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1

Woodbridge Research Facility Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study; Remedial Investigation, Volume 1 - Text, Tables, and Figures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an in...

J. Stowers K. Hanson K. Huber M. Ehlers P. Thompson

1997-01-01

2

Delivery Order 9 enhanced preliminary assessment, Woodbridge Research Facility, Virginia. Final report, Dec 91-Mar 92  

SciTech Connect

An enhanced preliminary assessment was conducted at Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) in Woodbridge, Virginia. WRF is a 579-acre facility located 22 miles southeast of Washington, D.C. It is operated by Harry Diamond Laboratory (HDL) at Adelphi, Maryland for the U.S. Army Laboratory Command. Its mission is to support HDL in a variety of programs involving nuclear weapons effects and Army systems survivability. Based on information obtained during and subsequent to a site visit (18 through 20 September 1991), 27 areas requiring environmental evaluation (AREE) were identified, including landfills, a pistol range, oil-contaminated areas, waste handling areas, storage areas, test areas, underground storage tanks, transformers, oil/water separators, asbestos, drainage ditches and spill areas. This report presents a summary of findings for each AREE and recommendations for further action.

Shimko, R.G.; Turner, R.E.

1992-03-01

3

Woodbridge Research Facility Remedial investigation\\/feasibility study: Focused feasibility study for Operable Unit One. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operable Unit One (OU1) at the Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) has been defined as the area encompassing AREEs 1 through 6B (former dumps) and AREE 7 (former Pistol Range). A Focused Feasibility Study,, has been conducted to identify and screen remedial alternatives for OU1, to address, contaminated groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil, and sediment detected at AREEs associated with OU1.

P. Thompson; K. Huber; K. Hanson; J. Stowers; M. Ehlers

1997-01-01

4

Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation\\/feasibility study. Sampling and analysis plan vol 1: Field sampling plan vol II: Quality assurance project plan. Addendum 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are the

D. Wisbeck; P. Thompson; T. Williams; M. Ehlers; M. Eliass

1996-01-01

5

Woodbridge Army Research Facility RI/FS; volume 1. Field sampling plan. Report for 1995-1996  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are primary chemicals of concern. The WRF is presently in the process of being turned over to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to be used as a wildlife refuge and training facility. This task calls for provision of the necessary staff and equipment to provide remedial investigation/feasibility support for the USAEC BRAC Program investigation at WRF. The scope of work includes Focused Feasibility Studies, Remedial Investigations, Feasibility Studies, ecological assessments, risk assessments, proposed plans, RODs, and community relations support. This Field Sampling Plan contains a description of the site, sample location rationale, technical approach to field operations, site safety procedures, and methods for ecological assessments, analyses of samples, data management, and disposal of investigation-derived wastes. Information contained in other plans which accompany this submittal is identified.

Choynowski, J.; Ehlers, M.; Elias, M.; Garcia, M.; Henry, C.

1996-02-01

6

Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Health and safety plan. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1910.120(f), shall be met for all employees performing or supervising hazardous waste operations. Medical exams shall be conducted as soon as possible upon notification by an employee that he/she has developed signs or symptoms indicating possible health hazards or overexposure to hazardous substances. Subcontractor personnel shall provide documentation of current status of participation in a medical surveillance program as required by 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Subcontractors unable to provide such documentation shall have successfully completed a medical examination as described in the above referenced OSHA standard prior to beginning work in a contaminated zone. Specific protocols for medical examinations are designed by an occupational physician. Common components include: (a) medical history and physical examination; (b) dipstick urinalysis, vision screen and vital signs; (c) spirometry ;(d) audiometry; (e) blood chemistry (complete blood count, liver function, kidney function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism); (f) resting EkG (with approval); (g) chest radiograph (P/A). No project-specific medical examinations, or biological monitoring is required for this project.

Thompson, P.; McKown, G.; Waugh, J.; Houser, W.; Joy, G.

1995-09-01

7

Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR): Follow-Up Study for Control of Silica Exposure at Woodbridge Sanitary Pottery Corporation, Woodbridge, New Jersey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study was made to document and evaluate the effectiveness of techniques designed to control previously identified health hazards at the Woodbridge Sanitary Pottery Corporation (SIC-3261), Woodbridge, New Jersey. The company manufactured vitreous china p...

T. C. Cooper M. G. Gressel R. L. Mickelsen P. A. Froehlich J. D. McGlothlin

1992-01-01

8

Report of sampling and analysis results, Woodbridge Army housing units, Woodbridge, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Roy F. Weston, Inc. had conducted a sampling and analysis program of the Army housing property located in Woodbridge, Virginia. The objectives of this effort include further characterization of environmental contamination indentified in an enhanced preliminary assessment carried out in 1989. The specific activities performed at this site were identification, evaluation of the condition, and collection of samples from specific suspected asbestos-containing materials, including floor tiles, pipe run and pipe fitting insulation, dust in the ductwork, and exterior siding, where present. These evaluations were necessary to clarify potential environmental issues identified in the earlier report, prior to the sale or realignment of the property.

Not Available

1990-08-01

9

Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR): Recommendations for control of silica exposure at Woodbridge Sanitary Pottery Corporation, Woodbridge, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

An in-depth survey of exposure to silica dust at the Woodbridge Sanitary Pottery Corporation, Woodbridge, New Jersey was conducted as a part of the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) cooperative effort. The facility manufactured vitreous china products, including toilet bowls and lavatories. Personal and area atmospheric sampling showed that personal exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust ranged from 0.12 to 0.18 mg/m{sup 3} with at least half the samples exceeding the NIOSH recommended exposure limit of 0.05 mg/m{sup 3} for crystalline silica. The workers in the Slip House suffered the highest exposures, where area concentrations averaged 0.38 mg/m{sup 3}. Of the other three areas, casting, glaze spraying, and glaze preparation, the highest personal exposures were in the glaze-spraying areas where 67% of the personal samples exceeded the OSHA permissible exposure limits for respirable dust. Ergonomic evaluations were conducted to determine lifting hazards at several workstations. The authors conclude that there were excessive exposures to respirable silica dust and respirable dust. There was also a high risk of lost time in injuries from manual handling of heavy loads. Improvements should be made in the design and maintenance of ventilation control systems, work stations, and work practices.

Caplan, P.E.; Valiante, D.; Cooper, T.C.; Crouch, K.G.; Gideon, J.A.

1989-06-01

10

Zoom Down to Manassas, and Woodbridge, VA, areas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Starting with a view of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, the D.C. border and the Beltway fade in. The view then shifts to Manassas and Woodbridge, Virginia, indicating urban growth with red dots. Data sets for 1973, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1996 are presented chronologically.

Snodgrass, Stuart; Masek, Jeffrey

2000-02-21

11

THE INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. his facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liqui...

12

Research Facilities Needs Soar.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Obsolescent and inadequate equipment, increased research volume, rising costs, rapid developments in technology, and lack of funding have created a serious and growing problem in capital renewal, replacement, and expansion of facilities for research. The problem varies by institution and is larger than individual schools can address without…

Hug, Jack

1989-01-01

13

Kimballton Underground Research Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new deep underground research facility is open and operating only 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech campus. It is located in an operating limestone mine, and has drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' x 20+'; the current lab is 35' x 22' x 100'), and is located where there is a 1700' overburden. The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ˜0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. There are currently six projects using the facility: mini-LENS - Low Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (Virginia Tech, Louisiana State University, BNL); Neutron Spectrometer (University of Maryland, NIST); Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); HPGe Low-Background Screening (North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina, Virginia Tech); MALBEK - Majorana neutrinoless double beta decay (University of North Carolina); Ar-39 Depleted Argon (Princeton University). I will summarize the current program and exciting potential for the future.

Rountree, S. Derek; Vogelaar, R. Bruce

2012-03-01

14

A Curriculum for a Three Year High School Science Research Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-year high school science research program has been taught in Woodbridge Township School District - Woodbridge, New Jersey, since 1987. The program's focus is to foster originial science research projects for high school students that have shown an aptitude and an interest in science. Students are instructed in basic research skills, including developing and conducting original research projects, statistical

F. Darytichen; J. Danch

2003-01-01

15

An ion source research facility.  

PubMed

As an ion source developer, D-Pace frequently faces the issue of needing access to a research facility to be able to test equipment or to develop our existing technology further. The closest facility to perform such tasks is hundreds of kilometers away, at TRIUMF, and it is not always feasible to make use of it on a timely basis. With a growing demand and a desire to enhance our products, the idea to create an ion source research facility in our region evolved. In this paper, we will discuss the approach that was chosen to reach our goal, the status of the project, the principle layout of the facility, and the different ways this facility could be utilized. PMID:18315134

Roeder, M; Dehnel, M; Jackle, P; Stewart, T; Theroux, J

2008-02-01

16

An ion source research facility  

SciTech Connect

As an ion source developer, D-Pace frequently faces the issue of needing access to a research facility to be able to test equipment or to develop our existing technology further. The closest facility to perform such tasks is hundreds of kilometers away, at TRIUMF, and it is not always feasible to make use of it on a timely basis. With a growing demand and a desire to enhance our products, the idea to create an ion source research facility in our region evolved. In this paper, we will discuss the approach that was chosen to reach our goal, the status of the project, the principle layout of the facility, and the different ways this facility could be utilized.

Roeder, M.; Dehnel, M.; Jackle, P.; Stewart, T.; Theroux, J. [D-Pace, Inc., P.O. Box 201, Nelson, British Columbia V1L 5P9 (Canada)

2008-02-15

17

Science and Engineering Research Facilities: 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... 2001 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities: 2001 This ...

18

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01

19

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

1993-05-01

20

Lampf: A Nuclear Research Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions ar...

M. S. Livingston

1977-01-01

21

Developing a Shared Research Facility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Planning, creation, and current operation of the Transgenic Mouse Research Facility at the New York University Kaplan Cancer Center are discussed. The university considered need, space, funding, supervision, and marketing and followed a logical and structured management process embodying both scientific and administrative input. (Author/MSE)

Goodman, Ira S.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

1990-01-01

22

Research facility access & science education  

SciTech Connect

As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-10-01

23

Nation's largest controlled fusion research facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The China HK-1 was certified as a controlled fusion experimental facility. The 5 Year Plan for nuclear fusion research is described. The China HL-1 facility will be handling experimentation using the ocean as an energy reservoir.

1986-01-01

24

The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake is presented. The Davis campus is described in detail including the two laboratory modules at the 4850ft level (4200 mwe). These modules currently house the LUX dark-matter experiment and MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. The facility is managed for the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The South Dakota Science and Technology Authority owns and operates the facility. The facility is being considered for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments as well as for nuclear astrophysics physics. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability.

Lesko, K. T.

2012-09-01

25

The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) at Homestake is presented. The Davis campus is described in detail including the two laboratory modules at the 4850-foot level (>4200 mwe). These modules house the LUX dark matter and MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment plans to place their far detector at SURF. The facility is managed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA) owns and operates the facility. SURF is a dedicated science facility with significant expansion capability.

Fiorucci, S.; Gilchriese, M. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Underground Research Facility, Sanford

2013-10-01

26

Design and Construction of a Truck Arrester Bed Research Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the summer of 1984, an Arrester Bed Research Facility was constructed adjacent to the Pavement Durability Research Facility of the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute. The Arrester Bed Research Facility is to be used for experimentation in the me...

M. S. Trueblood

1984-01-01

27

The IAT electromagnetic launch research facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new electromagnetic launcher research facility is being constructed at the Institute for Advanced Technology (IAT). IAT is federated with the Army Research Laboratory and The University of Texas at Austin. The mission and support for the IAT comes from the U.S. Army. A major task assigned to the IAT is to support the Army's tactical programs in electric armaments

J. V. Parker; D. T. Berry; P. T. Snowden

1997-01-01

28

The Conrad Observatory Research Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Conrad Observatory in Austria belongs to the group of most modern geophysical observatories worldwide. The observatory is situated 55 km SW of Vienna in the Eastern Alps. Since 2002 - when the observatory was officially opened - several research tasks, projects, training courses and workshops were carried out at this venue. The site is also magnetically very quiet - one of the requirements for establishing the second part of the observatory, which will serve as the magnetic base observatory for Austria in the future. So far, a tunnel of 145 m length equipped with seismometers, 3 boreholes of 100 m depth and one borehole of 50 m depth, as well as a laboratory, where the gravity is continuously moni-tored, are in operation. In addition an outside station has been built according to Austrian standards for reasons of comparison. Refraction profiles and borehole seismic was used to describe the subsurface conditions for H/V measurements and other scientific tasks. The underground observatory provides ex-cellent conditions to test seismometers under controlled conditions, and a newly developed calibration table assists in the determination of the generator constants of seismometers. Internet connection is available together with a re-distributed GPS-timing signal in the observatory. The NERIES Transnational Access activity TA-5 has attracted already project teams from Germany, Slovenia and The Netherlands to conduct specific instrument tests and comparisons between sensors. See also www.zamg.ac.at/conrad_observatory.

Lenhardt, W.; Melichar, P.

2009-04-01

29

Operating Large Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Research Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best a...

M. P. J. Gaudreau J. M. Tarrh R. S. Post P. Thomas

1987-01-01

30

Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17

31

Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: Users handbook  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this handbook is to provide information for those who plan to carry out research programs at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator systems and experimental apparatus available are described. The mechanism for obtaining accelerator time and the responsibilities of those users who are granted accelerator time are described. The names and phone numbers of ORNL personnel to call for information about specific areas are given. (LEW)

Auble, R.L. (ed.)

1987-01-01

32

OTEC research and the seacoast test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

OTEC mariculture, and other developing research programs at the Natural Energy Laboratory at Keahole Point, Hawaii are reviewed. The installation is designed to feature both onshore and offshore facilities, including cold water intakes and discharge pipelines, warm water intake and discharge pipelines, a pumping station, constant head tanks, laboratories, and support facilities. The Seacoast Test Facility for OTEC development is being constructed to have a ten year lifetime, a 50-ft depth warm water intake, 2100-ft cold water intake, uninterrupted flow from the intakes, cold water temperature rise limited to 1 C, degassing capability for the cold water, and biologically inert pipeline materials. An additional 250 gpm cold water pipeline is being fabricated for mariculture experimentation. Heat transfer monitors, biofouling and corrosion test sections are also being constructed.

Hallanger, L. W.

33

Community outreach at biomedical research facilities.  

PubMed

For biomedical researchers to fulfill their responsibility for protecting the environment, they must do more than meet the scientific challenge of reducing the number and volume of hazardous materials used in their laboratories and the engineering challenge of reducing pollution and shifting to cleaner energy sources. They must also meet the public relations challenge of informing and involving their neighbors in these efforts. The experience of the Office of Community Liaison of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in meeting the latter challenge offers a model and several valuable lessons for other biomedical research facilities to follow. This paper is based on presentations by an expert panel during the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held 1--2 November 1999 at NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. The risks perceived by community members are often quite different from those identified by officials at the biomedical research facility. The best antidote for misconceptions is more and better information. If community organizations are to be informed participants in the decision-making process, they need a simple but robust mechanism for identifying and evaluating the environmental hazards in their community. Local government can and should be an active and fully informed partner in planning and emergency preparedness. In some cases this can reduce the regulatory burden on the biomedical research facility. In other cases it might simplify and expedite the permitting process or help the facility disseminate reliable information to the community. When a particular risk, real or perceived, is of special concern to the community, community members should be involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of targeted risk assessment activities. Only by doing so will the community have confidence in the results of those activities. NIH has involved community members in joint efforts to deal with topics as varied as recycling and soil testing. These ad hoc efforts are more likely to succeed if community members and groups have also been included in larger and longer term advisory committees. These committees institutionalize the outreach process. This can provide the facility with vocal and influential allies who create an independent line of communication with the larger community. PMID:11124126

Goldman, M; Hedetniemi, J N; Herbert, E R; Sassaman, J S; Walker, B C

2000-12-01

34

The Oliktok Point Arctic Research Facility (OPARF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past year, the US Department of Energy, through Sandia National Laboratories, has operated a Designated User Facility at Oliktok Point Alaska, on the Arctic Ocean coast near the western end of the Prudhoe Bay oil fields. The primary purpose of this user facility is to accommodate and support manned and unmanned airborne measurement platforms over the Arctic Ocean and adjacent coastline as the arctic sea ice recedes. The speed at which the sea ice is receding exceeds model-projected speeds considerably for reasons that are not fully understood. The ultimate objective is to incorporate improved understanding of the radiative and other processes impacting sea ice recession into the relevant climate models. OPARF is based at a USAF Long Range Radar Station, an old Distant Early Warning (DEW) radar station built during the height of the Cold War, but continuing to be operated to track air traffic over the pole. The USAF has graciously granted Sandia and DOE use of selected facilities at Oliktok on a non-interference basis. DOE also maintains FAA-granted Restricted Airspace over Oliktok Point and adjacent ocean. In addition, DOE has also requested that the FAA establish a Warning Area over international waters 30 miles wide and 700 miles long stretching from near Oliktok towards the North Pole. That request is currently being processed by the FAA, with the public comment period now closed. This paper will update OPARF developments for potential users of the Oliktok user facility and other interested researchers.

Zak, B. D.; Ivey, M.

2011-12-01

35

Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility  

SciTech Connect

SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was �¢����shell space�¢��� that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

2011-11-11

36

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31

37

Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.  

SciTech Connect

The need for a Combustion and Melting Research Facility focused on the solution of glass manufacturing problems common to all segments of the glass industry was given high priority in the earliest version of the Glass Industry Technology Roadmap (Eisenhauer et al., 1997). Visteon Glass Systems and, later, PPG Industries proposed to meet this requirement, in partnership with the DOE/OIT Glass Program and Sandia National Laboratories, by designing and building a research furnace equipped with state-of-the-art diagnostics in the DOE Combustion Research Facility located at the Sandia site in Livermore, CA. Input on the configuration and objectives of the facility was sought from the entire industry by a variety of routes: (1) through a survey distributed to industry leaders by GMIC, (2) by conducting an open workshop following the OIT Glass Industry Project Review in September 1999, (3) from discussions with numerous glass engineers, scientists, and executives, and (4) during visits to glass manufacturing plants and research centers. The recommendations from industry were that the melting tank be made large enough to reproduce the essential processes and features of industrial furnaces yet flexible enough to be operated in as many as possible of the configurations found in industry as well as in ways never before attempted in practice. Realization of these objectives, while still providing access to the glass bath and combustion space for optical diagnostics and measurements using conventional probes, was the principal challenge in the development of the tank furnace design. The present report describes a facility having the requirements identified as important by members of the glass industry and equipped to do the work that the industry recommended should be the focus of research. The intent is that the laboratory would be available to U.S. glass manufacturers for collaboration with Sandia scientists and engineers on both precompetitive basic research and the solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully instrumented with standard measuring equipment, such as flow meters, thermocouples, continuous gas composition

Connors, John J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); McConnell, John F. (JFM Consulting, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Henry, Vincent I. (Henry Technology Solutions, LLC, Ann Arbor, MI); MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C. (Lilja Corp., Livermore, CA); Adams, Michael E. (Lilja Corp., Rochester, NY); Leadbetter, James M. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Tomasewski, Jack W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Operacz, Walter J. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Houf, William G.; Davis, James W. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Marvin, Bart G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Gunner, Bruce E. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Farrell, Rick G. (A.C. Leadbetter and Son, Inc., Toledo, OH); Bivins, David P. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Curtis, Warren (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Harris, James E. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA)

2004-08-01

38

Research Activities At The RCNP Cyclotron Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) cyclotron cascade system has been operated to provide high quality beams for various experiments. In order to increase the physics research opportunities, the Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron facility was upgraded recently. A flat-topping system and an 18-GHz superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source were introduced to improve the beam's quality and intensity. A new beam line was installed to diagnose the characteristics of the beam to be injected into the ring cyclotron and to bypass the ring cyclotron and directly transport low energy beams from the AVF cyclotron to experimental halls. A separator is equipped to provide RI beams produced by fusion reactions at low energy and by projectile fragmentations at high energy. Development has continued to realize the designed performance of these systems.

Hatanaka, Kichiji

2010-05-01

39

Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

Funk, Glenn A.

40

Reliable, efficient systems for biomedical research facility  

SciTech Connect

Medical Sciences Research Building III (MSRB III) is a 10-story, 207,000 ft{sup 2} (19,230 m{sup 2}) biomedical research facility on the campus of the University of Michigan. The design of MSRB III required a variety of technological solutions to complex design issues. The systems also had to accommodate future modifications. Closely integrated, modular systems with a high degree of flexibility were designed to respond to this requirement. Additionally, designs were kept as simple as possible for operation and maintenance personnel. Integrated electronic controls were used to provide vital data during troubleshooting and maintenance procedures. Equipment was also specified that provides reliability and minimizes maintenance. Other features include 100% redundancy of all central equipment servicing the animal housing area; redundant temperature controls for each individual animal housing room for fail-safe operation to protect the animals against overheating; and accessibility to all items requiring maintenance through an above-ceiling coordination process. It is critical that the engineering systems for MSRB III provide a safe, comfortable, energy efficient environment. The achievement of this design intent was noted by the University`s Commissioning Review Committee which stated: The Commissioning Process performed during both the design phase and construction phase of MSRB III was a significant success, providing an efficiently functioning facility that has been built in accordance with its design intent.

Basso, P. [Peter Basso Associates, Troy, MI (United States)

1997-05-01

41

NSTX: Facility/Research Highlights and Near Term Facility Plans  

SciTech Connect

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a collaborative mega-ampere-class spherical torus research facility with high power heating and current drive systems and the state-of-the-art comprehensive diagnostics. For the 2008 experimental campaign, the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating efficiency in deuterium improved significantly with lithium evaporation and produced a record central Te of 5 keV. The HHFW heating of NBI-heated discharges was also demonstrated for the first time with lithium application. The EBW emission in H-mode was also improved dramatically with lithium which was shown to be attributable to reduced edge collisional absorption. Newly installed FIDA energetic particle diagnostic measured significant transport of energetic ions associated with TAE avalanche as well as n=1 kink activities. A full 75 channel poloidal CHERS system is now operational yielding tantalizing initial results. In the near term, major upgrade activities include a liquid-lithium divertor target to achieve lower collisionality regime, the HHFW antenna upgrades to double its power handling capability in H-mode, and a beam-emission spectroscopy diagnostic to extend the localized turbulence measurements toward the ion gyro-radius scale from the present concentration on the electron gyro-radius scale. For the longer term, a new center stack to significantly expand the plasma operating parameters is planned along with a second NBI system to double the NBI heating and CD power and provide current profile control. These upgrades will enable NSTX to explore fully non-inductive operations over a much expanded plasma parameter space in terms of higher plasma temperature and lower collisionality, thereby significantly reducing the physics parameter gap between the present NSTX and the projected next-step ST experiments.

M. Ono

2008-11-19

42

Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the second TNA; Planetary Simulation Facilities. 11 laboratory based facilities are able to recreate the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of planetary systems with specific emphasis on Martian, Titan and Europa analogues. The strategy has been to offer some overlap in capabilities to ensure access to the highest number of users and to allow for progressive and efficient development strategies. For example initial testing of mobility capability prior to the step wise development within planetary atmospheres that can be made progressively more hostile through the introduction of extreme temperatures, radiation, wind and dust. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilties: Mars atmosphere simulation chambers at VUA and OU These relatively large chambers (up to 1 x 0.5 x 0.5 m) simulate Martian atmospheric conditions and the dual cooling options at VUA allows stabilised instrument temperatures while the remainder of the sample chamber can be varied between 220K and 350K. Researchers can therefore assess analytical protocols for instruments operating on Mars; e.g. effect of pCO2, temperature and material (e.g., ± ice) on spectroscopic and laser ablation techniques while monitoring the performance of detection technologies such as CCD at low T & variable p H2O & pCO2. Titan atmosphere and surface simulation chamber at OU The chamber simulates Titan's atmospheric composition under a range of pressures and temperatures and through provision of external UV light and or electrical discharge can be used to form the well known Titan Aerosol species, which can subsequently be analysed using one of several analytical techniques (UV-Vis, FTIR and mass spectrometry). Simulated surfaces can be produced (icy surfaces down to 15K) and subjected to a variety of light and particles (electron and ion) sources. Chemical and physical changes in the surface may be explored using remote spectroscopy. Planetary Simulation chamber for low density atmospheres INTA-CAB The planetary simulation chamber-ultra-high vacuum equipment (PSC-UHV) has been designed to study planetary surfaces and low dense atmospheres, space environments or any other hypothetic environment at UHV. Total pressure ranges from 7 mbar (Martian conditions) to 5x10-9 mbar. A residual gas analyzer regulates gas compositions to ppm precision. Temperature ranges from 4K to 325K and most operations are computer controlled. Radiation levels are simulated using a deuterium UV lamp, and ionization sources. 5 KV electron and noble-gas discharge UV allows measurement of IR and UV spectra and chemical compositions are determined by mass spectroscopy. Planetary Simulation chamber for high density planetary atmospheres at INTA-CAB The facility allows experimental study of planetary environments under high pressure, and was designed to include underground, seafloor and dense atmosphere environments. Analytical capabilities include Raman spectra, physicochemical properties of materials, e.a. thermal conductivity. P-T can be controlled as independent variables to allow monitoring of the tolerance of microorganisms and the stability of materials and their phase changes. Planetary Simulation chamber for icy surfaces at INTA-CAB This chamber is being developed to the growth of ice samples to simulate the chemical and physical properties of ices found on both planetary bodies and their moons. The goal is to allow measurement of the physical properties of ice samples formed under planetary conditions to assess how rheolo

Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

2008-09-01

43

In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

Bioassay monitoring for intakes of radioactive material is an essential part of the internal dosimetry program for radiation workers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site. This monitoring program includes direct measurements of radionuclides in the body by detecting photons that exit the body and analyses of radionuclides in excreta samples. The specialized equipment and instrumentation required to make the direct measurements of these materials in the body are located at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility (IVRRF). The IVRRF was originally built in 1960 and was designed expressly for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material in Hanford workers. Most routine in vivo measurements are performed annually and special measurements are performed as needed. The primary source terms at the Hanford Site include fission and activation products (primarily 137Cs and 90Sr), uranium, uranium progeny, and transuranic radionuclides. The facility currently houses five shielded counting systems, men’s and women’s change rooms and an instrument maintenance and repair shop. Four systems include high purity germanium detectors and one system utilizes large sodium iodide detectors. These systems are used to perform an average of 7,000 measurements annually. This includes approximately 5000 whole body measurements analyzed for fission and activation products and 2000 lung measurements analyzed for americium, uranium, and plutonium. Various other types of measurements are performed periodically to estimate activity in wounds, the thyroid, the liver, and the skeleton. The staff maintains the capability to detect and quantify activity in essentially any tissue or organ. The in vivo monitoring program that utilizes the facility is accredited by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for direct radiobioassay.

Lynch, Timothy P.

2011-02-01

44

A SURVEY OF RESEARCH PERFORMED AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER'S IMPACT DYNAMICS RESEARCH FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft.-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The facility was originally built in 1963 as a lunar landing simulator, allowing the Apollo astronauts to practice lunar landings under real- istic conditions. The IDRF was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 based on its significant contributions to

Karen E. Jackson; Edwin L. Fasanella

45

Research highlights from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present the scope of research carried out at the new Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge. This will be accomplished with reference to several research projects currently underway. The areas of research represented are microscopic and macroscopic aspects of nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. In view of the scope of this conference, emphasis will be placed on nuclear reactions. A brief description of HHIRF is given, together with its current status. Microscopic aspects of reactions between nuclei are discussed with reference to the prospects for the study of giant resonances by means of heavy ions, and to studies of elastic and inelastic scattering of /sup 60/Ni nuclei. Macroscopic aspects of nuclear reactions are illustrated by means of the study of collisions between /sup 58/Ni nuclei at 15.1 MeV/u and by means of Spin Spectrometer (crystal ball) studies of the /sup 19/F + /sup 159/Tb reaction. Results are presented for lifetime measurements of high-spin states in ytterbium nuclei. (WHK)

Plasil, F.

1982-01-01

46

Urban Watershed Research Facility at Edison Environmental Center  

EPA Science Inventory

The Urban Watershed Research Facility (UWRF) is an isolated, 20-acre open space within EPAâ??s 200 acre Edison facility established to develop and evaluate the performance of stormwater management practices under controlled conditions. The facility includes greenhouses that allow ...

47

Cost Analysis and Rate Setting Manual for Animal Research Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This overall goals of this manual are to: provide fair and consistent methodology for costing of animal research; enhance the quality of animal research and care; meet needs of animal facility users more fully; improve effectiveness and efficiency of anim...

2000-01-01

48

Superconducting Magnet Facility for Plasma Physics Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A superconducting magnet facility has recently been built and operated as an adjunct to a plasma physics experiment. The facility consists of two superconducting coils in a variable-spacing, horizontal-axis, split-pair configuration. Both coils are enclosed in Dewars that allow a working magnetic field diameter of 17.8 cm at the necks of the magnetic bottle. Each coil is capable of producing

J. Reece Roth; Donald C. Freeman; David A. Haid

1965-01-01

49

A Summary of DOD-Sponsored Research Performed at NASA Langley's Impact Dynamics Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft.-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The IDRF was originally built in the early 1960's for use as a Lunar Landing Research Facility. As such, the facility was configured to simulate the reduced gravitational environment of the Moon, allowing the Apollo astro- nauts to practice lunar

Karen E. Jackson; Richard L. Boitnott; Edwin L. Fasanella; Lisa E. Jones; Karen H. Lyle

2006-01-01

50

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research Fair  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On October 4th, 2010, nine countries signed the international agreement on the construction of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR. The new facility is going to be constructed within the next eight years adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt/Germany, expanding the research goals and technical possibilities substantially. Providing a broad spectrum of unprecedented fore-front research at worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, FAIR will open the way for a large variety of experiments in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as applied sciences which will be briefly described in this article.

Stöecker, H.; Sturm, C.

2012-01-01

51

The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility: Status2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility, a US DOE National User Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), comprises capabilities and infrastructure to support both tritium and non-tritium research activities important to the development of safe and environmentally friendly fusion energy. Research thrusts include (1) interactions of tritium and deuterium with plasma-facing-component (PFC) materials, (2)

R. A. Anderl; G. R. Longhurst; R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; S. T. Schuetz; D. A. Petti

2005-01-01

52

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175

Todd R. Snyder; Vann Bush; Larry G. Felix; William E. Farthing; James H. Irvin

2007-01-01

53

32 CFR 22.310 - Statutes concerning certain research, development, and facilities construction grants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Statutes concerning certain research, development, and facilities construction...Statutes concerning certain research, development, and facilities construction...provides for continuation of research and development performed by a...

2013-07-01

54

A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems  

SciTech Connect

This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report.

Not Available

1991-11-01

55

Health Facility Reuse, Retrofit, and Reconfiguration. NCHSR Research Proceedings Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In addition to publishing the papers given at key meetings, this series on health facilities includes discussions and responses. The series is intended to help meet the information needs of health service providers and others who require direct access to concepts and ideas evolving from the exchange of research results. Health facility reuse is an…

National Center for Health Services Research (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

56

Measurement of routinely encountered neutron doses in research facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study performed to determine the accuracy of routine neutron dose equivalent assessments made using portable neutron survey instruments calibrated against two 10-curie PuBe neutron sources. Measurements were made at a research reactor facility and a cyclotron facility using a Victoreen 488A portable survey instrument, a Ludlum Model 15 portable survey instrument, and a Bonner multisphere

G. A. Schlapper; R. D. Neff; D. R. Davis; P. S. Sandel

1983-01-01

57

Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities, 1999. Detailed Statistical Tables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The data in these tables are collected biennially through the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Congressionally mandated Survey of Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities. The 1999 survey was sent to research-performing colleges and universities in the United States and to U.S. biomedical research institutions that received National…

National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

58

Cathode Research and the Threshold Cathode Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This technical report discusses the parameters of the Threshold Cathode Test Facility (TCTF) and the use of the TCTF to perform cathode research. Experimental and simulation results are documented, as well as references to additional, more detailed, catho...

R. J. Umstattd T. A. Spencer

2002-01-01

59

National facilities for research in the physics of condensed matter  

SciTech Connect

Brief descriptions are given of 23 national facilities in the U.S. that are of importance to research in the physics of condensed matter. These facilities range from nuclear reactors and synchrotron sources to high-voltage electron microscopes and facilities for the preparation of special materials and submicron structures. They take a variety of forms and are located in several kinds of institutions, but are alike in being available to qualified scientists from other laboratories. The primary purpose, size, major experimental equipment, and method of operation are described for each facility.

Vineyard, G.H.; Falicov, L.M.

1984-04-01

60

ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, SAFETY CULTURE, AND SAFETY PERFORMANCE AT RESEARCH FACILITIES.  

SciTech Connect

Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30

61

Research Facilities for Solar Astronomy at ARIES  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solar observational facilities at ARIES (erstwhile U.P. State Observatory, UPSO), Nainital, began in the sixties with the acquisition of two moderate sized (25 cm, f/66 off-axis Skew Cassegrain and 15 cm, f/15 refractor) telescopes. Both these systems receive sunlight through a 45 cm and 25 cm coelostat respectively. The backend instruments to these systems comprised of a single pass grating spectrograph for spectroscopic study of the Sun and a Bernhard-Halle H? filter, coupled with a Robot recorder camera for solar patrolling in H? respectively. With the advancement in solar observing techniques with high temporal and spatial resolution in H? and other wavelengths, it became inevitable to acquire sophisticated instrumentation for data acquisition. In view of that, the above facilities were upgraded, owing to which the conventional photographic techniques were replaced by the CCD camera systems attached with two 15 cm, f/15 Coude refractor telescopes. These CCD systems include the Peltier cooled CCD ca mera and photometrics PXL high speed modular CCD camera which provide high temporal and spatial resolution of { 25 ms and {1.3 arcsec respectively.

Pant, P.

2006-09-01

62

The facility for antiproton and ion research FAIR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt/Germany the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR substantially expands research goals and technical possibilities. It will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented fore-front research in hadron, nuclear and atomic and plasma physics as well as applied sciences which will be described in this article briefly. The civil-construction work will start in 2012 and first beams will be delivered in 2018.

Sturm, C.; Stöcker, H.

2011-12-01

63

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30

64

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

Voyles, J.

2004-12-31

65

ARIES: NASA Langley's Airborne Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1994, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) acquired a B -757 -200 aircraft to replace the aging B - 737 Transport Systems Researc h Vehicle (TSRV). The TSRV was a modified B -737 -100, which served as a trailblazer in the development of glass cockpit technologies and other innovative aeronautical concepts. The mission for the B -757 is to

Michael S. Wusk

66

Seven layers of security to help protect biomedical research facilities.  

PubMed

In addition to risks such as theft and fire that can confront any type of business, the biomedical research community often faces additional concerns over animal rights extremists, infiltrations, data security and intellectual property rights. Given these concerns, it is not surprising that the industry gives a high priority to security. This article identifies security threats faced by biomedical research companies and shows how these threats are ranked in importance by industry stakeholders. The author then goes on to discuss seven key 'layers' of security, from the external environment to the research facility itself, and how these layers all contribute to the creation of a successfully secured facility. PMID:20305635

Mortell, Norman

2010-04-01

67

The Molecular Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (MIRFL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exploiting the advantage of the high magnetic rigidity (9.4Tm) of the HIRFL-CSRe, the recently launched Molecular Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (MIRFL) project at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou can open a new window for dissociative recombination research by extending the mass range of molecular ions up to 150 amu.

Cai, X.; Ruan, F.; Yang, J.; Mao, L.; Lu, R.; Shao, C.; Song, M.; Yu, D.

2011-07-01

68

Opening of the Barrow Global Climate Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility (BGCCRF) will open during spring 2007 to approximately coincide with the beginning of the International Polar Year. The new center at Barrow will be available to support IPY projects on the North Slope of Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. Barrow has been a popular locale for high-latitude research since the first IPY more

R. Glenn; G. W. Sheehan; B. Coakley; B. D. Zak

2006-01-01

69

Radiation Hazard Test Facilities at the Denver Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Bureau of Mines has developed test facilities for use in a research program that deals with radiation hazards in mining. This report describes the radon test chamber located at the Denver Research Center and the Twilight experimental mine located near...

R. F. Droullard T. H. Davis E. E. Smith R. F. Holub

1984-01-01

70

Space syntax in healthcare facilities research: a review.  

PubMed

Space Syntax is a theory and method that has been developing for the last 40 years. Originally conceived as a theory of "society and space," it has expanded to other areas. An important aspect of this is technical; it allows the quantification of layouts, and unit spaces within a layout, so that the environment itself can produce independent variables in quantitative research. Increasingly, it is being used to study healthcare facilities. Space Syntax has thereby become relevant to healthcare facilities researchers and designers. This paper attempts to explain Space Syntax to a new audience of healthcare designers, administrators, and researchers; it provides a literature review on the use of Space Syntax in healthcare facility research and suggests some possibilities for future application. PMID:23224810

Haq, Saif; Luo, Yang

2012-01-01

71

The Advanced Neutron Source Facility: A new user facility for neutron research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady state source of neutrons and for associated research space and equipment. The ANS will be open for use by scientists from universities, industry, and other federal laboratories. The ANS will be built around

1988-01-01

72

Advanced Neutron Source Facility: A New User Facility for Neutron Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady state source of neutrons and for associated research space and equipment. The ANS will ...

C. D. West

1988-01-01

73

Overview: Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities at Colleges and Universities, 1998  

NSF Publications Database

October 1999 Overview: Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities at Colleges and Universities ... Overview: Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities at Colleges and Universities, 1998 Portable ...

74

Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m\\/s to 8 km\\/s.

Asay

1981-01-01

75

ARM Climate Research Facility: Outreach Tools and Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sponsored by the Department of Energy, the ARM Climate Research Facility is a global scientific user facility for the study of climate change. To publicize progress and achievements and to reach new users, the ACRF uses a variety of Web 2.0 tools and strategies that build off of the program's comprehensive and well established News Center (www.arm.gov\\/news). These strategies include:

L. Roeder; R. Jundt

2009-01-01

76

Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure Facilities for Bio-Effects Research at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a ...

J. S. Ali C. Weil

1983-01-01

77

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

78

Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m/s to 8 km/s. Instrumentation available at the facility includes optical and microwave interferometry, time-resolved holography, fast x-radiography, framing and streak photography, fast multi-wavelength pyrometry, piezoelectric and piezoresistive gauges and computer data reduction. This report discusses the guns and instrumentation available at the facility and selected recent applications.

Asay, J.R.

1981-08-01

79

Capsule review of the DOE research and development and field facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Descriptions of DOE facilities are given for multiprogram laboratories (12); program dedicated facilities (biomedical and environmental facilities-12, fossil energy facilities-7, fusion energy facility-1, nuclear development facilities-3, physical research facilities-4, safeguards facility-1, and solar facilities-2); and production, testing, and fabrication facilities (nuclear materials production facilities-5, weapon testing and fabrication complex-8). Lists are presented of DOE field and project offices; DOE field facilities by state or territory, names, addresses, and telephone numbers; DOE R and D field facilities by type, contractor names, and names of directors.

1980-09-01

80

U.S. competitiveness compromised by outdated research facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

American industrial competitiveness is compromised by the effects of outdated university research and educational facilities, by the resulting slowed pace of university research, by a diminished knowledge base, and by an inability to train students in technological disciplines, according to the president of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md.Steven Muller testified before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in support of H.R. 1905, the University Research Facilities Revitatilization Act of 1987. The bill, introduced by Rep. Robert A. Roe (D-N.J.), would create in the National Science Foundation (NSF) a 10-year, $250-million-per-year program for the repair, renovation, and replacement of research laboratories in U.S. colleges and universities.

81

Ambient Neutron Flux Measurements at Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is important to accurately measure the ambient neutron flux at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia for the low background experiments housed there, some of which are associated with the Majorana project. This paper presents initial results for measurements of the neutron flux at KURF, which will be compared to those from other sites around the world.

Kaleko, David; Henning, Reyco; Tornow, Werner

2009-10-01

82

Part-time employees in the research facility.  

PubMed

As the "eyes and ears" of the biomedical research team, laboratory animal technicians perform functions essential to maintaining the health of the laboratory animals, and advocate their welfare. The author describes a program that allows part-time employees to perform some of the laboratory animal technician responsibilities when facilities are understaffed and low on funds. PMID:11381214

Douglas, F A; Hays, J T

2000-05-01

83

DURABILITY OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES: NEEDED RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

The United States Environmental Protection Agency is interested in both the short-and long-term performance of geosynthetics when these materials are used in waste management facilities. his paper discusses research to address both concerns and identifies data gaps that require a...

84

Hydraulic transport research facility data analysis report. Special report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bureau of Mines' Hydraulic Transport Research Facility generated a significant amount of data on the transport of 2-inch top-size coal in 6- and 12-inch diameter pipes. Four traditional hydrotransport equations and one new one developed for the Bureau in prior work were tested by using this data. The equations were Durand, the Charles modification of Durand, Newitt, Traynis, and

1992-01-01

85

Geothermal research at the Puna facility. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported. A conceptual model of the reservoir was developed comprising two production zones of different characteristics: the upper zone producing liquid while the lower zone produces vapor. Preliminary studies were carried out at the HGP-A facility on the flocculation behavior of silica under various conditions. (ACR)

Chen, B.

1985-12-12

86

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-09-28

87

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-10-18

88

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-04-19

89

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-02-28

90

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-03-25

91

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-12-30

92

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-05-15

93

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-10-01

94

Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

PubMed Central

Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10–20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

2012-01-01

95

Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

2012-03-01

96

Fourth Cycle of Pavement Research at the Pennsylvania Transportation Research Facility. Volume 7. Fourth Cycle of Pavement Research Summary Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fourth cycle of research at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's Pennsylvania Transportation Research Facilities involved the evaluation of the structural behavior of a variety of bituminous and portland cement pavement materials, including ope...

D. A. Anderson W. P. Kilareski D. R. Luhr

1984-01-01

97

OPERATION AND RESEARCH AT THE USEPA INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY: ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY91  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses two pilot-scale incinerators and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsi...

98

On the renovation of the three-stage axial compressor research facility for compressor performance research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research objective has been to redesign a high speed three stage axial compressor research facility. The new design provides uniform inlet flow to the compressor, a wider operational range at lower speeds, better speed control, and upgrades to the data acquisition system. The compressor used is a research compressor modeling the last three stages of a Rolls-Royce high-pressure compressor.

Anton Talalayev

2011-01-01

99

48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational...SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 235.015-70 Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by...

2012-10-01

100

10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities... Section 50.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC...licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities...is useful in the conduct of research and development...

2013-01-01

101

SUPERKAMIOKANDE computer facilities for cosmic elementary particle research.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR) at the University of Tokyo is currently constructing a new detector, called the SUPERKAMIOKANDE (SUPER KAMIOKA Nucleon Decay Experiment), which will substantially improve on the quality of the institute's existing equipment. Due to the large size of the new equipment, it will generate a huge amount of data. The institute has therefore built the "SUPERKAMIOKANDE computer facilities" as a part of the equipment in order to store and analyze the data. Researchers are currently preparing software for an experiment which will start in April 1996. This paper explains the general features and performance of the SUPERKAMIOKANDE computer facilities, which will enable round-the-clock data acquisition and high-speed transaction.

Nomura, K.; Nozawa, T.; Terai, M.

102

Neutron production at the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, the neutron radiation field at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) was investigated. Total neutron yields, spectra and angular distributions in the bombardment of various thick targets by 12C and 18O ions with energies up to 75 MeV\\/u were obtained using the activation method. The neutron dose equivalent rates of 60 MeV\\/u 18O on various thick

You-Wu Su; Gui-Ling Wang; Wu-Yuan Li; Zong-Qiang Li; Gui-Sheng Li; Hua-Zhi Zheng

2008-01-01

103

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

LR Roeder

2007-12-01

104

Development of an Extreme Environment Materials Research Facility at Princeton  

SciTech Connect

The need for a fundamental understanding of material response to a neutron and/or high heat flux environment can yield development of improved materials and operations with existing materials. Such understanding has numerous applications in fields such as nuclear power (for the current fleet and future fission and fusion reactors), aerospace, and other research fields (e.g., high-intensity proton accelerator facilities for high energy physics research). A proposal has been advanced to develop a facility for testing various materials under extreme heat and neutron exposure conditions at Princeton. The Extreme Environment Materials Research Facility comprises an environmentally controlled chamber (48 m^3) capable of high vacuum conditions, with extreme flux beams and probe beams accessing a central, large volume target. The facility will have the capability to expose large surface areas (1 m^2) to 14 MeV neutrons at a fluence in excess of 10^13 n/s. Depending on the operating mode. Additionally beam line power on the order of 15-75 MW/m2 for durations of 1-15 seconds are planned... The multi-second duration of exposure can be repeated every 2-10 minutes for periods of 10-12 hours. The facility will be housed in the test cell that held the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which has the desired radiation and safety controls as well as the necessary loading and assembly infrastructure. The facility will allow testing of various materials to their physical limit of thermal endurance and allow for exploring the interplay between radiation-induced embrittlement, swelling and deformation of materials, and the fatigue and fracturing that occur in response to thermal shocks. The combination of high neutron energies and intense fluences will enable accelerated time scale studies. The results will make contributions for refining predictive failure modes (modeling) in extreme environments, as well as providing a technical platform for the development of new alloys, new materials, and the investigation of repair mechanisms. Effects on materials will be analyzed with in situ beam probes and instrumentation as the target is exposed to radiation, thermal fluxes and other stresses. Photon and monochromatic neutron fluxes, produced using a variable-energy (4-45 MeV) electron linac and the highly asymmetric electron-positron collisions technique used in high-energy physics research, can provide non-destructive, deep-penetrating structural analysis of materials while they are undergoing testing. The same beam lines will also be able to generate neutrons from photonuclear interactions using existing Bremsstrahlung and positrons on target quasi-monochromatic gamma rays. Other diagnostics will include infrared cameras, residual gas analyzer (RGA), and thermocouples; additional diagnostic capability will be added.

Cohen, A B; Tully, C G; Austin, R; Calaprice, F; McDonald, K; Ascione, G; Baker, G; Davidson, R; Dudek, L; Grisham, L; Kugel, H; Pagdon, K; Stevenson, T; Woolley, R

2010-11-17

105

Report of the Research Results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in Fiscal 1976.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, due to increasing usage of fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi' as the major joint-use facility, works are performed in 'pillars' for research effectiveness. In fiscal 1976, two additional facilities, linac and n...

1977-01-01

106

Status of CHESS facility and research programs: 2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CHESS is a hard X-ray synchrotron radiation national facility located at Cornell University and funded by the National Science Foundation. It is open to all scientists by peer-reviewed proposal and serves 500–1000 visitors each year. The CHESS scientific and technical staff develops forefront research tools and X-ray instrumentation and methods and supports 12 experimental stations delivering high intensity X-ray beams produced at 5.3 GeV and 250 mA. The facility consists of a mix of dedicated and flexible experimental stations that are easily configured for general X-ray diffraction (wide- and small-angle), spectroscopy, imaging applications, etc. Dedicated stations support high-pressure powder X-ray diffraction, pulsed-laser deposition for layer-by-layer growth of surfaces, and three dedicated stations for protein crystallography. Specialized resource groups at the laboratory include: an X-ray detector group; MacCHESS, an NIH-supported research resource for protein crystallography; the G-line division, which primarily organizes graduate students and Cornell faculty members around three X-ray stations; a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell support laboratory; and a monocapillary drawing facility for making microbeam X-ray optics. Research is also ongoing to upgrade CHESS to a first-ever 5 GeV, 100 mA Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) hard X-ray source. This source will provide ultra-high spectral-brightness and <100 fs short-pulse capability at levels well in advance of those possible with existing storage rings. It will produce diffraction-limited X-rays beams of up to 10 keV energy and be capable of providing 1 nm round beams. Prototyping for this facility is under way now to demonstrate critical DC photoelectron injector and superconducting linac technologies needed for the full-scale ERL.

Fontes, Ernest; Bilderback, Donald H.; Gruner, Sol M.

2011-09-01

107

The Advanced Neutron Source Facility: A new user facility for neutron research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady state source of neutrons and for associated research space and equipment. The ANS will be open for use by scientists from universities, industry, and other federal laboratories. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of unprecedented flux; that is, it will produce the most intense continuous beams of neutrons in the world. The goal is to reach a thermal neutron flux for beam experiments of 5 /times/ 10/sup 19/ to 10 /times/ 10/sup 19/ neutrons/(m/sup 2//center dot/s/sup /minus/1/). By combining the higher source flux with improved experimental facilities, the ANS will surpass current US high flux reactors---the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory---by a factor of 10 to 20. The safety analysis of the ANS facility will include a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which will provide a systematic assessment of dependencies among systems at the malfunctions. For the current generation of nuclear power plants that have recently undergone the licensing review process, PRA has been used an an analysis tool after completion of the plant designs. For the ANS Project, the PRA effort has already begun, before the facility conceptual design. This allows safety insights from the PRA to be incorporated into the evolving plant design. 4 refs., 6 figs.

West, C.D.

1988-01-01

108

The New ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility Floating Beamline  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development and implementation of a new beam line at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) that is floatable at up to -12 kV and injected by a 10 GHz CAPRICE ECR ion source and is part of a major facility upgrade project. With the floating beam line operating at negative high voltage, and the ECR source at ground potential, intense DC beam deceleration into grounded experimental chambers to energies as low as a few eV/q is made possible. The primary application of these ion beams is to study fundamental collisional interactions of multicharged ions with electrons, atoms, and surfaces. Design details of the floating beam line, including source extraction, deceleration optics and voltage isolation will be presented. The novel features of a LABVIEW-based computer control system developed for the floating beam line will be described as well.

Meyer, Fred W [ORNL; Fogle, Mark R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hale, Jerry W [ORNL

2007-01-01

109

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30

110

Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-08-01

111

Interspecies pair housing of macaques in a research facility.  

PubMed

The eighth edition of The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals establishes social housing as the 'default' for social species including non-human primates. The advantages of social housing for primates have been well established, but small research facilities housing few primates in indoor cages have struggled with social housing as a result of limitations on appropriate housing and availability of compatible monkeys. Here, we report a novel approach to pair housing macaques - crossing species. We have successfully pair housed an intact male rhesus macaque with an intact male cynomolgus macaque, and an adult female rhesus macaque with numerous subadult female cynomolgus macaques. Monkeys in these pairs established dominant-subordinate relationships similar to same-species pairs. Rhesus and cynomolgus macaques can be successfully paired for the purpose of social housing in facilities with limited numbers of monkeys. PMID:22277270

DiVincenti, L; Rehrig, A; Wyatt, J

2012-01-25

112

Safety and health criteria for the design of a research and development facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Safety engineering support is provided to a chemical research and development center research and development facility. The criteria was developed during the early stages of the project and represents the minimum requirements tailored specifically for this facility.

Collins, G. E.; Kartachak, T. S.

1984-08-01

113

The radiological research accelerator facility at Columbia University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility located at the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University is a laboratory dedicated to bio-physics research. Its principal component is a 4 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator which produces protons, deuterons and other ions. The most important secondary radiation is neutrons of energies from about 100 keV to 18 MeV. In addition, diatomic and triatomic beams of protons and deuterons are employed in a special study. The biological effects of these radiations are compared with those of more conventional X-ray sources which are also available. The biological effects are correlated with physical aspects of the irradiation which include not only accurate measurements of the absorbed dose (the mean energy absorbed per unit mass of irradiated tissue) but also microdosimetry research which evaluates the distribution of energy at cellular and subcellular levels. Differences in these distributions can greatly affect the biological effectiveness of a given absorbed dose. The facility will be described, brief outlines of some of the biological and physical studies given and general implications of results discussed.

Rossi, Harald H.

1985-05-01

114

PIRATE: A Remotely Operable Telescope Facility for Research and Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce PIRATE, a new remotely operable telescope facility for use in research and education, constructed from off-the-shelf hardware, operated by The Open University. We focus on the PIRATE Mark 1 operational phase, in which PIRATE was equipped with a widely used 0.35 m Schmidt-Cassegrain system (now replaced with a 0.425 m corrected Dall-Kirkham astrograph). Situated at the Observatori Astronòmic de Mallorca, PIRATE is currently used to follow up potential transiting extrasolar planet candidates produced by the SuperWASP North experiment, as well as to hunt for novae in M31 and other nearby galaxies. It is operated by a mixture of commercially available software and proprietary software developed at the Open University. We discuss problems associated with performing precision time-series photometry when using a German Equatorial Mount, investigating the overall performance of such off-the-shelf solutions in both research and teaching applications. We conclude that PIRATE is a cost-effective research facility, and it also provides exciting prospects for undergraduate astronomy. PIRATE has broken new ground in offering practical astronomy education to distance-learning students in their own homes.

Holmes, S.; Kolb, U.; Haswell, C. A.; Burwitz, V.; Lucas, R. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Rolfe, S. M.; Rostron, J.; Barker, J.

2011-10-01

115

Recruitment of long-term care facilities for research.  

PubMed

We report the successful recruitment of a stratified random sample of nursing homes in the state of Maryland into three research studies funded by the National Institute on Aging. These studies examine the prevalence of infections and urinary tract instrumentation and the incidence of antimicrobial use in nursing home residents. Following selection of a facility, the administrator was telephoned and a meeting at the home was requested. At this meeting, the project was explained in detail using a packet of promotional information which included a project summary, a listing of project staff and their qualifications, and letters of support from influential organizations. A total of 61 eligible facilities were contacted in order to achieve a group of 53 participating homes with approximately 5000 beds. One hundred percent cooperation was achieved from all strata except small (less than or equal to 50 beds) proprietary comprehensive care facilities, and homes with both comprehensive and domiciliary beds. A direct, personal approach, backed by a carefully prepared study information and the support of medical and nursing home organizations resulted in successful recruitment of 53 (87%) of 61 homes sampled. PMID:3805558

Palumbo, F B; Magaziner, J S; Tenney, J H; Goren, L M; Warren, J W

1987-02-01

116

Congressional hearing reviews NSF major research and facilities projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An 8 March congressional hearing about the U.S. National Science Foundation's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (NSF MREFC) account focused on fiscal management and accountability of projects in that account and reviewed concerns raised by NSF's Office of Inspector General (OIG). NSF established the MREFC account in 1995 to better plan and manage investments in major equipment and facilities projects, which can cost from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars, and the foundation has funded 17 MREFC projects since then. The Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget includes funding for four MREFC projects: Advanced Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory (AdvLIGO), Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), National Ecological Observatory (NEON), and Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The hearing, held by a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, reviewed management oversight throughout the life cycles of MREFC projects and concerns raised in recent OIG reports about the use of budget contingency funds. NSF's February 2012 manual called “Risk management guide for large facilities” states that cost contingency is “that portion of the project budget required to cover ‘known unknowns,’” such as planning and estimating errors and omissions, minor labor or material price fluctuations, and design developments and changes within the project scope. Committee members acknowledged measures that NSF has made to improve the MREFC oversight process, but they also urged the agency to continue to take steps to ensure better project management.

Showstack, Randy

2012-03-01

117

Anti- and Hypermatter Research at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the next six years, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is built adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt, Germany. Thus, the current research goals and the technical possibilities are substantially expanded. With its worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, FAIR will provide a wide range of unprecedented fore-front research in the fields of hadron, nuclear, atomic, plasma physics and applied sciences which are summarized in this article. As an example this article presents research efforts on strangeness at FAIR using heavy ion collisions, exotic nuclei from fragmentation and antiprotons to tackle various topics in this area. In particular, the creation of hypernuclei and antimatter is investigated.

Steinheimer, J.; Xu, Z.; Gudima, K.; Botvina, A.; Mishustin, I.; Bleicher, M.; Stöcker, H.

2012-11-01

118

The Sondrestrom Research Facility All-sky Imagers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility is located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, just north of the Arctic Circle and 100 km inland from the west coast of Greenland. The facility is operated by SRI International in Menlo Park, California, under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation. Operating in Greenland since 1983, the Sondrestrom facility is host to more than 20 instruments, the majority of which provide unique and complementary information about the arctic upper atmosphere. Together these instruments advance our knowledge of upper atmospheric physics and determine how the tenuous neutral gas interacts with the charged space plasma environment. The suite of instrumentation supports many disciplines of research - from plate tectonics to auroral physics and space weather. The Sondrestrom facility has recently acquired two new all-sky imagers. In this paper, we present images from both new imagers, placing them in context with other instruments at the site and detailing to the community how to gain access to this new data set. The first new camera replaces the intensified auroral system which has been on site for nearly three decades. This new all-sky imager (ASI), designed and assembled by Keo Scientific Ltd., employs a medium format 180° fisheye lens coupled to a set of five 3-inch narrowband interference filters. The current filter suite allows operation at the following wavelengths: 750 nm, 557.7 nm, 777.4 nm, 630.0 nm, and 732/3 nm. Monochromatic images from the ASI are acquired at a specific filter and integration time as determined by a unique configuration file. Integrations as short as 0.5 sec can be commanded for exceptionally bright features. Preview images are posted to the internet in near real-time, with final images posted weeks later. While images are continuously collected in a "patrol mode," users can request special collection sequences for targeted experiments. The second new imager installed at the Sondrestrom facility is a color all-sky imager (CASI). The CASI instrument is a low-cost Keo Scientific Ltd. system similar to cameras designed for the THEMIS satellite ground-based imaging network. This camera captures all visible wavelengths simultaneously at a higher data rate than the ASI. While it is not possible to resolve fine spectral features as with narrowband filters on the ASI, this camera provides context on wavelengths not covered by other imagers, and makes it much simpler to distinguish clouds from airglow and aurora. As with the ASI, this imager collects data during periods of dark skies and the images are posted to the web for community viewing.

Kendall, E. A.; Grill, M.; Gudmundsson, E.; Stromme, A.

2010-12-01

119

Safety and licensing program for the proposed irradiation research facility  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) proposes to replace NRU with a dual-purpose irradiation-research facility (IRF) to test Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) fuels and materials and to perform materials research using neutrons. The reference IRF concept was estimated to cost $500 million and would require 87 months to complete. Approval of the IRF project is not expected to occur before 1997, and a favorable decision will be influenced by the estimated cost and confidence in the estimate. Accordingly, AECL has initiated a preproject program that includes code validation, analysis, development and testing, safety and licensing, and concept design activities to reduce uncertainties in the reference IRF project cost and schedule, and to develop cost and schedule reductions.

Lee, A.G.; Gillespie, G.E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Zeng, Y.; Bishop, W.E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31

120

Experimental digester facility modifications and digester gas upgrading research  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has been participating in an experimental program at the Community Waste Research Facility (CWRF) located at the Walt Disney World Resort Complex, Orlando, Florida. Four institutions have formed a team to provide solutions to community waste treatment and disposal programs. Of primary importance to this research effort is the implementation of low-cost, energy-efficient waste treatment and recovery technologies and the net production of energy (methane) from biomass and waste resources. The production of methane is being studied in a novel, high-rate digester. During 1988, we were responsible for modifying the Experimental Test Unit (ETU) to permit dry solids feeding of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and for conducting bench-scale experiments to evaluate techniques for efficient removal of carbon dioxide produced during anaerobic digestion.

Srivastava, V.J.; Biljetina, R.; Akin, C.

1989-01-01

121

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01

122

Cadaver use at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility.  

PubMed

The Anthropological Research Facility allows actualistic studies evaluating human decomposition to be conducted in a controlled, scientific setting. These studies have had significant ramifications for forensic investigations. Donated cadavers are used to study the precise nature and timing of decomposition events. More than 1,000 bodies have been donated, and more than 2,000 individuals are registered for donation on their death. Initial studies using cadavers focused on gross morphological changes of human decomposition, while more recent research has delved into biochemical analyses. This research has contributed to the accuracy of time since death estimations, which may be critical in criminal investigations. Furthermore, the donated cadavers contribute to the unprecedented diversity of the William M. Bass Donated Skeletal Collection, which allows for a wide range of skeletal-based research. The continuous supply of human cadavers is essential for these research endeavors, and the Forensic Anthropology Center strives to ensure that donor wishes are fulfilled and to assure donors that their invaluable gift will serve the scientific community for years to come. PMID:21433084

Shirley, Natalie R; Wilson, Rebecca J; Jantz, Lee Meadows

2011-04-01

123

Operations and research at the U. S. EPA Incineration Research Facility: Annual report for FY91  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses two pilot-scale incinerators and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsite laboratory facilities. During fiscal year 1991, five major test programs were completed at the facility: tests to establish residue characteristics from the incineration of spent potliners from aluminum production (K088) for the Office of Solid Waste (OSW); an evaluation of the incinerability of five contaminated soils from the Drake Chemical Superfund site for Region 3; an evaluation of the incinerability of PCB-contaminated marine sediments from the New Bedford Harbor Superfund site for Region 1; a parametric evaluation of the fate of trace metals in a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a Calvert high-efficiency scrubber system; and an evaluation of incinerability of arsenic-contaminated soil from the Chemical Insecticide Corporation Superfund site for Region 2.

Waterland, L.R.

1992-03-01

124

Operations and research at the US EPA incineration research facility: Annual report for FY92  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses two pilot-scale incinerators and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsite laboratory facilities. During fiscal year 1992, three major test programs were completed at the facility: an evaluation of the incinerability of two contaminated sludges from the Bofors-Nobel Superfund site for Region 5, an evaluation of the incinerability of PCB-contaminated soil from the Scientific Chemical Processing Superfund site for Region 2, and an evaluation of the effects of repeated incinerator waste feed cutoffs on incinerator particulate, HCl, trace metal, and organic constituent emissions for the Office of Solid Waste and the EPA incinerator permit writers.

Waterland, L.R.

1993-06-01

125

Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)  

SciTech Connect

A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Katoh, M. [UVSOR, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Hori, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Sasaki, S. [JASRI/SPring-8, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Koda, S. [Saga Light Source, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

2010-06-23

126

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01

127

Review of the National Research Council report ''Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines''  

SciTech Connect

The National Research Council-National Academy of Sciences report on ''Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines'' recommends that new facilities and upgrades of existing facilities are very important to the nation. At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the Energy Research Advisory Board has reviewed this report and finds that the Department of Energy is responsible for the majority of these projects to carry out its missions in energy, national defense, and science and technology. Therefore, we recommend that the Department should place a high priority on requesting the new funds necessary to fulfill these responsibilities in the next decade. The energy and defense missions of the Department will be best served by this approach. This responsibility requires strong coordination with other funding agencies through a shared advisory and decision-making process. The review recommends immediate implementation of new capabilities at existing DOE facilities (the neutron experimental halls at Brookhaven and Los Alamos and the new synchrotron insertion devices at Stanford and Brookhaven) as a cost effective way of maintaining the Nation's leading role in neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation research. It also recommends the immediate initiation of non-site-specific research and development for the proposed 6 GeV synchrotron and advanced steady state neutron source. This pre-construction work should be sufficient to ensure that these facilities will be constructed in a timely fashion at design goals and with well identified costs. Other recommendations concern advancing the Nation's leading capabilities in synchrotron produced ultraviolet radiation and spallation neutron research. A budget scenario is developed.

Not Available

1985-06-01

128

OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH AT THE U.S. EPA INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY: ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY92  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses two pilotscale incinerators and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsit...

129

National scientific facilities and their science impact on nonbiomedical research  

PubMed Central

The “h index” proposed by Hirsch [Hirsch JE (2005) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102:16569–16573] is a good indicator of the impact of a scientist's research and has the advantage of being objective. When evaluating departments, institutions, or laboratories, the importance of the h index can be further enhanced when it is properly calibrated for the size of the group. Particularly acute is the issue of federally funded facilities whose number of actively publishing scientists frequently dwarfs that of academic departments. Recently, Molinari and Molinari [Molinari JF, Molinari A (2008) Scientometrics, in press] developed a methodology that shows that the h index has a universal growth rate for large numbers of papers, allowing for meaningful comparisons between institutions. An additional challenge when comparing large institutions is that fields have distinct internal cultures, with different typical rates of publication and citation; biology is more highly cited than physics, for example. For this reason, the present study has focused on the physical sciences, engineering, and technology and has excluded biomedical research. Comparisons between individual disciplines are reported here to provide a framework. Generally, it was found that the universal growth rate of Molinari and Molinari holds well across the categories considered, testifying to the robustness of both their growth law and our results. The goal here is to set the highest standard of comparison for federal investment in science. Comparisons are made of the nation's preeminent private and public institutions. We find that many among the national science facilities compare favorably in research impact with the nation's leading universities.

Kinney, A. L.

2007-01-01

130

Obstacles to research in residential juvenile justice facilities: recommendations for researchers.  

PubMed

Federal, state, and local initiatives to improve the treatment and outcomes for young people in the juvenile justice system prompt the need for additional research. Despite the call for empirical data, researchers encounter numerous obstacles when initiating and conducting studies in detention and post-adjudication facilities. These obstacles are often only briefly mentioned in publications, but they can interfere with researchers' desires and abilities to conduct studies in these settings. This paper reviews legal, ethical, and methodological challenges to successfully conducting research in detention and residential post-adjudication placements, including selecting and accessing appropriate facilities, obtaining institutional review board approval, seeking parental permission and youth assent, reporting child abuse and neglect, responding to participants' threats to harm self or others, working effectively with facilities, juvenile justice system-related attrition, and the dissemination of research findings. Recommendations are presented to help investigators anticipate obstacles when designing and executing research protocols to prevent interference and to encourage ethical responses and successful study completion. PMID:22298128

Lane, Christy; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Heilbrun, Kirk; Cruise, Keith R; Pennacchia, Daniel

2012-01-04

131

The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility: Status-2004*  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present the current status of the development of the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Designated a National User Facility by the US DOE, the primary mission of STAR is to provide laboratory infrastructure to study tritium science and technology issues associated with the development of safe and environmentally friendly fusion energy. Both tritium and non-tritium fusion safety research is pursued along three key thrust areas: (1) plasma-material interactions of plasma-facing component (PFC) materials exposed to energetic tritium and deuterium ions, (2) fusion safety concerns related to PFC material chemical reactivity and dust/debris generation, activation product mobilization, and tritium behavior in fusion systems, and (3) molten salts and fusion liquids for tritium breeder and coolant applications. STAR comprises a multi-room complex with operations segregated to permit both tritium and non-tritium activities in separately ventilated rooms. Tritium inventory in STAR is limited to 15,000 Ci to maintain its classification as a Radiological Facility. Experiments with tritium are typically conducted in glovebox environments. Key components of the tritium infrastructure have been installed and tested. This includes the following subsystems: (1) a tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS) that uses two 50-g depleted uranium beds for tritium storage and PVT/beta-scintillation analyses for tritium accountability measurements, (2) a Tritium Cleanup System (TCS) that uses catalytic oxidation and molecular sieve water absorption to remove tritiated species from glovebox atmosphere gases and gaseous effluents from experiment and process systems, and (3) tritium monitoring instrumentation for room air, glovebox atmosphere and stack effluent tritium concentration measurements. Integration of the tritium infrastructure subsystems with the experimental and laboratory process systems is planned for early in 2004. Following an operational readiness review, tritium operations will be initiated in the summer of 2004. Summary results of the performance testing of the tritium infrastructure subsystems and their integration into the laboratory operations will be presented at this conference. Current research activity includes plasma-material interaction studies with the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) and tritium/chemistry interactions in the molten salt designated as Flibe (2·LiF-BeF2). The implementation of these capabilities in STAR will be described.

R. A. Anderl; G. R. Longhurst; R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; S. T. Schuetz; D. A. Petti

2004-09-01

132

Research on Biolab, a multi-user facility for APM.  

PubMed

A study carried out by a team of seven scientists appointed by ESA resulted in the design of a biological laboratory "Biolab" for Columbus APM. The basis for the study were four pre-Phase A studies performed by industry on the assumption that 15 racks would be available to biology and biotechnology in the APM. Due to the constraints newly imposed by the Columbus project, only five racks are now allocated. The tasks of the Biolab scientific team were: (i) to define the scientific objectives of biological research in Columbus; (ii) to review the requirements of the industrial studies; and (iii) to design a multi-purpose facility compatible with the present constraints and satisfying the requirements of the biological investigations considered in the four studies. The Biolab team was able to define a facility capable of accommodating in five racks the following biological objects: small plants (up to 40 cm), insects like drosophila, frog eggs, single cells from animals, bacteria, slime molds and protozoa, as well as human physiology, but restricted to general diagnostic needs. The Biolab facility includes instruments and devices providing the capacity of holding and/or growing the organisms as well as to perform basic experimentation and a minimum essential diagnostic inflight. Within the growth unit the growth chambers/incubators are exchangeable, permitting the use of growth chambers of different sizes. The temperature will be adjustable to the requirements of the objects under investigation, i.e. either 20 or 37 degrees C. Thus a considerable level of flexibility will permit to investigate a broad spectrum of living systems. PMID:11538165

Cogoli, M; Cogoli, A

1989-01-01

133

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01

134

Hydraulic transport research facility data analysis report. Special report  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines' Hydraulic Transport Research Facility generated a significant amount of data on the transport of 2-inch top-size coal in 6- and 12-inch diameter pipes. Four traditional hydrotransport equations and one new one developed for the Bureau in prior work were tested by using this data. The equations were Durand, the Charles modification of Durand, Newitt, Traynis, and the Eyler equation which was based on the work of K.C. Wilson. The results indicated that none of the equations accurately predict head loss for coarse coal over a wide range of transport velocities. The Eyler-Wilson equation shows promise, but more work is needed to define two of the input parameters.

Henderson, M.E.

1992-06-01

135

Updated - Research Support Facility (RSF) construction time lapse  

ScienceCinema

Haselden Construction and RNL built the 222,000 square-foot Research Support Facility (RSF) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. This time lapse video begins on July 23, 2009 and the last shot was taken in June 2010. The building is designed to be a model for sustainable, high-performance building design, and will provide DOE-owned work space for administrative staff who currently occupy leased space in the nearby Denver West Office Park. The engineers and scientists from NREL's Building Technology Program set the energy criteria and the energy design strategies that are making it possible for the RSF to use no more carbon-based energy than is produced by renewables. The RSF was designed by RNL. Stantec Consulting served as the project's engineering, energy modeling and sustainability consultant.

136

Near-field measurement facility plans at Lewis Research Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The direction of future antenna technology will be toward antennas which are large, both physically and electrically, will operate at frequencies up to 60 GHz, and are non-reciprocal and complex, implementing multiple-beam and scanning beam concepts and monolithic semiconductor devices and techniques. The acquisition of accurate antenna performance measurements is a critical part of the advanced antenna research program and represents a substantial antenna measurement technology challenge, considering the special characteristics of future spacecraft communications antennas. Comparison of various antenna testing techniques and their relative advantages and disadvantages shows that the near-field approach is necessary to meet immediate and long-term testing requirements. The LeRC facilities, the 22 ft x 22 ft horizontal antenna boresight planar scanner and the 60 ft x 60 ft vertical antenna boresight plant scanner (with a 60 GHz frequency and D/lamdba = 3000 electrical size capabilities), will meet future program testing requirements.

Sharp, R. G.

1983-05-01

137

Project definition study for research facility access and science education  

SciTech Connect

This UTA/SMU project definition study describes critical customer services and research programs which draw upon SSC assets to meet regional needs in two major components: Science Education; Academic/Small Business R and D Facility Access. The location of the SSC in Texas constituted a significant stimulus to R and D activities in Texas, encouraging new initiatives in high energy physics, as well as stimulating other areas of physics and related sciences. An important aspect of maximizing the utility of the investment in the SSC should be to re-allocate SSC assets in ways that maintain that momentum. This study addresses several ways to achieve that end, extending benefits to all of physics, the sciences in general and particularly, to science education.

Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Coll. of Science; Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-10-01

138

Research opportunities at the upgraded HI?S facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Intensity ?-ray Source (HI?S) is a joint project between the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL). This facility utilizes intra-cavity back-scattering of the FEL light in order to produce intense ?-ray beams. An upgrade which allows for the production of ?-rays up to energies of about 100 MeV having total intensities in excess of 108/s is essentially complete. The primary component of the upgrade is a 1.2 GeV booster-injector which makes it possible to replace lost electrons at full energy. In addition, an upgrade of the present linear undulator to a helical system has made it possible to produce nearly 100% linear and circularly polarized beams. The full system was commissioned in the early part of 2007. A nuclear physics research program using beams at energies below 50 MeV commenced in the fall of 2007. The proposed experimental program includes low-energy studies of nuclear reactions of importance in nuclear astrophysics as well as studies of nuclear structure using the technique of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). Few-body nuclear physics problems will also be addressed by studying photodisintegration of d, 3He and 4He. Future double-polarization experiments include a study of the Gerasimov Drell Hearn Sum Rule for the deuteron and 3He, and an extensive Compton scattering program designed to probe the internal structure of the nucleon. A major focus of these studies will be the measurement of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities as well as the spin-polarizabilities of the proton and the neutron. This review will describe the principles of operation of the upgraded facility, followed by a description of the performance which has been achieved to date, and a projection of the performance anticipated in the near future. Following this, we will review several of the research areas of nuclear physics which are accessible using this facility, and describe both the results to date and proposed experiments being developed for the future.

Weller, Henry R.; Ahmed, Mohammad W.; Gao, Haiyan; Tornow, Werner; Wu, Ying K.; Gai, Moshe; Miskimen, Rory

2009-01-01

139

Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research  

SciTech Connect

The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

1984-11-13

140

Pulsed Neutron Facility for Research in Illicit Trafficking and Nuclear Safeguards  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Joint Research Centre has taken into operation a new experimental facility designed for research in the fields of illicit trafficking and nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently undertaken include detection of shielded contraband materials (drugs, explosives, nuclear materials), and mass determination of small fissile materials in shielded containers. The facility, called the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA), incorporates

Andrea Favalli; H.-C. Mehner; Jean-Michel Crochemore; Bent Pedersen

2009-01-01

141

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-09-06

142

Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials ...

1993-01-01

143

Accessing User Facilities and Making your Research Experience Successful  

SciTech Connect

Access to many of the world's leading user facilities is easier than ever before, with web-based tutorials providing everything from instrumental overviews and example applications to online safety training. Submission of proposals for experiment time at large, heavily subscribed facilities, including synchrotron and neutron sources, has been streamlined with web-based submission. Support, which is commonly the key to successful experiments, is provided by facility staff and experienced users, allowing new users to begin experiments with minimal experience. Increasingly Earth scientists are taking advantage of the wide range of unique instrumentation at user facilities. Here, we explain how you can, too.

Reeder,R.; Lanzirotti, A.

2006-01-01

144

Academic Research Facilities: Financing Strategies. Report of a Conference (Washington, DC, July 22-23, 1985).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The obsolescence of university research facilities is addressed in this 1985 conference report. Seven of the major topics were potential action items for Congress and federal agencies, including approaches to facilities funding, such as acceleration of indirect cost recovery, provision of credit support, and federal funding of a national facility…

McCullough, Jim; Dennis, Pat

145

A new hydrodynamics test facility for UUV dynamics and control research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the development of a new hydrodynamics test facility for UUV dynamics, navigation, and control research. Located at the Johns Hopkins University, the facility's 174,000 liter water tank, navigation instrumentation, and testbed ROV provides the ability for development of advanced underwater vehicle systems. Experimental data demonstrating the performance of the facility's sensor suite is presented. This paper briefly

James C. Kinsey; David A. Smallwood; Louis L. Whitcomb

2003-01-01

146

Research and Training in Forensic Psychology: National Survey of Forensic Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey was sent to the 103 directors of public forensic facilities in the United States. Responses were received from 68, a response rate of 66%. Information on the facilities' involvement in training and research in forensic psychology was obtained. A number of facilities reported involvement in psychology training at different levels; graduate practicum (43%) and predoctoral internship (41%) were

Kirk S. Heilbrun; Lawrence V. Annis

1988-01-01

147

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

The JASPER Facility utilizes a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state(EOS) experiments on plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and control interfaces and containment. The containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented.

C. H. Conrad; J. Miller; M. Cowan; M. Martinez; B. Whitcomb

2003-01-01

148

Science and engineering research council central laser facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The major reconstruction and upgrade of the glass laser, which was undertaken to increase the versatility of the facility, is described. Work on: glass laser development, laser plasma interactions, transport and particle emission studies, ablative acceleration and compression studies, spectroscopy and XUV lasers, and theory and computation as described. Publications based on the work of the facility are listed.

1981-03-01

149

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

The JASPER Facility utilizes a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state(EOS) experiments on plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and control interfaces and containment. The containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented.

C. H. Conrad; J. Miller; M. Cowan; M. Martinez; B. Whitcomb

2003-10-01

150

Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

Introduction Biological organisms long ago solved many problems for which scientists and engineers seek solutions. Microbes in particular offer an astonishingly diverse set of capabilities that can help revolutionize our approach to solving many important DOE problems. For example, photosynthetic organisms can generate hydrogen from light while simultaneously sequestering carbon. Others can produce enzymes that break down cellulose and other biomass to produce liquid fuels. Microbes in water and soil can capture carbon and store it in the earth and ocean depths. Understanding the dynamic interaction between living organisms and the environment is critical to predicting and mitigating the impacts of energy-production-related activities on the environment and human health. Collectively, microorganisms contain most of the biochemical diversity on Earth and they comprise nearly one-half of its biomass. They primary impact the planet by acting as catalysts of biogeochemical cycles; they capture light energy and fix CO2 in the worlds oceans, they degrade plant polymers and convert them to humus in soils, they weather rocks and facilitate mineral precipitation. Although the ability of selected microorganisms to participate in these processes is known, they rarely live in monoculture but rather function within communities. In spite of this, little is known about the composition of microbial communities and how individual species function within them. We lack an understanding of the nature of the individual organisms and their genes, how they interact to perform complex functions such as energy and materials exchange, how they sense and respond to their environment and how they evolve and adapt to environmental change. Understanding these aspects of microbes and their communities would be transformational with far-reaching impacts on climate, energy and human health. This knowledge would create a foundation for predicting their behavior and, ultimately, manipulating them to solve DOE problems. Recent advances in whole-genome sequencing for a variety of organisms and improvements in high-throughput instrumentation have contributed to a rapid transition of the biological research paradigm towards understanding biology at a systems level. As a result, biology is evolving from a descriptive to a quantitative, ultimately predictive science where the ability to collect and productively use large amounts of biological data is crucial. Understanding how the ensemble of proteins in cells gives rise to biological outcomes is fundamental to systems biology. These advances will require new technologies and approaches to measure and track the temporal and spatial disposition of proteins in cells and how networks of proteins and other regulatory molecules give rise to specific activities. The DOE has a strong interest in promoting the application of systems biology to understanding microbial function and this comprises a major focus of its Genomics:GTL program. A major problem in pursuing what has been termed “systems microbiology” is the lack of the facilities and infrastructure for conducting this new style of research. To solve this problem, the Genomics:GTL program has funded a number of large-scale research centers focused on either mission-oriented outcomes, such as bioenergy, or basic technologies, such as gene sequencing, high-throughput proteomics or the identification of protein complexes. Although these centers generate data that will be useful to the research community, their scientific goals are relatively narrow and are not designed to accommodate the general community need for advanced capabilities for systems microbiology research.

Wiley, H. S.

2009-04-20

151

Addressing Pollution Prevention Issues in the Design of a New Nuclear Research Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chemistry and Metallurgical Research (CMR) Facility was designed in 1949 and built in 1952 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to support analytical chemistry, metallurgical studies, and actinide research and development on samples of plutonium a...

M. E. Cournoyer J. Corpion T. O. Nelson

2003-01-01

152

Nursing Research in Long-Term Care Facilities (1984-1988).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews nursing research focusing on long-term care facilities from 1984 to 1988. Discusses (1) past reviews of gerontological nursing research, (2) a current search of long-term care nursing research, (3) current trends, and (4) suggestions for research on such topics as research utilization, Alzheimer's disease, and the nursing home environment.…

Haight, Barbara K.

1989-01-01

153

Science and Engineering Research Council Central Laser Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The major reconstruction and upgrade of the glass laser, which was undertaken to increase the versatility of the facility, is described. Work on: glass laser development, laser plasma interactions, transport and particle emission studies, ablative acceler...

1981-01-01

154

High Pressure Combustion Test Facility for Gas Turbine Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new high pressure combustion test facility was constructed in the National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo, to assist the national project for developing a high efficiency combined cycle gas turbine. It enables continuous combustion tests by an air mass flo...

T. Tamaru K. Shimodaira S. Horiuchi T. Saito S. Hayashi

1984-01-01

155

YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).  

SciTech Connect

The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-04-28

156

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The JASPER Facility will utilize a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state (EOS) experiments of plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and mission. The primary and secondary containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented. Primary gun diagnostics and timing will

C. H. Konrad; R. W. Braddy; Mark Martinez

2001-01-01

157

Relevance of international research facilities to international stability  

SciTech Connect

International Facilities have played an important play in expanding and keeping open a dialogue between east and west. The advent of glasnost has dramatically reduced inhibitions on communications and opened new opportunities for international facilities to facilitate the understanding and appreciation of common goals and common threats. This is accomplished through frank discussions in which real problems are identified and assessed while fictitious ones are laid to rest.

Rosen, L.

1989-03-20

158

A PACIFIC-WIDE GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH LABORATORY: THE PUNA GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP-A) well, located in the Kilauea volcano east rift zone, was drilled to a depth of 6450 feet in 1976. It is considered to be one of the hot-test producing geothermal wells in the world. This single well provides 52,800 pounds per hour of 371 F and 160 pounds per square inch-absolute (psia) steam to a 3-megawatt power plant, while the separated brine is discharged in percolating ponds. About 50,000 pounds per hour of 368 F and 155 psia brine is discharged. Geothermal energy development has increased steadily in Hawaii since the completion of HGP-A in 1976: (1) a 3 megawatt power plant at HGP-A was completed and has been operating since 1981; (2) Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) has requested that their next increment in power production be from geothermal steam; (3) three development consortia are actively, or in the process of, drilling geothermal exploration wells on the Big Island; and (4) engineering work on the development of a 400 megawatt undersea cable for energy transmission is continuing, with exploratory discussions being initiated on other alternatives such as hydrogen. The purpose for establishing the Puna Geothermal Research Facility (PGRF) is multifold. PGRF provides a facility in Puna for high technology research, development, and demonstration in geothermal and related activities; initiate an industrial park development; and examine multi-purpose dehydration and biomass applications related to geothermal energy utilization.

Takahashi, P.; Seki, A.; Chen, B.

1985-01-22

159

NASA Glenn Research Center Creek Road Complex—Cryogenic Testing Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to expansion at neighboring Cleveland Hopkins Airport, several NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) facilities have been relocated to the Creek Road Complex. The complex consists of the Small Scale Multi-purpose Research Facility (SMiRF), Cryogenic Components Lab Cell 7 (CCL-7), and a shop building. The facilities have been updated and include state-of-the art technology. SMiRF is a liquid hydrogen/liquid nitrogen (LH2/LN2) test facility used to conduct research in a 7400 L vacuum chamber. The chamber simulates space environment and launch vehicle ascent profile. SMiRF handles 5680 L of LH2. CCL is a LH2/LN2 facility to perform small scale proof of concept tests for components and processes. It handles 1130 L of liquid hydrogen. Both facilities handle cryogens at sub-atmospheric pressures.

Jurns, John M.; Kudlac, Maureen T.

2006-02-01

160

Fossil Fuels Research Matrix Program. US Environmental Protection Agency\\/Department of Energy Fossil Fuels Research Materials Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fossil Fuels Research Materials Facility was established by an Interagency Agreement between the US EPA and US DOE to provide support for health and environmental-effects studies of alternate fossil fuels technologies. The Facility provides a common source of a wide range of samples which can be drawn upon for methods development and evaluation, interlaboratory comparison, or determination of chemical

W. H. Griest; M. R. Guerin

1980-01-01

161

Survey of tritium wastes and effluents in near-term fusion-research facilities  

SciTech Connect

The use of tritium control technology in near-term research facilities has been studied for both the magnetic and inertial confinement fusion programs. This study focused on routine generation of tritium wastes and effluents, with little referene to accidents or facility decommissioning. This report serves as an independent review of the effectiveness of planned control technology and radiological hazards associated with operation. The facilities examined for the magnetic fusion program included Fusion Materials Irradiation Testing Facility (FMIT), Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in the magnetic fusion program, while NOVA and Antares facilities were examined for the inertial confinement program.

Bickford, W.E.; Dingee, D.A.; Willingham, C.E.

1981-08-01

162

Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities: 2001. Detailed Statistical Tables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents information on the amount of science and engineering (S&E) research space existing at U.S. colleges, universities, and nonprofit biomedical research institutions based on research data collected biennially through the National Science Foundation. Data are also provided on the adequacy of this research space to meet current…

National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

163

DESIGN OF A PILOT SCALE FLUORINE CELL RESEARCH FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

To improve cell life and reduce the unit cost of fluorine, a pilot plant ; was designed and constructed. The test facility was designed so that data ; obtained from experimental cells would be comparable to that expected from plant ; scale equipment. Ease of assembly, handling, inspection, and repair were also ; major factors in establishing the design criteria.

W. K. Henderson; W. B. Goode; S. Bernstein; E. J. Tullos

1962-01-01

164

Project Management Actions Demolition of a Research Facility Building 431  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Demolition of B431 is required to achieve the mission of LLNL and the NNSA FIRP objectives by: (1) Supporting the NNSA Infrastructure Plan goal to ''demolish excess facilities as early as possible''; (2) Banking square footage that allows continued application of advanced science and nuclear technology to the Nation's defense; and (3) Helping maintain and enhance the safety, security,

2005-01-01

165

High School Education in Correctional Facilities. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of "Get tough on crime" and "Three strikes" in the 1980s and 1990s, correctional facilities have become overloaded with prisoners who are often repeat offenders. 51% of those imprisoned have a GED or high school diploma. Out of the remaining 49%, 36% of inmates had not completed the ninth grade and approximately a quarter of them…

Walker, Karen

2006-01-01

166

Air Quality in Production Animal Facilities: Updates and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specialists in engineering, human health, veterinary and animal science fields have expressed increasing concern that aerosols, combined with micro-organ isms, fungi and toxic gases in farm animal buildings have the potential to cause human health problems. Air quality in production animal facilities presents a challenge to the scientific communities, governmental agencies and the industry. This paper provides updates and discusses

Yuanhui Zhang

1995-01-01

167

The Miami Electron Beam Research Facility: a large scale wastewater treatment application  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Electron Beam Research Facility (EBRF) located in Miami, Florida houses a 1.5 MV, 50 mA electron accelerator. Extensive large scale (460 1 min?1) research on the use of electron beams for the treatment of water and wastewater has been conducted at this facility over the last several years. Initial research focused on determining the disinfection kinetics of bacteria in

Charles N. Kurucz; Thomas D. Waite; William J. Cooper

1995-01-01

168

NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER'S SIMULATION-TO-FLIGHT CONCEPT ACCOMPLISHED THROUGH THE INTEGRATION LABORATORIES OF THE TRANSPORT RESEARCH FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Flight Simulation and Software Branch (FSSB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) maintains the unique national asset identified as the Transport Research Facility (TRF). The TRF is a group of facilities and integration laboratories utilized to support the LaRC's simulation-to-flight concept. This concept incorporates common software, hardware, and processes for both ground- based flight simulators and LaRC's B-757-200 flying

Debbie Martínez; Paul C. Davidson; P. Sean Kenney; Brian K. Hutchinson

169

Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2's support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsi...

D. A. Edwards

2008-01-01

170

Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2 s support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsi...

D. A. Edwards

2007-01-01

171

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory: A research and user facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

HTML is a modern facility for high-temperature ceramic research; it is also a major user facility, providing industry and university communities access to special research equipment for studying microstructure and microchemistry of materials. User research equipment is divided among six User Centers: Materials Analysis, X-ray Diffraction, Physical Properties, Mechanical Properties, Ceramic Specimen Preparation, and Residual Stress. This brochure provides brief descriptions of each of the major research instruments in the User Centers: scanning Auger microprobe, field emission SEMs, electron microprobe, multitechnique surface analyzer, analytical electron microscope, HRTEM, optical microscopy & image analysis, goniometer, scanning calorimetry, simultaneous thermal analysis, thermal properties (expansion, diffusivity, conductivity), high-temperature tensile test facilities, flexure, electromechanical test facilities (flexure, compression creep, environmental), microhardness microprobe, ceramic machining. Hands-on operation by qualified users is encouraged; staff is available. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research may be performed; the former on full cost recovery basis.

Not Available

1992-12-01

172

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory: A research and user facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

HTML is a modern facility for high-temperature ceramic research; it is also a major user facility, providing industry and university communities access to special research equipment for studying microstructure and microchemistry of materials. User research equipment is divided among six User Centers: Materials Analysis, X-ray Diffraction, Physical Properties, Mechanical Properties, Ceramic Specimen Preparation, and Residual Stress. This brochure provides brief descriptions of each of the major research instruments in the User Centers: scanning Auger microprobe, field emission SEMs, electron microprobe, multitechnique surface analyzer, analytical electron microscope, HRTEM, optical microscopy image analysis, goniometer, scanning calorimetry, simultaneous thermal analysis, thermal properties (expansion, diffusivity, conductivity), high-temperature tensile test facilities, flexure, electromechanical test facilities (flexure, compression creep, environmental), microhardness microprobe, ceramic machining. Hands-on operation by qualified users is encouraged; staff is available. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research may be performed; the former on full cost recovery basis.

Not Available

1992-01-01

173

The application of instrumented light gas gun facilities for hypervelocity aerophysics research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A highly instrumented light gas gun facility and key considerations for the use of the facility for hypervelocity aerophysics research are discussed. In particular, attention is given to the launcher system operation, range instrumentation, and radar and optical signatures. A brief discussion is also presented on the methodology of developing radar scattering analytic models. Some other applications for which the facility has been successfully used are also mentioned.

Hayami, Richard A.

1992-07-01

174

Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support research and community interaction. Discussed are the considerations made to develop a facility that comprises an engaging learning environment, modes to support a range of pedagogies appropriate to the needs of healthcare professionals at different stages of their careers.

2009-02-01

175

A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems. Workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report.

Not Available

1991-11-01

176

FAIR - An International Accelerator Facility for Research with Ions and Antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

An overview is given on the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, its science motivation and goals, the facility lay-out and characteristics, the accelerator design challenges, the schedule for construction, and the international interest/participation in the project.

Henning, Walter [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstr.1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2005-06-08

177

The application of instrumented light gas gun facilities for hypervelocity aerophysics research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A highly instrumented light gas gun facility and key considerations for the use of the facility for hypervelocity aerophysics research are discussed. In particular, attention is given to the launcher system operation, range instrumentation, and radar and optical signatures. A brief discussion is also presented on the methodology of developing radar scattering analytic models. Some other applications for which the

Richard A. Hayami

1992-01-01

178

Maintaining the surgical research facility: the role of the surgical technician.  

PubMed

Building a well-equipped surgical facility is only half the battle. By ensuring that these facilities and their equipment are kept clean and well maintained, and that clear and thorough documentation is kept, research staff can protect both the quality of their work and the well-being of their animal patients. PMID:15179438

Lewis, Angie; Talcott, Michael

2004-06-01

179

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For

Sisterson

2011-01-01

180

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available

Sisterson

2007-01-01

181

Final cleanup of buildings within in legacy French research facilities: strategy, tools and lessons learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the methodology followed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to decommission the buildings of former research facilities for demolition or possible reuse. It is a well known fact that the French nuclear safety authority has decided not to define any general release level for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, thus effectively prohibiting radiological measurement-driven decommissioning. The

C. Le Goaller; C. Doutreluingne; M. A. Berton; O. Doucet

2007-01-01

182

Behavioral Management of Chimpanzees in Biomedical Research Facilities: The State of the Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current status of the behavioral management of chim- panzees housed in US research facilities is examined, and recent advances are described. Behavioral management in- cludes the application of environmental enrichment, animal training, and environmental design for improving animal welfare. Authors surveyed the six major chimpanzee hold- ing facilities and found that the vast majority of chimpan- zees are housed

Mollie A. Bloomsmith; James G. Else

183

FORMALIZATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN SUPPORT OF THE CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY RESEARCH FACILITY AUTHORIZATION BASIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility conducts analytical operations that are vital to the Stockpile Stewardship Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). From 1952 to the early 1990s, this facility operated without a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and bounded the risks associated with its diverse operations. An Interim Safety Analysis Report (ISAR) prepared in 1992, served until further

Richard C. Stupka; Lisa P. Stringfield

2000-01-01

184

Requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and t...

1989-01-01

185

Project Management Actions Demolition of a Research Facility Building 431  

SciTech Connect

The Demolition of B431 is required to achieve the mission of LLNL and the NNSA FIRP objectives by: (1) Supporting the NNSA Infrastructure Plan goal to ''demolish excess facilities as early as possible''; (2) Banking square footage that allows continued application of advanced science and nuclear technology to the Nation's defense; and (3) Helping maintain and enhance the safety, security, and reliability of the weapons stockpile. A significant effort has been put into the demolition concept in order to ensure that it is well thought out and represents best-value to the government for the money.

Collins, W L

2005-09-06

186

Ongoing Fundamental Hazardous Waste Incineration Research at EPA/RTP Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper describes five combustors, results of some completed research, and plans for future studies at EPA/AEERL's RCRA-permitted facility at Research Triangle Park, NC. Research is conducted to examine the effect of operating parameters such as residen...

R. E. Hall P. M. Lemieux W. P. Linak J. H. Wasser

1991-01-01

187

77 FR 26321 - Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating...Geoffrey Wertz, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear...Policy and Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. [FR Doc....

2012-05-03

188

FLAIR a facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to exploit the unique possibilities that will become available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, a collaboration of about 50 institutes from 15 countries was formed to efficiently enable an innovative research program towards low-energy antimatter-physics. In the Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) antiprotons and heavy (radioactive) ions are slowed down from 30 MeV to energies as low as 20 keV by a magnetic low-energy storage ring (LSR) and an electrostatic ultra-low energy storage ring (USR) or are even brought to rest by a universal trap facility (HITRAP). In this paper, the facility and the research program covered are briefly described with some emphasis on the accelerator chain and the expected particle numbers.

Welsch, Carsten P.; Ullrich, Joachim

2006-09-01

189

Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

1990-02-01

190

Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: a status report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is currently under construction in Darmstadt has key features that offer a wide range of exciting new opportunities in the field of atomic physics and related fields. The facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei, in combination with the strong electromagnetic fields generated by high-power lasers, thus allowing to widen atomic physics research into completely new domains. In the current contribution, a short overview of the SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration) research programme at the FAIR facility is given. Furthermore, we present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned SPARC physics programme at the modularized start version of the FAIR facility.

Gumberidze, A.; SPARC Collaboration

2013-09-01

191

Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities of VKTA at the Rossendorf Research Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

VKTA decommissions the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation prote...

U. Helwig W. Boessert

2003-01-01

192

Expenditures on S&E Research Facilities At Historically Black Colleges and Universities Continue to Decline  

NSF Publications Database

Expenditures on S&E Research Facilities At Historically Black Colleges and Universities Continue to Decline (February 10, 1995) This report is available in multiple formats. See Help for more information about viewing publications in different formats.

193

Offshore hydrodynamics. [Engineering design and research needs for offshore facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the author presents several applied as well as fundamental research problems related to the future needs of the offshore engineering. The paper starts out with a detailed discussion of the current uncertainties and constraints. Then, specific research issues on environmental input conditions, on the role of computational fluid dynamics, and on damping and dynamic response are presented.

Sarpkaya

1993-01-01

194

GUIDES TO POLLUTION PREVENTION: RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

This document provides research and educations institutions with guidelines and options to minimize both hazardous and nonhazardous wastes, identifies techniques that allow these institutions to reduce wastes, and provides a set of self-audit checklists to assist institutional st...

195

ANI (American Nuclear Insurers) support and research facility nuclear liability insurance inspection program  

SciTech Connect

American Nuclear Insurers (ANI), a voluntary association of insurance companies, provides property and nuclear liability insurance protection to the nuclear industry. It generally offers insurance coverage to nuclear facilities, suppliers, and transporters for the following: (1) their liability for damages because of bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the nuclear energy hazard, and (2) all-risk damage to nuclear facilities. Among the range of facilities and suppliers insured by ANI are (a) operators of nuclear power plants that supply electricity for the general public, (b) operators of nuclear testing and research reactors, (c) fuel fabricators that manufacture fuel for use in reactors, (d) operators of facilities that dispose of nuclear waste that cannot be salvaged, (e) facilities that maintain and repair equipment used at nuclear facilities, (f) nuclear laundries, and (g) low-level-waste processors. The fundamental goal of the ANI nuclear engineering inspection program is to provide protection to pool members' assets by reducing insurance risk.

Ernst, B.

1988-01-01

196

Budapest neutron centre user facilities at the modernized research reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) was recently restarted after a major upgrading and operates at 10 megawatt nominal power\\u000a from November 1993. The reactor built in 1958, has been fully reconstructed and upgraded according to modern scientific, technological\\u000a and safety requirements. This unique important neutron source in Central Europe serves various purposes, such as basic and\\u000a applied research in physics,

L. Rosta

1994-01-01

197

Research Opportunities at the Upgraded HI?S Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Intensity ?-ray Source (HI?S) is a joint project between TUNL and the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL). This facility utilizes intracavity back-scattering of the FEL light in order to produce intense ?-ray beams. An upgrade which will allow for the production of ?-rays up to energies of about 160 MeV having total intensities in excess of 108/sec is essentially completed. The primary component of the upgrade is a 1.2 GeV booster-injector which will make it possible to replace lost electrons at full energy. In addition, an upgrade of the present linear undulator to a helical system will provide nearly 100% linear and circularly polarized beams. The full system, including the booster injector, will be ready in 2007. The proposed experimental program includes low-energy studies of nuclear reactions of importance in nuclear astrophysics as well as studies of nuclear structure using the technique of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). Future double-polarization experiments include a study of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule for the deuteron and 3He, and an extensive Compton scattering program designed to probe the internal structure of the nucleon. A major focus of these studies will be the measurement of the spin-polarizabilities of the proton and the neutron. Studies at pion-threshold designed to observe Isospin-symmetry breaking effects are also being planned. A description of the anticipated facility following the present upgrades will be given in this talk, along with a description of some of the planned experiments.

Weller, H. R.

2007-10-01

198

Fire-protection research for DOE facilities: FY 82 year-end report  

SciTech Connect

We summarize our research in FY 82 for the DOE-sponsored project, Fire Protection Research for DOE Facilities. This research program was initiated in 1977 to advance fire-protection strategies for energy technology facilities to keep abreast of the unique fire problems that develop along with energy technology research. Since 1977, the program has broadened its original scope, as reflected in previous year-end reports. We are developing an analytical methodology through detailed study of fusion energy experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Using these experiments as models for methodology development, we are concurrently advancing three major task areas: (1) the identification of fire hazards unique to current fusion energy facilities; (2) the evaluation of accepted fire-management measures to meet and negate hazards; and (3) the performance of unique research into problem areas we have identified to provide input into analytical fire-growth and damage-assessment models.

Hasegawa, H.K.; Alvares, N.J.; Lipska-Quinn, A.E.; Beason, D.G.; Priante, S.J.; Foote, K.L.

1983-09-02

199

Fire protection research for DOE facilities: FY 83 year-end report  

SciTech Connect

We summarize our research in FY 83 for the DOE-sponsored project, Fire Protection Research for DOE Facilities. This research program was initiated in 1977 to advance fire-protection strategies of energy technology facilities in order to keep abreast of the unique fire problems that develop along with energy technology research. Since 1977, the program has broadened its original scope, as reflected in previous year-end reports. We are developing an analytical methodology through detailed study of fusion energy experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Using these experiments as models for methodology development, we are currently advancing three major task areas: (1) the identification of fire hazards unique to fusion energy facilities, (2) the evaluation of accepted fire-management measures to meet the negate hazards, and (3) the performance of unique research into problem areas we have identified to provide input into analytical fire-growth and damage-assessment models.

Hasegawa, H.K.; Alvares, N.J.; Lipska-Quinn, A.E.; Beason, D.G.; Foote, K.L.; Priante, S.J.; Stagge, K.

1984-08-02

200

Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Neutron Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) spallation neutron source utilizes 800-MeV protons from the Los Alamos Meson Physics linac. The proton beam transport system, the target systems, and the data acquisition and control system are described. Operating experience, present status, and planned improvements are discussed.

Woods, R.

1981-01-01

201

Retrospective exposure assessment in a chemical research and development facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this exposure assessment was to reconstruct cumulative historical exposures for workers who have been exposed to multiple chemicals and chemical groups to better understand a cluster of brain cancers within a research and development lab. Chemicals of interest, including acrylates, bis-chloromethyl ether (BCME), chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME), isothiazolones and nitrosoamines, were selected on the basis of the

Yu-Cheng Chen; Gurumurthy Ramachandran; Bruce H. Alexander; Jeffrey H. Mandel

202

Pedestrian Facilities in South Africa: Research and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of the pedestrian accident problem in South Africa is given, and the engineering solutions implemented to improve pedestrian safety are discussed. The pedestrian problem accounts for part of the road safety problem in South Africa. In recent years there has been a reduction in the number of pedestrian fatalities and injuries. Research findings in the early 1980s showed

Hubrecht Ribbens

1996-01-01

203

Conditions of Confinement: Juvenile Detention and Corrections Facilities. Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The most comprehensive nationwide research ever conducted on the juvenile detention and corrections field was a study by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) assessing conditions of confinement for juveniles and determining the extent to which those conditions conform to recognized national professional standards. The…

Parent, Dale G.; And Others

204

Conditions of Confinement: Juvenile Detention and Corrections Facilities. Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most comprehensive nationwide research ever conducted on the juvenile detention and corrections field was a study by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) assessing conditions of confinement for juveniles and determining the extent to which those conditions conform to recognized national professional standards. The…

Parent, Dale G.; And Others

205

Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM): A New Rotorcraft Research Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper introduces the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model 'TRAM' project. The TRAM project is a key infrastructure investment for NASA and U.S. Army tiltrotor research. The TRAM project consists of the development and testing of two modular, hardware-compat...

L. A. Young

1998-01-01

206

Research Needs in the Field of Educational Facility Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the physical environment of schools seems to affect the attitude and behavior of students and teachers, there is little scientific proof to support this belief. Two substantial studies have attempted to synthesize available research on the topic. First, an effort by Carol Weinstein has gathered significant data concerning spatial behavior…

Earthman, Glen I.

207

Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM): A New Rotorcraft Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) project. The TRAM project is a k e y infrastructure investment f o r NASA and U.S. Army tiltrotor research. The TRAM project consists of the development a n d testing of two modular, hardware- compatible, test stands: an i sol ated rotor configuration and a full- span model (dual rotors

Larry A. Young

208

High-voltage implantation facility at GM Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the effort undertaken at General Motors Research to build a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system in order to study the potential of pulsed implantation as a means of modifying the tribological properties of automotive parts and to investigate the feasibility of producing surface modified components. The system has been designed for high dose ion implantation of

Gerard W. Malaczynski; Alaa A. Elmoursi; Aboud H. Hamdi; Qiu Xiaohong

1993-01-01

209

European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI).

Fortov, Vladimir E.; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H.

2012-06-01

210

Overview of Recent NSTX Research Facility Upgrades and Plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2010 NSTX experimental campaign started with the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) and the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) commissioning. With lithium coating, ELM-free discharges were obtained over a wide range of lower triangularity and strike-point including on the LLD surface. Initial BES data was taken where coherent MHD activity was evident in spectrograms. For FY 2011, a second switching power amplifier for the non-axisymmetric coils, extra channels for the multi-pulse Thomson scattering, the MSE diagnostic based on laser-induced fluorescence, the tangential Fast Ion D-alpha and the tangential soft-x-ray diagnostics are being prepared. For a longer term NSTX facility upgrade, a new center-stack is being designed to double the toroidal field and plasma current while increasing the plasma pulse length from the present ˜ 1 s at 0.5 T to 5 s at 1 T. The second more tangential neutral beam is also planned to double the NBI heating power while improving NBI current drive efficiency. The upgrade will reduce the plasma collisionality toward those expected for the next step STs, and enable a demonstration of the fully non-inductive operation required for next-step applications.

Ono, Masayuki

2010-11-01

211

Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Run 262 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on July 10, 1991 and continued until September 30, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam from Wyoming Powder River Basin). A dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating solids buildup was also evaluated. Half volume reactors were used with supported Criterion 324 1/16'' catalyst in the second stage at a catalyst replacement rate of 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The hybrid dispersed plus supported catalyst system was tested for the effect of space velocity, second stage temperature, and molybdenum concentration. The supported catalyst was removed from the second stage for one test period to see the performance of slurry reactors. Iron oxide was used as slurry catalyst at a rate of 2 wt % MF coal throughout the run (dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) was used as the sulfiding agent). The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 1271.2 hours for an on-stream factor of 89.8% and the ROSE-SR unit was on-feed for 1101.6 hours for an on-stream factor of 90.3% for the entire run.

Not Available

1992-09-01

212

Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

Not Available

1992-09-01

213

Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Run 260 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville. The run was started on July 17, 1990 and continued until November 14, 1990, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam from Wyoming Powder River Basin). Both thermal/catalytic and catalytic/thermal tests were performed to determine the methods for reducing solids buildup in a subbituminous coal operation, and to improve product yields. A new, smaller interstage separator was tested to reduce solids buildup by increasing the slurry space velocity in the separator. In order to obtain improved coal and resid conversions (compared to Run 258) full-volume thermal reactor and 3/4-volume catalytic reactor were used. Shell 324 catalyst, 1/16 in. cylindrical extrudate, at a replacement rate of 3 lb/ton of MF coal was used in the catalytic stage. Iron oxide was used as slurry catalyst at a rate of 2 wt % MF coal throughout the run. (TNPS was the sulfiding agent.)

Not Available

1992-01-01

214

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10

215

ONGOING FUNDAMENTAL HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION RESEARCH AT EPA/RTP FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper describes five combustors, results of some completed research, and plans for future studies at EPA/AEERL's RCRA-permitted facility at Research Triangle Park, NC. esearch is conducted to examine the effect of operating parameters such as residence time, temperature, turb...

216

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17

217

Radiation hazard test facilities at the Denver Research Center. Information circular/1984  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines has developed test facilities for use in a research program that deals with radiation hazards in mining. This report describes the radon test chamber located at the Denver Research Center and the Twilight experimental mine located near Uravan, CO.

Droullard, R.F.; Davis, T.H.; Smith, E.E.; Holub, R.F.

1984-01-01

218

Bureau of mines coal cutting technology facilities at the Twin Cities Research Center. Information circular\\/1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on coal cutting at the Bureau of Mines Twin Cities Research Center (TCRC) has evolved from a purely mechanical approach, specifically to reduce dust or frictional methane ignitions, into an understanding of the complexity of the cutting system relationships. Achieving an understanding of these relationships requires a wide variety of testing techniques and equipment. Laboratory facilities and the associated

W. W. Roepke; C. F. Wingquist; R. C. Olson; B. D. Hanson

1983-01-01

219

IRIS - A Community-Based Facility to Support Research in Seismology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The IRIS Consortium was established in 1984 in response to growing pressure from the research community for enhanced facilities in global and lithospheric seismology. At the same time, the National Science Foundation was encouraging improvements in technology and infrastructure that were sorely needed to ensure the future health of the nation's research endeavors. The governance of IRIS and growth of

S. Ingate; T. Ahern; R. Butler; J. Fowler; D. Simpson; J. Taber; G. van der Vink

2002-01-01

220

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30

221

The Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities Proteomics Research Group 2006 Study: Relative Protein Quantitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The determination of differences in relative protein abun- dance is a critical aspect of proteomics research that is increasingly used to answer diverse biological questions. The Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities Pro- teomics Research Group 2006 study was a quantitative proteomics project in which the aim was to determine the identity and the relative amounts of eight proteins in two

Christoph W. Turck; Arnold M. Falick; Jeffrey A. Kowalak; Kathryn S. Lilley; Brett S. Phinney; Susan T. Weintraub; H. Ewa Witkowska; N. A. Yates

2007-01-01

222

Design of a grid-independent energy efficient building: Sustainable Energy Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes architectural and engineering design features of the “Sustainable Energy Research Facility (SERF)” to be constructed on Frostburg State University campus located in Western Maryland, USA. SERF will be an off-grid, energy efficient, residential size building supplied by clean renewable energy sources. When completed, SERF will be used by the FSU Renewable Energy Center to offer research, education,

O. Soysal; H. Soysal; J. Spears; D. Posson; K. O'Hearn; B. Charles; B. Harwick

2010-01-01

223

Development of the university of california, san francisco microcomputer facility for nursing research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ongoing development of microcomputer technology has fostered a great deal of new thinking about clinical nursing research and professional education. A facility for the expansion of these areas utilizing this technology has been established at the UCSF School of Nursing. Projects currently implemented include the development of microcomputer-based clinical nursing simulations, research training, and the development of courseware for

W. L. Holzemer; M. J. Slichter; R. E. Slaughter; N. A. Stotts

1983-01-01

224

A proton beam facility for single event research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a charged particle (Z = 1 or 2) radiation system developed jointly by KM Sciences, The Naval Research Laboratory, and The Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. The system is used primarily to simulate the space environmental protons and other charged particles with energies from 10 to 70 MeV. These particles in turn produce single events in devices being tested. The system provides a highly reproducible beam combined with precise dosimetric measurement and control to better than 2% for fluences from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1012 particles/cm2. The system can also provide chopped single pulses with durations from 0.1 to 10 s at intensities up to 3 particles/cm2s.

Murray, K. M.; Stapor, W. J.; Castenada, C.

1991-05-01

225

High-voltage implantation facility at GM Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the effort undertaken at General Motors Research to build a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system in order to study the potential of pulsed implantation as a means of modifying the tribological properties of automotive parts and to investigate the feasibility of producing surface modified components. The system has been designed for high dose ion implantation of irregularly shaped objects. It consists of a stainless steel vacuum chamber evacuated by a cryopump system, standard plasma diagnostic tools, a ring-cusp hot filament plasma source and a custom designed 150 kV, 10-20 ?s pulser. Details of the system are discussed together with justification for our choice of the specific components and the adopted techniques.

Malaczynski, Gerard W.; Elmoursi, Alaa A.; Hamdi, Aboud H.; Xiaohong, Qiu

1993-04-01

226

Guest research facilities at the Biologische Anstalt Helgoland: Past and present  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Biologische Anstalt Helgoland (BAH) offers unique possibilities for research and education in marine sciences in the southern\\u000a part of the North Sea. Besides its own research duties, the Institute provides research facilities and technical assistance\\u000a for guest scientists, assists in the teaching and education of university student groups, and conducts its own courses. The\\u000a Institute further supplies universities and

J. Harms

1995-01-01

227

OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH AT THE U.S. EPA INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY: ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY94  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facifity that houses a pilot-scale rotary kiln incineration system (RKS) and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equ...

228

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR Cosmic Matter in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cosmic matter in the laboratory - a broad spectrum of unprecedented fore-front research becomes available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR. The new facility will be constructed within the next seven years adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt/Germany. On October 4th, 2010, nine countries signed the international agreement on the construction of FAIR which will start in 2012. First beam will be delivered in 2017/2018 providing worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities. This will open the way for a large variety of experiments in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as applied sciences which will be briefly described in this article. A few more details will be given on heavy-ion collisions providing a tool to study strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions.

Stoecker, H.; Sturm, C.

2011-07-01

229

Pair housing of macaques in research facilities: a science-based review of benefits and risks.  

PubMed

Despite the enactment in the early 1990s of regulations requiring social housing of nonhuman primates (NHP), single housing is still prevalent in American research facilities. The publication of the 2011 edition of The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has increased emphasis on the implementation of social housing as the default housing method for NHP. Overestimation of the risks inherent in social housing coupled with underestimation of both the benefits of social housing and the risks inherent in long-term single housing has prevented large-scale transitions to social housing. Available caging and housing space often requires research facilities to use isosexual pairs to accomplish social housing. Pair housing presents unique challenges but can be used safely with a thorough understanding of macaque ethology. Here we review literature on the risks and benefits of pair housing macaques in research facilities and provide a concise best-practice approach to pair housing. PMID:22330777

DiVincenti, Louis; Wyatt, Jeffrey D

2011-11-01

230

Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from Run 258 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant at the Clean Coal Research Center, Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on May 19, 1989 and continued through November 8, 1989, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) thermal/catalytic mode processing subbituminous coal. Both reactors were operated at half-volume. Coals from two different mines were processed in this run -- a Spring Creek mine (Anderson-Dietz seam in Montana) and a Black Thunder mine (Wyodak Anderson seam in Wyoming) -- to determine the preferable coal for future subbituminous coal liquefaction processing. (Tests were conducted to investigate the effects on coal conversion of increasing the iron oxide concentration in the coal feed slurry and to study the effects of increasing the coal feed rate and the first stage thermal temperature while maintaining equivalent thermal reaction severities). The effects of space velocity, recycle process solvent composition, first and second stage reactor temperatures, and coal feed rate were also investigated. An aged catalyst from a previous Wilsonville run was charged to the second stage reactor to eliminate run time used to age catalyst to equilibrium age. Catalyst replacement started at the beginning of the run and continued until October 11, 1989. At that time, the aged catalyst was removed from the reactor and was replaced with fresh presulfided catalyst to determine a deactivation rate with Black Thunder coal. Batch deactivation continued until the catalyst reached an age equivalent to the desired replacement rate, after which replacement resumed. 96 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1991-05-01

231

Summary of informal meeting on ''facilities for atomic physics research with highly ionized atoms''  

SciTech Connect

An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature.

Cocke, C.L.; Jones, K.W.

1984-01-01

232

Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

Salazar, M.D.

1998-12-01

233

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01

234

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

1993-05-01

235

Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is operated infrequently for radioisotope production. Because the two irradiation programs compete by utilizing the same core locations, the issues should be resolved at a high level. (c) Cobalt-60 production uses the most valuable irradiation location in the ETRR-2 (the high neutron density flux-trap), but there seems to be no potential customer for the Co-60. Further, the low number of hours the reactor is operated per week precludes ever producing a marketable specific activity of Co-60. Accordingly, Co-60 production should be reevaluated. (d) ETRR-2 staff would benefit from additional training to successfully design new experiment facilities and utilize existing facilities more effectively. This training can include IAEA Fellowships, as well as topical DOE Sister Laboratory visits to gain experience using equipment and research tools at other research reactor facilities.

Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

2006-05-08

236

DECOMMISSIONING OF THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES OF VKTA AT THE ROSSENDORF RESEARCH SITE  

SciTech Connect

VKTA decommissioned the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation protection and runs an accredited laboratory for environmental and radionuclide analytics. The Rossendorf research site is located east of the city of Dresden. The period from 1982 to about 1997 was mainly characterized by obtaining the necessary licenses for decommissioning and developing a new infrastructure (i.e. waste treatment facility, interim storages for fissile material and waste, clearance monitoring facility). The decommissioning work has been in progress since that time. The decommissioning projects are concentrated on three complexes: (1) the reactors and a fuel development and testing facility, (2) the radioisotope production facilities, and (3) the former liquid and solid waste storage facilities. The status of decommissioning progress and treatment of the residues will be demonstrated. Finally an outlook will be given on the future tasks of VKTA based on the ''Conception VKTA 2000 plus'', which was confirmed by the Saxonian government last year.

U. Helwig, W. Boessert

2003-02-27

237

Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE`s proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP.

NONE

1995-10-01

238

Cancer Risks near Nuclear Facilities: The Importance of Research Design and Explicit Study Hypotheses  

PubMed Central

Background In April 2010, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission asked the National Academy of Sciences to update a 1990 study of cancer risks near nuclear facilities. Prior research on this topic has suffered from problems in hypothesis formulation and research design. Objectives We review epidemiologic principles used in studies of generic exposure–response associations and in studies of specific sources of exposure. We then describe logical problems with assumptions, formation of testable hypotheses, and interpretation of evidence in previous research on cancer risks near nuclear facilities. Discussion Advancement of knowledge about cancer risks near nuclear facilities depends on testing specific hypotheses grounded in physical and biological mechanisms of exposure and susceptibility while considering sample size and ability to adequately quantify exposure, ascertain cancer cases, and evaluate plausible confounders. Conclusions Next steps in advancing knowledge about cancer risks near nuclear facilities require studies of childhood cancer incidence, focus on in utero and early childhood exposures, use of specific geographic information, and consideration of pathways for transport and uptake of radionuclides. Studies of cancer mortality among adults, cancers with long latencies, large geographic zones, and populations that reside at large distances from nuclear facilities are better suited for public relations than for scientific purposes.

Wing, Steve; Richardson, David B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

2011-01-01

239

36 CFR 1254.22 - Do I need to register when I visit a NARA facility for research?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...register when I visit a NARA facility for research? 1254.22 Section 1254.22 ...RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Research Room Rules General Procedures § 1254...register when I visit a NARA facility for research? (a) Yes, you must register...

2012-07-01

240

36 CFR 1254.22 - Do I need to register when I visit a NARA facility for research?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...register when I visit a NARA facility for research? 1254.22 Section 1254.22 ...RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Research Room Rules General Procedures § 1254...register when I visit a NARA facility for research? (a) Yes, you must register...

2011-07-01

241

ADDRESSING POLLUTION PREVENTION ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A NEW NUCLEAR RESEARCH FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Chemistry and Metallurgical Research (CMR) Facility was designed in 1949 and built in 1952 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to support analytical chemistry, metallurgical studies, and actinide research and development on samples of plutonium and other nuclear materials for the Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear weapons program. These primary programmatic uses of the CMR Facility have not changed significantly since it was constructed. In 1998, a seismic fault was found to the west of the CMR Facility and projected to extend beneath two wings of the building. As part of the overall Risk Management Strategy for the CMR Facility, the Department of Energy (DOE) proposed to replace it by 2010 with what is called the CMR Facility Replacement (CMRR). In an effort to make this proposed new nuclear research facility environmentally sustainable, several pollution prevention/waste minimization initiatives are being reviewed for potential incorporation during the design phase. A two-phase approach is being adopted; the facility is being designed in a manner that integrates pollution prevention efforts, and programmatic activities are being tailored to minimize waste. Processes and procedures that reduce waste generation compared to current, prevalent processes and procedures are identified. Some of these ''best practices'' include the following: (1) recycling opportunities for spent materials; (2) replacing lithium batteries with alternate current adaptors; (3) using launderable contamination barriers in Radiological Control Areas (RCAs); (4) substituting mercury thermometers and manometers in RCAs with mercury-free devices; (5) puncturing and recycling aerosol cans; (6) using non-hazardous low-mercury fluorescent bulbs where available; (7) characterizing low-level waste as it is being generated; and (8) utilizing lead alternatives for radiological shielding. Each of these pollution prevention initiatives are being assessed for their technical validity, relevancy, and cost effectiveness. These efforts partially fulfill expectations of the DOE, other federal agencies, and the State of New Mexico for waste minimization. If the improvements discussed here are implemented, an estimated 1.8 million dollars in cost savings is expected.

Cournoyer, Michael E.; Corpion, Juan; Nelson, Timothy O.

2003-02-27

242

Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron irradiation facility (ENIF) on the east side of the BMRR reactor core and the thermal neutron irradiation facility (TNIF) on the west side of the core. Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry performed from 1994 to the present in both facilities are described and the results are presented and discussed.

Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Greenberg, D.D.; Reciniello, R.N.

1998-12-31

243

Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science  

SciTech Connect

The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Byrne, T.E. [Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States); Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-04-01

244

Low Background Counting at the 4850L of the Stanford Underground Research Facility (SURF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future generation of rare-event experiments require the use of material with unprecedented radio-purity. A low-background counting (LBC) facility has been established at the 4850L (Davis Campus) of SURF to perform initial radio-assay for material and detector parts with respect to the activity of 238U and 232Th decay chains, 40K and cosmic-ray induced isotopes. This facility currently consists of a single commercial low-background high purity germanium (HPGe) detector with the best cosmic-ray shield in the USA. This talk describes the facility, detector systems, calibration, analysis techniques and selected assay results. This research is supported by PHYS-0758120 and PHYS-0919278 and The South Dakota governor's research center - CUBED.

Goon, Jason; Mei, Dongming; Bryam, Dana; Wagner, Mitchell; Wei, Wenzhao; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Lesko, Kevin; Thomas, Keenan

2013-04-01

245

Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)  

SciTech Connect

An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

Not Available

2012-06-01

246

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1–March 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, and (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved.

Sivaraman, C

2011-06-14

247

Some results of research carried out at the Soviet U-02 open-cycle MHD facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses recent research conducted at two major Soviet open-cycle MHD facilities - the U-02 experimental installation and the U-25 pilot plant. The role of open-cycle MHD in the fuel-and-energy balance of the USSR is also reviewed.

A. E. Scheindlin; E. M. Shelkov; S. I. Pischikov; Iu. N. Sokolov; V. A. Ovcharenko

1976-01-01

248

A possible biomedical facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).  

PubMed

A well-attended meeting, called "Brainstorming discussion for a possible biomedical facility at CERN", was held by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics on 25 June 2012. This was concerned with adapting an existing, but little used, 78-m circumference CERN synchrotron to deliver a wide range of ion species, preferably from protons to at least neon ions, with beam specifications that match existing clinical facilities. The potential extensive research portfolio discussed included beam ballistics in humanoid phantoms, advanced dosimetry, remote imaging techniques and technical developments in beam delivery, including gantry design. In addition, a modern laboratory for biomedical characterisation of these beams would allow important radiobiological studies, such as relative biological effectiveness, in a dedicated facility with standardisation of experimental conditions and biological end points. A control photon and electron beam would be required nearby for relative biological effectiveness comparisons. Research beam time availability would far exceed that at other facilities throughout the world. This would allow more rapid progress in several biomedical areas, such as in charged hadron therapy of cancer, radioisotope production and radioprotection. The ethos of CERN, in terms of open access, peer-reviewed projects and governance has been so successful for High Energy Physics that application of the same to biomedicine would attract high-quality research, with possible contributions from Europe and beyond, along with potential new funding streams. PMID:23549990

Dosanjh, M; Jones, B; Myers, S

2013-05-01

249

Using action research to implement a career development framework in facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a research study to implement a career development framework within a large acute district general hospital facilities directorate. The findings of this study will provide points of interest in terms of the implementation of a career development framework and also a wider, more generalisable analysis relating to the

Neil Pease

2009-01-01

250

Public Library Facility Closure: How Research Can Better Facilitate Proactive Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

While there is agreement amongst professionals that the location of a public library facility affects use, there is little research on the impact of closure. Such an investigation is complex and rarely conducted. For the most part–there are simply news stories lamenting closure or impending closures. A recent national study by the authors of this paper offers a methodology for

Christie M. Koontz; Dean K. Jue

2007-01-01

251

Manager, Industry Partnership Facility National Research Council of Canada BA Commerce '70  

Microsoft Academic Search

When Jim Ledoux finished his Bachelor of Arts degree in commerce and economics at SFU in 1970, he had 13 job interviews and 13 job offers. Not bad for someone who initially dropped out of school in Grade 8. Today, Ledoux is the Manager of the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada's Industry Partnership Facility (IPF) in Ottawa, a role

Jim Ledoux

252

Ten megacoulomb switching operation for the Air Force battery powered inductive storage launcher research facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operation of the battery powered inductive energy storage research facility (BPS) presents unique switching problems. The energy storage system switch must be capable of conducting a peak current in excess of 2 MA for as long as five seconds. It must be capable of opening with microsecond precision timing, to synchronize current commutation with the operation of various electromechanical and

R. B. Klug; R. D. Ford; D. J. Jenkins; W. H. Lupton

1991-01-01

253

Ten megacoulomb switching operation for the Air Force battery powered inductive storage launcher research facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operation of the battery powered inductive energy storage research facility (BPS) presents unique switching problems. The energy storage system switch must be capable of conducting a peak current in excess of 2 MA for as long as five seconds, and of opening with microsecond precision timing, to synchronize current commutation with the operation of various electromechanical and electrical load components.

R. B. Klug; R. D. Ford; D. J. Jenkins; W. H. Lupton

1991-01-01

254

DISTRIBUTION OF TRACE ELEMENT EMISIONS FROM THE LIQUID INJECTION INCINERATOR COMBUSTION RESEARCH FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

A series of tests was conducted at EPA's Combustion Research Facility (CRF) to investigate the fate of volatile trace elements in liquid injection hazardous waste incineration. In these tests, arsenic in the form of arsenic trioxide and antimony in the form of antimony trichlorid...

255

Synchrotron radiation A general overview and a review of storage rings, research facilities, and insertion devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synchrotron radiation, the electromagnetic radiation given off by electrons in circular motion, is revolutionizing many branches of science and technology by offering beams of vacuum ultraviolet light and x rays of immense flux and brightness. In the past decade there has been an explosion of interest in these applications leading activity to construct new research facilities based on advanced storage

Herman Winick

1989-01-01

256

Scientific and Engineering Research Facilities at Colleges and Universities, 1998. Topical Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|On a biennial basis since 1986, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has collected data on issues related to Science and Engineering (S&E) research facilities at U.S. colleges, universities, and biomedical institutions. This report presents the major findings from the 1998 survey and provides a summary of the changes that took place between the…

National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

257

Fast-Tracking Federally-Supported Construction of Educational Research and Development Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reports the experience of the laboratory in applying the principles of construction management and fast-track scheduling in the planning and construction of the only noncampus facility in the United States constructed solely for educational research and development. The benefits resulting from the use of these techniques are set…

Hein, William H., Jr.

258

Lab animal allergy surveillance at a private medical school in three dissimilar animal research facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very few studies have described MUP-1 concentrations and measured prevalence of Laboratory Animal Allergy (LAA) at such a diverse institution as the private medical school (MS) that is the focus of this study. Air sampling was performed in three dissimilar animal research facilities at MS and quantitated using a commercially available ELISA. Descriptive data was obtained from an anonymous laboratory

Jeffrey P Feinberg

2007-01-01

259

Barriers to communication and cooperation in addressing community impacts of radioactive releases from research facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two instances of research facilities responding to public scrutiny will be discussed. The first concerns emissions from a �tritium labeling facility� operated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); the second deals with releases of plutonium from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). There are many parallels between these two cases, both of which are still ongoing. In both, the national laboratory

R J Harrach; S Peterson

1999-01-01

260

Acoustics in Research Facilities--Control of Wanted and Unwanted Sound. Laboratory Design Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Common and special acoustics problems are discussed in relation to the design and construction of research facilities. Following a brief examination of design criteria for the control of wanted and unwanted sound, the technology for achieving desired results is discussed. Emphasis is given to various design procedures and materials for the…

Newman, Robert B.

261

Impact Dynamics Research Facility for Full-Scale Aircraft Crash Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An impact dynamics research facility (IDRF) was developed to crash test full-scale general aviation aircraft under free-flight test conditions. The aircraft are crashed into the impact surface as free bodies; a pendulum swing method is used to obtain desi...

V. L. J. Vaughan E. Alfaro-bou

1976-01-01

262

High-Power Accelerator Research and Development at the NRL 11.424GHz Magnicon Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier has been jointly developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and Omega-P, Inc. as an alternative technology to klystrons for powering a future X-band linear collider. This paper will discuss its background, operating principles, and results to date, as well its present status as a facility for collaborative research on accelerator-related technologies that require high-power 11.424-GHz radiation.

Steven H. Gold; Allen K. Kinkead; Oleg A. Nezhevenko; Vyacheslav P. Yakovlev; Jay L. Hirshfield; Anatoly Vikharev; Oleg Ivanov; Sergey Kuzikov; Alexey Gorbachev; Vladimir A. Isaev; Wei Gai; John G. Power; Richard Konecny

2002-01-01

263

Gas-grain simulation facility: Aerosol and particle research in microgravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document reports on the proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) Science Workshop which was co-hosted by NASA Ames Research Center and Desert Research Institute, University of Nevada System, and held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 4-6, 1992. The intent of the workshop was to bring together the science community of potential GGSF experimenters, Science Working Group and

Judith L. Huntington; Ken Greenwald; C. Fred Rogers; David M. Stratton; Brenda Simmons; Mark L. Fonda

1994-01-01

264

The space station window observational research facility; a high altitude imaging laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth Science will be one of the major research areas to be conducted on the International Space Station. The facilities from which this research will be accomplished are currently being constructed and will be described in this paper. By April 1999, the International Space Station nadir viewing research window fabrication will be completed and ready for installation. The window will provide a 20 inch (51 cm) diameter clear aperture. The three fused silica panes, which make up the window are fabricated such that the total peak-to-valley wavefront error in transmission through the three panes over any six inch diameter aperture does not exceed ?/7 where the reference wavelength is 632.8 nm. The window will have over 90% transmission between about 400 and 750, above 50% transmission between about 310 nm and 1375 nm and 40% transmission between 1386 nm and 2000 nm. The Window Operational Research Facility (WORF) is designed to accommodate payloads using this research window. The WORF will provide access to the International Space Station utilities such as data links, temperature cooling loops and power. Emphasis has been placed on the factors which will make this facility an optimum platform for conducting Earth science research.

Runco, Susan K.; Eppler, Dean B.; Scott, Karen P.

1999-01-01

265

Green Infrastructure Research at NRMRL?s Urban Watershed Research Facility  

EPA Science Inventory

USEPA?s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) examined several options for completing water quality research supporting the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. NRMRL concluded that developing and understanding the engineering unit processes within gre...

266

Characterization, decontamination, and decontrol in the Los Alamos Chemistry Metallurgy Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is used to perform analytical chemistry in support of research and development efforts at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. When U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11 became effective, more than 50% of this half million square foot facility was radiologically controlled. In an extraordinary approach to comply with the new order, a concentrated effort was made to systematically characterize, decontaminate, and decontrol selected areas within the Facility. A historical record of those areas was obtained by interviewing present and past operating personnel. Whenever possible, tours and inspections were made by the characterization team with those individuals having applicable corporate knowledge. In some cases, precharacterization surveys were conducted to determine the extent of efforts required. The characterization surveys required the generation of thousands of swipes and large area wipes, and the direct survey of all accessible surfaces. As each of the target areas was characterized, it was appropriately posted, in compliance with DOE 5480.11, and scheduled for decontamination, as was applicable. Depending on programmatic requirements and funding, additional portions of the facility were characterized, decontaminated, resurveyed and decontrolled, as needed over the last 7 yr.

Cucchiara, A.; Olson, K.; Martinez, R.; Karl, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-12-31

267

Characterization, decontamination and decontrol efforts within the Los Alamos Chemistry Metallurgy Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is used to perform analytical chemistry in support of research and development efforts at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. When DOE Order 5480.11 became effective, more than 50% of this half a million square feet facility was radiologically controlled. In an extraordinary approach to comply with the new order, a concentrated effort was made to systematically characterize, decontaminate and decontrol selected areas within the Facility. A historical record of those areas was obtained by interviewing present and past operating personnel. Whenever possible the Characterization Team and individuals with applicable corporate knowledge conducted tours & inspections. In some cases, precharacterization surveys were conducted to determine the extent of efforts required and the feasibility of decontrolling those areas. The characterization surveys required the generation of thousands of swipes and large area wipes, and the direct survey of all accessible surfaces. As each of the target areas was characterized, it was appropriately posted, in compliance with DOE 5480.1 1, and scheduled for decontamination, as was applicable. Depending on programmatic requirements and funding, additional portions of the Facility were characterized, decontaminated, resurveyed and decontrolled, as needed, over the last seven years.

Cucchiara, A.; Olson, K.; Martinez, L.P.R.; Karl, T.

1995-12-31

268

0. 8 MWt circulating fluidized bed combustion research facility at the combustion and carbonization research laboratory, CANMET  

SciTech Connect

A 0.8 MWt pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) research facility has been built at the combustion and carbonization research laboratory (CCRL), CANMET. The major features of the versatile facility include a refractory lined combustor 405 mm in diam. and about 7 m high, a refractory lined hot cyclone and an inclined L type loop seal system for circulation of solids and comprehensive instrumentation and controls. Four retractable bayonet type vertical cooling tubes permit the control of the combustor temperature during operation at various test conditions. The combustor is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100{degrees}C and at a superficial gas velocity of up to 8 m/s. The combustor, ancillary equipment, instrumentation and controls are described in detail in this paper. Preliminary tests have demonstrated a satisfactory performance of the combustor and ancillary equipment.

Desai, D.L.; Friedrich, F.D.; Lee, G.K. (Canmet, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1 (CA))

1990-01-01

269

Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world`s largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running experiment This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The system architecture integrates high-performance array processors, matrix switches, signal conditioning amplifiers, antialiasing filter subsystems, high-precision analog-to-digital subsystems, high-performance data disks, and support equipment The hardware and software architecture with its distributed computers and distributed real-time data base, the signal processing algorithms and architecture, and the flexible user interface for facility and measurements integration are described in this paper.

Manges, W.W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J.T.; Breeding, J.E.; Jansen, J.M. Jr.; Tate, R.M.; Bentz, R.R.

1992-12-31

270

Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world's largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running experiment This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The system architecture integrates high-performance array processors, matrix switches, signal conditioning amplifiers, antialiasing filter subsystems, high-precision analog-to-digital subsystems, high-performance data disks, and support equipment The hardware and software architecture with its distributed computers and distributed real-time data base, the signal processing algorithms and architecture, and the flexible user interface for facility and measurements integration are described in this paper.

Manges, W.W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J.T.; Breeding, J.E.; Jansen, J.M. Jr.; Tate, R.M.; Bentz, R.R.

1992-01-01

271

Using an Australian Mars Analogue Research Facility for Astrobiology, Education and Outreach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mars Society is an international private organisation advocating the exploration and settlement of Mars. Part of its mission involves selecting areas for Martian analogue research, to test hardware, technology, strategies and human factors relevant to sending people to Mars. Mars Society Australia has selected an area in the Arkaroola region in the Flinders Ranges as the site for the first Australian analogue facility.The facility will be an invaluable public education and outreach tool for Australian science, focusing on astrobiology, and its role in future human Mars missions; demonstrating Australian contributions to astrobiology related science and work on terrestrial analogues to Martian environments.

Laing, Jennifer H.; Clarke, J.; Deckert, J.; Gostin, V.; Hoogland, J.; Lemke, L.; Leyden, J.; Mann, G.; Murphy, G.; Stoker, C.; Thomas, M.; Waldie, J.; Walter, M.; West, M.

2004-06-01

272

Web-based database for the management of tissue specimens in a transregional histological research facility  

PubMed Central

Background In the setting of a histological research core facility sample tracking and project specific archiving of tissue specimens and communication of related data is of central importance. Description Over a 24-month period 10 laboratories from two transregional research centers submitted in excess of 3000 tissue samples for histological processing and evaluation to our core facility. A web based database was set up to overcome the logistical problem of managing samples with inconsistent, duplicate and missing labels and to allow for efficient sample tracking, archiving and communication with the collaborating research laboratories. The database allows the users to remotely generate unique sample identifiers and enter sample annotation prior to sample processing. Furthermore the database facilitates communication about experimental set-up results and media files such as histological images. Conclusion Our newly constructed web based portal is an important tool for the management of research samples of our histological core facility and facilitates significantly interdisciplinary and transregional research. It is freely available for scientific use.

2011-01-01

273

Recommendations for control of pathogens and infectious diseases in fish research facilities.  

PubMed

Concerns about infectious diseases in fish used for research have risen along with the dramatic increase in the use of fish as models in biomedical research. In addition to acute diseases causing severe morbidity and mortality, underlying chronic conditions that cause low-grade or subclinical infections may confound research results. Here we present recommendations and strategies to avoid or minimize the impacts of infectious agents in fishes maintained in the research setting. There are distinct differences in strategies for control of pathogens in fish used for research compared to fishes reared as pets or in aquaculture. Also, much can be learned from strategies and protocols for control of diseases in rodents used in research, but there are differences. This is due, in part, the unique aquatic environment that is modified by the source and quality of the water provided and the design of facilities. The process of control of pathogens and infectious diseases in fish research facilities is relatively new, and will be an evolving process over time. Nevertheless, the goal of documenting, detecting, and excluding pathogens in fish is just as important as in mammalian research models. PMID:18755294

Kent, Michael L; Feist, Stephen W; Harper, Claudia; Hoogstraten-Miller, Shelley; Law, J Mac; Sánchez-Morgado, José M; Tanguay, Robert L; Sanders, George E; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Whipps, Christopher M

2008-08-08

274

Recommendations for control of pathogens and infectious diseases in fish research facilities?  

PubMed Central

Concerns about infectious diseases in fish used for research have risen along with the dramatic increase in the use of fish as models in biomedical research. In addition to acute diseases causing severe morbidity and mortality, underlying chronic conditions that cause low-grade or subclinical infections may confound research results. Here we present recommendations and strategies to avoid or minimize the impacts of infectious agents in fishes maintained in the research setting. There are distinct differences in strategies for control of pathogens in fish used for research compared to fishes reared as pets or in aquaculture. Also, much can be learned from strategies and protocols for control of diseases in rodents used in research, but there are differences. This is due, in part, the unique aquatic environment that is modified by the source and quality of the water provided and the design of facilities. The process of control of pathogens and infectious diseases in fish research facilities is relatively new, and will be an evolving process over time. Nevertheless, the goal of documenting, detecting, and excluding pathogens in fish is just as important as in mammalian research models.

Kent, Michael L.; Feist, Stephen W.; Harper, Claudia; Hoogstraten-Miller, Shelley; Mac Law, J.; Sanchez-Morgado, Jose M.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Sanders, George E.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Whipps, Christopher M.

2012-01-01

275

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01

276

Development of the University of California, San Francisco Microcomputer Facility for Nursing Research and Development  

PubMed Central

The ongoing development of microcomputer technology has fostered a great deal of new thinking about clinical nursing research and professional education. A facility for the expansion of these areas utilizing this technology has been established at the UCSF School of Nursing. Projects currently implemented include the development of microcomputer-based clinical nursing simulations, research training, and the development of courseware for general computer literacy as well as advanced special topics. Future areas of research and development will encompass the areas of nursing information systems, local area networks, software development and evaluation, as well as the extension of these concepts into a continuing educational framework.

Holzemer, W.L.; Slichter, M.J.; Slaughter, R.E.; Stotts, N.A.

1983-01-01

277

An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.

NONE

1995-12-31

278

Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world's largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while performing 200 million floating-point operations per second, producing a time-integrated, spatially filtered, frequency-domain data set with improved signal-to-noise ratio. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real-time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running equipment. This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The hardware and software architecture is described in this paper.

Manges, W. W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J. T.; Breeding, J. E.; Jansen, J. M., Jr.; Tate, R. M.; Bentz, R. R.

279

Safeguards systems analysis research and development and the practice of safeguards at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos Safeguards Systems Group personnel interact with Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear materials processing facilities in a number of ways. Among them are training courses, formal technical assistance such as developing information management or data analysis software and informal ad hoc assistance especially in reviewing and commenting on existing facility safeguards technology and procedures. These activities are supported by the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security, DOE Operations Offices, and contractor organizations. Because of the relationships with the Operations Office and facility personnel, the Safeguards Systems Group research and development (R D) staff have developed an understanding of the needs of the entire complex. Improved safeguards are needed in areas such as materials control activities, accountability procedures and techniques, systems analysis and evaluation methods, and material handling procedures. This paper surveys the generic needs for efficient and cost effective enhancements in safeguards technologies and procedures at DOE facilities, identifies areas where existing safeguards R D products are being applied or could be applied, and sets a direction for future systems analysis R D to address practical facility safeguards needs.

Zack, N.R.; Thomas, K.E.; Markin, J.T.; Tape, J.W.

1991-01-01

280

Rain Garden Research at NRMRL?s Urban Watershed Research Facility: Evaluating Pollutant Removal Performance  

EPA Science Inventory

This slide was displayed on a TV screen along with slides from other ORD postdocs at the EPA Science Forum Postdoc Exhibit, May 20-22. The slide illustrated the rain garden research I am working on at UWMB....

281

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research and the Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific activities at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure both bulk observables with large acceptance and rare diagnostic probes such as charmed particles and vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs. The layout and the physics performance of the proposed CBM experimental facility will be discussed.

Senger, P.

2010-08-01

282

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research and the Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific activities at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure both bulk observables with large acceptance and rare diagnostic probes such as charmed particles and vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs. The layout and the physics performance of the proposed CBM experimental facility will be discussed.

Senger, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

2010-08-04

283

The Materials Science Laboratory -A research Facility on Board the International Space Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is a multi-user facility that supports processing and investigation of metals, alloys, and semiconductors under weightlessness in a temperature range up to 1800C. MSL was built under a contract of the European Space Agency and is currently operated as part of NASA's Materials Science Research Rack in the US-Laboratory of the In-ternational Space Station. Various research fields are supported by means of dedicated Furnace Inserts which are exchanged on orbit over the ten years lifetime of the facility. MSL provides a very precise process control, several built-in diagnostics features, and the capability to add experiment specific diagnostics. An overview on the MSL design is given and technological challenges encountered during the development are discussed.

Lenski, Harald

284

Experimental research facility for creep-rupture testing of tantalum alloy T-111  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a research facility for computer-controlled elevated temperature tensile testing of refractory metallic alloys in an inert enviroment. In an application to tantalum alloy T-111, we have determined that a two-hour creep rupture life can be achieved at 1204°C (0.45 T\\/sub m\\/) and 1300°C (0.48 T\\/sub m\\/) if the applied true stresses are maintained below 46 ksi (317

W. A. Kawahara; B. D. Schoeneman; J. S. Korellis

1984-01-01

285

Turning a liability into an asset at Sandia California: The Tritium Research Facility transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

With an investment of $20.9 million, Sandia National Laboratories\\/California (Sandia\\/CA) saved the Department of Energy (DOE) an estimated $106.3 million--a 500% return on investment. In cooperation with DOE, Sandia\\/CA decontaminated and transitioned (D and T) the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL), a DOE non-reactor Category 2 nuclear facility. In support of the DOE`s Office of Defense Programs, Sandia\\/CA had conducted advanced

T. B. Garcia; S. J. Raubfogel

1997-01-01

286

Research on efficient X-ray lasing at XingGuang II Laser Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on efficient X ray lasing at the XingGuang II Laser Facility has been reviewed, in which lasing at 18.9, 20.3, and 28.5 nm from nickel-like molybdenum, niobium and neon-like chromium ions has been observed by using two 200-ps laser pulses with a total energy of 50 J at 1.053 ?m. This shows the possibility of extending nickel-like and neon-like

Jie Zhang; Y. Q. Gu; Y. J. Li; Y. T. Li; S. T. Chunyu; Y. L. You; W. Z. Huang; S. T. He; Y. L. He; L. Z. Lu; X. D. Yuan; X. F. Wei; C. F. Zhang

1999-01-01

287

The Energy Return on Investment for Algal Biocrude: Results for a Research Production Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is an experimental determination of the energy return on investment (EROI) for algal biocrude production at a research\\u000a facility at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). During the period of this assessment, algae were grown at several cultivation\\u000a scales and processed using centrifugation for harvesting, electromechanical cell lysing, and a microporous hollow fiber membrane\\u000a contactor for lipid

Colin M. Beal; Robert E. Hebner; Michael E. Webber; Rodney S. Ruoff; A. Frank Seibert

288

Quality assurance and quality control for the Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) and ZTH experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In compliance with DOE (US Department of Energy) order 5700.6B, which establishes policies to assure quality achievement in DOE programs, Los Alamos National Laboratory instituted a quality assurance and control (QA) program whose primary goal is to assure that reliable components are available with which to assemble the Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF)\\/ZTH experiment. The Code of Federal Regulations 10

R. W. Jr

1989-01-01

289

Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility  

SciTech Connect

Intense beams of heavy ions offer a very attractive tool for fundamental research in high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy science. These applications build on the significant recent advances in the generation, compression and focusing of intense heavy ion beams in the presence of a neutralizing background plasma. Such beams can provide uniform volumetric heating of the target during a time-scale shorter than the hydrodynamic response time, thereby enabling a significant suite of experiments that will elucidate the underlying physics of dense, strongly-coupled plasma states, which have been heretofore poorly understood and inadequately diagnosed, particularly in the warm dense matter regime. The innovations, fundamental knowledge, and experimental capabilities developed in this basic research program is also expected to provide new research opportunities to study the physics of directly-driven ion targets, which can dramatically reduce the size of heavy ion beam drivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments examining the behavior of thin target foils heated to the warm dense matter regime began at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2008, using the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - I (NDCX-I) facility, and its associated target chamber and diagnostics. The upgrade of this facility, called NDCX-II, will enable an exciting set of scientific experiments that require highly uniform heating of the target, using Li{sup +} ions which enter the target with kinetic energy in the range of 3 MeV, slightly above the Bragg peak for energy deposition, and exit with energies slightly below the Bragg peak. This document briefly summarizes the wide range of fundamental scientific experiments that can be carried out on the NDCX-II facility, pertaining to the two charges presented to the 2008 Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee (FESAC) panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). These charges include: (1) Identify the compelling scientific opportunities for research in fundamental HEDLP that could be investigated using existing and planned facilities in support of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the National Nuclear Security Administration/Defense Program missions; and (2) Identify the scientific issues of implosion and target design that need to be addressed to make the case for inertial fusion energy as a potential future energy source. Compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value that can be carried out on the NDCX-II experimental facility are briefly summarized below, grouped into four main research areas. Page 4 lists several national and internationally-attended user workshops that have provided much of the input for the experimental campaigns describe below. More detailed information can be provided upon request.

Barnard, John; Cohen, Ron; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave; Lund, Steven; Sharp, Bill; Bieniosek, Frank; Ni, Pavel; Roy, Prabir; Henestroza, Enrique; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwan, Joe; Lee, Ed; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lidia, Steven; Logan, Grant; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Waldron, Will

2009-03-23

290

ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) source for the HHIRF (Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility) tandem accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Electron Cyclotron Resonance, ECR, ion source technology has developed rapidly since the original pioneering work of R. Geller and his group at Grenoble in the early 1970s. These ion sources are capable of producing intense beams of highly charged positive ions and are used extensively for cyclotron injection, linac injection, and atomic physics research. In this paper, the advantages of using an ECR heavy-ion source in the terminal of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) 25-MV tandem accelerator is discussed. A possible ECR system for installation in the HHIRF tandem terminal is described.

Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.

1990-01-01

291

Design and Certification of Targets for Drop Tests at the NTRC Packaging Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation of the design and certification of drop pad (targets) at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) Packaging Research Facility(PRF). Based on the evaluation performed, it has been demonstrated that the small (interior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 3,150 lb (1,432 kg). The large (exterior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 28,184 lb (12,811 kg).

Ludwig, S.B.

2003-06-05

292

Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL  

SciTech Connect

Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

2012-09-19

293

Establishing a Cosmic Ray Station and Other Space Research Facilities in Ethiopia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the potential of Ethiopia in establishing space research facilities and conducting collaborative research and training. It also describes the goals and objectives of a proposed cosmic ray station in Ethiopia which would greatly improve the abilities of the existing worldwide network for heliospheric and cosmic ray research. The station will be located at the geomagentic equator, which is a very unique place for geomagnetic and heliospheric studies. Moreover, the paper presents an overview of the research and training activities in space physics and the successful collaborative project between Ethiopia and Finland, which facilitated the installation of a pulsation magnetometer and a photometer at Entoto Mountain in a suburb of the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

Damtie, B.; Bosinger, T.; Usoskin, I.

294

Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed action is Roane County, Tennessee. MSG is involved in the study of crystal growth and the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, such as high-temperature superconductors, while SPG is involved in semiconductor physics research. All MSG and a major pardon of SPG research activities are now conducted in Building 2000, a deteriorating structure constructed in the 1940. The physical deterioration of the roof; the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; and the plumbing make this building inadequate for supporting research activities. The proposed project is needed to provide laboratory and office space for MSG and SPG and to ensure that research activities can continue without interruption due to deficiencies in the building and its associated utility systems.

Not Available

1993-07-01

295

Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

1996-09-01

296

Sources and distribution of polychlorinated terphenyls at a major US aeronautics research facility  

SciTech Connect

High concentrations of an unusual, complex mixture of chlorinated compounds were discovered in sediments and oysters near a federal aeronautics facility during implementation of a pollutant screening protocol. The mixture was identified as Aroclor 5432, a polychlorinated terphenyl (PCT) formulation, produced in the US until 1972. PCTs, particularly low chlorinated mixtures, have rarely been reported in the environment, despite significant manufacture and usage. PCBs, and mercury were also detected in storm drain lines entering these outfalls. The lines received input from both storm water and research buildings. Historical hydraulic fluid leaks and in-service compressor fluids in some buildings contained PCTs and PCBs. Contaminated materials on-site were removed to minimize pollutant spread. Aroclor 5432 usage, most likely as compressor/hydraulic fluid additives, probably ended about ten years prior to its on-site detection, in terms of biological effects, intraperitoneal injection of fish with Aroclor 5432 induced cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity to a similar degree as PCB Aroclor 1254 and to a greater extent than PCT Aroclor 5460. The presence of high concentrations of PCTs contributed to the facility being included on the National Priorities List. It subsequently became the first US federal facility to sign a Federal Facility Agreement, identifying cleanup responsibilities, prior to formal listing.

Hale, R.C. [Coll. of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA (United States); Enos, C. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc., Kansas City, KS (United States); Gallagher, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1998-11-01

297

First operation of the medical research facility at the NSLS for coronary angiography  

SciTech Connect

The Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been completed and is operational for human coronary angiography experiments. The imaging system and hardware have been brought to SMERF from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory where prior studies were carried out. SMERF consists of a suite of rooms at the end of the high field superconducting wiggler X17 beamline and is classified as an Ambulatory health Care Facility. Since October of 1990 the coronary arteries of five patients have been imaged. Continuously improving image quality has shown that a large part of both the right coronary artery and the left anterior descending coronary artery can be imaged following a venous injection of contrast agent. 16 refs., 4 figs.

Thomlinson, W.; Gmuer, N.; Chapman, D.; Garrett, R.; Lazarz, N.; Moulin, H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Thompson, A.C. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Zeman, H.D. (Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, 38163 (US)); Brown, G.S. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Morrison, J.; Reiser, P

1991-01-01

298

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2008-09-30

299

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2008-04-01

300

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2008-06-01

301

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 – June 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-07-01

302

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data then are sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by 1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and 2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2009-10-15

303

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01

304

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2009-01-15

305

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-07-01

306

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2010-01-15

307

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-04-01

308

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2009-03-17

309

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01

310

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2008-01-08

311

Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility  

SciTech Connect

To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

2010-01-11

312

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, A user facility in support of research in high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) develops and operates high magnetic field facilities at its main location at Florida State University, Tallahassee, as well as a pulsed magnetic field facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A number of specialized facilities are also available to collaborators at the University of Florida for research at ultra-low temperatures, advanced magnetic resonance imaging, and materials sciences. The NHMFL is supported by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) and by the State of Florida. It is a user facility available to qualified users through a peer review proposal process. The facilities and staff support research and development at the extremes of parameter space. A part of its activities is devoted to the advancement of the state of the art of superconducting, pulsed, resistive, and hybrid magnets. This involves cryogenic materials research, the development of high strength, high conductivity conductors, and the development of low and ultra low temperature systems.

Crow, J.E.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Parkin, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sullivan, N.S. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-09-01

313

Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research  

SciTech Connect

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

2012-01-07

314

FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

Abdou, M.

1984-10-01

315

COMPLETELY AUTOMATIC MECHANIZED MULTIKILOCURIE COBALT60 IRRADIATION FACILITY FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, LARGE-SCALE INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION, AND RADIATION THERAPY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The large-scale industrtal use of gamma radiation requires highly ; versatile research facilities with multikilocurie Co⁶° radiation sources. ; Certain constructive examples of completely automatic mechanized gammaradiation ; facilities are given, in which the radiation source can either be immersed or the ; objects under exposure can be radiated in any desired physical form, in charges ; or contiruously, beside

Joklik

1958-01-01

316

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 1. Program and facility description  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Mines, Twin Cities Research Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota is the site of a 6.5 foot diameter Wellman-Galusha gasifier, installed in 1977-1978. This gasifier, combustor/incinerator, and flue gas scrubber system in the past had been operated jointly by Bureau of Mines personnel, personnel from member companies of the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas Group, and United States Department of Energy personnel-consultants. Numerous tests using a variety of coals have to date been performed. In May of 1982, Black, Sivalls and Bryson, Incorporated (BS and B) was awarded the contract to plan, execute, and report gasification test performance data from this small industrial fixed-bed gasification test facility. BS and B is responsible for program administration, test planning, test execution, and all documentation of program activities and test reports. The University of Minnesota, Particle Technology Laboratory (UMPTL) is subcontractor to BS and B to monitor process parameters, and provide analysis for material inputs and outputs. This report is the initial volume in a series of reports describing the fixed-bed gasification of US coals at the Bureau of Mines, Twin Cities Research Center. A history of the program is given in Section 1 and a thorough description of the facility in Section 2. The operation of the facility is described in Section 3. Monitoring systems and procedures are described in Sections 4 and 5. Data reduction tools are outlined in Section 6. There is no executive summary or conclusions as this volume serves only to describe the research program. Subsequent volumes will detail each gasification test and other pertinent results of the gasification program. 32 references, 23 figures, 15 tables.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Poole, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittleson, D.

1984-10-01

317

MORAL CONSIDERATIONS IN BODY DONATION FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH: A UNIQUE LOOK AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE’S ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH FACILITY 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTThis paper discusses keys to the moral procurement, treatment and disposition of remains used for scientific research, specifically those donated to the University of Tennessee’s Anthropological Research Facility (ARF). The ARF is an outdoor laboratory dedicated to better understanding the fate of human remains in forensic contexts, and focuses its research on decomposition, time since death estimates, body location and

ANGI M. CHRISTENSEN

2006-01-01

318

Spin spectrometer at the holified heavy-ion research facility and some planned experiments  

SciTech Connect

The 4..pi.. multidetector ..gamma..-ray spectrometer at the Holified Heavy-ion Research Facility (HHIRF) is described in some detail. The following important features of this spectrometer are discussed: (a) the geometric arrangement, (b) the actual performance of the individual detector elements, (c) the associated electronics and data acquisition system, and (d) the response of the system to input ..gamma..-cascades including the effect of crystal-to-crystal scattering and the response to neutrons. The first few experiments to be performed are briefly described.

Sarantites, D.G.; Jaaskelainen, M.; Hood, J.T.; Woodward, R.; Barker, J.H.; Hensley, D.C.; Halbert, M.L.; Chan, Y.D.

1980-01-01

319

Cost calculations at early stages of nuclear research facilities in the nordic countries  

SciTech Connect

The Nordic countries Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and to some extent also Finland, had very large nuclear research and development programs for a few decades starting in the nineteen fifties. Today, only some of the facilities are in use. Some have been decommissioned and dismantled while others are at various stages of planning for shutdown. The perspective ranges from imminent to several decades. It eventually became realized that considerable planning for the future decommissioning is warranted and that an integral part of this planning is financial, including how financial funds should be acquired, used and allocated over time. This necessitates that accurate and reliable cost estimates be obtained at all stages. However, this is associated with fundamental difficulties and treacherous complexities, especially for the early ones. Eventually, Denmark and Norway decided not to build any nuclear power plants while Finland and Sweden did. This is reflected in the financing where the latter countries have established systems with special funds in which money is being collected now to cover the future costs for the decommissioning of the research facilities. Nonetheless, the needs for planning for the decommissioning of nuclear research facilities are very similar. However, they differ considerably from those of nuclear power reactors, especially with regard to cost calculations. It has become apparent in the course of work that summation types of cost estimation methodologies give rise to large systematic errors if applied at early stages, in which case comparison based assessments are less biased and may be more reliable. Therefore, in order to achieve the required quality of the cost calculations, it is necessary that data and experience from authentic cases be utilized in models for cost calculations. It also implies that this calculation process should include a well adopted learning process. Thus, a Nordic co-operation has been established for the exchange and evaluation of cost-related information on nuclear research facilities. The aim is to identify good practices, accumulate experience, compile data from actual plants and projects, and to derive methodology for cost calculations, especially for early stages. The work includes the following tasks which constitutes the bulk of the present paper: identification of good practice with regard to the following: - strategy and planning; - methodology selection; - radiological surveying; - uncertainty analysis. - descriptions of relevant plants, features and projects: - decommissioning of reactor DR 1 in Denmark; - decommissioning of reactor R 1 in Sweden; - decommissioning of the pilot scale uranium fuel; reprocessing plant in Norway - planning for the future decommissioning of the TRIGA reactor in Finland. - techniques for assessments of costs introduction. (authors)

Iversen, Klaus [Danish Decommissioning (Denmark); Salmenhaara, Seppo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1805 - Kemistintie 3, Espoo, FIN - 02044 VTT (Finland); Backe, Steinar [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway); Cato, Anna; Lindskog, Staffan [The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Klarabergsviadukten 90, SE-106 58 Stockholm (Sweden); Callander, Clas; Efraimsson, Henrik [The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Inga [Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden); Sjoeblom, Rolf [Tekedo AB, Spinnarvaegen 10, 611 63 Nykoeping (Sweden)

2007-07-01

320

A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system.

Wang, Rongkun; Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai; Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun; Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin

2013-11-01

321

Coarse coal hydrotransport testing at the Hydraulic Transport Research Facility - 2-inch by 0 clean coal, 12-inch pipeline  

Microsoft Academic Search

This six-volume report describes a series of coarse coal hydraulic transport tests performed at the Hydraulic Transport Research Facility at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Bruceton, PA. The primary objective of the research covered in this volume was to examine the performance of the 12-inch (300 mm) pipeline in transporting clean, 2-inch by 0 (51 mm by minus 50 mm)

1985-01-01

322

Status of Activities on Rehabilitation of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Stie of Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute.'  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute'...

V. G. Volkov N. N. Ponomarev-Stepnoi E. S. Melkov E. P. Ryazantsev V. S. Dikarev

2003-01-01

323

Investigation of Seismicity and Related Effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters...

R. D. Cousineau R. Crook D. J. Leeds

1985-01-01

324

Models to Support State-Owned Park and Ride Lots and Intermodal Facilities. Research Results Digest 359.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This digest addresses the needs and issues associated with state park and ride/ intermodal commuter facilities and programs. It identifies deficiencies, best practices, and promising innovations. Research was conducted over an 8-month period and involved ...

2012-01-01

325

Experimental Results from the First Year of Operation of the Solar Ground Coupling Research Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results from the first year of operation of the solar ground coupling research facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are presented. Nine experiments which are first generation ground coupled heat transfer and storage devices for a solar source ...

P. D. Meta

1979-01-01

326

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 through December 31, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. For all fixed sites, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2007. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the current deployment in Niamey, Niger, Africa. PYE represents the AMF statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP Central Facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF in Niger. This report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days-broken down by institution type, gender, race, citizenship, visitor role, visit purpose, and facility-for actual visitors and for active user research computer accounts. During this reporting period, the ACRF Archive did not collect data on user characteristics in this way. Work is under way to collect and report these data. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. For the first quarter of FY 2007, the overall number of users is up from the last reporting period. The historical data show that there is an apparent relationship between the total number of users and the 'size' of field campaigns, called Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs): larger IOPs draw more of the site facility resources, which are reflected by the number of site visits and site visit days, research accounts, and device accounts. These types of users typically collect and analyze data in near-real time for a site-specific IOP that is in progress. However, the Archive accounts represent persistent (year-to-year) ACRF data users that often mine from the entire collection of ACRF data, which mostly includes routine data from the fixed and mobile sites, as well as cumulative IOP data sets. Archive data users continue to show a steady growth, which is independent of the size of IOPs. For this quarter, the number of Archive data user accounts was 961, the highest since record-keeping began. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Although the AMF is not officially colle

Sisterson, D. L.

2007-03-14

327

Concordia: The New Permanent Research Support Facility on the Antarctic plateau  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concordia has been the third permanent station inland the Antarctic continent since February 2005. It was built jointly by France and Italy in order to offer to the scientific community a platform for research on the antarctic plateau, high in altitude. After the very successful drilling programme EPICA at Dome C, an European project gathering 10 countries and offering the oldest accurate climate archive, many other field of science will benefit from the exceptional properties of the site, namely astronomical researches. This paper provides information on these properties and on the current facilities in terms of building and transport. In addition, it points out the environmental protection and waste management in force at Concordia, in agreement with the Antarctic Treaty and Madrid Protocol.

Godon, P.; Jugie, G.; Frénot, Y.; Cucinotta, A.

328

Storm Peak Laboratory: A Research, Teaching, and Service Facility for the Atmospheric Sciences.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), operated by the Atmospheric Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute, is now located in a newly constructed permanent building at elevation 3210 m (10530 ft) above mean sea level in the northwestern Colorado Rocky Mountains. The laboratory provides a site for the conduct of basic and applied research in the atmospheric sciences, hands-on instruction in meteorology for students ranging from middle school through graduate school, and high-elevation atmospheric measurement programs for various scientific groups, agencies, and private companies. This article provides a background of the history of SPL, its past and current activities, and a description of the facilities and opportunities available at the laboratory.

Borys, Randolph D.; Wetzel, Melanie A.

1997-10-01

329

Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact (sup 252)Cf neutron sourc...

R. C. Martin T. E. Byrne L. F. Miller

1997-01-01

330

NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources.

Bateman, F. B.; Desrosiers, M. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Coursey, B. M.; Bergstrom, P. M.; Seltzer, S. M.

2003-08-01

331

Behavioral management of chimpanzees in biomedical research facilities: the state of the science.  

PubMed

The current status of the behavioral management of chimpanzees housed in US research facilities is examined, and recent advances are described. Behavioral management includes the application of environmental enrichment, animal training, and environmental design for improving animal welfare. Authors surveyed the six major chimpanzee holding facilities and found that the vast majority of chimpanzees are housed socially, with access to the outdoors. The institutions currently invest in behavioral scientists, enrichment specialists, and, most recently, chimpanzee trainers to implement and study chimpanzee behavioral management. This review is based on the substantial scientific literature related to managing social behavior, identifying the behavioral effects of restricted socialization, evaluating various forms of enrichment, and describing positive reinforcement animal training. Authors outline recent accomplishments in behavioral management, summarize behavioral issues that have been evaluated, and identify issues for future consideration. It is proposed that the enhanced application of behavioral management techniques, including training, could significantly reduce chimpanzee stress that is generally associated with experimental manipulations, and could improve animal welfare and the quality of biomedical research. The next challenge is to implement effectively and thoroughly the approaches that have been shown to be beneficial. PMID:15775028

Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Else, James G

2005-01-01

332

New Lidar Remote Sensing Capabilities at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facilities (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2009 the US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) was awarded funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for instrument acquisitions and upgrades. A significant portion of that award is being used to acquire new advanced lidar systems for all of the ACRF sites. Efforts are currently underway to develop the following systems: 1) one Raman lidar for installation at the Tropical West Pacific (TWP) site in Darwin, Australia; 2) two High Spectral Resolution Lidars (HSRL) for deployment at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, and with the second mobile facility (AMF2); 3) three coherent Doppler lidars for deployment at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma, TWP-Darwin, and with the first mobile facility (AMF1). Additionally, the following systems are being upgraded: 1) laser ceilometers at SGP, TWP, NSA, and mobile facilities; 2) Micropulse Lidars (MPL) at SGP, TWP, NSA, and mobile facilities; 3) the existing Raman lidar at SGP. The new Raman lidar at TWP-Darwin will provide time and height resolved measurements of water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization. The design of this system will closely follow that of the existing Raman lidar at SGP. The SGP Raman system has been operational for well over 10 years and is well proven. Over the years a number of upgrades have been incorporated that have greatly improved performance of the system. Examples include simultaneous photon counting and analog detection electronics, the addition of two rotational Raman channels for temperature profiling, and continuous active boresight alignment. The new system at Darwin will incorporate these features as well. The HSRL systems will improve cloud and aerosol remote sensing at NSA and AMF2 by enabling a direct measurement of extinction. Extinction profiles at these sites are currently being generated as PI data products from MPL data. The HSRL measurement technique obviates the need to assume a constant (or prescribed) backscatter-to-extinction ratio, as is currently the case when using MPL data. The Doppler lidars will help fill a long standing measurement gap within ACRF. These systems will operate in a vertically staring mode to acquire long-term measurements of clear-air vertical velocities in the lower troposphere. These data will be used to investigate statistics of updrafts and downdrafts, and the vertical transport of aerosols. This presentation will discuss the expected performance characteristics of the new ACRF lidar systems and the impact that the new systems are expected to have on the science.

Newsom, R.; Comstock, J. M.; Turner, D. D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Flynn, C.; Goldsmith, J.; Morris, V. R.; Coulter, R.

2009-12-01

333

Status and plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high , non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusionrelevant plasma conditions.

Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

2005-01-01

334

Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

2005-07-27

335

Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high ?, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high ? Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high ? and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

Ono, Masayuki; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Bialek, J. M.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Biewer, T. M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bush, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D. S.; Dudek, L.; Feder, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Foley, J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gibney, T.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R.; Heidbrink, W.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kalish, M.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kessel, C.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; Labik, G.; Leblanc, B. P.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F. M.; Lowrance, J.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Park, H. K.; Paul, S. F.; Peebles, T.; Perry, E.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Sontag, A. C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K. L.; Halle, A. Von; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zatz, I.; Zhu, W.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bourdelle, C.; Carter, M. D.; Chang, C. S.; Choe, W.; Davis, W.; Diem, S. J.; Domier, C.; Ellis, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Field, A.; Finkenthal, M.; Fredd, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Glasser, A.; Goldston, R. J.; Grisham, L. R.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guazzotto, L.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Hill, K. W.; Houlberg, W.; Hosea, J. C.; Humphreys, D.; Jun, C.; Kim, J. H.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Lao, L. L.; Lee, S. G.; Lawson, J.; Luhmann, N. C.; Mau, T. K.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Pacella, D.; Parsells, R.; Pigarov, A.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Rasmussen, D.; Redi, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Ruskov, E.; Schmidt, J.; Semenov, I.; Shaing, K.; Shinohara, K.; Schaffer, M.; Sichta, P.; Tang, X.; Timberlake, J.; Wade, M.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, Z.; Woolley, R.; Wurden, G. A.; Xu, X.

336

Development of a pollution prevention and energy efficiency clearinghouse for biomedical research facilities.  

PubMed Central

This is the report of the National Association of Physicians for the Environment Committee on Development of a Pollution Prevention and Energy Efficiency Clearinghouse for Biomedical Research Facilities from the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, on 1--2 November 1999. A major goal of the conference was the establishment of a World Wide Web-based clearinghouse, which would lend tremendous resources to the biomedical research community by providing access to a database of peer-reviewed articles and references dealing with a host of aspects of biomedical research relating to energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and waste reduction. A temporary website has been established with the assistance of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions III and IV, where a pilot site provides access to the EPA's existing databases on these topics. A system of peer review for articles and promising techniques still must be developed, but a glimpse of topics and search engines is available for comment and review on the EPA Region IV-supported website (http://wrrc.p2pays.org/).

Barker, L F; Rau, E H; Pfister, E A; Calcagni, J

2000-01-01

337

Development of a pollution prevention and energy efficiency clearinghouse for biomedical research facilities.  

PubMed

This is the report of the National Association of Physicians for the Environment Committee on Development of a Pollution Prevention and Energy Efficiency Clearinghouse for Biomedical Research Facilities from the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, on 1--2 November 1999. A major goal of the conference was the establishment of a World Wide Web-based clearinghouse, which would lend tremendous resources to the biomedical research community by providing access to a database of peer-reviewed articles and references dealing with a host of aspects of biomedical research relating to energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and waste reduction. A temporary website has been established with the assistance of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions III and IV, where a pilot site provides access to the EPA's existing databases on these topics. A system of peer review for articles and promising techniques still must be developed, but a glimpse of topics and search engines is available for comment and review on the EPA Region IV-supported website (http://wrrc.p2pays.org/). PMID:11121361

Barker, L F; Rau, E H; Pfister, E A; Calcagni, J

2000-12-01

338

Research on the Impact of School Facilities on Students and Teachers: A Summary of Studies Published since 2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There has been a slow but steady increase of research on the impact of public school facilities on educational achievement and community outcomes and of the rigor of the research. This summary of studies is part of a larger literature review conducted by the 21st Century School Fund with funding from the Charitable Trust of the Council on…

Filardo, Mary; Vincent, Jeff

2010-01-01

339

Research on the Impact of School Facilities on Students and Teachers: A Summary of Studies Published since 2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There has been a slow but steady increase of research on the impact of public school facilities on educational achievement and community outcomes and of the rigor of the research. This summary of studies is part of a larger literature review conducted by the 21st Century School Fund with funding from the Charitable Trust of the Council on…

21st Century School Fund, 2009

2009-01-01

340

Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research  

SciTech Connect

This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

2005-03-01

341

Ignition X-Ray Imager for Laser-Fusion Research at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

X-ray imaging will be an important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). However, high neutron yields will make x-ray imaging much more difficult than it is at current smaller facilities. We analyze the feasibility and performance of an Ignition X-Ray Imager to be used on cryogenic DT implosions at NIF. The system is intended to provide time-integrated, broadband, moderate-energy x-ray core images of imploding ICF capsules. Highly magnified, spectrally-filtered images created using an array of pinholes placed close to the target will be projected onto a scintillator placed at the target chamber wall. A telescope will be used to relay the scintillator emission to a distant optical detector that is time-gated in order to minimize backgrounds, in particular from neutrons. The system is optimized with respect to spatial-resolution, signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios.

Tommasini, R; Phillips, T W; Koch, J A

2005-09-27

342

Final cleanup of buildings within in legacy French research facilities: strategy, tools and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology followed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to decommission the buildings of former research facilities for demolition or possible reuse. It is a well known fact that the French nuclear safety authority has decided not to define any general release level for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, thus effectively prohibiting radiological measurement-driven decommissioning. The decommissioning procedure therefore requires an intensive in-depth examination of each nuclear plant. This requires a good knowledge of the past history of the plant, and should be initiated as early as possible. The paper first describes the regulatory framework recently unveiled by the French Safety Authority, then, reviews its application to ongoing decommissioning projects. The cornerstone of the strategy is the definition of waste zoning in the buildings to segregate areas producing conventional waste from those generating nuclear waste. After dismantling, suitable measurements are carried out to confirm the conventional state of the remaining walls. This requires low-level measurement methods providing a suitable detection limit within an acceptable measuring time. Although this generally involves particle counting and in-situ low level gamma spectrometry, the paper focuses on y spectrometry. Finally, the lessons learned from ongoing projects are discussed. (authors)

Le Goaller, C.; Doutreluingne, C. [CEA/DEN/DDCO/SDSP, Site de Marcoule - BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Berton, M.A.; Doucet, O. [CEA/DEN/DGI/SIG, CEA GRENOBLE 38054 Grenoble (France)

2007-07-01

343

Radioactive Ion Beams with the HHIRF (Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility) accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Our present understanding of nuclear structure is almost completely based on facts obtained for nuclei that can be produced with stable projectiles and targets which have equilibrated for a significant fraction of the lifetime of the universe. The use of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) could overcome this limitation and provide unique opportunities for the study of nuclear structure with nuclei far from stability. These nuclei could answer critical issues concerning some of the most fundamental current nuclear structure themes and allow the study of entirely new phenomena, unobservable with current techniques and not derivable from our present knowledge of nuclear theory. RIB will also open new opportunities for the study of processes taking place at less equilibrated astrophysical sites, such as supernovae, cataclysmic binaries, and accreted shells of neutron stars. Widespread interest in RIB has developed in the last few years and a steering committee has recently been established to consider the construction of a large radioactive beam facility in North America. With this interest in mind, we have performed a feasibility study for a low-cost extension of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) accelerators which would provide access, on a short time scale, to much of the physics of proton-rich nuclei.

Meigs, M.J.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Tatum, B.A.; Toth, K.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Carter, H.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

1990-01-01

344

Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

Wootton, A.J.

1994-07-01

345

Thermal analysis of the CPFR (Confinement Physics Research Facility)/ZTH apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The design has been completed for a new-generation Reversed-Field Pinch machine to be assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1992. The Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) houses the front-end ZTH torus. A series of simulations has been performed to predict temperature levels for various elements within the front end of the CPRF/ZTH apparatus for bakeout conditions and for periodic experiments. A lumped-parameter approach was used to calculate temperatures of various elements as functions of time. Results indicate that temperatures can be held at acceptable levels for 10-min cycles for the 2-MA design condition. The cycle time must be extended to approximately 13 min for 4-MA experiments. Instrumentation temperatures during bakeout were also found to be within acceptable limits. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Schnurr, N.M.

1989-01-01

346

The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

NONE

1995-10-01

347

Unconventional Purcell filter in superferric magnets in the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the magnets used in beam lines, especially in high resolution applications, the field quality ?B/B is a very important factor which determines the quality of the beam after passing through the magnets. End-shaping of the poles and introduction of Purcell filters improve field uniformity. However, in most applications, what matters is the uniformity in the total field integrated along the beam path (?(?Bdl)/?Bdl). With this criterion in mind, we have used unconventional partially penetrating Purcell filters in designing wide aperture highly uniform dipole and quadrupole magnets for the large acceptance low energy beam line in the Super Fragment Separator of the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The weight of dipole magnets decreases by the use of such filters.

Sarma, P. R.; Dutta Gupta, A.; Nandi, C.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Pal, G.

2013-11-01

348

Coupled operation experience at the Holifield Heavy-Ion research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 25URC Pelletron tandem electrostatic accelerator and the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) comprise the accelerators of the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF). The two machines may be operated individually or coupled, with ORIC serving as an energy booster for the tandem. In the coupled dode, the ion beam enters the cyclotron through the dee stem and is directed by the inflection magnet so that it is tangent to an orbit suitable for acceleration at a higher charge state. A thin carbon foil, placed at the point of tangency, strips the ions so that a substantial fraction are in the desired higher charge state. This fraction of the beam is then accelerated and extracted in the normal fashion. Full energy performance (25 MeV/A oxygen) was demonstrated during first coupled operation in January 1981. Routine coupled operation for experiments commenced in July 1982.

Lord, R.S.; Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Kloeppel, P.K.; Ludemann, C.A.; Martin, J.A.; Mosko, S.W.; Ziegler, N.F.

1983-01-01

349

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

DL Sisterson

2006-03-31

350

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

DL Sisterson

2005-06-30

351

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

DL Sisterson

2005-12-31

352

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

Sisterson, D. L.

2009-01-15

353

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

DL Sisterson

2008-09-30

354

The BIOMAT facility at FAIR: a new tool for ground-based research in space radiation biophysics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The BIOMAT facility at FAIR: a new tool for ground-based research in space radiation biophysics M.Durante The FAIR accelerator complex at GSI (placeCityDarmstadt, country-regionGermany) will be a unique facility, where heavy ions with energies up to about 45 A GeV can be used for radiation biology experiments. The study of these very high charge and energy (HZE) particles is not

Marco Durante

2008-01-01

355

A fail safe laser activated switch used as an emergency control link at the Langley Vortex Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fail safe light activated switch was used as an emergency control link at the Langley Vortex Research Facility. In this facility aircraft models were towed through a still air test chamber by a gasoline powered vehicle which was launched from one end of a 427-meter track and attained velocities to 31 m\\/sec in the test chamber. A 5 mW

P. C. Kassel Jr.

1978-01-01

356

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

DL Sisterson

2005-03-31

357

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004  

SciTech Connect

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

DL Sisterson

2004-12-31

358

Development of a Science Research Program for Special Needs Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Originally designed for students in the top 20 percent of the class who had a strong interest in science, the Science Research Program in Woodbridge Township was expanded to include special needs students and others who had not previously demonstrated success and/or interest in science. New techniques to prepare, engage, and motivate special needs students in performing original research were developed and field-tested. A cooperative learning system where experienced research students acted as project mentors for the new special needs population was utilized. The program was extended to additional instructors by a teacher-training workshop for both science and special education teachers wishing to incorporate student-facilitated original research into their classrooms.

Danch, J. M.

2005-12-01

359

European Science Notes Information Bulletin: Reports on Current European\\/ Middle Eastern Science. Directory of European Research Facilities for the Condensed Matter and Materials Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this directory is to provide research investigators with information on specialized or unique facilities in Europe that could be useful in their research. The basic information from each laboratory include a description of: special or unique instrumentation; typical experiments, calculations, or data searches suited to the facility; description of the modes for carrying out research including requirements

Dean L. Mitchell; Connie R. Orendorf

1990-01-01

360

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

Sisterson, D. L.

2009-04-23

361

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

Sisterson, D. L.

2007-07-26

362

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

Sisterson, D. L.

2009-10-15

363

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

Sisterson, D. L.

2009-07-14

364

Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Field-Scale Test Facility for Addressing Fundamental Questions of Environmental Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting (a) development of cost-effective, non- invasive methods for quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training the next generation of professionals in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield provide for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts have been focused largely on (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for testing methods to jointly invert hard and soft data to return the "known" 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including static and time-lapse tomographic imaging methods. From this work we have developed a good understanding of the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS as a hierarchical system which includes layers and lenses; this framework is recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods and tracer tests. Work to date has been conducted by Boise State University with some collaboration and exchange with researchers and students from other institutions. At this point the BHRS is functioning well as a field-scale control volume and test cell in a multiscale heterogeneous aquifer so there is an opportunity to increase the range of both collaborative participation and research activities at the BHRS. In this regard, opportunities exist to investigate and monitor process and property variation in time and space, and fluxes within system components and across boundaries (i.e., ground water, surface water, unsaturated zone, phreatophytes) including chemical and biological/microbiological investigations in addition to on-going hydrologic and geophysical investigations.

Barrash, W.; Routh, P. S.

2006-12-01

365

2. 5 MWth circulating FBC research facility; Design and start-up experiences  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a 2.5 MWth circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) pilot plant facility that has been designed, constructed and operated. Shakedown of the facility was completed during March 1990. The furnace has a maximum cross-section of 27.5 {times} 27.5 in. and is 75 ft 3 in. tall. The facility complements an existing 9 {times} 9 in. CFB combustor, full-scale cold model CFB, and bench-scale facilities. The furnace dimensions allow the pilot plant to stimulate much larger CFBCs by direct scaling. The facility has the flexibility to operate over extended ranges of operating conditions without altering hardware. A computer-driven data acquisition system monitors pertinent variables for complete mass and energy balances around the facilities.

Hooper, M.P.; Flynn, T.J. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.)

1990-01-01

366

Mortality study of a research, engineering, and metal fabrication facility in western New York State  

SciTech Connect

The mortality experience of 8146 male employees of a research, engineering, and metal fabrication facility in Tonawanda, New York state was examined from 1946 to 1981. Potential workplace exposures included welding fumes, cutting oils, asbestos, organic solvents, and environmental ionizing radiation, as the result of disposal of wastes during the Manhattan Project of World War II. External comparisons with the US male population were supplemented by regional comparisons. For the total cohort, deficits were observed for all causes of death (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 87) and most non-cancer causes. The observed number of cancer deaths was close to expected (SMR = 99). There was an excess of connective and soft tissue cancer deaths, most notably in hourly employees hired prior to 1946. Among all hourly employees, there was an excess of respiratory cancer, which did not appear to be associated with length of employment. Mesothelioma was recorded as the cause of death for three decedents, two of whom were hourly employees who worked in production areas with high potential for asbestos exposure. The standardized mortality ratio for cirrhosis of the liver was elevated among long-term hourly employees hired prior to 1946. The roles of carbon tetrachloride exposure in the 1940s and alcohol consumption are discussed as possible contributory risk factors for the cirrhosis findings. The data do not provide evidence of radiation-induced cancers within this employee population.

Teta, M.J.; Ott, M.G.

1988-03-01

367

Emissions monitoring at a deep-pit swine finishing facility: research methods and system performance.  

PubMed

This paper describes part of a comprehensive National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS) conducted at a swine finishing farm located in the state of Indiana, in the United States. The NAEMS was a 2-year study of emissions from animal feeding operations that produce pork, chicken meat, eggs, and milk. It provided emission data for the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop tools for estimating emissions from livestock farms. The study in Indiana focused on quantifying and characterizing emissions of gases, particulate matter (PM), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a swine finishing quad (four 1000-head rooms under one roof). Long-term continuous and quasi-continuous measurements were conducted with 157 on-line measurement variables using an array of instruments and sensors for gas and PM concentrations, fan operation, room static pressures, indoor temperature and humidity, animal activity and feeding times, and weather conditions. Pig inventory and weight, feed type and quantity, and manure accumulation and composition were also documented. Systematic tests of the measurement system were conducted. Monitoring methodologies, instrumentation applications, equipment maintenance, quality controls, and system performances are presented and can be used as a reference in assessing research quality and improving future environmental studies on livestock facilities. PMID:23210218

Jin, Yaomin; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Ni, Ji-Qin; Ha, Jeong-Hyub; Heber, Albert J

2012-11-01

368

Remote controlled signal conditioner and fiber optic data link system development CPRF (Confinement Physics Research Facility)  

SciTech Connect

The ZTH reversed-field pinch to be installed in the Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) will produce a significant ambient magnetic field. To avoid ground-loop and other electrical problems, the diagnostics in direct or possible contact with the experiment will be accessed through a fiber optic data way. The frequency-modulated analog links developed for this system have a bandwidth of dc to 100 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 60 dB. The fiber optic transmitter units include a signal conditioner and a microprocessor controller. The conditioners can be configured as dc-coupled, low-noise differential amplifiers, or as high-gain, low-drift differential integrators with a very long droop time constant. Magnetic field pickup is minimized by balancing sensitive circuit areas to within 5 mm{sup 2} in all three planes of the PC boards. The gain, offset, and integrator reset are controlled and monitored by the microprocessor, and their status is displayed on the front panel of the transmitter unit. The signal conditioner can be controlled locally, or by way of a fiber optic coupled control network. The system allows fast, convenient, noise-immune control of a large number of signal conditioners from a central host computer. By varying the offset, the computer can verify the operational integrity of the data links. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Schrank, L.S.; Caudill, L.D.; Haberstich, A.; Klare, K.A.; Reass, W.A.

1989-01-01

369

Some results of research carried out at the Soviet U-02 and U-25 open-cycle MHD facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses recent research conducted at two major Soviet open-cycle MHD facilities-the U-02 experimental installation and the U-25 pilot plant. The role of open-cycle MHD in the fuel-and-energy balance of the USSR is also reviewed.

A. E. Scheindlin; E. M. Shelkov; S. I. Pischikov; Yu. N. Sokolov; V. A. Ovcharenko

1976-01-01

370

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be measured using routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) measurements and was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at

Beat Schmid; Connor J. Flynn; Rob K. Newsom; David D. Turner; Richard A. Ferrare; Marian F. Clayton; Elisabeth Andrews; John A. Ogren; Roy R. Johnson; Philip B. Russell; Warren J. Gore; Roseanne Dominguez

2009-01-01

371

The development of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new working condition for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source for the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is reported. This condition is based on the full use of the secondary electrons injected into the source plasma near the extraction region of source cavity, and allows ion extraction from a denser plasma. A new magnetic field configuration which

Liu Zhanwen; Zhang Wen; Zhao Hongwei; Yuan Ping; Zhang Xuezhen; Guo Xiaohong; Zhang Zimin; Li Xixia; Wang Hui; Feng Yucheng; Li Jinyu; Gao Jiyuan; Ma Baohua; Lei Hailiang; Zhou Sixin; Wang Yifang; Wei Baowen

1998-01-01

372

Historical Waste Retrieval and Clean-up Operations at Nuclear facility no.56, at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the different activities of the CEA research centre in Cadarache, located in the south of France, one of the most important involves cleaning, cleansing dismantling, decommissioning, and recovery of legacy wastes. This presentation will give an overview of the waste retrieval project from the historical interim storage facility called INB 56. The project is divided into three different sub-projects:

Santucci

2008-01-01

373

DICEF - A special Air Force facility for data acquisition and analysis and research in support of digital communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description is given of the Rome Air Development Center's Digital Communications Experimental Facility (DICEF), which is a laboratory dedicated to data acquisition and analysis, research, and development in digital communications. The communications processor can operate at any data rate up to 10 megabits per second. Real and simulated communications channels available include HF, wireline, and troposcatter. The support equipment,

J. B. McEvoy; N. J. Sturdevant

1974-01-01

374

The second phase of ATLAS: the continuation of a running THM test in the HADES underground research facility at Mol  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large-scale field experiment, called ATLAS for Admissible Thermal Loading for Argillaceous Storage, was designed as part of the Interclay II programme (1990–1994) managed by the European Commission (EC). This experiment, installed in the HADES Underground Research Facility (URF) at Mol, comprises a horizontal main borehole (19 m long) with heaters and two parallel boreholes (16 m long) with instrumentation.

Didier De Bruyn; Serge Labat

2002-01-01

375

Performance and uses of a refurbished 30-m former satellite communications antenna: The Georgia Tech Woodbury Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A class of large satellite communication antennas built in the 1970s for commercial purposes comprises a potential set of large antennas useful for education, research, satellite communications, or radio astronomy upon upgrade. Many of these facilities were abandoned as the advent of low-noise electronics obviated the need for such large antennas with their associated maintenance costs. Although many have sat

David R. DeBoer; Paul G. Steffes

1999-01-01

376

A new facility for Quaternary Geochronology in Spain: The National Research Centre for Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Burgos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new geochronology facility has been recently set up in Burgos, Spain, as part of the recently established National Research Centre for Human Evolution (CENIEH). The CENIEH is sponsored by governmental funding and was established to foster major advances in our understanding of human evolution through multidisciplinary research. As part of this initiative, a modern laboratory complex is emerging as an European facility for Geochronology and Geoarchaeology. The Geochronology laboratories include archaeomagnetism, electron spin resonance, luminescence, uranium-series, and a clean laboratory for sample preparation. The facility includes a 2G, 755-4K SRM superconducting magnetometer, a Bruker ESR spectrometer (EMXmicro-6/1 model) associated with a low-temperature control system, allowing ESR measurements at room and liquid nitrogen temperature, two Riso readers with a single-grain and pulsed OSL attachments, a ThermoFinnigan Neptune MC-ICP-MS, with a CETAC Aridus and an ESI Apex sample introduction system, a NewWave UP213 nm laser ablation facility, a NewWave Instr. Micromill and ancillary sample preparation and field equipment. The Geochronology group, GEB (Geochronology rEsearch group in Burgos) is being set up as a facility that provides auxiliary laboratory and general support to the scientific community interested in Quaternary studies, and in archaeological and paleontological sites. Methodological advancements in Quaternary dating, and inter-technique collaborative studies form an integral part of GEBs research activities. Current research projects include the chronology of the oldest human occupation of Europe (Atapuerca and Orce), north-African archaeological sites and integration with Plio-Pleistocene climatic changes, rates of incision and uplift of Cenozoic basins in Spain, and dating of ancient DNA sequences and early human occupation sites across Siberia and North America.

Parés, Josep M.; Duval, Mathieu; Arnold, Lee J.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.

2010-05-01

377

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

1991-01-01

378

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free-electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 micrometers . As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 104 to 107 greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0.5 to 100-micrometers range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility.

Newnam, Brian E.; Warren, Roger W.; Conradson, Steven D.; Goldstein, John C.; McVey, Brian D.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Elliott, C. James; Burns, M. J.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Chan, Kwok-Chi D.; Johnson, W. J.; Wang, Tai-San; Sheffield, Richard L.; Meier, Karl L.; Olsher, R. H.; Scott, Marion L.; Griggs, J. E.

1991-12-01

379

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03

380

Molecular Environmental Science: An Assessment of Research Accomplishments, Available Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, and Needs  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. ''EnviroSync'' recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G

2004-02-05

381

Molecular environmental science : an assessment of research accomplishments, available synchrotron radiation facilities, and needs.  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. EnviroSync* recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G. E., Jr.; Sutton, S. R.; Bargar, J. R.; Shuh, D. K.; Fenter, P. A.; Kemner, K. M.

2004-10-20

382

Testing and research capabilities at the Sandia Fast Pulsed Reactor Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A wide variety of space-based system components have been qualified for use through neutron irradiation testing performed at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) Facility. The SPR Facility is the operating location for two fast burst reactors, SPR II and SPR I...

D. T. Berry

1993-01-01

383

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: STORAGE/SEDIMENTATION FACILITIES FOR CONTROL OF STORM AND COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes applications of storage facilities in wet-weather flow (WWF) control and presents step-by-step procedures for the analysis and design of storage-treatment facilities. Retention, detention, and sedimentation storage are classified and described. International...

384

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report November 2008.  

SciTech Connect

FISH PRODUCTION: Final shocking of eggs was finished in the incubation. Egg enumeration for the 2008 brood was completed and the eggs are being incubated in 38 degree Fahrenheit chilled water. Don Larsen of NOAA made a request of eggs for research purposes and was able to acquire supplemental line eggs 10,555. Estimated density at the time of ponding in Mid-March of 2009 is approximately 43,869 fry per raceway after calculating an average fry loss of 2%. The end of the month totals for the 2007 brood reports 773,807 juveniles on hand with an overall average of 31.4 fish per pound. Tagging continues on the 2007 brood and is on pace to wrap up in early December. FISH CULTURE: Ponds are cleaned as needed and due to the colder water temperatures, the feeding frequency has been changed to three days a week. All ponds are sampled at the end of the month. Growth for production fish are adjusted accordingly as temperature dictates feeding levels. Torrential rain on the 12th turned the Yakima River extremely turbid. Fish tagging operations were halted and the ensuing conditions at the facility intake screens became a concern. Water flow to the wet well became restricted so the decision was made to shut the surface water (river) pumps down and turn on well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 to run water to the facility head box. This operation continued for twenty-four hours at which point normal operations were optimal and fish tagging resumed, although the river didn't clear up enough to feed the fish until the 17th. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,822 gallons/minute. Well No.2 is pumping water at a rate of 530 gallons per minute. All four river pumps are in operation and pumping 14,292 gallons/minute. ACCLIMATION SITES: Cle Elum staff has been working to prep the acclimation sites for the upcoming fish transfer before the snow falls. Thermographs at each site are changed weekly. AMB Tools performed routine maintenance on the compressor and Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the Jack Creek acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Snow tires are now on all vehicles and snow blowers were installed on the John Deere tractor and lawn tractor. The snowplow was also installed on the Ford one ton. The four Snowmobiles were serviced by Yamaha Jacks of Ellensburg. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Clean up occurs on Fridays of each week. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Water has been turned on to vertical incubator islands one and two. After eggs were transferred to vertical stacks cleaning of troughs began. WDFW crew inventoried eggs from isolettes and then transferred them to the vertical incubators. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four pumps are in operation and supplying the facility with 14,292 gallons/minute of water to rearing ponds. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 were turned on to supplement water flow to the facility as mentioned previously. Well No.5 was powered up but a winterizing valve malfunction wouldn't allow operation, we are currently working on it at this time. Well No.2 is pumping 530 gallons per minute and supplies well water to incubation and chiller. The pumps meter is recorded weekly. Test holes are monitored weekly and results are faxed to CH2MHILL afterward. SAFETY AND TRAINING: Ice melt and sand bags are popular items at the facility this month as freezing temperatures cause ground to become slippery and hazardous. GROUNDS: Van Alden's Plumbing installed a new commode in resident house No.411 and also inspected a plumbing problem at resident No.1131. Cle Elum staff along with WDFW staff worked to locate the spawning channel building back to the position it was at to have Greg Wallace of Wallace Electric hook electricity back up to the spawning shed. MEETINGS AND TOURS: Charlie attended a policy meeting at Cle Elum on the 18th. The Internal projects annual review took place at Cle Elum on the 19th and 20th. Bill Bosch continues to visit monthly to incorporate data into the YKFP data base. PERSONNEL: IHS employees traveled to Cle

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-09

385

Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.  

SciTech Connect

FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie, Simon and Vernon assisted with sorting and spawning Summer Chinook at the Wells hatchery for the Summer Chinook reintroduction program on the lower Yakima River. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 12,909 gallons/min. Four river pumps (12,400gpm) and one well pump No.2 (509gpm) are supplying water to the facility main head box and the egg incubation building. ACCLIMATION SITES: Easton had much activity in October, the electrical power panel that's switches commercial power operation to generator power (transfer switch) malfunctioned. Charlie called Wallace Electric as well as ASCO Services to trouble shoot the problem which has yet to be determined. Heaters have been turned on in all service buildings at the acclimation sites. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission traveled to Easton to install a pole to mount a satellite and a new ups backup system with new monitors and computers for pit tag data recording and transmitting. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tanks at Easton and Clark Flat. AMB Tools performed maintenance on the compressors at the acclimation sites as well as Cle Elum (5 total). VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Day Wireless performed maintenance on all handheld and vehicle radios. Day Wireless repaired radio communications (static noise) on the 6th also. All vehicles mileages and conditions are reported monthly to Toppenish. Cle Elum staff continues to clean and maintain all facility vehicles weekly. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Kevin of Raincountry was called in response to repairs needed to the water chiller system. Cle Elum staff winterized all irrigation as well as shop grounds. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the hatchery on the 22nd. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation room has been set up for transfer of eggs from isolation buckets to vertical stacks, temperature units are recorded daily. RESENTDENTIAL HOUSING: Residents irrigation has been winterized and fall fertilizer was applied to all grass on facility. Four Seasons performed maintenance on all heating sy

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-11

386

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report : December 1, 2008 - December 31, 2008.  

SciTech Connect

FISH PRODUCTION: Brood year 2008 production and experimental hatchery & supplemental crossed eggs continue to be incubated and chilled water at 380 Fahrenheit for the month. Temperature units are {approx}960 TU's at the end of the month. Hatching was observed at {approx}900 temperature units (TU's). The 2007 Brood year (BY) has approximately 773,477 juveniles on hand at the end of December, averaging 30.6 fish per pound. Fish tagging operations wrapped up on the 5th. Transportation of fish to acclimation sites is tentatively scheduled to begin January 12th. FISH CULTURE: Production pond cleaning continues on a weekly basis, and feeding continues to be performed two days per week due to the colder river water temperatures. Eggs in the incubation continue to be tempered in 38 degree water and temperature units recorded daily. On the 20th the river became too inclement for normal operations as the intake screens were covered with ice, at that time we shutdown two river pumps and turned on wells four and six to get 6,825 gallons of water. This was the operation at the facility for twenty-four hours at which point we were able to get back to normal operations. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,756 gallons/min. The river pumps are supplying 13,571 gallons per minute. Well pumps No.2 and No.4 are operating and supplying 1,185 gallons/min. More on well pumps in the well field maintenance section of this report. ACCLIMATION SITES: Preparation of acclimation sites for fish transfer was the main focus for the month of December. Each week thermographs that record water temperature have the data disc changed at the acclimations sites. Ford Excavation with assistance from YKFP maintenance has started clearing snow out of the Easton acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: The snowmobiles were taken in to have annual maintenance performed. The full-size John Deere tractor needed and was taken to Barnet Implement in Yakima. The tractor needed a new clutch installed and was picked up on the 31st. SHOP BUILDING MAINTENANCE: On the 12th the facility domestic water hydro pneumatic tank and its system malfunctioned. The problem persisted and had to be dealt with multiple times; first it caused the tank to over flow and floods the shop. Wallace Electric was called and after extensive monitoring of the tank, compressor and electrical operations an electrical relay switch was replaced. Weekly cleaning and tool inventory continues to be a priority. The shop is home to our liberation truck along with fish transfer equipment, fish pump and seine nets. ELECTRICAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The large generator is located in the electrical building and is checked daily for routine inspections. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation building is being used to clean and repair isolation buckets, egg incubation baskets and troughs. An experiment involving remote site incubators (RSI's) continued through the month. Chad Stockton, WDFW, records flows and monitors emergence of fry on a daily basis. Chad is working with Steve S. and Curt K. on the RSI's research along with spawning channel fry emergence. RIVERWATER COOLING FACILITY: The one pump in operation in this building is checked daily during our routine inspections, the variable pump is supplying water to the artificial spawning channel. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four river pumps are in operation and pumping {approx}13,571 gallons/min to the facility. The building is cleaned monthly and the air burst system is cycled daily during the morning checks. The crew continued weekly changing of the graph paper on the river temperature thermograph throughout the month, continuing this activity as part of the daily checks routine. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Wells No.1 and No.4 were in operation and supplying 1,185 gallons/minute to the facility and incubation building. Weekly test well readings are recorded and sent via fax to CH2MHILL. Also weekly well meter readings are recorded. Well No.5 had been determined to have a faulty drain valve while tryin

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2009-01-12

387

Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the facility license for the research reactor at the Dow Chemical Company  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation report for the application filed by the Dow Chemical Company for renewal of facility Operating License R-108 to continue to operate its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the grounds of the Michigan Division of the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan. The staff concludes that the Dow Chemical Company can continue to operate its reactor without endangering the health and safety of the public.

Not Available

1989-04-01

388

Disaster preparedness in biocontainment animal research facilities: developing and implementing an incident response plan (IRP).  

PubMed

Preparing for the wide variety of disasters that can occur is challenging for any animal research facility, but the level of concern for human and animal health rises significantly when infectious agents and toxins are part of the scenario. Federal regulations provide detailed requirements for the development of an incident response plan (IRP) when select agents and toxins (SATs) are used. In addition to the usual issues associated with disaster planning, the IRP must address concerns associated with the potential theft, loss, or release of SATs that may affect both institutional personnel and the surrounding community. The level of detail in the IRP and the intensity of training should be appropriate for the level of risk involved. Regulations describe certain basic requirements but do not address the risks of SAT-exposed animals, which have been the subject of additional guidance to help implement regulatory requirements. A 2008 joint publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service describes scenarios in which SAT-exposed animals are handled in the same manner as the agent or toxin itself for the purpose of reporting a SAT theft, loss, or release. Events that resulted from the impact of Hurricane Ike at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston provide a valuable opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of the federal regulations and to build on lessons learned from this disaster. These lessons can help to supplement the regulatory requirements and improve the safety and security of handling both SATs and animals exposed to them during and after an emergency situation. PMID:20375434

Swearengen, James R; Vargas, Karen J; Tate, Mallory K; Linde, N S

2010-01-01

389

Operations and research at the US EPA Incineration Research Facility: Annual report for FY93. Report for October 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses a pilot-scale rotary kiln incineration system (RKS) and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsite laboratory facilities. During fiscal year 1993, two major test programs were completed at the IRF: an evaluation of rotary kiln incinerator operation at low to moderate temperatures, and a series of tests in which simulated mixed wastes were incinerated to support the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Results of a pilot-scale test program previously completed, a parametric evaluation of the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a Calvert Flux-Force/Condensation scrubber system, were reported during FY93. Finally, a fabric filter air pollution control system, including flue gas reheat, was incorporated into the RKS. This report summarizes all efforts completed or onging at the IRF during FY93.

Waterland, L.R.

1994-06-01

390

Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under Task Order 0001 the MREF's laboratories and facilities were maintained and operated in compliance with government regulations. The MREF successfully passed all inspections and certifications. Major contract activities performed include: conducting i...

C. T. Olson R. P. Casillas

2006-01-01

391

Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed acti...

1993-01-01

392

Lambdastation: a forwarding and admission control service to interface production network facilities with advanced research network paths  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, there has been a great deal of research effort and funding put into the deployment of optical-based, advanced technology wide-area networks. Fermilab and CalTech have initiated a project to enable our production network facilities to exploit these advanced research network facilities. Our objective is to forward designated data transfers across these advanced wide area networks on a per-flow basis, making use our capacious production-use storage systems connected to the local campus network. To accomplish this, we intend to develop a dynamically provisioned forwarding service that would provide alternate path forwarding onto available wide area advanced research networks. The service would dynamically reconfigure forwarding of specific flows within our local production-use network facilities, as well as provide an interface to enable applications to utilize the service. We call this service LambdaStation. If one envisions wide area optical network paths as high bandwidth data railways, then LambdaStation would functionally be the railroad terminal that regulates which flows at the local site get directed onto the high bandwidth data railways. LambdaStation is a DOE-funded SciDac research project in its very early stage of development.

DeMar, Philip; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

2004-12-01

393

Barriers to communication and cooperation in addressing community impacts of radioactive releases from research facilities.  

SciTech Connect

Two instances of research facilities responding to public scrutiny will be discussed. The first concerns emissions from a ?tritium labeling facility? operated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); the second deals with releases of plutonium from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). There are many parallels between these two cases, both of which are still ongoing. In both, the national laboratory is the acknowledged source of low-level (by regulatory standards) radioactive contamination in the community. A major purpose of both investigations is to determine the degree of the contamination and the threat it poses to public health and the environment. The examining panel or committee is similarly constituted in the two cases, including representatives from all four categories of stakeholders: decision makers; scientists and other professionals doing the analysis/assessment; environmental activist or public interest groups; and ?ordinary? citizens (nearly everyone else not in one or more of the first three camps). Both involved community participation from the beginning. The levels of outrage over the events triggering the assessment are comparable; though ?discovered? or ?appreciated? only a few years ago, the release of radiation in both cases occurred or began occurring more than a decade ago. The meetings have been conducted in a similar manner, with comparable frequency, often utilizing the services of professional facilitators. In both cases, the sharply contrasting perceptions of risk commonly seen between scientists and activists were present from the beginning, though the contrast was sharper and more problematical in the Berkeley case. Yet, the Livermore case seems to be progressing towards a satisfactory resolution, while the Berkeley case remains mired in ill-will, with few tangible results after two years of effort. We perceive a wide gap in negotiation skills (at the very least), and a considerable difference in willingness to compromise, between the environmental activist groups participating in the two cases. A degree of contentiousness existed from the start among the participants in the Berkeley case?particularly between the environmental activists and the scientists/regulators?that was not approached in the Livermore case, and which was and still is severe enough to stifle meaningful progress. The Berkeley activists are considerably more aggressive, we believe, in arguing their points of view, making demands about what should be done, and verbally assailing the scientists and government regulators. We offer the following comments on the barriers to communication and cooperation that distinguish the Berkeley and Livermore cases. In no particular order, they are (a) the presence of a higher degree of polarization between the Berkeley activists and the ?establishment,? as represented by government scientists and regulators, (b) the absence, in the Berkeley case, of an activist leader with skills and effectiveness comparable to a well-known leader in Livermore, (c) frequent displays by several of the Berkeley activists of incivility, distrust, and disrespect for the regulators and scientists, (d) extraordinary difficulties in reaching consensus in the Tritium Issues Work Group meetings, perhaps because goals diverged among the factions, (e) a considerable degree of resentment by the Berkeley activists over the imbalance in conditions of participation, pitting well-paid, tax-supported professionals against ?citizen volunteers,? (f) the brick wall that divides the perspectives of ?no safe dose? and ?levels below regulatory concern? when trying to reach conclusions about radiation dangers to the community, and (g) unwillingness to consider both sides of the risk-reward coin: benefits to the community and society at large of the tritium labeling activity, vs. the health risk from small quantities of tritium released to the environment.

Harrach, R J; Peterson, S

1999-05-05

394

Interpersonal amplification of risk? Citizen discussions and their impact on perceptions of risks and benefits of a biological research facility.  

PubMed

Much risk communication research has demonstrated how mass media can influence individual risk perceptions, but lacks a comprehensive conceptual understanding of another key channel of communication: interpersonal discussion. Using the social amplification of risk as a theoretical framework, we consider the potential for discussions to function as amplification stations. We explore this possibility using data from a public opinion survey of residents living in potential locations for a new biological research facility in the United States. Controlling for a variety of key information variables, our results show that two dimensions of discussion-frequency and valence-have impacts on residents' perceptions of the facility's benefits and its risks. We also explore the possibility that an individual's overall attitude moderates the effect of discussion on their perceptions of risks and benefits. Our results demonstrate the potential for discussions to operate as amplifiers or attenuators of perceptions of both risks and benefits. PMID:21039705

Binder, Andrew R; Scheufele, Dietram A; Brossard, Dominique; Gunther, Albert C

2010-10-29

395

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-11-13

396

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Third Quarter: April 01–June 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive

Sivaraman, C

2011-08-18

397

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report First Quarter: October 01-December 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-02-28

398

Radiation technology facilities operating at the italian ENEA-Casaccia research center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ENEA Casaccia Research Center, 20 km far from Rome, is the main Italian technological research Center, with more than 2000 scientists involved in several advanced research fields (materials, energy, environment, etc.). Within the frame of radiation te...

A. Tata A. Festinesi R. Rosa

1998-01-01

399

Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility  

SciTech Connect

Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

2004-10-04

400

Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility  

SciTech Connect

Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

2004-10-01

401

Catalog of Resources Outlining Particular Facilities, Major Projects, and Research Training and Career Development Opportunities of the National Institute on Aging, the Veterans Administration, and the National Institute of Dental Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The catalog outlines the particular facilities, major projects, and research training and career development opportunities of the National Institute on Aging, the Veterans Administration; and the National Institute of Dental Research for use in connection...

1986-01-01

402

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime.

Sisterson, DL

2010-04-08

403

A Guide for Planning Facilities for Occupational Preparation Programs in Metallurgy Technology. Interim Report. Research 28.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The major purpose of this guide is to elicit the information necessary for writing educational specifications for facilities to house technical education programs in metallurgy. It is organized in these parts: (1) Part I discusses the major purpose, underlying assumptions, recent instructional trends, and guiding principles utilized in the…

German, Carl, Jr.

404

French Practice in the AREA of Seismic Hazard Assessment on Nuclear Facility Sites and Related Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The methodology put into practice in the analysis of seismic hazard on the site of a nuclear facility relies upon a deterministic approach and endeavors to account for the particularities of every site considered insofar as available data and techniques a...

B. Mohammadioun

1986-01-01

405

Issues Related to the Use of Animals in Biocontainment Research Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expansion and improvement of high-containment ani- mal facilities has been driven by terrorism, economics, the emergence of new pathogens, and the re-emergence of other pathogens in new areas. Working with highly infectious viral agents requires a team of trained scientists, laboratory technicians, veterinarians, animal care staff, biological safety officers, engineers, and physical plant staff to ensure safety, biocontainment, and

John Copps

406

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

2011-09-01

407

Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3-6 month intervals thereafter. Local control rates were estimated according to WHO criteria. The evaluation included a physical examination (ultrasonography and CT, for some cases) and a complete blood count. Acute and late side effects were scored according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Reactions occurring during RT or within the first 3 months after RT were scored as acute reactions. Results: 49 patients were followed-up (ranging from 1-13 months) and 2 were lost to follow-up. The tumors responded very well to the treatment in all patients. The tumor volumes started to regress during the RT or at the end of the RT, and up to 3-6 months, majority of tumors disappeared completely or almost. So far, no severe side-effects and no local recurrence within the treated volume have been observed. Conclusions: The data demonstrated that heavy ion radiotherapy for patients with shallow-seated tumors is clinical effective and safe, especially for patients with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies.

Zhang, Hong

408

Report of the Research Results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in Fiscal 1986.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This book contains a large number of reports of studies made in 1986 through joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and electron beam type accelerator which are installed in the Nuclear engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Un...

1987-01-01

409

Rain Garden Research at EPAâ??s Urban Watershed Research Facility: Promoting Nitrate Removal through Rain Garden Design  

EPA Science Inventory

Rain gardens are designed to infiltrate stormwater, capture suspended solids, sorb heavy metals and phosphorus, and transform nutrients through biological processes. Most studies have found a low capacity for stormwater nitrate removal. Research at the Urban Watershed Managemen...

410

Design and operation of a two-phase flow research facility  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe the new two-phase flow facility that has been constructed at Brown University. Included is the design philosophy that led us to select a blow-down, Freon tunnel as the means of studying the flow of a pure substance undergoing liquid-vapor phase changes. Each component is discussed from the initial design considerations, through sizing calculations, to actual system specifications. Special emphasis is placed on the instrumentation and automatic data acquisition and processing system. Finally a sampling of results obtained so far is presented. Section 1 gives the reasons for the construction of the facility and lists some of the uses and objectives of its operation. The reader can gain a good overview of the facility from Section 2 without a great deal of detail. In Section 3 we present the rationale for the particular design choices that were made and give details about the selection and sizing of all major components except the instrumentation. The latter subject is treated in Section 4 where we discuss the temperature and pressure probes, mass flow rate measurement, and other instrumentation. Section 5 is devoted to the test section proper where all the two-phase flow measurements and observations take place. The electronic data acquisition and facility control system is the subject of Section 6. Results on two-phase friction factors and flow pattern observations in a horizontal pipe are given in Section 7 along with the ranges of flow that have been covered so far. In capsule summary, the two-phase flow test facility is operational and has demonstrated a wide range of flow conditions from purely liquid to purely vapor through a variety of two-phase situations. Only horizontal flows have been studied so far, but the test section has been designed to operate in inclined positions up to fully vertical. The instrumentation performs very well as does the fully automatic control system. We believe the test facility is capable of yielding highly reliable and accurate data on two-phase flows which will be of great value in practice and in validating the various theories that have been put forth to describe this phenomenon.

Maeder, P.F.; Kestin, J.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Olia, H.

1982-05-01

411

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01

412

32 CFR 22.310 - Statutes concerning certain research, development, and facilities construction grants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (i) In the case of a new grant for research and development, there is...In the case of a follow-on grant for research and development, or of a grant...of higher educationânew grants for research and development. In the...

2009-07-01

413

32 CFR 22.310 - Statutes concerning certain research, development, and facilities construction grants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (i) In the case of a new grant for research and development, there is...In the case of a follow-on grant for research and development, or of a grant...of higher educationânew grants for research and development. In the...

2010-07-01

414

Reconstitution and Upgrade of the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility in the Basement Medical Room of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The M-011 thermal neutron beam has been reconstituted and upgraded to provide a high intensity and high quality facility for preclinical and certain clinical studies. Intensities of thermal neutrons in the beam range from 5.0-8.5 x 109 n cm-2 s-1. Beam contamination is at a low level where it has no practical influence on beam performance. New computer controlled dose and beam monitoring systems have been implemented which assure precise dose delivery and redundant safety interlocks. An additional beam shutter and massive shielding in the back of the medical room have been added which significantly reduce room background and now permit staff entry without the necessity for lowering the reactor power. This system is needed for BNCT research by the MIT group as well as other US groups. This need became acute with the closure of the BMRR which previously had the only high quality thermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT in the USA.

Harling, Otto, K.; Riley, Kent, J.; Binns, Peter J.

2004-12-31

415

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-08-31

416

Insights into the impact and use of research results in a residential long-term care facility: a case study  

PubMed Central

Background Engaging end-users of research in the process of disseminating findings may increase the relevance of findings and their impact for users. We report findings from a case study that explored how involvement with the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC) study influenced management and staff at one of 36 TREC facilities. We conducted the study at ‘Restwood’ (pseudonym) nursing home because the Director of Care engaged actively in the study and TREC data showed that this site differed on some areas from other nursing homes in the province. The aims of the case study were two-fold: to gain a better understanding of how frontline staff engage with the research process, and to gain a better understanding of how to share more detailed research results with management. Methods We developed an Expanded Feedback Report for use during this study. In it, we presented survey results that compared Restwood to the best performing site on all variables and participating sites in the province. Data were collected regarding the Expanded Feedback Report through interviews with management. Data from staff were collected through interviews and observation. We used content analysis to derive themes to describe key aspects related to the study aims. Results We observed the importance of understanding organizational routines and the impact of key events in the facility’s environment. We gleaned additional information that validated findings from prior feedback mechanisms within TREC. Another predominant theme was the sense that the opportunity to engage in a research process was reaffirming for staff (particularly healthcare aides)—what they did and said mattered, and TREC provided a means of having one’s voice heard. We gained valuable insight from the Director of Care about how to structure and format more detailed findings to assist with interpretation and use of results. Conclusions Four themes emerged regarding staff engagement with the research process: sharing feedback reports from the TREC study; the meaning of TREC to staff; understanding organizational context; and using the study feedback for improvement at Restwood. This study has lessons for researchers on how to share research results with study participants, including management.

2012-01-01

417

Research of areal density diagnostic technique on Shenguang III laser prototype facility.  

PubMed

In the test run of Shenguang III laser prototype facility, under the low density condition, the yield ratio method was used to measure the fuel areal density. Considering the uncertainty of the neutron yield, detectors with different efficiencies were used. The clear secondary-neutron signals in inertial confinement fusion experiments were obtained for the first time in China, and the values of the areal density were deduced. PMID:19044390

Kang, Xiaotao; Chen, Jiabin; Deng, Caibo; Liu, Zhongjie; Zhan, Xiayu; Chen, Ming

2008-08-01

418

Research of areal density diagnostic technique on Shenguang III laser prototype facility  

SciTech Connect

In the test run of Shenguang III laser prototype facility, under the low density condition, the yield ratio method was used to measure the fuel areal density. Considering the uncertainty of the neutron yield, detectors with different efficiencies were used. The clear secondary-neutron signals in inertial confinement fusion experiments were obtained for the first time in China, and the values of the areal density were deduced.

Kang Xiaotao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chen Jiabin; Deng Caibo; Liu Zhongjie; Zhan Xiayu; Chen Ming [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2008-08-15

419

Testing and research capabilities at the Sandia Fast Pulsed Reactor Facility  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of space-based system components have been qualified for use through neutron irradiation testing performed at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) Facility. The SPR Facility is the operating location for two fast burst reactors, SPR II and SPR III, which have been used to induce neutron and gamma damage in electronic components and other materials for customers in the Department of Energy, Department of Defense, NASA,, and the private sector. In addition to the pulse mode of operation, during which peak fluxes of up to lel9 n/cm{sup 2}{minus}s are achieved, the steady state mode allows for the long term irradiation of components and systems in a fast neutron environment at a flux of up to 5e11 n/cm{sup 2}{minus}s. The SPR reactors are operated in a 9.2 meter diameter exposure cell, or Kiva, suitable for the irradiation of large test articles external to the reactors. Currently, a new upgraded version of SPR Ill (SPR IIIM) is in fabrication; a unique feature of SPR IIIM is its 19 cm (usable diameter) central irradiation cavity, the largest of any US fast burst reactor. An improved cooling system permits continuous operation at power levels in excess of 20 kW{sub t}. The SPR Facility is also the operating site for a critical assembly which was used to characterize prototypic fuels in arrays appropriate for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program. Work continues on use of the facility to design, build, and operate critical assemblies for a diverse customer base.

Berry, D.T.

1993-10-01

420

Testing and Research Capabilities at the Sandia Fast Pulsed Reactor Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A wide variety of space-based system components have been qualified for use through neutron irradiation testing performed at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) Facility. The SPR Facility is the operating location for two fast burst reactors, SPR II and SPR III, which have been used to induce neutron and gamma damage in electronic components and other materials for customers in the Department of Energy, Department of Defense, NASA, and the private sector. In addition to the pulse mode of operation, during which peak fluxes of up to 1023 n/m2-s are achieved, the steady state mode allows for the long term irradiation of components and systems in a fast neutron environment at a flux of up to 5×1015 n/m2-s. The SPR reactors are operated in a 9.2 meter diameter exposure cell, or Kiva, suitable for the irradiation of large test articles external to the reactors. Currently, a new upgraded version of SPR III (SPR HIM) is in fabrication; a unique feature of SPR HIM is its 190 mm (usable diameter) central irradiation cavity, the largest of any U.S. fast burst reactor. An improved cooling system permits continuous operation at power levels in excess of 20 kWt. The SPR Facility is also the operating site for a critical assembly which was used to characterize prototypic fuels in arrays appropriate for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program. Work continues on use of the facility to design, build, and operate critical assemblies for a diverse customer base.

Berry, Donald T.

1994-07-01

421

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas.;\\u000a;\\u000aThe facility will become the benchmark for validating new

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-01-01

422

Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

2012-09-30

423

Metering Research Facility Program: Tests of candidate probes for flow pulsation detection. Technical memo. September 1995-June 1996  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Metering Research Facility (MRF) test program, two probes sensitive to pulsating flow rate have been tested. The purpose of the tests was to determine the effectiveness of these devices for identifying pulsation that can adversely affect the measurement accuracy of turbine meters. One of the test devices was a solid state pyroelectric anemometer and the other was a Pitot tube with a miniature pressure sensor imbedded in the probe head. The functionally and responsiveness of both probes were measured in a gas flow laboratory at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The tests were conducted at a line pressure of 30 psia and a gas temperature of 68 deg F. Two different flow rates, 160 and 300 acfm, were used for the tests. Each device was tested using five to seven different pulsation frequencies.

McKee, R.J.

1996-11-01

424

Coarse coal hydrotransport testing at the Hydraulic Transport Research Facility - 2-inch by 0 clean coal, 12-inch pipeline  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report describes a series of coarse coal hydraulic transport tests performed at the Hydraulic Transport Research Facility at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Bruceton, PA. The primary objective of the research covered in this volume was to examine the performance of the 12-inch (300 mm) pipeline in transporting clean, 2-inch by 0 (51 mm by minus 50 mm) coal at velocities ranging from 5 to 18 ft/s (1.5 to 5/5 m/s) and concentrations ranging from 15 to 55 pct by weight. Head loss and deposition conditions for future system design were quantified, and the effects of coal size distribution on hydraulic parameters, and the coal degradation rates caused by the pipeline and pumps, are also discussed.

Henderson, M.E.

1985-01-01

425

Dying in a rural residential aged care facility: an action research and reflection project to improve end of life care to residents with a non-malignant disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative research explored end of life care provided to people dying with a non malignant disease in two Australian rural, residential aged care facilities. Residential aged care facilities provide end of life care for many people dying from non malignant diseases. The illness trajectory in non malignant diseases can be difficult to predict and symptom management can be challenging.

Joanne Rowley

2010-01-01

426

OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH AT THE U.S. EPA INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY: ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY94  

EPA Science Inventory

Fiscal year 1994 (FY94, October 1, 1993 through September 30,1994) saw the continuation of incineration research testing efforts at the IRF. uring the year, two major pilot-scale programs were completed and a third carried to near-completion, and two bench-scale test programs of ...

427

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 01–September 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive. New information is highlighted in blue text. New information about processed data by the developer is highlighted in red text.

Sivaraman, C

2011-11-02

428

Spallation target-moderator-reflector studies at the Weapons Neutron Research facility. [800-MeV p  

SciTech Connect

Basic neutronics data, initiated by 800-MeV proton spallation reactions, are important to spallation neutron source development and electronuclear fuel production. Angle-dependent and energy-dependent neutron production cross sections, energy-dependent and total neutron yields, thermal and epithermal neutron surface and beam fluxes, and fertile-to-fissile conversion ratios are being measured. The measurements are being done at the Weapons Neutron Research facility on a variety of targets and target-moderator-reflector configurations. The experiments are relevant to the above applications, and provide data to validate computer codes. Preliminary results are presented and compared to calculated predictions. 13 figures.

Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Prael, S.D.; Robinson, H.; Howe, S.D.

1980-01-01

429

Research facilities of International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures at Wroclaw  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw, Poland is financed by the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Polish Academy of Sciences and Russian Academy of Sciences as the main contributors. But the scientists from Germany, UK and other countries are also users of the Laboratory facilities. The Laboratory offers the measurements of the magnetic, transport and some optical properties, and magnetostriction both in permanent magnetic fields (Bitter and superconducting coils) up to 20 T, and in quasi-pulsed magnetic field up to 55 T with pulse duration of about 0.1 s in the temperature range 0.7-300 K.

Suski, W.; Palewski, T.; Nizhankovskii, V. I.; Klamut, J.

2006-11-01

430

The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This reports presents the operating results for Run 252 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode (CC-ITSL) using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability in the CC-ITSL mode with catalytic-catalytic reactors and with ash recycle. Run 252 began on 26 November 1986 and continued through 3 February 1987. During this period 214.4 MF tons of Illinois No. 6 coal were fed in 1250 hours of operation. 3 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01

431

Hoshasei haikibutsu no shokyaku shori ni okeru haigasu joka sochi ni kansuru jikkenteki kenkyu. (Experimental research on exhaust gas purifying facilities in incinerating treatment of radioactive wastes).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Among the research on the incinerating treatment of combustible low level wastes, three items, that is, combustible low level radioactive wastes and incinerating treatment method, wet type exhaust gas purifying facilities and ceramic filter type dry exhau...

C. Machida

1988-01-01

432

Characterization of Endotoxin and Mouse Allergen Exposures in Mouse Facilities and Research Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Researchers and technicians who use mice in research are exposed to complex mixtures containing mouse allergen, endotoxin and particulates from animals, bedding and feed. The particle characteristics of these different exposures, and whether they are encountered together or separately, are important to better understand their adjuvant and allergic effects. Endotoxin and mouse allergen are derived from the same animal

KARIN A. PACHECO; CHARLES McCAMMON; PETER S. THORNE; MARSHA E. O'NEILL; ANDREW H. LIU; JOHN W. MARTYNY; MICHAEL VANDYKE; LEE S. NEWMAN; CECILE S. ROSE

2006-01-01

433

MEDES clinical research facility as a tool to prepare ISSA space flights  

Microsoft Academic Search

This new multi-disciplinary medical experimentation center provides the ideal scientific, medical and technical environment required for research programs and to prepare international space station Alpha (ISSA) missions, where space and healthcare industries can share their expertise. Different models are available to simulate space flight effects (bed-rest, confinement,…). This is of particular interest for research in Human psychology, physiology, physiopathology and

A. Maillet; A. Pavy-Le Traon

1998-01-01

434

IBRO Survey of Research Facilities and Manpower in Brain Sciences in the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. component of a worldwide survey sponsored by the International Brain Research Organization, the U.S. survey contains information on 4,245 researchers in 373 organizations furnished by 880 respondents to a questionnaire. Descriptions and tables co...

1968-01-01

435

Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at

Masayuki Ono; M. G. Bell; R. E. Bell; S. Bernabei; J. M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; T. M. Biewer; W. Blanchard; J. Boedo; C. Bush; J. Chrzanowski; D. S. Darrow; L. Dudek; R. Feder; J. R. Ferron; J. Foley; E. D. Fredrickson; D. A. Gates; G. Gettelfinger; T. Gibney; R. Harvey; R. Hatcher; W. Heidbrink; T. R. Jarboe; D. W. Johnson; M. Kalish; R. Kaita; S. M. Kaye; C. Kessel; S. Kubota; H. W. Kugel; G. Labik; B. P. Leblanc; K. C. Lee; F. M. Levinton; J. Lowrance; R. Maingi; J. Manickam; R. Maqueda; R. Marsala; D. Mastravito; E. Mazzucato; S. S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; T. Munsat; B. A. Nelson; C. Neumeyer; N. Nishino; H. K. Park; S. F. Paul; T. Peebles; E. Perry; Y.-K. M. Peng; C. K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; S. Ramakrishnan; R. Raman; P. Roney; A. L. Roquemore; P. M. Ryan; S. A. Sabbagh; H. Schneider; C. H. Skinner; D. R. Smith; A. C. Sontag; V. Soukhanovskii; T. Stevenson; D. Stotler; B. C. Stratton; D. Stutman; D. W. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; G. Taylor; K. L. Tritz; A. Von Halle; J. Wilgen; M. Williams; J. R. Wilson; I. Zatz; W. Zhu; S. J. Zweben; R. Akers; P. Beiersdorfer; P. T. Bonoli; C. Bourdelle; M. D. Carter; C. S. Chang; W. Choe; W. Davis; S. J. Diem; C. Domier; R. Ellis; P. C. Efthimion; A. Field; M. Finkenthal; E. Fredd; G. Y. Fu; A. Glasser; R. J. Goldston; L. R. Grisham; N. Gorelenkov; L. Guazzotto; R. J. Hawryluk; P. Heitzenroeder; K. W. Hill; W. Houlberg; J. C. Hosea; D. Humphreys; C. Jun; J. H. Kim; S. Krasheninnikov; L. L. Lao; S. G. Lee; J. Lawson; N. C. Luhmann; T. K. Mau; M. M. Menon; O. Mitarai; M. Nagata; G. Oliaro; D. Pacella; R. Parsells; A. Pigarov; G. D. Porter; A. K. Ram; D. Rasmussen; M. Redi; G. Rewoldt; J. Robinson; E. Ruskov; J. Schmidt; I. Semenov; K. Shaing; K. Shinohara; M. Schaffer; P. Sichta; X. Tang; J. Timberlake; M. Wade; W. R. Wampler; Z. Wang; R. Woolley; G. A. Wurden; X. Xu

2005-01-01

436

Calf Health, Performance, and Experimental Results Under a Commercial-Research Facility and Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

A salmonella outbreak in the calf research unit at the Purina Research Farm increased mortality during the 1st mo of life from a previous average of 1% to 10% during 1973 and 1974. Sporadic scouring and decreased weight gain also resulted while calves were on milk replacer or whole milk diets. Three of 37 calves were infected by salmonella at

A. F. Kertz

1977-01-01

437

DEVELOPMENT OF BIOSAFETY LEVEL-2 COMMERCIAL-SCALE PROCESSING FACILITY AT ERRC FOR FOOD PATHOGEN RESEARCH  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Food safety microbiological research to improve existing technology or to develop new technology for eliminating and/or controlling a particular foodborne pathogen in a target food system is often conducted under laboratory conditions. Such research findings must be validated under commercial-scale...

438

Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron

N. E. Holden; J. P. Hu; D. D. Greenberg; R. N. Reciniello

1998-01-01

439

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility upgrades project - A model for waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility, constructed in 1952, is currently undergoing a major, multi-year construction project. Many of the operations required under this project (i.e., design, demolition, decontamination, construction, and waste management) mimic the processes required of a large scale decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) job and are identical to the requirements of any of several upgrades projects anticipated for LANL and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. For these reasons the CMR Upgrades Project is seen as an ideal model facility - to test the application, and measure the success of - waste minimization techniques which could be brought to bear on any of the similar projects. The purpose of this paper will be to discuss the past, present, and anticipated waste minimization applications at the facility and will focus on the development and execution of the project`s {open_quotes}Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Strategic Plan.{close_quotes}

Burns, M.L.; Durrer, R.E.; Kennicott, M.A.

1996-07-01