temperature, including the Fusarium strain, the number of conidia injected, and the conidia morphology, where macroconidia are more virulent than their microconidia counterpart. There was a correlation in the killing rate of Fusarium spp. when evaluated in G. mellonella and a murine model. In vivo studies indicated G. mellonella hemocytes were capable of initially phagocytosing both conidial morphologies. The G. mellonella system was also used to evaluate antifungal agents, and amphotericin B was able to confer a significant increase in survival to Fusarium infected-larvae. The G. mellonella-Fusarium pathogenicity system revealed that virulence of Fusarium spp. is similar, regardless of the origin of the isolate, and that mammalian endothermy is a major deterrent for Fusarium infection and therefore provides a suitable alternative to mammalian models to investigate the interaction between the host and this increasingly important fungal pathogen. PMID:22115447

Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Muhammed, Maged; Kasperkovitz, Pia V.; Vyas, Jatin M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

2011-01-01

376

Fusarium strain development and selection for enhancement of ethanol production  

SciTech Connect

Research data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory indicates that selected Fusarium strains isolated from natural habitats are potential decomposers and parameters of biomass. The amount of ethanol produced is comparable to that yielded by other potential microorganisms and, moreover, Fusarium strains can ferment zylose (pentoses) while other microbes cannot. Preliminary mutagenesis studies on Fusarium isolates indicates that potential mutants can be developed which are capable of hydrolyzing more cellulosics in a shorter time as well as fermenting monosugars to ethanol at higher rates than their parental wild strains. Therefore, new studies were initiated to further enhance the ethanol production via Fusarium genetic manipulation. In particular, the aim of this task is to develop superior Fusarium strains capable of fermenting monosaccharides (specifically xylose) to ethanol, and able to tolerate higher ethanol concentrations than selected wild strains. Experimental work on hyphal fusions of selected Fusarium strains with the purpose of exploiting heterokaryosis and parasexuality for the development of new superior strains has been initiated. Bibliographic information related to Fusarium genetics and ethanol fermentation has been studied and a summary is presented. 63 refs.

Antonopoulos, A.A.; Wene, E.G.

1987-01-01

377

Incidence of weed reservoirs and vectors of tomato spotted wilt tospovirus on southern Tasmanian lettuce farms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thrips species and tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) alternate weed hosts were surveyed on two lettuce farms in southern Tasmania during 1994 and 1995. Only one known vector species, Thrips tabaci, was found at either site, comprising on average 36·8% of the total monthly catch. A major peak of thrips activity in the summer corresponded with an increase of disease

C. R. Wilson

1998-01-01

378

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa  

E-print Network

First report of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearumon eucalypts in South Africa BY T. A of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria, South Africa. E-mail: Teresa. Coutinho@FABI.up.ac.za; 3 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry, University of the Orange Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa; 4 Agricultural

379

Regeneration of Different Plant Functional Types in a Masson Pine Forest Following Pine Wilt Disease  

PubMed Central

Pine wilt disease is a severe threat to the native pine forests in East Asia. Understanding the natural regeneration of the forests disturbed by pine wilt disease is thus critical for the conservation of biodiversity in this realm. We studied the dynamics of composition and structure within different plant functional types (PFTs) in Masson pine forests affected by pine wilt disease (PWD). Based on plant traits, all species were assigned to four PFTs: evergreen woody species (PFT1), deciduous woody species (PFT2), herbs (PFT3), and ferns (PFT4). We analyzed the changes in these PFTs during the initial disturbance period and during post-disturbance regeneration. The species richness, abundance and basal area, as well as life-stage structure of the PFTs changed differently after pine wilt disease. The direction of plant community regeneration depended on the differential response of the PFTs. PFT1, which has a higher tolerance to disturbances, became dominant during the post-disturbance regeneration, and a young evergreen-broad-leaved forest developed quickly after PWD. Results also indicated that the impacts of PWD were dampened by the feedbacks between PFTs and the microclimate, in which PFT4 played an important ecological role. In conclusion, we propose management at the functional type level instead of at the population level as a promising approach in ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation. PMID:22563499

Hu, Guang; Xu, Xuehong; Wang, Yuling; Lu, Gao; Feeley, Kenneth J.; Yu, Mingjian

2012-01-01

380

EVALUATION OF FRANKLINIELLA BISPINOSA (THYSANOPTERA: THRIPIDAE) AS A VECTOR OF TOMATO SPOTTED WILT VIRUS IN PEPPER  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Frankliniella occidentalis is the key vector responsible for the emergence of Tomato spotted wilt virus as a global threat to agriculture. Frankliniella bispinosa is a common thrips in Florida, the Bahamas, and Bermuda, but the role of F. bispinosa in the epidemiology of the virus is not known. The ...

381

Impact of natural enemies on thrips and gomato spotted wilt virus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Thrips vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a primary concern in pepper production in the southern USA. This region has a complex of species that consists of Frankliniella occidentalis, F. bispinosa, and F. fusca, which can vector TSWV. Here we examine how interspecific differences in the ec...

382

Plant essential oils and particle films for the management of tomato spotted wilt on tomatoes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus is a limiting factor in tomato production in the southern USA. Because insecticides do not effectively control primary infection by thrips immigrating into crop fields, we are investigating alternatives that would be effective and environmentally non-di...

383

Differential acquisition and transmission of Florida Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates by Western flower thrips  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the most important insect-vectored plant pathogens globally. The virus host range encompasses many key vegetable, ornamental and agronomic crops. TSWV populations are highly heterogeneous, which has important implications for vector relati...

384

Greenhouse evaluation of wild sunflower species for resistance to Sclerotinia wilt  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wild sunflowers have been a frequent source of genes for disease resistance for cultivated sunflowers, but are largely unexplored in terms of resistance to Sclerotinia wilt, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The initial goal of this project was to develop a reliable greenhouse screening...

385

New outbreaks of verticillium wilt on Hop in Oregon caused by nonlethal verticillium albo-atrum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2006 and 2007, new outbreaks of Verticillium wilt on hop were detected on two farms in Oregon. Verticillium pathogens vary in their virulence to hop; some strains cause minor damage but others can kill susceptible cultivars. Studies were conducted to determine the identity of the Verticillium sp...

386

Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptoms  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Absence of a reliable reverse genetics system for Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has impeded direct demonstration of gene function. We previously used a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movement in the absen...

387

Diverse members of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex cause bacterial wilts of banana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bacterial wilts of banana known as Moko disease, Bugtok disease and blood disease are caused by members of the R. solanacearum species complex. R. solanacearum is a heterogeneous species which has been divided into 4 genetic groups known as phylotypes.Within the R. solanacearum species complex, strains that cause Moko and Bugtok diseases belong to phylotype II. The blood disease

M. Fegan; P. Prior

2006-01-01

388

APPLICATION OF PROPICONAZOLE IN MANAGEMENT OF LAUREL WILT DISEASE IN AVOCADO (Persea americana Mill.) TREES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Laurel wilt is a vascular disease of Lauraceous plants caused by a fungus (Raffaelea spp.) that is carried by a recently introduced, nonnative ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). The disease is devastating to Persea species including redbay (Persea borbonia) and avocado (Persea americana) trees i...

389

First Report of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Infecting African Clover (Trifolium tembense) in Georgia  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes a destructive disease which affects many economically important host plants. TSWV has been reported in subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum), white clover (Trifolium repens), and various unidentified wild clovers (Trifolium spp). in North America and A...

390

Antibacterial activity of Lansiumamide B to tobacco bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum).  

PubMed

Tobacco bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most serious diseases of tobacco in the area of tobacco cultivation. As there is no effective control method for tobacco bacterial wilt diseases, developing new antibacterial agents in tobacco will make great practical sense. The antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum of Lansiumamide B which is isolated from the seeds of Clausena lansium is reported in this paper for the first time. The bioassay results indicate that Lansiumamide B could completely inhibit the growth of R. solanacearum at the concentration of 125 mg/L in vitro, the EC50 and EC90 are 48.82 mg/L and 86.26 mg/L, respectively. The result of pot experiments indicates that the control efficiency of the Lansiumamide B on tobacco bacterial wilt are 95.84%, 91.67% and 86.38% at 7 days, 14 days and 21 days after treatment at the concentration of 100mg/kg, respectively, nearly 40 times higher than Streptomycin, a special fungicide to the disease, at 21 days after treatment with root irrigation method. These results suggest that Lansiumamide B has the potential of developing as a new type of plant-type fungicide on controlling the diseases of tobacco bacterial wilt. PMID:24512921

Li, Lichun; Feng, Xiujie; Tang, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Han, Yun; Zhang, Guobin; Wan, Shuqing

2014-01-01

391

Characterization of tomato spotted wilt virus isolates infecting peanut in Southwestern states of USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is among the greatest yield-reducing viruses affecting peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in all peanut-producing states in U.S. Due to the lack of molecular information on TSWV-isolates associated with peanut in southwestern states, the aim of this study was directed at ...

392

Polygenic Inheritance of Canopy Wilting in Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

As water demand for agriculture exceeds water availability, cropping systems need to become more efficient in water usage, such as deployment of cultivars that sustain yield under drought conditions. Soybean cultivars differ in how quickly they wilt during water-deficit stress, and this trait may l...

393

Figure 1. Rapidly wilting black walnut in the final stage of thousand cankers  

E-print Network

Figure 1. Rapidly wilting black walnut in the final stage of thousand cankers disease. Figure 2 1998. Pest Alert Walnut Twig Beetle and Thousand Cankers Disease of Black Walnut Within the past decade an unusual decline of black walnut (Juglans nigra) has been observed in several western states. Initial

394

Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation,movement and symptoms  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Direct demonstration of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) gene function has been slowed by the absence of a reliable reverse genetics system. A Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system was previously used by us to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movemen...

395

Fusarium avenaceum -- the North European situation.  

PubMed

The Fusarium species complex found on small-grain cereals in Northern Europe is largely dominated by F. avenaceum, while other important species include F. tricinctum, F. poae, F. culmorum and F. graminearum. The dominance of F. avenaceum has in recent years initiated extensive analytical activity in Norway and Finland in order to gain insight into the contamination of grain with secondary metabolites related to the fungus. Of these, moniliformin is the most studied compound with regard to toxicity. However, the data from analytical surveys indicate that field conditions in Northern Europe do not favour production of the metabolite. Instead, enniatins are regularly found in ppm-concentrations in grain, especially wheat and barley, while the bio-production of a range of other F. avenaceum related metabolites has so far barely been investigated. This paper summarises the results from mycological and chemical analyses of grain samples from Norway and Finland for major Fusarium species and F. avenaceum-related secondary metabolites. PMID:17884217

Uhlig, Silvio; Jestoi, Marika; Parikka, Päivi

2007-10-20

396

[Photodamage to spores of Fusarium fungi, sensitized by protoporphyrin IX].  

PubMed

The influence of photodynamic action with protoporphyrin IX as a sensitizer on the state of the components of hydrated spores of Fusarium fungi and germination of conidia in growth medium was investigated. It was shown, that protoporphyrin IX in micromole concentrations sensitizes the photooxidation of proteins and lipids from hydrated spores of Fusarium poae and Fusarium culmorum under illumination of their suspensions in doses of 50 - 200 kJ/m2. It was found that the photosensitized oxidation of cellular components leads to the disturbance of conidium membrane permeability and inhibition of spore germination during their subsequent cultivation in growth medium. PMID:18954007

Vorobe?, A V; Pinchuk, S V

2008-01-01

397

Post-operative endophthalmitis due to Fusarium dimerum.  

PubMed

Fungal endophthalmitis is a destructive intraocular infection resulting in poor visual prognosis. Endophthalmitis due to Fusarium spp has the worst visual prognosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old female patient who underwent cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation in the right eye and presented two months after the surgery with fungal endophthalmitis. The aqueous humor culture grew Fusarium dimerum. The patient was treated with intravitreal and oral voriconazole and topical prednisolone. The patient experienced one episode of recurrence following by remarkable improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Fusarium dimerum endophthalmitis. PMID:23413713

Khan, Sadia; Pillai, Gopal S; Vivek, V; Dinesh, Kavitha; Karim, P M Shamsul

2012-11-01

398

Assessing the cost of an invasive forest pathogen: a case study with oak wilt.  

PubMed

Economic assessment of damage caused by invasive alien species provides useful information to consider when determining whether management programs should be established, modified, or discontinued. We estimate the baseline economic damage from an invasive alien pathogen, Ceratocystis fagacearum, a fungus that causes oak wilt, which is a significant disease of oaks (Quercus spp.) in the central United States. We focus on Anoka County, Minnesota, a 1,156 km(2) mostly urban county in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan region. We develop a landscape-level model of oak wilt spread that accounts for underground and overland pathogen transmission. We predict the economic damage of tree mortality from oak wilt spread in the absence of management during the period 2007-2016. Our metric of economic damage is removal cost, which is one component of the total economic loss from tree mortality. We estimate that Anoka County has 5.92 million oak trees and 885 active oak wilt pockets covering 5.47 km(2) in 2007. The likelihood that landowners remove infected oaks varies by land use and ranges from 86% on developed land to 57% on forest land. Over the next decade, depending on the rates of oak wilt pocket establishment and expansion, 76-266 thousand trees will be infected with discounted removal cost of $18-60 million. Although our predictions of removal costs are substantial, they are lower bounds on the total economic loss from tree mortality because we do not estimate economic losses from reduced services and increased hazards. Our predictions suggest that there are significant economic benefits, in terms of damage reduction, from preventing new pocket establishment or slowing the radial growth of existing pockets. PMID:21331653

Haight, Robert G; Homans, Frances R; Horie, Tetsuya; Mehta, Shefali V; Smith, David J; Venette, Robert C

2011-03-01

399

Mycotoxin Production by Fusarium proliferatum isolates from rice with Fusarium sheath rot disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty samples of unpolished (rough) rice collected in Arkansas and Texas during the 1995 harvesting season from fields exhibiting\\u000a Fusarium sheath rot disease or panicle blight were previously shown to include 8 samples positive for fumonisin B1(FB1) in the range 2.2–5.2 ppm, and moniliformin (MON), but no beauvericin (BEA), deoxynivalenol, its derivatives or zearalenone\\u000a were detected. Fifteen cultures of F.

H. K. Abbas; R. D. Cartwright; W. Xie; C. J. Mirocha; J. L. Richard; T. J. Dvorak; G. L. Sciumbato; W. T. Shier

1999-01-01

400

A two-locus DNA sequence database for identifying host-specific pathogens and phylogenetic diversity within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An electronically portable two-locus DNA sequence database, comprising partial sequences of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a, 634 bp alignment) and nearly complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA, 2220 bp alignment) for 850 isolates spanning the phy...

401

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. palmarum, a Novel Forma Specialis Causing a Lethal Disease of Syagrus romanzoffiana and Washingtonia robusta in Florida  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A new disease of Syagrus romanzoffiana (queen palm) and Washingtonia robusta (Mexican fan palm) has spread across the southern half of Florida during the past 5 years. The initial foliar symptom is a one-sided chlorosis or necrosis of older leaf blades, with a distinct reddish-brown stripe along th...

402

Accelerated Degradation of Dipentyl Phthalate by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi Cutinase and Toxicity Evaluation of Its Degradation Products Using Bioluminescent Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficiency of two lipolytic enzymes (fungal cutinase and yeast esterase) in the degradation of dipentyl phthalate (DPeP)\\u000a was investigated. The DPeP degradation rate of fungal cutinase was surprisingly high, i.e., almost 60% of the initial DPeP\\u000a (500 mg\\/L) was decomposed within 2.5 hours, and nearly 40% of the degraded DPeP disappeared within the initial 15 minutes.\\u000a With the yeast

Ji-Young Ahn; Yang-Hoon Kim; Jiho Min; Jeewon Lee

2006-01-01

403

Bioconjugation of gold and silver nanoparticles synthesized by Fusarium oxysporum and their use in rapid identification of Candida species by using bioconjugate-nano-polymerase chain reaction.  

PubMed

We developed a Bioconjugate-Nano-PCR as a rapid and specific method for identification of Candida species in less time. This requires very low concentration of master mix and DNA sample of Candida albicans in conjugation with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). We report a modification of the PCR assay with nanoparticles that allows the detection of high fidelity amplification of ITS-rDNA and beta (beta) tubulin gene of Candida species from low concentrated DNA in short period. We synthesized and characterized the covalently attached 34 nm (AuNPs) and 35 nm of (AgNPs) and conjugated with C. albicans DNA sample, which is used as a template for PCR. The use of this nanoparticle modified template improves the sensitivity and specificity of the traditional PCR assay with very low cycles which is very helpful in molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. It proves to be an effective method for identification of Candida species with low concentration of DNA. This type of PCR assay is useful for detection of target gene by enhancing the specificity of the target gene and is less time consuming. PMID:24266252

Bansod, Sunita; Bonde, Shital; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Bawaskar, Manisha; Deshmukh, Shivaji; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

2013-12-01

404

Simple diagnosis using ethanol immersion of strawberry plants with latent infection by Colletotrichum acutatum , Dendrophoma obscurans , and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simple diagnosis by ethanol immersion (SDEI) to detect Glomerella cingulata was used to detect three other fungi that also cause latent infection of strawberry plants. Signs on strawberry leaves with asymptomatic latent infection by Colletotrichum acutatum became visible using SDEI. Salmon-pink conidial masses were produced in the acervuli on the treated leaves 5 days after incubation at 28°C. In the

Seiju Ishikawa

2004-01-01

405

Fusarium species and their mycotoxins in infected corn in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys of corn (infected plants and commercial kernels) forFusarium species and their mycotoxins were carried out on samples collected all over Italy and from some European and mediterranean countries.

Antonio Bottalico; Antonio Logrieco; Angelo Visconti

1989-01-01

406

First Report of Bacterial Wilt Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum Biovar 2 Race 1 on Tomato in Egypt  

PubMed Central

This study aims to isolate and identify the causal pathogen of tomato bacterial wilt in Egypt. In 2008, tomato plants showing typical symptoms of bacterial wilt disease with no foliar yellowing were observed in Minia, Assiut and Sohag governorates, Egypt. When cut stems of symptomatic plants were submerged in water, whitish ooze was evident and longitudinal sections showed a brown discoloration in the vascular tissues. Bacteria were isolated on triphenyl tetrazolium chloride medium and fifteen isolates shown typical morphological and cultural characteristics were confirmed as Ralstonia solanacearum biovar 2 race 1. Pathogenicity tests showed that all isolates proved to be pathogenic to tomato plants, varied from 52 to 97% wilting. This is the first report of R. solanacearum biovar 2 race 1 causing bacterial wilt in tomato crop in Egypt. PMID:25289016

Seleim, Mohamed A. A.; Abo-Elyousr, Kamal A. M.; Abd-El-Moneem, Kenawy M.; Saead, Farag A.

2014-01-01

407

First Report of Bacterial Wilt Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum Biovar 2 Race 1 on Tomato in Egypt.  

PubMed

This study aims to isolate and identify the causal pathogen of tomato bacterial wilt in Egypt. In 2008, tomato plants showing typical symptoms of bacterial wilt disease with no foliar yellowing were observed in Minia, Assiut and Sohag governorates, Egypt. When cut stems of symptomatic plants were submerged in water, whitish ooze was evident and longitudinal sections showed a brown discoloration in the vascular tissues. Bacteria were isolated on triphenyl tetrazolium chloride medium and fifteen isolates shown typical morphological and cultural characteristics were confirmed as Ralstonia solanacearum biovar 2 race 1. Pathogenicity tests showed that all isolates proved to be pathogenic to tomato plants, varied from 52 to 97% wilting. This is the first report of R. solanacearum biovar 2 race 1 causing bacterial wilt in tomato crop in Egypt. PMID:25289016

Seleim, Mohamed A A; Abo-Elyousr, Kamal A M; Abd-El-Moneem, Kenawy M; Saead, Farag A

2014-09-01

408

Visoltricin, a novel biologically active compound produced by Fusarium tricinctum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major compound responsible for toxicity to Artemia salina of some Fusarium tricinctum strains has been isolated, and its structure has been elucidated by spectroscopical methods, i.e. UV, IR, MS, H?NMR and C?NMR. The novel compound, trivially named visoltricin, is the first imidazole derivative produced by Fusarium spp., and its structure has been established as the methyl ester of 3?[l?methyl?4?(3?methyl?2?butenyl)?imidazol?5yl]?2?propenoic

A. Visconti; M. Solfrizzo

1995-01-01

409

Deoxynivalenol and other selected Fusarium toxins in Swedish wheat--occurrence and correlation to specific Fusarium species.  

PubMed

Wheat is often infected by Fusarium species producing mycotoxins, which may pose health risks to humans and animals. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most important Fusarium toxin in Swedish wheat and has previously been shown to be produced mainly by Fusarium graminearum. However, less is known about the co-occurrence of DON and F. graminearum with other toxins and Fusarium species in Sweden. This study examined the distribution of the most important toxigenic Fusarium species and their toxins in winter wheat (2009 and 2011) and spring wheat (2010 and 2011). DNA from seven species was quantified with qPCR and the toxin levels were quantified with a multitoxin analysis method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS). The method enabled detection of many fungal metabolites, including DON, zearalenone (ZEA), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxins, moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA), and enniatins (ENNs). It was found that Fusarium poae and Fusarium avenaceum were present in almost all samples. Other common Fusarium species were F. graminearum and F. culmorum, present in more than 70% of samples. Several species occurred at lower DNA levels in 2011 than in other years, but the reverse was true for F. graminearum and Fusarium langsethiae. The most prevalent toxins were ENNs, present in 100% of samples. DON was also common, especially in spring wheat, whereas ZEA and NIV were common in 2009 and in winter wheat, but less common in 2011 and in spring wheat. Only three samples of spring wheat contained T-2 or HT-2 above LOQ. Annual mean levels of several mycotoxins were significantly lower in 2011 than in other years, but the reverse applied for DON. The strongest correlations between mycotoxin and Fusarium DNA levels were found between F. avenaceum and ENNs (r(2) = 0.67) and MON (r(2) = 0.62), and F. graminearum and DON (r(2) = 0.74). These results show that several Fusarium species and toxins co-occur in wheat. The highest toxin levels were detected in spring wheat and DON and ENNs, the latter belonging to the group of so called "emerging toxins", which were the most prevalent toxins and those occurring at the highest levels. PMID:23962919

Lindblad, Mats; Gidlund, Ann; Sulyok, Michael; Börjesson, Thomas; Krska, Rudolf; Olsen, Monica; Fredlund, Elisabeth

2013-10-15

410

Responses of Quercus sapwood to infection with the pathogenic fungus of a new wilt disease vectored by the ambrosia beetle Platypus quercivorus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quercus serrata andQ. crispula wilt during the summer in wide areas along the Sea of Japan. Mass attacks of trees by an ambrosia beetle (Platypus quercivorus) are characteristic before appearance of the wilting symptoms. This study investigated the pathogenic effects of a fungus\\u000a detected specifically in the wilting trees. This hyphomycete fungus,Raffaelea sp., has a distribution that correlates with the

Keiko Kuroda

2001-01-01

411

Isolation of a Ve homolog, mVe1 , and its relationship to verticillium wilt resistance in Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a step toward greater understanding of the genetics of verticillium wilt resistance in plants, we report the sequencing\\u000a of a candidate wilt resistance gene, mVe1, from the mint diploid model species, Mentha longifolia (Lamiaceae). mVe1 is a putative homolog of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) verticillium wilt (Ve) resistance genes. The mVe1 gene has a coding region of 3,051 bp. The

Kelly Vining; Thomas Davis

2009-01-01

412

Management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode and root wilt fungus on pigeonpea through soil organically enriched with Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza, karanj (Pongamia pinnata) oilseed cake and farmyard manure.  

PubMed

This investigation was undertaken to compare the percentage response of colonization and development of VA-Mycorrhiza (Glomus fasciculatum) on a number of pulse crops viz. cowpea, chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea and lentil under glasshouse conditions. Among the above-mentioned crops, pigeonpea exhibited the best performance and was selected for further studies. In this host the development and colonization percentage of G. fasciculatum was investigated under two separate substrates i. e. soil amended with FYM and karanj oilseed cake keeping a control treatment of field soil. A third treatment amended with karanj oilseed cake and farm yard manure (FYM) was also kept which responded best in terms of colonization percentage. This treatment showing improved plant health as well as integration with G. fasciculatum was selected as an ideal treatment for the management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and root wilt fungus, Fusarium udum on pigeonpea. Thus the treatment constituting FYM, karanj oilseed cake and VA-Mycorrhiza reduced the disease incidence caused by both maladies to a great extent with the most promising improvement in plant growth parameters as compared to all others. The present investigation, in addition to proposing an ideal eco-friendly treatment for the management of this disease complex also proposed an excellent medium for the proliferation of the obligate bio-protectant, G. fasciculatum. PMID:17978958

Goswami, B K; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Goswami, Jaideep; Tewari, D D

2007-11-01

413

Verticillium systematics and evolution: how confusion impedes Verticillium wilt management and how to resolve it.  

PubMed

Verticillium wilts are important vascular wilt diseases that affect many crops and ornamentals in different regions of the world. Verticillium wilts are caused by members of the ascomycete genus Verticillium, a small group of 10 species that are related to the agents of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species. Verticillium has a long and complicated taxonomic history with controversies about species boundaries and long overlooked cryptic species, which confused and limited our knowledge of the biology of individual species. We first review the taxonomic history of Verticillium, provide an update and explanation of the current system of classification and compile host range and geographic distribution data for individual species from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) GenBank records. Using Verticillium as an example, we show that species names are a poor vehicle for archiving and retrieving information, and that species identifications should always be backed up by DNA sequence data and DNA extracts that are made publicly available. If such a system were made a prerequisite for publication, all species identifications could be evaluated retroactively, and our knowledge of the biology of individual species would be immune from taxonomic changes, controversy and misidentification. Adoption of this system would improve quarantine practices and the management of diseases caused by various plant pathogens. PMID:24548214

Inderbitzin, Patrik; Subbarao, Krishna V

2014-06-01

414

Genetic Dissection of Verticillium Wilt Resistance Mediated by Tomato Ve11[C][W][OA  

PubMed Central

Vascular wilt diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens are among the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The Verticillium genus includes vascular wilt pathogens with a wide host range. Although V. longisporum infects various hosts belonging to the Cruciferaceae, V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum cause vascular wilt diseases in over 200 dicotyledonous species, including economically important crops. A locus responsible for resistance against race 1 strains of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum has been cloned from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) only. This locus, known as Ve, comprises two closely linked inversely oriented genes, Ve1 and Ve2, that encode cell surface receptor proteins of the extracellular leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein class of disease resistance proteins. Here, we show that Ve1, but not Ve2, provides resistance in tomato against race 1 strains of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and not against race 2 strains. Using virus-induced gene silencing in tomato, the signaling cascade downstream of Ve1 is shown to require both EDS1 and NDR1. In addition, NRC1, ACIF, MEK2, and SERK3/BAK1 also act as positive regulators of Ve1 in tomato. In conclusion, Ve1-mediated resistance signaling only partially overlaps with signaling mediated by Cf proteins, type members of the receptor-like protein class of resistance proteins. PMID:19321708

Fradin, Emilie F.; Zhang, Zhao; Juarez Ayala, Juan C.; Castroverde, Christian D.M.; Nazar, Ross N.; Robb, Jane; Liu, Chun-Ming; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.

2009-01-01

415

Making headway in understanding pine wilt disease: what do we perceive in the postgenomic era?  

PubMed

The advent of next generation sequencing has revolutionized research approaches to biology by making entire genome sequences available and marking a new age in biology that has the potential to open innovative research avenues in various fields. Genome sequencing is now being applied in the fields of forest ecology and forest pathology, which previously had limited access to molecular techniques. One of the most advanced areas of progress is the study of "pine wilt disease", which is caused by the parasitic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The entire genome sequence of B. xylophilus was determined in 2011, and since then, proteomic studies have been conducted to understand the molecular basis of the parasitism and pathogenicity of B. xylophilus. These postgenomic studies have provided numerous molecular insights and greatly changed our understanding of the pathogenesis of pine wilt disease. Here, we review the recent advances in genomic and proteomic approaches that address some of the longstanding questions behind the pathogenesis of pine wilt disease and have identified future questions and directions in this regard. PMID:23474098

Shinya, Ryoji; Morisaka, Hironobu; Takeuchi, Yuko; Futai, Kazuyoshi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

2013-07-01

416

Toxin production by Fusarium species from sugar beets and natural occurrence of zearalenone in beets and beet fibers.  

PubMed Central

Fifty-five Fusarium isolates belonging to nine species were collected from fungus-invaded tissue of stored sugar beets and identified as F. acuminatum (11 isolates), F. avenaceum (1 isolate), F. culmorum (1 isolate), F. equiseti (23 isolates), F. graminearum (4 isolates), F. oxysporum (1 isolate), F. solani (4 isolates), F. sporotrichioides (7 isolates), and F. subglutinans (2 isolates). All isolates were cultured on autoclaved rice grains and assayed for toxicity by feeding weanling female rats the ground-rice cultures of the isolates in a 50% mixture with a regular diet for 5 days. Fifty-eight percent of the isolates were acutely toxic to rats, 26% caused hematuria, 18% caused hemorrhages, and 29% caused uterine enlargement. In most cases, toxicity could not be accounted for by the known toxins found. The following mycotoxins were found in extracts of the rice cultures: zearalenone (22 to 6,282 micrograms/g), chlamydosporol (HM-8) (68 to 4,708 micrograms/g), moniliformin (45 to 400 micrograms/g), deoxynivalenol (10 to 34 micrograms/g), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (5 to 10 micrograms/g), diacetoxyscirpenol (22 to 63 micrograms/g), monoacetoxyscirpenol (21 to 26 micrograms/g), scirpenetriol (24 micrograms/g), T-2 toxin (4 to 425 micrograms/g), HT-2 toxin (2 to 284 micrograms/g), neosolaniol (2 to 250 micrograms/g), and T-2 tetraol (4 to 12 micrograms/g). F. equiseti was the predominant species found on visibly molded beets in the field. Six of 25 moldy sugar beet root samples collected in the field contained zearalenone in concentrations ranging between 12 and 391 ng/g, whereas 10 samples from commercial stockpiles were negative for zearalenone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1444361

Bosch, U; Mirocha, C J

1992-01-01

417

The PKS4 Gene of Fusarium graminearum Is Essential for Zearalenone Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zearalenones are produced by several Fusarium species and can cause reproductive problems in animals. Some aurofusarin mutants of Fusarium pseudograminearum produce elevated levels of zearalenone (ZON), one of the estrogenic mycotoxins comprising the zearalenones. An analysis of transcripts from polyketide synthase genes identified in the Fusarium graminearum database was carried out for these mutants. PKS4 was the only gene with

E. Lysoe; Sonja S. Klemsdal; Karen R. Bone; Rasmus J. N. Frandsen; Thomas Johansen; Ulf Thrane; Henriette Giese

2006-01-01

418

First report of Fusarium torulosum causing dry rot of seed potato tubers in Michigan  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium dry rot of potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a postharvest disease caused by several Fusarium species and is of worldwide importance. Thirteen species of Fusarium have been implicated in fungal dry rots of potatoes worldwide. Among them, eight species have been reported in the northern United S...

419

Toxigenic Fusarium Species and Mycotoxins Associated with Maize Ear Rot in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several Fusarium species occurring worldwide on maize as causal agents of ear rot, are capable of producing mycotoxins in infected kernels, some of which have a notable impact on human and animal health. The main groups of Fusarium toxins commonly found are: trichothecenes, zearalenones, fumonisins, and moniliformin. In addition, beauvericin and fusaproliferin have been found in Fusarium-infected maize ears. Zearalenone

A. Logrieco; G. Mulè; A. Moretti; A. Bottalico

2002-01-01

420

Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Other Filamentous Fungi Isolated From Keratitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: The 90 isolates included 41 Aspergillus spe- cies, 38 Fusarium species, and 11 others. The triazoles and caspofungin had the lowest MICs against Aspergil- lus species; voriconazole, amphotericin B, and posacona- zole had the lowest MICs against Fusarium species, and none of theFusarium species were inhibited by itracona- zole or caspofungin. Amphotericin B had significantly lower MICs compared with

Prajna Lalitha; Brett L. Shapiro; Muthiah Srinivasan; Namperumalsamy Venkatesh Prajna; Nisha R. Acharya; Annette W. Fothergill; Jazmin Ruiz; Jaya D. Chidambaram; Kathryn J. Maxey; Kevin C. Hong; Stephen D. McLeod; Thomas M. Lietman

421

Clinical and Epidemiological Aspects of Infections Caused by Fusarium Species: a Collaborative Study from Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fusarium infections are an important problem worldwide, commonly affecting immunocompromised indi- viduals. We conducted a retrospective study in two Israeli tertiary medical centers of factors predisposing to infection by Fusarium spp. and their influence on the epidemiology and clinical outcome of this infection. Fusarium spp. were isolated from 89 patients with a median age of 57 years. Sixty-eight patients were

Ran Nir-Paz; Jacob Strahilevitz; Mervyn Shapiro; Nathan Keller; Anna Goldschmied-Reouven; Oded Yarden; Colin Block; Itzhack Polacheck

2004-01-01

422

Fusarium circinatum (teleomorph = Gibberella circinata) causes the serious disease of pines known as pitch canker  

E-print Network

Fusarium circinatum (teleomorph = Gibberella circinata) causes the serious disease of pines known the southeastern United States and the Caribbean region.Fusarium circinatum has caused tremendous damage to native have now been identified from the November 2010 Wood SA & Timber Times10 Fusarium circinatum: The first

423

Fusarium mycotoxins: a review of global implications for animal health, welfare and productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trichothecenes, zearalenone (ZEN) and fumonisins are the major Fusarium mycotoxins occurring on a worldwide basis in cereal grains, animal feeds and forages. Other important Fusarium mycotoxins include moniliformin and fusaric acid. Spontaneous outbreaks of Fusarium mycotoxicoses have been recorded in Europe, Asia, New Zealand and South America and, in addition, chronic exposure occurs on a regular and more widespread scale.

J. P. F. D’Mello; C. M. Placinta; A. M. C. Macdonald

1999-01-01

424

Near-infrared versus visual sorting of Fusarium-damaged kernels in winter wheat  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium head blight of wheat, caused by Fusarium graminearum, often results in shriveled and/or discolored kernels referred to as Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK). FDK is one of the major grain grading factors and therefore is routinely determined for purposes of quality assurance. Determination o...

425

Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.  

PubMed Central

There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

1994-01-01

426

Segregation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis in hybrids of Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium proliferatum.  

PubMed

Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium proliferatum are two phylogenetically closely related species of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFC). In some cases, strains of these species can cross and produce a few ascospores. In this study, we analyzed 26 single ascospore isolates of an interspecific cross between F. fujikuroi C1995 and F. proliferatum D4854 for their ability to produce four secondary metabolites: gibberellins (GAs), the mycotoxins fusarin C and fumonisin B(1), and a family of red polyketides, the fusarubins. Both parental strains contain the biosynthetic genes for all four metabolites, but differ in their ability to produce these metabolites under certain conditions. F. fujikuroi C1995 produces GAs and fusarins, while F. proliferatum D4854 produces fumonisins and fusarubins. The segregation amongst the progeny of these traits is not the expected 1:1 Mendelian ratio. Only eight, six, three and three progeny, respectively, produce GAs, fusarins, fumonisin B(1) and fusarubins in amounts similar to those synthesized by the producing parental strain. Beside the eight highly GA(3)-producing progeny, some of the progeny produce small amounts of GAs, predominantly GA(1), although these strains contain the GA gene cluster of the non-GA-producing F. proliferatum parental strain. Some progeny had recombinant secondary metabolite profiles under the conditions examined indicating that interspecific crosses can yield secondary metabolite production profiles that are atypical of the parent species. PMID:22626844

Studt, L; Troncoso, C; Gong, F; Hedden, P; Toomajian, C; Leslie, J F; Humpf, H-U; Rojas, M C; Tudzynski, B

2012-07-01

427

Sexual compatibility in Fusarium pseudograminearum (Gibberella coronicola).  

PubMed

Numerous pathogenic Fusarium species have well-characterized sexual cycles, whereas others, including the crown rot fungus F. pseudograminearum, do not. We conducted studies to elucidate the potential frequency and nature of sexual reproduction in field populations of F. pseudograminearum and developed tester strains for controlled crossings under laboratory conditions. Studies on the role of sexual recombination in the life cycle of F. pseudograminearum revealed apparently low levels of female fertility under controlled laboratory conditions, despite the observation of naturally occurring perithecia of the teleomorph Gibberella coronicola at two field sites. Female fertility levels were experimentally increased to produce female fertile tester strains using four generations of single and multi-stage crossings between sibling progeny derived from fertile laboratory crosses between field isolates collected in northeastern Australia. The production of reliable female fertile tester strains has potential applications for the construction of biological species boundaries, elucidation of the physical characters of reproductive structures, and the generation of genetic diversity via sexual recombination in F. pseudograminearum. As such, the current study is a significant advancement in the understanding of G. coronicola, allowing for future characterisation of various biological, epidemiological, and genetic parameters. PMID:18694636

Bentley, Alison R; Summerell, Brett A; Burgess, Lester W

2008-09-01