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1

LAPACK Working Notes LAPACK Working Note #1  

E-print Network

­ 15 ­ LAPACK Working Notes LAPACK Working Note #1 James Demmel, Jack J. Dongarra, Jeremy Du Croz Science Division, Technical Memoran­ dum No. 97, September, 1987. LAPACK Working Note #2 Jack J. Dongarra

Dongarra, Jack

2

Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes

Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velsquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

2015-01-01

3

Social Work NoteS Research Holding the Torch of Knowledge  

E-print Network

Social Work NoteS Research Holding the Torch of Knowledge Bronze icon at the main entrance I S S O U R I #12;2 | Social Work Notes Greetings from the School of Social Work! The cover places on the generation of knowl- edge and the application of knowledge in the practice of social work

Taylor, Jerry

4

5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK OF THE PARAPET WALL AND REMAINS OF 1920 TIMBER AND CONCRETE FLOORING SYSTEM. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

5

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

6

7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD TRAVERSING DISTANT RIDGE BEYOND BRIDGE. SEEN FROM WEST OF HIGHWAY FROM OLD HIGHWAY LOOP. LOOKING E. - Lassen Park Road, Mineral, Tehama County, CA

7

These notes are from 2010 Cap and Trade Working Already  

E-print Network

Acid Rain These notes are from 2010 #12;Cap and Trade Working Already December 15, 2009 10:14 AM across the country decreased emissions of SO2, a precursor to acid rain, to 7.6 million tons in 2008. #12;Overview of Acid Rain Phenomenon Most common term for acidification of the environment, which can occur

Toohey, Darin W.

8

Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often

Dimitriadis, Greg

2011-01-01

9

Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals  

SciTech Connect

In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

Garbey, M. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-07-01

10

Work Sharing Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide private sector employers with the practical information necessary to select and then to design and implement work sharing arrangements, this book presents case studies of some 36 work sharing programs. Topics covered in the case studies include the circumstances leading to adoption of the program, details of compensation and

McCarthy, Maureen E.; And Others

11

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-print Network

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

12

Work-Study Job Directory* Job Publish Request Form  

E-print Network

Work-Study Job Directory* Job Publish Request Form Please note: Work-Study jobs can be posted via-mail address students may contact: Job Description Changes (if any): Help us keep the directory up that we may remove your listing(s) from the directory. This form is for posting existing work-study job

Guenther, Frank

13

Independent Study in Idaho ISI Course BSU Course NOTES  

E-print Network

Independent Study in Idaho ISI Course BSU Course NOTES Updated 03/2012 Boise State University Administration #12;Independent Study in Idaho ISI Course BSU Course NOTES Updated 03/2012 Boise State University

Barrash, Warren

14

Studies in international social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies in international social work is a joint report series between the Department of Social Work and INSWED (International Social Work Education and Development), both of which are at Stockholm University. The series was started in 2002 in order to reflect some of the international work relevant for social work that is being done by or in cooperation with these

Sven Trygged

2008-01-01

15

Working and Studying Abroad  

E-print Network

travelling/ accepting a position abroad. The site covers a range of issues including insurance, passports and internships - work permit / visa regulations - application and interview tips - cultural and relocation. Exodus international careers database from Careers Europe offers an introduction to opportunities abroad

16

Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63

Barley, Stephen R.

1990-01-01

17

Some Notes on Conversational Fission. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 91.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While most previous research has implied or assumed that the conversational structure giving each speaker a turn to speak is universally normative, findings of one study suggest that in interactions with at least four participants, alternatives to this rule are possible. A phenomenon called "conversational fission" occurs when a four- (or more)

Sigman, Stuart J.

18

A study of actions in operative notes.  

PubMed

Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report 'procedure description' section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman's Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E; Ryan, James O; Melton, Genevieve B

2012-01-01

19

LAPACK Working Note 58 The Design of Linear Algebra Libraries for High Performance Computers \\Lambda  

E-print Network

LAPACK Working Note 58 The Design of Linear Algebra Libraries for High Performance Computers Abstract This paper discusses the design of linear algebra libraries for high performance computers of distributed versions of the Level 3 Basic Linear Algebra Subgrams (BLAS) as computational building blocks

Dongarra, Jack

20

In Working Notes, AAAI-93 Workshop on AI in Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems. Steering Traffic Networks  

E-print Network

In Working Notes, AAAI-93 Workshop on AI in Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems. Steering Traffic University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003-4610 Abstract When a traffic management system involves many will affect the system. For large-scale traffic management problems it is both necessary and difficult

21

Teaching Note--Heterosexism as Experienced by LGBT Social Work Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As social work educators, much of our practice involves helping students think critically about complex political, economic, and social issues. One of the most complex and contentious sociopolitical issues of our time has been civil rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. This teaching note considers how we, as LGBT

Johnson, Lisa M.

2014-01-01

22

Exploration of GPs' views and use of the fit note: a qualitative study in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Sickness certification constitutes daily clinical practice for GPs. In April 2010, the UK sickness certification system changed to reflect the evidence that work is generally good for health and a new Statement of Fitness for Work the fit note was introduced. Sickness certification is a contentious topic among GPs and the proposed fit note generated mixed reviews. Aim To explore GPs' views and use of the fit note during its first year of operation. Design and setting Qualitative interview study of GPs based in different geographical locations across the UK. Method GPs (n = 15), who were recruited from a national sample, participated in semi-structured telephone interviews which were subject to constant comparative analysis. Results Overall, the fit note was well received. GPs recognised that work is generally good for health and felt the fit note facilitated using an earlier return to work as a negotiation tool. GPs perceive employers as the major obstacle to early return to work. There were reports of scepticism towards the system that negatively impacted on some GPs' operation of sickness certification. Feedback over the fit note's impact on employer behaviour and the return of a mechanism that enables GPs to request early independent assessments would be welcomed. Conclusion A revised approach is needed to address the scepticism towards the sickness certification system that persists among some GPs. New strategies need to be designed to engage employers in facilitating an early return to work and to enable the objectives of the medical statement reforms to be achieved. PMID:22546596

Welsh, Victoria K; Mallen, Christian D; Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Jinks, Clare

2012-01-01

23

Noted  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the

Nunberg, Geoffrey

2013-01-01

24

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/swws Social Work and Women's Studies can lead Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America because it focuses on social

25

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Women's Studies can lead Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America because it focuses on social

26

The Study of Work Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook provides suggestions for learning activities that teachers can use in providing an experience-based prevocational career education program such as the Study of Work Project that was conducted at Eastside High School in Paterson, New Jersey. The emphasis of the handbook is on developing connections between skill acquisition in the

Mitchell, Nancy; Favors, Audrey

27

Social Work and Diaspora Studies Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work and Diaspora Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Diaspora Studies can lead, children's services, residential centres and family services. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Social Work

28

Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Disability Studies can or family practice. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

29

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/swws www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America. We

30

Electronic Nursing Notes: A Case Study on Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Computer & Information Technology (CIT) and Nursing (NSG) Departments at the Middletown and Hamilton regional campuses of Miami University (of Ohio), student team members created a Web-based application to create Electronic Nursing Notes. Students from the two departments worked together to design

Howard, Elizabeth V.; Teets, Janet

2006-01-01

31

Social Work and Applied Social Studies  

E-print Network

Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate 1 #12;www.bath.ac.uk/sps Undergraduate Social Work and Applied Social Studies What is Social Work? `The social work profession promotes social change' (International Federation of Social Workers, 2000) Social work is an exceptionally interesting, challenging

Burton, Geoffrey R.

32

Social Work and Applied Social Studies  

E-print Network

Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate #12;Undergraduate Social and Policy Sciences 2, social policy, international development and social work. Many of our staff are at the forefront Guide 2015, for example, social work at Bath is ranked 1st, sociology 2nd, social policy 3rd. Bath

Burton, Geoffrey R.

33

[Notes on vital statistics for the study of perinatal health].  

PubMed

Vital statistics, published by the National Statistics Institute in Spain, are a highly important source for the study of perinatal health nationwide. However, the process of data collection is not well-known and has implications both for the quality and interpretation of the epidemiological results derived from this source. The aim of this study was to present how the information is collected and some of the associated problems. This study is the result of an analysis of the methodological notes from the National Statistics Institute and first-hand information obtained from hospitals, the Central Civil Registry of Madrid, and the Madrid Institute for Statistics. Greater integration between these institutions is required to improve the quality of birth and stillbirth statistics. PMID:24878259

Jurez, Sol Pa

2014-01-01

34

Page 1 of 5 WORK STUDY APPLICATION  

E-print Network

planning and statistical analysis. For more information, please contact the Office of the University/Permanent Resident Students If Divorced/Separated/Single With Dependent(s) In order to assess your work study bursary

Linder, Tams

35

Studies in the Work of Colley Cibber  

E-print Network

BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS HUMANISTIC STUDIES Vol. 1 October 1, 1912 No. 1 STUDIES IN THE WORK OF COLLEY CIBBER BY DE WITT C.:'CROISSANT, PH.D. A ssistant Professor of English Language in the University of Kansas LAWRENCE, OCTOBER... gratitude to Professor R. D. (VLeary, of the University of Kansas, who has read these pages in manuscript and in proof, and has offered many valuable suggestions. D. C. C. University of Kansas, October, 1912. STUDIES IN THE WORK OF COLLEY GIBBER De...

Croissant, De Witt C.

1912-10-01

36

Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while

Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

2013-01-01

37

FIELD STUDY OF HOOF WALL PROBLEMS IN UNSHOD WORKING HORSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population of 100 native breed unshod working horses was examined for hoof wall problems. The diagnosis of hoof wall defects was performed by close visual observation and via physical examina- tion. The location, extent and types of defects were then determined and recorded. Out of 100 horses, 124 hoof wall defects were noted in ninety working horses. The number

A. S. BIGHAM; A. N. TABATABAEI

38

Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.  

PubMed

Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. PMID:23694704

Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

2013-09-01

39

New Study Finds Substance That Helps Working Memory Work Better  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Maura Furey and her colleagues have found that the drug physostigmine apparently aids and improves performance of everyday working memory. Working memory is the process which temporarily holds information such as a phone number until a person is able to dial the number. Working with a variety of taxa from mice to monkeys, scientists interested in the causes of aging have recently made significant advances in scientists' understanding of the aging process. Researchers have long realized that aging and the pathologies associated with it have evolutionary, physiological and genetic causes, although the relative influence of each of these has been debated. By testing hypotheses in diverse fields, and with a variety of species (from short-lived to long-lived), researchers are growing closer to building an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the aging process.

1997-01-01

40

Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,

Feiman, Sharon

41

Tree-related research at Wytham Woods The following notes provide background to some of the work going on in Wytham Woods, focussed  

E-print Network

Tree-related research at Wytham Woods The following notes provide background to some of the work going on in Wytham Woods, focussed particularly on changes in the tree and shrub layer and its function...........................................................................................................................6 Canopy Research at Wytham

Malhi, Yadvinder

42

Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing

Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

2013-01-01

43

Depression and Work Performance: The Work and Health Initiative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Depression, a chronic, episodic condition affecting at least 4.9% of the working age population (Blazer et al.1994), causes\\u000a substantial functional limitation and social role disability (Wells 1985, 1997; Wells et al. 1991). Since Wells et al. (1989)\\u000a first reported on the disabling impact of depression in the 1980s, evidence of its human and economic burdens has continued\\u000a to accumulate (Druss

Debra Lerner; David Adler; Richard C. Hermann; William H. Rogers; Hong Chang; Pamella Thomas; Annabel Greenhill; Katherine Perch

44

Oklahoma Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation Cooperative Work-Study Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's work study program for handicapped high school students, a cooperative effort between public schools and the State Departments of Education and Human Services, is described. Responsibilities of each party are discussed, and basic training elements (adjustment training, career awareness, and employer-employee relations) are noted.

Green, Lowell E.; Jones, C. D., Jr.

45

Research Note--A Pilot Cyber Counseling Course in a Graduate Social Work Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyber counseling is a new and growing medium for offering mental health services to children and youth. However, there is a lack of identification of the core competencies required to provide effective online counseling. A school of social work, in partnership with a national service agency providing online counseling to children and youth,

Mishna, Faye; Tufford, Lea; Cook, Charlene; Bogo, Marion

2013-01-01

46

Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 1625, Springer, 1999 Optimum Work Roll Profile Selection in the  

E-print Network

and Mathematics, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd CF37 1DL UK jaware@glam.ac.uk Abstract. The finishing train Algorithm has been developed for the optimization of the work roll profiles in the finishing stands of the strip from the simulated mill was significantly improved. 1 Introduction There is a world-wide

Hopgood, Adrian

47

Analysis of enclosed internal-combustion-engine operation with water as the working fluid. Technical note  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is desirable to develop a totally enclosed system that contains an internal combustion engine and all the accessories required to produce at least 480 hp-hr of work. The system must perform underwater without external support and must release nothing but heat to the water. Most prior development has dealt with systems very similar to air breathing engines. Fuel, oxygen

Rein

1983-01-01

48

Teaching Note--Integrating Prevention Content into Clinical Social Work Practice Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapid changes in health care services and delivery suggest an upcoming paradigm shift in the field of mental health. Recent national reports, health care policy changes, and growing evidence support a shift toward prevention-focused mental health care. The social work profession is uniquely positioned to act as leaders in this shift as the

Rishel, Carrie W.

2014-01-01

49

Academy Transactions Note Working and walking on small asteroids with circumferential ropes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The low gravity of a small asteroid would present a challenge for an astronaut attempting to work on its surface. Extravehicular activities (EVAs) of the sophistication of the Apollo Moon missions are not likely to be possible if astronauts attempt to walk freely on the asteroid, hover above its surface, or anchor locally into the regolith. Manipulating large rocks, drilling,

Ian Garrick-Bethell; Christopher E. Carr

50

Crowdsourcing Student Notes to Provide Real-Time Study Guides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

What if you had access to all your students' notes, their questions, their answers to questions you posed in class and when they were confused in class. What could you do with that information to help guide your students. With the advent of in-class tools like LectureTools it is now possible to have such access to student data. This paper describes on-going research at the University of Michigan to explore how best to mine student notes and questions to provide adaptive learning opportunities to students. Student notes are parsed in real-time searching for keywords from the geosciences. These words and phrases are then linked to a variety of resources for those wishing further clarification. This presentation will demonstrate the tools that have been generated for students and report on the students' assessment of the value of such information. The presentation will use LectureTools to demonstrate the crowdsourcing. Attendees are encouraged to bring a mobile device to the session.

Samson, P. J.

2013-12-01

51

Note on the English version: The official language is German, in case of doubt, the German version shall prevail. CONTRACT FOR WORK AND SERVICES  

E-print Network

, in case of doubt, the German version shall prevail. § 3 In case of delayed work performance, the customer The contractor is obliged to render the work performance with the guaranteed properties. In case of scientificNote on the English version: The official language is German, in case of doubt, the German version

Schindelhauer, Christian

52

GUIDELINES FOR WORKING IN AN ADULT PRISON OR JUVENILE FACILITY NOTE: This training guide is a compilation of the experience and suggestions of the Prison  

E-print Network

GUIDELINES FOR WORKING IN AN ADULT PRISON OR JUVENILE FACILITY NOTE: This training guide is a compilation of the experience and suggestions of the Prison Creative Arts Project from our more than 20 years of facilitating this work in prisons, juvenile facilities and high schools. It should be taken as recommendations

Eustice, Ryan

53

A study on the relationships between age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation of age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry. [Subjects and Methods] The study was conducted using 100 subjects who were over 55?years old and worked in heavy industry. To obtain data, we first had the subjects complete the MoCA-K test and Work Ability Index (WAI). The data were then analyzed by frequency and correlation using statistical software (SPSS 21.0). [Results] Through this study, we discovered a significant positive correlation between WAI and MoCA-K, age, and work experience. [Conclusion] This study revealed that work ability in older employees increases not with the number of years worked but with the enhancement of cognitive ability. Special management that focuses on cognition is therefore required for senior employees working in the field of heavy industry. PMID:25642062

Chung, Jaeyeop; Park, Juhyung; Cho, Milim; Park, Yunhee; Kim, DeokJu; Yang, Dongju; Yang, Yeongae

2015-01-01

54

A study on the relationships between age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation of age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry. [Subjects and Methods] The study was conducted using 100 subjects who were over 55?years old and worked in heavy industry. To obtain data, we first had the subjects complete the MoCA-K test and Work Ability Index (WAI). The data were then analyzed by frequency and correlation using statistical software (SPSS 21.0). [Results] Through this study, we discovered a significant positive correlation between WAI and MoCA-K, age, and work experience. [Conclusion] This study revealed that work ability in older employees increases not with the number of years worked but with the enhancement of cognitive ability. Special management that focuses on cognition is therefore required for senior employees working in the field of heavy industry. PMID:25642062

Chung, Jaeyeop; Park, Juhyung; Cho, Milim; Park, Yunhee; Kim, DeokJu; Yang, Dongju; Yang, Yeongae

2015-01-01

55

A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change  

SciTech Connect

The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Heerwagen, J.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

1995-02-01

56

Work Groups: From the Hawthorne Studies to Work Teams of the 1990s and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the Hawthorne studies related to work groups and their legacy and traces applications of work groups and related empirical research through the 1990s. A selective review of empirical studies of work group effectiveness conducted in work settings and published in the last 20 years addresses 4 questions: (a) What identifying features have field researchers used in operationally

Eric Sundstrom; Michael McIntyre; Terry Halfhill; Heather Richards

2000-01-01

57

Working during your studies Andrew Falconer  

E-print Network

your friends to cover your shift if you cannot work · National Insurance was made optional in 2003, council tax, immigration, parking fines, anti-social behaviour, police, victims of crime, job centres changes must be authorised This is a restriction and means that you can work up to 20 hours per week term

Royal Holloway, University of London

58

Resource Allocation and Budgeting for the 1972-73 Mini-Schools of the Alum Rock Voucher Demonstration. Analysis of the Education Voucher Demonstration. A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Working Note documents the first year's events and outcomes in developing the budgeting system and resource allocation rules to support the Education Voucher Demonstration. The district now has systems for per pupil resource allocation and school/minischool cost center accounting. The basic voucher of $1,041 for grades 7-8, and $788 for

Haggart, S. A.; Furry, W. S.

59

It's about Time: A Study of Hours Worked and Work Spillover among Law Firm Lawyers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study set out to address two basic questions: why do law firm lawyers work as much as they do and why do they feel that their work is invading their nonwork life? The results show that the factors related to the number of hours worked do not necessarily translate into feelings of work spillover and that the number of

Jean E. Wallace

1997-01-01

60

California Energy Futures Study Working Committee  

E-print Network

: Can we get there with low carbon technologies without reducing demand? H. Youngs ­ EBI, UC Berkeley Organization (ILO) (2008) Green Jobs: Towards decent work in a sustainable, low-carbon world. 376 pp. Urbanchuk and transport or novel feedstocks, research on sustainable removal levels Low #12;Socioeconomic Barriers

California at Davis, University of

61

Personality factors predicting changes in shift work tolerance: A longitudinal study among nurses working rotating shifts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between personality factors (hardiness, morningness, flexibility, and languidity) and longitudinal changes on different measures of shift work tolerance (fatigue, sleepiness, anxiety and depression) over one year among nurses working rotating shifts. A total of 642 female Norwegian nurses working in a rotating three-shift schedule participated in the study. The

Ingvild Saksvik-Lehouillier; Bjrn Bjorvatn; Hilde Hetland; Gro Mjeldheim Sandal; Bente E. Moen; Nils Magery; Allison Harvey; Giovanni Costa; Stle Pallesen

2012-01-01

62

Use of anecdotal notes by clinical nursing faculty: a descriptive study.  

PubMed

Although the use of anecdotal notes by faculty to document clinical performance is thought to be a common practice, no empirical study of this evaluation tool has been conducted. To investigate the frequency and pattern of use, a faculty questionnaire was developed using the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a framework. The model was adapted to focus on clinical nursing education. Sixty-four nursing faculty from six schools participated in the regional study. A descriptive design was used to collect quantitative data from clinical faculty. Findings indicated that 97% of clinical faculty use anecdotal notes during the student evaluation process, and the majority of faculty do so on a weekly basis. Based on faculty feedback and the CIPP evaluation model, a clinical nursing faculty tool was developed after study completion to support clinical faculty in note use. PMID:19877575

Hall, Mellisa A; Daly, Barbara J; Madigan, Elizabeth A

2010-03-01

63

Student Employment Application (Regular or Work-Study)  

E-print Network

Student Employment Application (Regular or Work-Study) Revised: 11/16/2012 Name: Date: Last First No Are you eligible for work study? Yes No Are you currently employed in any other departments on campus? Yes presently legally authorized to work in the United States? Yes No Employment History: (Please list your work

64

A descriptive study of work aggravated asthma  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims: Work related asthma (WRA) is one of the most frequently reported occupational lung diseases in a number of industrialised countries. A better understanding of work aggravated asthma (WAA), as well as work related new onset asthma (NOA), is needed to aid in prevention efforts. Methods: WAA and NOA in the United States were compared using cases reported to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) from four state Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) surveillance programmes for 199395. Results: A total of 210 WAA cases and 891 NOA cases were reported. WAA cases reported mineral and inorganic dusts as the most common exposure agent, as opposed to NOA cases, in which diisocyanates were reported most frequently. A similar percentage of WAA and NOA cases still experienced breathing problems at the time of the interview or had visited a hospital or emergency room for work related breathing problems. NOA cases were twice as likely to have applied for workers' compensation compared with WAA cases. However, among those who had applied for worker compensation, approximately three-fourths of both WAA and NOA cases had received awards. The services and manufacturing industrial categories together accounted for the majority of both WAA (62%) and NOA (75%) cases. The risk of WAA, measured by average annual rate, was clearly the highest in the public administration (14.2 cases/105) industrial category, while the risk of NOA was increased in both the manufacturing (3.2 cases/105) and public administration (2.9 cases/105) categories. Conclusions: WAA cases reported many of the same adverse consequences as NOA cases. Certain industries were identified as potential targets for prevention efforts based on either the number of cases or the risk of WAA and NOA. PMID:15150390

Goe, S; Henneberger, P; Reilly, M; Rosenman, K; Schill, D; Valiante, D; Flattery, J; Harrison, R; Reinisch, F; Tumpowsky, C; Filios, M

2004-01-01

65

Blue Note  

ScienceCinema

Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08

66

Blue Note  

SciTech Connect

Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

Murray Gibson

2007-04-27

67

Notes toward an African Cultural Studies of Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, the author attempts to sketch out both an argument for and the outlines of what might be termed an African cultural studies of education. This formation would actually be composed of several fields and discourses that are often taken up as quite distinct, namely critical approaches to education, cultural studies, and African

Wright, Handel Kashope

2006-01-01

68

Financial Aid Office FEDERAL WORK STUDY SKILLS SURVEY  

E-print Network

Financial Aid Office FEDERAL WORK STUDY SKILLS SURVEY (Complete only if you have accepted Federal a Federal Work Study employee last year? Yes No If yes, do you want to return to the same position? Yes

Mohaghegh, Shahab

69

Struggling at work - a qualitative study of working Danes with depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: Little is known on how employees at work with mental health problems experience their work environment. This study explores how a selected sample of Danish employees with depressive symptoms experience the interaction with their work environment and how they respond to and deal with problems at work. Methods: From a survey study on work and mental health in Denmark, we invited participants for in-depth interviews. Using grounded theory, we conducted 13 semi structured interviews with employees, at work, experiencing depressive symptoms. Findings: Work was pivotal for the informants who were in an on-going process that we conceptualised as struggling at work. Informants struggled with the negative experiences of work that led to emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms. Relationships with supervisors and colleagues, work load and work pressure and their self-image as a good worker conditioned the struggle. The informants found themselves unable to change their problematic working situation. This gradually led to different strategies to endure work and take care of one-self. These strategies were as follows: tending to symptoms and altering prospects for their future. The consequence of the on-going struggle was that the informants distanced themselves from their work. Conclusions: This study provided insight to the process of struggling at work, which the interviewed employees with depressive symptoms experienced. Implications for Rehabilitation Behaviour of supervisors is a key element for employees with depressive symptoms struggling at work. Practitioners and other health and rehabilitation practitioners working with people with depressive symptoms and other mental health problems could inquire about supervisor's behaviour and relation between supervisors and employees. Interventions that targets both the individual employee as well as work environment focused interventions at the organisational level could be beneficial for employees with mental health problems as well as the workplaces. PMID:25350663

Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Andersen, Malene Friis; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Ulla

2014-10-28

70

Notes for STA 250, Radford M. Neal, 2000 Observational Studies  

E-print Network

Randomized experiments may be unethical --- eg, for testing whether smoking causes lung cancer. ffl Double variable to the others. In particular, do these other variables have a causal effect? For instance: Does smoking cause cancer? Problem: We can't really answer such questions from an observational study

Neal, Radford M.

71

Historical Note about Cross-Sectional versus Longitudinal Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article discusses a study by L. Terman in which results of the two methods can be compared. Both types of comparisons indicated that CMT (Concept Mastery Test) ability improves considerably with age. This multiple checking of several groups each time versus the same groups over time strengthens the conclusion. (Author/CL)

Stanley, Julian C.

1985-01-01

72

Preparing for the world of work: an exploratory study of disabled students experiences of work placement  

Microsoft Academic Search

For people with disabilities, one of the best ways to achieve independence is through work. Experience gained by undertaking a work placement whilst a student provides valuable knowledge and understanding of the demands of work, and enhances employability on graduation for both students with disabilities and for their non-disabled peers. The aims of this study were to explore the experiences

Catherine Elizabeth Georgiou; Shima Espahbodi; Lorraine Hilary De Souza

2011-01-01

73

Interest in Working with the Elderly: A Cross-National Study of Graduating Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents a cross-national study of social work students' interest in working with the elderly, based on a sample of 679 graduating BSW students from 7 countries: Australia, Brazil, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel, and the United States. The findings among all the national cohorts show that the motivation to work with the elderly was

Weiss, Idit

2005-01-01

74

International scoping study: accelerator working group report  

SciTech Connect

During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

2006-09-30

75

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-007 A Framework and Simulation Engine for Studying Artificial Life  

E-print Network

}, institution = {Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University}, keywords = {artificial life0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-007 A Framework and Simulation Engine for Studying Artificial Life H. A. James and C. J. Scogings and K. A. Hawick 2004 The area of computer

Hawick, Ken

76

Foundations of Geometry Exam 1 Study Guide Spring 2014 1. Notes about the examination  

E-print Network

geometry, Four­Point Geometry, Fano's Geometry, Young's Geometry, Incidence Geometry, Euclidean parallel Postulates, non­Euclidean geometries, {Hyperbolic, Elliptic} Parallel Postulate 3. Write a brief biographicalFoundations of Geometry Exam 1 Study Guide Spring 2014 1. Notes about the examination

Hein, Derek

77

"Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes  

E-print Network

, supplying the region's ecosystems, agriculture, cities, and hydropower. Indeed, water in its various forms"Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how climate, natural resources, and socioeconomic systems affect each other. 2 #12;3 ntroduction Climate

78

LBNL-52872/CBP Note 516 A Preliminary Comparative Study of the Electron-Cloud Effect  

E-print Network

with a cloud of electrons in the vacuum chamber that contains it, and leads to various undesirable effectsLBNL-52872/CBP Note 516 A Preliminary Comparative Study of the Electron-Cloud Effect for the PSR 94025, USA June 24, 2003 Abstract We present preliminary electron-cloud simulation results

Furman, Miguel

79

Study in Germany / Work in Germany  

E-print Network

CAUTG-based; currently run through U of Alberta Yearly: Six ½ weeks (5. May-18. June 2011 - August for 9 credit units Format: 14 weeks web-based plus 4 weeks (August) in Heidelberg U, e-mail: ejwarken@mun.ca http://www.mun.ca/german/german/scholarships.php #12;I.B. Study in Germany

Peak, Derek

80

Sex Work and Students: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N=130) in the south of England, who completed a cross-sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological

Roberts, Ron; Bergstrom, Sandra; La Rooy, David

2007-01-01

81

Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 2: Construction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The construction portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines the requirements and selects the concepts for the crewman work system required to support the construction of large structures in space.

Wilde, R. C.

1980-01-01

82

Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time

Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

2009-01-01

83

An Exploratory Study on Multiple Intelligences and Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveyed social work educators about the importance of multiple intelligences for social work practice and social work education. The sample consisted of 91 faculty members who responded to an online survey that asked them to rate the importance of 7 intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial,

Matto, Holly; Berry-Edwards, Janice; Hutchison, Elizabeth D.; Bryant, Shirley A.; Waldbillig, Amy

2006-01-01

84

"Not Too Late to Take the Sanitation Test": Notes of a Non-Gifted Academic from the Working Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Working-class academic narratives reveal a number of common themes, like dual estrangement and internalized class conflict. A less popularized motif is the bookish child who is catapulted out of her working-class origins. But some working-class academics, like myself, were not academically ambitious as children. I am a nontraditional working-class

Borkowski, David

2004-01-01

85

Work Study Position -Educational Technology Projects Assistant FC101584  

E-print Network

Work Study Position - Educational Technology Projects/Windows) Interests in educational technology tools Website design, graphic design Communications Initiatives Project Manager and the Educational Technologies Group. Tasks

Boonstra, Rudy

86

Bullying and harassment at work and their relationships to work environment quality: An exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to explore relationships between organizational and social work conditions and the occurrence of bullying and harassment at work. Bullying and harassment are situations where a worker or supervisor is systematically mistreated and victimized by fellow workers or supervisors through repeated negative acts like insulting remarks and ridicule, verbal abuse, offensive teasing, isolation, and social

Stle Einarsen; Bjrn Inge Raknes; Stig Berge Matthiesen

1994-01-01

87

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID Federal Work-Study Program  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID Federal Work-Study Program AUTHORIZATION FOR FEDERAL WORK-STUDY (FWS) EMPLOYMENT Fall 2011 - Spring 2012 August 21, 2011 ­ May 19, 2012 You have accepted a Federal will notify you as your gross earnings approach your award limit. 3. Federal regulations allow you to hold

Milchberg, Howard

88

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

89

Social policy and social work education: A historical comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a historical comparative study (Babbie, 1999) in which legislative policy developments and social work curriculum were paralleled to determine the relationship of one to the other. This study explores whether social work education led or lagged the legislative policy process. More specifically, legislative policy developments were considered in terms of dominant paradigms in accordance with the ideas of

Thomas E. Brenner

2004-01-01

90

Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.  

PubMed

Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments. PMID:20962033

Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castao-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

2011-02-01

91

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two individual-level psychotherapy interventions: (a) treatment as usual consisting of cognitivebehavioral therapy (CBT) and (b) work-focused CBT (W-CBT) that integrated work aspects early into the treatment. Both interventions were carried out by psychotherapists with employees on sick leave because of common mental disorders (depression, anxiety, or adjustment disorder). In

Suzanne E. Lagerveld; Roland W. B. Blonk; Veerle Brenninkmeijer; Leoniek Wijngaards-de Meij; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

2012-01-01

92

A Win-Win Paradigm for Quality of Work Life and Business Performance. [and] Invited Reaction: Comments on Lau and May's Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lau and May's study of 58 "best U.S. companies to work for" and 88 top Standard and Poor's companies suggests that companies with high quality of working life can also enjoy exceptional growth and profitability. Schurman's critique notes that their sample does not reflect conditions in the majority of U.S. employers. (SK)

Lau, R. S. M.; May, Bruce E.; Schurman, Susan J.

1998-01-01

93

Working-Class Students Need More Friends at University: A Cautionary Note for Australia's Higher Education Equity Initiative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2008, Denise Bradley and colleagues published their "Review of Australian Higher Education." A key point of the Bradley Review was to highlight the long-standing under-representation of working-class people at Australia's universities. Working-class people represent 25% of Australia's general population; however, they represent only 15% of

Rubin, Mark

2012-01-01

94

Work on the Super and the Study of Atmospheric Ignition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By 1951, the group of young faculty (Bob Gluckstern and me), post doctoral fellows and graduate students, was comfortably established in Sloane Laboratory, and as "The Breit Group", in the department of physics at Yale. We didn't consciously separate ourselves from others in the department, and no one seemed to put us apart, but the association with Breit gave us a special "aura"--sometimes as objects of pity. Any project that involved the group as a whole, or a significant part of it, was discussed with Bob and me, and sometime in 1951 Breit called us in to consider a request that we look at the possibility of atmospheric ignition by a "Super" - as we still called it then, after Edward Teller. At the end of my stay at Los Alamos, in the summer of 1946, we youngsters had many bull sessions about that "Super", and the possibility of controlled fusion energy. We were confident that the former would be working in perhaps five years, and the latter within ten. After all, Han Bethe had shown us how the sun made its energy, and all that was needed to do was to replace a couple of his slow beta decays with something faster. As I write, some fifty-four years later, we still haven't got fusion energy for power. Our crystal balls were cloudier than Vicky Weisskopf's were to be! But I knew some of the lingo, and had worked out the way radiation penetrates the atmosphere (for understanding the Bikini tests), so in 1951, initially drew the task of looking at opacity, a key question in the bomb itself, and in the possibility of atmospheric ignition. Most of our limited work on the bomb was checking calculations that had been done by others as the Teller-Ulam design was being put together. At least some work on atmospheric ignition had already been done as well, but Teller wanted the "most careful physicist he knew" to do the definitive calculations, so Breit got the call. I do not recall all the members of the group who worked on the project and for that I apologize - no private notes were allowed because the work was classified. But in addition to Bob Gluckstern, I recall, for reasons that will appear, that John McHale was one of the project workers. At one point I think we were all working on nitrogen reactions ...

Hull, Mcallister

2001-03-01

95

Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work

Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

2005-01-01

96

NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK  

EPA Science Inventory

The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

97

COURSE OF STUDY: DISTANCE OPTION MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM  

E-print Network

First Year 19 credits Fall Winter Spring SW 520 Social Work and Social Welfare Policy (4 credit hours Development in the Social Environment, Issues in Child Welfare, Health Care Policies and Programs and PovertyCOURSE OF STUDY: DISTANCE OPTION MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM Three-year curriculum grid example

98

A Descriptive Study of Social Work Practice in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although mental health has become the predominant area of social work practice, there is a lack of concrete information regarding what social workers actually provide and to whom. This situation becomes more critical as social work competes for clients and concentrates on improving the profession's image. The data used in this study were obtained from questionnaire responses from a sample

Travis J. Courville; Kathryn F. Kennedy

1986-01-01

99

Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in

Ashby, Sjon F.

2011-01-01

100

Workshop on the Work-Study Experience Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The publication, a summary of a two-day workshop for education and rehabilitation personnel working with the mentally retarded student-client, contains the rationale for work-study experience programs, guidelines for establishing and maintaining a program, and information on various stages of the process. The following papers, which are included

Plummer, Jack M., Ed.

101

A Study To Increase Computer Applications in Social Work Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to address the use of computers in social work practice and to survey the field for tools, concepts, and trends that could assist social workers in their practice. In addition to a review of the relevant literature, information was requested from the Social Work Service and Ambulatory Care Database Section at Walter

Lucero, John A.

102

Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Studya German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation  

PubMed Central

The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schrder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Mller, Bernd Hans

2014-01-01

103

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...school attended by the youth identify as...able to benefit from the program shall be...participate. (ii) Instructional schedule. Every...she participates in the work-study program...number of hours of classroom instruction,...

2011-07-01

104

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...school attended by the youth identify as...able to benefit from the program shall be...participate. (ii) Instructional schedule. Every...she participates in the work-study program...number of hours of classroom instruction,...

2012-07-01

105

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...school attended by the youth identify as...able to benefit from the program shall be...participate. (ii) Instructional schedule. Every...she participates in the work-study program...number of hours of classroom instruction,...

2013-07-01

106

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...school attended by the youth identify as...able to benefit from the program shall be...participate. (ii) Instructional schedule. Every...she participates in the work-study program...number of hours of classroom instruction,...

2014-07-01

107

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION  

E-print Network

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION demonstrates outstanding performance 2 = above average employee; often exerts extra effort 3 = average employee = not applicable to student's position Using the above criteria, evaluate the student's performance

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

108

24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community Development Work Study Program. 570.415 Section 570.415 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

2010-04-01

109

24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Community Development Work Study Program. 570.415 Section 570.415 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

2011-04-01

110

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Job Posting for WORK STUDY position  

E-print Network

. Skills: Communication, interpersonal, creative thinking skills are necessary. OtherATHLETICS & RECREATION Job Posting for WORK STUDY position Title exceptional interpersonal skills and have experience in presenting in front of large

Boonstra, Rudy

111

Work-focused treatment of common mental disorders and return to work: a comparative outcome study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two individual-level psychotherapy interventions: (a) treatment as usual consisting of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and (b) work-focused CBT (W-CBT) that integrated work aspects early into the treatment. Both interventions were carried out by psychotherapists with employees on sick leave because of common mental disorders (depression, anxiety, or adjustment disorder). In a quasi-experimental design, 12-month follow-up data of 168 employees were collected. The CBT group consisted of 79 clients, the W-CBT group of 89. Outcome measures were duration until return to work (RTW), mental health problems, and costs to the employer. We found significant effects on duration until RTW in favor of the W-CBT group: full RTW occurred 65 days earlier. Partial RTW occurred 12 days earlier. A significant decrease in mental health problems was equally present in both conditions. The average financial advantage for the employer of an employee in the W-CBT group was estimated at $5,275 U.S. dollars compared with the CBT group. These results show that through focusing more and earlier on work-related aspects and RTW, functional recovery in work can be substantially speeded up within a regular psychotherapeutic setting. This result was achieved without negative side effects on psychological complaints over the course of 1 year. Integrating work-related aspects into CBT is, therefore, a fruitful approach with benefits for employees and employers alike. PMID:22308965

Lagerveld, Suzanne E; Blonk, Roland W B; Brenninkmeijer, Veerle; Wijngaards-de Meij, Leoniek; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

2012-04-01

112

Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program: Prebreathe elimination study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study examined impacts of changing Orbiter cabin pressure and EMU EVA pressure to eliminate pure O2 prebreathing prior to EVA. The investigation defines circumscribing physiological boundaries and identifies changes required within Orbiter to reduce cabin pressure. The study also identifies payload impacts, payload flight assignment constraints, and impacts upon EMU resulting from raising EVA pressure. The study presents the trade-off which optimizes the choice of reduced cabin pressure and increased EVA pressure.

Wilde, R. L.

1981-01-01

113

STUDY OF WORKING FLUID MIXTURES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE WORKING FLUIDS FOR COMPRESSOR DRIVEN SYSTEMS  

E-print Network

FOR COMPRESSOR DRIVEN SYSTEMS Final Report Part A Prepared by: Thore Berntsson, Chalmers University of Technology for compressor-driven systems", which is Annex VI of the International Energy Agency working group Advanced Heat drops, and realistic compressor efficiencies 40 Physical properties 43 #12;5.3 General parameter study

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

114

Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL

Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

2013-01-01

115

Appears in Working Notes of the IJCAI-95 Workshop on Engineering Problems for Qualitative Reasoning, Monreal, Quebec, Canada, August 1995  

E-print Network

with Behavioral Modes Siddarth Subramanian, Raymond J. Mooney Dept. of Computer Sciences University of Texas-fault assumption (Dvorak, 1992). Most previous work on model-based diagnosis (Reiter, 1987; de Kleer and Williams to SHER- LOCK (de Kleer and Williams, 1989)and the algorithmbuilds on INC-DIAGNOSE (Ng, 1990). The system

Mooney, Raymond J.

116

Review of Thomas G. Bever, "A Survey of Some Recent Work in Psycholinguistics." Linguistic Notes from La Jolla, No. 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review of Bever's psycholinguistics survey is for the most part favorable. Commentary is centered on sections 1, 2, 4, and 6 of the report. The survey's first part is judged significant in that Wundt's pioneering work in psycholinguistics is discussed. The second section, on grammar as a psychological process, is found obscure in its

Chapin, Paul G.

117

The Business Work-Life Study, 1998: A Sourcebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveyed a representative sample of 1,057 companies with 100 or more employees to assess how U.S. companies are responding to the work-life needs of the nation's changing workforce. Specifically, the study sought to identify the extent to which companies provide benefits, programs, and policies and create supportive workplace

Galinsky, Ellen; Bond, James T.

118

How to Critically Evaluate Case Studies in Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to develop guidelines to assist practitioners and researchers in evaluating and developing rigorous case studies. The main concern in evaluating a case study is to accurately assess its quality and ultimately to offer clients social work interventions informed by the best available evidence. To assess the quality of

Lee, Eunjung; Mishna, Faye; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

2010-01-01

119

Comparative study of NOTES alone versus NOTES guided by a new image registration system for navigation in the mediastinum: a study in a porcine model  

PubMed Central

Background Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) mediastinoscopy (MED) through the esophagus has proved to be feasible in the animal model. However, injury of the adjacent pleura and pneumothorax has been reported as a frequent adverse event when using a blind access. Objective To assess the utility and safety of a CT-based image registration system (IRS) for navigation in the mediastinum. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled trial in 30 Yorkshire pigs. Thirty-minute MEDs were performed: 15 MEDs were performed with IRS guidance (MED-IRS), and 15 MEDs were performed with a blind access. Setting Animal research laboratory. Interventions In both groups, the mediastinum was accessed through a 10-cm submucosal tunnel in the esophageal wall. Timed exploration was performed with identification of 8 mediastinal structures. Main Outcome Measurements Technical feasibility, adverse events, and the number of mediastinal structures identified. Results Thirty animals weighing 31.5 3.5 kg were included in this study. MED was not possible in 2 animals in the MED with blind access group but was possible in all MEDs performed with IRS. The mean number of identified organs was slightly higher in with IRS-MED (6.13 1.3) than with MED with blind access (4.7 2.3; P = .066). Moreover, the right atrium and vena cava were identified in more cases with IRS-MED than in MED with blind access (13 vs 3 and 15 vs 11, P = .000 and P = .03, respectively). There were 3 (23%) adverse events with IRS-MED and 4 (27%) with MED with blind access (P = not significant), with pneumothorax being the most frequent (2 and 3, respectively). Limitations Nonsurvival animal study. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the IRS system appears feasible in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery MED and suggests that IRS guidance might be useful for selected procedures. PMID:23261099

Crdova, Henry; Estpar, Ral San Jos; Rodrguez-DJess, Antonio; Martnez-Pall, Graciela; Arguis, Pedro; de Miguel, Cristina Rodrguez; Navarro-Ripoll, Ricard; Perdomo, Juan M.; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Llach, Josep; Vosburgh, Kirby G.; Fernndez-Esparrach, Gloria

2013-01-01

120

Forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound-guided NOTES interventions: A study on peritoneoscopic potential  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of diagnostic and therapeutic transgastric (TG) peritoneoscopic interventions with a forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound (FV-EUS). METHODS: This prospective endoscopic experimental study used an animal model. Combined TG peritoneoscopic interventions and EUS examination of the intra-abdominal organs were performed using an FV-EUS on 10 animal models (1 porcine and 9 canine). The procedures carried out include EUS evaluation and endoscopic biopsy of intraperitoneal organs, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA), and argon plasma coagulation (APC) for hemostatic control. The animals were kept alive for 7 d, and then necropsy was performed to evaluate results and complications. RESULTS: In all 10 animals, TG peritoneoscopy, followed by endoscopic biopsy for the liver, spleen, abdominal wall, and omentum, was performed successfully. APC helped control minor bleeding. Visualization of intra-abdominal solid organs with real-time EUS was accomplished with ease. Intraperitoneal EUS-FNA was successfully performed on the liver, spleen, and kidney. Similarly, a successful outcome was achieved with EUS-RFA of the hepatic parenchyma. No adverse events were recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: Peritoneoscopic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) interventions through FV-EUS were feasible in providing evaluation and performing endoscopic procedures. It promises potential as a platform for future EUS-based NOTES. PMID:24222961

Jeong, Seung Uk; Aizan, Hassanuddin; Song, Tae Jun; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Su-Hui; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

2013-01-01

121

A Study of Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Beliefs about the Inclusion of Religious and Spiritual Content in Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory quantitative study employs a 4-page Religion/Spirituality and Social Work Questionnaire that focuses on the beliefs and perceptions of 324 undergraduate social work students in 7 Council on Social Work Education-accredited schools of social work in the state of Texas about the role of religion and spirituality in social work

Graff, Dorothy L.

2007-01-01

122

Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW)  

E-print Network

Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) Academic Plan of Study College of Health and Human Services Department of Social Work the BSW graduate for generalist social work practice. Students will need to complete SOWK 1101, 2182, 2183

Raja, Anita

123

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

124

Study of the extinction of a note in reed instruments Laboratoire d'acoustique de l'universite du Maine, B^at. IAM -UFR Sciences Avenue Olivier  

E-print Network

Study of the extinction of a note in reed instruments A. Almeida Laboratoire d'acoustique de l focuses on the extinction transients in reed instruments. Firstly, the most relevant methods for characterising the extinction of the note are briefly discussed. The extinction duration of recorded notes using

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

125

Work.  

PubMed

The very nature of work is changing because of rapid social change, a culture of abundance, and the ability to substitute information for equipment, inventory, and other material aspects of value creation. In America, we are experiencing an erosion of the concept of a "job," a dramatic shift to service and information as the basis for value added, market commercialism, and the importance of the self-managed career. In some of these areas, dentistry has been consistent with the patterns of innovation--even being a model in some cases. There are also areas where dentistry is moving in contrary directions. PMID:12602221

Chambers, David W

2002-01-01

126

IS supported service work: A case study of global  

E-print Network

of the Black Pearl (Walt Disney, 2003)] #12;IS supported service work: a case study of global certification ii. The practices of company `W' is placed within a larger historical and institutional context. Research literature the company's and workers' perspective. Main topics are Decision Making as negotiated sensemaking, contextual

Langseth, Helge

127

Adult Education and the Working Class: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a successful pilot project developed by a staff member of the Institute of Continuing Education, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, to help combat the failure of adult education to reach the working class women in the city. A part-time tutor-organizer was employed to create study/action groups offering an alternative educational experience

Lovett, Tom; Mackay, Libby

1976-01-01

128

Curriculum Guide for the Work-Study Program, 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is the 1974 work-study program curriculum guide from Fairfax County, Virginia for mildly retarded secondary school students. The vocational program's four-fold goal is to develop curriculum materials, train personnel, develop instructional techniques, and provide logistics support to future the employment potential of students. The

Yamagata, Barbara; And Others

129

Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

Xu, F. Grace

2009-01-01

130

The significance of field work in monographic studies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

131

Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Fiscal Year 1997 Grant Allocations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains project synopses and evaluations supporting recommendations for funding 25 continuing and 7 new projects in public and nonpublic colleges and universities included in the $1.5 million appropriated for fiscal year 1997 for the Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Selection criteria included: strengthening cooperation among

Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

132

Putting Disability Studies to Work in Art Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Putting disability studies to work in art education suggests a form of action or industry, a creative opportunity for something to be done, recognising the relationship between theory and practice. Drawing on discourse analysis, this article offers an initial theoretical discussion of some of the ways in which disability is revealed and created

Penketh, Claire

2014-01-01

133

Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships

Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

2012-01-01

134

A Factor Analytic Study of the Protestant Work Ethic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been suggested that the Protestant Work Ethic (PWE) is a multidimensional concept. The concept of PWE has been examined in many different samples and societies. Very little research has been done concerning the factor structure of the PWE scale in a Chinese sample. This study examined the factor structure of the PWE scale in a sample of

Tang, Thomas Li-Ping

135

Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students

Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

136

STUDY ABROAD AND VALUES DEVELOPMENT IN SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents results of a qualitative study of values development in U.S. and Scottish social work students who participated in a study-abroad program. Six themes emerged: opening the mind to new ways of thinking; awareness and insight into one's own values and beliefs; social awareness and challenges to societal values and beliefs; appreciation of difference, cultural sensitivity, and anti-discriminatory

Elizabeth W. Lindsey

2005-01-01

137

Ergonomic study of an operator's work of a molybdenum plant.  

PubMed

This study was part of an ergonomic program which is being carried out through an agreement between the University of Concepcin and a Chilean private mining company. The purpose of this case study was to identify working conditions in which the physical and mental workload could be over the capabilities of the operator. He was responsible for loading trucks with sacks of molybdenum and for downloading reagents and handles them. The methods employed in this study included electronic records, interviews, surveys, review of the company standards, a time study and physical and mental workload analysis. Results showed that 84% of the time the operator was carrying out principal and secondary activities and no break periods were detected. It was found that the pace of work and the shift system generated unfavorable conditions by imbalance in the workload on the different days of the week. In the light of the results recommendations were made for a number of ergonomic changes. Most of them were accepted by the company. The most important achievement was a change in the shift system. The overload of the operator was due to the fact that he was in a shift working 5 days and resting on weekends. The imbalance was mainly because the work of the week end was accumulated for Monday. As a result of the study, the company contracted a second worker for this job and adopted a 7x7 shift system, meaning that they work seven days and rest seven days. An evaluation carried out two month after adopting the new shift revealed that changes were well accepted by the worker. PMID:22317731

Oate, Esteban; Meyer, Felipe

2012-01-01

138

Mortality among women and men relative to unemployment, part time work, overtime work, and extra work: a study based on data from the Swedish twin registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo examine mortality before 70 years of age among women and men relative to unemployment, part time work, overtime work, and extra work. Age, marital status, children, smoking and alcohol habits, use of sleeping pills and tranquilisers, stress, shift work, personality factors, and long lasting or serious illness were taken into account as potential confounding factors.METHODSThe study group comprised a

L Nyln; M Voss; B Floderus

2001-01-01

139

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions. PMID:22238619

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

140

Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software are covered. This month`s Tech Notes include: (1) a study linking development and reservoir silting in El Salvador, (2) publication of a guide for small hydro operatos, and (3) publication of a text outlining the development of hydroelectric power in Russia.

NONE

1993-12-31

141

Do Work Demands and Resources Predict Work-to-Family Conflict and Facilitation? A Study of Iranian Male Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of some work demands-resources on two dimensions of work-to-family interface among Iranian\\u000a employees. The results of canonical correlation and multiple-regression showed that among work resources (i.e., social support\\u000a and autonomy), social support was associated negatively with work-to-family conflict and autonomy was associated positively\\u000a with work-to-family facilitation. Also, among work demands (i.e., job demands and working

Leila Karimi; Aboulghasem Nouri

2009-01-01

142

Exploring the experiences of EU qualified doctors working in the United Kingdom: A qualitative study.  

PubMed

This qualitative study of 23 doctors from other EU member states working in the UK highlights that, contrary to media reports, doctors from other member states working in the UK were well prepared and their main motivation to migrate was to learn new skills and experience a new health care system. Interviewees highlighted some aspects of their employment that work well and others that need improving. Some interviewees reported initially having language problems, but most noted that this was resolved after a few months. These doctors overwhelmingly reported having very positive experiences with patients, enjoying a NHS structure that was less hierarchical structure than in their home systems, and appreciating the emphasis on evidence-based medicine. Interviewees mostly complained about the lack of cleanliness of hospitals and gave some examples of risk to patient safety. Interviewees did not experience discrimination other than some instances of patronising and snobbish behaviour. However, a few believed that their nationality was a block to achieving senior positions. Overall, interviewees reported having enjoyable experiences with patients and appreciating what the NHS had to offer. PMID:25239032

Legido-Quigley, Helena; Saliba, Vanessa; McKee, Martin

2015-04-01

143

Notes for GMail  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This handy application for adding notes to Gmail conversations and exchanges is quite useful. It works as a web browser application that allows users to annotate emails, create to-do lists, and much more. Additionally, visitors can add reminders with social network integration and pin notes for future reference. This version is compatible with all computers utilizing Google Chrome.

2014-07-16

144

Preparing for the World of Work: An Exploratory Study of Disabled Students' Experiences of Work Placement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For people with disabilities, one of the best ways to achieve independence is through work. Experience gained by undertaking a work placement whilst a student provides valuable knowledge and understanding of the demands of work, and enhances employability on graduation for both students with disabilities and for their non-disabled peers. The aims

Georgiou, Catherine Elizabeth; Espahbodi, Shima; De Souza, Lorraine Hilary

2012-01-01

145

Work-family conflict: a study of lesbian mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose Among the most consistent predictors of work-family conflict for working parents are the number of hours worked, job role autonomy, and degree of support managers offer parents. Yet, little is known about the unique work experiences of lesbian women in terms of work-family conflict. This paper seeks to identify correlates of work-family conflict, specifically work interference with family

Tracy L. Tuten; Rachel A. August

2006-01-01

146

Health among hospital employees in Europe: a cross-national study of the impact of work stress and work control.  

PubMed

This article analyses the effect of working conditions on the health of hospital employees across Europe. Hospital employees often have demanding jobs that increase their stress levels and, consequently, their risk of health problems. Work control - typified by employee autonomy and working time flexibility - helps them cope with high levels of work stress. Researchers have traditionally studied the relationship between working conditions, coping strategies and occupational health from an individual perspective. We argue that the individual work-health relationship is closely connected with the social and institutional context. This study explores how work stress and work control influence the health of hospital employees and aims to understand cross-country differences in this respect. Using data on over 1500 hospital employees who participated in the study 'Quality of work and life in a changing Europe' (2007) in eight European countries, we used ordinal regression analyses to test a range of hypotheses. The results show that work stress has a negative effect on the health of hospital employees, while work control is not found to have any effect on their health. Comparative analyses reveal that the effects of working conditions on health vary across European countries. While working overtime is more closely related to poorer health in Eastern European countries, we found evidence of a positive relationship between job autonomy and health in Western Europe only, indicating that circumstances in the working environment have differing effects on employee health in Eastern and Western Europe. PMID:21330025

Pisljar, Tjasa; van der Lippe, Tanja; den Dulk, Laura

2011-03-01

147

Fostering Communication between Students Working Collaboratively: Results from a Practitioner Action Research Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a secondary mathematics teacher, I used practitioner action research to determine effective ways to intervene with students working in groups, with the goal of improving their communication. Utilising transcripts of group interactions and teacher interventions, field notes, and student feedback, I discovered ten different issues that prevent

Quebec Fuentes, Sarah

2013-01-01

148

Health visitors' child protection work: exploratory study of risk assessment.  

PubMed

This paper outlines a small-scale research project that utilised a modified grounded theory approach in order to explore the role of risk assessment in health visitors' child protection work. A review of the literature investigated the role of risk assessment in current health and social care policy. Structured focus group and interview work enabled the opinions of health visitors to be collected about the factors that enable them to identify, analyse and manage issues of risk to children.Transcripts were analysed with reference to the literature review. The health visitors considered aspects of their relationship with clients to influence the identification, analysis and management of risk to children. The results suggest that health visitors are not convinced that the Common Assessment Framework or health assessment tools assist in their management of risk to children. The findings of this study are based on data collected from a small sample of health visitors, and conclusions are therefore tentative, but aim to contribute to wider professional debate about risk management in child protection work. PMID:19480117

Selbie, Jean

2009-05-01

149

Noted cinema and video game studies scholar Dr. Bernard Perron will examine survival horrorvideogamesasarich,complexsiteforthestudyforgender.Withitshypersexualized  

E-print Network

Noted cinema and video game studies scholar Dr. Bernard Perron will examine survival 303 Paterson Hall 1:00 Dr. Perron is the Full Professor of Cinema at the University of Montreal. He of Michigan Press, 2012). His research concentrates on video games; on horror; on interactive cinema

150

Europe Note Europe note number  

E-print Network

1 Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/05 Date 23 April 2012 Distribution Vice HE International Unit European Activity Survey of UK HEIs - Wales Introduction 1. This E-note reports the survey was collected from November 2011 to December 2011 using an online survey tool. Separate E-notes

Müller, Jens-Dominik

151

Europe Note Europe note number  

E-print Network

Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/04 Date 23 April 2012 Distribution Vice of the 2011 UK HE International Unit European Activity Survey of UK HEIs - Scotland Introduction 1. This E-note using an online survey tool. Separate E-notes have been developed with results for the UK as a whole

Müller, Jens-Dominik

152

Europe Note Europe note number  

E-print Network

1 Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/02 Date 23 April 2012 Distribution Vice HE International Unit European Activity Survey of UK HEIs - UK Introduction 1. This E-note informs UK to December 2011 using an online survey tool. Separate E-notes have been developed with results for England

Müller, Jens-Dominik

153

Europe Note Europe note number  

E-print Network

1 Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/03 Date 15 April 2012 Distribution Vice 1. This E-note reports on the outcomes for England and Northern Ireland of the UK HE International was collected from November 2011 to December 2011 using an online survey tool. Separate E-notes have been

Müller, Jens-Dominik

154

Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

Meagher, Thomas Francis

155

Should Middle School Students with Learning Problems Copy and Paste Notes from the Internet? Mixed-Methods Evidence of Study Barriers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the experimental phase of this mixed-methods study, 49 middle school students receiving special education services took notes from the Internet under either a written notes or a copy-and-paste notes condition. Immediate, cued-recall measures of factual learning showed that students who wrote their notes were better able to recall what they had noted, although recall was low for all students. However, after a one-week delay (which included two classroom opportunities to study their notes), students who pasted their notes performed significantly better on two different measures of factual learning than students who wrote their notes. Follow-up student interviews and analyses of notes revealed a robust explanatory theme: many written notes contained barriers to learning (e.g., illegible handwriting, spelling errors, and/or indecipherable paraphrases), which likely reduced the benefit of study time. Implications for instructing this population of students to use copy and paste while gathering information on the Internet are discussed.

L. Brent Igo

2009-01-01

156

Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: these instructions will work on OS X 10.5 (Leopard) and OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard). For help configuring previous OS X versions, please  

E-print Network

Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: these instructions will work on OS X 10, select System Preferences. Navigate to Print & Fax 3. Click the plus (+) to add a printer 4. The Add: Another Device · Print Using: Generic PostScript Printer 11.The parameters for the Name and URL fields

de Lijser, Peter

157

A physical fitness programme during paid working hours - impact on health and work ability among women working in the social service sector: a three year follow up study.  

PubMed

In order to study the influence of a physical fitness programme on work ability among women employed in the social sector an intervention was offered to 205 women working in the social care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The reference group comprised 165 women from the same sector working in another municipality. All participants were employed and answered questionnaires at baseline and after 36 months. For women younger than 45 years, work ability and general health improved significantly while for women, 45 years or older, future work expectations improved. For women with less musculoskeletal pain, improvements were observed regarding future work expectations, as well as work ability and general health while for women with more musculoskeletal pain, improvements were observed for general health and future work expectations. Well-structured physical fitness programmes at the worksite can be useful in contributing to individual's experiences of improvements in their own capacity as well as increased health and wellbeing. PMID:20037249

Vingrd, Eva; Blomkvist, Vanja; Rosenblad, Andreas; Lindberg, Per; Voss, Margaretha; Alfredsson, Lars; Josephson, Malin

2009-01-01

158

Work-aged stroke survivors psychosocial challenges narrated during and after participating in a dialogue-based psychosocial intervention: a feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Studies point to the lack of psychosocial support and rehabilitation services that are adjusted to the work-aged stroke survivors specific needs in order to promote psychosocial well-being. The aim of the study was to illuminate the psychosocial challenges work-aged participants (i.e. aged 1867years) thematised during and after participating a dialogue-based psychosocial intervention during the first year following a stroke. Methods The study was a feasibility study guided by the UK Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Qualitative data from in-depth interviews with fourteen stroke-survivors aged 3366years, researcher field notes and log notes written during the intervention were analysed applying a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. Results The stroke and its consequences had a substantial impact on family and work life. Their experiences were summarised in the two themes The threat of becoming marginalised in family life and The threat of becoming marginalised in work life. Conclusion Life as a work-aged stroke survivor was experienced as challenging and created a threat of becoming marginalised in family and work life. The study highlights the need to understand the specific psychosocial challenges and needs facing work-aged stroke survivors in order to promote their psychosocial well-being. More research is needed concerning specific life-span challenges amongst work-aged stroke survivors in order to further develop appropriate interventions that helps address this issue. PMID:24066840

2013-01-01

159

Social Work/Ethnic Studies Joint Faculty Position The University of Utah Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work invite applications for a  

E-print Network

Social Work/Ethnic Studies Joint Faculty Position The University of Utah Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work invite applications for a fulltime (ongoing 9-month contract) tenure-track position in the Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work. Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary

Simons, Jack

160

Changes in work situation and work ability in young female and male workers. A prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Good work ability is very important in young workers, but knowledge of work situations that influence work ability in this group is poor. The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in self-reported work factors are associated with self-reported work ability among young female and male workers. Methods A sample of 1,311 (718 women and 593 men) was selected from a Swedish cohort of workers aged 2125?years. At baseline and at 1-year follow-up, participants completed a self-administrated questionnaire including ratings of physical and psychosocial work factors and current work ability. Prevalence ratios were calculated to assess univariate and multivariate associations between changes in work factors and changes in work ability. Results Decreased job control (PR 1.7, 95% CI 1.492.12) and increased negative influence of job demands on private life (PR 1.5, 95% CI 1.251.69) were associated with reduced work ability for both female and male workers in the multivariate analyses. Among female workers, an association was found between improved work ability and increased social support at work (PR 2.4, CI 1.433.95). For male workers, increased job control (PR 2.3, 95% CI 1.214.54) and decreased negative influence of job demands on private life (PR 2.1, 95% CI 1.103.87) were associated with improved work ability in the multivariate analyses. Conclusions Decreased job control and increased negative influence of job demands on private life over time seem to be the most important work factors associated with reduced work ability among young workers of both sexes. Increased social support at work, increased job control, and decreased negative influence of job demands on private life were also found to be the main work factors associated with improved work ability, although with possible gender differences. PMID:22920936

2012-01-01

161

Delaware Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Delaware Library has been expanding their online offerings in the past few years, and this addition of the "Delaware Notes" archive is most welcome. The series consists of a variety of publications created by the University from 1923 to the present, and the subject matter covered within these pages is quite diverse. Here visitors will find a very exhaustive history of the University of Delaware ("University of Delaware: Ancestors, Friends and Neighbors"), an academic appraisal of Longfellow's wanderings ("Longfellow and Germany"), and an early paper on aerodynamics titled "Aerodynamics of the Psychrometer". Visitors are encouraged to search the collection by author, title, subject, or date. It's an impressive potpourri of scholarly works, and one that might pique a new interest among curious visitors.

162

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

163

Here is a quick run-down on these notes, with various terms to be learned in boldface. Much of scientific work involves relationships called maps  

E-print Network

) (barometric pressure, humidity, temperature); mother's age frequency of newborn with Down syndrom availablev overview Here is a quick run-down on these notes, with various terms to be learned in boldface

Liblit, Ben

164

Note: Optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems  

SciTech Connect

A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time.

Moscicki, J. K.; Sokolowska, D.; Dziob, D.; Nowak, J. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)] [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kwiatkowski, L. [Department of Econometrics and Operations Research, Cracow University of Economics, Rakowicka 27, 31-510 Krakow (Poland)] [Department of Econometrics and Operations Research, Cracow University of Economics, Rakowicka 27, 31-510 Krakow (Poland)

2014-02-15

165

Note: optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems.  

PubMed

A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time. PMID:24593402

Moscicki, J K; Sokolowska, D; Kwiatkowski, L; Dziob, D; Nowak, J

2014-02-01

166

Work Ethic and Employment Status: A Study of Jobseekers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there have been numerous changes within the workplace during the past century, employers continue to search for employees with a strong work ethic. Employers often cite a strong work ethic as the most desired characteristic in a new employee. Work ethic can be described as a set of characteristics and attitudes in which an individual

Hill, Roger B.; Fouts, Susan

2005-01-01

167

Faculty Work Practices in Material Environments: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is an extensive and well-developed body of literature on the nature of faculty work (e.g., Blackburn & Lawrence, 1996; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006) that has examined numerous aspects of faculty work and sources of influence on that work (e.g., intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, personal characteristics, disciplinary affiliation,

Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

2011-01-01

168

Getting back to work after injury: the UK Burden of Injury multicentre longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Background Injuries to working age adults are common and place a considerable burden on health services accounting for more than 10% of GP sick notes and 14% of those claiming benefits because they are unable to work in the UK. General practitioners (GPs) currently assess fitness to work and provide care and referral to other services to facilitate return to work (RTW). Recent UK recommendations suggest replacing GP sickness certification with independent assessments of fitness to work after four weeks sick leave. The impact of a wide range of injuries on RTW and subsequent need for independent fitness to work assessments has not been well studied in the UK. The aim of this study was to quantify RTW and factors predicting RTW following a wide range of injuries. Methods We used a multicentre longitudinal study, set in four acute NHS Trusts in the UK which recruited emergency department (ED) attenders and hospital admissions for injury and included those aged 1665years that were employed or self-employed before the injury. Participants were followed up by postal questionnaire at 1, 4 and 12 months post injury to measure health status (EQ-5D), recovery, use of health and social services, time off work in the preceding month and work problems amongst those who had RTW. Multivariable Poisson regression with a robust variance estimator was used to estimate relative risks for factors associated with RTW. Results One month after injury 35% of ED attenders had fully RTW. The self employed were more likely (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.47 compared with employed) and the moderate/severely injured less likely to RTW (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.72 compared with minor injuries). At four months, 83% of ED attenders had RTW and self employment and injury severity remained significant predictors of RTW (self employment RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.30; moderate/severe injury RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.92). At four months 57% of hospital admissions had RTW. Men were more likely than women to RTW (RR 1.94, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.82), whilst those injured at work (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.87 compared with at home) and those living in deprived areas (most deprived tertile RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.85 and middle tertile RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.93) were less likely to RTW. Health status was significantly poorer at one and four months after injury than before the injury and was significantly poorer amongst those that had not RTW compared to those that had. Problems with pain control, undertaking usual activities, mobility and anxiety and depression were common and persisted in a considerable proportion of participants up to four months post injury. Conclusions Injuries have a large impact on time off work, including amongst those whose injuries did not warrant hospital admission. The majority of injured people would require an in-depth fitness for work assessment if recent UK recommendations are implemented. Many people will have on-going pain, mobility problems, anxiety and depression at the point of assessment and it is important that patients are encouraged to use primary care services to address these problems. A range of factors may be useful for identifying those at risk of a slower recovery and a delayed RTW so that appropriate interventions can be provided to this group. PMID:22853715

2012-01-01

169

Water's contribution and enzyme's work: a KITA study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enzyme dynamics control and contribute to myriads of mostly well-characterized metabolic processes. Yet, understanding the role of the aqueous reaction matrix remains an experimental challenge. By kinetic THz absorption (KITA) spectroscopy, we have studied the dynamic interplay between water and a human metalloenzyme at work in realtime. In our KITA setup, we combined a THz-time domain spectrometer (THz-TDS) with a stopped-flow mixer to study reactions with millisecond time resolution. We used picosecond THz pulses which directly probe hydrogen bond formation and breaking in the water network to observe enzyme-water interactions upon enzyme catalysis at the active site of a matrix-metalloprotease. During formation of the productive Michaelis complex, we detected a perturbation of coupled enzyme-water network dynamics. Supplemented by real-time biophysical techniques and molecular dynamics simulations we characterized the enzyme-water interplay in the particular case of enzyme catalysis. Our results suggest a polarization-induced gradient of water dynamics at the remote active site of a metalloenzyme with decelerated hydration water dynamics towards the active site. The observed long-range gradient of collective water motions might facilitate productive binding of substrates to enzyme active sites. Further KITA experiments shall improve our understanding of water's contribution to biological function.

Born, Benjamin; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

2012-03-01

170

High-involvement work processes, work intensification and employee well-being: A study of New Zealand worker experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-involvement work processes are at the heart of the current interest in high- performance work systems. A study of 775 New Zealand employees shows that greater experience of high-involvement processes is associated with higher job satisfaction. To a lesser extent, there are also better outcomes in terms of job- induced stress, fatigue and work-life imbalance. However, in situations where pressures

Keith Macky; Peter Boxall

2008-01-01

171

Work-Family Conflict and Psychosocial Work Environment Stressors as Predictors of Job Stress in a Cross-Cultural Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to investigate the relationship between work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC), job demands, job control, social support, flexibility in working hours, and job stress. The sample consisted of 27 doctors and 328 nurses from Norway, as well as 111 doctors and 136 nurses from India. The results indicate that predictors of job stress

Suchitra Pal; Per ystein Saksvik

2008-01-01

172

The Efficacy of Symbolic Work-Family Integration for Married Professionals who Share Paid Work - A Descriptive Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates whether spouses sharing paid work (in terms of workplace, occupation, or both) affects the amount and direction of work-family integration in terms of use of time, space, artifacts, activities, and associates (Nippert-Eng 1996). Results from interviews of each member of twenty-six professional couples reveal that spousal shared paid work arrangements influenced the likelihood of about half of

Michelle Y. Janning

173

U.S. Taxation of Business: Relevance of the European Experience. German Studies Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

American and European business taxation policies are compared in this booklet. Topics discussed in the paper include effects of the corporation income tax, integration of income taxation, and the value added tax. Two major differences between the American and European systems are noted. First, European countries derive substantial portions of

McLure, Charles E., Jr.

174

Technical NoteFEASIBILITY STUDIES OF ALPHA-PARTICLE CHANNELING IN MIRROR MACHINES  

E-print Network

or by otherwise sustaining plasma confinement, thus increasing the effective fusion reactiv- ity. To identify the effective fusion reactivity by a fac- tor of 2.8. In this paper we discuss and reformulate the results Note: Some figures in this paper are in color only in the electronic version. I. INTRODUCTION Alpha

175

Note: Design of a dose-controlled phototherapy system based on hyperspectral studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phototherapy consists in applying radiation on a part of the human body in order to treat an illness. A radiation dose is established for each treatment. In order to apply the correct dose a treatment time is set. However, in this work we have carried out some hyperspectral imaging studies that conclude that the radiation sources and the absorption properties of each patient can change. Therefore, the same treatment time does not ensure that the patient receive the appropriate dose. Thus, an optimized therapy system must measure the radiation emitted by the source and absorbed by the patient on real time to calculate the optimal dose at which the treatment is effective. In this work, we have developed and designed a custom system to measure the effectiveness of a radiative therapy treatment to adapt the appropriate dose for a specific patient in real time.

Ugarte, M. F.; Chvarri, L.; Briz, S.

2013-02-01

176

A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Working Memory in Youth after Sports-Related Concussion: Is It Still Working?  

PubMed Central

Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-leveldependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory strategies to maintain cognitive performance after mTBI. This has significant implications for safe return to daily activities, including competitive sport. PMID:24070614

Singh Saluja, Rajeet; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

2014-01-01

177

What Is Not Working in Working Memory of Children with Literacy Disorders? Evidence from a Three-Year-Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of this study were to explore the deficits in working memory associated with literacy disorders (i.e. developmental disorders of reading and/or spelling) and the developmental trajectories of these working memory deficits. The performance of 28 children with literacy disorders was compared to a non-disabled control group with the same

Fischbach, Anne; Knen, Tanja; Rietz, Chantal S.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

2014-01-01

178

Federal Work-Study (FWS) Orientation Review Questions  

E-print Network

) It serves as a source of financial assistance b) It offers a training ground where students can work day of the semester? a) 2nd Day b) 4th Day c) 7th Day d) 10th Day 10. When is a FWS employee the orientation presentation again and return for a new appointment. I have reviewed the online Federal Work

Rosen, Jay

179

Project Work Plan Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform Attenuation Parameter Studies: Heterogeneous Hydrolytic Reactions  

SciTech Connect

Between 1955 and 1973, an estimated 750,000 kg of carbon tetrachloride were discharged to the soil in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site as part of the plutonium production process. Of this amount, some carbon tetrachloride reached the groundwater more than 70 m below the ground surface and formed a plume of 10 km2. Recent information has shown that the carbon tetrachloride plume extends to a depth of at least 60 m below the water table. Some carbon tetrachloride has been degraded either by the original process or subsequent transformations in the subsurface to form a co-existing chloroform plume. Although current characterization efforts are improving the conceptual model of the source area, more information is needed to effectively assess the fate and transport of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform to support upcoming remediation decisions for the plume. As noted in a simulation study by Truex et al. (2001), parameters describing porosity, sorption, and abiotic degradation have the largest influence on predicted plume behavior. The work proposed herein will improve the ability to predict future plume movement by better quantifying abiotic degradation mechanisms and rates. This effort will help define how much active remediation may be needed and estimate where the plume will eventually stabilize key factors in determining the most appropriate remedy for the plume.

Amonette, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2006-06-01

180

Isolated perfused working heart preparation for in vitro biomechanical studies  

E-print Network

The isolated perfused working heart preparation has been an established method of investigation for larger animals. However, because of technical, economic and ethical issues, this methodology needs to be extended for use on mouse heart. Owing...

Shroff, Manish Vikram

2003-01-01

181

38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...C. 206(a)) times the number of hours the veteran, reservist, or eligible person has agreed to work; or (2) The hourly minimum wage under comparable law of the State in which the services are to be performed...

2013-07-01

182

38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...C. 206(a)) times the number of hours the veteran, reservist, or eligible person has agreed to work; or (2) The hourly minimum wage under comparable law of the State in which the services are to be performed...

2014-07-01

183

38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...C. 206(a)) times the number of hours the veteran, reservist, or eligible person has agreed to work; or (2) The hourly minimum wage under comparable law of the State in which the services are to be performed...

2012-07-01

184

38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

2010-07-01

185

Shoulder disorders in female working-age population: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are among the most common pathologies in the general population. However, research into the prevalence of upper arm MSDs is hampered by a lack of uniformity in case definition, and by the absence of a gold standard for measurement. Furthermore, some sectors of the population have benefited from extensive research whilst others have largely been ignored. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Objectives: to investigate the prevalence of shoulder MSDs in a working age female population not exposed to specific occupational risk factors such as heavy and/or repetitive work, assessing the differences in prevalence recorded by using three different standard measurement tools. Methods 302 working aged women were enrolled in this study (age 2055years). Each subject underwent three different assessments: standardized questionnaires for symptoms and disability and the SF36 health survey, a clinical assessment performed by a blinded orthopaedic specialist, and an imaging assessment by means of ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) if indicated. Results According to the questionnaire 77 subjects (25.5%) complained of shoulder pain whilst 225 (74.5%) were asymptomatic. According to the clinical examination, 31 subjects (10.3%) resulted positive, whereas 271 subjects (89.7%) had normal shoulders. According to the imaging findings, 26 subjects (8.6%) had alterations to the anatomical structures of the shoulder, whilst 276 subjects (91.4%) had no detectable abnormalities in either shoulder. In all assessments, the prevalence increased with age (p?=?0.001). Conclusion Depending on the outcome measure used, the prevalence of reported MSDs of the shoulder varies considerably. There is a striking difference between the prevalence of subjective reported symptoms and the standardized clinical/imaging examinations. However, the results of all the assessments did concur in one aspect; there was a significant trend of increased prevalence of shoulder MSDs with age. When looking at reported prevalence, this study shows the importance of noting the measurement method used before making comparisons, as it can vary considerably. The epidemic of shoulder pain reported is not indicative of an epidemic of shoulder pathology. PMID:24708552

2014-01-01

186

Student perception about working in rural United States/Canada after graduation: a study in an offshore Caribbean medical school  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Rural residents of the United States (US) and Canada face problems in accessing healthcare. International medical graduates (IMGs) play an important role in delivering rural healthcare. IMGs from Caribbean medical schools have the highest proportion of physicians in primary care. Xavier University School of Medicines admits students from the US, Canada and other countries to the undergraduate medical (MD) course and also offers a premedical program. The present study was conducted to obtain student perception about working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Methods: The study was conducted among premedical and preclinical undergraduate medical (MD) students during October 2014. The questionnaire used was modified from a previous study. Semester of study, gender, nationality, place of residence and occupation of parents were noted. Information about whether students plan to work in rural US/Canada after graduation, possible reasons why doctors are reluctant to work in rural areas, how the government can encourage rural practice, possible problems respondents anticipate while working in rural areas were among the topics studied. Results: Ninety nine of the 108 students (91.7%) participated. Forty respondents were in favor of working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Respondents mentioned good housing, regular electricity, water supply, telecommunication facilities, and schools for education of children as important conditions to be fulfilled. The government should provide higher salaries to rural doctors, help with loan repayment, and provide opportunities for professional growth. Potential problems mentioned were difficulty in being accepted by the rural community, problems in convincing patients to follow medical advice, lack of exposure to rural life among the respondents, and cultural issues. Conclusions: About 40% of respondents would consider working in rural US/Canada. Conditions required to be fulfilled have been mentioned above. Graduates from Caribbean medical schools have a role in addressing rural physician shortage. Similar studies in other offshore Caribbean medical schools are required as Caribbean IMGs make an important contribution to the rural US and Canadian health workforce.

Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Nandy, Atanu; Herz, Burton L; Little, Brian W

2014-01-01

187

Technical Note: Use of remote sensing for landslide studies in Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the framework of FP7, an EU-funded SafeLand project, a questionnaire was prepared to collect information about the use of remote sensing for landslide study and to evaluate its actual application in landslide detection, mapping and monitoring. The questionnaire was designed using a Google form and was disseminated among end-users and researchers involved in landslide studies in Europe. In total, 49 answers from 17 different European countries were collected. The outcomes showed that landslide detection and mapping is mainly performed with aerial photos, often associated with optical and radar imagery. Concerning landslide monitoring, satellite radars prevail over the other types of data. Remote sensing is mainly used for detection/mapping and monitoring of slides, flows and lateral spreads with a preferably large scale of analysis (1:5000-1:25 000). All the compilers integrate remote sensing data with other thematic data, mainly geological maps, landslide inventory maps and DTMs and derived maps. According to the research and working experience of the compilers, remote sensing is generally considered to have a medium effectiveness/reliability for landslide studies. The results of the questionnaire can contribute to an overall sketch of the use of remote sensing in current landslide studies and show that remote sensing can be considered a powerful and well-established instrument for landslide mapping, monitoring and hazard analysis.

Tofani, V.; Segoni, S.; Agostini, A.; Catani, F.; Casagli, N.

2013-02-01

188

A feasibility study of work group monitoring for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Present Hanford internal dosimetry policy recommends placing a worker on a routine bioassay monitoring program if the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) in a single calendar year may exceed 100 mrem for all radionuclides. Nearly all Hanford workers who enter contamination zones are on routine bioassay programs. Site environmental restoration and remediation now require an even larger number of workers to enter contamination zones, therefore increasing the number of workers requiring routine bioassay monitoring. Work group bioassay is a method which demonstrates, at a reduced cost, that workers who are assumed to be essentially at no risk for incurring intakes are, in fact, not incurring intakes. For the proposed program, a work group will be identified by a letter to their exposure history file. The analytical result for a work group bioassay sample will be placed in the dosimetry record of the person actually providing the sample and will be identified as pertaining to a work group by an appropriate code. Any positive result will be followed up using the same procedure as for individual-specific bioassay, which limits false positives to less than 0.5%. Workers who (1) have radioactive material depositions that interfere with detecting and assessing additional intakes, (2) use any form of respiratory protection, or (3) enter airborne radioactivity areas will be excluded from a work group bioassay program and placed on an individual-specific bioassay program.

MacLellan, J.A.

1994-04-01

189

Work and non-work stressors, psychological distress and obesity: evidence from a 14-year study on Canadian workers  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of work, non-work and individual factors to obesity with regard to gender-related differences, and to clarify the mediating role that psychological distress plays in these dynamics in Canada from 1994 to 2008 using the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS). Design Longitudinal. Settings The NPHS is a randomised longitudinal cohort study with biennial interviews of the Canadian adult population from 18 to 64. Participants 5925 non-obese workers in cycle 1 (49% were women). Measurements Obesity was measured using the body mass index (BMI), with a threshold of BMI >30?kg/m2. BMI was corrected in accordance with the recommendations of Connor Gorber et al to adjust for gender bias in responses. Results Of the work characteristics evaluated, only decision authority was associated with obesity for women but not for men. Living as a couple, child-related strains, psychotropic drug use, hypertension, being physically inactive and low psychological distress were obesity risk factors but were not moderated by gender. Overall, psychological distress did not mediate the associations that work factors have on obesity. Conclusions Our study suggests that men and women differ little in the extent to which work, non-work and individual factors predict obesity. However, for women, the level of decision authority is associated with a lower obesity risk. In addition, psychological distress did not mediate the contribution of work factors and actually seems, contrary to expectations, to decrease the obesity risk when work, non-work and individual factors are taken into account. PMID:25740022

Marchand, Alain; Beauregard, Nancy; Blanc, Marie-Eve

2015-01-01

190

Employment, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross sectional study of Dutch patients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVETo evaluate employment status, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).?METHODSA questionnaire was sent to 709patients with AS aged 16-60. The results of 658of the patients could be analysed.?RESULTSAfter adjustment for age, labour force participation was decreased by 15.4% in male patients and 5.2% in female patients compared with the general Dutch population. Work disability (all causes) was 15.7% and 16.9% higher than expected in the general population for male and female patients respectively. In particular, the proportion of those with a partial work disability pension was increased. Patients with a paid job lost 5.0% of work days as the result of having AS, accounting for a mean of 10.1days of sick leave due to AS per patient per year in addition to the national average of 12.3unspecified days of sick leave.?CONCLUSIONThis study on work status in AS provides data adjusted for age and sex, and the differences from the reference population were significant. The impact of AS on employment and work disability is considerable. Work status in patients with AS needs more attention as an outcome measure in future research.?? PMID:11247865

Boonen, A; Chorus, A; Miedema, H; van der Heijde, D; van der Tempel, H; van der Linden, S.

2001-01-01

191

An empirical study of the selected consequences of frontline employees workfamily conflict and familywork conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of workfamily conflict (WFCON) and familywork conflict (FWCON) on a number of selected consequences using data collected from frontline employees in international five-star chain hotels in Jordan. The results demonstrated that WFCON exerted a significant positive influence on job stress (JSTRESS), while FWCON did not. Contrary to the

Osman M. Karatepe; Lulu Baddar

2006-01-01

192

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents seven notes on new equipment, techniques, or materials of interest to teachers of physics. A circuit of a low-cost computer terminal to audiovisual device interface, and a demonstration of the buoyancy of air are among notes presented. (HM)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

193

Industrial Work Experience I. Curriculum Guide. General Related Study Units.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this guide is to present basic sample instructional materials for the Industrial Work Experience (IWE) Program. It is designed to aid those charged with local administration and coordination of programs in secondary level trade and industrial education, referred to as the IWE training program. The guide contains 10 units of

Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

194

Piedmont Works and PVCC Students: A Comparative Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report analyzes the Piedmont Works Adult Education Program (PW) at Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) and compares PW students with regular students at the college. PW offers aid to students to attend PVCC. Those students follow the same scheduling and enrollment procedures as other PVCC students. The PW program helps fund educational

Lerman, David

195

Technical Work Plan for: Fracture and Lithophysal Studies  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work scope described in this technical work plan (TWP) is to enhance the descriptions of fracture and lithophysal parameters for the repository host horizon (RHH) over the repository footprint utilizing a predictive model. This work is planned to address U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) additional information needs (AINs) associated with the Structural Deformation and Seismicity (SDS) Key Technical Issues (KTI) agreement SDS 3.03 (Schlueter 2000 [DIRS 166615]). The results of the planned work are expected to enhance the technical basis and confirm the results of the fracture analyses presented in ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107], Section 6.1.6). This model is not intended to provide an alternative for the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models currently used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Nor are the outputs of this model intended to address the SDS 3.03 AINs related to the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models.

n

2006-09-11

196

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDIES ON PERSONS WORKING WITHIN THE REACH OF MICROWAVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of periodical examinations were carried out on 120 persons ; working within fields of high-frequency electromagnetic waves. Case-history ; analysis and morphological evaluation of the electroencephalographic records ; showed a significantly large number of complaints submitted by individuals ; exposed to microwaves for more than three years. Moreover, there was a distinct ; preponderance of EEG records with

Z. Edelwejn; S. Haduch

1962-01-01

197

24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...additional support. (A) Student stipend...sufficiently high to allow a student to earn the full stipend without working over 20 hours...during the school year and 40 hours per week during the summer. The amount of...receives assistance for a program that...

2014-04-01

198

24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...additional support. (A) Student stipend...sufficiently high to allow a student to earn the full stipend without working over 20 hours...during the school year and 40 hours per week during the summer. The amount of...receives assistance for a program that...

2012-04-01

199

24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...additional support. (A) Student stipend...sufficiently high to allow a student to earn the full stipend without working over 20 hours...during the school year and 40 hours per week during the summer. The amount of...receives assistance for a program that...

2013-04-01

200

A Case Study of Work in Long Island Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the course of the past few decades, technology has shaped the way people interact, work, learn, and retrieve and disperse information. The advent of the 21st Century includes new forms of knowledge and information, requiring tools and skills previously unseen by generations of learners. New tools are meant to be used for expansion of

McDermott, Carrie L.

2013-01-01

201

Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light

Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

2013-01-01

202

Development and Evaluation of Briefing Notes as a Novel Knowledge Translation Tool to Aid the Implementation of Sex/Gender Analysis in Systematic Reviews: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing recognition of sex/gender differences in health and the importance of identifying differential effects of interventions for men and women. Yet, to whom the research evidence does or does not apply, with regard to sex/gender, is often insufficiently answered. This is also true for systematic reviews which synthesize results of primary studies. A lack of analysis and reporting of evidence on sex/gender raises concerns about the applicability of systematic reviews. To bridge this gap, this pilot study aimed to translate knowledge about sex/gender analysis (SGA) into a user-friendly briefing note format and evaluate its potential in aiding the implementation of SGA in systematic reviews. Methods Our Sex/Gender Methods Group used an interactive process to translate knowledge about sex/gender into briefing notes, a concise communication tool used by policy and decision makers. The briefing notes were developed in collaboration with three Cochrane Collaboration review groups (HIV/AIDS, Hypertension, and Musculoskeletal) who were also the target knowledge users of the briefing notes. Briefing note development was informed by existing systematic review checklists, literature on sex/gender, in-person and virtual meetings, and consultation with topic experts. Finally, we held a workshop for potential users to evaluate the notes. Results Each briefing note provides tailored guidance on considering sex/gender to reviewers who are planning or conducting systematic reviews and includes the rationale for considering sex/gender, with examples specific to each review groups focus. Review authors found that the briefing notes provided welcome guidance on implementing SGA that was clear and concise, but also identified conceptual and implementation challenges. Conclusions Sex/gender briefing notes are a promising knowledge translation tool. By encouraging sex/gender analysis and equity considerations in systematic reviews, the briefing notes can assist systematic reviewers in ensuring the applicability of research evidence, with the goal of improved health outcomes for diverse populations. PMID:25372876

Doull, Marion; Welch, Vivian; Puil, Lorri; Runnels, Vivien; Coen, Stephanie E.; Shea, Beverley; ONeill, Jennifer; Borkhoff, Cornelia; Tudiver, Sari; Boscoe, Madeline

2014-01-01

203

Understanding China's Post80 employees' work attitudes: an explorative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among job and career satisfactions, work commitment, and turnover intentions for the Post-80 employees in China. Design\\/methodology\\/approach A total of 290 of China's Post-80 employees from 19 knowledge-intensive companies were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used for data analysis. Findings The perceptions of selected Post-80 employees

Qinxuan Gu; Lihong Wang; Judy Y. Sun; Yanni Xu

2010-01-01

204

Page 1 of 5 2014 SUMMER TERM WORK STUDY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

. If the deadline falls on a weekend, applications will be accepted the next business day. You are encouraged. Is there a deadline to apply? How do I find out if my application was approved? You will be sent an e-mail once your-mail. How much can I earn working on the program? The wage is $12.00/hour including vacation pay

Abolmaesumi, Purang

205

Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

1984-01-01

206

Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, workhome balance and the European Working Time Directive: a panel study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and workhome balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Design Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Setting Norway. Participants Unbalanced cohort of 13001600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Outcome measures Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. Results From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (4647?h) and junior (4546?h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (2735%) than junior (1120%) doctors reported suboptimal workhome balance, defined as working more than 48?h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45?h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. Conclusions The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. PMID:25311038

Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

2014-01-01

207

Work-Study Abroad Courses in International Development Studies: Some Ethical and Pedagogical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A strong presumption in many international development studies programs appears to be that field or work placements are intrinsically effective and good. But what does it really mean to put relatively affluent, mostly white undergraduates in a real world situation abroad for a short stint of time? What are the specific risks in terms of development ethics and educational goals?

Marc Epprecht

2004-01-01

208

Reflections on the Study of Adult Learning. NALL Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A common pattern in all studies of adult learning is that informal learning seems to be a very normal, very natural human activity. A 30-year old study and the 1998 Livingstone study show parallel findings. One of the most important findings is that about 90 percent of people had done some sort of intentional learning in the last year. The 10

Tough, Allen

209

Lesson Study: Still a Work in Progress in America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the years since the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) focused on the success of Japanese students, much has been written about Japanese lesson study and its possible benefits for mathematics classrooms in America. Lesson study is a professional development process used in Japanese schools that brings teachers (and other

Tolle, Penelope P.

2010-01-01

210

Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.  

PubMed

The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:25479968

Petit, Audrey; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Rigouin, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Brunet, Ren; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

2015-03-01

211

NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited dataset, and further investigation on a larger patient population has to be done before its clinical implementation.

Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cervio, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

2009-10-01

212

Connecting Work and School: A Statewide Study of Employer Participation in Florida School-to-Work Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed the characteristics and practices of employers participating in Florida school-to-work (STW) initiatives, the factors influencing their participation, and the quality and value of their partnerships with schools. Data were gathered through a statewide mail survey of a random sample of employers drawn from more than 15,000 Florida

Haley, Mary

213

Organization of working memory within the human prefrontal cortex: a PET study of self-ordered object working memory  

E-print Network

in the right dorsolateral, but not ventrolateral, prefrontal cortex. Increases in blood ow in the dorsolateral-specic hypothesis. 7 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Dorsolateral prefrontal cortexOrganization of working memory within the human prefrontal cortex: a PET study of self

Curtis, Clayton

214

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Split-YFP/BiFC in Plant Protein-Protein Interaction Studies  

PubMed Central

Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein), has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginners guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments. PMID:24886811

Horstman, Anneke; Nougalli Tonaco, Isabella Antonia; Boutilier, Kim; Immink, Richard G. H.

2014-01-01

215

A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia  

E-print Network

A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia Therese Jefferson Alison Preston University of Technology Perth Western Australia http://www.cbs.curtin.edu/wiser #12;A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia ii A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western

216

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...shall not apply in any case in which the individual...candidates for a work-study allowance than there are...performance of work-study services after the completion...of services (or in the case of any remaining hours...covered by the work-study debt-liquidation...

2011-07-01

217

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...shall not apply in any case in which the individual...candidates for a work-study allowance than there are...performance of work-study services after the completion...of services (or in the case of any remaining hours...covered by the work-study debt-liquidation...

2013-07-01

218

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...shall not apply in any case in which the individual...candidates for a work-study allowance than there are...performance of work-study services after the completion...of services (or in the case of any remaining hours...covered by the work-study debt-liquidation...

2012-07-01

219

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...shall not apply in any case in which the individual...candidates for a work-study allowance than there are...performance of work-study services after the completion...of services (or in the case of any remaining hours...covered by the work-study debt-liquidation...

2014-07-01

220

Do Serious Games Work? Results from Three Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three studies in higher education look at whether serious games (or video games whose primary purpose is something other than entertainment, such as military training, education, physical therapy) really do change learning outcomes.

Richard Blunt

2009-01-01

221

Problem-Based Learning in Social Work: A Study of Student Learning Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) in social work education. The participants were 132 second-year social work students who took the core courses of Social Work Theory and Practice and Skills Laboratory in the PBL mode. A 40-item scale was used to measure the students' perceptions of their social work knowledge,

Wong, Donna Kam Pun; Lam, Debbie Oi Bing

2007-01-01

222

The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative

Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

2012-01-01

223

Working conditions and weight gain: a 28-year follow-up study of industrial employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Longitudinal studies observing working conditions and weight gain are rare. We aimed to study whether weight gain can be predicted\\u000a by working conditions or changes in them in a 28-year follow-up. The study population consisted of working-aged industrial\\u000a employees (n=449). Data on height and weight were collected in clinical examinations in 1973, 1983 and 2001, and information on working\\u000a conditions

Tea Lallukka; Sirpa Sarlio-Lhteenkorva; Leena Kaila-Kangas; Janne Pitkniemi; Ritva Luukkonen; Pivi Leino-Arjas

2008-01-01

224

Telepresence work station system definition study, part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study effort has shown that the development of a space robotic servicing system is totally feasible. More importantly, many of the key elements of such a system are currently available as the result of previous and ongoing technical efforts. In many cases, decisions remain to be made concerning tradeoffs between options available to satisfy system technology requirements. The primary recommendation resulting from this study is for the development of a flight test bed system that could be used to establish a performance database to assist some of the necessary technical decisions described in the study package. A properly design flight test bed system would prove tremendously useful in terms of rapidly evaluating technology in a realistic setting and would be a great benefit in the development of the operational system.

1987-01-01

225

Patients Who Share Transparent Visit Notes With Others: Characteristics, Risks, and Benefits  

PubMed Central

Background Inviting patients to read their primary care visit notes may improve communication and help them engage more actively in their health care. Little is known about how patients will use the opportunity to share their visit notes with family members or caregivers, or what the benefits might be. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the characteristics of patients who reported sharing their visit notes during the course of the study, including their views on associated benefits and risks. Methods The OpenNotes study invited patients to access their primary care providers visit notes in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Washington. Pre- and post-intervention surveys assessed patient demographics, standardized measures of patient-doctor communication, sharing of visit notes with others during the study, and specific health behaviors reflecting the potential benefits and risks of offering patients easy access to their visit notes. Results More than half (55.43%, 2503/4516) of the participants who reported viewing at least one visit note would like the option of letting family members or friends have their own Web access to their visit notes, and 21.70% (980/4516) reported sharing their visit notes with someone during the study year. Men, and those retired or unable to work, were significantly more likely to share visit notes, and those sharing were neither more nor less concerned about their privacy than were non-sharers. Compared to participants who did not share clinic notes, those who shared were more likely to report taking better care of themselves and taking their medications as prescribed, after adjustment for age, gender, employment status, and study site. Conclusions One in five OpenNotes patients shared a visit note with someone, and those sharing Web access to their visit notes reported better adherence to self-care and medications. As health information technology systems increase patients ability to access their medical records, facilitating access to caregivers may improve perceived health behaviors and outcomes. PMID:25405911

Mejilla, Roanne; Darer, Jonathan D; Oster, Natalia V; Ralston, James D; Leveille, Suzanne G; Walker, Jan; Delbanco, Tom; Elmore, Joann G

2014-01-01

226

Women's Work and Women's Studies, 1973-1974: A Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The bibliography lists almost 4,000 books, articles, pamphlets, and research papers about women and feminism. All items in this third volume were published or in progress in 1973-1974. The items are classified by the topics of abortion, arts and media, contemporary women's movement, cultural studies, education, employment, family organization,

Friedman, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

227

Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology

Pollitt, David. Ed.

2000-01-01

228

Practical work in the study of aerial photocameras  

Microsoft Academic Search

The book deals with laboratory investigations of aerial cameras, including cameras used for topographic purposes and for studying natural resources. Practical recommendations are given for checking optical systems, shutters, cassettes, time-lag devices for obtaining longitudinal overlaps, gyrostabilizers, statoscopes, and radio altimeters. Review questions at the end of each chapter make the volume well suited as a textbook.

E. P. Arzhanov; R. T. Vasilev; V. B. Ilin

1977-01-01

229

Preliminary Work on Coconut Milk Fouling Deposits Study  

E-print Network

AbstractThe characterizations of coconut milk fouling deposits formed during pasteurization process at temperature from 70 to 80C were investigated. Both in-situ (using lab-scale plate heat exchanger) and ex-situ methods (using shakable water bath) were applied in preparing the fouling sample and for cleaning study. A few microanalyses such as proximate analysis, texture analysis and microstructure analysis were carried out to examine the characteristics of the coconut milk fouling deposits. Selection of raw material and determination of the optimal process parameters for pasteurization process were done to obtain a typical pasteurization condition as applied in the coconut milk product industry in Malaysia. The changes of the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) during the process were studied. The removal/cleaning of coconut milk fouling deposit was also studied at 80C, 2 LPM and with 2 %V/V hydroxide of alkaline solution (optimal condition obtained from ex-situ method). The results indicate that fouling period was occurred during coconut milk pasteurization and it caused a resistance to heat transfer. Coconut milk fouling deposit which contains of high fat content (29.25%) can be removed by applying single stage clean-in-place (CIP) method with alkaline solution. The factors causing fouling were studied Index Terms coconut milk, fouling deposit, cleaning, pasteurization process, plate heat exchanger F I.

Hui Yin Law; Chin Im Ong; Norashikin Ab. Aziz; Farah Saleena Taip; Noraziah Muda

230

Three models of child abuse consultations: A qualitative study of inpatient child abuse consultation notes.  

PubMed

Child abuse pediatricians have multiple roles in caring for abused children, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and, when needed, expert legal opinion. The child physical abuse consultation differs from the traditional medical consultation in that it has medical, investigative and legal audiences, all of whom have different information needs. How child abuse pediatricians approach their cases and how they document their initial inpatient consultations that will be used by such a diverse audience is currently unexplored. We used content analysis to examine 37 child physical abuse consultation notes from a national sample of child abuse pediatricians in order to understand physicians' approaches to these consultations. Three commonly used models of child physical abuse consultation were identified in the data that we named the base model, the investigative model, and the family-dynamic model. While model types overlap, each is distinguished by key features including the approach used to gather information, the information recorded, and the language used in documentation. The base model most closely mirrors the traditional medical approach; the investigative model concentrates on triangulation of sources of information; and, the family-dynamic model concentrates on physician perceptions of family relationships. The three models of consultations for child physical abuse mirror the areas of child abuse pediatrics: diagnostic, forensic and therapeutic. These models are considered in relationship to best practice from other medical specialties with forensic components. PMID:25484319

Keenan, Heather T; Campbell, Kristine A

2014-12-01

231

Federal Work-Study Q& A for Supervisors Q What is my first step if I am interested in hiring work-study students?  

E-print Network

that is emailed to you after your login request is processed. Q Are there specific deadlines to post a jobFederal Work-Study Q& A for Supervisors Q What is my first step if I am interested in hiring work periods of higher than usual student volume it may take longer. A Do I email a description of my job? Q No

Qiu, Weigang

232

Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega Studies: A Case Study at Argonne National Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Between 1952 and 1992 more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the life span and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology mega studies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals, and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research. PMID:22004930

Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

2013-01-01

233

Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design

Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

2009-01-01

234

28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial Administration...TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or...

2010-07-01

235

Alternative work schedule interventions in the Australian construction industry: a comparative case study analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Project?based construction workers in the Australian construction industry work long and irregular hours and experience higher levels of work?to?family conflict and burnout than office?based workers, giving rise to an interest in alternative work schedules as a means of supporting worklife balance. Alternative work schedules were implemented in four case study construction projects in Australia. Interventions differed between projects, with two

Helen Clare Lingard; Keith Townsend; Lisa Bradley; Kerry Brown

2008-01-01

236

Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity  

SciTech Connect

A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

2012-02-15

237

Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

2011-09-06

238

Ethical and Practical Guidelines for Reporting Genetic Research Results To Study Participants: Updated Guidelines from an NHLBI Working Group  

PubMed Central

In January 2009 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 NHLBI Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening five years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that the technologic and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals which would not have been possible a decade ago. While unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the Working Group produced five recommendations. The Working Group offers two recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The Group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final Recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to IRBs, investigators, research institutions and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants. PMID:21156933

Fabsitz, Richard R.; McGuire, Amy; Sharp, Richard R.; Puggal, Mona; Beskow, Laura M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Bookman, Ebony; Burke, Wylie; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Church, George; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Eckfeldt, John H.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Fisher, Rebecca; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gachupin, Francine; James, Cynthia; Jarvik, Gail P.; Kittles, Rick; Leib, Jennifer R.; ODonnell, Christopher; O'Rourke, P. Pearl; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Schully, Sheri D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sze, Rebecca K.F.; Thakuria, Joseph V.; Wolf, Susan M.; Burke, Gregory L.

2011-01-01

239

NOTE / NOTE A note on the relationship between the  

E-print Network

1587 NOTE / NOTE A note on the relationship between the quadratic mean stand diameter and harmonic mean basal area under size-biased distribution theory Jeffrey H. Gove Abstract: This note seeks : Cette note vise à élargir la portée de la théorie de la distribution diamétrale biaisée telle qu

240

Jobs on the Move: European Case Studies in Relocating eWork. IES Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study analyzed and synthesized results of 62 company case studies in 18 European countries. Focus was "eWork," information-processing work carried out at a distance with extensive use of computer systems and telecommunication links. Each case study was based on several qualitative interviews with company respondents. Case studies covered both

Flecker, J.; Kirschenhofer, S.

241

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

242

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

243

Biology Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

244

Incidental captures of birds in small-mammal traps: a cautionary note for interdisciplinary studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although benefits of interdisciplinary studies are numerous, potential exists for data acqui- sition for some aspects of such studies to impact data acquisition for other aspects. This may be particularly true in studies involving both trapping of small mammals and assess- ment of bird populations. We summarize the incidence of birds captured during 8 research projects in Massachusetts, Oregon, and

David L. Waldien; Miranda M. Cooley; Jennifer Weikel; John P. Hayes; Chris C. Maguire; Tom Manning; Thomas J. Maier

2004-01-01

245

A didactical note on the advantage of using two parameters in Hopf bifurcation studies  

PubMed Central

In order to maximize the information that a linearized stability analysis provides, one should work with two free parameters rather than one. Moreover, it is recommended to first consider coefficients in the characteristic equation as parameters and in a second step (try to) invert the map that defines the coefficients in terms of the parameters as they occur in the original equation. Our aim is to substantiate these claims by way of a delay equation example taken from the literature. AMS Subject Classification: 34K18; 34K20; 34K60; 92C99 PMID:23327443

Diekmann, O.; Korvasov, K.

2013-01-01

246

Academic Performance of College Students: Influence of Time Spent Studying and Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's college students are less prepared for college-level work than their predecessors. Once they get to college, they tend to spend fewer hours studying while spending more hours working, some even full time (D. T. Smart, C. A. Kelley, & J. S. Conant, 1999). In this study, the authors examined the effect of both time spent studying and time

Nonis, Sarath A.; Hudson, Gail I.

2006-01-01

247

Eye-Gaze Patterns as Students Study Worked-out Examples in Mechanics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores what introductory physics students actually look at when studying worked-out examples. Our classroom experiences indicate that introductory physics students neither discuss nor refer to the conceptual information contained in the text of worked-out examples. This study is an effort to determine to what extent students

Smith, Adam D.; Mestre, Jose P.; Ross, Brian H.

2010-01-01

248

Impact of Diabetes on Work Cessation Data from the GAZEL cohort study  

E-print Network

Impact of Diabetes on Work Cessation Data from the GAZEL cohort study EL?ONORE HERQUELOT, MSC ALICE of diabetes on work cessation, i.e., on the risks of work disability, early retirement, and death while with diabetes and randomly selected 2,530 nondiabetic employed control subjects matched for major socio

Boyer, Edmond

249

Influence of gender on IT professional work identity: outcomes from a PLS study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the impact of gender on the work identity for IT professionals. Work identity directly and indirectly affects job satisfaction and intent to leave the organization. The model is empirically evaluated using the partial least squares technique. Survey data was collected from 240 IT professionals using on-line distribution. The results demonstrate that the work identity of female IT

Mari W. Buche

2008-01-01

250

Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.

Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

2010-01-01

251

Learning through Working: A Case Study of Chinese College Students in South Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study was designed to provide an understanding of the work experience of Chinese college students in South Korea. A growing number of Chinese students are coming to South Korea for college education, and their aspirations for better work materialize into work experiences in South Korean businesses. In-depth interviews were

Cha, Minyoung; Chang, Wonsup

2009-01-01

252

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work

Willy Eriksen; Kristian Tambs; Stein Knardahl

2006-01-01

253

Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between

Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

2010-01-01

254

STUDY CONCERNING THE INFLUENCE OF SOME WORKING CONDITIONS, ON THE HEAT PUMPS PERFORMANCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents relevant information about the working principle of the geothermal heat pumps and a study, based on an original computer simulation, analysing the influences of the working conditions on the heat pump performances. After presenting some basic considerations about the geothermal energy and about the heat pumps working principle, there are included some relevant considerations about the environmental

Mugur BALAN; Mihai DAMIAN; Lorentz JNTSCHI; Ion ION; B-dul. Muncii

255

Working in the Margins: A Study of University Professionals Serving Marginalized Student Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to gain some understandings of how university professionals who work with marginalized student populations perceive their professional work as situated within a university context. The professionals in this study work in federal TRIO programs that serve first-generation, low-income students who have been

Wallace, Dawn; Ropers-Huilman, Becky; Abel, Ron

2004-01-01

256

Work-related treatment for major depressive disorder and incapacity to work: Preliminary findings of a controlled, matched study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of work-related cognitive-behavioral treatment (W-CBT) with that of cognitive-behavioral treatment as usual (CBT-AU) for employees on sick leave as a result of a major depressive disorder (MDD). We collected data for 26 matched outpatients at pre- and posttreatment, as well as at 1-year follow-up. Outcome measures were the days of incapacity to work (DIW) as well as self-report measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI], Symptom Checklist 90-R [GSI], Life Satisfaction Questionnaire [FLZ]). We analyzed data with hierarchical linear modeling in a 2-level model. Therapy effects were defined in 3 ways: effect size (ES), response (based on the reliable change index), and remission compared with the general population's symptom level. The DIW were reduced significantly after both types of treatment, but employees showed even fewer DIW after W-CBT. At follow-up, significantly more employees were working as a result of W-CBT than with CBT-AU. Significant improvements on scores of self-rating measures corresponded with moderate-to-large effect sizes for both treatment types. Approximately 2 thirds of the treated employees were categorized as unimpaired on BDI scores at posttreatment and at follow-up. At least 1 half of the employees were classified as unimpaired on GSI scores at both assessment points. In future research, a randomized controlled trial should be conducted using a larger sample size to investigate the impact of moderators (e.g., employees at different branches of the company). Findings provided support for using common CBT techniques to enhance return to work without losing expected improvements at the symptom level. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25402222

Krger, Christoph; Bode, Katharina; Wunsch, Eva-Maria; Kliem, Sren; Grocholewski, Anja; Finger, Friederike

2015-04-01

257

The USC School of Social Work offers programs of study leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in social  

E-print Network

Professor of Social Work Research: John Brekke, Ph.D.* John Milner Professor of Child Welfare: Jacquelyn McThe USC School of Social Work offers programs of study leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in social work. These programs provide the student a broad background

Southern California, University of

258

Notes from the Ethnic Studies Home Front: Student Protests, Texting, and Subtexts of Oppression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The protest against Arizona House Bill 2281 designed to ban Ethnic Studies from K-12 public schools on 12 May 2010 in Tucson resulted in 15 arrests. Students walked out of their classrooms in large numbers to defend their Mexican American Studies curriculum and program. Based primarily on participant observation of the protest, the authors examine

Otero, Lydia R.; Cammarota, Julio

2011-01-01

259

A Note on the Importance of Studying Class Effects in Aptitude-Treatment Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results pertaining to methodological aspects of an aptitude-treatment interaction study are presented. One treatment group in the study was given imagery instructions, the other had no imagery instructions. Each treatment group consisted of seven fifth-grade classes. Among the aptitude variables there were two versions of a paired-associates

Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

260

The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in

Dyson, Anne Haas

2013-01-01

261

Reactivity in rapidly collected hygiene and toilet spot check measurements: a cautionary note for longitudinal studies.  

PubMed

Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. PMID:25385856

Arnold, Benjamin F; Khush, Ranjiv S; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford, John M

2015-01-01

262

Improving return-to-work after childbirth: design of the Mom@Work study, a randomised controlled trial and cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Many women suffer from health problems after giving birth, which can lead to sick leave. About 30% of Dutch workers are on sick leave after maternity leave. Structural contact of supervisors with employees on maternity leave, supported by early medical advice of occupational physicians, may increase the chances of return-to-work after maternity leave. In addition, to understand the process of sick leave and return-to-work after childbirth it is important to gain insight into which factors hinder return-to-work after childbirth, as well, as which prognostic factors lead to the development of postpartum health complaints. In this paper, the design of the Mom@Work study is described. Methods The Mom@Work study is simultaneously a randomised controlled trial and a cohort study. Pregnant women working for at least 12 hours a week at one of the 15 participating companies are eligible to participate. The supervisors of these pregnant employees are randomised at 35 weeks pregnancy into the intervention group or control group. During maternity leave, supervisors in the intervention group contact their employee six weeks after delivery using a structured interview. When employees do not expect to return to their jobs at the end of their scheduled maternity leave due to health problems, the supervisor offers early support of the occupational physician. Supervisors in the control group have no structural contact with their employees during maternity leave. Measurements take place at 30 weeks pregnancy and at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks postpartum. In addition, cost data are collected. For the RCT, primary outcome measures are sick leave and return-to-work, and secondary outcome measures are costs, health, satisfaction with intervention and global feelings of recovery. Outcome measures for the cohort are pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain, fatigue and depression. Finally, a number of prognostic factors for return-to-work and for the development of complaints will be measured. Discussion The Mom@Work study will provide important information about return-to-work of employees after giving birth. Results will give insight in prognosis of postpartum sick leave and complaints. Also, the role of supervisors and occupational physicians in successful return-to-work after childbirth will be clarified. PMID:17394629

Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne GM; van Poppel, Mireille NM; Hendriksen, Ingrid JM; Bruinvels, David J; Uegaki, Kimi; de Bruijne, Martine C; van Mechelen, Willem

2007-01-01

263

Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates  

SciTech Connect

The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

Molina-Mendoza, Aday J., E-mail: aday.molina@uam.es [Departamento de Fsica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rodrigo, Jos G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino [Departamento de Fsica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales Nicols Cabrera, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Agrat, Nicols [Departamento de Fsica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain) [Departamento de Fsica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales Nicols Cabrera, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileo de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2014-02-15

264

Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative

Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

2012-01-01

265

Note on Tekman's study of preference judgments for excerpts of music.  

PubMed

Tekman's study is a useful exploration and benefits from his consideration of published research on music; however, his interpretation of music tempo research by LeBlanc and associates cannot be supported. It would be worthwhile for Tekman to conduct a follow-up study with a larger number of participants and music excerpts from other styles of music in addition to art music ("classical" music). PMID:9923170

LeBlanc, A

1998-12-01

266

Being engaged at work and detached at home: A week-level study on work engagement, psychological detachment, and affect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although earlier research has shown that work engagement is associated with positive outcomes for the employee and the organization, this paper suggests that employees also need time periods for temporarily disengaging (i.e., psychological detaching) from work. We hypothesized that work engagement and psychological detachment from work during off-job time predict high positive affect and low negative affect and that psychological

Sabine Sonnentag; Eva J. Mojza; Carmen Binnewies; Annika Scholl

2008-01-01

267

NOTE / NOTE Comparison between shell morphology and  

E-print Network

NOTE / NOTE Comparison between shell morphology and genetic diversity in two sympatric lymnaeid with shell characteristics common to both species are O. glabra. We also note an absence of hybridization

Roche, Benjamin

268

Factors associated with hospital staff nurses working on-call hours: a pilot study.  

PubMed

When nurses work on-call hours, they have limited ability to control the hours they work. Nurses may be required to work extra hours and, if they are unable to detach from work during break time, can experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Previous studies have not examined factors associated with on-call work. In this pilot study, the authors examined state regulatory, organizational, and personal factors related to nurse on-call hours. Data were collected from registered nurses working in hospitals in two states; the final analytic sample consisted of 219 nurses. The authors found that four variables (teaching hospital employment, patient-to-nurse ratio, race/ethnicity of the nurse, and living with children) were significantly related to working on-call hours. Additional research is needed to understand nurse on-call hours and develop agency policies to promote nurses' health and well-being. PMID:23650895

Bae, Sung-Heui; Trinkoff, Alison; Jing, Hongjuan; Brewer, Carol

2013-05-01

269

Changes in brain network activity during working memory tasks: A magnetoencephalography study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we elucidate the changes in neural oscillatory processes that are induced by simple working memory tasks. A group of eight subjects took part in modified versions of the N-back and Sternberg working memory paradigms. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were recorded, and subsequently processed using beamformer based source imaging methodology. Our study shows statistically significant increases in ? oscillations

Matthew J. Brookes; Jonathan R. Wood; Claire M. Stevenson; Johanna M. Zumer; Thomas P. White; Peter F. Liddle; Peter G. Morris

2011-01-01

270

The Development of Work-Study and School Enterprises in China's Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the historical development of work-study programs from the early days of communist government to current practices in China. Traditional Chinese culture separated mental and manual labor according to Confucian edicts. After a slow start, work-study was integrated into the national curriculum in the late 1950s. (MJP)

Fouts, Jeffrey T.; Chan, Jack C. K.

1997-01-01

271

No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement after Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations

Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Fried, David E.; Hambrick, David Z.; Kane, Michael J.; Engle, Randall W.

2013-01-01

272

Job Demands and Resources as Antecedents of Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By utilizing a 2-year longitudinal design, the present study investigated the experience of work engagement and its antecedents among Finnish health care personnel (n = 409). The data were collected by questionnaires in 2003 (Time 1) and in 2005 (Time 2). The study showed that work engagement--especially vigor and dedication--was relatively

Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Ruokolainen, Mervi

2007-01-01

273

First National Conference on the Work-Study-Play or Platoon Plan. Bulletin, 1922, No. 35  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In February, 1922, the United States Commissioner of Education, John J. Tigert, called the First National Conference on the Work-Study-Play, or Platoon. One result of this conference was that the superintendents who attended asked the United States Bureau of Education to serve as a clearing house of information in regard to the work-study-play

Barrows, Alice

1922-01-01

274

Are you thinking about applying to study the Northern Ireland Degree in Social Work?  

E-print Network

1 Are you thinking about applying to study the Northern Ireland Degree in Social Work? If so to make a more informed decision about applying to study the Northern Ireland Degree in Social Work Course Qualification. It was developed in line with requirements laid down by the Northern Ireland Social Care Council

Paxton, Anthony T.

275

Burnout among Turkish High School Teachers Working in Turkey and Abroad: A Comparative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine perceived levels of burnout among Turkish high school teachers working in Turkey and abroad. Method: A total of 255 Turkish teachers working at public schools in Germany (n=78), Cyprus (n=94) and Turkey (n=83) comprised our study group. In Germany and Cyprus, the participants were selected

Aydogan, Ismail; Dogan, Ahmet Atilla; Bayram, Nuran

2009-01-01

276

Increased frontocerebellar activation in alcoholics during verbal working memory: an fMRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is clear evidence of alcoholism-related damage to the frontal lobes and cerebellum from neuroimaging, neuropathological, and neuropsychological studies, the functional role of the cerebellum and cerebrocerebellar circuits related to verbal working memory deficits of alcoholics have not been well studied. Alcoholic and nonalcoholic subjects performed a Sternberg verbal working memory task while receiving an fMRI scan in a

John E Desmond; S. H. Annabel Chen; Eve DeRosa; Michelle R Pryor; Adolf Pfefferbaum; Edith V Sullivan

2003-01-01

277

34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...How does a State administer its community service work-study program...How Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program...How does a State administer its community service work-study...

2010-07-01

278

BRIEFING NOTES November 2010  

E-print Network

% of the total world supply of primary energy depends on fossil fuels (IEA, 2008). However, oil reservesBRIEFING NOTES November 2010 Sustainable biofuels in Africa: cultivation of Jatropha curcas in Mali Background Case study 1 - Mali Case study 2 - Malawi Policy recommendations Biofuel cultivation worldwide

Mound, Jon

279

Technical note: a study of Hersey and Blanchards situational leadership theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study empirically tested Hersey and Blanchards situational leadership theory (SLT) among 151 senior executives within service and manufacturing businesses of a large Fortune 100 company. SLT focuses on the interaction of the leaders behaviour and follower readiness to determine leader effectiveness. SLT suggests that the appropriate level of task and relationship behaviour is the one that matches the level

Thomas D. Cairns; John Hollenback; Robert C. Preziosi; William A. Snow

1998-01-01

280

Limiting Nonresponse in Longitudinal Research: Three Strategies for School-Based Studies. A RAND Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Longitudinal studies conducted with children typically experience non-response problems that can make substantial inroads on sample size and introduce bias into the analysis. Three methods for limiting non-response in school-based research programs were assessed: (1) asking parents to return consent forms only if they do not want their children to

Ellickson, Phyllis L.

281

Intro to Statistics Exam 1 Study Guide Spring 2013 1. Notes about the examination  

E-print Network

, poll 5 of the principals for their job satisfaction. ex: Several persons surveyed are asked their shoe} level of measurement, data collection, observational study, experiment, block, simu- lation, surveyandleaf plot, stem, leaf, dot plot, pie chart, Pareto chart, paired, scatter plot, time series, measure

Hein, Derek

282

60 FR 61796 - Student Assistance General Provisions, Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Work-Study Programs...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Federal Work-Study Programs...institution of higher education and a federal...Under the Higher Education Act of 1965...Courses of Study by Correspondence...institution of higher education with respect...program the curriculum of...

1995-12-01

283

Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

2013-01-01

284

Technical Notes: Multiple-Tank Aquarium System with Recirculating Water for Laboratory Studies of Freshwater Fishes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recirculating-water aquarium system for laboratory studies of freshwater fishes is described. The system consists of 216 glass tanks (3.5 gal each), two particle filters, a multistage biofilter, two ultraviolet-light sterilizers, and a regenerative blower for auxiliary aeration. Each tank is connected separately to the recirculating-water supply through inflow and outflow manifold pipes. Water flow to individual tanks is adjustable

Roger W. Rottmann; Donald E. Campton

1989-01-01

285

Associations of Work-Related Factors and Work Engagement with Mental and Physical Health: A 1-Year Follow-up Study Among Older Workers.  

PubMed

Purpose The goals of this study were to determine whether, among older employees, unfavourable physical and psychosocial work-related factors were associated with poorer mental and physical health and whether high work engagement buffered the associations between unfavourable work-related factors and poorer health. Methods A 1-year longitudinal study with employed persons aged 45-64 was conducted within the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (n=8,837). Using an online questionnaire, work-related factors (physical: physical load; psychosocial: psychological job demands, autonomy, and support) and work engagement were measured at baseline and health at baseline and 1-year follow-up. General linear models were used to assess associations of work-related factors and work engagement with health. Tests of interaction terms assessed whether work engagement buffered the work-related factor-health associations. Results Unfavourable psychosocial work-related factors at baseline were associated with poorer mental health at follow-up. Higher physical load, higher psychological job demands, and lower autonomy at baseline were associated with poorer physical health at follow-up. Higher work engagement at baseline was related to better physical and especially better mental health during the 1-year follow-up. Work engagement had a small effect on the associations between work-related factors and health. Conclusions Among older employees, especially the promotion of a high work engagement and, to a lesser extent, favourable work-related factors can be beneficial for mental health in particular. PMID:24928413

Leijten, Fenna R M; van den Heuvel, Swenne G; van der Beek, Allard J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Robroek, Suzan J W; Burdorf, Alex

2015-03-01

286

Notes from the field: investigation of contacts of a health care worker who worked while ill with pertussis--Maryland, August-September 2014.  

PubMed

On September 5, 2014, the public health department of a Maryland hospital was notified of a case of Bordetella pertussis infection confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a staff health care worker (HCW). The HCW experienced onset of diarrhea and malaise (nonrespiratory symptoms atypical of the catarrhal phase of pertussis) on August 26. By September 2, paroxysms of coughing led the HCW to consult a colleague, who ordered the PCR test, prescribed a 5-day course of azithromycin, and advised avoidance of patient care until treatment completion. Contrary to the hospital's infection control policy, neither the HCW nor the colleague reported the presumptive diagnosis of pertussis to the hospital's public health department. The HCW continued to work in the outpatient department until the positive PCR result was received on September 5, at which time the hospital's public health department was first notified. The hospital barred the HCW from further work at the hospital while ill, and, in collaboration with local and state public health counterparts, began a contact investigation and stratified patient and HCW contacts by level of exposure. PMID:25611170

Chu, Kasi M; Johnson, Lucas A

2015-01-23

287

On the interpretation of synchronization in EEG hyperscanning studies: a cautionary note  

PubMed Central

EEG Hyperscanning is a method for studying two or more individuals simultaneously with the objective of elucidating how co-variations in their neural activity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) are influenced by their behavioral and social interactions. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different hyper-connectivity measures using (i) simulated data, where the degree of coupling could be systematically manipulated, and (ii) individually recorded human EEG combined into pseudo-pairs of participants where no hyper-connections could exist. With simulated data we found that each of the most widely used measures of hyperconnectivity were biased and detected hyper-connections where none existed. With pseudo-pairs of human data we found spurious hyper-connections that arose because there were genuine similarities between the EEG recorded from different people independently but under the same experimental conditions. Specifically, there were systematic differences between experimental conditions in terms of the rhythmicity of the EEG that were common across participants. As any imbalance between experimental conditions in terms of stimulus presentation or movement may affect the rhythmicity of the EEG, this problem could apply in many hyperscanning contexts. Furthermore, as these spurious hyper-connections reflected real similarities between the EEGs, they were not Type-1 errors that could be overcome by some appropriate statistical control. However, some measures that have not previously been used in hyperconnectivity studies, notably the circular correlation co-efficient (CCorr), were less susceptible to detecting spurious hyper-connections of this type. The reason for this advantage in performance is discussed and the use of the CCorr as an alternative measure of hyperconnectivity is advocated. PMID:24399948

Burgess, Adrian P.

2013-01-01

288

Note on the applicability of the James-Stein estimator in regional hydrologic studies.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

By means of computer simulation studies the James-Stein estimator, subject to the Lindley modification and adoption of the positive part rule suggested by Efron and Morris and conditioned on the assumption of independence, was shown to be robust in the case of the hydrologically plausible distribution considered here, namely, Weibull distributions with coefficient of skewness ranging from 0 to 10. However, in contrast to traditional methods of regionalization the effect of cross correlation is a diminishment of the relative risk advantage of the James-Stein estimator, even in the best case of normal variables: this is discussed and illustrated. -from Authors

Landwehr, J.M.; Matalas, N.C.; Wallis, J.R.

1984-01-01

289

NOTE: Study of Gafchromic EBT film response over a large dose range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Presently Gafchromic EBT films are widely used for relative dose verification in standard radiation therapy using high-energy photons, inclusive IMRT. The use of films for dosimetry in medical ion beams is more complicated due to the strongly inhomogeneous dose deposition by ions on microscopic level. Track structure models, presently used to describe dosimeter response as a function of the ion field properties, are based on input information which can be obtained from the film response in photon beams. We therefore studied the performance of Gafchromic EBT films, ancestors of currently available EBT2 films, in 60Co photon beams. The dose-response curve was measured from 7.5 10-2 Gy to 3 104 Gy. The dynamic range, linearity and dose rate dependence of this calibration curve were studied. A high saturation dose of 3 103 Gy, and thus a large dynamic range, was observed. No signs of supralinearity and bleaching due to radiation were found. No dependence of the response on the dose rate at high dose rates and high doses was found. All those properties justify the use of simplified models of the film response to ions. Furthermore, fits of the calibration data by predictions of different models for signal creation mechanism of dosimetric materials were performed. The best description was found for the recently published gamma-distributed single-hit model which takes into account different sizes of the active centres.

Martikov, Mria; Jkel, Oliver

2010-05-01

290

Technical note: a novel geometric morphometric approach to the study of long bone shape variation.  

PubMed

Procrustes-based geometric morphometrics (GM) is most often applied to problems of craniofacial shape variation. Here, we demonstrate a novel application of GM to the analysis of whole postcranial elements in a study of 77 hominoid tibiae. We focus on two novel methodological improvements to standard GM approaches: 1) landmark configurations of tibiae including 15 epiphyseal landmarks and 483 semilandmarks along articular surfaces and muscle insertions along the tibial shaft and 2) an artificial affine transformation that sets moments along the shaft equal to the sum of the moments estimated in the other two anatomical directions. Diagrams of the principal components of tibial shapes support most differences between human and non-human primates reported previously. The artificial affine transformation proposed here results in an improved clustering of the great apes that may prove useful in future discriminant or clustering studies. Since the shape variations observed may be related to different locomotor behaviors, posture, or activity patterns, we suggest that this method be used in functional analyses of tibiae or other long bones in modern populations or fossil specimens. PMID:23124572

Frelat, Mlanie A; Katina, Stanislav; Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L

2012-12-01

291

Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees health. However, the dimensionality of the workfamily conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbachs alpha, of the workfamily conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the WorkFamily Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women. PMID:24639612

SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

2014-01-01

292

Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics.  

PubMed

In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results. PMID:24387484

Veda Prakash, G; Kumar, R; Patel, J; Saurabh, K; Shyam, A

2013-12-01

293

Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

2013-12-01

294

Assessment of a manipulator device for NOTES with basic surgical skill tests: a bench study.  

PubMed

Advanced complex surgery performed with the natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery technique requires use of a multitasking platform. The aim of this study is to evaluate the basic functionality of a prototype multitasking platform "EndoSAMURAI" with the use of a biosimulation model and ex vivo porcine stomach. We compared the performance of basic surgical skill tasks between the EndoSAMURAI and standard laparoscopic instrumentation. Basic surgical tasks include cutting, dissection, and suturing and knot tying. Main outcome measurements were the time to complete each task and leak pressure to evaluate the quality of the suturing and knot tying. Although it took longer to perform all basic surgical tasks with the EndoSAMURAI than with laparoscopic instrumentation, all tasks could be performed precisely and with an accuracy comparable to that of the laparoscopic technique. Leak pressures of the gastric closure site between both techniques were also comparable. PMID:24710223

Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Tajiri, Hisao

2014-10-01

295

Orienting the Work-Based Curriculum Towards Work Process Knowledge: A Rationale and a German Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term 'work process knowledge' refers to the knowledge needed for working in flexible and innovative business environments, including those in which information and communication technologies have been introduced to integrate previously separated production functions. It involves a systems-level understanding of the work process in the

Boreham, Nick

2004-01-01

296

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the

Applebaum, Herbert

297

A Descriptive Study of Commuter Students at the University of South Carolina, Fall 1974. Research Notes No. 25-75.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the fall of 1974, a questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 700 off-campus students at the main campus of the University of South Carolina who were enrolled in nine or more semester hours of course work (approximately 8 percent of the population). The goal of the study was to describe off-campus students including their

Thrift, Julianne Still; Fidler, Paul P.

298

The Burgers equations as a first step towards the study of the incompressible flows (Lecture notes, in spanish)  

E-print Network

In this lecture notes we present the equations and the physics involved in the dynamic of incompressible fluids. We present the mathematical techniques needed in order to prove the existence and uniqueness result for the case where we consider Burgers equation. We also explain an useful numerical method when dealing with this kind of equations. These lecture notes were written for the 2010 JAE-Intro Summer School. This Summer School was organized by ICMAT-CSIC and takes place in Madrid.

Rafael Granero Belinchon; Jose Manuel Moreno Valderrama

2011-05-30

299

Social Consequences of Nomadic Working: A Case Study in an Organization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research study identified social challenges that knowledge workers in the Swedish organization TeliaSonera (Telia) face when utilizing wireless technologies to conduct work on the move. Upon collecting the relevant research data, five problem areas were identified: work and life balance, addiction, organizational involvement, nomadic work and control, and individual productivity. Each problem area was examined with the philosophical underpinning of socio-technical design principles. The results confirm that better role boundary management, self-discipline, work negotiation, and e-mail communication skills may be required for the knowledge workers to manage the demands of nomadic working. Similarly, rewarding nomadic work performance, building employee supervisor trust relations, and designing jobs that enhance work and life balance can be imperative.

Singh, Ramanjit; Wood-Harper, Trevor

300

NOTE: Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%.

Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

2006-04-01

301

Technical notes: A detailed study for the provision of measurement uncertainty and traceability for goniospectrometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement uncertainty and traceability of the Finnish Geodetic Institutess field gonio-spectro-polarimeter FIGIFIGO have been assessed. First, the reference standard (Spectralon sample) was measured at the National Standard Laboratory of MIKES-Aalto. This standard was transferred to FGIs field reference standard (larger Spectralon sample), and from that to the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), reference standards (1 m2 plates). The reflectance measurement uncertainty of FIGIFIGO has been estimated to be 0.01 in ideal laboratory conditions, but about 0.02-0.05 in typical field conditions, larger at larger solar or observation zenith angles. Target specific uncertainties can increase total uncertainty even to 0.1-0.2. The angular reading uncertainty is between 1 and 3, depending on user selection, and the polarisation uncertainty is around 0.01. For UAV, the transferred reflectance uncertainty is about 0.05-0.1, depending on, how ideal the measurement conditions are. The design concept of FIGIFIGO has been proved to have a number of advantages, such as a well-adopted user-friendly interface, a high level of automation and excellent suitability for the field measurements. It is a perfect instrument for collection of reference data on a given target in natural (and well-recorded) conditions. In addition to the strong points of FIGIFIGO, the current study reveals several issues that need further attention, such as the field of view, illumination quality, polarisation calibration, Spectralon reflectance and polarisation properties in the 1000-2400 nm range.

Peltoniemi, Jouni I.; Hakala, Teemu; Suomalainen, Juha; Honkavaara, Eija; Markelin, Lauri; Gritsevich, Maria; Eskelinen, Juho; Jaanson, Priit; Ikonen, Erkki

2014-10-01

302

Work Time Control and Sleep Disturbances: Prospective Cohort Study of Finnish Public Sector Employees  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Employee control over work times has been associated with favorable psychosocial and health-related outcomes, but the evidence regarding sleep quality remains inconclusive. We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between work time control and sleep disturbances in a large working population, taking into account total hours worked. Methods: The data were from a full-panel longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work time control and sleep disturbances in years 2000-2001, 2004-2005, 2008-2009, and 2012. The analysis of cross-sectional associations was based on 129,286 person measurements from 68,089 participants (77% women) aged 17-73 years (mean 43.1). Data from 16,503 participants were used in the longitudinal analysis. Log-binomial regression analysis with the generalized estimating equations method was used. Results: Consistently in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, less control over work time was associated with greater sleep disturbances in the total population and among those working normal 40-hour weeks. Among participants working more than 40 hours a week, work time that was both very high (cross-sectional prevalence ratio compared to intermediate work time control [PR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.65) and very low (PR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.39) was associated with sleep disturbances, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: These data suggest that having few opportunities to influence the duration and positioning of work time may increase the risk of sleep disturbances among employees. For persons working long hours, very high levels of control over working times were also associated with increased risk of sleep disturbances. Citation: Salo P, Ala-Mursula L, Rod NH, Tucker P, Pentti J, Kivimki M, Vahtera J. Work time control and sleep disturbances: prospective cohort study of Finnish public sector employees. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1217-1225. PMID:25061250

Salo, Paula; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Tucker, Philip; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

2014-01-01

303

Technical Note: On the Use of Nudging for Aerosol-Climate Model Intercomparison Studies  

SciTech Connect

Nudging is an assimilation technique widely used in the development and evaluation of climate models. Con- straining the simulated wind and temperature fields using global weather reanalysis facilitates more straightforward comparison between simulation and observation, and reduces uncertainties associated with natural variabilities of the large-scale circulation. On the other hand, the artificial forcing introduced by nudging can be strong enough to change the basic characteristics of the model climate. In the paper we show that for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, due to the systematic temperature bias in the standard model and the relatively strong sensitivity of homogeneous ice nucleation to aerosol concentration, nudging towards reanalysis results in substantial reductions in the ice cloud amount and the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on longwave cloud forcing. In order to reduce discrepancies between the nudged and unconstrained simulations and meanwhile take the advantages of nudging, two alternative experimentation methods are evaluated. The first one constrains only the horizontal winds. The second method nudges both winds and temperature, but replaces the long-term climatology of the reanalysis by that of the model. Results show that both methods lead to substantially improved agreement with the free-running model in terms of the top-of-atmosphere radiation budget and cloud ice amount. The wind-only nudging is more convenient to apply, and provides higher correlations of the wind fields, geopotential height and specific humidity between simulation and reanalysis. This suggests that nudging the horizontal winds but not temperature is a good strategy, especially for studies that involve both warm and cold clouds.

Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Kooperman, G. J.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.

2014-08-26

304

Editor's Note.  

PubMed

The Research Article "A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus" by F. Wolfe-Simon et al., published online 2 December 2010, was the subject of extensive discussion and criticism following its online publication. Science received a wide range of correspondence that raised specific concerns about the Research Article's methods and interpretations. Eight Technical Comments that represent the main concerns, as well as a Technical Response by Wolfe-Simon et al., are published online in Science Express at the addresses listed in this note. They have been peer-reviewed and revised according to Science's standard procedure. PMID:21622710

Alberts, Bruce

2011-05-27

305

Optics Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

OpticsNotes.com was created for engineers, scientists, technicians, students, and others to find resources, references, and tutorial information available about Optics and Photonics on the Web. This deliberately graphic free site is simple to use and offers an abundant amount of great information on a unique subject. Users can choose from several links that include optics fundamentals, design, components, manufacture, applications, reference, and industry. Other quick links are provided, such as a dictionary, formulas, standards, newsgroups, and more, making this an overall great resource for all you optics lovers out there.

306

Linux Notes Fall 2011 Linux Notes  

E-print Network

Linux Notes Fall 2011 Linux Notes Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and that uses in which the user types commands. The important thing to note about any of these window managers). #12;Linux Notes Fall 2011 Command Description Files/Directories ls list contents of current directory

Gousie, Michael B.

307

Notes for Math 450 Lecture Notes 3  

E-print Network

Notes for Math 450 Lecture Notes 3 Renato Feres 1 Moments of Random Variables We introduce some of the proposition was already mentioned in the second set of lecture notes. 1.2 Expectation The most basic parameter of notes. (You do not need to know about the Lebesgue integral. We are only using the notation.) So we

Feres, Renato

308

Linux Notes Spring 2014 Linux Notes  

E-print Network

Linux Notes Spring 2014 Linux Notes Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and that uses to note about any of these window managers is that you can set up any one you wish, and customize/directory names. Most commands have options that are added starting with a ­ (see ls below). #12;Linux Notes

Gousie, Michael B.

309

Linux Notes Fall 2013 Linux Notes  

E-print Network

Linux Notes Fall 2013 Linux Notes Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and that uses. The important thing to note about any of these window managers is that you can set up any one you wish starting with a ­ (see ls below). #12;Linux Notes Fall 2013 Command Description Files/Directories ls list

Gousie, Michael B.

310

Low back pain patients' experiences of work modifications; a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Research indicates that work modifications can reduce sickness absence and work disability due to low back pain. However, there are few studies that have described modified work from the perspective of patients. A greater understanding of their experiences may inform future workplace management of employees with this condition. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Data was analysed thematically. Results Many participants had made their own work modifications, which were guided by the extent of control they had over their hours and duties, colleague support, and their own beliefs and attitudes about working with back pain. A minority of the participants had received advice or support with work modifications through occupational health. Access to these services was limited and usually followed lengthy sickness absence. Implementation largely rested with the manager and over-cautious approaches were common. Conclusions There was little evidence of compliance with occupational health guidance on modified work. There appears to be insufficient expertise among managers and occupational health in modifying work for employees with low back pain and little indication of joint planning. On the whole, workers make their own modifications, or arrange them informally with their manager and colleagues, but remain concerned about working with back pain. More effective and appropriate application of modifications may increase employees' confidence in their ability to work. PMID:21134248

2010-01-01

311

Procedures for using the Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs The Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs function has been created to allow departments to  

E-print Network

Procedures for using the Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs The Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs function has been created to allow departments to maintain supervisor information for hourly paid work-study students. Work-Study jobs have an assigned supervisor when they are created

Guenther, Frank

312

Using exit surveys to assess counterproductive work behaviors: a case study.  

PubMed

Summary.-Counterproductive work behaviors are notoriously difficult to measure in applied settings. As a result, many organizations are unable to reliably evaluate the frequency and antecedents of these behaviors. Exit surveys provide a unique opportunity for measuring potentially sensitive organizational issues but have yet to be widely adopted for measuring counterproductive work behaviors. The present paper describes a case study in which an exit survey was designed to study counterproductive work behaviors in a large telecommunications company. The results of this study suggest that a similar methodology may be beneficial for other organizations looking to better understand and manage these potentially damaging behaviors. PMID:25650640

Pecker, Gabriela; Fine, Saul

2015-02-01

313

A statistical study on temporary work and occupational accidents: Specific risk factors and risk management strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temporary work, supplied by temporary-help agencies and sometimes referred to as job in leasing, was only recently introduced in Italy, and has since spread considerably thanks to its flexibility and cost effectiveness. In this study, trends in the rates of occupational injuries in different sectors of Italian industries in the period 20002004 are explored, contrasting direct employment and temporary work.

Bruno Fabiano; Fabio Curr; Andrea P. Reverberi; Renato Pastorino

2008-01-01

314

Mood, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate at Work: An Experience-Sampling Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a study that examined the distinctiveness of momentary positive and negative affect (PA and NA) and their relationships with blood pressure and heart rate at work in a sample of 67 full-time employees who provided psychological and physiological measurements multiple times a day, over 10 working days. These employees recorded their subjective ratings on personal digital assistant devices

Remus Ilies; Nikos Dimotakis; David Watson

2010-01-01

315

Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

2008-01-01

316

Viewing work historically through art : Incorporating the visual arts into organizational studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose To contemplate how the arts might inform organizational studies by investigating how historically based visual art images contribute to an understanding of workers' experiences during the Depression era (1930-1941) in the USA. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Inductively looked for patterns among collected visual art images pertaining to work during the Depression era to establish narratives about how workers experienced work.

Elizabeth M. Doherty

2006-01-01

317

Stability and Change in Work Values: A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A meta-analysis of longitudinal studies was conducted to investigate stability and change in work values across the life span. Both rank-order stability and mean-level change were investigated using an integrative classification for intrinsic, extrinsic, social and status work values (Ross, Schwartz, & Surkis, 1999). Results of rank-order

Jin, Jing; Rounds, James

2012-01-01

318

The Study of Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Its Design, Efficiency, and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, a Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work paradigm is proposed. Recently, multitouch technology has become widely available for human-computer interaction. We found it has great potential to facilitate more awareness of human-to-human interaction than personal computers (PCs) in colocated collaborative work. However, other

Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han

2012-01-01

319

WORK-LIFE BALANCE IN THE TOURISM INDUSTRY: A CASE STUDY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the key issues surrounding the debate over work-life balance. It provides an overview of current thinking in the general work environment, with specific focus into the issue within the tourism industry. The paper presents a case study of a five star hotel that attempts to address issues of employee dissatisfaction and included in these issues are embryonic

Margaret Deery; Leo Jago; Michael Stewart

320

Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and

LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

2013-01-01

321

An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic

Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

2013-01-01

322

Stressful Work, Psychological Job Strain, and Turnover: A 2Year Prospective Cohort Study of Truck Drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a model that combines existing organizational stress theory and job transition theory, this 2-year longitudinal study examined antecedents and consequences of turnover among Dutch truck drivers. For this purpose, self-reported data on stressful work (job demands and control), psychological strain (need for recovery after work and fatigue), and turnover were obtained from 820 drivers in 1998 and 2000.

Einar M. de Croon; Judith K. Sluiter; Roland W. B. Blonk; Jake P. J. Broersen; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2004-01-01

323

School Culture: A Validation Study and Exploration of Its Relationship with Teachers' Work Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was aimed at exploring the relationship between school culture and teachers' work environment and further exploring the roles of school culture, teachers' efficacy, beliefs, and behaviors for character education, and teachers' work environment in the relationship between a character education intervention and

Guo, Ping

2012-01-01

324

Intercultural Competence in Work: A Case Study in Eastern Finnish Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the research results of a study that focused on intercultural interaction issues in private sector workplaces in Eastern Finland. The results show that the current challenges caused by the globalisation pressures in the realm of economics behoves work communities to review their personnel training and management practices: the work communities as a whole should be helped to

Pirkko Pitknen

2007-01-01

325

A comparative study of Work and Family Conflict in Norwegian and Indian Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the gender and cultural differences experienced in the work-family conflict (WFC) by Norwegian and Indian doctors and nurses. Do Norwegian and Indian doctors and nurses experience a similar or different type of work-family conflict for their respective gender? Our sample consisted of 27 doctors and 328 nurses from Norway, as well as 111 doctors and 136 nurses

Suchitra Pal; Per ystein Saksvik

2006-01-01

326

Clusters of Occupations Based on Systematically Derived Work Dimensions: An Exploratory Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explored the feasibility of deriving an educationally relevant occupational cluster structure based on Occupational Analysis Inventory (OAI) work dimensions. A hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to the factor score profiles of 814 occupations on 22 higher-order OAI work dimensions. From that analysis, 73 occupational clusters were

Cunningham, J. W.; And Others

327

The Impact of Work Stressors on the Life Satisfaction of Social Service Workers: A Preliminary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past several decades, there has been an increase in the number of studies that have examined the impact of the work environment on social service employees. Much of this research has focused on how the work environment helps shape the job satisfaction, job stress, and burnout of workers. Very little research has been conducted on the impact of

Sudershan Pasupuleti; Reva I. Allen; Eric G. Lambert; Terry Cluse-Tolar

2009-01-01

328

MSU America Reads*America Counts Tutor (Volunteer and Work-Study)  

E-print Network

MSU America Reads*America Counts Tutor (Volunteer and Work-Study) Position Description The Office experiences in the Bozeman area community. OAE administers and oversees the MSU America Reads* America Counts. The MSU America Reads*America Counts tutors are responsible for working with the students to whom

Lawrence, Rick L.

329

Strategies for Research Development in Hospital Social Work: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This article identifies salient components in the advancement of social work research leadership within health care. Method: Using tenets of a modified retrospective case study approach, processes and outcomes of social work research progression at a pediatric hospital are reviewed. Results: Capacity-building processes were

McNeill, Ted; Nicholas, David Bruce

2012-01-01

330

A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job

Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

2012-01-01

331

SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours-45 credits of classroom work and 18 credits of  

E-print Network

SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours- 45 credits the program. The Master's of Social Work Program is designed for people who are interested in entering the social work profession at an advanced professional level and for people currently in the profession who

Thomas, Andrew

332

Notes on Linguistics, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1990. Articles in the four issues include: "The Indians Do Say Ugh-Ugh" (Howard W. Law); "Constraints of Relevance, A Key to Particle Typology" (Regina Blass); "Whatever Happened to Me? (An Objective Case Study)" (Aretta Loving); "Stop Me and Buy One (For $5...)"

Notes on Linguistics, 1990

1990-01-01

333

Application Note for protein  

E-print Network

Application Note Dynabeads® for protein complex isolation Studying the way proteins function and interact is an exciting area of research. By looking at protein structures, researchers can identify how cofactors and other molecules influence enzymatic or protein activity. Isolating complete protein complexes

Lebendiker, Mario

334

Notes on Instructional Cross-Media Comparisons. A Working Paper Written by Wilbur Schramm and a Committee, and Bearing Some Sign of Its Authorship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instructional cross-media experiments are difficult to design because they involve complex instructional systems which include variables that are hard to control. Strict controls can be approached in the laboratory setting, but as the experimenter moves from the laboratory to the field study, especially in developing countries, concessions to

Schramm, Wilbur

335

Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP). This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses' knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment. PMID:25548662

Becker, Kathleen

2014-01-01

336

A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs British  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings For both the Taiwanese and

Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao; Mao-Ting Huang

2006-01-01

337

A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose - The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings - For both the Taiwanese and

British Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao

338

An Introduction to the Work (and Play) of Writing Studies Research Methods through Micro Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the benefits and challenges involved with assigning small-scale research projects in one research methods class as means of introducing new(er) researchers to the work and rewards of empirical writing research. The following discussion does not claim to offer examples of cutting-edge methodological work. That is not our goal

Aiken, Suzan; Beard, Emily J.; McClure, David R. E.; Nickoson, Lee

2013-01-01

339

Nurses' perceptions of the working environment: a UK independent sector study.  

PubMed

The working environment is an important determinant of employee well-being. Previous UK studies report registered nurses' perception of the working environment using the Work Environment Scale (WES), but surprisingly few include data for nurses working in mental health or learning disability settings. One hundred and sixty-one (58.8%) registered nurses working day shifts in five specialist divisions (forensic adult mental health, adolescent mental health, elderly continuing care, adult and adolescent learning disability and brain injury rehabilitation) of a large charitable hospital comprising mostly secure (i.e. 'locked') wards completed the WES. Nurses working in separate clinical divisions differed only on the 'physical comfort' subscale. These results are discussed in the context of previous UK research: this sample of nurses scored differently on a number of subscales, with the working environment characterized by relatively high levels of support, cohesion and managerial control and slightly lower levels of autonomy. It is unclear whether the differences reflect the organizational (i.e. non-NHS) context, or a secure environment effect. Previous studies of mental health nurses are now 10 years old and we present data that may provide a benchmark of perceptions of the working environment held by nurses working in mental health and learning disability settings. PMID:15876236

Dickens, G; Sugarman, P; Rogers, G

2005-06-01

340

Environmental Studies - Class Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of four units (chapters) focusing on evolution (chapter I), civilization of man (chapter II), ecological concepts (chapter III), and limnological concepts (Chapter IV). Each chapter contains "text material" on the topic indicated. In addition: (1) a list of key vocabulary words, questions, reading list, and questions related

Canipe, Stephen L.

341

Nuer Field Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The complicated process of creating meaningful field notes is a problem that vexes many scholars who rely on these important primary documents, including anthropologists, geographers, and sociologists. Currently, there aren't many websites that feature digital archives of fieldnotes, but this joint project undertaken by Indiana University and the University of Michigan is one step in the right direction. The essential goal of the project is to make the linguistic field notes recorded by Eleanor Vandevort (a missionary and researcher) in the South Sudan between 1949 and 1963 available on the web. The digital archive succeeds mightily, as it includes the linguistic field notes, and also photographs from her work there, various letters from the field, and a biographical sketch of her work there in the South Sudan. Along with these materials, visitors can read Vandevort's book about her time in Africa, titled _A Leopard Tamed_ and some fine essays on the history of colonial and missionary linguistics in the Sudan by Edward Miner.

342

Does Brain-Training Make You Smarter? Evidence from Working Memory Training Studies  

E-print Network

Does Brain-Training Make You Smarter? Evidence from Working Memory Training Studies Guest Lecture by Claudia von Bastian Psychology & Neuroscience be improved through cognitive training? This question is still highly controversial

Rose, Michael R.

343

Some Working Parameters and Energy Use in a Pistachio Nut Processing Plant: A Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was performed with the objective to investigate the work process, work capacity, work effectiveness, energy consumption and labor force requirements of basic units such as washing, dehulling, sorting, separating, roasting and packing in a pistachio processing plant which has been mechanized in the last years. As a result of this study, the work capacity in washing, sorting, breaking, drying, separating units was found to be 1.5, 1.5, 2, 1, 1.6 t h-1, respectively. The work effectiveness in sorting and breaking units was found to be 95% and that of separating unit was 99%. The total energy consumption of the units was found to be 20.42 kW h-1 and the total labor force requirement was found to be five workers.

Polat, Refik; Erol Ak, Bekir; Acar, Izzet

344

How Does the New TANF Work Requirement "Work" in Rural Minority Communities? A Case Study of the Northern Cheyenne Nation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In August of 1996 Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), which President Bill Clinton then signed into law. This essay will address the question, how have American Indian reservation residents fared in relation to the new work requirements? The authors are interested in the consequences of

Whiting, Erin Feinauer; Ward, Carol; Villa, Rita Hiwalker; Davis, Judith

2005-01-01

345

Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

2011-01-01

346

Emerging Themes on the Efficacy of Ballet Barre Work and Its Connection to Center Work: An Investigatory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the efficacy of traditional ballet barre exercises in relation to student learning and performance in technique class essentially is non-existent. This research explored how students described their experiences with barre work as well as how they saw these experiences as developing desired skills for moving in the center work.

Martinell, Nicole Antonette

2009-01-01

347

Working Girls: Abuse or Choice in Street-Level Sex Work? A Study of Homeless Women in Nottingham  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryThis paper uses fifteen indices of abuse and a definition of coercion as constraint, restraint, compulsion; the application of force to control the action of a voluntary agent (OED Online, 2006) to explore how homeless women understand their choice to sex work. Twenty-six homeless women were interviewed, nine of whom had sex worked. A structured, qualitative questionnaire was used in

Rachel Harding; Paul Hamilton

2009-01-01

348

The impact of engaging leadership on performance, attitudes to work and wellbeing at work : A longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between quality of leadership and attitudes to work and a sense of wellbeing at work, and organizational performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach This is a longitudinal empirical investigation, using quantitative methods. Findings The findings were fourfold: the leadership instrument used was demonstrated to have convergent, discriminant and predictive validity;

Beverly Alimo-Metcalfe; John Alban-Metcalfe; Margaret Bradley; Jeevi Mariathasan; Chiara Samele

2008-01-01

349

The effects of improving hospital physicians working conditions on patient care: a prospective, controlled intervention study  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians, particularly in hospitals, suffer from adverse working conditions. There is a close link between physicians psychosocial work environment and the quality of the work they deliver. Our study aimed to explore whether a participatory work-design intervention involving hospital physicians is effective in improving working conditions and quality of patient care. Methods A prospective, controlled intervention study was conducted in two surgical and two internal departments. Participants were 57 hospital physicians and 1581 inpatients. The intervention was a structured, participatory intervention based on continuous group meetings. Physicians actively analyzed problematic working conditions, developed solutions, and initiated their implementation. Physicians working conditions and patients perceived quality of care were outcome criteria. These variables were assessed by standardized questionnaires. Additional data on implementation status were gathered through interviews. Results Over the course of ten months, several work-related problems were identified, categorized, and ten solutions were implemented. Post-intervention, physicians in the intervention departments reported substantially less conflicting demands and enhanced quality of cooperation with patients relatives, compared to control group physicians. Moreover, positive changes in enhanced colleague support could be attributed to the intervention. Regarding patient reports of care quality of care, patient ratings of physicians organization of care improved for physicians in the intervention group. Five interviews with involved physicians confirm the plausibility of obtained results, provide information on implementation status and sustainability of the solutions, and highlight process-related factors for re-design interventions to improve hospital physicians work. Conclusions This study demonstrates that participatory work design for hospital physicians is a promising intervention for improving working conditions and promoting patient quality of care. PMID:24103290

2013-01-01

350

Work resumption at the price of distrust: a qualitative study on return to work legislation in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background Return to work (RTW) after sick leave is considered necessary to support the employees health. Cooperation between employees and employers may encourage employees RTW, but is hampered by bottlenecks that we do not completely understand. Dutch legislation means to support this cooperation and allows trying RTW during two years. The Resource Dependence Institutional Cooperation (RDIC) model has been developed for studying cooperation in public health. Study aims were to get insight into the degree of cooperation between Dutch sick-listed employees and employers, how this (lack of) cooperation can be understood, and how valid the RDIC model is for understanding this (lack of) cooperation. Methods This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 8 employees and 8 employers. Employees reported sick for 1.5-20months for various reasons. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach and pattern matching. Results Cooperation was lacking early during sick leave. Later on there were regular meetings, but employers decided about RTW without consulting the employees. Particularly employers were motivated to cooperate during the first year, while employees were especially motivated during the second. This could be understood by experienced dependence; employees (first year) and employers (secondyear) did not consider cooperation to be important for achieving medical recovery (employees) or RTW (employers). These divergent goals may be understood by personal norms about the timing of medical recovery and RTW. Legislation was particularly effective regarding employer behaviour in year 1 and employee behaviour in year 2. Employees distrusted their employers during the first year, while employers reported to distrust the employees during the secondyear. Besides, employees and employers experienced a moderate ability to cooperate. This could be understood particularly by having moderate knowledge about legislation. The RDIC model appeared to be valid to understand the cases studied, but the additional factor distrust also played a role. Conclusions Legislation appeared to support cooperation, but awareness of a mutual dependence, trust, knowledge about the legislation and personal norms regarding recovery and RTW are also important. Professionals such as occupational physicians should support this to attain a degree of cooperation that is necessary for effective RTW. PMID:23421974

2013-01-01

351

Schools at Work in 48 States: A Study of Elementary School Practices. Bulletin, 1952, No. 13  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Schools at Work in 48 States" is a record of a cooperative study made over a period of two and a half years by nine staff members of the elementary school section of the Office of Education, with the advice and help of their co-workers. Such a study requires that the group of persons working together arrive at some commonly accepted principles of

Bathurst, Effie, G.; Blough, Glenn O.

1952-01-01

352

Methods for recruiting white, black, and hispanic working-class women and men to a study of physical and social hazards at work: the United for Health study.  

PubMed

Despite research on work and health having a long-standing concern about unjust exposures and inequitable burdens of disease, there are few studies that document the joint distribution and health effects of physical and psychosocial hazards (e.g., noise, dusts, fumes, and job strain) and social hazards (e.g., racial discrimination and gender harassment) encountered at work. Also, there is a paucity of data on how these exposures, singly and combined, are distributed in relation to sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, and nativity. This article presents a conceptual model for redressing these knowledge gaps and describes recruitment strategies and the characteristics of study participants in the United for Health study. Working with labor unions, the authors recruited 14 (67%) of 21 worksites from manufacturing, meat processing, retail, and transportation, and 1,282 workers (72% response rate), of whom 62 percent were men, 36 percent were women, 39 percent were black, 23 percent were Hispanic, 25 percent were white, 31% earned less than a living wage, 40 percent were below the poverty level, and 23 percent had less than a high school education. PMID:17436989

Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Hartman, Cathy; Quinn, Margaret M; Stoddard, Anne M; Krieger, Nancy

2007-01-01

353

Combined Study and Work Paths in VET: Policy Implications and Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated ways in which Australian vocational education and training (VET) students in the 1990s combined study and work to prepare for future long-term career paths. The study was conducted throughout 1998 in three technical and further education (TAFE) institutes in three states, using the following methods: a survey of about 1,400

Dwyer, Peter; Harwood, Aramiha; Costin, Glen; Landy, Mark; Towsty, Lidia; Wyn, Johanna

354

StudyWorks! A Model Project Establishing a Coalition between Two Diverse Groups of Exceptional Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The StudyWorks Project was a 1-year unit of study designed for implementation with gifted/talented (G/T) students and developmentally handicapped (DH) students. The project involved four major areas of study (economic development, career education, social/interpersonal skills, and health/nutrition) and provided practical application of these areas

Metzger, Rebecca Griffeth

355

Research Excellence Framework: Impact pilot exercise Example case studies from Social Work and Social Policy  

E-print Network

1 Research Excellence Framework: Impact pilot exercise Example case studies from Social Work and Social Policy November 2010 Introduction 1. This document provides some examples of case studies the highest-scoring case studies submitted to the pilot, to show a range of types of impacts that were

Crowther, Paul

356

Nonlinear Politics PerceptionsWork Outcomes Relationships: A Three-Study, Five-Sample Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research reports the findings of three studies (involving a total of five samples) developed to explore the nonlinear relationships of organizational politics perceptions with practically and theoretically relevant work outcomes. Study 1 hypothesized a nonlinear relationship between organizational politics perceptions and job satisfaction. In Sample 1 of this study, a nonlinear relationship was identified, best depicted as an inverted-U

Wayne A. Hochwarter; Gerald R. Ferris; Mary Dana Laird; Darren C. Treadway; Vickie Coleman Gallagher

2010-01-01

357

An epidemiological study of the magnitude and consequences of work related violence: the Minnesota Nurses' Study  

PubMed Central

Aims: To identify the magnitude of and potential risk factors for violence within a major occupational population. Methods: Comprehensive surveys were sent to 6300 Minnesota licensed registered (RNs) and practical (LPNs) nurses to collect data on physical and non-physical violence for the prior 12 months. Re-weighting enabled adjustment for potential biases associated with non-response, accounting for unknown eligibility. Results: From the 78% responding, combined with non-response rate information, respective adjusted rates per 100 persons per year (95% CI) for physical and non-physical violence were 13.2 (12.2 to 14.3) and 38.8 (37.4 to 40.4); assault rates were increased, respectively, for LPNs versus RNs (16.4 and 12.0) and males versus females (19.4 and 12.9). Perpetrators of physical and non-physical events were patients/clients (97% and 67%, respectively). Consequences appeared greater for non-physical than physical violence. Multivariate modelling identified increased rates for both physical and non-physical violence for working: in a nursing home/long term care facility; in intensive care, psychiatric/behavioural or emergency departments; and with geriatric patients. Conclusions: Results show that non-fatal physical assault and non-physical forms of violence, and relevant consequences, are frequent among both RNs and LPNs; such violence is mostly perpetrated by patients or clients; and certain environmental factors appear to affect the risk of violence. This serves as the basis for further analytical studies that can enable the development of appropriate prevention and control efforts. PMID:15150388

Gerberich, S; Church, T; McGovern, P; Hansen, H; Nachreiner, N; Geisser, M; Ryan, A; Mongin, S; Watt, G

2004-01-01

358

Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study  

PubMed Central

Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59) and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38), and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99). In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over ones job is likely to help prevent early retirement due to disability. PMID:22537302

2012-01-01

359

Project Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

School Science Review, 1977

1977-01-01

360

Working Memory and Parent-Rated Components of Attention in Middle Childhood: A Behavioral Genetic Study  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the current study was to investigate potential genetic and environmental correlations between working memory and three behavioral aspects of the attention network (i.e., executive, alerting, and orienting) using a twin design. Data were from 90 monozygotic (39% male) and 112 same-sex dizygotic (41% male) twins. Individual differences in working memory performance (digit span) and parent-rated measures of executive, alerting, and orienting attention included modest to moderate genetic variance, modest shared environmental variance, and modest to moderate nonshared environmental variance. As hypothesized, working memory performance was correlated with executive and alerting attention, but not orienting attention. The correlation between working memory, executive attention, and alerting attention was completely accounted for by overlapping genetic covariance, suggesting a common genetic mechanism or mechanisms underlying the links between working memory and certain parent-rated indicators of attentive behavior. PMID:21948215

Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Cutting, Laurie; Thompson, Lee A.; Petrill, Stephen A.

2012-01-01

361

The Influence of Practice Standards on Massage Therapists Work Experience: A Phenomenological Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a one size fits all categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy. PMID:21589709

Fortune, Luann D.; Gillespie, Elena

2010-01-01

362

Psychosocial factors at work and sickness absence in the Gazel cohort: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To test whether psychosocial factors at work are predictors of rates of sickness absence. METHODS: The study population consisted of middle aged men and women employed by the French national electricity and gas company (EDF-GDF) in various occupations and followed up since 1989 by annual self administered questionnaires and independent data obtained from the medical and personnel departments of EDF-GDF. The 1995 questionnaire provided information about three psychosocial work factors: psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support at work. Sick-ness absence data were provided by the company's social security department. The occurrence of spells and days of absence in the 12 months after completion of the 1995 questionnaire was studied. Potential confounding variables were age, smoking, alcohol, and marital status, assessed in the 1995 questionnaire, and educational level and occupation, assessed from data provided by the personnel department. This study was restricted to the 12,555 subjects of the initial cohort who were still working and answered the self administered questionnaire in 1995. RESULTS: Low levels of decision latitude were associated with more frequent and longer sickness absences among men and women. Low levels of social support at work increased the numbers of spells and days of absence among men only. These associations weakened after adjustment for potential confounding factors, but remained significant. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that psychosocial factors at work, especially decision latitude, are predictive of sickness absence. PMID:9924449

Niedhammer, I.; Bugel, I.; Goldberg, M.; Leclerc, A.; Gueguen, A.

1998-01-01

363

Fulfillment of WorkLife Balance From the Organizational Perspective: A Case Study  

PubMed Central

Context: Researchers studying worklife balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. Objective: To investigate what factors influence worklife balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Results: Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages worklife balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. Conclusions: The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for worklife balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance. PMID:24067152

Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

2013-01-01

364

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work factors that predict the level of psychological distress in nurses' aides. Methods The sample of this prospective study comprised 5076 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4076 (80.3 %) completed a second questionnaire 15 months later. A wide spectrum of physical, psychological, social, and organisational work factors were measured at baseline. Psychological distress (anxiety and depression) was assessed at baseline and follow-up by the SCL-5, a short version of Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Results In a linear regression model of the level of psychological distress at follow-up, with baseline level of psychological distress, work factors, and background factors as independent variables, work factors explained 2 % and baseline psychological distress explained 34 % of the variance. Exposures to role conflicts, exposures to threats and violence, working in apartment units for the aged, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that were reported to result in less support and encouragement were positively associated with the level of psychological distress. Working in psychiatric departments, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that gave lower work pace were negatively associated with psychological distress. Conclusion The study suggests that work factors explain only a modest part of the psychological distress in nurses' aides. Exposures to role conflicts and threats and violence at work may contribute to psychological distress in nurses' aides. It is important that protective measures against violent patients are implemented, and that occupational health officers offer victims of violence appropriate support or therapy. It is also important that health service organisations focus on reducing role conflicts, and that leaders listen to and consider the views of the staff. PMID:17132172

Eriksen, Willy; Tambs, Kristian; Knardahl, Stein

2006-01-01

365

The relationship between transformational leadership and work engagement in governmental hospitals nurses: a survey study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of transformational leadership and its components on work engagement among hospital nurses. There are a few set of researches that have focused on the effects of transformational leadership on work engagement in nurses. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. In this study, 240 nurses have been chosen by stratified random sampling method which filled related self-reported scales include multifactor leadership questionnaire (MLQ) and work engagement scale. Data analysis has been exerted according to the statistical method of simple and multiple correlation coefficients. Findings indicated that the effect of this type of leadership on work engagement and its facets is positive and significant. In addition, the research illustrates that transformational leaders transfer their enthusiasm and high power to their subordinates by the way of modeling. This manner can increase the power as a component of work engagement in workers. Idealized influence among these leaders can result in forming a specific belief among employees toward those leaders and leaders can easily transmit their inspirational motivation to them. Consequently, it leads to make a positive vision by which, and by setting high standards, challenges the employees and establishes zeal along with optimism for attaining success in works. regarding to the results we will expand leadership and work engagement literature in hospital nurses. Also, we conclude with theoretical and practical implications and propose a clear horizon for future researches. PMID:24455469

Hayati, Davood; Charkhabi, Morteza; Naami, Abdolzahra

2014-01-14

366

Difficulties with multitasking on return to work after TBI: a critical case study.  

PubMed

Work performance research highlights that psychometric cognitive measures and cognitive component information processing measures are strong predictors of success in multitasking work environments [14]. People with a mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) returning to a job requiring multitasking, may have difficulty succeeding despite pre-morbid equivalent cognitive scores. A critical case study is presented to begin to determine what aspects of information processing contribute to difficulties in multitasking work performance, for people with a TBI. The Perceive Recall Plan and Perform (PRPP) System of Task Analysis: Workplace Interview (i.e. PRPP@WORK) is used with the employer to obtain information processing scores. Results indicate substantial information processing deficits were perceived by the employer for the employee with a TBI. Future larger studies of people with a TBI who return to work that requires multitasking are needed to more clearly indicate: the level of multitasking they perform; what aspects of information processing hinder their work performance; the impact on performance of perceived cognitive load by the person with a TBI and the type and impact of support provided to improve their work performance. PMID:20634614

Bootes, Kylie; Chapparo, Christine

2010-01-01

367

Work factors as predictors of sickness absence: a three month prospective study of nurses' aides  

PubMed Central

Aims: To identify the work factors that predict sickness absence in nurses' aides. Methods: The sample comprised 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave because of illness or pregnancy when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4931 (88.6%) completed a second questionnaire three months later. The outcome measure was the three month incidence proportion of certified sickness absence (>3 days), as assessed by self reports at follow up. Results: Perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit (odds ratio (OR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 2.34), working in psychiatric and paediatric wards, having injured the neck in an accident, and health complaints were associated with higher risk of sickness absence, after adjustments for a series of physical, psychological, and organisational work factors, personal engagement in the work unit, demographic characteristics, and daily consumption of cigarettes. Having untraditional jobs (for nurses' aides) (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.77), and engaging in aerobics or gym were associated with a lower risk of sickness absence. Conclusions: The study suggests that the three month effects of work factors on rates of certified sickness absence are modest in nurses' aides. The most important work factor, in terms of predicting sickness absence, seems to be perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit. PMID:12660375

Eriksen, W; Bruusgaard, D; Knardahl, S

2003-01-01

368

Working Notes 1995 AISB Workshop Series  

E-print Network

to Craig MacNish (York) who assisted with publicity. We would like to thank AISB for sponsoring : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 Brandon Bennett Towards a Decision Procedure for the RCC Theory of Spatial Regions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 24 David Duffy, Craig MacNish & Miles Osborne Practical Issues in Applying Automated Reasoning

Fisher, Michael

369

Working Notes 1995 AISB Workshop Series  

E-print Network

). Thanks also go to Craig MacNish (York) who assisted with publi* *city. We would like to thank AISB Based Theorem Proving ..................................* *. 3 Brandon Bennett Towards .........................* *.. 24 David Duffy, Craig MacNish & Miles Osborne Practical Issues in Applying Automated Reasoning

Fisher, Michael

370

Long Story...beyond "Technologies" of Knowing in Case Study Work with Permanently Excluded Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper draws on case study research with Lee who had been permanently excluded from an urban secondary school in England. It begins with two extended extracts from the case study in order to illustrate the challenges the principal researcher, Deon, faced in the day-to-day conduct of the work. The section that follows engages in a reflexive

Frankham, Jo; Edwards-Kerr, Deon

2009-01-01

371

The Role of the Directorate of Studies in the Legislative Work of the Hellenic Parliament.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the role of the Directorate of Studies in the legislative work of the Hellenic Parliament (Greece). The first section describes the establishment and organization of the Directorate of Studies, which consists of three departments: the department for the elaboration of bills and law proposals, the department for parliamentary

Vassilouni, Stavroula

372

The Role of Professional School Counselors in Working with Students in Gangs: A Grounded Theory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to propose a grounded theory that contributed to the understanding of the professional school counselor's role at the secondary school level in working with students in gangs. The study explored the role of the professional school counselor from the first person perspective of the professional school counselor and

Barrow, Jennifer Cahoon

2011-01-01

373

The Relationship between Working Memory for Serial Order and Numerical Development: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite numerous studies, the link between verbal working memory (WM) and calculation abilities remains poorly understood. The present longitudinal study focuses specifically on the role of serial order retention capacities, based on recent findings suggesting a link between ordinal processing in verbal WM and numerical processing tasks. Children

Attout, Lucie; Nol, Marie-Pascale; Majerus, Steve

2014-01-01

374

Liberal Studies in Hong Kong: A New Perspective on Critical Thinking through Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports research that is contextualised within reforms of secondary education in Hong Kong and the reintroduction of Liberal Studies, which jointly emphasise the need for a learning environment that facilitates the practice of group work and the development of critical thinking. A study is described that explores the relevance of

Fung, Dennis; Howe, Christine

2012-01-01

375

Studying, Working, and Living in Another EU Country: French Youth's Point of View  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the willingness of French youth to go and study or work for some time in another EU country. We examined three types of questions: (a) What is the overall level of willingness to go in another EU country? Does age, gender or socioeconomic status (SES) of the family influence this overall level? Which country do French youth

Etienne Mullet; Vronique Dej; Isabelle Lemaire; Philippe Raff; Jolyon Barthorpe

2000-01-01

376

The Nature and Requirements of Work in University-Based Telehealth Units: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Telehealth units are one of many university administrative units created to foster innovation in universities over the last 40 years. Despite the proliferation of such units, few organizational studies have examined the work undertaken inside of these units. This qualitative study used a sequential two-part research design to understand the

Seale, Deborah E.

2013-01-01

377

Research, Study, Travel & Work Abroad: Opportunities and Information for Students and Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The material in this pamphlet, compiled by the Institute of International Studies, is based on requests for information by students and teachers concerning research, study, travel, and work abroad. Two major sections are provided. The first treats United States government-sponsored opportunities and includes: (1) lecturing and advanced research

Bruner, Karen, Comp.

378

Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal Behaviourists  

E-print Network

), and the Companion Animal Behaviour Therapy Study Group, which is an affiliated group of the British Small AnimalAssociation for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal for clinical animal behaviourists in the UK, similar to the Animal Behavior Society (ABS) Board of Professional

Little, Tony

379

Engagement in Work: Case Study of Four Schools in Suffolk County, New York  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was a qualitative case study on engagement in work in four schools in Suffolk County, New York. The purpose of this researcher was to investigate how school systems and educators engage students and adults in 21st Century education. The levels of engagement were examined using patterns of instruction, organization, governance, and

Fox, Sean Bayles

2013-01-01

380

Which Type of Work-Study Experience Is More Beneficial?: Perceptions of Taiwanese College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rapid increase of tuition and the reduced financial support from government and families have forced many more students to take part-time jobs, however, different jobs might bear different benefits. The main purposes of this study were to identify the major benefits of part-time jobs or work-study experiences performed by college students, and

Yang, Cheng Cheng; Ho, Hsuan-Fu; Chen, Shan-Hua

2013-01-01

381

A Meta-Analysis of Published School Social Work Practice Studies: 1980-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This systematic review examined the effectiveness of school social work practices using meta-analytic techniques. Method: Hierarchical linear modeling software was used to calculate overall effect size estimates as well as test for between-study variability. Results: A total of 21 studies were included in the final analysis.

Franklin, Cynthia; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

382

Development of Working Memory and Performance in Arithmetic: A Longitudinal Study with Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: This study has aimed to investigate the relationship between the development of working memory and performance on arithmetic activities. Method: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study of a sample of 90 children, that was followed during the first, second and third year of primary school. All children were tested on measures of WM

Lpez, Magdalena

2014-01-01

383

THE HAITI CASE STUDY Working Paper of the collaborative NATO-Harvard project  

E-print Network

study: Haiti after the January 2010 earthquake. The paper addresses four key themes: the impact of the earthquake and the subsequent cholera epidemic on Haiti's health system; security community participation1 THE HAITI CASE STUDY Working Paper of the collaborative NATO-Harvard project: TOWARDS

Mootha, Vamsi K.

384

Long Working Hours and Subsequent Use of Psychotropic Medicine: A Study Protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Mental ill health is the most frequent cause of long-term sickness absence and disability retirement in Denmark. Some instances of mental ill health might be due to long working hours. A recent large cross-sectional study of a general working population in Norway found that not only very much overtime, but also moderate overtime (41-48 work hours/week) was significantly associated with increased levels of both anxiety and depression. These findings have not been sufficiently confirmed in longitudinal studies. Objective The objective of the study is to give a detailed plan for a research project aimed at investigating the possibility of a prospective association between weekly working hours and use of psychotropic medicine in the general working population of Denmark. Methods People from the general working population of Denmark have been surveyed, at various occasions in the time period 1995-2010, and interviewed about their work environment. The present study will link interview data from these surveys to national registers covering all inhabitants of Denmark. The participants will be followed for the first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. Poisson regression will be used to analyze incidence rates as a function of weekly working hours (32-40; 41-48; > 48 hours/week). The analyses will be controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. According to our feasibility studies, the statistical power is sufficient and the exposure is stable enough to make the study worth the while. Results The publication of the present study protocol ends the design phase of the project. In the next phase, the questionnaire data will be forwarded to Statistics Denmark where they will be linked to data on deaths, migrations, socioeconomic status, and redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medication. We expect the analysis to be completed by the end of 2014 and the results to be published mid 2015. Conclusions The proposed project will be free from hindsight bias, since all hypotheses and statistical models are completely defined, peer-reviewed, and published before we link the exposure data to the outcome data. The results of the project will indicate to what extent and in what direction the national burden of mental ill health in Denmark has been influenced by long working hours. PMID:25239125

Albertsen, Karen

2014-01-01

385

More Students Seek Campus Jobs as Work-Study Positions Dwindle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more college students are relying on part- or full-time work to help pay for their education, federally financed work-study jobs are becoming harder to find. The percentage of freshmen who planned to hold full-time jobs while in college jumped to 4.7 percent this year, from 2.7 percent in 2000. But as more students are seeking jobs, federal

Lipka, Sara

2007-01-01

386

Perspectives and practical applications of medical oncologists on defensive medicine (SYSIPHUS study): a study of the Palliative Care Working Committee of the Turkish Oncology Group (TOG).  

PubMed

Defensive medicine occasionally indulges unnecessary treatment requests to defend against lawsuits for medical errors and the use of unapproved medical applications. This study determines the attitudes and orientations of medical oncologists on defensive medicine. A cross-sectional survey was sent by e-mail to medical oncologists. The survey was designed to determine the participants' demographic characteristics and defensive medicine practices. The survey measured the attitudes about defensive medicine practices of the oncologists based on a five-point Likert scale (never, rarely, sometimes, often, and always). One hundred and forty-six of a total of 402 physicians serving in oncology were fully filled, and the rate of return invitation was 36%. The majority of participants were male, with a duration of between 7 and 9years of work as university hospital officials, and the mean age was 469 (years). International guidelines were followed in the most common is NCCN, and the majority of respondents felt that the application of these guidelines improves their defensive medicine. All participants of defensive medicine who stand on the basis of the definition were found to be more afraid of complaints by patients' relatives. Physicians of 45% was noted that applying defensive medicine. Among the participants were the most frequent checkups of positive defensive approach is defined as increasing or shortening the follow-up period, while avoiding high-risk patients were detected as described in the definition of negative defensive medicine. Both professional groups in both the positive and negative defensive medicine approach defensive medicine approach, academic tasks, work experience and job time, there was a significant correlation between the location. Made in single- and multi-variable analyses, positions were identified both positive and negative defensive medicine is an independent risk factor for direction. Improving the working conditions of young physicians to protect against medical error may require additional educational opportunities. PMID:25750041

Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cay-Senler, Filiz; Yavuzsen, Tugba; Turhal, Serdar; Akman, Tulay; Komurcu, Seref; Cehreli, Ruksan; Ozyilkan, Ozgur

2015-04-01

387

Human factors studies of the working hours of UK ships' pilots. Part 2: A survey of work-scheduling problems and their social consequences.  

PubMed

This paper reports findings from interview, questionnaire and diary surveys of the working hours and working arrangements of UK ships' pilots relevant for the question of individual well-being, fatigue and social effects of work-scheduling practices. Aspects of pilots' lifestyles, task factors and different work systems are described. Findings are drawn from the pilots' own subjective accounts, opinions and ratings and some pilots' wives also gave their views. It is concluded that certain districts have working hours and working systems which impose a strain on their pilots, particularly those without a supportive domestic life. Compatibility between home and work life is thought to make an important contribution to well-being. Recommendations for change are outlined and a major obstacle against their implementation (sea-faring attitudes) is described. This study formed part of a larger project investigating stress in ships' pilots with particular reference to workload factors. PMID:15676383

Shipley, P; Cook, T C

1980-09-01

388

The moderating effect of work-time influence on the effect of shift work: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo investigate whether work-time influence moderated the effect of shift work on psychological well-being measured as vitality,\\u000a mental health, somatic stress symptoms, and disturbed sleep.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsWe used questionnaire data from 2,148 health care workers who finished their education in 2004 and were followed during their\\u000a first 2years of employment in the eldercare and health care sectors. We analyzed the effect

Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen; Anne Helene Garde; Karen Albertsen; Finn Diderichsen

2011-01-01

389

Application Application Notes  

E-print Network

Application Notes #12;Application Notes Intelligent Alphanumeric Purdy Electronics Corporation Terminals RS, R/W I/O Terminals DB0 to DB7 #12;Application Notes Intelligent Alphanumeric Purdy Electronics

Grantner, Janos L.

390

Work First, Study Second: Adult Undergraduates Who Combine Employment and Postsecondary Enrollment. Postsecondary Educational Descriptive Analysis Reports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Working adult undergraduates can be broken into two groups: employees who study (those who work full-time and pursue postsecondary education to obtain skills necessary to advance in their careers) and students who work (those who work part-time and attend school full-time). In 1999-2000 roughly two-thirds of working undergraduates aged 24 or older

Berker, Ali; Horn, Laura; Carroll, C. Dennis

391

Healthcare workers' attitudes towards working during pandemic influenza: A multi method study  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare workers (HCWs) will be key players in any response to pandemic influenza, and will be in the front line of exposure to infection. Responding effectively to a pandemic relies on the majority of medical, nursing, laboratory and hotel services staff continuing to work normally. Planning assumes that during a pandemic normal healthcare service levels will be provided, although it anticipates that as caseloads increase only essential care will be provided. The ability of the NHS to provide expected service levels is entirely dependent upon HCWs continuing to work as normal. Methods/design This study is designed as a two-phase multi-method study, incorporating focus groups and a questionnaire survey. In phase one, qualitative methods will be used to collect the views of a purposive sample of HCWs, to determine the range of factors associated with their responses to the prospect of working through pandemic influenza. In phase two, the findings from the focus groups, combined with the available literature, will be used to inform the design of a survey to determine the generalisability of these factors, enabling the estimation of the likely proportion of HCWs affected by each factor, and how likely it is that they would be willing and/or able to continue to work during an influenza pandemic. Discussion There are potentially greater than normal health risks for some healthcare workers working during a pandemic, and these workers may be concerned about infecting family members/friends. HCWs will be as liable as other workers to care for sick family members and friends. It is vital to have information about how motivated HCWs will be to continue to work during such a crisis, and what factors might influence their decision to work/not to work. Through the identification and subsequent management of these factors it may be possible to implement strategies that will alleviate the concerns and fears of HCWs and remove potential barriers to working. PMID:18518971

Draper, Heather; Wilson, Sue; Ives, Jonathan; Gratus, Christine; Greenfield, Sheila; Parry, Jayne; Petts, Judith; Sorell, Tom

2008-01-01

392

Work plan addendum for the remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Salmon Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended as an addendum to the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the Salmon Site (SS) (formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site) Lamar County, Mississippi. The original work plan - Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Tatum Dome Test Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (herein after called the Work Plan) was approved by the state of Mississippi in 1992 and was intended as the operative document for investigative activities at the Tatum Dome Test Site. Subsequent to the approval of the document a series of activities were undertaken under the auspices of the work plan. This document is organized in the same manner as the original work plan: (1) Introduction; (2) Site Background and History; (3) Initial Evaluation; (4) Data Quality Objectives; (5) RI/FS Tasks; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Management; and (8) Reference. This addendum will identify changes to the original work plan that are necessary because of additional information acquired at the SS. This document is not intended to replace the work plan, rather, it is intended to focus the remaining work in the context of additional site knowledge gained since the development of the original work plan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a focused and phased site characterization as a part, of the RI/FS. The RI/FS is the methodology under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) for evaluating hazardous waste sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The SS is not listed on the NPL, but DOE has voluntarily elected to conduct the evaluation of the SS in accordance with CERCLA.

NONE

1995-11-01

393

Anticipated significant work limitation in primary care consulters with osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the prevalence of expected work limitations (EWL) prior to future retirement age in osteoarthritis consulters, and the associated health, sociodemographic and workplace factors. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting General practices in Staffordshire, England. Participants 297 working adults aged 5065, who had consulted primary care for osteoarthritis. Outcome EWL was defined using a single question, Do you think joint pain will limit your ability to work before you reach 69?years old? Results 51 (17.2%) indicated that joint pain would not limit their ability to work until 69, 79 (26.6%) indicated EWL and 167 (56.2%) did not know if joint pain would limit work before 69. In bivariate analysis, physical function (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.91 to 0.96), depression (4.51; 1.81 to 11.3), cognitive symptom (3.84; 1.81 to 8.18), current smoker (2.75; 1.02 to 7.38), age (0.69; 0.58 to 0.82), physically demanding job (3.18; 1.50 to 6.72), no opportunities to retrain (3.01; 1.29 to 7.05) and work dissatisfaction (3.69; 1.43 to 9.49) were associated with EWL. The final multivariate model included physical function and age. Conclusions Only one in five osteoarthritis consulters expected that joint pain would not limit their work participation before 69?years of age. Given the expectation for people to work until they are older, the results highlight the increasing need for clinicians to include work participation in their consultation and implement strategies to address work loss/limitation. Targeting pain-related functional limitation and effective communication with employers to manage workplace issues could reduce EWL. PMID:25190616

Wilkie, Ross; Phillipson, Chris; Hay, Elaine M; Pransky, Glenn

2014-01-01

394

A nested case-control study of fatal work related injuries among Brazilian steel workers.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the relative risk of death from work related injury in a steelworks, associated with exposure to various occupational hazards, sociodemographic factors, and medical history. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a nested case-control design. It was based on a cohort of men employed in the steel plant of USIMINAS, Brazil between January 1977 and August 1990, who were followed up to November 1992. The cases were defined as all workers in the cohort who died from injury in the study period and whose death had been notified to the Brazilian Ministry of Labour as being related to work. Four controls per case, matched to cases on year of birth, were randomly selected from among workers employed in the plant at the time of death of the matching case. Data on potential risk factors for occupational injury were extracted from company records; for the controls these data were abstracted for the period preceding the death of the matching case. RESULTS: There were 37 deaths related to work injuries during the study period. Four surviving workers were selected as controls for each case, but for eight the personnel records were incomplete, leaving 140 controls in all. Significantly increased risk of fatal injury related to work was associated with exposure to noise, heat, dust and fumes, gases and vapours, rotating shift work, being a manual worker, and working in the steel mill, coke ovens, blast furnaces, and energy and water supply areas. Risk of fatal injury related to work increased with intensity of exposure to noise (P (trend) = 0.004) and heat (P < 0.001), and increased greatly with a hazard score that combined information on noise, heat, dust, and gas exposure (P < 0.001). Number of years of schooling (P = 0.03) and salary level (P = 0.03) were both negatively associated with risk. In a multivariate analysis including all these significant factors, only hazard score and area of work remained associated with death from injury related to work. The highest risks were for men exposed to all four environmental hazards (odds ratio (OR) 19.4; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 352.1) and those working in the energy supply area (OR 18.0; 1.6 to 198.1). CONCLUSIONS: The study identified parts of the steelworks and types of hazard associated with greatly increased risk of fatal accident. Research and measures to prevent accidents need to concentrate on these areas and the people working in them. The use of a hazard score was successful in identifying high risk, and similar scoring might prove useful in other industrial situations. PMID:9326164

Barreto, S M; Swerdlow, A J; Smith, P G; Higgins, C D

1997-01-01

395

The role of experience in night work: Lessons from two ergonomic studies.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to analyze some connections between experience, health and work, especially in the field of night work. As a result of the baby boom, the proportion of elderly workers is steadily increasing, while at the same time many workers are reaching retirement age and being replaced by younger people. And, in the same time, there is an overall gradual increase in shift work and night work. To our knowledge, worker experience has not been extensively studied in this context. This was our focus in studying work activity in two very different situations, in a hospital and in a steel industry. In these two studies we observed that the experienced workers endeavor to plan ahead, especially at night. They do this to limit fatigue and to avoid emergencies and ensure that work is stress-free and as far as possible under control. But experience not only brings workers to plan ahead, it also enables them to do so, thanks to the resources it confers: gaining familiarity with tasks and acquiring the ability to identify critical situations, gaining knowledge about themselves and awareness of situations that cause difficulty; and gaining a better overview of the collective aspects of their work and of ways to share tasks or obtain assistance. They are able to undertake these strategies thanks to specific skills and capacities they have built along their professional career, which notably leads them to find the best trade-off between several goals, possibly contradictory. Such experience is especially valuable at night, when the worker is tired, and when there are fewer supervisors present. This experience can only be gained, however, if the work environment fosters its acquisition and provides an opportunity to make use of it, especially during the night shift and especially with respect to planning tasks ahead of time. PMID:20673571

Pueyo, Valrie; Toupin, Cathy; Volkoff, Serge

2011-01-01

396

Changes in nurses work associated with computerised information systems: Opportunities for international comparative studies using the revised Work Observation Method By Activity Timing (WOMBAT)  

PubMed Central

An important step in advancing global health through informatics is to understand how systems support health professionals to deliver improved services to patients. Studies in several countries have highlighted the potential for clinical information systems to change patterns of work and communication, and in particular have raised concerns that they reduce nurses time in direct care. However measuring the effects of systems on work is challenging and comparisons across studies have been hindered by a lack of standardised definitions and measurement tools. This paper describes the Work Observation Method by Activity Time (WOMBAT) technique version 1.0 and the ways in which the data generated can describe different aspects of health professionals work. In 2011 a revised WOMBAT version 2.0 was developed specifically to facilitate its use by research teams in different countries. The new features provide opportunities for international comparative studies of nurses work to be conducted. PMID:24199139

Westbrook, Johanna I.; Creswick, Nerida J.; Duffield, Christine; Li, Ling; Dunsmuir, William T. M.

2012-01-01

397

Explaining the social gradient in sickness absence: a study of a general working population in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Background Some previous studies have proposed potential explanatory factors for the social gradient in sickness absence. Yet, this research area is still in its infancy and in order to comprise the full range of socioeconomic positions there is a need for studies conducted on random population samples. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if somatic and mental symptoms, mental wellbeing, job strain, and physical work environment could explain the association between low socioeconomic position and belonging to a sample of new cases of sick-listed employees. Methods This study was conducted on one random working population sample (n?=?2763) and one sample of newly sick-listed cases of employees (n?=?3044), drawn from the same random general population in western Sweden. Explanatory factors were self-rated 'Somatic and mental symptoms', 'Mental well-being', 'job strain', and 'physical work conditions' (i.e. heavy lifting and awkward work postures). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results Somatic and mental symptoms, mental well-being, and job strain, could not explain the association between socioeconomic position and sickness absence in both women and men. However, physical work conditions explained the total association in women and much of this association in men. In men the gradient between Non-skilled manual OR 1.76 (1.24;2.48) and Skilled manual OR 1.59 (1.10;2.20), both in relation to Higher non-manual, remained unexplained. Conclusions The present study strengthens the scientific evidence that social differences in physical work conditions seem to comprise a key element of the social gradient in sickness absence, particularly in women. Future studies should try to identify further predictors for this gradient in men. PMID:23738703

2013-01-01

398

Implications of women's work for child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examines the relationships between women's work and child nutritional status (stunting and wasting) of 5331 Nigerian children aged 059 months, using data from the 1990 Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey. In defining women's work, the study considers whether women earned cash from their work and carried their children to work in order to assess the importance of childcare

Festus A. Ukwuani; Chirayath M. Suchindran

2003-01-01

399

Attending work or not when sick what makes the decision? A qualitative study among car mechanics  

PubMed Central

Background High prevalence of sickness absence in countries with generous welfare schemes has generated debates on mechanisms that may influence workers decisions about calling in sick for work. Little is known about the themes at stake during the decision-making process for reaching the choice of absence or attendance when feeling ill. The aim of the study was to examine decisions of absence versus attendance among car mechanics when feeling ill. Methods Interviews with 263 male car mechanics from 19 companies were used for the study, analysed by systematic text condensation and presented as descriptions and quotations of experiences and opinions. Results Three major themes were at stake during the decision-making process: 1) Experienced degree of illness, focusing on the present health condition and indicators of whether you are fit for work or not; 2) daily life habits, where attending work was a daily routine, often learned from childhood; 3) the importance of the job, with focus on the importance of work, colleagues, customers and work environment. Conclusions The car mechanics expressed a strong will to attend work in spite of illness. Knowledge about attitudes and dilemmas in reaching the decision regarding sickness absence or sickness attendance is useful in the prevention of sickness absence. PMID:22994972

2012-01-01

400

Healthcare workers' attitudes to working during pandemic influenza: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare workers (HCWs) will play a key role in any response to pandemic influenza, and the UK healthcare system's ability to cope during an influenza pandemic will depend, to a large extent, on the number of HCWs who are able and willing to work through the crisis. UK emergency planning will be improved if planners have a better understanding of the reasons UK HCWs may have for their absenteeism, and what might motivate them to work during an influenza pandemic. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored UK HCWs' views (n = 64) about working during an influenza pandemic, in order to identify factors that might influence their willingness and ability to work and to identify potential sources of any perceived duty on HCWs to work. Methods A qualitative study, using focus groups (n = 9) and interviews (n = 5). Results HCWs across a range of roles and grades tended to feel motivated by a sense of obligation to work through an influenza pandemic. A number of significant barriers that may prevent them from doing so were also identified. Perceived barriers to the ability to work included being ill oneself, transport difficulties, and childcare responsibilities. Perceived barriers to the willingness to work included: prioritising the wellbeing of family members; a lack of trust in, and goodwill towards, the NHS; a lack of information about the risks and what is expected of them during the crisis; fear of litigation; and the feeling that employers do not take the needs of staff seriously. Barriers to ability and barriers to willingness, however, are difficult to separate out. Conclusion Although our participants tended to feel a general obligation to work during an influenza pandemic, there are barriers to working, which, if generalisable, may significantly reduce the NHS workforce during a pandemic. The barriers identified are both barriers to willingness and to ability. This suggests that pandemic planning needs to take into account the possibility that staff may be absent for reasons beyond those currently anticipated in UK planning documents. In particular, staff who are physically able to attend work may nonetheless be unwilling to do so. Although there are some barriers that cannot be mitigated by employers (such as illness, transport infrastructure etc.), there are a number of remedial steps that can be taken to lesson the impact of others (providing accommodation, building reciprocity, provision of information and guidance etc). We suggest that barriers to working lie along an ability/willingness continuum, and that absenteeism may be reduced by taking steps to prevent barriers to willingness becoming perceived barriers to ability. PMID:19216738

Ives, Jonathan; Greenfield, Sheila; Parry, Jayne M; Draper, Heather; Gratus, Christine; Petts, Judith I; Sorell, Tom; Wilson, Sue

2009-01-01

401

Working memory load reduces facilitated processing of threatening faces: an ERP study.  

PubMed

The present study tested the hypothesis that facilitated processing of threatening faces depends on working memory load. Participants judged the gender of angry versus happy faces while event-related brain potentials were recorded. Working memory load was manipulated within subjects by the mental rehearsal of one- versus eight-digit numbers. Behavioral results showed that the relative slow-down to angry compared to happy faces in the gender-naming task (i.e., the negativity bias) was eliminated under high working memory load. Under low (but not high) load, N2 amplitudes were smaller to angry compared to happy faces. Moreover, high load reduced LPP amplitude and eliminated the enhanced LPP to angry compared to happy faces that were present under low load. These results suggest that working memory load improves attentional control, and reduces sustained attention for distracting negative expressions. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that facilitated processing of threatening cues may be contingent on cognitive resources. PMID:22642340

Van Dillen, Lotte F; Derks, Belle

2012-12-01

402

Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

Not Available

1994-06-01

403

[De Quervain's tenosynovitis and work with hand tools: a case study].  

PubMed

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs are a frequent complaint and their pathogenetic mechanism is often related to mechanical overload of the body region involved without traumatic events. The occupational origin of such disorders is much debated, since the clinical pictures are often not specific and may be found in subjects who do not perform hazardous work tasks. A better understanding of the relationship between clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and functional capacity would provide a deeper knowledge in decision making for return to work and rehabilitation strategies. In this paper we present a case study of a worker using scissors who developed De Quervain's syndrome in the dominant hand. A methodology for the biomechanical investigation of the work task and the possible occupational aetiology of the clinical picture are discussed according to the findings of the specific literature. PMID:15551954

Capodaglio, P; Mancin, N; Cornaggia, N; Capodaglio, E M; Saretto, G; Catenacci, G; Danesino, P

2004-01-01

404

Environmental effects of dredging. Lower limits of organic carbon normalization: Results of fish/sediment/water equilibrium partitioning studies. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This technical note reports the initial results of studies measuring biota/ sediment/water equilibrium partitioning of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener. The focus of this technical note is on the validity of normalizing concentrations of neutral organic chemicals on sediment total organic carbon (TOC) when sediment TOC concentrations are low. Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has aggressively pursued development of single-chemical sediment quality criteria (SQC). Equilibrium partitioning of neutral organic chemicals between the organic carbon fraction of bedded sediments and the interstitial water of the sediments provides the theoretical basis for the most popular approach to development of SQC. The solution phase of the chemical in equilibrium with the sediment is considered to represent the bioavailable fraction and to enable the conversion of existing water quality criteria (WQC) into SQC or sediment quality standards.

McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.E.; Feldhaus, J.; Ace, L.N.; Brannon, J.M.

1996-03-01

405

A preliminary study of the effects of tooth guidance on working-side condylar movement.  

PubMed

Clinical observations have indicated that lateral working-side tooth contacts can produce a posterior shift of the working-side condyle, resulting in pain in the temporomandibular joint. This study examined the influence of lateral retrusive and lateral protrusive tooth guidance on the movements of working condyles of the lateral pole. Four patients with lateral retrusive natural tooth contacts and four patients with lateral protrusive natural tooth contacts were studied. Movement of the lateral pole of the working condyle was recorded under the following conditions: (1) natural teeth in contact, (2) wearing of a mandibular acrylic resin splint that created lateral protrusive or lateral retrusive tooth guidance, and (3) a central bearing screw and bearing plate separating the teeth. The results indicated that the condition of the patient's temporomandibular joints was a crucial factor in consistency of condylar tracings. Condylar tracings from patients with temporomandibular joint condyle-disk lacking coordination were inconsistent and unreproducible. Consistent, reproducible tracings for patients without condyle-disk disorders indicated that lateral retrusive guidance can cause a more posterior pathway of the lateral pole of the working condyle than lateral protrusive guidance. Future studies are necessary to establish the relationship between lateral tooth guidance and temporomandibular disorders. PMID:2760858

Coffey, J P; Mahan, P E; Gibbs, C H; Welsch, B B

1989-08-01

406

[The socioeconomic and demographic characterization of children and adolescents who study and work outside their home].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to identify the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of children and adolescents who study and work outside their home. This non-experimental, correlational, cross-sectional study was performed using questionnaires applied to primary education students, enrolled in public schools in Ribeiro Preto (Brazil). Two schools were selected through a draw. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 14.0. Of the 133 students who answered the questionnaire, 36 (27.7%) reported working outside their home, 20.6% were between 11 and 13 years of age, and 66.7% were male (p=0.000) and had started working early to help with the family income (p=0.003). The salary they received helped comprise the family income, and it was found that as the family income increased, the need for the youngsters to work was reduced. It was found that many factors contribute to these subjects' early start at work, including family size, structure and poverty. PMID:22576529

Silveira, Renata Cristina da Penha; Ribeiro, Luiz Cludio; Secco, Iara Aparecida de Oliveira; Robazzi, Maria Lcia do Carmo Cruz

2012-04-01

407

A Study on the Perfectionist Personality Traits and Empathic Tendencies of Working and Non-Working Adolescents across Different Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted with the goal of examining the perfectionist personality traits and empathic tendencies of adolescents between the ages of 15 and 17. The study group consisted of 531 children attending a vocational education center and two general high schools located in the city center of Kayseri, Turkey. Data for this study were

Koksal Akyol, Aysel; Sali, Gnes

2013-01-01

408

Multicenter historical cohort study of the relationship between shift work and blood pressure  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Regarding the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and shift work (SW), previous studies have reported contradictory results. In the present study, we used Bayesian multilevel modeling to evaluate the association of SW and BP after controlling some confounding factors. METHODS Data of this multicenter historical study were extracted from annual observations of the male workers of Isfahans Mobarakeh Steel Company (IMSC) and Polyacryl Iran Corporation (PIC) in Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2011. In this research, we assessed the effect of SW on systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DPB) with controlling body mass index, age, work experience, marriage, and education status. RESULTS A total of 8613 (IMSC, n = 5314 and PIC, n = 3299) workers participated in this study with a mean [standard deviation (SD)] age of 41.60 (8.30) and mean (SD) work experience of 16.17 (7.89) years. In this study, after controlling confounding factors, we found no significant relationship between SW and SBP and DBP. CONCLUSION In general, the results of this multicenter cohort study did not support a relationship between SW and BP. We suggest prospective studies with controlling more confounding factors in this area.

Gholami-Fesharaki, Mohammad; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Zayeri, Farid; Rowzati, Mohsen; Sanati, Javad; Akbari, Hamed

2014-01-01

409

Variables Related to Working Capability among Swiss Patients with Multiple SclerosisA Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Reduced working capability is one of the most devastating consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to study working capability and related variables in Swiss MS patients. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional analysis of employment status and risk factors for reduced working capability among MS patients treated at our outpatient clinic. A questionnaire was mailed to 644 MS patients and returned by 69.7%. 405 patients (66% female, mean age 44.2 years (SD10.2), median EDSS 3.0 (SD1.8)) were eligible for subsequent analysis. Results After a mean disease duration of 12.3 years (SD8.25), full or part time employment was declared by 26.7% and 25.7%, respectively. Incapacity to work was reported by 27.1%. A total of 52.8% specified MS as the cause for altered working capability, whereas 20.5% cited reasons unrelated to the disorder. Even with minimal disability (EDSS<3) a significant proportion of patients (24%) reported reduced working capability. Among the MS-specific restricting factors were fatigue (47.6%), sensorimotor deficits (31.1%), impaired vision (3.3%) and pain (2.8%). Conclusion MS continues to takes its toll on the professional life of the patients early in the course. While complete incapacity becomes relevant with moderate to severe disability, many patients scale down to part-time even with minimal impairment. PMID:25867208

Findling, Oliver; Baltisberger, Magdalena; Jung, Simon; Kamm, Christian P.; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Sellner, Johann

2015-01-01

410

White Counseling Supervisees' Experiences Working with Latino Youth: A Phenomenological Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of White counseling students who facilitated a group intervention with Latino adolescents. A phenomenological approach revealed several challenges experienced by the counselors in working across race and culture. Two major themes that emerged from the analysis included counselors' lack

Malott, Krista M.; Havlik, Stacey; Palacios, Lyda Holgun; Contrisciane Lewis, Colleen

2014-01-01

411

Work-related depression in the hotel industry: a study in the United Arab Emirates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop and test a model, which examines work-related depression among frontline hotel employees. Specifically, the model examines emotional exhaustion as a full mediator of the effects of positive affectivity and intrinsic motivation on depression. The model also investigates the interaction of intrinsic motivation and positive affectivity on emotional exhaustion and depression.

Osman M. Karatepe; Ladan Zargar Tizabi

2011-01-01

412

A Pilot Study Connecting Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties to Summer Work Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the potential contributions of adolescent employment to postschool success, many youth who experience emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) do not access these opportunities. This intervention study examined the effects of a package of strategies designed to increase access to summer work experiences. Fifty-seven youth with EBD from

Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Ditchman, Nicole; Owens, Laura

2011-01-01

413

Illinois Institute of Technology Federal WorkStudy (FWS) Student Employment Program  

E-print Network

the quality of life, especially for low income persons and for persons with disabilities. Such jobs include or local public agency, or a private nonprofit organization, incorporated in or authorized to do business in Illinois ("Organization") agree to participate in the Federal WorkStudy Community Service

Argamon, Shlomo

414

Review of Study Programme Renewal in Lithuania: Planning Students' Independent Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article introduces external quality assessment results of first cycle and second cycle study programmes renewed under the Human Resources Development Action Programme 2007-2013 priority direction 2 "Lifelong Learning" (hereinafter the "Programme") through the aspect of planning students' independent work. Problems

Zibeniene, Gintaute

2013-01-01

415

Developing Successful Collaborative Working Practices for Children with Speech and Language Difficulties: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of collaborative practice between those who provide services to children with special educational needs is now regarded as essential and is supported strongly by the UK government. However, joint working is often difficult to implement, despite the goodwill of all involved. This paper describes a pilot study aimed at developing

Paradice, Ruth; Bailey-Wood, Nicola; Davies, Kate; Solomon, Marion

2007-01-01

416

A Descriptive Study of Working Memory, Phonological Awareness and Literacy Performance of People Who Use AAC  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ten cerebral palsied adolescents and young adults with complex communicative needs who use augmentative and alternative communication were studied. They were classified according to their high versus low working memory capacity and according to their high versus low phonological skills into two groups of participants. These groups were compared on

Taibo, Maria Luisa Gomez; Iglesias, Pilar Vieiro; Mendez, Maria Sotillo; del Salvador, Maria Gonzalez Raposo

2009-01-01

417

Studies in Public Welfare. Paper Number 13. How Income Supplements Can Affect Work Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To what extent, if any, will workers in families receiving Government cash benefits reduce their hours of work? The papers by Irwin Garfinkel and by Glen Cain and Harold Watts review large numbers of studies on this question. These authors caution us against having great confidence in the detailed estimates of how workers will respond because

Garfinkel, Irwin; And Others

418

Comparability work and the management of difference in research synthesis studies.  

PubMed

The new imperative to be more methodologically inclusive has generated a burgeoning interest in synthesizing the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies, or mixed research synthesis. Yet, the very diversity seen to define the mixed research synthesis enterprise is also considered to defy it as it intensifies the problem of comparing the seemingly incomparable to enable the combination of the seemingly uncombinable. We propose here that the research synthesis enterprise, in general, and the mixed research synthesis enterprise, in particular, entail comparability work whereby reviewers impose similarity and difference on the studies to be reviewed. The very study diversity requiring management does not exist a priori but rather is itself an outcome of comparability work already done whereby judgments have been made about what constitutes methodological and topical diversity and uniformity. Conceiving the research synthesis process as defined by comparability work moves the backstage interpretive work of systematic review to center stage and, thereby, sets a new stage for addressing the methodological issues involved. These issues are explored by reference to the synthesis of empirical studies of antiretroviral adherence in HIV-positive women in the US. PMID:17029691

Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I; Barroso, Julie

2007-01-01

419

Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades 2 and 3. The results were that (a)

H. Lee Swanson

2011-01-01

420

The impact of work on marriage in three cultures: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the impact of work on marriage across three cultures: London (UK), Hong Kong, and Beijing (China), via qualitative interviews. A total of 79 respondents were interviewed in the three cultures, and template analysis was used as the method of analysis. The results showed that although one-third to half of the respondents from each culture mentioned the

Sowan Wong; Robin Goodwin

2009-01-01

421

A Case Study on the Relationships between Participation in Online Discussion and Achievement of Project Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the study is to discuss about the correlation between each group's performances of participation in online discussion and their achievements of project-based works. Performances of online discussion consist of content, frequency, and frequency of participation in discussion after each login into the Web community system. Research

Chang, Chi-Cheng

2008-01-01

422

Effects of age on working memory: an event-related potential study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of age on behavioural performance and event-related potentials recorded during a working memory task using digits presented either acoustically or visually, were studied in 37 healthy subjects with an age range from 19 to 71 years. With increasing age, psychological tests showed a progressive decline in visuo-spatial performance and both auditory and visual reaction times (RT) increased. There

Luciana Pelosi; Lance D Blumhardt

1999-01-01

423

A Study of Korean Working Mothers with Infants: Implications for Research and Social Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine a broad range of variables that predict maternal self-efficacy with a sample of 92 Korean working mothers whose infants are cared for at non-maternal child care settings. In addition, differences between mothers of infants on welfare roll and their socioeconomic status (SES) counterparts (not on welfare)

Seo, So-Jung

2006-01-01

424

Researching Teaching on Gender in Social Work Education: a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of women lecturers in a university department of social work were concerned that perspectives on gender needed more prominence as their department adopted a new problem?based teaching style. This paper describes a small?scale research study of the process of introducing pilot learning materials on gender issues. Lecturers identified their need to develop their understanding of gender issues and

Jill Reynolds

1994-01-01

425

Training Library Work Study Students for Academic Credit: A Way To Address the Accountability Factor.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work study students at Northland Pioneer College's Learning Resource Centers in Arizona are required to take a one-unit class entitled Learning Resource Center Survival Skills. Students who successfully complete the course will have mastered 18 skills needed to perform their duties at the resource centers. Assignment of a grade for this course

Rothlisberg, Allen P.

426

How the Simplification of Work Can Degrade Safety: A Gas Company Case Study  

E-print Network

How the Simplification of Work Can Degrade Safety: A Gas Company Case Study Hortense Blazsin money, particularly through economies of scale and employee specialization. On the other hand is to better understand the effects of the rationalisation on organizational reliability and performance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

What Works Clearinghouse Evidence Standards for Reviewing Studies, Version 1.0. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) and the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) have identified topic areas that present a wide range of this nation's most pressing issues in education (e.g., middle school math, beginning reading, and character education). Within each selected topic area, the WWC collects studies of interventions (i.e., programs,

What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

2008-01-01

428

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper  

E-print Network

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper Quy-Toan Do (The World's rivers, focusing on infant mortality as a measure of health outcomes. In particular, we quantify two impacts: The mortality burden of river pollution in the district of its measurement; and the persistence

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

429

Mayo Clinic study finds nutritional supplement works against some pancreatic cancer cells in mice  

Cancer.gov

The dietary supplement gamma-linolenic acid can inhibit the growth of a subset of pancreatic cancer cells and selectively promote cancer cell death in mice, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The supplement, a fatty acid also known as GLA, worked particularly well when combined with the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine, the researchers say.

430

Work function study of rhenium oxidation using an ultra high vacuum scanning Kelvin probe  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have undertaken a study of high work function (?) surfaces as part of an ongoing project searching for efficient target materials for use in hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI), a new mass spectroscopy ionization technique. HSI relies on high ? surfaces for the production of positive ions. Rhenium is particularly interesting in this respect as oxidation substantially increases ? to

I. D. Baikie; U. Petermann; A. Speakman; K. M. Dirscherl; P. J. Estrup

2000-01-01

431

Work function study of rhenium oxidation using an ultra high vacuum scanning Kelvin probe  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have undertaken a study of high work function (phi) surfaces as part of an ongoing project searching for efficient target materials for use in hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI), a new mass spectroscopy ionization technique. HSI relies on high phi surfaces for the production of positive ions. Rhenium is particularly interesting in this respect as oxidation substantially increases phi to

I. D. Baikie; U. Petermann; A. Speakman; B. Lgel; K. M. Dirscherl; P. J. Estrup

2000-01-01

432

Validation Study of a Gatekeeping Attitude Index for Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a study designed to validate the Gatekeeping Attitude Index, a 14-item Likert scaling index. The authors collected data from a convenience sample of social work field instructors (N = 188) with a response rate of 74.0%. Construct validation by exploratory factor analysis identified a 2-factor solution on the index after

Tam, Dora M. Y.; Coleman, Heather

2011-01-01

433

Work factors and smoking cessation in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking in nursing personnel remains high. The aim of this study was to identify work factors that predict smoking cessation among nurses' aides. METHODS: Of 2720 randomly selected, Norwegian nurses' aides, who were smoking at least one cigarette per day when they completed a questionnaire in 1999, 2275 (83.6 %) completed a second questionnaire 15 months

Willy Eriksen

2005-01-01

434

Work Experiences of People with Mental Illness in Malaysia: A Preliminary Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a preliminary qualitative study, using a basic interpretive approach, to investigate the work experiences of people with mental illness in Malaysia. Six females and four males (aged 30-70) from a residential home for the mentally ill participated in semi-structured interviews. Three inter-relating themes emerged, namely the experience of

Boo, Su-Lyn; Loong, Jaymee; Ng, Wai-Sheng

2011-01-01

435

Rotating Night Shift Work May Raise Risks of Heart Disease, Lung Cancer: Study  

MedlinePLUS

... Rotating Night Shift Work May Raise Risks of Heart Disease, Lung Cancer: Study Research can't prove cause- ... Tuesday, January 6, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Cancer Heart Diseases Occupational Health MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ...

436

A nested case-control study of fatal work related injuries among Brazilian steel workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the relative risk of death from work related injury in a steelworks, associated with exposure to various occupational hazards, sociodemographic factors, and medical history. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a nested case-control design. It was based on a cohort of men employed in the steel plant of USIMINAS, Brazil between January 1977 and August 1990, who

S M Barreto; A J Swerdlow; P G Smith; C D Higgins

1997-01-01

437

Experimental study of work exchange with a granular gas: the viewpoint of the Fluctuation Theorem.  

E-print Network

epl draft Experimental study of work exchange with a granular gas: the viewpoint of the Fluctuation of the fluctuations of energy flux between a granular gas and a small driven harmonic oscillator. The DC-motor driving forcing, between the motor and the gas are examined from the viewpoint of the Fluctuation Theorem

Boyer, Edmond

438

Principal Documents Issued by the Ministry of Education and Relevant Departments Concerning Study-Abroad Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the past twenty-five years, the Ministry of Education of the Republic of China and relevant departments have formulated a total of more than 400 documents with regard to the selection and sending of personnel for studies abroad, management abroad, work after returning to China, serving the country, convenience in entering and exiting China's

Chinese Education and Society, 2005

2005-01-01

439

Evolutionary engagement in an ongoing collaborative work process: a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a case study in which experimental collabor- ationtechnologies were used for over two years in the real, ongoing work process of intellectual property management (IPM) at Xerox PARC. The technologies include LiveBoard- based meeting support tools, laptop notetaking tools, digital audio recording, and workstation tools to later access and replay the meeting activities. In cooperation with the IPM

Thomas P. Moran; Patrick Chiu; Steve R. Harrison; Gordon Kurtenbach; Scott L. Minneman; William van Melle

1996-01-01

440

Affective Mechanisms Linking Dysfunctional Behavior to Performance in Work Teams: A Moderated Mediation Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the association between dysfunctional team behavior and team performance. Data included measures of teams' dysfunctional behavior and negative affective tone as well as supervisors' ratings of teams' (nonverbal) negative emotional expressivity and performance. Utilizing a field sample of 61 work teams, the authors tested the proposed relationships with robust data analytic techniques. Results were consistent with

Michael S. Cole; Frank Walter; Heike Bruch

2008-01-01

441

Study of an interconnected flashing warning light system for work zone lane closures  

E-print Network

effectiveness in encouraging earlier lane-changing upstream of a lane closure compared to a standard lane closure. The studies simulated a work zone with a left lane closure. The following treatments in conjunction with an arrow panel were examined at two...

Finley, Melisa Dayle

1999-01-01

442

Intellectually Gifted Individuals' Career Choices and Work Satisfaction: A Descriptive Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study set out to investigate which career path a group of intellectually gifted individuals chose, if any. How did they actually like their work, and what were the reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their chosen career? In all, 287 Mensa members (216 men and 71 women) constituted the research group. Their average age was 34.4

Persson, Roland S.

2009-01-01

443

Whole World Handbook. A Student Guide to Work, Study and Travel Abroad. 1978-79 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1978-79 student guide to work, study, and travel abroad contains chapters on the following areas: Western Europe; the U.S.S.R. and Eastern Europe; the Middle East and North Africa; Africa south of the Sahara; South Asia (India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Pakistan); East Asia; Southeast Asia; Australia and New Zealand; Latin America and

Cohen, Marjorie Adoff

444

The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by

Schoffstall, Donald G.

2013-01-01

445

The ECLS-K Study and Database: A Resource for School Social Work Practitioners and Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to introduce the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) database to school social work practitioners and researchers. This database not only serves as a viable source for evidence-based practice pertaining to the influences of families and schools on the academic achievement of children beginning at

Williams, Sheara A.

2008-01-01

446

Working through the Problems of Study Abroad Using the Methodologies of Religious Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After illustrating the joys of teaching religious studies abroad with an anecdote from my trip to China, I warn of some of its inherent pedagogical and ethical challenges. I argue that teaching some of the "new directions" in religious studies scholarship might address these challenges. These include a turning away from the abstract

Siegler, Elijah

2015-01-01

447

ConferenceMe Release notes  

E-print Network

computer you must upgrade to the new version by running the ConferenceMe installer from an MCU running 3. ConferenceMe works with TANDBERG Codian MCU units and MSE media blades; in these release notes, "MCU" is used of your MCU, or by launching the program and entering the conference address. ConferenceMe has one main

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

448

A note on Fermat's problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The General Fermat Problem asks for the minimum of the weighted sum of distances fromm points inn-space. Dozens of papers have been written on variants of this problem and most of them have merely reproduced known results. This note calls attention to the work of Weiszfeld in 1937, who may have been the first to propose an iterative algorithm. Although

Harold W. Kuhn

1973-01-01

449

Determinants of Work Disability in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Longitudinal Study of the GENISOS Cohort  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the prevalence, correlates, and predictors of work disability (WD) in the Genetics versus ENvironment In Scleroderma Outcome Study (GENISOS). We hypothesized that WD in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a function of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. Methods Patients enrolled in the GENISOS cohort were subdivided in 3 groups: work disabled, working, and retired or homemakers. The latter group (n=29) was excluded from further analysis. We used logistic regression analysis with a forward hierarchical variable selection strategy to investigate the independent correlates of WD at enrollment. Cox regression proportional Hazards model with a similar variable selection strategy was utilized to determine the predictors of WD in those working at enrollment. Results Overall, 284 patients with mean age of 48.7 years and disease duration of 2.5 (1.6) years were enrolled into the GENISOS cohort, consisting of 83.5% female, 46.8% Caucasian, 28.9% Hispanic, and 20.4% African American. Patients were longitudinally followed for 3.9 (3.6) years in 1438 study visits. At enrollment, 124 patients (43.7%) were work disabled whereas 131 (46.1%) were working. Lower education (p<0.001), higher Medsger Lung Severity Index (p=0.012), higher Fatigue Severity Score (FSS) (p=0.008), and less social support (p<0.001) correlated independently with WD. Of those working at baseline, 35 (26.7%) eventually developed WD. Non-Caucasian ethnicity (p=0.038), lower DLCO %predicted value (p=0.038), and higher FSS (p=0.009) at enrollment independently predicted WD on follow-up visits. Conclusion Demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors correlate with WD cross-sectionally and predict WD longitudinally in the patients with SSc. PMID:21429562

Sharif, Roozbeh; Mayes, Maureen D.; Nicassio, Perry M.; Gonzalez, Emilio B.; Draeger, Hilda; McNearney, Terry A.; Estrada-Y-Martin, Rosa M; Nair, Deepthi K.; Reveille, John D.; Arnett, Frank C.; Assassi, Shervin

2011-01-01

450

Psychosocial work conditions, social capital, and daily smoking: a population based study  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the associations between psychosocial conditions at work, social capital/social participation, and daily smoking. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5180 persons aged 1864 years that belonged to the work force and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work/unemployment, social participation, and daily smoking. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demandcontrol/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and jobstrain categories. The multivariate analyses included age, country of origin, education and economic stress. Results: 17.2% proportion of all men and 21.9% of all women were daily smokers. The jobstrain (high demands/low control) and unemployed categories had significantly higher odds ratios of daily smoking among both men and women compared to the relaxed (low demands/high control) reference category. The passive (low demands/low control), jobstrain, and unemployed categories were also significantly associated with low social participation. Low social participation was significantly and positively associated with daily smoking within each of the psychosocial work conditions and unemployed categories. Conclusions: The positive association between low social capital/low social participation and daily smoking is well known. However, both social participation and daily smoking are associated with psychosocial work conditions and unemployment. Psychosocial work conditions and unemployment may affect daily smoking both directly and through a pathway including social participation. PMID:15333886

Lindstrom, M

2004-01-01

451

Nurse Managers Work Life Quality and Their Participation in Knowledge Management: A Correlational Study  

PubMed Central

Background: The association between quality of work life and participation in knowledge management is unknown. Objectives: This study aimed to discover the association between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management. Materials and Methods: This was a correlational study. All nurse managers (71 people) from 11 hospitals affiliated with the Social Security Organization in Tehran, Iran, were included. They were asked to rate their participation in knowledge management and their quality of work life. Data was gathered by a researcher-made questionnaire (May-June 2012). The questionnaire was validated by content and construct validity approaches. Cronbachs alpha was used to evaluate reliability. Finally, 50 questionnaires were analyzed. The answers were scored and analyzed using mean of scores, T-test, ANOVA (or nonparametric test, if appropriate), Pearsons correlation coefficient and linear regression. Results: Nurse managers performance to implement knowledge management strategies was moderate. A significant correlation was found between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management strategies (r = 0.82; P < 0.001). The strongest correlations were found between implementation of knowledge management and participation of nurse managers in decision making (r = 0.82; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement of nurse managers work life quality, especially in decision-making, may increase their participation in implementing knowledge management.

Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Dehnavi, Fariba

2014-01-01

452

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

453

A qualitative study about immigrant workers perceptions of their working conditions in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Spain has recently become an inward migration country. Little is known about the occupational health of immigrant workers. This study aimed to explore the perceptions that immigrant workers in Spain had of their working conditions.Methods:Qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study. Criterion sampling. Data collected between September 2006 and May 2007 through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews, with a topic guide. One

E Q Ahonen; V Porth; M L Vzquez; A M Garca; M J Lpez-Jacob; C Ruiz-Frutos; E Ronda-Prez; J Benach; F G Benavides

2009-01-01

454

Staying at work with back pain: patients' experiences of work-related help received from GPs and other clinicians. A qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain commonly affects work ability, but little is known about the work-related help and advice that patients receive from GPs and other clinicians. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of employed people with back pain and their perceptions of how GPs and other clinicians have addressed their work difficulties. Methods A qualitative approach with thematic analysis was used. Individual interviews were carried out with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Results The perception of the participants was that GPs and other clinicians had provided little or no work-focused guidance and support and rarely communicated with employers. Sickness certification was the main method that GPs used to manage participants' work problems. Few had received assistance with temporary modifications and many participants had remained in work despite the advice they had received. There was little expectation of what GPs and other clinicians could offer to address work issues. Conclusions These findings question the ability of GPs and other clinicians to provide work-focused support and advice to patients with low back pain. Future research is recommended to explore how the workplace problems of patients can be best addressed by health professionals. PMID:20799938

2010-01-01

455

Return to work following unintentional injury: a prospective follow-up study  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to predict time off work following unintentional injuries due to accidents leading to hospital admission. Design Prospective 6-month follow-up study. Setting Department of Trauma Surgery of a University Hospital. Participants Consecutively recruited victims of unintentional injuries (n=221) hospitalised for a minimum of 32?h including two consecutive nights. All the participants were aged 1865?years and were able to participate in an assessment within 30?days of the accident. Main outcome measures Interview-assessed number of days off work during the 6?months immediately following the accident. Results The patients subjective appraisals of (1) accident severity and (2) their ability to cope with the resulting injury and its job-related consequences predicted time off work following the accident beyond the impact of the objective severity of their injury and the type of accident involved. Conclusions The patients subjective appraisals of the accident severity and of their ability to cope with its consequences are highly relevant for return to work after accidents. Extending the findings from previous studies on severely injured and otherwise preselected accident victims, this seems to apply to the whole spectrum of patients hospitalised with unintentional injuries. PMID:24327361

Hepp, Urs; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hepp-Beg, Sofia; Friedrich-Perez, Josefina; Stulz, Niklaus; Moergeli, Hanspeter

2013-01-01

456

Working Length Determination of Root Canal of Young Permanent Tooth: An In vitro Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Determination of correct working length is one of the keys to success in endodontic therapy. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of various methods to determine working length of root canal. Materials and Methods: Tactile method was assessed using digital radiography and compared with electronic method using apex locator. A total sample of 30 single rooted young permanent teeth the (mandibular first premolars) with matured apices were selected for the study. Access cavity preparation was carried out. Working length was measured by tactile method using digital radiography and electronic method using apex locator with no 15 K file. Actual working length was established by grinding of cementum and dentine from the root apex and was observed under stereomicroscope. Data was collected and statistical analysis was carried out with the help of SPSS-15. Results: The results of this study showed that there was a significant difference between tactile method assessed by digital radiography and electronic method using apex locator. Conclusion: Apex locator was found to be more reliable and accurate when compared with the actual length. PMID:25221703

Diwanji, A; Rathore, AS; Arora, R; Dhar, V; Madhusudan, A; Doshi, J

2014-01-01

457

Note on tachyon moduli and closed strings  

SciTech Connect

The collective behavior of the SL(2,R) covariant brane states of noncritical c=1 string theory, found in a previous work, is studied in the Fermi liquid approximation. It is found that such states mimic the coset WZW model, whereas only by further restrictions one recovers the double-scaling limit which was purported to be equivalent to closed string models. Another limit is proposed, inspired by the tachyon condensation ideas, where the spectrum is the same of two-dimensional string theory. We close by noting some strange connections between vacuum states of the theory in their different interpretations.

Carneiro da Cunha, Bruno [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland) and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 53901-970, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

2008-07-15

458

Physics Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Short articles describe a method of introducing the study of simple harmonic motion, and suggest models that are analogues for impedence matching, electrical transformers, and birefringent crystals. (AL)

School Science Review, 1972

1972-01-01

459

Intentions to work during terminal illness: an exploratory study of antecedent conditions.  

PubMed

Facing a terminal illness is an unimaginably difficult experience, yet many individuals intend to work despite their prognosis. However, research has not systematically examined the potential antecedents underlying such intentions. Using behavioral intention theory as an underlying framework, this study hypothesized that reasons for working (intrinsic and extrinsic), the will to live, disability severity, accessibility of travel, and age would predict intentions to work during terminal illness. A representative sample of medically diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease) patients with a mean life expectancy of approximately 3 years participated (mean age=57.8 years). Controlling for length of diagnosis, employment status, and demographic variables, results indicated that intrinsic reasons were particularly strong predictors of intentions, followed by age, disability severity, and accessibility of travel. Exploratory findings also indicated that behavioral intentions were positively related to future employment status, consistent with past theory. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:16316283

Westaby, James D; Versenyi, Andrea; Hausmann, Robert C

2005-11-01

460

Relations between Characteristics of Workplace Practices and Types of Informal Work-Related Learning: A Survey Study among Dutch Police  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some organizations seek to promote informal work-related learning to stimulate organizational performance. This study focuses on six types of work-related learning in relation to personal, relational, and work characteristics of the workplace practice. A survey was conducted to identify types and levels of work-related learning for executive Dutch

Doornbos, Anja J.; Simons, Robert-Jan; Denessen, Eddie

2008-01-01

461

An Evaluation Study of Youth Participation in Youth Work: A Case Study in Southern Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper an evaluation study of a public programme financing a regional network of 157 youth centres in the South of Italy is presented. A theory-based evaluation model was adopted to explore the causal links between different types of participation experience. Evaluation questions focused on three main issues are: the perception of

Morciano, Daniele; Scardigno, Anna Fausta; Manuti, Amelia; Pastore, Serafina

2014-01-01

462

Project Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

School Science Review, 1979

1979-01-01

463

Shame! Self-stigmatisation as an obstacle to sick doctors returning to work: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore the views of sick doctors on the obstacles preventing them returning to work. Design Qualitative study. Setting Single participating centre recruiting doctors from all over the UK. Participants Doctors who had been away from work for at least 6?months with physical or mental health problems, drug or alcohol problems, General Medical Council involvement or any combination of these, were eligible. Eligible doctors were recruited in conjunction with the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund, the General Medical Council and the Practitioner Health Programme. These organisations approached 77 doctors; 19 participated. Each doctor completed an in-depth semistructured interview. We used a constant comparison method to identify and agree on the coding of the data and the identification of a number of central themes. Results The doctors described that being away from work left them isolated and sad. Many experienced negative reactions from their family and some deliberately concealed their problems. Doctors described a lack of support from colleagues and feared a negative response when returning to work. Self-stigmatisation was central to the participants accounts; several described themselves as failures and appeared to have internalised the negative views of others. Conclusions Self-stigmatising views, which possibly emerge from the belief that doctors are invincible, represent a major obstacle to doctors returning to work. From medical school onwards cultural change is necessary to allow doctors to recognise their vulnerabilities so they can more easily generate strategies to manage if they become unwell. PMID:23069770

Henderson, Max; Brooks, Samantha K; del Busso, Lilliana; Chalder, Trudie; Harvey, Samuel B; Hotopf, Matthew; Madan, Ira; Hatch, Stephani

2012-01-01

464

Psychosocial work environment and sickness absence among British civil servants: the Whitehall II study.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. This study sought to examine the association between the psychosocial work environment and subsequent rates of sickness absence. METHODS. The analyses were based on a cohort of male and female British civil servants (n=9072). Rates of short spells (7 days) of sickness absence were calculated for different aspects of the psychosocial work environment, as measured by self-reports and personnel managers' ratings (external assessments). RESULTS. Low levels of work demands, control, and support were associated with higher rates of short and long spells of absence in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. The differences were similar for the self-reports and external assessments. After adjustment for grade of employment, the differences were diminished but generally remained significant for short spells. The combination of high demands and low control was only associated with higher rates of short spells in the lower grades. CONCLUSIONS. The psychosocial work environment predicts rates of sickness absence. Increased levels of control and support at work could have beneficial effects in terms of both improving the health and well-being of employees and increasing productivity. PMID:8604757

North, F M; Syme, S L; Feeney, A; Shipley, M; Marmot, M

1996-01-01

465

Finnish occupational physicians' and nurses' experience of work related stress management: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Work-related stress has a strong influence on the health of workers. Occupational health care has an important role in assessing and managing this stress in collaboration with enterprises. The methods to reduce stress can be directed at the individual and at the organization as a whole. There is little information about stress handling methods in occupational health practices. This study aims to investigate these practices in Finnish occupational health physicians' and nurses' work. The data were generated through semi structured interviews of ten voluntary occupational physicians and eight occupational nurses in the metropolitan area of Finland in June 2009. The work-related stress was experienced as difficult to handle. There was no specific protocol for handling work-related stress in practice. Stress reduction activities were mostly randomly directed at the individual or the organizational level. Activities remained mainly on the individual level and were rarely allocated to the organization. There is a need for structured guidelines on how to manage work-related stress to assure standardized action on both the individual and organizational level. The roles of the physician, nurse and psychologist should be clarified in teamwork. Their collaborative activities should be directed also to the organisational level. PMID:22020021

Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta

2011-01-01

466

Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers  

PubMed Central

Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.689.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.113.96) age 5069 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.573.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.192.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.855.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

2014-01-01

467

A Qualitative Study on Working Experience of Rural Doctors in Malappuram District of Kerala, India  

PubMed Central

Background: Improving the working conditions of rural doctors is an important issue to increase the quality of health services to target groups. Objectives: To assess the working experience of rural doctors at primary health care level. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted among 30 medical officers from 21 primary health centers in Malappuram district of Kerala, India. In-depth interview was conducted, and content analysis was performed with the identification of themes based on the responses obtained. Results: There were 19 males and 11 females belonged to 25 to 55 years age group. About 70% (21) of them were graduates with MBBS qualification, and the rest were postgraduates. About 2/3rd of them (20) had experience of less than 5 years. They expressed difficulty in managing the work in stipulated time period. However, this had never affected their OP management in anyway. They told that higher authorities were supportive, but they faced some opposition from the public in implementation of national program. Few opined that the training received was grossly insufficient in running the administrative affairs of the health center. Most of them satisfied with physical infrastructure, but manpower including medical officers and supporting staff were not sufficient. Some opined that the age of retirement is too early and should be increased. They participated in Continuing Medical Education, but expressed that it's content should suit to primary health care level. Conclusion: This study highlighted their concern to patient care and time, field work, administrative work, infrastructure, professional development, and future prospects. Further large scale evaluation studies will explore the situational analysis of it. PMID:25161972

Vallikunnu, Vinod; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Sarkar, Sonali; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Harichandrakumar, K. T.

2014-01-01

468

A Time Study of Physicians Work in a German University Eye Hospital to Estimate Unit Costs  

PubMed Central

Background Technical efficiency of hospital services is debated since performance has been heterogeneous. Staff time represents the main resource in patient care and its inappropriate allocation has been identified as a key factor of inefficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the utilisation of physicians work time stratified by staff groups, tasks and places of work. A further aim was to use these data to estimate resource use per unit of output. Methods A self-reporting work-sampling study was carried during 14-days at a University Eye Hospital. Staff costs of physicians per unit of output were calculated at the wards, the operating rooms and the outpatient unit. Results Forty per cent of total work time was spent in contact with the patient. Thirty per cent was spent with documentation tasks. Time spent with documentation tasks declined monotonically with increasing seniority of staff. Unit costs were 56 per patient day at the wards, 77 and 20 per intervention at the operating rooms for inpatients and outpatients, respectively, and 33 per contact at the outpatient unit. Substantial differences in resources directly dedicated to the patient were found between these locations. Conclusion The presented data provide unprecedented units costs in inpatient Ophthalmology. Future research should focus on analysing factors that influence differences in time allocation, such as types of patients, organisation of care processes and composition of staff. PMID:25803022

Wolff, Jan; McCrone, Paul; Patel, Anita; Auber, Gerd; Reinhard, Thomas

2015-01-01

469

Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-08-01

470

[Tell me what you are like--a study of mentorship conferences in health and social work graduate studies].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate educational systems with regard to mentoring practice in two Schools of Health and a School of Social Work. Student-mentor interaction, notably mentor receptiveness, was studied through storytelling and discourse analysis from a practical/theoretical perspective. The study revealed that clinical mentors competencies are insufficient. As would be expected, clinical mentors, however, are superior to college teachers in practical mentoring situations. The study is based on observations of six different mentoring situations in three different groups/contexts. PMID:9393127

Finstad, H H

1997-01-01

471

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a technique to produce samples for x-ray diffraction studies on the Tel-X-Ometer 80 x-ray apparatus from readily available crystalline powders and discusses observations of transverse modes of an optical resonator. (SK)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1982-01-01

472

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1978-01-01

473

Shift work and the risk of metabolic syndrome: a nested case-control study.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to examine the association between shift work and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) using a large-scale longitudinal study design. Data were collected from a historical cohort of health checkups in the Japanese population. The baseline survey, which involved 16,952 inhabitants of the Minami Saku area of the Nagano Prefecture, was started in 1978. A nested case-control study was conducted between 1987 and 1990. This analysis was restricted to 6,712 men and women (age range 25-59 years). A conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the risk of MetS associated with shift work. Compared with the day workers, shift workers had a significantly higher risk of MetS (odds ratio 1.87; 95% CI, 1.13-3.08). Our results demonstrate that shift work was strongly associated with MetS. The study suggests appropriate dietary habits as a basis for managing the MetS risk of shift workers. PMID:21618947

Li, Ying; Sato, Yasuto; Yamaguchi, Naohito

2011-01-01

474

Psychological and Social Work Factors as Predictors of Mental Distress: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. caseness level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline cases were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.453.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.430.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.400.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.410.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. PMID:25048033

Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

2014-01-01

475

Psychological and social work factors as predictors of mental distress: a prospective study.  

PubMed

Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. "caseness" level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline "cases" were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45-3.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.43-0.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.40-0.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.41-0.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. PMID:25048033

Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

2014-01-01

476

Openness in cross-cultural work settings: a multicountry study of expatriates.  

PubMed

Openness plays an important role in determining what kind of experiences individuals seek out not only in their personal lives, but also in work environments. The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the influence of openness and its facets on the decision to work abroad and (b) to study whether employees' openness relates to cross-cultural adjustment as well as job and life satisfaction. We investigated these questions among a sample of 2,096 expatriates. In addition to self-reports of openness and cross-cultural adjustment, ratings of subjects' adjustment were also obtained from 928 knowledgeable others. The openness facets of actions, ideas, and values appear to be good predictors of acceptance of international assignments. In addition, global Openness and its facets Openness to actions and feelings relate to self- and other ratings of cross-cultural adjustment. PMID:24003885

Albrecht, Anne-Grit; Dilchert, Stephan; Deller, Jrgen; Paulus, Frieder M

2014-01-01

477

Reducing vividness and emotional intensity of recurrent "flashforwards" by taxing working memory: an analogue study.  

PubMed

Several studies have found that making eye movements while retrieving visual images about past negative events reduces their vividness and emotional intensity. A working memory account states that eye movements tax working memory and interfere with visual imagery, thus degrading images. This study examined whether eye movements also affect recurrent, intrusive visual images about potential future catastrophes ("flashforwards") in a sample of female undergraduates who had indicated on a screening-scale that they suffer from such intrusions. They were asked to recall two intrusive images with or without making eye movements. Before and after each condition, participants retrieved the image, and rated its vividness and emotionality. Results showed that vividness of intrusive images was lower after recall with eye movement, relative to recall only, and there was a similar trend for emotionality. Potential implications are discussed. PMID:21376527

Engelhard, Iris M; van den Hout, Marcel A; Dek, Eliane C P; Giele, Catharina L; van der Wielen, Jan-Willem; Reijnen, Marthe J; van Roij, Birgit

2011-05-01

478

The work of commissioning: a multisite case study of healthcare commissioning in England's NHS  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the work of commissioning care for people with long-term conditions and the factors inhibiting or facilitating commissioners making service change. Design Multisite mixed methods case study research, combining qualitative analysis of interviews, documents and observation of meetings. Participants Primary care trust managers and clinicians, general practice-based commissioners, National Health Service trust and foundation trust senior managers and clinicians, voluntary sector and local government representatives. Setting Three commissioning communities (areas covered by a primary care trust) in England, 20102012. Results Commissioning services for people with long-term conditions was a long drawn-out process involving a range of activities and partners. Only some of the activities undertaken by commissioners, such as assessment of local health needs, coordination of healthcare planning and service specification, appeared in the official commissioning cycle promoted by the Department of Health. Commissioners undertook a significant range of additional activities focused on reviewing and redesigning services and providing support for implementation of new services. These activities often involved partnership working with providers and other stakeholders and appeared to be largely divorced from contracting and financial negotiations. At least for long-term condition services, the time and effort involved in such work appeared to be disproportionate to the anticipated or likely service gains. Commissioners adopting an incremental approach to service change in defined and manageable areas of work appeared to be more successful in terms of delivering planned changes in service delivery than those attempting to bring about wide-scale change across complex systems. Conclusions Commissioning for long-term condition services challenges the conventional distinction between commissioners and providers with a significant amount of work focused on redesigning services in partnership with providers. Such work is labour-intensive and potentially unsustainable at a time of reduced finances. New clinical commissioning groups will need to determine how best to balance the relational and transactional elements of commissioning. PMID:24014483

Shaw, Sara E; Smith, Judith A; Porter, Alison; Rosen, Rebecca; Mays, Nicholas

2013-01-01

479

Primacy, recency, and the variability of data in studies of animals working memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance measures in many experiments on animal memory are expected to have an underlying binomial distribution, with\\u000a additional variance contributed, for example, by between- subject differences. This paper examines whether the data from published\\u000a studies of serial position effects (primacy and recency) in animals working memory conform to that expectation. In most cases,\\u000a the variance, when it can be

E. A. Gaffan

1992-01-01

480

A Longitudinal Study of Website Accessibility: Have Social Work Education Websites Become More Accessible?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study (N=45 schools) sought to determine the accessibility of baccalaureate social work program websites in 2003 and 2008 using Priority 1 checkpoints from the World Wide Web Consortium 1.0 guidelines. Paired t-test results indicate that the mean accessibility scores of five of the nine items (plus the website accessibility scale as a whole) was statistically higher after five years.

Angela L. Curl; Deborah D. Bowers

2009-01-01

481

Extension Note  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) commonly grows in mixed stands, and is a relatively important tree species in the Nelson Forest Region. Researchers at the University of British Columbia undertook a larch productivity study, which included collecting data from ??? stem analysis plots. Of these, ?? plots were suitable for developing growth intercept models. The data were ana- lyzed using

Gordon D. Nigh; David Brisco; David New

482

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

483

Chemistry Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Short articles on the determination of the activation energy of the thiosulphate-acid reaction, an experiment on hydrolysis of similar metal salt solutions, the preparation and electrolytic properties of iodine monochloride and iodine trochloride, and instructions for apparatus enabling laboratory study of the thermal cracking of ethylbenzene. (AL)

School Science Review, 1972

1972-01-01

484

RESEARCH NOTE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frequency of tornadoes on the Canadian Prairies is a subject of much current debate. The author questions the traditional view that tornado frequency on the Prairies decreases westwards from southern Manitoba. A study of various sources of information on severe thunderstorm events on both sides ofthe 49thparallel leads to the conclusion that prairie tornadoes often are not isolated singular

Alec H. Paul

1981-01-01

485

Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR?=?1.91; 1.073.42), and in the physical (OR?=?1.62; 1.022.66), and environmental (OR?=?2.39; 1.374.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR?=?1.82; 1.003.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR?=?1.55, 1.062.26) and environmental (OR?=?1.69; 1.082.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. PMID:24884707

2014-01-01

486

Ethical and practical guidelines for reporting genetic research results to study participants: updated guidelines from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute working group.  

PubMed

In January 2009, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening 5 years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that technological and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals that would not have been possible a decade ago. Although unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the working group produced 5 recommendations. The working group offers 2 recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to institutional review boards, investigators, research institutions, and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants. PMID:21156933

Fabsitz, Richard R; McGuire, Amy; Sharp, Richard R; Puggal, Mona; Beskow, Laura M; Biesecker, Leslie G; Bookman, Ebony; Burke, Wylie; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Church, George; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Eckfeldt, John H; Fernandez, Conrad V; Fisher, Rebecca; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Gabriel, Stacey; Gachupin, Francine; James, Cynthia; Jarvik, Gail P; Kittles, Rick; Leib, Jennifer R; O'Donnell, Christopher; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Schully, Sheri D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sze, Rebecca K F; Thakuria, Joseph V; Wolf, Susan M; Burke, Gregory L

2010-12-01

487

Woodworking injuries: a comparative study of work-related and hobby-related accidents.  

PubMed

The primary objective of this study was to describe the injury characteristics and demographics of patients injured during woodworking activities, upon their arrival to the emergency department in a regional of France where this industry is prevalent. The secondary objective was to compare patient and injury characteristics for work-related and hobby-related accidents. A cohort of 87 patients who had suffered a woodworking accident over a two-year period was evaluated; 79 were available for follow-up. The context and circumstances of the accident, nature and location of the injuries and patient demographics were recorded. Hobby-related accidents accounted for two-thirds of the accidents (51/79). Most of the injured workers were either loggers (35%) or carpenters (46%). The hand was injured in 53 cases (67%). Work-related accidents resulted in significantly more serious consequences in terms of hospital stay, work stoppage, resumption of work or retraining than hobby-related accidents. For the workplace accidents, 86% occurred on new machines; more than 25% of the machines involved in accidents at home were over 15 years. Sixty-eight per cent of workers were wearing their safety gear, while only 31% of those injured during recreational woodworking wore the appropriate gear. Several elements of prevention should be improved: information about the need to maintain the equipment, protect the worker with suitable clothing, and learn which maneuvers are considered hazardous. Safety gear should be regularly inspected in the workplace. PMID:25043313

Loisel, F; Bonin, S; Jeunet, L; Pauchot, J; Tropet, Y; Obert, L

2014-10-01

488

Linnaeus' study of Swedish swidden cultivation: Pioneering ethnographic work on the 'economy of nature'.  

PubMed

Carl Linnaeus' work on the 'economy of nature' was a major early development in what became the modern field of ecology. This analysis suggests that a key subject of this work that has been ignored or misunderstood for 250years is the rural livelihoods, especially swidden (or slash-and-burn) agriculture, which Linnaeus studied during his expeditions through rural Sweden. Rereading his reports in the light of modern work on swiddens, political ecology, and the history of science affords a new appreciation of Linnaeus' insights into traditional systems of resource exploitation. The logic of nutrient cycling in swidden agriculture and its utilization of natural dynamics to serve human ends exemplify the principles of the 'economy of nature', and gave Linnaeus a philosophical basis for understanding and defending this system of agriculture as well as other rural resource use systems in Sweden. This analysis sheds new light on Linnaeus' ethnographic work, his view of folk environmental knowledge, and his often derided identification with Sweden's ethnic peoples. PMID:25155194

Dove, Michael R

2015-04-01

489

Burnout in nurses working in Portuguese palliative care teams: a mixed methods study.  

PubMed

Repeat contact with suffering, dying, and death is considered to be a risk factor for burnout among health professionals, particularly nurses working in palliative care. A mixed methods study was conducted to identify burnout levels, risk and protective factors, prevention strategies, and the emotional impact of working in palliative care among nurses in Portugal. A quantitative questionnaire was completed by nursing members of nine different palliative care teams and was supported by interviews and observation. Although the participants were exposed to risk factors, such as work overload, disorganisation, difficult relationships within the team and with patients' relatives, they showed a low risk of burnout. These results appear to be related both to the protective factors identified-namely the ethic of care in the relationship the nurses establish with patients, families, and within their teams-and to the preventive strategies they actively adopt for burnout prevention. The positive aspects of the nurses' roles help them to build a positive view of their work, which also promotes their own personal and professional development. PMID:23123982

Fonseca, Antonio; Pereira, Sandra; Carvalho, Ana Sofia

2012-08-01

490

Health Care Costs and the Socioeconomic Consequences of Work Injuries in Brazil: A Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Work injuries are a worldwide public health problem but little is known about their socioeconomic impact. This prospective longitudinal study estimates the direct health care costs and socioeconomic consequences of work injuries for 406 workers identified in the emergency departments of the two largest public hospitals in Salvador, Brazil, from June through September 2005. After hospital discharge workers were followed up monthly until their return to work. Most insured workers were unaware of their rights or of how to obtain insurance benefits (81.6%). Approximately half the cases suffered loss of earnings, and women were more frequently dismissed than men. The most frequently reported family consequences were: need for a family member to act as a caregiver and difficulties with daily expenses. Total costs were US$40,077.00 but individual costs varied widely, according to injury severity. Out-of-pocket costs accounted for the highest proportion of total costs (50.5%) and increased with severity (57.6%). Most out-of-pocket costs were related to transport and purchasing medicines and other wound care products. The second largest contribution (40.6%) came from the public National Health System ? SUS. Employer participation was negligible. Health care funding must be discussed to alleviate the economic burden of work injuries on workers. PMID:23803496

SANTANA, Vilma Sousa; FERNANDES DE SOUZA, Luis Eugnio Portela; PINTO, Isabela Cardoso de Matos

2013-01-01

491

The effect of individual differences in working memory capacity on sentence comprehension: an FMRI study.  

PubMed

This study explores the interaction between working memory systems and language processing by examining how differences in working memory capacity (WMC) modulates neural activation levels and functional connectivity during sentence comprehension. The results indicate that two working memory systems may be involved in sentence comprehension, the verbal working memory system and the episodic buffer, but during different phases of the task. A sub-region of the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) was correlated with WMC during the probe and not during sentence reading while the only region to reveal a correlation with WMC during sentence reading was the posterior cingulate/precuneus area, a region linked to event representation. In addition, functional connectivity analysis suggests that there were two distinct networks affected by WMC. The first was a semantic network that included the middle temporal cortex, an anterior region of the inferior frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal region. The second included the posterior cingulate and BA 45 of the inferior frontal gyrus. We propose here that high capacity readers may generate an event representation of the sentence during reading that aids in comprehension and that this event representation involves the processing of the posterior cingulate cortex. PMID:23124385

Newman, Sharlene D; Malaia, Evie; Seo, Roy; Cheng, Hu

2013-07-01

492

Exploring varieties of knowledge in safe work practices - an ethnographic study of surgical teams  

PubMed Central

Background Within existing research in health and medicine, the nature of knowledge on how teams conduct safe work practices has yet to be properly explored. Methods We address this concern by exploring the varieties in which knowledge is expressed during interdisciplinary surgical operations. Specifically, the study was conducted in a surgical section of a Norwegian regional general hospital, between January and April of 2010, by means of an ethnographic design combining detailed non-participant observations, conversations and semi-structured interviews. Results Based on an analysis of the gathered data, we identify three particular themes in how knowledge is expressed by operating room personnel: (i) the ability and variety individuals demonstrate in handling multiple sources of information, before reaching a particular decision, (ii) the variety of ways awareness or anticipation of future events is expressed, and (iii) the different ways sudden and unexpected situations are handled by the individual team members. Conclusions We conclude that these facets of knowledge bring different insights into how safe work practices are achieved at an individual and team level in surgical operations, thus adding to the existing understanding of the nature of knowledge in safe work practices in surgical operations. Future research should focus on exploring and documenting the relationships between various elements of knowledge and safe work practices, in different surgical settings and countries. PMID:21914183

2011-01-01

493

Work and Risk: Perceptions of Nuclear-Power Personnel. a Study in Grounded Theory.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utility industry has devoted time and money to assure personnel within nuclear power plants are informed about occupational risks. Radiation-protection training programs are designed to present information to employees about occupational radiation and protective procedures. Work -related concerns are known to create stress, affect the morale of the workforce, influence collective bargaining, and increase compensation claims. This study was designed to determine perceptions of risk among employees of nuclear power plants and identify variables that influence these perceptions. Four power plants were included in the study, one in Canada and three in the United States. Data were generated through participant observations and interviews of 350 participants during a period of 3 weeks at each plant. Data were gathered and analyzed following procedures advanced by Grounded Theory, a naturalistic methodology used in this study. Training content, information, and communication materials were additional sources of data. Findings indicated employees believed health and safety risks existed within the work environment. Perceptions of risk were influenced by training quality, the work environment, nuclear myths and images of the general public, and fears of family members. Among the three groups of workers, administration personnel, security personnel, and radiation workers, the latter identified a larger number of risks. Workers perceived radiation risks, shift work, and steam pipe ruptures as high-level concerns. Experiencing stress, making mistakes, and fear of sabotage were concerns shared among all employee groups at various levels of concern. Strategies developed by employees were used to control risk. Strategies included teamwork, humor, monitoring, avoidance, reframing, and activism. When risks were perceived as uncontrollable, the employee left the plant. A coping strategy of transferring concerns about radiological risks to nonradiological risks were uncovered in the data. Implications and recommendations include (a) the development of interactive training sessions concerning perceptions and facts of radiological exposures, (b) informational training for nonradiological employees, and (c) educational material development for family members and friends of employees.

Fields, Claire Dewitt

1992-01-01

494

Work-related stress and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

Work-related stress is a pattern of reactions to work demands unmatched to nurses' knowledge, skills, or abilities; these challenges exceed their ability to cope, resulting in burnout, turnover, and low quality patient care. An institution-based cross-sectional study of 343 nurses was conducted in public hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2012. Data were collected by pretested and self-administered questionnaires using a nursing stress scale. One hundred twenty-one (37.8%) (95% confidence interval: 34.3 to 39.1) nurses reported experiencing occupational stress. Significant associations were found between nurses' stress and gender, work shift, illness, marital status, and worksite or unit. Prevalence of work-related stress was higher than expected and opportunities exist for stake holders to design stress reduction and management programs for nurses. PMID:25101930

Salilih, Selamawit Zewdu; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu

2014-08-01

495

NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica  

E-print Network

NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica accumulation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) under transport Si, through transpiration, from soils to shoots, while others actively transport silica manipulated transpiration rates by changing humidity and air movements around pot-grown plants receiving

Kitajima, Kaoru

496

Book notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sociology of Religion Steve Bruce (ed.), 1995 Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing 1240 pp., 2 Vols., 240.00 (hb) ISBN 1852788992Jesus in the Qur'an Geoffrey Parrinder, 1995 Oxford: Oneworld Publications 187 pp., 8.95 (pb) ISBN 1851680942Revelation, History and the Dialogue of Religions: A Study of Bhartrhari and Bonaventure David Carpenter, 1995 Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books 208 pp., US$23.00 (pb) ISBN 1570750394Jesus

Elisabeth Arweck

1997-01-01

497

Publishers' Note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS cod