Science.gov

Sample records for work study note

  1. Revised Study Design for Final Phase of the Change Agent Study. Study of Change Agent Programs: A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, G.; And Others

    The Rand change agent study was designed to determine the factors for successful implementation and continuation of selected federal programs--the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title III, Innovation Projects; ESEA Title VII, Bilingual Projects; Vocational Education Part D, Exemplary Programs; and the Right-to-Read program. This report…

  2. Summary of Revised Study Design for Change Agent Study. Study of Change Agent Programs: A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincus, J.; Greenwood, P.

    During 1973-75, the Rand Corporation conducted a study of federally funded change agent programs to determine the factors for successful change in the schools at the local, state, and federal levels. The programs included the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title III, Innovation Projects; ESEA Title VII, Bilingual Projects;…

  3. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velsquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes

  4. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes…

  5. Women: work and employment -- some notes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, M; Sujaya, C P; Jain, D

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses recent literature on women's work in India, provides commentary on some outcomes of women's work and research findings on women's work, identifies differences of opinion on policies and programs, and offers future strategies. The number of entries on Indian women's employment increases every year and offers a range of specialized information. Studies focus on the characteristics of women's work, debates about what should be considered as work, trends, market activity by occupation and gender, casual rural labor, inter-regional and inter-class variations, women's poverty and low wages, consequences of using the household as a unit of analysis, women's survival strategies, and home-based employment options. There is widespread agreement that almost all poor women are engaged in some form of income earning work. Among the Indian population without assets, women have higher work participation rates. In low resource households, women's earnings satisfy survival needs. Sex disaggregated data is needed at all levels. Women manage multiple roles that tax their nutritional status, create emotional pressure, and require an energy expenditure that is underestimated. Various groups of women are being recognized, such as female heads of households, widows, destitute women, and women impoverished due to male out-migration. Women's work tends to be the most backbreaking, laborious, low skilled, and poorly paid. Women's studies in the future must examine whether economic theories remain the same when a gendered analysis is accounted for. It is posited that women's work is not marginal but central. Development has not recognized this. PMID:12347366

  6. Shooting Gallery Notes. Working Paper #22. Preliminary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgois, Philippe

    This paper contains ethnographic participant-observation field notes taken on a one-night visit to a "shooting gallery" in East Harlem (New York City) along with background information and commentary. East Harlem, also referred to as "El Barrio" or Spanish Harlem, is a 200-square block neighborhood on the upper East Side of Manhattan in New York…

  7. 7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD TRAVERSING DISTANT RIDGE BEYOND BRIDGE. SEEN FROM WEST OF HIGHWAY FROM OLD HIGHWAY LOOP. LOOKING E. - Lassen Park Road, Mineral, Tehama County, CA

  8. Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. 5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK OF THE PARAPET WALL AND REMAINS OF 1920 TIMBER AND CONCRETE FLOORING SYSTEM. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  10. Mysore study: A study of suicide notes

    PubMed Central

    Namratha, P.; Kishor, M.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suicide is one of the leading causes of preventable deaths. Recent data suggest South India as one of the regions with highest suicide rates in the world. In 2013, 134,799 people committed suicide in India according to the statistics released by the National Crime Records Bureau. Suicide note is one of the most important sources to understand suicide, which may be beneficial in suicide prevention. Studies on suicidal notes from this part of the world are sparse. Objective: The aim was to study the themes in suicide notes that might be useful in prevention strategies. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of all suicide notes of those individuals who committed suicide between 2010 and 2013 available with Police Department, Mysore district was obtained and analyzed. Results: A total of 22 suicide note were available. A majority of suicide note was in age group of 1640 years (86%) and most were men (59%). All suicide notes were handwritten, the majority (70%) in regional language Kannada. Length of notes varied from just few words to few pages. Contents of suicide notes included apology/shame/guilt (80%), love for those left behind (55%) and instruction regarding practical affairs (23%). Most have blamed none for the act (50%). 23% mentioned that they are committing suicide to prove their innocence. 32% mentioned a last wish. Conclusion: The majority of suicidal note contained guilt which is a strong indicator of possible depression in deceased. Creating awareness about suicide among public and ensuring access to professionals trained in suicide prevention is need of the hour in this part of the world. PMID:26816426

  11. Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often

  12. Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often…

  13. Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M. . Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. )

    1993-07-01

    In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

  14. Noted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunberg, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

  15. Asymptotic analysis, Working Note No. 1: Basic concepts and definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1993-07-01

    In this note we introduce the basic concepts of asymptotic analysis. After some comments of historical interest we begin by defining the order relations O, o, and O{sup {number_sign}}, which enable us to compare the asymptotic behavior of functions of a small positive parameter {epsilon} as {epsilon} {down_arrow} 0. Next, we introduce order functions, asymptotic sequences of order functions and more general gauge sets of order functions and define the concepts of an asymptotic approximation and an asymptotic expansion with respect to a given gauge set. This string of definitions culminates in the introduction of the concept of a regular asymptotic expansion, also known as a Poincare expansion, of a function f : (0, {epsilon}{sub o}) {yields} X, where X is a normed vector space of functions defined on a domain D {epsilon} R{sup N}. We conclude the note with the asymptotic analysis of an initial value problem whose solution is obtained in the form of a regular asymptotic expansion.

  16. Asymptotic analysis: Working note {number_sign}3, boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1993-09-01

    In this chapter the authors discuss the asymptotic approximation of functions that display boundary-layer behavior. The purpose here is to introduce the basic concepts underlying the phenomenon, to illustrate its importance, and to describe some of the fundamental tools available for its analysis. To achieve their purpose in the clearest way possible, the authors will work with functions that are assumed to be given explicitly -- that is, functions f : (0,{epsilon}{sub 0}) {yields} X whose expressions are known, at least in principle. Only in the following chapter will they begin the study of functions that are given implicitly as solutions of boundary value problems -- the real stuff of which singular perturbation theory is made. Boundary-layer behavior is associated with asymptotic expansions that are regular {open_quotes}almost everywhere{close_quotes} -- that is, expansions that are regular on every compact subset of the domain of definition, but not near the boundary. These regular asymptotic expansions can be continued in a certain sense all the way up to the boundary, but a separate analysis is still necessary in the boundary layer. The boundary-layer analysis is purely local and aims at constructing local approximations in the neighborhood of each point of the singular part of the boundary. The problem of finding an asymptotic approximation is thus reduced to matching the various local approximations to the existing regular expansion valid in the interior of the domain. The authors are thinking, for example, of fluid flow (viscosity), combustion (Lewis number), and superconductivity (Ginzburg-Landau parameter) problems. Their solution may remain smooth over a wide range of parameter values, but as the parameters approach critical values, complicated patterns may emerge.

  17. Dysphoria among Hispanic Working Women: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napholz, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Five affective and personality instruments were completed by 126 urban Hispanic working women, aged 18-65. Dysphoria was positively related to role conflict and negatively related to masculinity (instrumentality), life satisfaction, and self-esteem (the latter 3 having positive correlations with each other). Educational attainment was negatively…

  18. Online Notes: Differential Effects of Studying Complete or Partial Graphically Organized Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors investigated in this study the effects of two electronic notes conditions (complete vs. partial) and two testing conditions (immediate vs. delayed) on three types of tests (fact, structure, and application). A 2 x 2 factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) yielded no significant main effects for notes conditions on the fact…

  19. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method.

    PubMed

    Sabik, A; Gołek, F; Antczak, G

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers. PMID:26026572

  20. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Gołek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  1. A study of actions in operative notes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E; Ryan, James O; Melton, Genevieve B

    2012-01-01

    Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report 'procedure description' section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman's Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

  2. A Study of Actions in Operative Notes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E.; Ryan, James O.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2012-01-01

    Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report ‘procedure description’ section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

  3. Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

  4. Note-Taking and Information Recall: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Jerry R.; Miller, Paul R.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of recorded information from a medical interview by note-taking was compared with that received with no note-taking. The study with 46 medical students suggests that note-taking facilitates recall and that there is a progressive decay of memory recall with the passage of time between the physician-patient interview and the recording of…

  5. University Clinic of Toxicology--historical note and present work.

    PubMed

    Bozinovska, C

    2013-01-01

    The University Clinic of Toxicology (UCT) in Skopje was founded as the Clinic for Toxicology and Emergency Internal Medicine on January 15th 1976. Today UCT has a modern building with office space of 1,300 m2 on 4 floors, 40 hospital beds and 72 employees including 18 doctors. UCT works in accordance with the public healthcare services in the Republic of Macedonia through the use of specialist/consultative and hospital healthcare for people over the age of 14 years. The Clinic also provides services in the field of emergency internal medicine, acute poisoning with medications, pesticides, corrosives, poisonous gases and mushrooms, heavy metals and other chemicals. The Clinic takes an active part in the detoxification programme for users of opiates and psychotropic substances, protocols for enteral and parenteral nutrition and guides for home treatment. Yearly there are more than 14,000 ambulance admissions, over 1,400 hospitalized patients, over 4,000 urgent EHO checks, more than 1,000 urgent upper endoscopies and over 700 other toxicological analyses and other interventions. The educational services and activities are realized through the chair for internal medicine. The Clinic offers undergraduate and graduate level education for medical students and dentists, for medical nurses, radiology technicians, speech therapists and physiotherapists. Over 300 papers and reports have been published to date by the medical staff at the UCT in the form of abstracts and integrated projects in the Republic of Macedonia and aboard. 8 doctorates have been successfully completed by employees from the Clinic as well as 4 master's theses and 1 in-depth project. UCT employees are the authors of some textbooks and monographs. UCT have undertaken some scientific projects. Employees from the Clinic of Toxicology are members taking an active part in many domestic and international associations. PMID:23928801

  6. Some Notes on Conversational Fission. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Stuart J.

    While most previous research has implied or assumed that the conversational structure giving each speaker a turn to speak is universally normative, findings of one study suggest that in interactions with at least four participants, alternatives to this rule are possible. A phenomenon called "conversational fission" occurs when a four- (or more)…

  7. 4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKER IN THE CENTER IS ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

  8. 3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKERS AT THE FAR END ARE ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

  9. Providing Study Notes: Comparison of Three Types of Notes for Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiewra, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Forty-four undergraduates received different types of notes for review of a lecture (complete text, linear outline, or matrix), or received no notes. Any form of notes increased performance over no notes, with matrix and outline notes producing higher recall and matrix notes producing greatest transfer. (SLD)

  10. Teaching Note--Heterosexism as Experienced by LGBT Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    As social work educators, much of our practice involves helping students think critically about complex political, economic, and social issues. One of the most complex and contentious sociopolitical issues of our time has been civil rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. This teaching note considers how we, as LGBT…

  11. Electronic Nursing Notes: A Case Study on Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth V.; Teets, Janet

    2006-01-01

    In an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Computer & Information Technology (CIT) and Nursing (NSG) Departments at the Middletown and Hamilton regional campuses of Miami University (of Ohio), student team members created a Web-based application to create Electronic Nursing Notes. Students from the two departments worked together to design…

  12. Non-Traditional Learning Study: Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraine Valley Community College., Palos Hills, IL. Office of Institutional Research.

    A study was conducted at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) to determine the characteristics of individuals who had taken courses through the college's Non-Traditional Learning (NTL) sub-division. The records of students who had taken specified NTL courses during spring 1981, fall 1981 or spring 1982 were retrieved and analyzed. Study…

  13. Study Notes for an Interactive Videodisc Lesson: Post-Hoc Analysis of a Comparison of Matrix Notes with Conventional Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Arthur P.

    1993-01-01

    Notetaking and note reviewing appear to increase learning from conventional instruction. An experiment on notetaking with interactive videodisk (IVD) did not mirror these findings. With the IVD lesson, no statistically significant effects were associated with notetaking or reviewing, either conventional or matrix notes. (AEF)

  14. Minority Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East-West Gateway Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

    This report covers a work-study program in the East-West Gateway area to provide employment and training for minority and economically disadvantaged graduate and upper-division undergraduate students enrolled in planning and related curricula. The program has aided students in continuing their education who might otherwise be financially unable to…

  15. My Obstetrician Got Me Fired: How Work Notes Can Harm Pregnant Patients and What to Do About It.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca A; Gardner, Sigrid; Torres, Leah N; Huchko, Megan J; Zlatnik, Marya G; Williams, Joan C

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal care providers are frequently asked to provide employment notes for their patients requesting medical leave or changes to work duties. Writing employment notes correctly can help patients negotiate for and obtain medically indicated workplace accommodations, allowing them to continue to work and earn an income. However, a poorly written or poorly timed note can jeopardize a patient's employment and salary. This commentary provides an overview of pregnancy-related employment laws and guidance in writing work accommodations letters that allow pregnant women to keep their jobs while maintaining a healthy pregnancy. PMID:26241411

  16. Social Work Assessment Notes: A Comprehensive Outcomes-Based Hospice Documentation System.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Angela Gregory; Martin, Ellen; Jones, Barbara L; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the development of an integrated psychosocial patient and caregiver assessment and plan of care for hospice social work documentation. A team of hospice social workers developed the Social Work Assessment Notes as a quality improvement project in collaboration with the information technology department. Using the Social Work Assessment Tool as an organizing framework, this comprehensive hospice social work documentation system is designed to integrate assessment, planning, and outcomes measurement. The system was developed to guide the assessment of patients' and caregivers' needs related to end-of-life psychosocial issues, to facilitate collaborative care plan development, and to measure patient- and family-centered outcomes. Goals established with the patient and the caregiver are documented in the plan of care and become the foundation for patient-centered, strengths-based interventions. Likert scales are used to assign numerical severity levels for identified issues and progress made toward goals and to track the outcome of social work interventions across nine psychosocial constructs. The documentation system was developed for use in an electronic health record but can be used for paper charting. Future plans include automated aggregate outcomes measurement to identify the most effective interventions and best practices in end-of-life care. PMID:26285358

  17. Examining the Effects of Notetaking Format on Achievement When Students Construct and Study Computerized Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes two experiments conducted to investigate the effects of notetaking format on achievement. Students constructed and studied different types of notes: partial (framework and partial notes), skeletal (framework with no notes), and control (no framework and no notes). Found that, based on an application test, students who completed and…

  18. Lives and Deaths: Biographical Notes on Selections from the Works of Edwin S. Shneidman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenaars, Antoon A.

    2010-01-01

    Edwin S. Shneidman (DOB: 1918-05-13; DOD: 2009-05-15) is a father of contemporary suicidology. His work reflects the intensive study of lives lived and deaths, especially suicides, and is the mirror to his mind. His contributions can be represented by five categories: psychological assessment, logic, Melville and Murray, suicide, and death. His…

  19. Return to Learning, Return to Work: Helping Low-Qualified Adults Out of Unemployment. Briefing Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, the question uppermost in policymakers' minds has understandably been the explosive growth of youth unemployment. But the crisis has also severely affected low-qualified adults, who face the highest rate of unemployment across Europe. A recent Cedefop study confirms that work-based training programmes can address the particular needs…

  20. Work Teams: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, M. Scott

    1981-01-01

    An important aspect of work environment is job content and structure. As this case study illustrates, increased productivity, enhanced job satisfaction, substantial cost reduction, and a reduction in turnover are some of the benefits of task reorganization. (CT)

  1. Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

  2. Teaching Notes: Reframing Multicultural Education--Teaching White Privilege in the Social Work Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Laura S.; Gibson, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a model of teaching diversity in social work education that includes significant content on White privilege. The authors first discuss some limitations of social work's current multicultural framework. Next, they introduce concepts and pedagogical strategies concerning White identity and privilege that are drawn from…

  3. A Note on Some Common Problems in Current Field Work in Sociology and Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Record, Wilson

    This paper compares research interests of anthropologists and sociologists. The hypothesis is that similarities in the way in which anthropologists and sociologists define and gather data may produce convergences in style and methods of research, particularly in field work situations. Field work is interpreted to include practical and/or research…

  4. Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing

  5. Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing…

  6. Teaching Note--Integrating Prevention Content into Clinical Social Work Practice Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid changes in health care services and delivery suggest an upcoming paradigm shift in the field of mental health. Recent national reports, health care policy changes, and growing evidence support a shift toward prevention-focused mental health care. The social work profession is uniquely positioned to act as leaders in this shift as the…

  7. Teaching Note--Integrating Prevention Content into Clinical Social Work Practice Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid changes in health care services and delivery suggest an upcoming paradigm shift in the field of mental health. Recent national reports, health care policy changes, and growing evidence support a shift toward prevention-focused mental health care. The social work profession is uniquely positioned to act as leaders in this shift as the

  8. Teaching Note--Incorporating Social Innovation Content into Macro Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Cosner Berzin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The practice of social innovation offers promising approaches for addressing social issues. Although many social innovation strategies are congruent with macro social work theory and practice, some of the insights and tactics that have emerged in the social innovation field have the potential to strengthen current macro practice. Based on our

  9. Teaching Note--Incorporating Social Innovation Content into Macro Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Cosner Berzin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The practice of social innovation offers promising approaches for addressing social issues. Although many social innovation strategies are congruent with macro social work theory and practice, some of the insights and tactics that have emerged in the social innovation field have the potential to strengthen current macro practice. Based on our…

  10. National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Programmatic Research and Development. A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Arnold; And Others

    This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different management systems used by the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Air Force in managing programmatic research and…

  11. A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Wallace K. C.; Meyer, Bruce D.; Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Achen, Alexandra C.

    2008-01-01

    Charles (2003) examines the dynamic effects of disability, finding a small decline in earnings and hours following disability onset, even for those who have positive disability reports for each of the next ten years. These outcomes also rebound quickly after the onset of disability. In recent work, Meyer and Mok (2006), find a much larger loss in…

  12. Research Note--A Pilot Cyber Counseling Course in a Graduate Social Work Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishna, Faye; Tufford, Lea; Cook, Charlene; Bogo, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Cyber counseling is a new and growing medium for offering mental health services to children and youth. However, there is a lack of identification of the core competencies required to provide effective online counseling. A school of social work, in partnership with a national service agency providing online counseling to children and youth,…

  13. National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Fundamental Research. A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirt, John; And Others

    This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different methods used by three Federal agencies--the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research--in managing fundamental research. Fundamental research…

  14. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

  15. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results

  16. Race, space, place: notes on the racialisation and spatialisation of commercial sex work in Dubai, UAE.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Pardis

    2010-11-01

    This paper focuses on the perceived racialisation and resultant spatialisation of commercial sex in Dubai. In recent years, the sex industry in Dubai has grown to include women from the Middle East, Eastern Europe, East Asia and Africa. With the increase in sex workers of different nationalities has come a form of localised racism that is embedded in structures and desires seen within specific locations. The physical spatialisation of sex work hinges on perceived race and produces distinct income generating potential for women engaged in the sex industry in Dubai. The social and physical topography of Dubai is important in marginalising or privileging these various groups of sex workers, which correlates race, space and place with rights and assistance. I begin with a description of the multidirectional flows of causality between race, space, place and demand. I then discuss how these various groups are inversely spatialised within the discourse on assistance, protection and rights. The findings presented here are based on ethnographic research conducted with transnational migrants in the UAE in 2004, 2008 and 2009. PMID:20936551

  17. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  18. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  19. ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment. ADIFOR Working Note No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Carle, A.

    1992-07-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

  20. Work redesign: a case study.

    PubMed

    Marr, J A

    1997-06-01

    This paper details the implementation experience of a work redesign process in a neurosurgical setting in a large community hospital, from conception to "live" demonstration. First, the concept of work redesign is explored, in relation to its underpinnings and its application in the health care setting. Work redesign has two elements: first, it involves the reconfiguration in the job or work role itself and second, a change in the way work is actually performed. Next, the model as it was conceived by the organization, is described. While the "high level" or organizational-wide design was constructed by a central steering team, we recognized the need to customize the model to the unique needs of each clinical service area. Finally, implementation is discussed, including structure, process, evaluation and critical success factors. PMID:9295482

  1. Historical Note about Cross-Sectional versus Longitudinal Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Julian C.

    1985-01-01

    The article discusses a study by L. Terman in which results of the two methods can be compared. Both types of comparisons indicated that CMT (Concept Mastery Test) ability improves considerably with age. This multiple checking of several groups each time versus the same groups over time strengthens the conclusion. (Author/CL)

  2. Studying Conceptions of Reality--A Metatheoretical Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marton, Ference

    1981-01-01

    Presents a case for the approach to thinking which takes logicality for granted and studies understanding. Argues that description of the qualitatively different ways in which people experience and understand various aspects of reality make up an autonomous field of inquiry, called phenomenography. (NEC)

  3. Staffing and Training for Work Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Vincent G.

    1971-01-01

    Work Study may be defined as a combination of (1) methods study, which is a prerequisite to (2) work measurement. Most organizations include an industrial engineering or similar department for conducting their work study programs. In general, there is a declining percentage of employees doing work study as the size of the firm increases. (EB)

  4. NIDA Notes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... Advanced Search Search NIDA Notes Study Links Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to Reduced Mortality From Opioid Overdose ( May ...

  5. Finding Meaning in the Work of Nursing: An International Study.

    PubMed

    Malloy, David Cruise; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Murakami, Masaaki; Lee, Yongho; Choi, Eunhee; Hirose, Eri; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Sixty nurses from five countries (Canada, India, Ireland, Japan, and Korea) took part in 11 focus groups that discussed the question: Do you consider your work meaningful? Fostering meaning and mentorship as part of the institutional culture was a central theme that emerged from the discussions. In this article, we begin with a background discussion of meaning and meaningful work as presented in the literature related to existentialism and hardiness. Next, we describe the method and analysis processes we used in our qualitative study asking how nurses find meaning in their very challenging work and report our findings of four themes that emerged from the comments shared by nurses, specifically relationships, compassionate caring, identity, and a mentoring culture. After offering a discussion of our findings and noting the limitations of this qualitative study, we conclude that nursing leaders and a culture of mentorship play an important role in fostering meaningful work and developing hardy employees. PMID:26882516

  6. Histological evaluation of pure NOTES - related complications in a survival animal study.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, St; Surlin, V; Râmboiu, S; Georgescu, E

    2011-01-01

    Considered as an extension of both laparoscopic surgery and interventional endoscopy, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is emerging as a new alternative of minimal invasive surgery. Literature on the gastrointestinal complications of this novel technique is sparse. The goal of this study was the histopathologic evaluation of postoperative complications in a NOTES experimental animal group. Ten female pigs (Sus scrofus domesticus) underwent transgastric endoscopic oophorectomy and tubectomy followed by gastric closure using OTSC clips. Fourteen days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Based on the gross examination during necropsy focused excisional biopsies were performed. Gross and microscopic evidence of gastric ulcer distal to the puncture site and perigastric lymph node abscess were found on one animal. Histological evaluation plays a determinant role in the correct evaluation of postoperative complications of pure NOTES procedures. PMID:21892532

  7. Studying Differential Item Functioning via Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Multiple-Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Lee, Chun-Lung; Chang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    This note is concerned with a latent variable modeling approach for the study of differential item functioning in a multigroup setting. A multiple-testing procedure that can be used to evaluate group differences in response probabilities on individual items is discussed. The method is readily employed when the aim is also to locate possible…

  8. Studying Differential Item Functioning via Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Multiple-Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Lee, Chun-Lung; Chang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    This note is concerned with a latent variable modeling approach for the study of differential item functioning in a multigroup setting. A multiple-testing procedure that can be used to evaluate group differences in response probabilities on individual items is discussed. The method is readily employed when the aim is also to locate possible

  9. International note: Prediction of mathematics work ethic and performance from behavioral, normative, and control beliefs among Qatari adolescents.

    PubMed

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Mahasneh, Randa Ali; Khine, Myint Swe; Welch, Anita G; Melkonian, Michael; Al Nuaimi, Samira Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Over half-a-million adolescents take part in each cycle of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). Yet often, researchers and policy makers across the globe tend to focus their attention primarily on the academic trajectories of adolescents hailing from highly successful education systems. Hence, a vast majority of the adolescent population who regionally and globally constitute the 'long tail of underachievement' often remain unnoticed and underrepresented in the growing literature on adolescents' academic trajectories. The present study, therefore, explored the relations of dispositions toward mathematics, subjective norms in mathematics, and perceived control of success in mathematics to mathematics work ethic as well as mathematics performance; and the mediational role of mathematics work ethic in the association between dispositional, normative, and control beliefs and mathematics performance among adolescents in one of the lowest performing education systems, Qatar. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses revealed that Qatari adolescents' dispositional, normative, and control beliefs about mathematics were significantly associated with their mathematics work ethic and mathematics performance, and mathematics work ethic significantly mediated the relationship between dispositional, normative, and control beliefs about mathematics and mathematics performance. However, multi-group SEM analyses indicated that these relationships were not invariant across the gender and the SES groups. PMID:26584217

  10. Enriching Social Work through Interdisciplinary Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Irene; Quaglia, Christine; Leslie, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper recommends that faculties of Social Work incorporate Disability Studies in their curriculum by embracing its interdisciplinary deconstructionist perspective. Disability Studies encourages Social Work to move beyond person-in--the-environment and anti-oppressive approaches to find more effective ways of removing barriers for persons with…

  11. Work and Sleep—A Prospective Study of Psychosocial Work Factors, Physical Work Factors, and Work Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Garefelt, Johanna; Richter, Anne; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Sverke, Magnus; Kecklund, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is limited knowledge about the prospective relationship between major work characteristics (psychosocial, physical, scheduling) and disturbed sleep. The current study sought to provide such knowledge. Design: Prospective cohort, with measurements on two occasions (T1 and T2) separated by two years. Setting: Naturalistic study, Sweden. Participants: There were 4,827 participants forming a representative sample of the working population. Measurements and Results: Questionnaire data on work factors obtained on two occasions were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Competing models were compared in order to investigate temporal relationships. A reciprocal model was found to fit the data best. Sleep disturbances at T2 were predicted by higher work demands at T1 and by lower perceived stress at T1. In addition, sleep disturbances at T1 predicted subsequent higher perception of stress, higher work demands, lower degree of control, and less social support at work at T2. A cross-sectional mediation analysis showed that (higher) perceived stress mediated the relationship between (higher) work demands and sleep disturbances; however, no such association was found longitudinally. Conclusions: Higher work demands predicted disturbed sleep, whereas physical work characteristics, shift work, and overtime did not. In addition, disturbed sleep predicted subsequent higher work demands, perceived stress, less social support, and lower degree of control. The results suggest that remedial interventions against sleep disturbances should focus on psychosocial factors, and that such remedial interventions may improve the psychosocial work situation in the long run. Citation: Åkerstedt T, Garefelt J, Richter A, Westerlund H, Magnusson LL, Sverke M, Kecklund G. Work and sleep—a prospective study of psychosocial work factors, physical work factors, and work scheduling. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1129–1136. PMID:26118559

  12. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, Doug

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  13. Earn, Learn...Serve? Federal Work-Study Program Confronts Midlife Crises as It Nears 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzick, Abbey

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that although research indicates that integrating work experience with schools is a key workforce development strategy, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, which provides campuses with matching funds to support part-time jobs for financially needy students, is being threatened. Describes the FWS program, noting that a growing body of

  14. Earn, Learn...Serve? Federal Work-Study Program Confronts Midlife Crises as It Nears 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzick, Abbey

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that although research indicates that integrating work experience with schools is a key workforce development strategy, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, which provides campuses with matching funds to support part-time jobs for financially needy students, is being threatened. Describes the FWS program, noting that a growing body of…

  15. "Not Too Late to Take the Sanitation Test": Notes of a Non-Gifted Academic from the Working Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkowski, David

    2004-01-01

    Working-class academic narratives reveal a number of common themes, like dual estrangement and internalized class conflict. A less popularized motif is the bookish child who is catapulted out of her working-class origins. But some working-class academics, like myself, were not academically ambitious as children. I am a nontraditional working-class…

  16. [Work capacity perceived by nurses: descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Tomietto, Marco; Zanini, Antonietta; Sgrazzutti, Sasha; Palese, Alvisa

    2011-01-01

    Perceived work ability is the worker perception of his/her job performances. There are many factors involved in this perception: individual characteristics (such as health status, motivation, and attitudes), job characteristics (such as technological resources, physical and mental demands) and working climate (such as job organization and leadership styles). The promotion of a good work ability could decrease the premature loss of workers and could help them in facing job demands and stress. In the health care settings the risk to perceive a low work ability could be higher due to nurses' shortage. The main aim of this pilot study was to measure the perceived work ability among nurses in order to find the work ability predictors. 78 nurses were recruited and had filled the Work Ability Index (WAI). The main work ability predictors found were: age over 45 years (OR=4,56; IC 95% 1,14 to 19,14), working years over 15 (OR=3,18; IC 95% 1,09 to 9,45) and more than 3 diseases (OR=25,00; IC95% 3,17 to 531,90). These results give useful information to health care managers in order to improve human resources management strategies and to find solutions about nurses' shortage and aging workforce. PMID:22452097

  17. Working-Class Students Need More Friends at University: A Cautionary Note for Australia's Higher Education Equity Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Denise Bradley and colleagues published their "Review of Australian Higher Education." A key point of the Bradley Review was to highlight the long-standing under-representation of working-class people at Australia's universities. Working-class people represent 25% of Australia's general population; however, they represent only 15% of…

  18. Comparative study of NOTES alone versus NOTES guided by a new image registration system for navigation in the mediastinum: a study in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, Henry; Estépar, Raúl San José; Rodríguez-D’Jesús, Antonio; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Arguis, Pedro; de Miguel, Cristina Rodríguez; Navarro-Ripoll, Ricard; Perdomo, Juan M.; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Llach, Josep; Vosburgh, Kirby G.; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) mediastinoscopy (MED) through the esophagus has proved to be feasible in the animal model. However, injury of the adjacent pleura and pneumothorax has been reported as a frequent adverse event when using a blind access. Objective To assess the utility and safety of a CT-based image registration system (IRS) for navigation in the mediastinum. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled trial in 30 Yorkshire pigs. Thirty-minute MEDs were performed: 15 MEDs were performed with IRS guidance (MED-IRS), and 15 MEDs were performed with a blind access. Setting Animal research laboratory. Interventions In both groups, the mediastinum was accessed through a 10-cm submucosal tunnel in the esophageal wall. Timed exploration was performed with identification of 8 mediastinal structures. Main Outcome Measurements Technical feasibility, adverse events, and the number of mediastinal structures identified. Results Thirty animals weighing 31.5 ± 3.5 kg were included in this study. MED was not possible in 2 animals in the “MED with blind access” group but was possible in all MEDs performed with IRS. The mean number of identified organs was slightly higher in “with IRS-MED” (6.13 ± 1.3) than with MED with blind access (4.7 ± 2.3; P = .066). Moreover, the right atrium and vena cava were identified in more cases with IRS-MED than in MED with blind access (13 vs 3 and 15 vs 11, P = .000 and P = .03, respectively). There were 3 (23%) adverse events with IRS-MED and 4 (27%) with “MED with blind access” (P = not significant), with pneumothorax being the most frequent (2 and 3, respectively). Limitations Nonsurvival animal study. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the IRS system appears feasible in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery MED and suggests that IRS guidance might be useful for selected procedures. PMID:23261099

  19. Management System for EMR Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia County Board of Public Instruction, Lake City, FL. Exceptional Child Education Dept.

    A computerized information management system involving the specification of objectives, the coding of teacher evaluations of students, and a variety of possible outputs has been used in a work study program for educable mentally retarded adolescents. Instructional objectives are specified and coded by number and category. Evaluation is by means of

  20. Constructing and Studying Notes from On-Line Text: Why Filling the Blanks in a "Partial-Notes" Format May Lead to Higher Performance on Delayed Higher-Order Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.; Weiler, William

    The effectiveness of notes provided students in two formats was studied. Students received either a completed set of notes or a partially completed set, with approximately half the information left blank. The study was also designed to investigate the effect of test taking conditions, whether immediate (shortly after the study session) or delayed…

  1. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

  2. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL

  3. Like Father, Like Son? A Note on the Intergenerational Transmission of IQ Scores. NBER Working Paper No. 14274

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2008-01-01

    More able parents tend to have more able children. While few would question the validity of this statement, there is little large-scale evidence on the intergenerational transmission of IQ scores. Using a larger and more comprehensive dataset than previous work, we are able to estimate the intergenerational correlation in IQ scores, examining not…

  4. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

  5. A study of physiological and work study indices of forestry work.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, R W; Manenica, I

    1977-09-01

    Reasons for the use of physiological methods of assessment in addition to classical work study methods are given for the case of manual work. A study of use of both assessment processes with regard to a series of forestry tasks is presented. Poor correlations between physiological and work study assessments were obtained and since the tasks were manual in nature it was presumed the physiological methods offered greater accuracy. A test study was used to support this view. Finally, the paper suggests a physiological index of manual effort, related to individual capacity, which might be capable of application in normal field work. PMID:15677240

  6. [Random notes on the hygienic works in the guerrilla of eastern Zhejiang Province of New Fourth Army].

    PubMed

    Zhu, D M

    2016-01-28

    Being reorganized on the basis of the 3rd and 5th branches of Songhu Guerrilla and its 3rd column, the Eastern Zhejiang Guerrilla got remarkable achievements in the health works from nothing. It is especially so and deserved written description for the Rear Hospitals of Sanbei when its medical staffs were surrounded by the Japanese and Kuomintang troops under very difficult conditions, which were overcome by the support of local people. PMID:27049746

  7. Adverse events of NOTES mediastinoscopy compared to conventional video-assisted mediastinoscopy: a randomized survival study in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, Henry; Cubas, Georgina; Boada, Marc; Rodríguez de Miguel, Cristina; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Gimferrer, Josep M.; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safety is a concern in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) mediastinoscopy. The objective of this study was to compare the safety of NOTES mediastinoscopy with video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM). Methods: Twenty-four pigs were randomly assigned to NOTES or VAM. Thirty-minute mediastinoscopies were performed with the identification of seven predetermined structures. The animals were euthanized after 7 days and necropsy was performed. Results: Mediastinoscopy was not possible in one animal in each group. There were more intraoperative adverse events with NOTES than VAM (7 vs. 2, P = 0.04); hemorrhage was the most frequent adverse event (4 and 1, respectively). At necropsy, pathological findings were observed in 13 animals (9 NOTES and 4 VAM; P = 0.03). Inflammatory parameters were not different between groups and were not related to adverse events. Conclusion: Systematic NOTES mediastinoscopy is possible and comparable to VAM in terms of number of organs identified and inflammatory impact. However, the safety profile of NOTES mediastinoscopy has to be improved before it can be adopted in a clinical setting. PMID:26716115

  8. Understanding Children's Drawings: The Path to Manhood. With "Notes on the Study of Man," By Wolfgang Schad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Michaela

    Based on the notes of Hanns Strauss and his collection of 6,000 drawings by 2- to 7-year-olds, this book describes the stages of development of children's drawings by using the framework of Rudolf Steiner's "anthroposophical" science. In the introduction, the early development of children's drawing is compared with works of art left by early…

  9. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  10. Protest suicide among Korean students and laborers: a study of suicide notes.

    PubMed

    Ben Park, B C; Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    Suicide notes from two groups of protest suicides in South Korea during the period 1975-2003 were compared: suicide notes from students (n =16) and suicide notes from workers (n = 15). The students appeared to be acting upon abstract ideals, including the oppression of the masses by the government and the American forces in Korea, and they typically urged the reunification of Korea. The workers were acting upon more local concerns, such as the oppression of their union by the government and the companies and the policies of their specific companies. PMID:20099554

  11. Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles L.

    Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75% during ON, 89% during ON+RSC, and 99.5% during GNSC+RSC. The class mean scores on next-day quizzes during ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 39%, 68%, and 90%, respectively. The class mean score on review quizzes following ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 2.1, 5.3, and 7.8 (maximum score, 10), respectively. Results for five of the seven students provide convincing evidence of functional relationships between ON+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON and between GNSC+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON+RSC. Students', teachers', and parents' opinions regarding the RSC and GNSC procedures were highly favorable.

  12. A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.; Heerwagen, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

  13. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Chris; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented are 25 short articles which represent a variety of topics. Included are laboratory exercises, games, demonstrations, models, activities, teaching methods, notes regarding procedures and updates of scientific information. (CW)

  14. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This section of the journal includes several short notes on science activities and materials for secondary schools. Activities and materials are included that relate to biology, microbiology, microcomputers, chemistry, and physics. (RH)

  15. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents sixteen project notes developed by pupils of Chipping Norton School and Bristol Grammar School, in the United Kingdom. These Projects include eight biology A-level projects and eight Chemistry A-level projects. (HM)

  16. U.S. Taxation of Business: Relevance of the European Experience. German Studies Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, Charles E., Jr.

    American and European business taxation policies are compared in this booklet. Topics discussed in the paper include effects of the corporation income tax, integration of income taxation, and the value added tax. Two major differences between the American and European systems are noted. First, European countries derive substantial portions of…

  17. Note: Optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, J. K.; Sokolowska, D.; Dziob, D.; Nowak, J.; Kwiatkowski, L.

    2014-02-15

    A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time.

  18. Note: Optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscicki, J. K.; Sokolowska, D.; Kwiatkowski, L.; Dziob, D.; Nowak, J.

    2014-02-01

    A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time.

  19. Sharing Physician Notes Through an Electronic Portal is Associated With Improved Medication Adherence: Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Darer, Jonathan; Tang, Xiaoqin; Thompson, Jason; Tusing, Lorraine; Fossa, Alan; Delbanco, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background In surveys, interviews, and focus groups, patients taking medications and offered Web portal access to their primary care physicians’ (PCPs) notes report improved adherence to their regimens. However, objective confirmation has yet to be reported. Objective To evaluate the association between patient Internet portal access to primary care physician visit notes and medication adherence. Methods This study is a retrospective comparative analysis at one site of the OpenNotes quasi-experimental trial. The setting includes primary care practices at the Geisinger Health System (GHS) in Danville, Pennsylvania. Participants include patients 18 years of age or older with electronic portal access, GHS primary care physicians, and Geisinger health plan insurance, and taking at least one antihypertensive or antihyperlipidemic agent from March 2009 to June 2011. Starting in March 2010, intervention patients were invited and reminded to read their PCPs' notes. Control patients also had Web portal access throughout, but their PCPs' notes were not available. From prescription claims, adherence was assessed by using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients with a PDC ≥.80 were considered adherent and were compared across groups using generalized linear models. Results A total of 2147 patients (756 intervention participants, 35.21%; 1391 controls, 64.79%) were included in the analysis. Compared to those without access, patients invited to review notes were more adherent to antihypertensive medications—adherence rate 79.7% for intervention versus 75.3% for control group; adjusted risk ratio, 1.06 (95% CI 1.00-1.12). Adherence was similar among patient groups taking antihyperlipidemic agents—adherence rate 77.6% for intervention versus 77.3% for control group; adjusted risk ratio, 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.07). Conclusions Availability of notes following PCP visits was associated with improved adherence by patients prescribed antihypertensive, but not antihyperlipidemic, medications. As the use of fully transparent records spreads, patients invited to read their clinicians’ notes may modify their behaviors in clinically valuable ways. PMID:26449757

  20. A Study of Concept Extraction Across Different Types of Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngjun; Riloff, Ellen; Hurdle, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Our research investigates methods for creating effective concept extractors for specialty clinical notes. First, we present three new “specialty area” datasets consisting of Cardiology, Neurology, and Orthopedics clinical notes manually annotated with medical concepts. We analyze the medical concepts in each dataset and compare with the widely used i2b2 2010 corpus. Second, we create several types of concept extraction models and examine the effects of training supervised learners with specialty area data versus i2b2 data. We find substantial differences in performance across the datasets, and obtain the best results for all three specialty areas by training with both i2b2 and specialty data. Third, we explore strategies to improve concept extraction on specialty notes with ensemble methods. We compare two types of ensemble methods (Voting/Stacking) and a domain adaptation model, and show that a Stacked ensemble of classifiers trained with i2b2 and specialty data yields the best performance. PMID:26958209

  1. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    This collection of notes describes (1) an optoelectronic apparatus for classroom demonstrations of mechanical laws, (2) a more efficient method for demonstrated nuclear chain reactions using electrically energized "traps" and ping-pong balls, and (3) an inexpensive demonstration for qualitative analysis of temperature-dependent resistance. (CS)

  2. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without

  3. Editor's Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Introduces the articles in this journal issue, noting the burgeoning interest in the roots of parental beliefs, values, and goals. Highlights thematic continuities among the otherwise diverse research approaches presented, for example, synthesis of different theoretical perspectives of parent beliefs, or the context in which parental beliefs

  4. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  5. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  6. Publisher's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    Due to a production error, the following article was wrongly included as part of this regular issue, Volume 88C. This article is now replaced with this note and will be included in one of the upcoming regular issues. Please refer to the DOI and citation details in that version when citing the paper. The Publisher apologizes for the inconvenience.

  7. Working Together: Case Studies in Cooperative Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Condict Gaye

    This report examines regional and/or state cooperative preservation programs and related activities. The major part of the report is given over to case studies that present a synopsis of the key structural and program elements of cooperative preservation initiatives. These case studies include the: Office of Library and Archival Materials

  8. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  9. International scoping study: accelerator working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

    2006-09-30

    During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

  10. Teaching Notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    If you would like to contribute a teaching note for any of these sections please contact ped@iop.org. Contents: LET'S INVESTIGATE: Standing waves on strings MY WAY: Physics slips, trips and falls PHYSICS ON A SHOESTRING The McOhm: using fast food to explain resistance Eggs and a sheet STARTING OUT: After a nervous start, I'm flying ON THE MAP: Christ's Hospital CURIOSITY: The Levitron TECHNICAL TRIMMINGS: Brownian motion smoke cell LET'S INVESTIGATE

  11. Sex Work and Students: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ron; Bergstrom, Sandra; La Rooy, David

    2007-01-01

    Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N=130) in the south of England, who completed a cross-sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological…

  12. Work-family conflict and sleep disturbance: the Malaysian working women study.

    PubMed

    Aazami, Sanaz; Mozafari, Mosayeb; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Akmal, Syaqirah

    2016-01-29

    This study aimed at assessing effect of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts (strain and time-based work interference into family and family interference into work) on sleep disturbance in Malaysian working women. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 325 Malaysian married working women. Multiple-stage simple random sampling method was used to recruit women from public service departments of Malaysia. Self-administrated questionnaires were used to measure the study variables and data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. We found that high level of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts significantly increase sleep disturbance. Our analyses also revealed an age-dependent effect of the work-family conflict on sleep disturbance. Women in their 20 to 30 yr old suffer from sleep disturbance due to high level of time-based and strain-based work-interference into family. However, the quality of sleep among women aged 30-39 were affected by strain-based family-interference into work. Finally, women older than 40 yr had significantly disturbed sleep due to strain-based work-interference into family as well as time-based family interference into work. Our findings showed that sleep quality of working women might be disturbed by experiencing high level of work-family conflict. However, the effects of inter-role conflicts on sleep varied among different age groups. PMID:26423332

  13. Work-family conflict and sleep disturbance: the Malaysian working women study

    PubMed Central

    AAZAMI, Sanaz; MOZAFARI, Mosayeb; SHAMSUDDIN, Khadijah; AKMAL, Syaqirah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing effect of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts (strain and time-based work interference into family and family interference into work) on sleep disturbance in Malaysian working women. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 325 Malaysian married working women. Multiple-stage simple random sampling method was used to recruit women from public service departments of Malaysia. Self-administrated questionnaires were used to measure the study variables and data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. We found that high level of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts significantly increase sleep disturbance. Our analyses also revealed an age-dependent effect of the work-family conflict on sleep disturbance. Women in their 20 to 30 yr old suffer from sleep disturbance due to high level of time-based and strain-based work-interference into family. However, the quality of sleep among women aged 30–39 were affected by strain-based family-interference into work. Finally, women older than 40 yr had significantly disturbed sleep due to strain-based work-interference into family as well as time-based family interference into work. Our findings showed that sleep quality of working women might be disturbed by experiencing high level of work-family conflict. However, the effects of inter-role conflicts on sleep varied among different age groups. PMID:26423332

  14. Interest in Working with the Elderly: A Cross-National Study of Graduating Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Idit

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a cross-national study of social work students' interest in working with the elderly, based on a sample of 679 graduating BSW students from 7 countries: Australia, Brazil, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel, and the United States. The findings among all the national cohorts show that the motivation to work with the elderly was

  15. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in accordance with paragraph (b)(2) of this section when seeking continuance of its work-study.... The agreement shall detail the objectives of the work-study program; describe the specific job...

  16. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in accordance with paragraph (b)(2) of this section when seeking continuance of its work-study.... The agreement shall detail the objectives of the work-study program; describe the specific job...

  17. Notes towards a Social Theory of Lifetime Learning: History, Place, and the Learning Society. Patterns of Participation in Adult Education and Training. Working Paper 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Gareth; Fevre, Ralph; Furlong, John; Gorard, Stephen

    This working paper is a product of a regional study in industrial South Wales of the determinants of participation and non-participation in post-compulsory education and training, with special reference to processes of change in the patterns of these determinants over time and to variations between geographical areas. Discussion begins with an…

  18. The AFL penetrometer study: work in progress.

    PubMed

    Orchard, J

    2001-06-01

    Five hundred and seventy one matches in the Australian Football League [AFL] had ground hardness measured using a Penetrometer, over the period 1997-2000. The method used was 3 drops at each of 20 locations over the playing field on the morning before games. Anterior Cruciate Ligament [ACL] injuries were recorded using an ongoing injury surveillance system. There was a non-significant trend towards a higher risk of ACL injury when the 3-drop average of the Penetrometer was less (harder) than 4.5cm, RR 2.36 (95% CI 0.90-6.24). When the first drop average of the Penetrometer was less (harder) than 2.5cm, the relative risk was 2.60 (95% CI 0.94-7.20). There was also a nonsignificant trend towards an increased risk of ACL injury in games where the predominant grass type was couch (Bermuda) grass, as opposed to rye grass, RR 2.37 (95% CI 0.89-6.36). This study confirms previous findings from the AFL that early season matches and matches played at northern (warmer) venues have a higher risk of ACL injury. It is likely that ground-related variables are partially responsible for these observations, but to date, the relative contributions of ground hardness, grass type, shoe-surface traction and other confounding factors are not certain. There was a significant fall in the number of ACL injuries in the AFL (to approximately half the previous level of incidence) during seasons 1999 and 2000. It is possible that reaction to this study and related publicity has led to the preparation of ground conditions in the AFL that are less likely to produce ACL injuries. PMID:11548921

  19. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    In this issue Fabricius, Logan, Weeks, Lewis, and Brodie report a sophisticated synthesis of remotely sensed data that reveals important features of turbidity affecting the Great Barrier Reef region. This study details sources, geographic distributions, and transport, as well as highlights some processes leading to changing turbidity regimes. It is an excellent example of incisive processing and analysis of large, existing data sets, aiming at novel discovery of important aspects of coastal conditions. The results of course beg for efforts at obtaining and examining further information, on associated nutrient deliveries, particularly of nitrogen, detailing biological effects on food webs and corals, and more on the changing baselines that appear imminent. The results of this study therefore are an impressive basis for further work on important aspects of the largest coral region in the world, and could be an example to emulate elsewhere.

  20. A qualitative study of work and work return in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Main, Deborah S; Nowels, Carolyn T; Cavender, Tia A; Etschmaier, Martine; Steiner, John F

    2005-11-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of cancer on the survivor's quality of work life. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe the work experiences among a diverse group of cancer survivors and to explore factors influencing decisions about work after cancer diagnosis and treatment. We interviewed 28 participants with a broad range of socioeconomic backgrounds and primary cancer sites. Qualitative results indicate that after learning about their cancer diagnosis, participants had diverse and complex patterns of work return and work change, and experienced a variety of factors that influenced post-cancer decisions. Experiences at work after cancer also varied in relation to how others responded, changes in productivity, effects of cancer and treatment on work, and feelings about work. Most respondents received little guidance from their physicians about work, and many participants described their cancer as impacting their priority of work relative to other aspects of their lives. Our findings reinforce the complexity of measuring employment outcomes and the range of adaptations made to improve the quality of work life. Additional research is needed to identify prognostic factors that can guide clinical or workplace efforts to restore cancer survivors to their desired level of work function and economic productivity. PMID:15744780

  1. Sawtooth Functions. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Using MAPLE enables students to consider many examples which would be very tedious to work out by hand. This applies to graph plotting as well as to algebraic manipulation. The challenge is to use these observations to develop the students' understanding of mathematical concepts. In this note an interesting relationship arising from inverse…

  2. Potential Danger in Pre-Populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so…

  3. Potential Danger in Pre-Populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so

  4. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reservist, or eligible person has agreed to work; or (2) The hourly minimum wage under comparable law of the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or...

  5. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 2: Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The construction portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines the requirements and selects the concepts for the crewman work system required to support the construction of large structures in space.

  6. Three models of child abuse consultations: A qualitative study of inpatient child abuse consultation notes.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Heather T; Campbell, Kristine A

    2015-05-01

    Child abuse pediatricians have multiple roles in caring for abused children, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and, when needed, expert legal opinion. The child physical abuse consultation differs from the traditional medical consultation in that it has medical, investigative and legal audiences, all of whom have different information needs. How child abuse pediatricians approach their cases and how they document their initial inpatient consultations that will be used by such a diverse audience is currently unexplored. We used content analysis to examine 37 child physical abuse consultation notes from a national sample of child abuse pediatricians in order to understand physicians' approaches to these consultations. Three commonly used models of child physical abuse consultation were identified in the data that we named the base model, the investigative model, and the family-dynamic model. While model types overlap, each is distinguished by key features including the approach used to gather information, the information recorded, and the language used in documentation. The base model most closely mirrors the traditional medical approach; the investigative model concentrates on triangulation of sources of information; and, the family-dynamic model concentrates on physician perceptions of family relationships. The three models of consultations for child physical abuse mirror the areas of child abuse pediatrics: diagnostic, forensic and therapeutic. These models are considered in relationship to best practice from other medical specialties with forensic components. PMID:25484319

  7. Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how…

  8. Balancing Paid Work and Studies: Working (-Class) Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Marie-Pierre; Leathwood, Carole

    2006-01-01

    Engagement in paid work during term-time amongst undergraduates in England has increased in recent years, reflecting changes in both higher education funding and labour market policy. This article draws on research with students in a post-1992 university to explore undergraduate students' accounts of combining work and study during term-time and

  9. Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how

  10. Balancing Work with Study: Impact on Marketing Students' Experience of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Alessandro, Steven; Volet, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 57% of students in the United States work while attending college. For most of these students (81%), this is more than 20 hours a week. There has been shown to be a negative relationship between hours worked and academic achievement in studies in the United States as well as the United Kingdom and Australia. There is, however, no

  11. Work-Study Program Considerations for Students with Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanos, George E.

    Presented are recommendations for developing a secondary level work-study program for handicapped students. The recommendations given include provision for on-campus work training; opportunity for off-campus employment for students 16 years of age or older; employment placement based on readiness and need after assessment by the work-study…

  12. An Exploratory Study on Multiple Intelligences and Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly; Berry-Edwards, Janice; Hutchison, Elizabeth D.; Bryant, Shirley A.; Waldbillig, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This study surveyed social work educators about the importance of multiple intelligences for social work practice and social work education. The sample consisted of 91 faculty members who responded to an online survey that asked them to rate the importance of 7 intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial,…

  13. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time

  14. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

  15. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

  16. Returning to Work after Cancer: Quantitative Studies and Prototypical Narratives

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, John F.; Nowels, Carolyn T.; Main, Deborah S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective A combination of quantitative data and illustrative narratives may allow cancer survivorship researchers to disseminate their research findings more broadly. We identified recent, methodologically rigorous quantitative studies on return to work after cancer, summarized the themes from these studies, and illustrated those themes with narratives of individual cancer survivors. Methods We reviewed English-language studies of return to work for adult cancer survivors through June, 2008, and identified 13 general themes from papers that met methodological criteria (population-based sampling, prospective and longitudinal assessment, detailed assessment of work, evaluation of economic impact, assessment of moderators of work return, and large sample size). We drew survivorship narratives from a prior qualitative research study to illustrate these themes. Results Nine quantitative studies met 4 or more of our 6 methodological criteria. These studies suggested that most cancer survivors could return to work without residual disabilities. Cancer site, clinical prognosis, treatment modalities, socioeconomic status, and attributes of the job itself influenced the likelihood of work return. Three narratives - a typical survivor who returned to work after treatment, an individual unable to return to work, and an inspiring survivor who returned to work despite substantial barriers - illustrated many of the themes from the quantitative literature while providing additional contextual details. Conclusion Illustrative narratives can complement the findings of cancer survivorship research if researchers are rigorous and transparent in the selection, analysis, and retelling of those stories. PMID:19507264

  17. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible...

  18. Mental Representation and Problem Solving in Work-Study Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colardyn, Danielle; White, Kathleen M.

    Transitional situations, such as those experienced by work study students, may create cognitive difficulties by requiring people to simultaneously use both a learning and a use logic. To examine this phenomenon, a problem solving task (electrical schemata of a washing machine) was administered to 43 full time students and 51 work study students…

  19. Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the…

  20. Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the

  1. What Works Clearinghouse[TM] Reporting Guide for Study Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document provides guidance about how to describe studies and report their findings in a way that is clear, complete, and transparent. This document does not include information about how studies are judged against What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards. For information about What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards, please refer to…

  2. Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

  3. Work on the Super and the Study of Atmospheric Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Mcallister

    2001-03-01

    By 1951, the group of young faculty (Bob Gluckstern and me), post doctoral fellows and graduate students, was comfortably established in Sloane Laboratory, and as "The Breit Group", in the department of physics at Yale. We didn't consciously separate ourselves from others in the department, and no one seemed to put us apart, but the association with Breit gave us a special "aura"--sometimes as objects of pity. Any project that involved the group as a whole, or a significant part of it, was discussed with Bob and me, and sometime in 1951 Breit called us in to consider a request that we look at the possibility of atmospheric ignition by a "Super" - as we still called it then, after Edward Teller. At the end of my stay at Los Alamos, in the summer of 1946, we youngsters had many bull sessions about that "Super", and the possibility of controlled fusion energy. We were confident that the former would be working in perhaps five years, and the latter within ten. After all, Han Bethe had shown us how the sun made its energy, and all that was needed to do was to replace a couple of his slow beta decays with something faster. As I write, some fifty-four years later, we still haven't got fusion energy for power. Our crystal balls were cloudier than Vicky Weisskopf's were to be! But I knew some of the lingo, and had worked out the way radiation penetrates the atmosphere (for understanding the Bikini tests), so in 1951, initially drew the task of looking at opacity, a key question in the bomb itself, and in the possibility of atmospheric ignition. Most of our limited work on the bomb was checking calculations that had been done by others as the Teller-Ulam design was being put together. At least some work on atmospheric ignition had already been done as well, but Teller wanted the "most careful physicist he knew" to do the definitive calculations, so Breit got the call. I do not recall all the members of the group who worked on the project and for that I apologize - no private notes were allowed because the work was classified. But in addition to Bob Gluckstern, I recall, for reasons that will appear, that John McHale was one of the project workers. At one point I think we were all working on nitrogen reactions ...

  4. Notes on the p-spin glass studied via Hamilton-Jacobi and smooth-cavity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Burioni, Raffaella; Di Biasio, Aldo

    2012-06-01

    In these notes, we continue our investigation of classical toy models of disordered statistical mechanics, through techniques recently developed and tested mainly on the paradigmatic Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass. Here, we consider the p-spin-glass model with Ising spins and interactions drawn from a normal distribution N[0,1]. After a general presentation of its properties (e.g., self-averaging of the free energy, existence of a suitable thermodynamic limit), we study its equilibrium behavior within the Hamilton-Jacobi framework and the smooth cavity approach. Through the former we find both the RS and the 1-RSB expressions for the free-energy, coupled with their self-consistent relations for the overlaps. Through the latter, we recover these results as irreducible expression, and we study the generalization of the overlap polynomial identities suitable for this model; a discussion on their deep connection with the structure of the internal energy and the entropy closes the investigation.

  5. The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    2013-01-01

    Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in…

  6. A Follow-Up Note on Prescriptive Statements in Nonintervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Shana M.; Walls, Stephen M.; Dacy, Breana Sylvester; Levin, Joel R.; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Robinson, Levin, Thomas, Pituch, and Vaughn (2007) examined 74 articles reporting nonintervention studies (i.e., studies with no researcher-manipulated variables) that appeared in 5 educational journals in 1994. Of these articles, 22 contained prescriptive statements (e.g., if teachers or students did X, then student outcome Y would result). In…

  7. Notes from the Ethnic Studies Home Front: Student Protests, Texting, and Subtexts of Oppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, Lydia R.; Cammarota, Julio

    2011-01-01

    The protest against Arizona House Bill 2281 designed to ban Ethnic Studies from K-12 public schools on 12 May 2010 in Tucson resulted in 15 arrests. Students walked out of their classrooms in large numbers to defend their Mexican American Studies curriculum and program. Based primarily on participant observation of the protest, the authors examine…

  8. Notes on Tracking Respondents in the Career Development Study, "Entry Into Careers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Vaughn R. A.; And Others

    This monograph relates in considerable detail the procedures and experience of the Career Development Study in the relocation of 6,798 respondents to the first wave of a panel study. Following an introduction discussing the problems related to tracking, the design to track these young people who were high school juniors and seniors in 1965-66 is…

  9. The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    2013-01-01

    Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in

  10. Reactivity in Rapidly Collected Hygiene and Toilet Spot Check Measurements: A Cautionary Note for Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Benjamin F.; Khush, Ranjiv S.; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford Jr., John M.

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. PMID:25385856

  11. A Win-Win Paradigm for Quality of Work Life and Business Performance. [and] Invited Reaction: Comments on Lau and May's Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, R. S. M.; May, Bruce E.; Schurman, Susan J.

    1998-01-01

    Lau and May's study of 58 "best U.S. companies to work for" and 88 top Standard and Poor's companies suggests that companies with high quality of working life can also enjoy exceptional growth and profitability. Schurman's critique notes that their sample does not reflect conditions in the majority of U.S. employers. (SK)

  12. Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Rodrigo, José G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Agraït, Nicolás; Condensed Matter Physics Center and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales “Nicolás Cabrera,” Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid; Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid

    2014-02-15

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  13. Technical Note - Project Icarus: The Origins and Aims of the Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K. F.; Obousy, R.; Tziolas, A.

    A brief summary is presented on the origins and aims of Project Icarus, the joint British Interplanetary Society (BIS) and Tau Zero Foundation (TZF) theoretical engineering study for the design of an unmanned interstellar probe. This paper is intended to represent an introduction to the set of technical papers presented in this special issue as well as discussing some of the early history regarding the formation of Project Icarus. This is a submission of the Project Icarus Study Group.

  14. Revising Lecture Notes: How Revision, Pauses, and Partners Affect Note Taking and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Linlin; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Note taking has been categorized as a two-stage process: the recording of notes and the review of notes. We contend that note taking might best involve a three-stage process where the missing stage is revision. This study investigated the benefits of revising lecture notes and addressed two questions: First, is revision more effective than…

  15. ENDING ON A HIGH NOTE: Adding a Better End to Effortful Study

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Bridgid

    2010-01-01

    Remembered utility is the retrospective evaluation about the pleasure and pain associated with a past experience. It has been shown to influence prospective choices about whether to repeat or to avoid similar situations in the future (Kahneman 2000; Kahneman, Fredrickson, Schreiber & Redelmeier, 1993). Evaluations about our hedonic past often disregard the duration of the experience and are influenced more by the peak and the final levels of discomfort (Fredrickson & Kahneman, 1993). Two experiments explored the remembered discomfort of an effortful learning experience and the influence of this evaluation on prospective study choices. The design of the studies mimicked Kahneman et al.'s, (1993) cold-pressor study, but used an exceptionally challenging learning experience in place of the painful experience of submerging one's hand in ice water. An extremely effortful study episode extended by a more moderate interval was preferred to a shorter, unextended interval, despite better test performance following the shorter interval. Future study choices reflected this preference. These findings suggest that the act of acquiring knowledge has value in the learning process. PMID:20854005

  16. Note on the Applicability of the James-Stein Estimator in Regional Hydrologic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landwehr, J. Maciunas; Matalas, N. C.; Wallis, J. R.

    1984-11-01

    The applicability of the James-Stein estimator in regional hydrologic studies which entail the estimation of an N-dimensional location parameter is discussed. Regional studies are frequently characterized by relatively short, generally correlated, samples drawn from nonsymmetric and bounded, i.e., nonnormal, populations. By means of computer simulation studies the James-Stein estimator, subject to the Lindley modification and adoption of the positive part rule suggested by Efron and Morris and conditioned on the assumption of independence, was shown to be robust in the case of the hydrologically plausible distribution considered here, namely, Weibull distributions with coefficient of skewness ranging from 0 to 10. However, in contrast to traditional methods of regionalization the effect of cross correlation is a diminishment of the relative risk advantage of the James-Stein estimator, even in the best case of normal variables : this is discussed and illustrated.

  17. Note: A stand on the basis of atomic force microscope to study substrates for imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Chkhalo, N. I.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Zorina, M. V.

    2015-01-15

    A description of a stand based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for roughness measurements of large optical components with arbitrary surfaces is given. The sample under study is mounted on a uniaxial goniometer which allows the sample to be tilted in the range of ±30°. The inclination enables the local normal along the axis of the probe to be established at any point of the surface under study. A comparison of the results of the measurement of noise and roughness of a flat quartz sample, in the range of spatial frequencies 0.025–70 μm{sup −1}, obtained from “standard” AFM and developed versions is given. Within the experimental error, the measurement results were equivalent. Examples of applications of the stand for the study of substrates for X-ray optics are presented.

  18. NOTE: A preliminary study for non-invasive quantification of manganese in human hand bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A.; Chettle, D. R.; McNeill, F. E.; Pysklywec, M. W.; Oudyk, J.

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a nutrient essential for regulating neurological and skeletal functions in the human body, but it is also toxic when humans are excessively exposed to Mn. Blood (or serum/plasma) and other body fluids reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive measurement of Mn stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following feasibility studies, a first pilot study, using neutron activation analysis to measure Mn in the bones of the hand of ten healthy male human subjects, was conducted with the approval of the concerned research ethics boards. The participants of this study had no known history of exposure to Mn. Two volunteers were excluded from this study due to technical problems with their measurements. The inverse variance weighted mean value of Mn/Ca for the participants of this study is 0.12 ± 0.68 µg Mn/g Ca which is comparable within uncertainties with the estimated range of 0.16 0.78 µg Mn/g Ca and mean value of 0.63 ± 0.30 µg Mn/g Ca derived from cadaver data. It is recommended to investigate the use of the diagnostic technique for in vivo measurements of workers exposed occupationally to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. The technique needs further development to improve the precision of in vivo measurements in the non-exposed population.

  19. DESIGN NOTE: An opposed jet burner for the study of high-intensity combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Akira

    1999-12-01

    bla***An opposed jet burner for the study of high-intensity combustion in the distributed reaction regime is described. The Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence is smaller than the laminar flame thickness. This burner can be applied to both premixed and diffusion flame studies. A stable annular turbulent premixed or diffusion flame can be stabilized between two ceramic plates, which ensure the adiabaticity of the flame. A characteristic feature of this burner is its easy optical access and probe measurements. The NOx emission characteristics of this burner are described in relation to the high-intensity combustion.

  20. [To begin to believe. Working notes on a mother-daughter incest case and its implications on the formation of the pre-transitional object].

    PubMed

    Haineault, D L

    1990-11-01

    Most psychoanalytic literature dealing with incest holds the premise that the act took place between a parent and a child of opposite sex. Incidentally, most of these cases involve a father-daughter incest (e.g. research by Julien Bigras). However, this is only one of four mathematically possible combinations. For instance, we tend to underestimate the occurrences and, consequently, the repercussions of mother-daughter incest relationships. The biological and psychological importance of the mother in the child's development radically influences the mother-daughter incest. In the reactualizing of transference, analysts, especially if they are female, often find themselves confronted with some of the most fundamental choices in the life of an infant, such as to live or to die, to grow or to cease to grow. It then becomes crucial to understand the most primitive components of the infant's early life. In such a case, an analyst must consult some of the most complex theoretical work covering the subject. The author, for her part, has greatly referred to the experiences of Renatta Gaddini, who insists on the importance of developing a pretransitional space during the analysis. This pretransitional space, however, is useless if the analyst is unable to follow it up by becoming a transformational object in the eyes of the patient, in the way described by Christopher Bollas: an object suggesting that the patient relive the steps leading from pre-thought to thought, from real to symbolic. Indeed, Bollas' research has allowed the author to develop a more accurate vision of what is at stake. At the same time, she was able to assess the amount of work still needed in that area of study, an area which, up to this day, offers only very little research to support the author's exploration. PMID:2094487

  1. Limiting Nonresponse in Longitudinal Research: Three Strategies for School-Based Studies. A RAND Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    Longitudinal studies conducted with children typically experience non-response problems that can make substantial inroads on sample size and introduce bias into the analysis. Three methods for limiting non-response in school-based research programs were assessed: (1) asking parents to return consent forms only if they do not want their children to…

  2. A Study To Increase Computer Applications in Social Work Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucero, John A.

    The purpose of this study was to address the use of computers in social work practice and to survey the field for tools, concepts, and trends that could assist social workers in their practice. In addition to a review of the relevant literature, information was requested from the Social Work Service and Ambulatory Care Database Section at Walter…

  3. Workplace Skills in Practice. Case Studies of Technical Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasz, Cathleen; And Others

    A study was conducted to explore skills and work-related dispositions in technical work. It used a sociocultural approach to examine skills in seven target jobs in worksites representing diverse industries--health care, traffic management, transportation, and semiconductor manufacturing. It explored employers' strategies for obtaining the skills…

  4. Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work

  5. Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Sjon F.

    2011-01-01

    English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in…

  6. Curriculum of Work-Study Program, Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darrell; And Others

    The work study curriculum guide for secondary special education students was designed for use in a classroom atmosphere simulating a work setting. Performance objectives and suggested activities are listed for 10 units (sample subunits in parentheses): purchasing habits (advertising methods, types of stores and merchandise, sales tax); budgeting…

  7. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  8. Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Sjon F.

    2011-01-01

    English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in

  9. Curriculum of Work-Study Program, Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darrell; And Others

    The work study curriculum guide for secondary special education students was designed for use in a classroom atmosphere simulating a work setting. Performance objectives and suggested activities are listed for 10 units (sample subunits in parentheses): purchasing habits (advertising methods, types of stores and merchandise, sales tax); budgeting

  10. Detrimental Effects of RNAi: A Cautionary Note on Its Use in Drosophila Ageing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Nazif; Hoddinott, Matthew P.; Foley, Andrea; Slack, Cathy; Piper, Matthew D. W.; Partridge, Linda

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides an important tool for gene function discovery. It has been widely exploited in Caenorhabditis elegans ageing research because it does not appear to have any non-specific effects on ageing-related traits in that model organism. We show here that ubiquitous, adult-onset activation of the RNAi machinery, achieved by expressing a double stranded RNA targeting GFP or lacZ for degradation, or by increasing expression of Dicer substantially reduces lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Induction of GFPRNAi construct also alters the response of lifespan to nutrition, exacerbating the lifespan-shortening effects of food containing a high quantity of yeast. Our study indicates that activation of the RNAi machinery may have sequence-independent side-effects on lifespan, and that caution needs to be exercised when employing ubiquitous RNAi in Drosophila ageing studies. However, we also show that RNAi restricted to certain tissues may not be detrimental to lifespan. PMID:23028964

  11. Cohort profile: the lidA Cohort Study-a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation.

    PubMed

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-12-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  12. On the interpretation of synchronization in EEG hyperscanning studies: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Adrian P

    2013-01-01

    EEG Hyperscanning is a method for studying two or more individuals simultaneously with the objective of elucidating how co-variations in their neural activity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) are influenced by their behavioral and social interactions. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different hyper-connectivity measures using (i) simulated data, where the degree of coupling could be systematically manipulated, and (ii) individually recorded human EEG combined into pseudo-pairs of participants where no hyper-connections could exist. With simulated data we found that each of the most widely used measures of hyperconnectivity were biased and detected hyper-connections where none existed. With pseudo-pairs of human data we found spurious hyper-connections that arose because there were genuine similarities between the EEG recorded from different people independently but under the same experimental conditions. Specifically, there were systematic differences between experimental conditions in terms of the rhythmicity of the EEG that were common across participants. As any imbalance between experimental conditions in terms of stimulus presentation or movement may affect the rhythmicity of the EEG, this problem could apply in many hyperscanning contexts. Furthermore, as these spurious hyper-connections reflected real similarities between the EEGs, they were not Type-1 errors that could be overcome by some appropriate statistical control. However, some measures that have not previously been used in hyperconnectivity studies, notably the circular correlation co-efficient (CCorr), were less susceptible to detecting spurious hyper-connections of this type. The reason for this advantage in performance is discussed and the use of the CCorr as an alternative measure of hyperconnectivity is advocated. PMID:24399948

  13. On the interpretation of synchronization in EEG hyperscanning studies: a cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Adrian P.

    2013-01-01

    EEG Hyperscanning is a method for studying two or more individuals simultaneously with the objective of elucidating how co-variations in their neural activity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) are influenced by their behavioral and social interactions. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different hyper-connectivity measures using (i) simulated data, where the degree of coupling could be systematically manipulated, and (ii) individually recorded human EEG combined into pseudo-pairs of participants where no hyper-connections could exist. With simulated data we found that each of the most widely used measures of hyperconnectivity were biased and detected hyper-connections where none existed. With pseudo-pairs of human data we found spurious hyper-connections that arose because there were genuine similarities between the EEG recorded from different people independently but under the same experimental conditions. Specifically, there were systematic differences between experimental conditions in terms of the rhythmicity of the EEG that were common across participants. As any imbalance between experimental conditions in terms of stimulus presentation or movement may affect the rhythmicity of the EEG, this problem could apply in many hyperscanning contexts. Furthermore, as these spurious hyper-connections reflected real similarities between the EEGs, they were not Type-1 errors that could be overcome by some appropriate statistical control. However, some measures that have not previously been used in hyperconnectivity studies, notably the circular correlation co-efficient (CCorr), were less susceptible to detecting spurious hyper-connections of this type. The reason for this advantage in performance is discussed and the use of the CCorr as an alternative measure of hyperconnectivity is advocated. PMID:24399948

  14. Tilting wind tunnel for fire behavior studies. Forest Service research note (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The combined effects of wind velocity and slope on wildland fire behavior can be studied in the laboratory using a tilting wind tunnel. The tilting wind tunnel requires a commercially available fan to induce wind and can be positioned to simulate heading and backing fires spreading up and down slope. The tunnel is portable and can be disassembled for transport using a full-size pickup truck. Vertical velocity profiles indicate that the average turbulence level is about 15 percent of mean wind velocity.

  15. NOTE: Laboratory Studies of Catalysis of CO to Organics on Grain Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.; Nuth, J. A.; Smith, T.

    2000-05-01

    Experiments simulating heterogeneous conversion of H 2 and CO into simple hydrocarbons in astrophysical environments have been performed, utilizing realistic cosmic grain analogs of Fe-doped silicates as Fischer-Tropsch-Type catalysts. Catalysis was studied for temperatures from 470-670 K and reactant gas mixtures of H 2/CO with a ratio of 2-100. The total gas pressure was near 0.5 bar. Maximum conversion rates of a few percentage points were achieved over a 3-h time period. Major products were methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon dioxide, and water. Products were identified by IR spectroscopy.

  16. Note on the applicability of the James-Stein estimator in regional hydrologic studies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landwehr, J.M.; Matalas, N.C.; Wallis, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    By means of computer simulation studies the James-Stein estimator, subject to the Lindley modification and adoption of the positive part rule suggested by Efron and Morris and conditioned on the assumption of independence, was shown to be robust in the case of the hydrologically plausible distribution considered here, namely, Weibull distributions with coefficient of skewness ranging from 0 to 10. However, in contrast to traditional methods of regionalization the effect of cross correlation is a diminishment of the relative risk advantage of the James-Stein estimator, even in the best case of normal variables: this is discussed and illustrated. -from Authors

  17. Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

  18. NOTE: Study of Gafchromic® EBT film response over a large dose range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jäkel, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Presently Gafchromic EBT films are widely used for relative dose verification in standard radiation therapy using high-energy photons, inclusive IMRT. The use of films for dosimetry in medical ion beams is more complicated due to the strongly inhomogeneous dose deposition by ions on microscopic level. Track structure models, presently used to describe dosimeter response as a function of the ion field properties, are based on input information which can be obtained from the film response in photon beams. We therefore studied the performance of Gafchromic EBT films, ancestors of currently available EBT2 films, in 60Co photon beams. The dose-response curve was measured from 7.5 × 10-2 Gy to 3 × 104 Gy. The dynamic range, linearity and dose rate dependence of this calibration curve were studied. A high saturation dose of 3 × 103 Gy, and thus a large dynamic range, was observed. No signs of supralinearity and bleaching due to radiation were found. No dependence of the response on the dose rate at high dose rates and high doses was found. All those properties justify the use of simplified models of the film response to ions. Furthermore, fits of the calibration data by predictions of different models for signal creation mechanism of dosimetric materials were performed. The best description was found for the recently published gamma-distributed single-hit model which takes into account different sizes of the active centres.

  19. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program: Prebreathe elimination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The study examined impacts of changing Orbiter cabin pressure and EMU EVA pressure to eliminate pure O2 prebreathing prior to EVA. The investigation defines circumscribing physiological boundaries and identifies changes required within Orbiter to reduce cabin pressure. The study also identifies payload impacts, payload flight assignment constraints, and impacts upon EMU resulting from raising EVA pressure. The study presents the trade-off which optimizes the choice of reduced cabin pressure and increased EVA pressure.

  20. Notes on Linguistics, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Linguistics, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1990. Articles in the four issues include: "The Indians Do Say Ugh-Ugh" (Howard W. Law); "Constraints of Relevance, A Key to Particle Typology" (Regina Blass); "Whatever Happened to Me? (An Objective Case Study)" (Aretta Loving); "Stop Me and Buy One (For $5...)"…

  1. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

  2. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility.

    PubMed

    Fiksel, G; Agliata, A; Barnak, D; Brent, G; Chang, P-Y; Folnsbee, L; Gates, G; Hasset, D; Lonobile, D; Magoon, J; Mastrosimone, D; Shoup, M J; Betti, R

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology. PMID:25638132

  3. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  4. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P. -Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energymore » storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.« less

  5. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P. -Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  6. The violence of heteronormativity in communication studies: notes on injury, healing, and queer world-making.

    PubMed

    Yep, Gust A

    2003-01-01

    Heteronormativity is everywhere. It is always already present in our individual and collective psyches, social institutions, cultural practices, and knowledge systems. In this essay, I provide some sketches for a critical analysis of heteronormativity in the communication discipline. More specifically, I examine the symbolic, discursive, psychological, and material violence of heteronormativity, and begin exploring ways to heal, grow, transform, and contemplate new possibilities in our social world. To accomplish this, this essay is divided into live sections. First, I discuss the study of sexuality in Communication. Next, through the notion of injury, I focus on the violence of heteronormativity. Third, using the concept of healing, I discuss ways of unpacking heteronormativity through a critique of hegemonic heterosexuality. Further, I offer potential ways for queer world-making through the lens of queer theory. I conclude by exploring the need for more sexuality research in the discipline by engaging the productive tensions between constructive and deconstructive impulses. PMID:14651173

  7. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Veda Prakash, G; Kumar, R; Patel, J; Saurabh, K; Shyam, A

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results. PMID:24387484

  8. African American women and breast cancer: notes from a study of narrative.

    PubMed

    Moore, R J

    2001-02-01

    Survival after breast cancer and after all cancers is significantly worse for African American women than for others. Although many reasons have been proposed, no studies have explored the reception of messages about breast cancer by African American survivors of this disease, and how public images and discourses about breast cancer affects both their perceived risk for this disease and their experiences of illness. Narrative accounts of their lived experiences with breast cancer were collected from 23 African American survivors of breast cancer. Three themes have emerged: (a) Breast cancer is perceived to be a white woman's disease; (b) cancer is caused by experiences of repeated traumatic heartbreak; and finally, (c) there is a perceived lack of social support and understanding for the unique life experiences of the African American survivor of breast cancer. Nurses are on the front line of patient care. In the context of the managed care environment, they spend more time with patients than other health care providers and are soundboards for many patient concerns. As such, they can use the information provided in this study to inform high-risk women, current patients, partners, and other individuals in the medical community of how African American women might inaccurately access their personal risks for breast cancer, despite the public emphasis on this disease. Through the use of culturally sensitive pamphlets, nurses and other medical practitioners can also open discussions with underserved and minority patients as a means of realistically addressing some of these women's fears about breast cancer. These fears are barriers to effective cancer prevention because these individuals may consciously or unconsciously link a diagnosis of breast cancer, or even behaviors related to cancer prevention, to a potential death sentence. PMID:11219421

  9. [Work in mental health: a job satisfaction and work impact study].

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Denise; Abelha, Lúcia; Legay, Letícia Fortes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge of job satisfaction and work impact among psychiatric staff is highly useful for policymakers and mental health professionals. Since there are few studies on this issue in Brazil, a cross-sectional study was carried out among mental health professionals. Data were collected for 133 professionals from 4 mental health services in Rio de Janeiro, using SATIS-BR and IMPACTO-BR scales and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Statistical associations were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and chi-square tests and multiple linear regression. SPSS 10.1 for Windows was used for statistical analyses. Mean satisfaction was 3.30 and mean work impact was 2.08 (on a scale from 1 to 5). 62.4% of subjects reported moderate satisfaction. Mental health workers with less schooling showed higher satisfaction. Work impact was not associated with any explanatory variable. The results for job satisfaction were similar to those of other studies. Work impact was very low. Unlike studies from the United States and Europe, there were no differences between the community-based and in-hospital staff. PMID:18327450

  10. Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: a content analysis study.

    PubMed

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement. PMID:24093736

  11. A Qualitative Study of the Work Environments of Mexican Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Juarez, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of the nursing work environment are increasingly common in developed countries, but few exist in developing countries. Because of resource differences between the two contexts, researchers need to clarify what aspects of the work environments are similar and different. Objectives To study the perspectives of Mexican nurses about their work environments to determine similarities and differences to results from developed world studies. Design A secondary, directed content analysis of qualitative data from 46 Spanish language interviews using workplace-oriented themes Setting Purposively selected Mexican states from four regions of the country that reflect the country’s socioeconomic differences. Participants Practicing Mexican nurses with at least one year of clinical experience and currently working in nursing. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Methods Initial data collection occurred in 2006 and 2008 during a broader study about professionalization processes that occurred in Mexican nursing between 1980 and 2005. The secondary, directed content analysis focused on an in-depth exploration of a central theme that emerged from the two original studies: The Workplace. The directed content analysis used themes from the global nursing work environment literature to structure the analysis: Professional relationships, organizational administrative practices, and quality of care and services. Results The three themes from the global literature were relevant for the Mexican context and a new one emerged related to hiring practices. By category, the same factors that created positive or negative perceptions of the work environment matched findings from other international studies conducted in developed countries. The descriptors of the category, however, had different conceptual meanings that illustrate the health system challenges in Mexico. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that studies that seek to measure nursing work environments will most likely apply in Mexico and other Latin American or middle-income countries. Instruments designed to measure the work environment of nurses in these countries may prove relevant in those contexts, but require careful adaptation and systematic translations to ensure it. PMID:22386989

  12. Technical notes: A detailed study for the provision of measurement uncertainty and traceability for goniospectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Jouni I.; Hakala, Teemu; Suomalainen, Juha; Honkavaara, Eija; Markelin, Lauri; Gritsevich, Maria; Eskelinen, Juho; Jaanson, Priit; Ikonen, Erkki

    2014-10-01

    The measurement uncertainty and traceability of the Finnish Geodetic Institutess field gonio-spectro-polarimeter FIGIFIGO have been assessed. First, the reference standard (Spectralon sample) was measured at the National Standard Laboratory of MIKES-Aalto. This standard was transferred to FGIs field reference standard (larger Spectralon sample), and from that to the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), reference standards (1 m2 plates). The reflectance measurement uncertainty of FIGIFIGO has been estimated to be 0.01 in ideal laboratory conditions, but about 0.02-0.05 in typical field conditions, larger at larger solar or observation zenith angles. Target specific uncertainties can increase total uncertainty even to 0.1-0.2. The angular reading uncertainty is between 1° and 3°, depending on user selection, and the polarisation uncertainty is around 0.01. For UAV, the transferred reflectance uncertainty is about 0.05-0.1, depending on, how ideal the measurement conditions are. The design concept of FIGIFIGO has been proved to have a number of advantages, such as a well-adopted user-friendly interface, a high level of automation and excellent suitability for the field measurements. It is a perfect instrument for collection of reference data on a given target in natural (and well-recorded) conditions. In addition to the strong points of FIGIFIGO, the current study reveals several issues that need further attention, such as the field of view, illumination quality, polarisation calibration, Spectralon reflectance and polarisation properties in the 1000-2400 nm range.

  13. NOTE: Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%.

  14. Technical Note: On the Use of Nudging for Aerosol-Climate Model Intercomparison Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Kooperman, G. J.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.

    2014-08-26

    Nudging is an assimilation technique widely used in the development and evaluation of climate models. Con- straining the simulated wind and temperature fields using global weather reanalysis facilitates more straightforward comparison between simulation and observation, and reduces uncertainties associated with natural variabilities of the large-scale circulation. On the other hand, the artificial forcing introduced by nudging can be strong enough to change the basic characteristics of the model climate. In the paper we show that for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, due to the systematic temperature bias in the standard model and the relatively strong sensitivity of homogeneous ice nucleation to aerosol concentration, nudging towards reanalysis results in substantial reductions in the ice cloud amount and the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on longwave cloud forcing. In order to reduce discrepancies between the nudged and unconstrained simulations and meanwhile take the advantages of nudging, two alternative experimentation methods are evaluated. The first one constrains only the horizontal winds. The second method nudges both winds and temperature, but replaces the long-term climatology of the reanalysis by that of the model. Results show that both methods lead to substantially improved agreement with the free-running model in terms of the top-of-atmosphere radiation budget and cloud ice amount. The wind-only nudging is more convenient to apply, and provides higher correlations of the wind fields, geopotential height and specific humidity between simulation and reanalysis. This suggests that nudging the horizontal winds but not temperature is a good strategy, especially for studies that involve both warm and cold clouds.

  15. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles describe a method of introducing the study of simple harmonic motion, and suggest models that are analogues for impedence matching, electrical transformers, and birefringent crystals. (AL)

  16. Project Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

  17. Note on numerical study of the beam energy spread in NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P.A.; Friedman, A.

    2011-01-19

    The kinetic energy spread (defined here as the standard deviation of the beam particle energies) sets the ultimate theoretical limit on the longitudinal compression that can be attained on NDCX-I and NDCX-II. Experimental measurements will inevitably include the real influences on the longitudinal phase space of the beam due to injector and accelerator field imperfections1. These induced energy variations may be the real limit to the longitudinal compression in an accelerator. We report on a numerical investigation of the energy spread evolution in NDCX-I; these studies do not include all the real imperfections, but rather are intended to confirm that there are no other intrinsic mechanisms (translaminar effects, transverse-longitudinal anisotropy instability, etc.) for significant broadening of the energy distribution. We have performed Warp simulations that use a realistic Marx voltage waveform which was derived from experimental measurements (averaged over several shots), a fully-featured model of the accelerating and focusing lattice, and new diagnostics for computing the local energy spread (and temperature) that properly account for linear correlations that arise from the discrete binning along each physical dimension (these capabilities reproduce and extend those of the earlier HIF code BPIC). The new diagnostics allow for the calculation of multi-dimensional maps of energy spread and temperature in 2-D axisymmetric or 3-D Cartesian space at selected times. The simulated beam-line was terminated at z = 3 m by a conducting plate, so as to approximately reproduce the experimental conditions at the entrance of the spectrometer that was used for mapping the longitudinal phase space. Snapshots of the beam projection and current, as well as the Marx waveform and history of beam kinetic energy collected at the end plate, are shown in Fig. 1. A two-dimensional axisymmetric map of energy spread from simulations of a typical NDCX-I configuration is shown in Fig. 2 (a). The energy spread starts at 0.1 eV at the source and rapidly rises to a few eV, then fluctuates between a fraction of an eV and tens of eV, ending near the exit in a range of a few eV at the outer edge of the beam to a few tens of eV near the axis. The higher value on-axis is associated with greater numerical noise there, due to the axisymmetric geometry of the calculation, resulting in poorer simulation-particle statistics at small radius. A scatter plot of the macroparticles kinetic energy (KE) versus radius (R) and longitudinal position (0.28 m < z < 3 m) colored by local energy spread is shown in Fig. 2 (b). As expected, there is a correlation of the kinetic energy with radius that is clearly visible at z = 2.8 m and vanishes at the metal plate at z = 3 m. More snapshots from simulations varying the time step, grid resolution and number of macroparticles are given in Appendix II. The macro-particles were collected at the exit plate and their kinetic energy history is plotted in Fig. 3 (left) and contrasted to an experimental measurement using a streak camera shown in Fig. 3. For some types of measurements, averaging over several pulses to improve signal-to-noise will contribute an additional spread that may not be present on any single beam pulse. The upper bound for the energy spread is in the range of a few 100 eV for the experiment while in the range of a few eV for the reported Warp simulations. The Marx voltage exhibits variations in the range of up to several hundreds of volts, playing a significant role in the experimentally measured energy spread, which may account for the difference between the experimental and the simulated bounds.

  18. Working in the sky: a diary study on work engagement among flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulou, Despoina; Bakker, Arnold B; Heuven, Ellen; Demerouti, Evangelia; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2008-10-01

    This study aims to gain insight in the motivational process of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model by examining whether daily fluctuations in colleague support (i.e., a typical job resource) predict day-levels of job performance through self-efficacy and work engagement. Forty-four flight attendants filled in a questionnaire and a diary booklet before and after consecutive flights to three intercontinental destinations. Results of multilevel analyses revealed that colleague support had unique positive effects on self-efficacy and work engagement. Self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between support and engagement, but work engagement mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and (in-role and extra-role) performance. In addition, colleague support had an indirect effect on in-role performance through work engagement. These findings shed light on the motivational process as outlined in the JD-R model, and suggest that colleague support is an important job resource for flight attendants helping them reach their work-related goals. PMID:18837629

  19. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)

  20. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a technique to produce samples for x-ray diffraction studies on the Tel-X-Ometer 80 x-ray apparatus from readily available crystalline powders and discusses observations of transverse modes of an optical resonator. (SK)

  1. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes physics experiments and apparatus construction for studies in astronomy, electricity, wave measurement and speed, the behavior of steel, and intermolecular forces. Includes a detailed description of how to simulate apparent trajectories of the moon and sun. (CS)

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkney, J. N.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes eleven laboratory experiments, including the catalytic effect of copper in zinc-acid reaction; a study of the rate of polymerization of some aldehydes; and a demonstration automatic potentiometric titrator. (MLH)

  3. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)

  4. Environmental Studies - Class Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    This document consists of four units (chapters) focusing on evolution (chapter I), civilization of man (chapter II), ecological concepts (chapter III), and limnological concepts (Chapter IV). Each chapter contains "text material" on the topic indicated. In addition: (1) a list of key vocabulary words, questions, reading list, and questions related…

  5. Environmental Studies - Class Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    This document consists of four units (chapters) focusing on evolution (chapter I), civilization of man (chapter II), ecological concepts (chapter III), and limnological concepts (Chapter IV). Each chapter contains "text material" on the topic indicated. In addition: (1) a list of key vocabulary words, questions, reading list, and questions related

  6. Registration Study. Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    During spring 1977 registration, 3,255 or 45% of Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) registering students responded to a scheduling preferences and problems questionnaire covering enrollment status, curriculum load, program preference, ability to obtain courses, schedule conflicts, preferred times for class offerings, actual scheduling of…

  7. The relative value of nursing work: a study in progress.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Gloria; Saxe-Braithwaite, Marcy; Mass, Heather; Calnan, Robert; Mann, Janet; Ratsoy, Bernadet

    2003-01-01

    The nursing shortage is likely to continue and, without intervention, may worsen. While retention and recruitment are constantly discussed among nursing leaders, the shortages, particularly in specialty areas, continue. Nurses have frequently stated that they are not valued for their knowledge. Yet many nurses have university degrees, post graduate degrees, specialty certificates and specialty credentials. Nurses seek recognition for what they know and what they do. To date, however, there is no objective method that is used to assess the value of nurses and their work. The study of relative value may provide a method for recognizing nurses' work. The concept of relative value deals with logical operators and facilitates assigning value to a nurse's overall knowledge base and capacity to perform nursing work. Currently, nursing shortages are concentrated in specialty areas. Nurses who work in specialized areas need specialized knowledge in a narrow field of nursing. Specialty nurses are not interchangeable with specialists in other areas or with generalists. A study is in progress to calculate the relative value of nursing work in 15 specialties. The goal is to assess relative value from the point of view of the knowledge base in the specialties and between specialties. In this paper, the research team reports on the background of the study, the study's parameters and its progress to date. Outcomes will include devising a way to recognize nurses' work, developing policies related to retention and recruitment and finding a long-term solution for dealing with the nursing shortage in specialty areas. PMID:12934699

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Included is information regarding: sucrose dehydration by sulphuric acid; an example of school-industry link in studying zinc oxide production; viscous flow in inorganic silicate glass; construction of a peristaltic pump; electrolysis; carbon dioxide preparation; electrophoresis; safety in using hydrogen and sulphuric acid; and approaches to…

  9. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the determination of the activation energy of the thiosulphate-acid reaction, an experiment on hydrolysis of similar metal salt solutions, the preparation and electrolytic properties of iodine monochloride and iodine trochloride, and instructions for apparatus enabling laboratory study of the thermal cracking of ethylbenzene. (AL)

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

  11. Research Notes and Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, III, Dean S.

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access and data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.

  12. Research Notes and Information References

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access andmore » data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.« less

  13. Editors' note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The Fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) contains original research that evaluates the role of teletherapy and online language exercises in the treatment of chronic aphasia; investigates whether improvements are maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and studies the use of in-home telerehabilitation for proximal humerus fractures. Within the context of two case studies, authors evaluated three service delivery models (direct, hybrid, and telepractice) for stuttering intervention. The results of a preliminary qualitative investigation are presented for telepractice in rural schools in Australia. And, schemas are offered for privacy and security analyses for store and forward applications in physical and occupational therapy. The Fall 2014 issue also contains a book review, and announcements from the American Telemedicine Association and the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center. PMID:25945224

  14. Editors’ Note

    PubMed Central

    COHN, ELLEN R.; CASON, JANA

    2015-01-01

    The Fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) contains original research that evaluates the role of teletherapy and online language exercises in the treatment of chronic aphasia; investigates whether improvements are maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and studies the use of in-home telerehabilitation for proximal humerus fractures. Within the context of two case studies, authors evaluated three service delivery models (direct, hybrid, and telepractice) for stuttering intervention. The results of a preliminary qualitative investigation are presented for telepractice in rural schools in Australia. And, schemas are offered for privacy and security analyses for store and forward applications in physical and occupational therapy. The Fall 2014 issue also contains a book review, and announcements from the American Telemedicine Association and the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center. PMID:25945224

  15. Study on work load of matrons under shift work in a special nursing home for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wakui, T

    2000-07-01

    In order to find out the work load of matrons under shift work in a special nursing home for the elderly (SNH), six healthy female matrons volunteered to participate in the present study. For each subject, care working time, heart rate, walking steps, estimated energy expenditure and working time in different postures were determined during day shift work (540 min) and night shift work (960 min). Although the time on duty, working and recess were significantly longer in night shift work than day shift work, the percentages of working and recess time to duty time were nearly the same regardless of shift work. The longest care work in each shift work was individual care of residents in the SNH. The maximum, minimum and mean heart rate and percentages to estimated maximal heart rate were similar in each shift work. Although total walking steps in night shift work were significantly larger than those in day shift work, steps per hour did not differ between them. The estimated total energy expenditure (kcal) was significantly higher in night shift work than in day shift work; however, the work intensity (kcal/kg/min) was significantly higher in day shift work. The longest length and larger percentage of working time were observed in standing posture in each shift work. These findings suggest that physical activity and energy expenditure of matrons under either shift work in the SNH seem to be high. Further studies are needed to clarify the work load of matrons engaged in SNH to formulate countermeasures. PMID:10943075

  16. Facilitating Collaborative Work in Tertiary Teaching: A Self-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenikina, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a self-study undertaken by the author to better understand the educational practices of scaffolding in pre-service teachers' collaborative group work. The method included student interviews, conversations with a critical friend, and the researcher's diary. The self-study allowed for fine-tuning theoretical understanding and…

  17. Exemplary Practice in Work-Based Education: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanibbi, Mike; Munby, Hugh; Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Versnel, Joan; Chin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This paper validates the concept of exemplary practice in work-based education (WBE) programs. The validation uses two theoretical frameworks: Social Cognitive Career Theory, and Billett's research on workplace learning. The empirical component of the validation study consists of two widely differing case studies of high school students in work…

  18. Wage Rate Comparability Review Washington State Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    Washington State's Higher Education Coordinating Board undertook a review of the State Work Study (SWS) program requirements related to the classification and compensation of SWS positions at public colleges and universities. A task force studying wage rate comparability was convened to review statutory directives related to this issue and to…

  19. Facilitating Collaborative Work in Tertiary Teaching: A Self-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verenikina, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a self-study undertaken by the author to better understand the educational practices of scaffolding in pre-service teachers' collaborative group work. The method included student interviews, conversations with a critical friend, and the researcher's diary. The self-study allowed for fine-tuning theoretical understanding and

  20. Teaching, Learning, and Working with International Students: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, D. Randall

    This case study of a program for Taiwanese students at Louisiana Tech University examined the challenges and rewards of working with international students. Data for the study come from the literature on international education, interviews with Taiwanese graduate students in the program, observations of classes, personal reflections of the…

  1. Commentary: The Challenge of Nonexperimental Interventions Studies in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The challenging context of social work interventions require that most intervention studies will be derived from nonexperimental research designs. Two evaluation studies in this special issue employed nonrandomized designs to examine the efficacy of two programs--a police crisis intervention team designed to enhance officers' responses to mental…

  2. How to Critically Evaluate Case Studies in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunjung; Mishna, Faye; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop guidelines to assist practitioners and researchers in evaluating and developing rigorous case studies. The main concern in evaluating a case study is to accurately assess its quality and ultimately to offer clients social work interventions informed by the best available evidence. To assess the quality of…

  3. The Business Work-Life Study, 1998: A Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galinsky, Ellen; Bond, James T.

    This study surveyed a representative sample of 1,057 companies with 100 or more employees to assess how U.S. companies are responding to the work-life needs of the nation's changing workforce. Specifically, the study sought to identify the extent to which companies provide benefits, programs, and policies and create supportive workplace…

  4. Publishers' Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EPL Management Team

    2008-12-01

    We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS codes 10 and 20. This offer will remain open until the SCOAP3 agreement at CERN takes effect. Authors submitting any article to EPL will continue to be offered the opportunity to make their published letter open access for a one-off payment. However, with effect from 1 November 2008, any author who submits work related to subject areas within PACS 10 and 20 will benefit from open access at no charge, meaning their published article will be available free to all readers, forever. ``Physics of Elementary Particles and Fields'' and ``Nuclear Physics'' are two research areas focusing on the HEP community, that the EPLA Directors recognize as significant to the broadband development of EPL, and they endeavour to increase the number of high-quality research letters published in these fields, to engage more closely with the High Energy Physics community, and to strengthen and promote the journal. All submitted articles will still be subject to rigorous peer review to maintain the high standard of articles published in EPL, and will benefit from expert leadership within the Editorial Board and rapid publication in addition to open access. You are invited to submit your paper now on https://www.epletters.net to take advantage of this fantastic offer. If you have comments or questions about changes taking place in 2009, please e-mail us at info@epljournal.org or editorial.office@epletters.net. With our best wishes for 2009!

  5. Stress situations of daily living in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a retrospective case note study.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Shin; Tashiiro, Nobutada

    2004-02-01

    About 40% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are said to have treatment-refractory symptoms and chronic course of illness in spite of cognitive-behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy. The present purpose was to investigate factors relevant to OCD patients' chronic course and disturbed daily functions in view of human basic needs based on Maslow's hierarchy of five basic needs. Case notes of 101 outpatients with OCD (47 men and 54 women who were 18 to 55 years old) and seen on a psychiatry unit of a general hospital were studied to explore their stressful situations and identify thwarted basic needs. 84 of the 101 patients had Love Needs, and Esteem Needs (n = 47) and Safety Needs (n = 45) were next. The Poor-functioning group mainly had histories with problems of Safety Needs (70.8%), while the Good-functioning group tended to mainly have problems of Esteem Needs (51.5%) rather than Safety Needs (33.3%). 57 patients (23 men and 34 women) who were treated for more than three months were divided into two groups according to their Global Assessment of Functioning score at the final assessment (cut-off point: 61); patients in the Good-functioning group tended to have problems of higher needs. PMID:15077758

  6. Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the grounded theory approach in which themes emerge from iterative readings of the transcripts by a group of investigators. This study identified themes related to excessive workload, familiar work/unfamiliar hazards, cultural tensions, lack of health care, pregnancy, sexual harassment, and family obligations/expectations. The responses of the Latina workers in this study clearly indicated that they live within a complex web of stressors, both as workers and as women. The increased economic opportunities that come with immigration to the United States are accompanied by many opportunities for exploitation, especially if they are undocumented. It is hoped that the findings of this study will raise awareness regarding these issues and spur further work in this area. PMID:26346566

  7. Empowering leaders optimize working conditions for engagement: a multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Tuckey, Michelle R; Bakker, Arnold B; Dollard, Maureen F

    2012-01-01

    Using a multilevel framework, this study examined the role of empowering leadership at the group level by fire brigade captains in facilitating the individual level motivational processes that underpin work engagement in volunteer firefighters. Anonymous mail surveys were completed by 540 volunteer firefighters from 68 fire brigades and, separately, by 68 brigade captains. As predicted on the basis of the Job Demands-Resources model, increased levels of cognitive demands and cognitive resources partially mediated the relationship between empowering leadership and work engagement. In a three-way Leadership × Demands × Resources interaction, empowering leadership also had the effect of optimizing working conditions for engagement by strengthening the positive effect of a work context in which both cognitive demands and cognitive resources were high. Our findings shed light on a process through which leaders can empower workers and enhance well-being: via their influence on and interaction with the work environment. They also underscore the need to examine work engagement from a multilevel theoretical perspective. PMID:22409390

  8. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Jens Peter E; Munch-Hansen, Torsten; Wieclaw, Joanna; Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels; Agerbo, Esben

    2009-01-01

    Background Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. Methods Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002–2005. Individual self-reports of psychosocial factors at work including satisfaction with the work climate and dimensions of the job strain model were obtained by self-administered questionnaires (response rate 77,2%). Each employee was assigned the average score value for all employees at his/her managerial work unit [1094 units with an average of 18 employees (range 3–120)]. The risk of first-time AD prescription during follow-up was examined according to level of satisfaction and psychosocial strain by Cox regression with adjustment for gender, age, marital status, occupational status and calendar year of the survey. Results The proportion of employees that received at least one prescription of ADs from 1995 through 2006 was 11.9% and prescriptions rose steadily from 1.50% in 1996 to the highest level 6.47% in 2006. ADs were prescribed more frequent among women, middle aged, employees with low occupational status and those living alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. Conclusion The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription of antidepressant pharmaceuticals. These findings need cautious interpretation because of lacking individual exposure assessments. PMID:19635130

  9. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  10. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  11. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  12. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  13. Putting Disability Studies to Work in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penketh, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Putting disability studies to work in art education suggests a form of action or industry, a creative opportunity for something to be done, recognising the relationship between theory and practice. Drawing on discourse analysis, this article offers an initial theoretical discussion of some of the ways in which disability is revealed and created…

  14. Authentic Intellectual Work: Common Standards for Teaching Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, M. Bruce; Newmann, Fred M.; Carmichael, Dana L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors summarize important and promising research on what they call "authentic intellectual work." It is important because so often schoolwork, not only in social studies but across the curriculum, requires little in the way of deep conceptual learning that also connects to life beyond school, and it is promising because the…

  15. Work Satisfaction and the Black Female Professional: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.

    Black women who have gained access to higher education and higher paying positions often find themselves in less than optimal work environments, on account of racist and sexist attitudes of their colleagues. Accordingly, this study was undertaken to identify those aspects of interpersonal interaction and response among black professional women on…

  16. Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work…

  17. Dimensions of Field Work in Teacher Education: A Demonstration Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Gertrude

    A demonstration study was initiated under the auspices of the Department of Education, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, and designed to determine the interactive roles that can be undertaken by college, students in teacher training, the public school, and the community. To test the hypothesis that saturation field work would…

  18. Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

    This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

  19. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  20. The Work-Study Experience of Indigenous Undergraduates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large number of universities in Taiwan and the increased availability of scholarships for disadvantaged students, the number of college students from indigenous families has been on the rise in recent years. However, many indigenous students still find it necessary to work part-time. In this study, indigenous students were interviewed

  1. Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

  2. Grit and Work Engagement: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhei; Tamesue, Dai; Asahi, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Grit, defined as perseverance of effort and consistency of interest, has attracted attention as a predictor of success in various fields beyond IQ and the Big Five personality dimension of Conscientiousness. The purpose of the current study was to examine previously uninvestigated questions regarding grit using a cross-sectional design among a large number of working adults in Japan. First, we tested geographical generalizability of associations between grit and orientations towards happiness by comparing previous studies in the U.S. and the current study in Japan. It was confirmed that orientation towards meaning rather than orientation towards engagement had a stronger positive correlation with grit in our sample of Japanese people. This result is inconsistent with previous studies in the U.S. Furthermore, the Big Five dimension of Openness to Experience was newly confirmed as having a positive association with grit. Second, we examined the association between grit and work engagement, which is considered as an outcome indicator for work performance. In this analysis, grit was a strong predictor for work performance as well as academic performance. PMID:26335001

  3. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work-study program. 570.37 Section 570.37 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Employment of Minors Between 14 and 16 Years of Age (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37...

  4. Postgraduate Study and Managers' Subsequent Work Experience: An Exploratory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jane; Harris, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on an exploratory qualitative study, this article considers the link between business school teaching at graduate level and subsequent work behaviour and experiences of former students. It evaluates the student experience some time "after" graduation. The findings of the retrospective evaluation point to the value of classroom peer…

  5. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  6. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR... (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study program. (a) This section varies the provisions contained in... therefore is not deemed to be oppressive child labor. (b)(1) A school-supervised and...

  7. A Study of Imputation Algorithms. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ming-xiu; Salvucci, Sameena

    Many imputation techniques and imputation software packages have been developed over the years to deal with missing data. Different methods may work well under different circumstances, and it is advisable to conduct a sensitivity analysis when choosing an imputation method for a particular survey. This study reviewed about 30 imputation methods…

  8. Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Fiscal Year 1997 Grant Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report contains project synopses and evaluations supporting recommendations for funding 25 continuing and 7 new projects in public and nonpublic colleges and universities included in the $1.5 million appropriated for fiscal year 1997 for the Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Selection criteria included: strengthening cooperation among…

  9. The Work-Study Experience of Indigenous Undergraduates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large number of universities in Taiwan and the increased availability of scholarships for disadvantaged students, the number of college students from indigenous families has been on the rise in recent years. However, many indigenous students still find it necessary to work part-time. In this study, indigenous students were interviewed…

  10. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  11. Grit and Work Engagement: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Grit, defined as perseverance of effort and consistency of interest, has attracted attention as a predictor of success in various fields beyond IQ and the Big Five personality dimension of Conscientiousness. The purpose of the current study was to examine previously uninvestigated questions regarding grit using a cross-sectional design among a large number of working adults in Japan. First, we tested geographical generalizability of associations between grit and orientations towards happiness by comparing previous studies in the U.S. and the current study in Japan. It was confirmed that orientation towards meaning rather than orientation towards engagement had a stronger positive correlation with grit in our sample of Japanese people. This result is inconsistent with previous studies in the U.S. Furthermore, the Big Five dimension of Openness to Experience was newly confirmed as having a positive association with grit. Second, we examined the association between grit and work engagement, which is considered as an outcome indicator for work performance. In this analysis, grit was a strong predictor for work performance as well as academic performance. PMID:26335001

  12. A Qualitative Study of the Dislocated Working Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Cotter, Elizabeth W.; Carter, Laura; Bernfeld, Steven; Gray, India; Liu, Jane P.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines factors that influence the career decisions of dislocated workers. The research focuses on individuals identified as working class, as this group has been relatively ignored in past research compared to individuals from higher socioeconomic statuses. Participants include 13 individuals (10 females and 3 males)…

  13. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Thomas H; Castro, Victor M; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M; Kohane, Isaac S; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment--that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion--in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  14. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas H.; Castro, Victor M.; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Perlis, Roy H.

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment–that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion–in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  15. Ergonomic study of an operator's work of a molybdenum plant.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Esteban; Meyer, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    This study was part of an ergonomic program which is being carried out through an agreement between the University of Concepción and a Chilean private mining company. The purpose of this case study was to identify working conditions in which the physical and mental workload could be over the capabilities of the operator. He was responsible for loading trucks with sacks of molybdenum and for downloading reagents and handles them. The methods employed in this study included electronic records, interviews, surveys, review of the company standards, a time study and physical and mental workload analysis. Results showed that 84% of the time the operator was carrying out principal and secondary activities and no break periods were detected. It was found that the pace of work and the shift system generated unfavorable conditions by imbalance in the workload on the different days of the week. In the light of the results recommendations were made for a number of ergonomic changes. Most of them were accepted by the company. The most important achievement was a change in the shift system. The overload of the operator was due to the fact that he was in a shift working 5 days and resting on weekends. The imbalance was mainly because the work of the week end was accumulated for Monday. As a result of the study, the company contracted a second worker for this job and adopted a 7x7 shift system, meaning that they work seven days and rest seven days. An evaluation carried out two month after adopting the new shift revealed that changes were well accepted by the worker. PMID:22317731

  16. NOTES AND WORKING PAPERS CONCERNING THE ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS AUTHORIZED UNDER TITLE I OF THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT OF 1965, PROGRAM PARTICIPATION OF NONPUBLIC SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

    THIS EVALUATION REPORT ON THE PARTICIPATION OF NONPUBLIC SCHOOL CHILDREN IN TITLE I PROJECTS IS BASED ON CASE STUDIES OF 10 LARGE, 10 MEDIUM, AND 10 SMALL SCHOOL SYSTEMS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. THE STUDIES WERE PREPARED THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF 14 FIELD SURVEY COORDINATORS WHO INTERVIEWED PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVES AT BOTH THE…

  17. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription

  18. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  19. Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions. PMID:22238619

  20. Sounding the field: recent works in sound studies.

    PubMed

    Boon, Tim

    2015-09-01

    For sound studies, the publication of a 593-page handbook, not to mention the establishment of at least one society - the European Sound Studies Association - might seem to signify the emergence of a new academic discipline. Certainly, the books under consideration here, alongside many others, testify to an intensification of concern with the aural dimensions of culture. Some of this work comes from HPS and STS, some from musicology and cultural studies. But all of it should concern members of our disciplines, as it represents a long-overdue foregrounding of the aural in how we think about the intersections of science, technology and culture. PMID:26256314

  1. Referrals to an Intellectual Disability Psychotherapy Service in an Inner City Catchment Area--A Retrospective Case Notes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Geosrgina; Mukherjee, Raja A. S.; Karagianni, Efthalia; Attavar, Rajnish; Sinason, Valerie; Hollins, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aims were to identify referral characteristics and outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities referred to a psychodynamic psychotherapy service. Materials and Methods: A retrospective case notes review of anonymized data relating to 100 sequential patient episodes. Results: A total of 81 people out of 100 with a range of…

  2. Note-Making with T-Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elvis G.; Davis, Archie D.

    The T-Note system is an easy way for students to take notes, is organized for effective review, and is adaptable because it provides a system for recording five types of information typically presented in the classroom. The student first divides a single loose-leaf notebook page vertically down the middle, and horizontally about one or two inches…

  3. Fostering Communication between Students Working Collaboratively: Results from a Practitioner Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quebec Fuentes, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    As a secondary mathematics teacher, I used practitioner action research to determine effective ways to intervene with students working in groups, with the goal of improving their communication. Utilising transcripts of group interactions and teacher interventions, field notes, and student feedback, I discovered ten different issues that prevent…

  4. Preparing for the World of Work: An Exploratory Study of Disabled Students' Experiences of Work Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, Catherine Elizabeth; Espahbodi, Shima; De Souza, Lorraine Hilary

    2012-01-01

    For people with disabilities, one of the best ways to achieve independence is through work. Experience gained by undertaking a work placement whilst a student provides valuable knowledge and understanding of the demands of work, and enhances employability on graduation for both students with disabilities and for their non-disabled peers. The aims…

  5. Cautionary notes on the use of NF-?B p65 and p50 antibodies for CNS studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The characterization and cellular localization of transcription factors like NF-?B requires the use of antibodies for western blots and immunohistochemistry. However, if target protein levels are low and the antibodies not well characterized, false positive data can result. In studies of NF-?B activity in the CNS, antibodies detecting NF-?B proteins have been used to support the finding that NF-?B is constitutively active in neurons, and activity levels are further increased by neurotoxic treatments, glutamate stimulation, or elevated synaptic activity. The specificity of the antibodies used was analyzed in this study. Methods Selectivity and nonselectivity of commonly used commercial and non-commercial p50 and p65 antibodies were demonstrated in western blot assays conducted in tissues from mutant gene knockout mice lacking the target proteins. Results A few antibodies for p50 and p65 each mark a single band at the appropriate molecular weight in gels containing proteins from wildtype tissue, and this band is absent in proteins from knockout tissues. Several antibodies mark proteins that are present in knockout tissues, indicating that they are nonspecific. These include antibodies raised against the peptide sequence containing the nuclear localization signals of p65 (MAB3026; Chemicon) and p50 (sc-114; Santa Cruz). Some antibodies that recognize target proteins at the correct molecular weight still fail in western blot analysis because they also mark additional proteins and inconsistently so. We show that the criterion for validation by use of blocking peptides can still fail the test of specificity, as demonstrated for several antibodies raised against p65 phosphorylated at serine 276. Finally, even antibodies that show specificity in western blots produce nonspecific neuronal staining by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions We note that many of the findings in the literature about neuronal NF-?B are based on data garnered with antibodies that are not selective for the NF-?B subunit proteins p65 and p50. The data urge caution in interpreting studies of neuronal NF-?B activity in the brain. PMID:21999414

  6. Exploring the experiences of EU qualified doctors working in the United Kingdom: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Saliba, Vanessa; McKee, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This qualitative study of 23 doctors from other EU member states working in the UK highlights that, contrary to media reports, doctors from other member states working in the UK were well prepared and their main motivation to migrate was to learn new skills and experience a new health care system. Interviewees highlighted some aspects of their employment that work well and others that need improving. Some interviewees reported initially having language problems, but most noted that this was resolved after a few months. These doctors overwhelmingly reported having very positive experiences with patients, enjoying a NHS structure that was less hierarchical structure than in their home systems, and appreciating the emphasis on evidence-based medicine. Interviewees mostly complained about the lack of cleanliness of hospitals and gave some examples of risk to patient safety. Interviewees did not experience discrimination other than some instances of patronising and snobbish behaviour. However, a few believed that their nationality was a block to achieving senior positions. Overall, interviewees reported having enjoyable experiences with patients and appreciating what the NHS had to offer. PMID:25239032

  7. Longitudinal Evaluation of Work/Study Programs for the Educable Mentally Retarded in Oregon: Progress Report. Working Paper No. 62.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Andrew S.; And Others

    Discussed is phase 3 of a longitudinal research study evaluating Oregon's work-study programs for educable retarded secondary school students along the following dimensions: student characteristics, curriculum content and school experiences, work placement, instructional objectives of 26 work coordinators and evaluative instruments of short-term…

  8. The relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported paediatric medication administration errors: a pan canadian study.

    PubMed

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs) occur frequently, with devastating consequences for children and their families. This study explored the relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported PMAEs. In total, 127 potential and 245 actual PMAEs were reported. Workload, distraction, and ineffective communication were identified as significant contributors to the occurrence of PMAEs. Medical/surgical units reported more errors than critical care environments (p=.000) and a 2.9% increase in the frequency of reported PMAEs was noted for each additional bed on units (p=.001). This study supports the awareness that a systems reform is required to reduce PMAEs. PMID:23290866

  9. Work stress models and diurnal cortisol variations: The SALVEO study.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Alain; Juster, Robert-Paul; Durand, Pierre; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess components, subscales, and interactions proposed by the popular Job Demand-Control (JDC), Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS), and Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) work stress models in relation to diurnal variation of the stress hormone cortisol. Participants included 401 day-shift workers employed from a random sampling of 34 Canadian workplaces. Questionnaires included the Job Content Questionnaire to measure psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support as well as the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire to measure effort, reward, and overcommitment. Salivary cortisol was collected on 2 working days at awaking, +30 min after awaking, 1400h, 1600h, and bedtime. Multilevel regressions with 3 levels (time of day, workers, workplaces) were performed. Results revealed that JDC, JDCS and ERI interactions were not statistically associated with variations in diurnal cortisol concentrations. By contrast when assessing specific work stress subscales, increased psychological demands were linked to decreased bedtime cortisol, increased job recognition was linked to increased cortisol +30 min after waking and at bedtime, and finally increased overcommitment was linked to increased awakening cortisol and decreased cortisol at 1400h, 1600h, and bedtime. Sex moderation effects principally among men were additionally detected for psychological demands, total social support, and supervisor support. Our findings suggest that components and subsubscales of these popular work stress models rather than theorized interactions are more meaningful in explaining diurnal cortisol variations. In particular, psychological demands, job recognition, overcommitment, and to a lesser extent social support at work are the most significant predictors of diurnal cortisol variation in this large sample of Canadian workers. Importantly, the overall effect sizes of these subscales that explained diurnal cortisol concentrations were weak. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322441

  10. Working conditions and mental health: Results from the CARESUN study.

    PubMed

    Feola, Daniela; Pedata, Paola; D'Ancicco, Francesco; Santalucia, Laura; Sannolo, Nicola; Ascione, Eduardo; Nienhaus, Albert; Magliano, Lorenza; Lamberti, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The authors conducted a work-related stress surveillance study in 2013 on 6,558 public-sector employees in Italy, examining how they perceived their jobs, via the Job Content Questionnaire, and their mental health status, via the General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12). Of the 2,094 employees completing the questionnaires, 60% were male, 52% had a medium-level education, and 76% had a medium-level job. Three hundred and eighty-five employees (18%) had a GHQ-12 score >3 and were classified as GHQ-12 cases: these were more often female (54%), medium-to-highly educated (54%), and had more often reported health problems over the previous year (51%). Thus, GHQ-12 cases represented a significant percentage of the examined population, indicating that work-related stress surveillance programs are needed for the planning of psychosocial interventions aimed at the reintegration of individuals with mental health problems. PMID:26167870

  11. Solar Concepts: Teacher Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Jonathan W.

    This volume of teacher notes describes teaching methods to support the material presented in the background text and to elaborate on basic solar concepts. Included are objectives and quizzes, teacher notes and bibliographies, and selected student projects. (Author/RE)

  12. Learning Work: A Critical Pedagogy of Work Education. Critical Studies in Education and Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Roger I.; And Others

    Through discussions of teaching practice and actual lesson suggestions, this book clarifies how the viewpoint of critical pedagogy can be used to develop a clear and principled practice of work education. The introduction provides a brief discussion of how critical pedagogy is understood and how it relates to work education. Chapter 1 situates the…

  13. Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meagher, Thomas Francis

    To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

  14. Individual Need Satisfaction in Work and Non-Work: A Comparative Study of the Effects of the Technology and Organization of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubner, Walter Frank

    This study attempted to identify the nature of the relationship between organizational variables and attitudinal and behavioral reactions of individuals to employment - WORK. Employee needs, satisfaction, non-work activities, and overall attitudes toward company and work were assessed through responses to questionnaires; and organizational…

  15. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,

  16. The Loss Spiral of Work Pressure, Work-Home Interference and Exhaustion: Reciprocal Relations in a Three-Wave Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Bulters, Annemieke J.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the "loss spiral" hypothesis of work-home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency…

  17. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  18. Perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work: a qualitative study in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Green, Tyler; Green, Heidi; Scandlyn, Jean; Kestler, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year medical providers from wealthy countries participate in short-term medical volunteer work in resource-poor countries. Various authors have raised concern that such work has the potential to be harmful to recipient communities; however, the social science and medical literature contains little research into the perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work from the perspective of members of recipient communities. This exploratory study examines the perception of short-term medical volunteer work in Guatemala among groups of actors affected by or participating in these programs. Methods The researchers conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 72 individuals, including Guatemalan healthcare providers and health authorities, foreign medical providers, non-medical personnel working on health projects, and Guatemalan parents of children treated by a short-term volunteer group. Detailed notes and summaries of these interviews were uploaded, coded and annotated using Atlas.ti (Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin) to identify recurrent themes from the interviews. Results Informants commonly identified a need for increased access to medical services in Guatemala, and many believed that short-term medical volunteers are in a position to offer improved access to medical care in the communities where they serve. Informants most frequently cited appropriate patient selection and attention to payment systems as the best means to avoid creating dependence on foreign aid. The most frequent suggestion to improve short-term medical volunteer work was coordination with and respect for local Guatemalan healthcare providers and their communities, as insufficient understanding of the country's existing healthcare resources and needs may result in perceived harm to the recipient community. Conclusion The perceived impact of short-term medical volunteer projects in Guatemala is highly variable and dependent upon the individual project. In this exploratory study, project characteristics were identified that are consistently perceived to be either positive or negative. These findings have direct implications for anyone involved in the planning and execution of short-term medical volunteer projects, including local and foreign medical team members, project planners and coordinators, and health authorities. Most importantly, this preliminary study suggests avenues for future study and evaluation of the impact of short-term medical volunteer programs on local health care services. PMID:19245698

  19. A collection of Schottky-scan notes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabersky, A.P.

    1980-10-01

    This paper is a republication of ISR-RF notes and performance reports on work done in 1974-1975. The original notes have been edited, corrected and, in most cases, shortened. Discussed in this note are the following topics: noise, errors and the Schottky scan; speeding up the Schottky scan; Schottky markers and fast Schottky scans; and some engineering aspects of the fast Schottky scan.

  20. Application notes mine electric power systems. Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    These application notes on mine electric power systems are based on work done under contract to the Bureau of Mines. The notes are intended to provide ready reference to mine maintenance engineers. The subject covered in the first notes are: (1) the measurement of earth resistivity; (2) measurement of ground bed resistance; (3) cable fault location using time domain reflectometry instruments; (4) cable fault location; (5) common splicing errors and how to avoid them; and (6) learning from failed splices.

  1. Changes in work situation and work ability in young female and male workers. A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Good work ability is very important in young workers, but knowledge of work situations that influence work ability in this group is poor. The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in self-reported work factors are associated with self-reported work ability among young female and male workers. Methods A sample of 1,311 (718 women and 593 men) was selected from a Swedish cohort of workers aged 2125?years. At baseline and at 1-year follow-up, participants completed a self-administrated questionnaire including ratings of physical and psychosocial work factors and current work ability. Prevalence ratios were calculated to assess univariate and multivariate associations between changes in work factors and changes in work ability. Results Decreased job control (PR 1.7, 95% CI 1.492.12) and increased negative influence of job demands on private life (PR 1.5, 95% CI 1.251.69) were associated with reduced work ability for both female and male workers in the multivariate analyses. Among female workers, an association was found between improved work ability and increased social support at work (PR 2.4, CI 1.433.95). For male workers, increased job control (PR 2.3, 95% CI 1.214.54) and decreased negative influence of job demands on private life (PR 2.1, 95% CI 1.103.87) were associated with improved work ability in the multivariate analyses. Conclusions Decreased job control and increased negative influence of job demands on private life over time seem to be the most important work factors associated with reduced work ability among young workers of both sexes. Increased social support at work, increased job control, and decreased negative influence of job demands on private life were also found to be the main work factors associated with improved work ability, although with possible gender differences. PMID:22920936

  2. Work-aged stroke survivors’ psychosocial challenges narrated during and after participating in a dialogue-based psychosocial intervention: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies point to the lack of psychosocial support and rehabilitation services that are adjusted to the work-aged stroke survivors’ specific needs in order to promote psychosocial well-being. The aim of the study was to illuminate the psychosocial challenges work-aged participants (i.e. aged 18–67 years) thematised during and after participating a dialogue-based psychosocial intervention during the first year following a stroke. Methods The study was a feasibility study guided by the UK Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Qualitative data from in-depth interviews with fourteen stroke-survivors aged 33–66 years, researcher field notes and log notes written during the intervention were analysed applying a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. Results The stroke and its consequences had a substantial impact on family and work life. Their experiences were summarised in the two themes The threat of becoming marginalised in family life and The threat of becoming marginalised in work life. Conclusion Life as a work-aged stroke survivor was experienced as challenging and created a threat of becoming marginalised in family and work life. The study highlights the need to understand the specific psychosocial challenges and needs facing work-aged stroke survivors’ in order to promote their psychosocial well-being. More research is needed concerning specific life-span challenges amongst work-aged stroke survivors in order to further develop appropriate interventions that helps address this issue. PMID:24066840

  3. Stress among Graduate Social Work Students: An Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Carlton E.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 82 graduate social work students revealed low levels of physical and psychological stress associated with graduate work. Symptoms were reported at higher levels in relation to classroom work than field practice. No major differences were found by sex or marital status, but class standing did produce significant differences. (MSE)

  4. Work Ethic and Employment Status: A Study of Jobseekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Roger B.; Fouts, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Although there have been numerous changes within the workplace during the past century, employers continue to search for employees with a strong work ethic. Employers often cite a strong work ethic as the most desired characteristic in a new employee. Work ethic can be described as a set of characteristics and attitudes in which an individual…

  5. A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Luo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three occasions,…

  6. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of working memory in youth after sports-related concussion: is it still working?

    PubMed

    Keightley, Michelle L; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory strategies to maintain cognitive performance after mTBI. This has significant implications for safe return to daily activities, including competitive sport. PMID:24070614

  7. A qualitative study of factors influencing different generations of Newfoundland and Saskatchewan trained physicians to leave a work location

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested that young physicians may have different expectations and practice behaviours than their older generational counterparts, including their reasons for wanting to remain or leave a community. This study examined the factors associated with a physician’s decision to leave a work location. We compared different generations of physicians to assess whether these factors have changed over generations. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 physicians who graduated from two Canadian medical schools. We asked each physician about the number and nature of work location changes and the factors related to their decisions to leave each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Dissatisfaction with the working environment was the most frequently cited reason for leaving a location for physicians of all generations. Elements which contributed to the quality of the work environment included the collaborative nature of the practice, the relationship with administrators, and access to resources and personnel. For younger physicians, the work environment had to meet their personal expectations for work-life balance. While remuneration level was given by some physicians as the key reason for leaving a location, for others it was the “last straw” if the work environment was poor. A small number of older generation physicians moved in response to political events and/or policies Conclusions We documented generational differences in physicians’ reasons for choosing a work location. We found that a poor work environment was universally the most important reason why a physician chose to leave a location. A few physicians who were unsatisfied with their work location identified level of remuneration as an additional reason for leaving. Some older generation physicians cited political climate as a reason for leaving a work location. While economic factors have largely been the focus of recruitment and retention initiatives, our findings highlight the importance of the work environment and organizational culture on the retention of physicians of all generations. PMID:22830486

  8. Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

  9. Environmental effects of dredging. Lower limits of organic carbon normalization: Results of fish/sediment/water equilibrium partitioning studies. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.E.; Feldhaus, J.; Ace, L.N.; Brannon, J.M.

    1996-03-01

    This technical note reports the initial results of studies measuring biota/ sediment/water equilibrium partitioning of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener. The focus of this technical note is on the validity of normalizing concentrations of neutral organic chemicals on sediment total organic carbon (TOC) when sediment TOC concentrations are low. Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has aggressively pursued development of single-chemical sediment quality criteria (SQC). Equilibrium partitioning of neutral organic chemicals between the organic carbon fraction of bedded sediments and the interstitial water of the sediments provides the theoretical basis for the most popular approach to development of SQC. The solution phase of the chemical in equilibrium with the sediment is considered to represent the bioavailable fraction and to enable the conversion of existing water quality criteria (WQC) into SQC or sediment quality standards.

  10. Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-01-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  11. NOTE: Engineered bone from bone marrow stromal cells: a structural study by an advanced x-ray microdiffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, A.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Burghammer, M.; Komlev, V.; Giannoni, P.; Favia, A.; Cancedda, R.; Rustichelli, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism of mineralized matrix deposition was studied in a tissue engineering approach in which bone tissue is formed when porous ceramic constructs are loaded with bone marrow stromal cells and implanted in vivo. We investigated the local interaction between the mineral crystals of the engineered bone and the biomaterial by means of microdiffraction, using a set-up based on an x-ray waveguide. We demonstrated that the newly formed bone is well organized inside the scaffold pore, following the growth model of natural bone. Combining wide angle (WAXS) and small angle (SAXS) x-ray scattering with high spatial resolution, we were able to determine the orientation of the crystallographic c-axis inside the bone crystals, and the orientation of the mineral crystals and collagen micro-fibrils with respect to the scaffold. In this work we analysed six samples and for each of them two pores were studied in detail. Similar results were obtained in all cases but we report here only the most significant sample.

  12. The importance of a medical chaperone: a quality improvement study exploring the use of a note stamp in a tertiary breast surgery unit

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K; Eshelby, S; Thiruchelvam, P; Khoo, A; Hogben, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The project aim was to determine current use and documentation of medical chaperones within a major breast service unit. It explored ways of improving adherence to professional guidelines concerning chaperones. Setting The single centre quality improvement project was completed in a tertiary breast service unit in North West London. It was a three-stage project with initial audit in October 2013, 1st postintervention cycle in November 2013 and 2nd postintervention cycle in October 2014. Participants In each study cycle, data were collected from entries in clinic notes until at least 155 encounters with documented clinical examination were analysed. All notes were of female patients. Interventions (1) Intervention 1st cycle: presentation and discussion of chaperone guidelines alongside reminder posters and introduction of note stamp. (2) Intervention 2nd cycle: note stamp alone. Primary and secondary outcome measures Documentation of chaperone offer, documentation of patient preference regarding chaperone, identifier (name or signature) of chaperone present and gender of examining clinician. Results In the 1st postintervention cycle, 69.95% documentation of chaperone offer was recorded, p<0.001, CI (59.04% to 80.76%). This result was replicated in the 2nd postintervention cycle a year later with 74.86% documentation of chaperone offer recorded, p<0.001, CI (66.41% to 83.31%). The 4.91% difference was insignificant; p=0.294, CI (14.03% to 4.21%). Conclusions The authors suggest that a proforma approach to medical chaperones is an effective means of ensuring adherence to best practice guidelines. A stamp, or similar, that can be embedded into documentation structure is an effective example of such an approach. Improved documentation allows any problems with adherence to guidelines to be more easily identified, helping to ensure the safeguarding of patients and staff involved in intimate examinations. PMID:26179645

  13. Does Practical Work Really Work? A Study of the Effectiveness of Practical Work as a Teaching and Learning Method in School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ian; Millar, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Many within the science education community and beyond see practical work carried out by students as an essential feature of science education. Questions have, however, been raised by some science educators about its effectiveness as a teaching and learning strategy. This study explored the effectiveness of practical work by analysing a sample of…

  14. Rehearsing biological motion in working memory: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zaifeng; Bentin, Shlomo; Shen, Mowei

    2015-01-01

    Holding biological motion (BM), the movements of animate entities, in working memory (WM) is important to our daily social life. However, how BM is maintained in WM remains unknown. The current study investigated this issue and hypothesized that, analogous to BM perception, the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is involved in rehearsing BM in WM. To examine the MNS hypothesis of BM rehearsal, we used an EEG index of mu suppression (8-12 Hz), which has been linked to the MNS. Using a change detection task, we manipulated the BM memory load in three experiments. We predicted that mu suppression in the maintenance phase of WM would be modulated by the BM memory load; moreover, a negative correlation between the number of BM stimuli in WM and the degree of mu suppression may emerge. The results of Experiment 1 were in line with our predictions and revealed that mu suppression increased as the memory load increased from two to four BM stimuli; however, mu suppression then plateaued, as WM could only hold, at most, four BM stimuli. Moreover, the predicted negative correlation was observed. Corroborating the findings of Experiment 1, Experiment 2 further demonstrated that once participants used verbal codes to process the motion information, the mu suppression or modulation by memory load vanished. Finally, Experiment 3 demonstrated that the findings in Experiment 1 were not limited to one specific type of stimuli. Together, these results provide evidence that the MNS underlies the process of rehearsing BM in WM. PMID:25061930

  15. NOTE: Treatment plan adaptation for MRI-guided radiotherapy using solely MRI data: a CT-based simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhof, E. M.; Balter, J. M.; Vineberg, K.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2010-08-01

    An integrated MRI-accelerator system provides MRI images before and during irradiation. Our purpose is to investigate the feasibility of treatment plan adaptation using solely MRI data, which lack density information. In this study we used CT data to quantify the tissue density effect. Treatment planning was performed for five prostate cancer patients. We simulated correction of a 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm prostate shift relative to the body contour in the anterior, posterior, superior and inferior directions. We applied the original treatment plan to each corrected prostate shift and recalculated the dose distribution using the same monitor units (MU). We calculated the dose differences with and without density information. The latter mimics geometrically correct MRI data. Physical path lengths, available in MRI data, are used to perform MU rescaling per beam and are shown to be of more importance than tissue densities for treatment plan adaptation in prostate cancer. As the change in the physical path length of the central beam axis is representative of the entire beam, MU rescaling based on central beam axis information works fine. In conclusion, MRI data could be used for treatment plan adaptation in prostate cancer provided that the images are geometrically correct.

  16. Breaking the Myth of Flexible Work: Contingent Work in Toronto. A Study Conducted by the Contingent Workers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wolff, Alice

    A survey of 205 people, 4 group interviews with approximately 30 people, and 6 design and analysis meetings involving approximately 40 people were conducted in a 1999 participatory study of contingent workers in Toronto. (Contingent work was defined to be lower-waged forms of non-permanent work arrangements that include contracting, employment…

  17. What Is Not Working in Working Memory of Children with Literacy Disorders? Evidence from a Three-Year-Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbach, Anne; Könen, Tanja; Rietz, Chantal S.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to explore the deficits in working memory associated with literacy disorders (i.e. developmental disorders of reading and/or spelling) and the developmental trajectories of these working memory deficits. The performance of 28 children with literacy disorders was compared to a non-disabled control group with the same…

  18. Technical Note: The impact of spatial scale in bias correction of climate model output for hydrologic impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, E. P.; Ficklin, D. L.; Wang, W.

    2016-02-01

    Statistical downscaling is a commonly used technique for translating large-scale climate model output to a scale appropriate for assessing impacts. To ensure downscaled meteorology can be used in climate impact studies, downscaling must correct biases in the large-scale signal. A simple and generally effective method for accommodating systematic biases in large-scale model output is quantile mapping, which has been applied to many variables and shown to reduce biases on average, even in the presence of non-stationarity. Quantile-mapping bias correction has been applied at spatial scales ranging from hundreds of kilometers to individual points, such as weather station locations. Since water resources and other models used to simulate climate impacts are sensitive to biases in input meteorology, there is a motivation to apply bias correction at a scale fine enough that the downscaled data closely resemble historically observed data, though past work has identified undesirable consequences to applying quantile mapping at too fine a scale. This study explores the role of the spatial scale at which the quantile-mapping bias correction is applied, in the context of estimating high and low daily streamflows across the western United States. We vary the spatial scale at which quantile-mapping bias correction is performed from 2° ( ˜ 200 km) to 1/8° ( ˜ 12 km) within a statistical downscaling procedure, and use the downscaled daily precipitation and temperature to drive a hydrology model. We find that little additional benefit is obtained, and some skill is degraded, when using quantile mapping at scales finer than approximately 0.5° ( ˜ 50 km). This can provide guidance to those applying the quantile-mapping bias correction method for hydrologic impacts analysis.

  19. Environmental effects of dredging: Synopsis of Hamlet City Lake, North Carolina, and San Francisco Bay Area, California, sediment leaching studies. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.E.; Brannon, J.M.; Engler, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    This note summarizes results from six laboratory leaching studies conducted on contaminated sediments. Laboratory batch and column leach tests were conducted on sediments from Hamlet City Lake, Hamlet, North Carolina; Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, Oakland, California; Santa Fe Channel (Richmond Harbor), Oakland; and West Richmond and Pinole Shoal reaches of the J. F. Baldwin Channel, Oakland. These studies were conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer Districts, Wilmington and San Francisco. Implications of the results for development of predictive techniques for leachate quality in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) are discussed.

  20. Note on tachyon moduli and closed strings

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro da Cunha, Bruno

    2008-07-15

    The collective behavior of the SL(2,R) covariant brane states of noncritical c=1 string theory, found in a previous work, is studied in the Fermi liquid approximation. It is found that such states mimic the coset WZW model, whereas only by further restrictions one recovers the double-scaling limit which was purported to be equivalent to closed string models. Another limit is proposed, inspired by the tachyon condensation ideas, where the spectrum is the same of two-dimensional string theory. We close by noting some strange connections between vacuum states of the theory in their different interpretations.

  1. Work study of a desk computer in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Lines, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    Calculating results from laboratory data is a time-consuming part of laboratory work, particularly in chemical pathology, and is a frequent source of mistakes. It is much less popular with technical staff than the basic laboratory work. The reasons for purchasing a desk computer, and its use to perform the calculations in a number of investigations and to convert AutoAnalyzer data into concentration units, are discussed. The introduction of a desk computer improved morale, speeded up the work, and reduced both fatigue and mistakes. Images PMID:4391447

  2. Project Work Plan Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform Attenuation Parameter Studies: Heterogeneous Hydrolytic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2006-06-01

    Between 1955 and 1973, an estimated 750,000 kg of carbon tetrachloride were discharged to the soil in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site as part of the plutonium production process. Of this amount, some carbon tetrachloride reached the groundwater more than 70 m below the ground surface and formed a plume of 10 km2. Recent information has shown that the carbon tetrachloride plume extends to a depth of at least 60 m below the water table. Some carbon tetrachloride has been degraded either by the original process or subsequent transformations in the subsurface to form a co-existing chloroform plume. Although current characterization efforts are improving the conceptual model of the source area, more information is needed to effectively assess the fate and transport of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform to support upcoming remediation decisions for the plume. As noted in a simulation study by Truex et al. (2001), parameters describing porosity, sorption, and abiotic degradation have the largest influence on predicted plume behavior. The work proposed herein will improve the ability to predict future plume movement by better quantifying abiotic degradation mechanisms and rates. This effort will help define how much active remediation may be needed and estimate where the plume will eventually stabilize – key factors in determining the most appropriate remedy for the plume.

  3. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  4. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete

  5. Music training and working memory: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    George, Elyse M; Coch, Donna

    2011-04-01

    While previous research has suggested that music training is associated with improvements in various cognitive and linguistic skills, the mechanisms mediating or underlying these associations are mostly unknown. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that previous music training is related to improved working memory. Using event-related potentials (ERPs) and a standardized test of working memory, we investigated both neural and behavioral aspects of working memory in college-aged, non-professional musicians and non-musicians. Behaviorally, musicians outperformed non-musicians on standardized subtests of visual, phonological, and executive memory. ERPs were recorded in standard auditory and visual oddball paradigms (participants responded to infrequent deviant stimuli embedded in lists of standard stimuli). Electrophysiologically, musicians demonstrated faster updating of working memory (shorter latency P300s) in both the auditory and visual domains and musicians allocated more neural resources to auditory stimuli (larger amplitude P300), showing increased sensitivity to the auditory standard/deviant difference and less effortful updating of auditory working memory. These findings demonstrate that long-term music training is related to improvements in working memory, in both the auditory and visual domains and in terms of both behavioral and ERP measures. PMID:21315092

  6. A feasibility study of work group monitoring for Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Present Hanford internal dosimetry policy recommends placing a worker on a routine bioassay monitoring program if the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) in a single calendar year may exceed 100 mrem for all radionuclides. Nearly all Hanford workers who enter contamination zones are on routine bioassay programs. Site environmental restoration and remediation now require an even larger number of workers to enter contamination zones, therefore increasing the number of workers requiring routine bioassay monitoring. Work group bioassay is a method which demonstrates, at a reduced cost, that workers who are assumed to be essentially at no risk for incurring intakes are, in fact, not incurring intakes. For the proposed program, a work group will be identified by a letter to their exposure history file. The analytical result for a work group bioassay sample will be placed in the dosimetry record of the person actually providing the sample and will be identified as pertaining to a work group by an appropriate code. Any positive result will be followed up using the same procedure as for individual-specific bioassay, which limits false positives to less than 0.5%. Workers who (1) have radioactive material depositions that interfere with detecting and assessing additional intakes, (2) use any form of respiratory protection, or (3) enter airborne radioactivity areas will be excluded from a work group bioassay program and placed on an individual-specific bioassay program.

  7. Minority Access and Persistence Study: A Working Bibliography with Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Vinette; And Others

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this contribution offers an annotated bibliography on minority access and persistence. It cites the following: nine books (e.g., "Student Outcome Questionnaires: An Implementation Handbook" by P. Ewell and

  8. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light

  9. A Case Study of Work in Long Island Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of the past few decades, technology has shaped the way people interact, work, learn, and retrieve and disperse information. The advent of the 21st Century includes new forms of knowledge and information, requiring tools and skills previously unseen by generations of learners. New tools are meant to be used for expansion of

  10. Designing Classrooms That Work: Conception and Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasz, Cathleen

    During the 1990s, school programs that more explicitly link school and work have been expanded. In order to realize the curricular and pedagogical reforms that underlie these programs, teachers need appropriate staff development. In 1996, RAND staff designed and pilot-tested a 6-week "mini-sabbatical," a prototype course to help teachers in a…

  11. Technical Work Plan for: Fracture and Lithophysal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    n

    2006-09-11

    The primary objective of the work scope described in this technical work plan (TWP) is to enhance the descriptions of fracture and lithophysal parameters for the repository host horizon (RHH) over the repository footprint utilizing a predictive model. This work is planned to address U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) additional information needs (AINs) associated with the Structural Deformation and Seismicity (SDS) Key Technical Issues (KTI) agreement SDS 3.03 (Schlueter 2000 [DIRS 166615]). The results of the planned work are expected to enhance the technical basis and confirm the results of the fracture analyses presented in ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107], Section 6.1.6). This model is not intended to provide an alternative for the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models currently used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Nor are the outputs of this model intended to address the SDS 3.03 AINs related to the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models.

  12. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  13. Music Training and Working Memory: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elyse M.; Coch, Donna

    2011-01-01

    While previous research has suggested that music training is associated with improvements in various cognitive and linguistic skills, the mechanisms mediating or underlying these associations are mostly unknown. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that previous music training is related to improved working memory. Using event-related potentials…

  14. Industrial Work Experience I. Curriculum Guide. General Related Study Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    The primary purpose of this guide is to present basic sample instructional materials for the Industrial Work Experience (IWE) Program. It is designed to aid those charged with local administration and coordination of programs in secondary level trade and industrial education, referred to as the IWE training program. The guide contains 10 units of…

  15. A Case Study of Work in Long Island Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of the past few decades, technology has shaped the way people interact, work, learn, and retrieve and disperse information. The advent of the 21st Century includes new forms of knowledge and information, requiring tools and skills previously unseen by generations of learners. New tools are meant to be used for expansion of…

  16. 76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    .... Application for Work-Study Allowance, VA Form 22-8691. b. Student Work-Study Agreement (Advance Payment), VA Form 22-8692. c. Extended Student Work-Study Agreement, VA Form 22-8692a. d. Work-Study Agreement,...

  17. Experimental research on electric propulsion. Note 5: Experimental study of a magnetic field stabilized arc-jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robotti, A. C.; Oggero, M.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using an electric arc under the influence of a magnetic field in ambient air to transform the heat energy of the working fluid arc into the kinetic energy of the jet was investigated. A convergent-divergent type nozzle was used. Variation of specific thrust and chamber pressure are discussed. Nitrogen was the propellant used.

  18. Work and non-work stressors, psychological distress and obesity: evidence from a 14-year study on Canadian workers

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Alain; Beauregard, Nancy; Blanc, Marie-Eve

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of work, non-work and individual factors to obesity with regard to gender-related differences, and to clarify the mediating role that psychological distress plays in these dynamics in Canada from 1994 to 2008 using the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS). Design Longitudinal. Settings The NPHS is a randomised longitudinal cohort study with biennial interviews of the Canadian adult population from 18 to 64. Participants 5925 non-obese workers in cycle 1 (49% were women). Measurements Obesity was measured using the body mass index (BMI), with a threshold of BMI >30 kg/m2. BMI was corrected in accordance with the recommendations of Connor Gorber et al to adjust for gender bias in responses. Results Of the work characteristics evaluated, only decision authority was associated with obesity for women but not for men. Living as a couple, child-related strains, psychotropic drug use, hypertension, being physically inactive and low psychological distress were obesity risk factors but were not moderated by gender. Overall, psychological distress did not mediate the associations that work factors have on obesity. Conclusions Our study suggests that men and women differ little in the extent to which work, non-work and individual factors predict obesity. However, for women, the level of decision authority is associated with a lower obesity risk. In addition, psychological distress did not mediate the contribution of work factors and actually seems, contrary to expectations, to decrease the obesity risk when work, non-work and individual factors are taken into account. PMID:25740022

  19. The impact of note taking style and note availability at retrieval on mock jurors' recall and recognition of trial information.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Craig; Baxter, Rebecca E; Lorek, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Jurors forget critical trial information and what they do recall can be inaccurate. Jurors' recall of trial information can be enhanced by permitting them to take notes during a trial onto blank sheets of paper (henceforth called freestyle note taking). A recent innovation is the trial-ordered-notebook (TON) for jurors, which is a notebook containing headings outlining the trial proceedings and which has space beneath each heading for notes. In a direct comparison, TON note takers recalled more trial information than freestyle note takers. This study investigated whether or not note taking improves recall as a result of enhanced encoding or as a result of note access at retrieval. To assess this, mock jurors watched and freely recalled a trial video with one-fifth taking no notes, two-fifths taking freestyle notes and two-fifths using TONs. During retrieval, half of the freestyle and TON note takers could access their notes. Note taking enhanced recall, with the freestyle note takers and TON note takers without note access performing equally as well. Note taking therefore enhances encoding. Recall was greatest for the TON note takers with note access, suggesting a retrieval enhancement unique to this condition. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25853172

  20. Evaluating Work-Based Learning: Insights from an Illuminative Evaluation Study of Work-Based Learning in a Vocational Qualification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rensburg, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an illuminative evaluation study of the work-based module in a vocational qualification in Animal Health offered for the paraveterinary industry by a distance education institution in South Africa. In illuminative evaluation, a programme is studied by qualitative methods to gain an in-depth understanding of its "instructional

  1. Evaluating Work-Based Learning: Insights from an Illuminative Evaluation Study of Work-Based Learning in a Vocational Qualification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rensburg, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an illuminative evaluation study of the work-based module in a vocational qualification in Animal Health offered for the paraveterinary industry by a distance education institution in South Africa. In illuminative evaluation, a programme is studied by qualitative methods to gain an in-depth understanding of its "instructional…

  2. Basic operations in working memory: contributions from functional imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Bledowski, Christoph; Kaiser, Jochen; Rahm, Benjamin

    2010-12-25

    Working memory (WM) constitutes a fundamental aspect of human cognition. It refers to the ability to keep information active for further use, while allowing it to be prioritized, modified and protected from interference. Much research has addressed the storage function of WM, however, its 'working' aspect still remains underspecified. Many operations that work on the contents of WM do not appear specific to WM. The present review focuses on those operations that we consider "basic" because they operate in the service of memory itself, by providing its basic functionality of retaining information active, in a stable yet flexible way. Based on current process models of WM we review five strands of research: (1) mnemonic selection of one item amongst others, (2) updating the focus of attention with the selected item, (3) updating the content of visual WM with new item(s), (4) rehearsal of visuospatial information and (5) coping with interference. We discuss the neuronal substrates underlying those operations obtained with functional magnetic resonance imaging and relate them to findings on "executive functions". The presented data support the view that WM emerges from interactions between higher sensory, attentional and mnemonic functions, with separable neural bases. However, interference processing and the representation of rule switching in WM may demand an extension of the current WM models by executive control functions. PMID:20678984

  3. Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Yeung, April W. M.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Yip, Paul S. F.; Tang, Arthur K. H.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of…

  4. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Coecke, Bob

    2006-01-04

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns 'doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement. For a survey on the 'what', the 'why' and the 'hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  5. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  6. Lesson Study: Still a Work in Progress in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolle, Penelope P.

    2010-01-01

    In the years since the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) focused on the success of Japanese students, much has been written about Japanese lesson study and its possible benefits for mathematics classrooms in America. Lesson study is a professional development process used in Japanese schools that brings teachers (and other…

  7. A study of emotion work in student paramedic practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Angela

    2013-05-01

    Student paramedics are exposed to the harsh reality of paramedic practice early within preregistration education (British Paramedic Association (BPA) 2006). Active involvement in the emergency assessment, management and treatment of potentially life threatening and traumatic incidents involves exposure to human suffering, pain, trauma and death. Managing their own and others' emotions would appear to be integral. There is however, a paucity of research evidencing the emotional aspects of paramedic practice and none which specifically captures the student perspective. A qualitative, exploratory design and semi-structured interviews were undertaken with eight second year undergraduate paramedic science students to explore their perceptions and experiences of emotion work and the strategies used to deal with it. Thematic content analysis revealed three main themes, 'getting on with the job', 'struggling with emotion' and 'talking it through'. This paper presents the findings on the first two themes. Emergency resuscitation and getting on with the job emerged as a priority in a number of the experiences and subthemes included control and suppression of emotion, 'got to deal with it' and 'don't see them as a person'. Students struggled to deal with patients' and relatives' emotions and their own in some situations and subthemes included 'not sure of what to say', 'stop myself crying', and 'personal links'. The findings provide evidence of the emotional demands of student paramedic practice and have important implications for the curriculum content which must prepare and support students to perform emotion work effectively. PMID:22476010

  8. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presentsseries efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. Alternatively, a new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of new structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.

  9. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of new structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.

  10. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of newmore » structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.« less

  11. RNS. Research Notes and Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III

    1988-05-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access and data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.

  12. RNS. Research Notes and Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III )

    1988-05-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access and data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexingg). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.

  13. Solutions to Faculty Work Overload: A Study of Job Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Brenda J.; Coll, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the opinions of a national sample of counselor education chairs and college of education deans regarding the advantages and disadvantages of faculty job sharing. Results showed favorable responses toward faculty job sharing from approximately half the sample, despite limited experience with job sharing. The study found few…

  14. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Rigouin, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Brunet, René; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:25479968

  15. Excitation-contraction coupling properties in women with work-related myalgia: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Green, Howard J; Ranney, Don; Burnett, Margaret; Galvin, Patti; Kyle, Natasha; Lounsbury, David; Ouyang, Jing; Smith, Ian C; Stewart, Riley; Tick, Heather; Tupling, A Russell

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the potential role of selected excitation-contraction coupling processes in females with work-related myalgia (WRM) by comparing WRM with healthy controls (CON) using tissue from extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and trapezius (TRAP) muscles. For the ECRB, age (mean SE) was 29.6 3.5 years for CON (n = 9) and 39.2 2.8 years for WRM (n = 13), while for the TRAP, the values were 26.0 2.1 years for CON (n = 7) and 44.6 2.9 years for WRM (n = 11). For the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of the ECRB, WRM displayed concentrations (nmol(mg protein)(-1)min(-1)) that were lower (P < 0.05) for Total (202 4.4 vs 178 7.1), Basal (34 1.6 vs 30.1 1.3), and maximal Ca(2+)-ATPase activity (Vmax, 168 4.9 vs 149 6.3), and Ca(2+)-uptake (5.06 0.31 vs 4.13 0.29), but not SERCA1a and SERCA2a isoforms, by comparison with CON. When age was incorporated as a co-variant, Total, Basal, and Ca(2+)-uptake remained different from CON (P < 0.05), but not Vmax (P = 0.13). For TRAP, none of the ATPase properties differed between groups (P > 0.05) either before or following adjustment for age. No differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the groups for Ca(2+)-release in the SR for either TRAP or ECRB. Similarly, no deficiencies, regardless of muscle, were noted for either the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase content or the ? and ? subunit isoform distribution in WRM. This preliminary study provides a basis for further research, with expanded numbers, investigating the hypothesis that abnormalities in SR Ca(2+)-regulation are involved in the cellular etiology of WRM. PMID:24886407

  16. Exploring Multiple Spaces and Practices: A Note on the Use of Ethnography in Research in Library and Information Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Hanna; Hanell, Fredrik; Lindh, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, there has been a growing interest in ethnographic research within the field of library and Information studies. Although ethnography has been used by information researchers for studying a wide variety of phenomena, discussions concerning methodological developments and directions, as well as ethnography's wider…

  17. Gifts on a High Note: A Case Study of Major Donors to Music Programs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barascout, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This study is an examination of the giving decision-making process, as well as the factors, characteristics, and motivators of major donors to music programs in higher education. The college and the conservatory of music selected for this study are part of large, public, doctoral, research universities in metropolitan areas with at least three…

  18. Transforming English Language Learners' Work Readiness: Case Studies in Explicit, Work-Specific Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal-Hopes, Diana L.; Villavicencio, Edna; Foote, Martha M.; Green, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of a six-step framework for work-specific vocabulary instruction in adult English language learners (ELLs). Guided by research in English as a second language (ESL) methodology and the transactional theory, the researchers sought to unveil how these processes supported the acquisition and application of…

  19. Connecting Work and School: A Statewide Study of Employer Participation in Florida School-to-Work Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Mary

    A study assessed the characteristics and practices of employers participating in Florida school-to-work (STW) initiatives, the factors influencing their participation, and the quality and value of their partnerships with schools. Data were gathered through a statewide mail survey of a random sample of employers drawn from more than 15,000 Florida…

  20. Student perception about working in rural Nepal after graduation: a study among first- and second-year medical students

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is a developing country in South Asia with a population of 29.8 million. In September 2011, there were 18 medical schools with 14 being in the private sector. KIST Medical College is a private school in Lalitpur district. The present study was conducted to obtain information on student perceptions about working in rural Nepal after graduation. Methods The study was conducted among first- and second-year undergraduate medical students using a semi-structured questionnaire developed by the authors using inputs from the literature and their experiences of teaching medical students. Year of study, gender, method of financing of medical education, place of family residence and occupation of parents were noted. Participant responses were analysed, grouped together and the number of respondents stating a particular response was noted. Results Of the 200 students, 185 (92.5%) participated with 95 being from the first year and 90 from the second. Most students were self-financing and from urban areas. Regarding the question of working in rural Nepal after graduation, 134 (72.4%) said they will work after their undergraduate course. Students preferred to work in the government or nongovernmental sector. Student felt doctors are reluctant to serve in rural Nepal due to inadequate facilities, low salary, less security, problems with their professional development, less equipment in health centres, decreased contact with family and difficulties in communicating with an illiterate, rural population. About 43% of respondents felt medical education does not adequately prepare them for rural service. Repeated rural exposure, postings in rural hospitals and health centres, and training students to diagnose and treat illness with less technology were suggested. The median monthly salary expected was 60 000 Nepalese rupees (US$ 820) and was significantly higher among first-year students. Conclusions The majority of respondents were in favour of working in rural Nepal after graduation. They wanted facilities in rural areas and health centres to be improved. Changes in the education system were suggested. Providing relatively better facilities for rural doctors compared with urban doctors and reorienting medical education for producing doctors for rural Nepal can be considered. Further studies are required in other private medical schools. PMID:22938089

  1. Company Policies on Working Hours and Night Work in Relation to Older Workers' Work Ability and Work Engagement: Results From a Dutch Longitudinal Study with 2 Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Laudry; Leijten, Fenna R M; Heuvel, Swenneke G; Ybema, Jan F; de Wind, Astrid; Burdorf, Alex; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To longitudinally investigate (1) whether lower work ability and work engagement predict the use of company policies on reduced working hours and exemption from evening/night work among older workers, and (2) whether using such policies subsequently contribute to higher work ability and work engagement. Methods In total 6922 employees (45-64 years) participating in the first three waves of the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation were included. Participants yearly filled out an online questionnaires. Regression analyses were applied to study the influence of baseline work ability and work engagement on the incident use of policies during the first year of follow-up, and the incident use of these policies on work ability and work engagement during the second year of follow-up. Results Employees with a higher work ability were less likely to start using the policy 'reduced working hours' [OR 0.91 (95 % CI 0.83-0.98)]. Starting to use this policy was in turn related to lower work ability 1 year later [B -0.28 (95 % CI -0.47 to -0.08)]. Starting to use the policy 'exemption from evening/night work' was related to higher work engagement 1 year later [B 0.23 (95 % CI 0.07-0.39)]. Conclusions Low work ability precedes the use of some company policies aiming to support sustainable employability of older workers. Further research is needed to explore whether company policies result in a (longstanding) improvement, or reduced deterioration, of older workers' employability. PMID:26250870

  2. Confirmation Bias in Studies of Nestmate Recognition: A Cautionary Note for Research into the Behaviour of Animals

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Ellen; Elgar, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Confirmation bias is a tendency of people to interpret information in a way that confirms their expectations. A long recognized phenomenon in human psychology, confirmation bias can distort the results of a study and thus reduce its reliability. While confirmation bias can be avoided by conducting studies blind to treatment groups, this practice is not always used. Surprisingly, this is true of research in animal behaviour, and the extent to which confirmation bias influences research outcomes in this field is rarely investigated. Here we conducted a meta-analysis, using studies on nestmate recognition in ants, to compare the outcomes of studies that were conducted blind with those that were not. Nestmate recognition studies typically perform intra- and inter colony aggression assays, with the a priori expectation that there should be little or no aggression among nestmates. Aggressive interactions between ants can include subtle behaviours such as mandible flaring and recoil, which can be hard to quantify, making these types of assays prone to confirmation bias. Our survey revealed that only 29% of our sample of 79 studies were conducted blind. These studies were more likely to report aggression among nestmates if they were conducted blind (73%) than if they were not (21%). Moreover, we found that the effect size between nestmate and non-nestmate treatment means is significantly lower in experiments conducted blind than those in which colony identity is known (1.38 versus 2.76). We discuss the implications of the impact of confirmation bias for research that attempts to obtain quantitative synthesises of data from different studies. PMID:23372659

  3. Guest editor's note

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment transport processes in rivers are of great concern in many practical studies ranging from large-scale problems such as reservoir management, dam removal, and design of restoration works to small-scale problems such as local bed scour around intakes, outfalls and piers. Within the discipline...

  4. Telepresence work station system definition study, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This study effort has shown that the development of a space robotic servicing system is totally feasible. More importantly, many of the key elements of such a system are currently available as the result of previous and ongoing technical efforts. In many cases, decisions remain to be made concerning tradeoffs between options available to satisfy system technology requirements. The primary recommendation resulting from this study is for the development of a flight test bed system that could be used to establish a performance database to assist some of the necessary technical decisions described in the study package. A properly design flight test bed system would prove tremendously useful in terms of rapidly evaluating technology in a realistic setting and would be a great benefit in the development of the operational system.

  5. Work-related burns: a 6-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ng, D; Anastakis, D; Douglas, L G; Peters, W J

    1991-04-01

    During the 6 years from July 1984 to May 1990, 193 patients (30.2 per cent of all patients) were admitted to our regional adult burn centre, for treatment of work-related burn injuries. The median age of patients was 32.5 years (range 18-64 per cent), and 94 per cent were males. Fifty-nine per cent of the patients came from metropolitan Toronto, and 40 per cent from rural Ontario. Most of the patients (97.3 per cent) were referred to the burn centre within 24 h of their injury. The most common aetiology was electrical injury (29.5 per cent), followed by flame (24.4 per cent), contact (10.4 per cent), flash (9.8 per cent), tar and asphalt (9.3 per cent), scald (7.8 per cent), chemical (5.1 per cent), steam (4.7 per cent) and grease (1 per cent). Within the electrical burn group, about one-half were flash burns, one-quarter were clothing fire injuries, and one-quarter were contact injuries. These occupational burns tended to be extensive injuries. The median body surface area (BSA) was 16.5 per cent, with a median full thickness (FT) component of 5.0 per cent. The average length of stay was 20.0 days. Inhalation injury requiring intubation occurred in 14.8 per cent of patients. Sepsis--confirmed by positive blood cultures--developed in 14 per cent of the patients, at an average time of 8.8 days postburn. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism isolated from blood cultures. Pneumonia occurred in 6.3 per cent of patients. A total of 207 surgical procedures was performed on 113 of the 193 patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2054074

  6. Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, David. Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology

  7. Learning to Speak: Student Work. Female Studies X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfelt, Deborah Silverton, Ed.

    The tenth volume in a series, this publication is a collection of papers produced by college students in women's studies classes around the country. The major purpose of the collection is to provide teachers and students in the field with access to the products of classes other than their own. Most of the writings come from the humanities or from…

  8. How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

    Detailing the false starts, uncertainty, and internal questioning that occur as companies organize and manage language simplification projects, the 12 case studies contained in the two sections of this book reveal how some business organizations have benefited by simplifying consumer documents. Descriptions of each case contain information on the…

  9. Ecology and Human Values: A Course of Study. (Working Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This interdisciplinary course is designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is made of the case study…

  10. Work, Learning and Satisfaction in Undergraduate Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Francis M., III

    Levels of student satisfaction with the Great Lakes Colleges Association - Philadelphia Urban Semester, a 16-week multidisciplinary urban field study program, were investigated. Several aspects of the program, including the four day per week field placement, weekly "city" seminar, elective seminar, and minimally structured living experience were

  11. Ways that Work: Putting Social Studies Standards into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindquist, Tarry

    This book presents a collection of ideas about how social studies and language arts can be combined to promote learning and to create an active, informed citizenship for the 21st century. Chapter titles include: (1) "By the Book: Learning History beyond the Text"; (2) "A Place at the Table: Investigating Global Issues in a Day"; (3) "Across the…

  12. Classics and Women's Studies. Working Paper No. 119.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Judith P.

    A consideration of classical study as an evolving profession includes discussion of classical content and methodology and an examination of the role of women both as objects of classical inquiry and as classical scholars. Material is arranged in three parts. In part A, classical content and scope are defined. The interdisciplinary and elitist…

  13. Work, Learning and Satisfaction in Undergraduate Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Francis M., III

    Levels of student satisfaction with the Great Lakes Colleges Association - Philadelphia Urban Semester, a 16-week multidisciplinary urban field study program, were investigated. Several aspects of the program, including the four day per week field placement, weekly "city" seminar, elective seminar, and minimally structured living experience were…

  14. Helping Parents to Work: A Study for Kent TEC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dench, S.; O'Regan, S.

    A study evaluated three clubs that provide out-of-school childcare in Kent, England: Out-of-School Childcare, Returners Roadshow and Workshops, and a parenting skills course. Questionnaires collected information from 29 club managers and 282 parents of children in the clubs and 78 participants of Returners events. Thirty participants in the…

  15. Developmental Studies at Nunez Community College: A Work in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accomando, Annette

    2004-01-01

    This paper chronicles the process undertaken by one community college to analyze its Developmental Studies Program. A participant/observer faculty member involved in the college's assessment activities contemplated the institution's complex past, the challenging present, and the unfolding future. An interesting account explicating committee…

  16. Academic and Personal Development through Group Work: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study linked academic and personal development within a group counseling intervention. A pre-test post-test research design compared social skills, learning behaviors, and achievement with a convenience sample and control group of students from three elementary schools. For the treatment group, grade point average in Language Arts…

  17. Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, David. Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology…

  18. Women's Work and Women's Studies, 1973-1974: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

    The bibliography lists almost 4,000 books, articles, pamphlets, and research papers about women and feminism. All items in this third volume were published or in progress in 1973-1974. The items are classified by the topics of abortion, arts and media, contemporary women's movement, cultural studies, education, employment, family organization,…

  19. Lower Level Mediation Effect Analysis in Two-Level Studies: A Note on a Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Mels, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a didactic discussion of a multilevel covariance structure modeling approach to estimation of lowest level mediation effect indexes in two-level studies. The procedure is useful when addressing questions about relations among total and indirect effects between variables of interest while accounting for the hierarchical…

  20. Baseline study of effects of ionizing radiation on the chromosomes of the marine worm, 'Neanthes arenaceodentata'. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Pesch, G.G.; Young, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    Between 1946 and 1970 the United States disposed of low level radioactive waste at several sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In 1972 the Environmental Protection Agency was authorized under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act (PL-92-532) to regulate all ocean disposal activities. This Act requires EPA to establish a program for reviewing and evaluating ocean dumping permit applications. Before EPA can approve permits for ocean dumping of radioactive waste, it will be necessary to determine how such wastes may affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using a marine coastal worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata, as a cytogenetic model for assessing radiation damage to ocean organisms. Groups of worms were exposed to cobalt-60, then slide preparations were made and scored for gross chromosome aberrations and damage. All the levels of ionizing radiation tested from 180-680 rads were found to cause significant chromosome damage in N. arenaceodentata. The nature of this damage depended on dose, dose-rate and DNA repair capability of the worm. Worms responded to the same dose range as do mice. Since mice are accepted models for studying radiation effects on humans, this study supports the utility of using this species to study radiation effects on marine organisms.

  1. Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software. Items covered this month include: (1) a recommendation that dam designers give more consideration to earthquake resistance, (2) the development of a new wave rotor design, (3) the development of a small hydro database in China, and (4) an ICOLD bulletin on the optimization of constuction costs.

  2. "It Is Interesting to Note That . . .": A Comparative Study of Anticipatory "It" in Student and Published Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewings, Martin; Hewings, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Explores one grammatical feature of metadiscourse--clauses with an anticipatory "it" and extraposed subject. This feature is compared in two computerized corpora, one consisting of published journal articles from the field business studies and the second of MBA student dissertations written by nonnative speakers of English. (Author/VWL)

  3. Technical Note: Study of the electron transport parameters used in PENELOPE for the Monte Carlo simulation of Linac targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in Linac targets using the condensed history technique is known to be problematic owing to a potential dependence of absorbed dose distributions on the electron step length. In the PENELOPE code, the step length is partially determined by the transport parameters C1 and C2. The authors have investigated the effect on the absorbed dose distribution of the values given to these parameters in the target. Methods: A monoenergetic 6.26 MeV electron pencil beam from a point source was simulated impinging normally on a cylindrical tungsten target. Electrons leaving the tungsten were discarded. Radial absorbed dose profiles were obtained at 1.5 cm of depth in a water phantom located at 100 cm for values of C1 and C2 in the target both equal to 0.1, 0.01, or 0.001. A detailed simulation case was also considered and taken as the reference. Additionally, lateral dose profiles were estimated and compared with experimental measurements for a 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 2100 for the cases of C1 and C2 both set to 0.1 or 0.001 in the target. Results: On the central axis, the dose obtained for the case C1 = C2 = 0.1 shows a deviation of (17.2% ± 1.2%) with respect to the detailed simulation. This difference decreases to (3.7% ± 1.2%) for the case C1 = C2 = 0.01. The case C1 = C2 = 0.001 produces a radial dose profile that is equivalent to that of the detailed simulation within the reached statistical uncertainty of 1%. The effect is also appreciable in the crossline dose profiles estimated for the realistic geometry of the Linac. In another simulation, it was shown that the error made by choosing inappropriate transport parameters can be masked by tuning the energy and focal spot size of the initial beam. Conclusions: The use of large path lengths for the condensed simulation of electrons in a Linac target with PENELOPE conducts to deviations of the dose in the patient or phantom. Based on the results obtained in this work, values of C1 and C2 larger than 0.001 should not be used in Linac targets without further investigation.

  4. Patient Care Doesn't Suffer When Surgical Residents Work More: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Care Doesn't Suffer When Surgical Residents Work More: Study Even shifts that exceeded 28 hours ... when the doctors-in-training are allowed to work longer shifts, a new study finds. In fact, ...

  5. Effect of excipients on dissolution enhancement of aceclofenac solid dispersions studied using response surface methodology: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2014-03-01

    The aim of present study was to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug aceclofenac by solid dispersion technique using corn starch, dicalcium phosphate, lactose, and microcrystalline cellulose as carriers. Solid dispersions were prepared by solvent wetting method using 3(2) full factorial design for each of the carrier. The prepared solid dispersions were evaluated for differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and angle of repose. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) and 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2). The results of solid state characterization bring to view that in solid dispersions the crystalline drug gets converted to its amorphous form. FTIR study results indicated the absence of interaction between aceclofenac and carriers. For prepared solid dispersions, angle of repose was found to be in the range of 26.19° to 35.29°, which indicates good flowability. Enhanced drug dissolution was obtained with carrier in order lactose > corn starch > microcrystalline cellulose > dicalcium phosphate. Hence, these carriers could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug. PMID:23674128

  6. Characteristics study of Transmission Line Mechanical Research Center (TLMRC) wind tower data. Notes on field-wind loading experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, L.

    1992-10-01

    To initiate and develop EPRI`s wind loading research program, an experimental wind tower was erected at the TLMRC site. A number of anemometers were placed at different elevation levels of the wind tower. Strain gages were also mounted on the leg posts of the tower. The purposes of this experiment were to establish the wind characteristics at the TLMRC site, and to gain experience using different types of instrumentation and data acquisition techniques in field-wind loading experiments. Three sets of wind data collected from the TLMRC wind tower were validated and analyzed in this study. Since the characteristics of wind and response data can be described in different terms and by various methods, the study describes the concept, Identifies the focal point, and discusses the results of each method used in this report. In addition, some comments are provided on how to conduct the field-wind loading experiments as well as how to analyze the wind and response data. The results of this study show that: (1) the magnitudes of wind velocity and direction can vary considerably during a short period of time; (2) the mean vertical wind profile does not hold constant as usually assumed; (3) the turbulence intensity and the gust factor increase as the height above ground decreases; (4) the averaging time can greatly influence the results of wind data analysis; (5) although wind contains lime energy beyond 1 Hz, structural responses above 1 Hz can be excited; (6) strong relationships exist between the wind velocity and the responses in the leg posts of the wind tower. System identification, a tool for establishing models of dynamic systems based in observed data, is successfully used in a trial application which estimates the relationship between the wind velocity and the responses in the wind tower.

  7. Note: Matching index technique for avoiding higher order mode resonance in accelerators: INDUS-2 accelerator as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Joshi, S. C.; Bhandarkar, U. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098

    2013-08-15

    Resonance between circulating beam frequencies and RF cavity Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of accelerators can lead to coupled-bunch instabilities. Shifting these HOMs to avoid the resonance is a topic of active interest. A study has been carried out for the accelerating cavities of the INDUS-2. For quantitative measure of deciding which modes have to be moved and by how much, we introduce a new index called the matching index (I{sub M}), as a measure of how close a HOM is to the nearest beam mode. Depending on the value of I{sub M}, the operating scenarios are classified as safe and unsafe.

  8. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  9. Respondent-driven sampling in a study of drug users in New York City: notes from the field.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and effective in recruiting a diverse sample of drug users. PMID:16977493

  10. Proportion of third-level variation in multi-level studies: A note on an interval estimation procedure.

    PubMed

    Raykov, Tenko

    2010-05-01

    An interval estimation procedure is outlined that can be used for evaluating the proportion of observed variance in a response variable, which is due to the third level of nesting in a hierarchical design. The approach is also useful when it is of concern to address the necessity of including a third level in analyses of data from a multi-level study, relative to an alternative of proceeding with two-level modelling. The proposed method is illustrated with an empirical example. PMID:19793411

  11. Innovative approaches to exoplanet detection and characterization: Notes from the Nov 10-13 Keck Institute for Space Studies workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2010-05-01

    A four-day workshop was convened on November 10-13, 2009 by the Keck Institute for Space Studies and JPL to consider innovative approaches to detecting and characterizing exoplanets and planetary systems. The program and many of the presentations can be found online: . We present some of the observational strategies discussed in this workshop and summarize some of the issues associated with them. In particular, we will highlight some of the advantages and shortcomings of suborbital and orbital (e.g., ESPA rings) observing platforms in the context of exoplanet detection and characterization.

  12. Making a place for escort work: a case study.

    PubMed

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Lewis, Jacqueline; Street, Megan

    2005-02-01

    This case study focused on the steps taken by a Canadian city bordering the United States to manage the commercial sex component of an adult entertainment package that draws many American visitors. It explored how the city dealt with the potential of community stigmatization resulting from its growing reputation as a place for easily accessible sex trade. The distinctive Canadian laws related to the sex industry, the predominantly laissez-faire attitude toward people's sex lives, and concerns about maintaining the atmosphere of safety and privacy protection preferred by many residents set boundaries to the approach that could be taken. The specific historical, geographic, social, and political location of the city figured prominently in its choice of a normalization rather than a spatialization strategy. PMID:15795804

  13. A BRIEF NOTE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANXIETY AND PERFORMANCE IN SCUBA DIVING IN ADOLESCENTS: A FIELD STUDY.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Fabian; Doppelmayr, Michael

    2015-06-01

    This study explored the relationship between anxiety and scuba diving performance of young individuals (N = 44; 16.9 yr., SD = 1.2) participating in an introductory scuba diving activity. The question was whether the well-known negative correlation between anxiety and scuba diving performance found for experienced and middle-aged scuba divers will be observed in young participants in their first dive experience. Diving instructors rated standardized scuba diving skills that were correlated with individual state and trait anxiety. There was no relationship between anxiety and scuba diving performance, neither for state nor for trait anxiety. This non-significant correlation between anxiety and performance was in contrast to recent findings observed for experienced divers or those who participated at a scuba diving training program. Considering the differences in methodological design between this study and recent investigations, further research is needed to reveal possible relations between anxiety, scuba diving performance, and panic behavior in beginner-level youth or adults. PMID:26029967

  14. STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom setting to help students develop skills related to decision-making. Students will read about the engine cut-off sensor anomaly which created challenges during the STS-114 mission and have the opportunity to make decisions as lead NASA engineers and Mission Management Team members. Included within this document are three case study presentation options - class discussion, group activity, and open-ended research. Please read the full case prior to in-class presentation to allow ample time for students' analysis and reflection, as well as to prepare additional questions. activities or exercises, material selection, etc. Depending upon the setting of your presentation and the number of participants, please choose at least one presentation format beforehand and plan accordingly. You may expect the following learning objectives by using the proposed formats. Learning Objectives: To enable students to experience the responsibilities of NASA management, engineers, and analysis; to discover possible procedures for investigating system anomalies; to become familiar with the liquid hydrogen low level engine cut-off sensor, including its function, connecting components, and location within the Space Shuttle; and to encourage critical analysis and stimulating discussion of Space Shuttle mission challenges.

  15. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or study release programs is awarded automatically, beginning on...

  16. 78 FR 18629 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ...; Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL..., ``Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for... Work-Study Program (WSP) of the Child Labor Regulations. This program allows for the employment of...

  17. 38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance of work-study services. 1.929 Section 1.929 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... performance of work-study services. (a) Scope. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section VA may allow an... becomes entitled by performance of work-study services under 38 U.S.C. 3485 and 3537 when the debt...

  18. 38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance of work-study services. 1.929 Section 1.929 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... performance of work-study services. (a) Scope. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section VA may allow an... becomes entitled by performance of work-study services under 38 U.S.C. 3485 and 3537 when the debt...

  19. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or study release programs is awarded automatically, beginning on...

  20. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or study release programs is awarded automatically, beginning on...

  1. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or study release programs is awarded automatically, beginning on...

  2. Technical Note: Application of artificial neural networks in groundwater table forecasting - a case study in Singapore swamp forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Wendi, D.; Kim, D. E.; Liong, S.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    Accurate prediction of groundwater table is important for the efficient management of groundwater resources. Despite being the most widely used tools for depicting the hydrological regime, numerical models suffer from formidable constraints, such as extensive data demanding, high computational cost and inevitable parameter uncertainty. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), in contrast, can make predictions on the basis of more easily accessible variables, rather than requiring explicit characterization of the physical systems and prior knowledge of the physical parameters. This study applies ANN to predict the groundwater table in a swamp forest of Singapore. A standard multilayer perceptron (MLP) is selected, trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The inputs to the network are solely the surrounding reservoir levels and rainfall. The results reveal that ANN is able to produce accurate forecast with a leading time up to 7 days, whereas the performance slightly decreases when leading time increases.

  3. NOTE: A Monte Carlo study of dose rate distribution around the specially asymmetric CSM3-a 137Cs source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Ballester, F.; Serrano, M. A.; Lluch, J. L.; Limami, Y.; Puchades, V.; Casal, E.

    2001-07-01

    The CSM3 137Cs type stainless-steel encapsulated source is widely used in manually afterloaded low dose rate brachytherapy. A specially asymmetric source, CSM3-a, has been designed by CIS Bio International (France) substituting the eyelet side seed with an inactive material in the CSM3 source. This modification has been done in order to allow a uniform dose level over the upper vaginal surface when this `linear' source is inserted at the top of the dome vaginal applicators. In this study the Monte Carlo GEANT3 simulation code, incorporating the source geometry in detail, was used to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of this special CSM3-a 137Cs brachytherapy source. The absolute dose rate distribution in water around this source was calculated and is presented in the form of an along-away table. Comparison of Sievert integral type calculations with Monte Carlo results are discussed.

  4. Technical note: Application of artificial neural networks in groundwater table forecasting - a case study in a Singapore swamp forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yabin; Wendi, Dadiyorto; Eon Kim, Dong; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of groundwater table is important for the efficient management of groundwater resources. Despite being the most widely used tools for depicting the hydrological regime, numerical models suffer from formidable constraints, such as extensive data demanding, high computational cost, and inevitable parameter uncertainty. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), in contrast, can make predictions on the basis of more easily accessible variables, rather than requiring explicit characterization of the physical systems and prior knowledge of the physical parameters. This study applies ANN to predict the groundwater table in a freshwater swamp forest of Singapore. The inputs to the network are solely the surrounding reservoir levels and rainfall. The results reveal that ANN is able to produce an accurate forecast with a leading time of 1 day, whereas the performance decreases when leading time increases to 3 and 7 days.

  5. Merozoite surface protein-3 alpha as a genetic marker for epidemiologic studies in Plasmodium vivax: a cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread of the human malaria parasites in terms of geography, and is thought to present unique challenges to local efforts aimed at control and elimination. Parasite molecular markers can provide much needed data on P. vivax populations, but few such markers have been critically evaluated. One marker that has seen extensive use is the gene encoding merozoite surface protein 3-alpha (MSP-3α), a blood-stage antigen known to be highly variable among P. vivax isolates. Here, a sample of complete msp-3α gene sequences is analysed in order to assess its utility as a molecular marker for epidemiologic investigations. Methods Amplification, cloning and sequencing of additional P. vivax isolates from different geographic locations, including a set of Venezuelan field isolates (n = 10), yielded a sample of 48 complete msp-3α coding sequences. Characterization of standard population genetic measures of diversity, phylogenetic analysis, and tests for recombination were performed. This allowed comparisons to patterns inferred from the in silico simulation of a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol used widely. Results The larger sample of MSP-3α diversity revealed incongruence between the observed levels of nucleotide polymorphism, which were high in all populations, and the pattern of PCR-RFLP haplotype diversity. Indeed, PCR-RFLP haplotypes were not informative of a population’s genetic diversity and identical haplotypes could be produced from analogous bands in the commonly used protocol. Evidence of frequent and variable insertion-deletion mutations and recurrent recombination between MSP-3α haplotypes complicated the inference of genetic diversity patterns and reduced the phylogenetic signal. Conclusions The genetic diversity of P. vivax msp-3α involves intragenic recombination events. Whereas the high genetic diversity of msp-3α makes it a promising marker for some epidemiological applications, the ability of msp-3α PCR-RFLP analysis to accurately track parasites is limited. Local studies of the circulating alleles are needed before implementing PCR-RFLP approaches. Furthermore, evidence from the global sample analysed here suggests such msp-3α PCR-RFLP methods are not suitable for broad geographic studies or tracking parasite populations for an extended period of time. PMID:23964962

  6. Notes and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Physics, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)

  7. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will start a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issues section discussing worst-case analysis requirements.

  8. Notes on Linguistics, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, David, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 issues of "Notes on Linguistics," published quarterly, include the following articles, review articles, reviews, book notices, and reports: "A New Program for Doing Morphology: Hermit Crab"; "Lingualinks CD-ROM: Field Guide to Recording Language Data"; "'Unruly' Phonology: An Introduction to Optimality Theory"; "Borrowing vs. Code…

  9. Notes on Literacy, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Literacy, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 volume of "Notes on Literacy," numbers 1-4, includes the following articles: "Community Based Literacy, Burkina Faso"; "The Acquisition of a Second Writing System"; "Appropriate Methodology and Social Context"; "Literacy Megacourse Offered"; "Fitting in with Local Assumptions about Literacy: Some Ethiopian Experiences"; "Gender in…

  10. NCTM Student Math Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan, Ed.; Yunker, Lee E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first Note concerns mathematics on postage stamps. Historical procedures and mathematicians, metric conversion, geometric ideas, and formulas are among the topics considered. Successful…

  11. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will continue a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issue's section discussing the use of Root-Sum-Square calculations for digital delays.

  12. Notes on Linguistics, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loos, Eugene, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1991. Articles in the four issues include: "Linguistics without Books: A Diary Entry" (John Verhaar); "Writing for Scholarly Publications" (Howard Law); "Will Kofi Understand the White Woman's Dictionary?" (Gillian Hansford); "Tips About 'WORD'" (Bryan Harmelink);

  13. Tech notes. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Tech Notes is a monthly compilation of fact sheets of new technology developed by Federal agencies and their contractors. Each issue is divided into easy-to-scan sections covering: agriculture and food, computers, electrotechnology, energy, life sciences, machinery, engineering, manufacturing, materials, medicine and biology, physical sciences and testing and instrumentation. More than 120 fact sheets are provided in each issue.

  14. The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

  15. A Five-Year Study of Junior Faculty Expectations about Their Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Deborah; Crawford, Lizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    A study used the "met-expectations" framework to examine effects of postgraduate work experience on tenure acquisition. Pretenure faculty with academic postdoctoral experience had better time management skills, were clearer about work priorities, experienced less work stress than inexperienced faculty. Early work stress was associated with lower…

  16. The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative

  17. Phylogenetic and chemical studies in the potential psychotropic species complex of Psilocybe atrobrunnea with taxonomic and nomenclatural notes.

    PubMed

    Borovička, J; Oborník, M; Stříbrný, J; Noordeloos, M E; Parra Sánchez, L A; Gryndler, M

    2015-06-01

    Five Psilocybe species with unresolved systematic position (P. atrobrunnea, P. laetissima, P. medullosa, P. pelliculosa, and P. silvatica) were investigated using four molecular markers (EF1-α, ITS, LSU, and IGS). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that with the exception of P. laetissima, which is now rightfully classified in the genus Leratiomyces, all investigated species belong to Psilocybe sect. Psilocybe. For the first time, psychotropic compounds psilocin and psilocybin were detected in P. medullosa using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. On the contrary, neither psilocin, nor psilocybin was detected in P. atrobrunnea and negative results were also obtained from mycelia grown in vitro on tryptamine/tryptophan-amended media. These results strongly suggest that biosynthesis of these alkaloids was lost in P. atrobrunnea. With the exception of minor differences detected in EF1-α marker, all sequences of American and European collections of P. atrobrunnea were identical. On the other hand, a thorough nomenclatural study revealed that the name P. atrobrunnea must be considered dubious; the oldest available candidate name, P. fuscofulva, was therefore adopted. The molecular data suggests that morphologically identical American P. silvatica and European P. medullosa likely represent distinct species; epitypes of both taxa were therefore designated. PMID:26240441

  18. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation for isotopic studies: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as an additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Anhydrous CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on the characterization of vaterite under equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.4 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield per experiment of up to 235 mg relative to the initially dissolved CaCO3 amount of on average 360 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between the mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  19. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega Studies: A Case Study at Argonne National Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1992 more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the life span and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology mega studies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals, and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research. PMID:22004930

  20. Ethical and Practical Guidelines for Reporting Genetic Research Results To Study Participants: Updated Guidelines from an NHLBI Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Fabsitz, Richard R.; McGuire, Amy; Sharp, Richard R.; Puggal, Mona; Beskow, Laura M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Bookman, Ebony; Burke, Wylie; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Church, George; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Eckfeldt, John H.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Fisher, Rebecca; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gachupin, Francine; James, Cynthia; Jarvik, Gail P.; Kittles, Rick; Leib, Jennifer R.; O’Donnell, Christopher; O'Rourke, P. Pearl; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Schully, Sheri D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sze, Rebecca K.F.; Thakuria, Joseph V.; Wolf, Susan M.; Burke, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2009 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 NHLBI Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening five years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that the technologic and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals which would not have been possible a decade ago. While unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the Working Group produced five recommendations. The Working Group offers two recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The Group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final Recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to IRBs, investigators, research institutions and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants. PMID:21156933

  1. Farewell to the World: Suicide Notes from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirel, Birol; Akar, Taner; Sayin, Aslihan; Candansayar, Selcuk; Leenaars, Antoon A.

    2008-01-01

    There has been limited study of suicide in Islamic countries. This paper marks the first study of suicide notes in Turkey, an Islamic country. Using a classification scheme, 49 suicide notes (a rate of 34.5%) were studied. The results show that note writers do not differ greatly from other suicides. Further analysis of younger (less than 40) and…

  2. [Work in the prison system: a study of correctional officers in Greater Metropolitan Salvador, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira; Silvany Neto, Annibal Muniz; Sena, Gildélia de Miranda; Leal, Alexandre dos Santos; Carneiro, Carina Amorim Pouillard; Costa, Fernanda Pita Mendes da

    2002-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify possible associations between working conditions and health among correctional officers in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The study used a stratified proportional random sample of 311 individuals who answered a non-identifiable self-applied questionnaire. The following results were obtained by logistic regression: (a) psychologically inadequate workplace, insufficient basic work conditions, no leisure time, lack of sports practice, >/=nine years working in the prison system, excessive work hours, >/=48 hours work/week, and inadequate organizational conditions at work were associated with minor psychological disorders; (b) lack of specific training, female gender, >/=48 hours work/week, psychologically inadequate workplace, no leisure time, and lack of sports practice were associated with persistent stress, (c) age >/=45 years, >/=nine years working in the prison system, excessive work hours, lack of sports practice, inadequate basic and organizational work conditions, and minor psychological disorders were associated with health complaints. PMID:12048606

  3. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  4. Construing Systems of Management among Primary Headteachers: Moving Forward from Work Activity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Norah; Connolly, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A study used a Personal Construct Theory/Repertory Grid approach to examine the work of 12 Welsh primary headteachers. Analysis of thematic work-activity grids suggests principals have a more coherent view of their work (as centered on children and education) than Henry Mintzberg's observational studies portrayed. (Contains 36 references.) (MLH)

  5. 38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 times the number of hours the individual works; or (ii) The hourly..., without fault on his or her part, performs work-study services for which payment may not be authorized... services and activities which are or were open to those students receiving a work-study allowance...

  6. 38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 times the number of hours the individual works; or (ii) The hourly..., without fault on his or her part, performs work-study services for which payment may not be authorized... services and activities which are or were open to those students receiving a work-study allowance...

  7. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or...

  8. The Husting dilemma: A methodological note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hepp, G.R.; Pollock, K.H.; Hines, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, Gill (1985) discussed the interpretation of capture history data resulting from his own studies on the red-spotted newt, Notophthalmus viridescens , and work by Husting (1965) on spotted salamanders, Ambystoma maculatum. Gill (1985) noted that gaps in capture histories (years in which individuals were not captured, preceded and followed by years in which they were) could result from either of two very different possibilities: (1) failure of the animal to return to the fenced pond to breed (the alternative Husting (1965) favored), or (2) return of the animal to the breeding pond, but failure of the investigator to capture it and detect its presence. The authors agree entirely with Gill (1985) that capture history data such as his or those of Husting (1965) should be analyzed using models that recognize the possibility of 'census error,' and that it is important to try to distinguish between such 'error' and skipped breeding efforts. The purpose of this note is to point out the relationship between Gill's (1985:347) null model and certain capture-recapture models, and to use capture-recapture models and tests to analyze the original data of Husting (1965).

  9. Combining Work and Study: An Empirical Study of Full-Time Students in School, College and University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Rosemary; Lammont, Norma

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 150 working and 50 nonworking secondary and postsecondary students in Britain found that, although financial need was an initial motivation, working becomes habitual and normative. Most learn to adjust to work and study demands. Work enables the acquisition of transferable interpersonal skills, even in poorly rewarded jobs. (SK)

  10. Towards scar-free surgery: An analysis of the increasing complexity from laparoscopic surgery to NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Chellali, Amine; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Jones, Daniel B.; Romanelli, John; Miller, Amie; Rattner, David; Roberts, Kurt E.; Cao, Caroline G.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background NOTES is an emerging technique for performing surgical procedures, such as cholecystectomy. Debate about its real benefit over the traditional laparoscopic technique is on-going. There have been several clinical studies comparing NOTES to conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, no work has been done to compare these techniques from a Human Factors perspective. This study presents a systematic analysis describing and comparing different existing NOTES methods to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Videos of endoscopic/laparoscopic views from fifteen live cholecystectomies were analyzed to conduct a detailed task analysis of the NOTES technique. A hierarchical task analysis of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and several hybrid transvaginal NOTES cholecystectomies was performed and validated by expert surgeons. To identify similarities and differences between these techniques, their hierarchical decomposition trees were compared. Finally, a timeline analysis was conducted to compare the steps and substeps. Results At least three variations of the NOTES technique were used for cholecystectomy. Differences between the observed techniques at the substep level of hierarchy and on the instruments being used were found. The timeline analysis showed an increase in time to perform some surgical steps and substeps in NOTES compared to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Conclusion As pure NOTES is extremely difficult given the current state of development in instrumentation design, most surgeons utilize different hybrid methods – combination of endoscopic and laparoscopic instruments/optics. Results of our hierarchical task analysis yielded an identification of three different hybrid methods to perform cholecystectomy with significant variability amongst them. The varying degrees to which laparoscopic instruments are utilized to assist in NOTES methods appear to introduce different technical issues and additional tasks leading to an increase in the surgical time. The NOTES continuum of invasiveness is proposed here as a classification scheme for these methods, which was used to construct a clear roadmap for training and technology development. PMID:24902811

  11. Work-related treatment for major depressive disorder and incapacity to work: preliminary findings of a controlled, matched study.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Christoph; Bode, Katharina; Wunsch, Eva-Maria; Kliem, Sören; Grocholewski, Anja; Finger, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of work-related cognitive-behavioral treatment (W-CBT) with that of cognitive-behavioral treatment as usual (CBT-AU) for employees on sick leave as a result of a major depressive disorder (MDD). We collected data for 26 matched outpatients at pre- and posttreatment, as well as at 1-year follow-up. Outcome measures were the days of incapacity to work (DIW) as well as self-report measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI], Symptom Checklist 90-R [GSI], Life Satisfaction Questionnaire [FLZ]). We analyzed data with hierarchical linear modeling in a 2-level model. Therapy effects were defined in 3 ways: effect size (ES), response (based on the reliable change index), and remission compared with the general population's symptom level. The DIW were reduced significantly after both types of treatment, but employees showed even fewer DIW after W-CBT. At follow-up, significantly more employees were working as a result of W-CBT than with CBT-AU. Significant improvements on scores of self-rating measures corresponded with moderate-to-large effect sizes for both treatment types. Approximately 2 thirds of the treated employees were categorized as unimpaired on BDI scores at posttreatment and at follow-up. At least 1 half of the employees were classified as unimpaired on GSI scores at both assessment points. In future research, a randomized controlled trial should be conducted using a larger sample size to investigate the impact of moderators (e.g., employees at different branches of the company). Findings provided support for using common CBT techniques to enhance return to work without losing expected improvements at the symptom level. PMID:25402222

  12. Jobs on the Move: European Case Studies in Relocating eWork. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecker, J.; Kirschenhofer, S.

    A study analyzed and synthesized results of 62 company case studies in 18 European countries. Focus was "eWork," information-processing work carried out at a distance with extensive use of computer systems and telecommunication links. Each case study was based on several qualitative interviews with company respondents. Case studies covered both…

  13. Student perception about working in rural United States/Canada after graduation: a study in an offshore Caribbean medical school

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Nandy, Atanu; Herz, Burton L; Little, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rural residents of the United States (US) and Canada face problems in accessing healthcare. International medical graduates (IMGs) play an important role in delivering rural healthcare. IMGs from Caribbean medical schools have the highest proportion of physicians in primary care.  Xavier University School of Medicines admits students from the US, Canada and other countries to the undergraduate medical (MD) course and also offers a premedical program. The present study was conducted to obtain student perception about working in rural US/Canada after graduation.   Methods: The study was conducted among premedical and preclinical undergraduate medical (MD) students during October 2014. The questionnaire used was modified from a previous study. Semester of study, gender, nationality, place of residence and occupation of parents were noted. Information about whether students plan to work in rural US/Canada after graduation, possible reasons why doctors are reluctant to work in rural areas, how the government can encourage rural practice, possible problems respondents anticipate while working in rural areas were among the topics studied. Results: Ninety nine of the 108 students (91.7%) participated. Forty respondents were in favor of working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Respondents mentioned good housing, regular electricity, water supply, telecommunication facilities, and schools for education of children as important conditions to be fulfilled. The government should provide higher salaries to rural doctors, help with loan repayment, and provide opportunities for professional growth.  Potential problems mentioned were difficulty in being accepted by the rural community, problems in convincing patients to follow medical advice, lack of exposure to rural life among the respondents, and cultural issues. Conclusions: About 40% of respondents would consider working in rural US/Canada. Conditions required to be fulfilled have been mentioned above. Graduates from Caribbean medical schools have a role in addressing rural physician shortage. Similar studies in other offshore Caribbean medical schools are required as Caribbean IMGs make an important contribution to the rural US and Canadian health workforce. PMID:25901275

  14. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and exposure to phenoxyherbicides, chlorophenols, fencing work, and meat works employment: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, N E; Smith, A H; Howard, J K; Sheppard, R A; Giles, H J; Teague, C A

    1986-01-01

    A previous case-control study which used the occupational information available on the New Zealand Cancer Registry found that agricultural workers were at increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The findings are now presented for the second phase of the study which entailed interviewing 83 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma registered under code 202 of the International Classification of Diseases together with 168 controls with other types of cancer and 228 general population controls. The findings for the two control groups were similar, and there were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding potential exposure to phenoxy-herbicides (odds ratio = 1.4, 90% confidence limits 0.7-2.5, p = 0.26) or chlorophenols (odds ratio = 1.3, 90% confidence limits 0.6-2.7, p = 0.39). The odds ratio for fencing work, necessitating exposure to several potential risk factors including arsenic and sodium pentachlorophenate was 2.0 (90% confidence limits 1.3-3.0, p = 0.01). The odds ratio for employment in a meat works, necessitating potential exposure to 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol and zoonotic viruses, was 1.8 (90% confidence limits 1.1-3.1, p = 0.04). There was a significant statistical interaction between the risks associated with these two activities, the odds ratio for involvement in both activities compared with involvement in neither being 5.7 (90% confidence limits 2.3-14.3, p = 0.03). PMID:3753879

  15. 4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note cliff erosion under foundation at left center. Looking 297° W. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. How to do a grounded theory study: a worked example of a study of dental practices

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Qualitative methodologies are increasingly popular in medical research. Grounded theory is the methodology most-often cited by authors of qualitative studies in medicine, but it has been suggested that many 'grounded theory' studies are not concordant with the methodology. In this paper we provide a worked example of a grounded theory project. Our aim is to provide a model for practice, to connect medical researchers with a useful methodology, and to increase the quality of 'grounded theory' research published in the medical literature. Methods We documented a worked example of using grounded theory methodology in practice. Results We describe our sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation. We explain how these steps were consistent with grounded theory methodology, and show how they related to one another. Grounded theory methodology assisted us to develop a detailed model of the process of adapting preventive protocols into dental practice, and to analyse variation in this process in different dental practices. Conclusions By employing grounded theory methodology rigorously, medical researchers can better design and justify their methods, and produce high-quality findings that will be more useful to patients, professionals and the research community. PMID:21902844

  17. Notes: a suitable case for audit.

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, J.; Briggs, T.; Parker, C.; Miller, R.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing emphasis on management responsibilities and audit led us to investigate the state of surgical notes in our hospital. Twelve criteria were evaluated regarding information that should be contained in the notes and the absence of this important information was documented. Deficiencies were revealed in all criteria selected. Until hospital patients files are well kept and maintained, retrospective audit whether financial or medical will not be valid. A significant injection of resources is required to redress the situation. Hospitals which have not carried out detailed studies into the contents of their notes need to do so as a matter of urgency. PMID:8415348

  18. The Region of the Study [and] Outline Methodology of the Study. Patterns of Participation in Adult Education and Training. Working Paper 1 [and] Working Paper 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen; Rees, Gareth; Furlong, John; Fevre, Ralph

    These two working papers are products of a regional study in industrial South Wales of the determinants of participation and non-participation in post-compulsory education and training, with special reference to processes of change in the patterns of these determinants over time and to variations between geographical areas. The study combines…

  19. An Assessment of Intervention Fidelity in Published Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Nicole A.; Kim, Irang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention fidelity is a critical strategy to help advance the usefulness and integrity of social work research. This study assessed the extent to which a selected sample of published social work intervention researchers reported its intervention protocols. Methods: Six core social work journals were reviewed in this analysis. The

  20. Learning through Working: A Case Study of Chinese College Students in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Minyoung; Chang, Wonsup

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to provide an understanding of the work experience of Chinese college students in South Korea. A growing number of Chinese students are coming to South Korea for college education, and their aspirations for better work materialize into work experiences in South Korean businesses. In-depth interviews were

  1. WORK EXPERIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICTS. REPORT OF AN EVALUATIVE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FIELSTRA, CLARENCE

    THE PROGRAM HAS OPERATED SINCE 1953 IN FIVE COMMUNITIES. HIGH SCHOOL PERSONNEL HAVE DEVELOPED A WORK-STUDY PROGRAM IN AN ATTEMPT TO HELP STUDENTS--(1) MAKE BETTER OCCUPATIONAL CHOICES, (2) GAIN THE NECESSARY PREPARATION FOR THEIR CHOSEN WORK, (3) FIND PLACEMENT ON THE JOB, AND (4) ADJUST TO AND GROW ON THE JOB. THREE FORMS OF WORK EDUCATION ARE…

  2. A Qualitative Study of Immigration Policy and Practice Dilemmas for Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich; Langer, Carol L.; Sanchez, Thomas Wayne; Negi, Nalini Junko

    2007-01-01

    Social policy shapes the infrastructure wherein social work is practiced. However, what happens when a particular social policy is seemingly incongruent with the social work code of ethics? How do social work students conceive and resolve potential practice dilemmas that may arise as a consequence? In this study, the authors explored potential…

  3. An Assessment of Intervention Fidelity in Published Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Nicole A.; Kim, Irang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention fidelity is a critical strategy to help advance the usefulness and integrity of social work research. This study assessed the extent to which a selected sample of published social work intervention researchers reported its intervention protocols. Methods: Six core social work journals were reviewed in this analysis. The…

  4. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between

  5. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  6. A Qualitative Study of Immigration Policy and Practice Dilemmas for Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Rich; Langer, Carol L.; Sanchez, Thomas Wayne; Negi, Nalini Junko

    2007-01-01

    Social policy shapes the infrastructure wherein social work is practiced. However, what happens when a particular social policy is seemingly incongruent with the social work code of ethics? How do social work students conceive and resolve potential practice dilemmas that may arise as a consequence? In this study, the authors explored potential

  7. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  8. Learning through Working: A Case Study of Chinese College Students in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Minyoung; Chang, Wonsup

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to provide an understanding of the work experience of Chinese college students in South Korea. A growing number of Chinese students are coming to South Korea for college education, and their aspirations for better work materialize into work experiences in South Korean businesses. In-depth interviews were…

  9. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Study of pair-produced doubly charged Higgs bosons with a four-muon final state with the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommerskirchen, T.; Hebbeker, T.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery potential of doubly charged Higgs bosons pair-produced in Drell-Yan events at the CMS detector is presented in this note. The decay branching ratio into muon pairs is assumed to be 100%. The pure muonic decay channel yields a clear signal which is almost background free. Doubly charged Higgs bosons with masses in the range 100-800 GeV are studied, for a low luminosity scenario of \\mathcal{L} = 2\\times 10^{33} cm-2 s-1. The full detector simulation is used. Doubly charged Higgs bosons in this production and decay channel with masses m_{H^{\\pm\\pm}} \\le 650 GeV are expected to be observable at CMS with a significance exceeding 5σ at 10 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. If no signal will be detected for this integrated luminosity, the existence of a doubly charged Higgs boson with m_{H^{\\pm\\pm}} \\le 760 GeV can be excluded at 95% confidence level. This exceeds the current exclusion limit m_{H^{\\pm\\pm}} \\le 136 GeV, set by CDF at Tevatron Run II, by 624 GeV.

  10. Learning Geometry Problem Solving by Studying Worked Examples: Effects of Learner Guidance and Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokosmaty, Sahar; Sweller, John; Kalyuga, Slava

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that instruction that relies heavily on studying worked examples is more effective for less experienced learners compared to instruction emphasizing problem solving. However, the guidance associated with studying some worked examples may reduce the performance of more experienced learners. This study investigated…

  11. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the

  12. Notes & Reflections. Issue 7, Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Michele, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Notes & Reflections" offers practical information--ideas, strategies, tools, and resources--about topics of special interest to professional developers who are working to improve school performance. Today, professional development services to schools are provided by variety of people: teacher leaders; principals; and district, regional, and state

  13. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the…

  14. Night work and mortality: prospective study among Finnish employees over the time span 1984 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Nätti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Oinas, Tomi; Mustosmäki, Armi

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that night work is associated with increased morbidity, but only a few studies have focused on its relation to mortality. This study investigates the relationship between the type of working-time arrangement (weekly night work/daytime work) and total and cause-specific mortality among men and women. The data consist of a representative working conditions survey of Finnish employees conducted in 1984 (2286 men/2216 women), which has been combined with register-based follow-up data from Statistics Finland covering the years 1985-2008. In the 1984 survey, the employees were asked if they worked during the night (23:00-06:00 h) and if so, how often. In this study, the authors compare employees who worked at night (121 men/89 women) to daytime employees who did not do night work (1325 men/1560 women). The relative risk of death was examined by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for background (age, level of education, family situation, and county), health (longstanding illness, pain symptoms, smoking status, and psychological symptoms), and work-related factors (weekly working hours, physical and psychological demands, demands of learning at work, and perceived job insecurity). Female employees working at night had a 2.25-fold higher risk of mortality than female dayworkers (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-4.20) after adjustment for background and health- and work-related factors. In addition to total mortality, night work was also associated with tumor mortality. Female night workers had a 2.82-fold higher risk of tumor mortality than female dayworkers (95% CI 1.20-6.65) in the adjusted model. Among men, no such significant association was observed. The present study indicated that female night workers had a higher risk of both total and tumor mortality compared to female daytime employees. Additional research on the potential factors and mechanisms behind the association between night work and mortality is required. PMID:22621357

  15. Payload specialist station study. Volume 3: Program study cost estimates. Part 1: Work breakdown structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Payload Specialist Station (PSS) is presented. The WBS is divided into two elements--PSS contractor and mission unique requirements. In accordance with the study ground rules, it is assumed that a single contractor, hereafter referred to as PSS Contractor will perform the following: (1) provide C and D hardware (MFDS and elements of MMSE), except for GFE; (2) identify software requirements; (3) provide GSE and ground test software; and (4) perform systems engineering and integration in support of the Aft Flight Deck (AFD) C and D concept. The PSS Contractor WBS element encompasses a core or standardized PSS concept. Payload peculiar C and D requirements identified by users will originate as a part of the WBS element mission unique requirements; these requirements will be provided to the PSS Contractor for implementation.

  16. Kepler Data Release 4 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  17. Orienting the Work-Based Curriculum Towards Work Process Knowledge: A Rationale and a German Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    The term 'work process knowledge' refers to the knowledge needed for working in flexible and innovative business environments, including those in which information and communication technologies have been introduced to integrate previously separated production functions. It involves a systems-level understanding of the work process in the…

  18. The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Herbert

    During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

  19. Social support at work, heart rate, and cortisol: a self-monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Evans, O; Steptoe, A

    2001-10-01

    This study assessed the influence of work social support on self-monitored heart rate, blood pressure, and salivary cortisol recorded on 3 work days and 2 leisure days from 61 nurses and 32 accountants (40 men, 53 women). Heart rate and blood pressure were higher during the day at work than in the evening or on leisure days. Cortisol was higher on leisure than work days and was lower in the evening than in the day. Low social support at work was associated with elevated heart rate during the daytime and evening of work days, an effect that persisted after controlling for psychological distress, age, sex, smoking, and physical activity. Work social support was not related to cortisol on work days, but on leisure days cortisol was elevated among individuals reporting high social support. There were few differences between men and women, and no important occupational effects. PMID:11605829

  20. The effects of new ways of work in the Netherlands: national data and a case study.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Blok, M; Formanoy, M; de Korte, E; Groenesteijn, L

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 15.2% of the work force in the Netherlands works with a computer at another location than at the office or at the clients' location. 27% of the Dutch working population is not satisfied about the possibility to work at home and 18% is not satisfied on the possibility to plan your own working time. The case control study affirms what has been reported as effects of new ways of work: the experienced productivity by communication and the representativeness of the office interior are improved and attention is needed for workers that need concentration space and need to personalize their work environment. In implementing new ways of work these issues need attention. PMID:22317113

  1. Potential Danger in Pre-populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-09-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so would focus students on other important conceptual aspects of the course. In all cases, I gave a brief survey to get student perspectives on their exam preparation. In addition, I introduced an online pre-exam forum asking students to respond to two short questions about how they might prepare their notes for the exam.

  2. No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement after Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Fried, David E.; Hambrick, David Z.; Kane, Michael J.; Engle, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations…

  3. 76 FR 5787 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... institutions to make low-interest, long-term loans to needy undergraduate and graduate students to help pay for... Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Programs... Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

  4. Burnout among Turkish High School Teachers Working in Turkey and Abroad: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogan, Ismail; Dogan, Ahmet Atilla; Bayram, Nuran

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine perceived levels of burnout among Turkish high school teachers working in Turkey and abroad. Method: A total of 255 Turkish teachers working at public schools in Germany (n=78), Cyprus (n=94) and Turkey (n=83) comprised our study group. In Germany and Cyprus, the participants were selected…

  5. Job Demands and Resources as Antecedents of Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Ruokolainen, Mervi

    2007-01-01

    By utilizing a 2-year longitudinal design, the present study investigated the experience of work engagement and its antecedents among Finnish health care personnel (n = 409). The data were collected by questionnaires in 2003 (Time 1) and in 2005 (Time 2). The study showed that work engagement--especially vigor and dedication--was relatively

  6. 76 FR 31682 - Agency Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program)) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program), VA Form 22-8690. OMB Control Number: 2900-0379. Type...

  7. No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement after Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Fried, David E.; Hambrick, David Z.; Kane, Michael J.; Engle, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations

  8. Job Demands and Resources as Antecedents of Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Ruokolainen, Mervi

    2007-01-01

    By utilizing a 2-year longitudinal design, the present study investigated the experience of work engagement and its antecedents among Finnish health care personnel (n = 409). The data were collected by questionnaires in 2003 (Time 1) and in 2005 (Time 2). The study showed that work engagement--especially vigor and dedication--was relatively…

  9. 75 FR 12217 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant programs... Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG... may consider on a case-by-case basis the effect that a major disaster, as defined in section 102(2)...

  10. 77 FR 4547 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Programs... requests and documents from postsecondary institutions for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study.... (Washington, DC time) on the applicable deadline date. The Secretary may consider on a case-by-case basis...

  11. First National Conference on the Work-Study-Play or Platoon Plan. Bulletin, 1922, No. 35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrows, Alice

    1922-01-01

    In February, 1922, the United States Commissioner of Education, John J. Tigert, called the First National Conference on the Work-Study-Play, or Platoon. One result of this conference was that the superintendents who attended asked the United States Bureau of Education to serve as a clearing house of information in regard to the work-study-play…

  12. The Work Disincentive Effects of Unemployment Insurance. Studies in Unemployment Insurance and Related Problems Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munts, Raymond; Garfinkel, Irwin

    In estimating the relationship between the reward for working and work efforts, the authors use cross section studies, social experiments, and studies of related transfer programs, such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children and Old Age Insurance. From the available empirical evidence, they conclude that the Unemployment Insurance system does…

  13. The Limits of the Economic Ideology: A Comparative Anthropological Study of Work Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwimmer, Erik

    1980-01-01

    Presents a comparative study of folk concepts of work in six cultures--Norway, Shetland Islands, Lesotho, Papua New Guinea, Kenya, and Columbia. Concludes that in all cases studied, work represents a means of personal and social fulfillment as well as an economic necessity. (DB)

  14. Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, Peter E.

    2015-06-01

    This application note describes how to model steady-state power flows and transient events in electric power grids with the SPICE-compatible Xyce TM Parallel Electronic Simulator developed at Sandia National Labs. This application notes provides a brief tutorial on the basic devices (branches, bus shunts, transformers and generators) found in power grids. The focus is on the features supported and assumptions made by the Xyce models for power grid elements. It then provides a detailed explanation, including working Xyce netlists, for simulating some simple power grid examples such as the IEEE 14-bus test case.

  15. A Note About HARP's State Trimming Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1998-01-01

    This short note provides some additional insight into how the HARP program works. In some cases, it is possible for HARP to tdm away too many states and obtain an optimistic result. The HARP Version 7.0 manual warns the user that 'Unlike the ALL model, the SAME model can automatically drop failure modes for certain system models. The user is cautioned to insure that no important failure modes are dropped; otherwise, a non-conservative result can be given.' This note provides an example of where this occurs and a pointer to further documentation that gives a means of bounding the error associated with trimming these states.

  16. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Crotty, Dominic J.; Stevens, Grant M.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Methods: Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. Results: ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%–20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head) relative to SmartmA. Conclusions: ODM reduced dose in all experimental and simulation studies over a range of phantoms, while increasing noise. The results suggest a net dose/noise benefit for breast and eye lens for all studied phantoms, negligible lung dose effects for two phantoms, increased lung dose and/or noise for eight phantoms, and increased dose and/or noise for brain and spine for all studied phantoms compared to the reference protocol.

  17. Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP). This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses' knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment. PMID:25548662

  18. Is working in culturally diverse working environment associated with physicians' work-related well-being? A cross-sectional survey study among Finnish physicians.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Väänänen, Ari; Bergbom, Barbara; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko

    2014-08-01

    International mobility of health care professionals is increasing, though little is known about how working in a culturally diverse team affects the native physicians' psychosocial work environment. We examined Finnish physicians' perceptions of work-related wellbeing according to whether they had foreign-born colleagues (FBCs) in their work unit. We also examined whether work-related resources moderate the potential association between work-related wellbeing and working alongside FBCs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted for a random sample of physicians in Finland in 2010 (3826 respondents, response rate 55%). Analyses were restricted to native Finnish physicians working in public health care. The results were analyzed by ANCOVA. In unadjusted analyses, having FBCs was related to poor team climate (p<0.001) and poor job satisfaction (p=0.001). Those physicians who reported high procedural justice and high job control perceived also higher job satisfaction even if they had many FBCs in the work unit (p=0.007 for interaction between FBCs and procedural justice and p<0.001 for interaction between FBCs and job control). These associations were robust to adjustments for age, sex, health care sector, specialization, on-call duty, employment contract, full-time employment and leadership position. The results indicate that culturally diverse work units face challenges related to team climate and job satisfaction. The results also show that leadership plays an important role in culturally diverse work units. The potential challenges of culturally diverse teams for native physicians may be reduced by fair decision-making and by increasing physicians' job control. PMID:24602375

  19. Need satisfaction and employees' recovery state at work: A daily diary study.

    PubMed

    van Hooff, Madelon L M; Geurts, Sabine A E

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to advance insight in the associations between employees' daily effort expenditure at work and their recovery state during the workday, and specifically focused on the role of daily work-related need satisfaction in this process. We examined (a) if high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort act as mediating mechanisms underlying the beneficial role of need satisfaction, and (b) to what extent need satisfaction mitigates the adverse effects of high job demands (work pressure and cognitive demands) on employee recovery. Data were collected by means of a 5-day daily diary study (2 measurements daily: in the morning before work, and at the end of the workday) among 68 participants. Multilevel analyses showed that need satisfaction at work was related to a beneficial recovery state at the end of the workday, and that this association was mediated by high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort. Furthermore, need satisfaction attenuated the adverse effects of high work pressure on employee recovery. All in all, this study increased our understanding of employees' daily effort and recovery processes at work, and highlighted the beneficial role of need satisfaction at work. PMID:25705912

  20. Assessing Statistical Change Indices in Selected Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Amanda D.; Huggins-Hoyt, Kimberly Y.; Pettus, Joelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined how evaluation and intervention research (IR) studies assessed statistical change to ascertain effectiveness. Methods: Studies from six core social work journals (2009-2013) were reviewed (N = 1,380). Fifty-two evaluation (n= 27) and intervention (n = 25) studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies were…

  1. Social Consequences of Nomadic Working: A Case Study in an Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramanjit; Wood-Harper, Trevor

    This research study identified social challenges that knowledge workers in the Swedish organization TeliaSonera (Telia) face when utilizing wireless technologies to conduct work on the move. Upon collecting the relevant research data, five problem areas were identified: work and life balance, addiction, organizational involvement, nomadic work and control, and individual productivity. Each problem area was examined with the philosophical underpinning of socio-technical design principles. The results confirm that better role boundary management, self-discipline, work negotiation, and e-mail communication skills may be required for the knowledge workers to manage the demands of nomadic working. Similarly, rewarding nomadic work performance, building employee supervisor trust relations, and designing jobs that enhance work and life balance can be imperative.

  2. Working conditions and depressive symptoms: A prospective study of U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Sarah A.; Elliott, Michael R.; Zivin, Kara; House, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prior longitudinal studies of negative working conditions and depression generally have used a single exposure indicator, such as job strain, and have required consistent availability of the measure across waves and selection of only those working at all measurement points. Methods Up to four waves of the American’s Changing Lives study (1986-2001/2) and item response theory (IRT) models were used to generate wave-specific measures of negative working conditions. Random-intercept linear mixed models assessed the association between the score and depressive symptoms. Results Adjusting for covariates, negative working conditions were associated with significantly greater depressive symptoms. Conclusion A summary score of negative working conditions allowed use of all available working conditions measures and predicted depressive symptoms in a nationally-representative sample of U.S. workers followed for up to 15 years. Linear mixed models also allowed retention of intermittent workers. PMID:24013657

  3. Emerging Themes on the Efficacy of Ballet Barre Work and Its Connection to Center Work: An Investigatory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinell, Nicole Antonette

    2009-01-01

    Research on the efficacy of traditional ballet barre exercises in relation to student learning and performance in technique class essentially is non-existent. This research explored how students described their experiences with barre work as well as how they saw these experiences as developing desired skills for moving in the center work.…

  4. An Introduction to the Work (and Play) of Writing Studies Research Methods through Micro Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Suzan; Beard, Emily J.; McClure, David R. E.; Nickoson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the benefits and challenges involved with assigning small-scale research projects in one research methods class as means of introducing new(er) researchers to the work and rewards of empirical writing research. The following discussion does not claim to offer examples of cutting-edge methodological work. That is not our goal…

  5. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Deirdre; Fitzpatrick, Clodagh; O'Toole, Lynn; Doran, Michele; O'Shea, Finbar

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases' experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and working full-time. Three themes were identified: "Impact of fatigue on work performance" with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme "Disclosure at Work" participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme "work-based fatigue management strategies" included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases. PMID:26516896

  6. Work resumption at the price of distrust: a qualitative study on return to work legislation in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Return to work (RTW) after sick leave is considered necessary to support the employees’ health. Cooperation between employees and employers may encourage employees’ RTW, but is hampered by bottlenecks that we do not completely understand. Dutch legislation means to support this cooperation and allows trying RTW during two years. The Resource Dependence Institutional Cooperation (RDIC) model has been developed for studying cooperation in public health. Study aims were to get insight into the degree of cooperation between Dutch sick-listed employees and employers, how this (lack of) cooperation can be understood, and how valid the RDIC model is for understanding this (lack of) cooperation. Methods This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 8 employees and 8 employers. Employees reported sick for 1.5-20 months for various reasons. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach and pattern matching. Results Cooperation was lacking early during sick leave. Later on there were regular meetings, but employers decided about RTW without consulting the employees. Particularly employers were motivated to cooperate during the first year, while employees were especially motivated during the second. This could be understood by experienced dependence; employees (first year) and employers (second year) did not consider cooperation to be important for achieving medical recovery (employees) or RTW (employers). These divergent goals may be understood by personal norms about the timing of medical recovery and RTW. Legislation was particularly effective regarding employer behaviour in year 1 and employee behaviour in year 2. Employees distrusted their employers during the first year, while employers reported to distrust the employees during the second year. Besides, employees and employers experienced a moderate ability to cooperate. This could be understood particularly by having moderate knowledge about legislation. The RDIC model appeared to be valid to understand the cases studied, but the additional factor distrust also played a role. Conclusions Legislation appeared to support cooperation, but awareness of a mutual dependence, trust, knowledge about the legislation and personal norms regarding recovery and RTW are also important. Professionals such as occupational physicians should support this to attain a degree of cooperation that is necessary for effective RTW. PMID:23421974

  7. The relationship between job tenure and work disability absence among adults: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Breslin, F Curtis; Tompa, Emile; Zhao, Ryan; Pole, Jason D; Amick Iii, Benjamin C; Smith, Peter M; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2008-01-01

    Little population-based, prospective research has been conducted to examine the demographic and work-related determinants of occupational injury or illness. This study examined the relative contribution of sociodemographic characteristics and work factors to the likelihood of a work-related disability or illness. In a representative sample of adult Canadians 25-70 years old from a prospective survey, a hazard modelling approach of time to work disability absence from the start of a new job was estimated with the following predictors: age, gender, type of job (manual, non-manual, and mixed), hours worked, highest education achieved, multiple concurrent job, job tenure, school activity, union membership and living in a rural or urban area. Workers holding manual or mixed jobs and having a low education level were factors independently associated with the increased likelihood of a work disability absence. Gender was not independently associated with work disability absences. A strong job tenure gradient in the unadjusted work disability absence rates was virtually eliminated when controlling for demographic/individual and other work factors. In multivariate analyses, work-related factors remained predictors of work disability absence whereas individual characteristics such as gender did not. The exception was workers with less education who appeared to be particularly vulnerable, even after controlling of physical demands on the job. This may be due to inadequate job training or increased hazard exposure even in the same broad job category. PMID:18215570

  8. Low back pain patients' experiences of work modifications; a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research indicates that work modifications can reduce sickness absence and work disability due to low back pain. However, there are few studies that have described modified work from the perspective of patients. A greater understanding of their experiences may inform future workplace management of employees with this condition. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Data was analysed thematically. Results Many participants had made their own work modifications, which were guided by the extent of control they had over their hours and duties, colleague support, and their own beliefs and attitudes about working with back pain. A minority of the participants had received advice or support with work modifications through occupational health. Access to these services was limited and usually followed lengthy sickness absence. Implementation largely rested with the manager and over-cautious approaches were common. Conclusions There was little evidence of compliance with occupational health guidance on modified work. There appears to be insufficient expertise among managers and occupational health in modifying work for employees with low back pain and little indication of joint planning. On the whole, workers make their own modifications, or arrange them informally with their manager and colleagues, but remain concerned about working with back pain. More effective and appropriate application of modifications may increase employees' confidence in their ability to work. PMID:21134248

  9. Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2013-01-01

    Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and

  10. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to School Social Work Practice: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasley, Martell; Canifield, James P.; Archuleta, Adrian J.; Crutchfield, Jandel; Chavis, Annie McCullough

    2012-01-01

    Understanding barriers to practice is a growing area within school social work research. Using a convenience sample of 284 school social workers, this study replicates the efforts of a mixed-method investigation designed to identify barriers and facilitators to school social work practice within different geographic locations. Time constraints and…

  11. The Gospel of Work: A Study in Values and Value Change. Teacher and Student Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, William A.

    A study of value change, this unit for college-preparatory students focuses on the ethic of work in America. The student is asked to evaluate the ethic of work from the Puritans to the present and to account for changes in the concept brought about by industrialism and, most importantly, by the depression of the 1930's. He is then confronted with…

  12. Stability and Change in Work Values: A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jing; Rounds, James

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of longitudinal studies was conducted to investigate stability and change in work values across the life span. Both rank-order stability and mean-level change were investigated using an integrative classification for intrinsic, extrinsic, social and status work values (Ross, Schwartz, & Surkis, 1999). Results of rank-order…

  13. Therapists' Affective Reactions to Working with Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    A study of therapists' affective reactions to working with adult survivors of child sexual abuse found that the most common responses were feelings of being overwhelmed by the work, vulnerability in personal relationships, rage, sadness, and horror. Affective reactions varied by several characteristics associated with the survivors and their

  14. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  15. The Study of Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Its Design, Efficiency, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work paradigm is proposed. Recently, multitouch technology has become widely available for human-computer interaction. We found it has great potential to facilitate more awareness of human-to-human interaction than personal computers (PCs) in colocated collaborative work. However, other…

  16. What's Working Memory Got to Do with It? A Case Study on Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Andrew; Oliver, Mary; McGrane, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a small-scale study concerned with the development of working memory during adolescence. The working memory of adolescent students was examined with a novel method, electroencephalography, which allowed insight into the neurological development of the students. Results showed that: electroencephalography is a…

  17. Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.…

  18. Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2013-01-01

    Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and…

  19. School Culture: A Validation Study and Exploration of Its Relationship with Teachers' Work Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ping

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the relationship between school culture and teachers' work environment and further exploring the roles of school culture, teachers' efficacy, beliefs, and behaviors for character education, and teachers' work environment in the relationship between a character education intervention and…

  20. The Federal Work-Study Program: Impacts on Academic Outcomes and Employment. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Student employment subsidies are one of the largest types of employment subsidies and one of the oldest forms of student aid. The Federal Work-Study program (FWS) is the largest student employment subsidy program; since 1964, it has provided about $1 billion per year to cover 75 percent of wages for student employees, who typically work on campus

  1. From Laura Ingalls to Wing Biddlebaum: A Study of Teacher Identity in Works of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchmore, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to systemically analyze the types of teachers that appear in works of literature, and to explore the various teacher identities that are depicted. The data consists of 44 works of literature representing a wide variety of genres, settings, cultures, and historical periods. They include 20 adult novels, 6 young adult…

  2. Married Thai Working Mothers: Coping with Initial Part-Time Doctoral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thinnam, Thanit

    2011-01-01

    Advanced educational attainment can "grow" a career. But acquiring a doctoral qualification adds study to existing work and family responsibilities, especially for women. This phenomenological research explores the experiences of eight Thai working mothers enrolled in the initial stage of part-time doctoral programs in Thailand. A majority…

  3. Work Stress, Burnout, and Coping. Brief Summary of an Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Kenneth B.; Gfroerer, Coleman A.; Curlette, William C.; Harris, Kristin

    The effects of social and family disruption from stress in the work place has caused the American Psychological Association to conclude that "American workers...constitute a work force more at risk than ever for psychological, physical, and behavioral health problems." The study explores what can be learned from successful coping and questions…

  4. Clusters of Occupations Based on Systematically Derived Work Dimensions: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, J. W.; And Others

    The study explored the feasibility of deriving an educationally relevant occupational cluster structure based on Occupational Analysis Inventory (OAI) work dimensions. A hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to the factor score profiles of 814 occupations on 22 higher-order OAI work dimensions. From that analysis, 73 occupational clusters were…

  5. Federal Student aid Handbook, 2002-2003. Volume 6: Federal Work-Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program allows undergraduate and graduate students to work part-time to help pay for the cost of their education. Schools must use 75% of their FSW Program funds to compensate students employed in community service jobs. This volume describes the ways schools are required to use money from FSW program funds to…

  6. A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

  7. The Work Study Student as Collaborator: The Thrill of Victory, the Agony of Defeat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Ina Ruth

    A professor at a small college collaborated with work study students on four individual research projects and also received their assistance in managing the annual conference of the Communication Association of Massachusetts. Based on these experiences, the professor has identified several exigencies and benefits of collaborating with work study…

  8. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic

  9. Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.

  10. Problem Solving in Everyday Office Work--A Diary Study on Differences between Experts and Novices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Andreas; Schley, Thomas; Warwas, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary office work is becoming increasingly challenging as many routine tasks are automated or outsourced. The remaining problem solving activities may also offer potential for lifelong learning in the workplace. In this study, we analyzed problem solving in an office work setting using an Internet-based, semi-standardized diary to collect…

  11. The Effect of Job Resources on Work Engagement: A Study on Academicians in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunel, Mustafa C.; Kocak, Omer Erdem; Cankir, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Conducting research and publishing these research papers in academic journals is an accepted norm in the academic world. Previous studies prove that work engagement is a significant predictor of performance. Herein, the relationship between work engagement, which is assumed as a substitute for performance, and job resources is examined. At least…

  12. Strategies for Research Development in Hospital Social Work: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Ted; Nicholas, David Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article identifies salient components in the advancement of social work research leadership within health care. Method: Using tenets of a modified retrospective case study approach, processes and outcomes of social work research progression at a pediatric hospital are reviewed. Results: Capacity-building processes were…

  13. Effects of Client Violence on Social Work Students: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This study uses a work stress theoretical framework to examine the effects of direct and indirect client violence on a randomly selected national sample of MSW and BSW social work students from the National Association of Social Workers (N=595). Client violence variables were analyzed in relationship to fear of future violence and occupational…

  14. The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

  15. Staff Perceptions of the Work Environment in Juvenile Group Home Settings: A Study of Social Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Kevin I.; Wells, James B.; Jones, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This study used the Prison Social Climate Survey to measure perceptions of the work environment among staff employed in all group homes administered by a state department of juvenile justice. Work environment perceptions were favorable along six dimensions and in the moderate range on a seventh. The variables that most consistently predicted staff…

  16. Return to work after knee replacement: a qualitative study of patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bardgett, Michelle; Lally, Joanne; Malviya, Ajay; Deehan, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective An increasing number of patients in the working population are undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) for end-stage osteoarthritis. The timing and success of return to work is becoming increasingly important for this group of patients with social and economic implications for patients, employers and society. There is limited understanding of the patient variables that determine the ability to return to work. Our objective was (from the patient's perspective) to gain an insight into the factors influencing return to work following knee replacement. Setting and participants This qualitative study was undertaken in a secondary-care setting in a large teaching hospital in the north of England. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 10 patients regarding their experiences of returning to work following TKR. Outcomes Interviews were transcribed and analysed using a qualitative thematic approach to identify the factors influencing return to work from the patient's perspective. Results Three themes were identified that influenced the process of return to work, from the patient's perspective. These were delays in surgical intervention, limited and often inconsistent advice from healthcare professionals regarding return to work, and finally the absence of rehabilitation to optimise patient's recovery and facilitate return to work. Conclusions There is currently no consistent process to optimise return to work for patients of working age after TKR. The impact of delayed surgical intervention, limited advice regarding return to work, and a lack of work-focused rehabilitation, all contribute to potential delays in successful return to work. There is a need to change the focus of healthcare provision for this cohort of patients, and provide a tailored healthcare intervention to optimise patient outcomes. PMID:26832426

  17. Semiannual report for the period April 1-September 30, 1979 of work on: (1) Superconducting power transmission development; (2) Cable insulation development. Power Transmission Project Technical Note No. 99

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-15

    The objective of the program is to develop an underground superconducting power transmission system which is economical and technically attractive to the utility industry. The system would be capable of carrying very large blocks of electric power, thus enabling it to supplant overhead lines in urban and suburban areas and regions of natural beauty. The program consisted initially of work in the laboratory to develop suitable materials, cryostats, and cable concepts. The materials work covers the development and testing of suitable superconductors and dielectric insulation. The laboratory work has now been extended to an outside test facility which represents an intermediate step between the laboratory scale and a full-scale system. The facility will allow cables several hundred feet long to be tested under realistic conditions. In addition, the refrigerator has been designed for optimum service for utility applications.

  18. Race, Labor Repression, and Capitalist Agriculture: Notes from South Texas, 1920-1930. Institute for the Study of Social Change Working Papers Series #102.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montejano, David

    Racism and racial exploitation, rather than disappearing with the march of capitalist development, appear instead as its intimate companions. The racial experience of the Mexican in South Texas was shaped by the rapid development of agriculture there in the early part of the century, between 1900-1910 and 1920-1930. The agrarian land revolution…

  19. A pilot study examining if satisfaction of basic needs can ameliorate negative effects of shift work

    PubMed Central

    SAKSVIK-LEHOUILLIER, Ingvild; HETLAND, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if satisfaction of the basic needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness is related to shift work tolerance, specifically physical and mental fatigue, insomnia, and digestive troubles in a sample of shift workers. This is a cross-sectional pilot questionnaire study, including 252 shift workers employed in a municipality in Norway. Autonomy was negatively related to physical fatigue and digestive troubles, while competence was negatively related to mental fatigue. Relatedness showed significant correlations with insomnia and mental fatigue, but did not reach significance in the regression model controlling for the two other basic needs as well as work scheduling, night work exposure, and sleep medication. Sleep medication was significant in the final regression model for insomnia, but unrelated to fatigue and digestive troubles. The demographic variables, work hours per week, work schedule, and night work exposure were unrelated to all four measures of shift work tolerance. Autonomy and competence may be more important for fatigue and digestive troubles among shift workers than work arrangement variables, night work exposure, and sleep medication use. PMID:26423327

  20. A pilot study examining if satisfaction of basic needs can ameliorate negative effects of shift work.

    PubMed

    Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild; Hetland, Hilde

    2016-03-28

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if satisfaction of the basic needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness is related to shift work tolerance, specifically physical and mental fatigue, insomnia, and digestive troubles in a sample of shift workers. This is a cross-sectional pilot questionnaire study, including 252 shift workers employed in a municipality in Norway. Autonomy was negatively related to physical fatigue and digestive troubles, while competence was negatively related to mental fatigue. Relatedness showed significant correlations with insomnia and mental fatigue, but did not reach significance in the regression model controlling for the two other basic needs as well as work scheduling, night work exposure, and sleep medication. Sleep medication was significant in the final regression model for insomnia, but unrelated to fatigue and digestive troubles. The demographic variables, work hours per week, work schedule, and night work exposure were unrelated to all four measures of shift work tolerance. Autonomy and competence may be more important for fatigue and digestive troubles among shift workers than work arrangement variables, night work exposure, and sleep medication use. PMID:26423327