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1

State Education Agency Involvement in Change Agent Programs. Study of Change Agent Programs: A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings of a study that examined the role of the state education agency (SEA) in implementing innovative projects within school districts are presented in this paper. The following federal programs were investigated: (1) the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title III, Innovative Projects; (2) ESEA Title VII, Bilingual Projects; (3)…

Prusoff, Linda L.; Sumner, Gerald C.

2

Research note Working and learning with electronic performance support systems: an effectiveness study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the effectiveness of electronic performance support systems (EPSS) is reported. Some of the expected advantages of EPSS, such as an increase in productivity and improved learning are evaluated with insurance agents using laptop computers. Theoretical statements, research design and hypotheses are presented. The conclusion is that EPSS was cheaper than classroom training and had some benefits for

Theo J. Bastiaens; Wim J. Nijhof; Jan N. Streumer; Harmen J. Abma

3

Shooting Gallery Notes. Working Paper #22. Preliminary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contains ethnographic participant-observation field notes taken on a one-night visit to a "shooting gallery" in East Harlem (New York City) along with background information and commentary. East Harlem, also referred to as "El Barrio" or Spanish Harlem, is a 200-square block neighborhood on the upper East Side of Manhattan in New York…

Bourgois, Philippe

4

Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often…

Dimitriadis, Greg

2011-01-01

5

Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals  

SciTech Connect

In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

Garbey, M. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-07-01

6

Performance Studies: Notes on the Early Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explain the development of the performance studies department at New York University (NYU), this paper describes the early years of the department as it began in the graduate drama department, noting how an association of concerned people, including Robert Corrigan, Richard Schechner, Monroe Lippman, Michael Kirby, and Brooks McNamara, and…

McNamara, Brooks

7

Asymptotic analysis, Working Note No. 1: Basic concepts and definitions  

SciTech Connect

In this note we introduce the basic concepts of asymptotic analysis. After some comments of historical interest we begin by defining the order relations O, o, and O{sup {number_sign}}, which enable us to compare the asymptotic behavior of functions of a small positive parameter {epsilon} as {epsilon} {down_arrow} 0. Next, we introduce order functions, asymptotic sequences of order functions and more general gauge sets of order functions and define the concepts of an asymptotic approximation and an asymptotic expansion with respect to a given gauge set. This string of definitions culminates in the introduction of the concept of a regular asymptotic expansion, also known as a Poincare expansion, of a function f : (0, {epsilon}{sub o}) {yields} X, where X is a normed vector space of functions defined on a domain D {epsilon} R{sup N}. We conclude the note with the asymptotic analysis of an initial value problem whose solution is obtained in the form of a regular asymptotic expansion.

Garbey, M. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d`Analyse Numerique; Kaper, H.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-07-01

8

Notes from the Wise: Bringing Professional Study Notes into the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a two-week unit in a high school English class which teaches high school students how, why, and when to use professional study notes, such as "Cliffs Notes." Prepares students with the skills to research and write their own notes. (SR)

Skelton, Diane Jones

1997-01-01

9

Asymptotic analysis: Working note {number_sign}3, boundary layers  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter the authors discuss the asymptotic approximation of functions that display boundary-layer behavior. The purpose here is to introduce the basic concepts underlying the phenomenon, to illustrate its importance, and to describe some of the fundamental tools available for its analysis. To achieve their purpose in the clearest way possible, the authors will work with functions that are assumed to be given explicitly -- that is, functions f : (0,{epsilon}{sub 0}) {yields} X whose expressions are known, at least in principle. Only in the following chapter will they begin the study of functions that are given implicitly as solutions of boundary value problems -- the real stuff of which singular perturbation theory is made. Boundary-layer behavior is associated with asymptotic expansions that are regular {open_quotes}almost everywhere{close_quotes} -- that is, expansions that are regular on every compact subset of the domain of definition, but not near the boundary. These regular asymptotic expansions can be continued in a certain sense all the way up to the boundary, but a separate analysis is still necessary in the boundary layer. The boundary-layer analysis is purely local and aims at constructing local approximations in the neighborhood of each point of the singular part of the boundary. The problem of finding an asymptotic approximation is thus reduced to matching the various local approximations to the existing regular expansion valid in the interior of the domain. The authors are thinking, for example, of fluid flow (viscosity), combustion (Lewis number), and superconductivity (Ginzburg-Landau parameter) problems. Their solution may remain smooth over a wide range of parameter values, but as the parameters approach critical values, complicated patterns may emerge.

Garbey, M. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France). Laboratoire d`Analyse Numerique; Kaper, H.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01

10

Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

Barley, Stephen R.

1990-01-01

11

Nature of the Aircraft Component Failure Process: A Working Note.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The physics of component failures is normally assumed to follow a Poisson process. However, many studies have shown that the component demands in the U.S. Air Force supply system have a variance-to-mean ratio (VMR) much higher than 1.0, the VMR of a Poiss...

C. C. Sherbrooke F. M. Slay

1988-01-01

12

B. Reviews and notes bibliographies and works of reference  

Microsoft Academic Search

INDEX ISLAMICUS 1665–1905: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ARTICLES ON ISLAMIC SUBJECTS IN PERIODICALS AND OTHER COLLECTIVE PUBLICATIONS. Compiled by W.H. BEHN. Millersville, Adiyok, 1989. xxx, 870pp. US$ 125.— or DM 225.— or £72.00.CATALOGUE OF THE ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS IN THE DAIBER COLLECTION, INSTITUTE OF ORIENTAL CULTURE, UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO. By HANS DAIBER. Tokyo, Documentation Center for Asian Studies, Institute of Oriental Culture,

J. D. Latham; Geoffrey Roper; Frances M. Abercromby; John K. Cooley; Charles Tripp; Robin Bidwell; Adrian Brockett; Edmund Bosworth; C. H. Bleaney; J. M. Wagstaff; Philip Sadgrove; Geoffrey Khan; Sayed Shoukry; Haskell D. Isaacs; Jørgen Nielsen; Brian W. Beeley; Frances Bostock; Paul Starkey; Ernest Noble; Clive Holes; Charles Melville; Behruz Morvaridi; Annemarie Schimmel; Levon Avdoyan; Robert Hillenbrand; Michael Rogers; Mounira Khemir; Gillian M. Grant

1989-01-01

13

3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKERS AT THE FAR END ARE ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

14

4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKER IN THE CENTER IS ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

15

Note-Taking and Information Recall: An Empirical Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The amount of recorded information from a medical interview by note-taking was compared with that received with no note-taking. The study with 46 medical students suggests that note-taking facilitates recall and that there is a progressive decay of memory recall with the passage of time between the physician-patient interview and the recording of…

May, Jerry R.; Miller, Paul R.

1977-01-01

16

Non-Traditional Learning Study: Research Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) to determine the characteristics of individuals who had taken courses through the college's Non-Traditional Learning (NTL) sub-division. The records of students who had taken specified NTL courses during spring 1981, fall 1981 or spring 1982 were retrieved and analyzed. Study

Moraine Valley Community College., Palos Hills, IL. Office of Institutional Research.

17

2 Surgeries Work Equally Well for Female Incontinence, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... that needs further study, he noted. If both surgeries work equally well, how do a surgeon and patient choose the best option? Trinh said based on the lack of evidence supporting one technique over the other, surgeons should ...

18

Fit for purpose? Using the fit note with patients with chronic pain: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Staying in work may benefit patients with chronic pain, but can be difficult for GPs to negotiate with patients and their employers. The new fit note is designed to help this process, but little is known of how it is operating. Aim To explore GPs' views on the fit note, with particular reference to sickness certification for patients with chronic pain. Design and setting Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews in eight primary care trusts in south-west England. Method In-depth interviews with 13 GPs. Results GPs reported that the rationale behind the fit note is sound and that it may help patients with chronic pain to return to work earlier. However, GPs also reported barriers to successful fit note use, including the need to preserve doctor–patient relationships, inconsistent engagement from employers, GPs' lack of specialist occupational health knowledge, issues with fit note training, and whether a new form can achieve cultural shift. Conclusion While doctors agree that good work improves health outcomes, they do not think that fit notes will greatly alter sickness-certification rates without more concerted initiatives to manage the tripartite negotiation between doctor, patient, and employer.

Wainwright, Elaine; Wainwright, David; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

2011-01-01

19

Construct Validation of Group-Administered Achievement Tests Through Individual Testing. BTES. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note III-4. Phase III-A.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This technical note describes part of the work done to develop student achievement tests in reading and mathematics for use in a later phase of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. While the achievement battery consists primarily of group-administered multiple-choice test items, several individual-testing studies were conducted to examine the…

Filby, Nikola N.; Dishaw, Marilyn M.

20

Working towards a 'fit note': an experimental vignette survey of GPs  

PubMed Central

Background The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has designed a trial medical statement. Aim To compare fitness for work assessment outcomes and written advice across current and trial medical statements. To examine the use of and suggestions to improve the trial medical statement. Design of study Comparative study with a two-way mixed design using questionnaire-based vignettes presenting GPs with three hypothetical sick leave cases (back pain, depression, combined back pain and depression) and medical statements (current or trial). The questionnaire also gathered GP views of using the trial Med 3. Setting Nine primary care organisations (PCOs) in England, Scotland, and Wales. Method Five hundred and eighty-three GPs employed in PCOs in summer 2008 were randomised to receive a current or trial Med 3 postal questionnaire. GPs assessed vignette patients' fitness for work using the questionnaire medical statements. Results GPs using the trial Med 3 were less likely to advise refraining from work and more likely to provide written fitness for work advice compared to GPs using the current Med 3 form. Date sections of the trial Med 3 were used inconsistently, and a return to work date was unclear. GPs wanted further clarification of the implications of assessing a case as ‘fit for some work’ and its relationship to employers' willingness to follow GP advice about work. Conclusion The study indicates a revised form may reduce the number of patients advised to refrain from work and increase the provision of written fitness for work information.

Sallis, Anna; Birkin, Richard; Munir, Fehmidah

2010-01-01

21

Examining the Effects of Notetaking Format on Achievement When Students Construct and Study Computerized Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two experiments conducted to investigate the effects of notetaking format on achievement. Students constructed and studied different types of notes: partial (framework and partial notes), skeletal (framework with no notes), and control (no framework and no notes). Found that, based on an application test, students who completed and…

Katayama, Andrew D.; Crooks, Steven M.

2001-01-01

22

Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

2013-01-01

23

Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing…

Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

2013-01-01

24

Research Teenagers' part-time employment and their Note work-related attitudes and aspirations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary We assessed the relationship between the quality (i.e., job characteristics, role stressors, and interpersonal relationships) and quantity of part-time employment, and work- related attitudes and aspirations among 349 students. Neither the linear nor the quad- ratic components of employment quantity predicted any of the outcome variables. Motivation to do good work was predicted both by role stressors and by

CATHERINE A. LOUGHLIN; JULIAN BARLING

1998-01-01

25

National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Programmatic Research and Development. A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different management systems used by the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Air Force in managing programmatic research and…

Lieberman, Arnold; And Others

26

National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Fundamental Research. A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different methods used by three Federal agencies--the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research--in managing fundamental research. Fundamental research…

Wirt, John; And Others

27

A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Charles (2003) examines the dynamic effects of disability, finding a small decline in earnings and hours following disability onset, even for those who have positive disability reports for each of the next ten years. These outcomes also rebound quickly after the onset of disability. In recent work, Meyer and Mok (2006), find a much larger loss in…

Mok, Wallace K. C.; Meyer, Bruce D.; Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Achen, Alexandra C.

2008-01-01

28

Research Note--A Pilot Cyber Counseling Course in a Graduate Social Work Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyber counseling is a new and growing medium for offering mental health services to children and youth. However, there is a lack of identification of the core competencies required to provide effective online counseling. A school of social work, in partnership with a national service agency providing online counseling to children and youth,…

Mishna, Faye; Tufford, Lea; Cook, Charlene; Bogo, Marion

2013-01-01

29

Crowdsourcing Student Notes to Provide Real-Time Study Guides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

What if you had access to all your students' notes, their questions, their answers to questions you posed in class and when they were confused in class. What could you do with that information to help guide your students. With the advent of in-class tools like LectureTools it is now possible to have such access to student data. This paper describes on-going research at the University of Michigan to explore how best to mine student notes and questions to provide adaptive learning opportunities to students. Student notes are parsed in real-time searching for keywords from the geosciences. These words and phrases are then linked to a variety of resources for those wishing further clarification. This presentation will demonstrate the tools that have been generated for students and report on the students' assessment of the value of such information. The presentation will use LectureTools to demonstrate the crowdsourcing. Attendees are encouraged to bring a mobile device to the session.

Samson, P. J.

2013-12-01

30

Putting museum studies to work  

Microsoft Academic Search

A measure of the long-term success of museum continuing education programmes is the degree to which learning is put to use. This paper explores the outcomes of a comparative case analysis that was undertaken to explore the influence of both personal agency and workplace climate on the transfer of learning from a professional education programme to museum settings. This study

Joy Anne Davis

2011-01-01

31

The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

Lawanto, O.

2012-01-01

32

Blue Note  

ScienceCinema

Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08

33

Blue Note  

SciTech Connect

Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

Murray Gibson

2007-04-27

34

Inviting Patients to Read Their Doctors' Notes: A Quasi-experimental Study and a Look Ahead  

PubMed Central

Background Little information exists about what primary care physicians (PCPs) and patients experience if patients are invited to read their doctors’ office notes. Objective To evaluate the effect on doctors and patients of facilitating patient access to visit notes over secure Internet portals. Design Quasi-experimental trial of PCPs and patient volunteers in a year-long program that provided patients with electronic links to their doctors’ notes. Setting Primary care practices at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Massachusetts, Geisinger Health System (GHS) in Pennsylvania, and Harborview Medical Center (HMC) in Washington. Participants 105 PCPs and 13 564 of their patients who had at least 1 completed note available during the intervention period. Measurements Portal use and electronic messaging by patients and surveys focusing on participants’ perceptions of behaviors, benefits, and negative consequences. Results 11 797 of 13 564 patients with visit notes available opened at least 1 note (84% at BIDMC, 92% at GHS, and 47% at HMC). Of 5391 patients who opened at least 1 note and completed a postintervention survey, 77% to 87% across the 3 sites reported that open notes helped them feel more in control of their care; 60% to 78% of those taking medications reported increased medication adherence; 26% to 36% had privacy concerns; 1% to 8% reported that the notes caused confusion, worry, or offense; and 20% to 42% reported sharing notes with others. The volume of electronic messages from patients did not change. After the intervention, few doctors reported longer visits (0% to 5%) or more time addressing patients’ questions outside of visits (0% to 8%), with practice size having little effect; 3% to 36% of doctors reported changing documentation content; and 0% to 21% reported taking more time writing notes. Looking ahead, 59% to 62% of patients believed that they should be able to add comments to a doctor’s note. One out of 3 patients believed that they should be able to approve the notes’ contents, but 85% to 96% of doctors did not agree. At the end of the experimental period, 99% of patients wanted open notes to continue and no doctor elected to stop. Limitations Only 3 geographic areas were represented, and most participants were experienced in using portals. Doctors volunteering to participate and patients using portals and completing surveys may tend to offer favorable feedback, and the response rate of the patient surveys (41%) may further limit generalizability. Conclusion Patients accessed visit notes frequently, a large majority reported clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, and virtually all patients wanted the practice to continue. With doctors experiencing no more than a modest effect on their work lives, open notes seem worthy of widespread adoption. Primary Funding Source The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Drane Family Fund, the Richard and Florence Koplow Charitable Foundation, and the National Cancer Institute.

Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan; Bell, Sigall K.; Darer, Jonathan D.; Elmore, Joann G.; Farag, Nadine; Feldman, Henry J.; Mejilla, Roanne; Ngo, Long; Ralston, James D.; Ross, Stephen E.; Trivedi, Neha; Vodicka, Elisabeth; Leveille, Suzanne G.

2013-01-01

35

Studying Conceptions of Reality--A Metatheoretical Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a case for the approach to thinking which takes logicality for granted and studies understanding. Argues that description of the qualitatively different ways in which people experience and understand various aspects of reality make up an autonomous field of inquiry, called phenomenography. (NEC)

Marton, Ference

1981-01-01

36

Resource Allocation and Budgeting for the 1972-73 Mini-Schools of the Alum Rock Voucher Demonstration. Analysis of the Education Voucher Demonstration. A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Working Note documents the first year's events and outcomes in developing the budgeting system and resource allocation rules to support the Education Voucher Demonstration. The district now has systems for per pupil resource allocation and school/minischool cost center accounting. The basic voucher of $1,041 for grades 7-8, and $788 for…

Haggart, S. A.; Furry, W. S.

37

Heaping in anniversary reaction studies: a cautionary note.  

PubMed

Several studies have reported evidence that death is often associated with significant ceremonial events like holidays and birthdays, a phenomenon variously called the "anniversary reaction," "holiday effect," "birthday blues," etc. This article, using data from the social security death index (SSDI), shows how evidence for this phenomenon can arise from an artifact in death records called "death heaping" in which certain dates, usually the 1st or the 15th, are systematically entered for missing data. In this study, each calendar birthday for the year 2003 in the SSDI was paired with either the 14th or 15th calendar day of death. For each pairing, there were more deaths for the 15th than the 14th. A second analysis compared the correspondence between dying on the same day of the month as one's birthday for the first 28 days of the month. A significantly greater number of birth-death combinations occurred for the 1st and 15th day of the month. These results suggest that studies of "anniversary reactions" should conduct preliminary evaluations to consider the possibility that statistically significant relationships do not arise from "death heaping." PMID:17844772

Abel, Ernest L; Kruger, Michael L

38

TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: Reproducible noncontact force spectroscopy for studying molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed an alternative method to measure force curves reproducibly by noncontact force spectroscopy for studying molecules. In this method, the force curve is collected without disabling the tip-sample distance feedback thereby in a non-destructive manner. The method can be used when the interaction force versus the tip-sample distance is monotonic and it is useful especially for measuring force curves on organic surfaces. We safely obtained the force curves, which are overlapped with those measured by the conventional method on graphite and lead-phthalocyanine samples in ultra high vacuum.

Hosokawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

2009-09-01

39

What drives the persistence of presenteeism as a managerial value in hotels?: Observations noted during an Irish work-life balance research project  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research project on work-life balance and Irish hotel managers by McLaughlin and Cullen (Managers and work-life balance: a case of Irish hospitality industry, Irish Management Institute, Dublin) noted high levels of presenteeism amongst focus group participants. This paper analyses the qualitative data obtained during this project with a view to identifying drivers of this finding and discusses possible consequences

John Cullen; Andrew McLaughlin

2006-01-01

40

Work Study Techniques Help Planning of Construction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper comprises essentially two parts. Part 1 is an attempt to review the fundamentals which underpin work study and quantitative management. In part 2 the focus is on simulation of construction operations.

A. Jaafari

1986-01-01

41

Working While Studying: Does It Matter? An Examination of the Washington State Work Study Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of working on academic performance and persistence of a sample of full-time undergraduates enrolled in Washington State's public and private institutions during fall 1983 through spring 1985 was studied. Data sources included: student records for the State Work Study, College Work Study, and nonworking financial aid recipients; and…

Van de Water, Gordon; Augenblick, John

42

New Study Finds Substance That Helps Working Memory Work Better  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Maura Furey and her colleagues have found that the drug physostigmine apparently aids and improves performance of everyday working memory. Working memory is the process which temporarily holds information such as a phone number until a person is able to dial the number. Working with a variety of taxa from mice to monkeys, scientists interested in the causes of aging have recently made significant advances in scientists' understanding of the aging process. Researchers have long realized that aging and the pathologies associated with it have evolutionary, physiological and genetic causes, although the relative influence of each of these has been debated. By testing hypotheses in diverse fields, and with a variety of species (from short-lived to long-lived), researchers are growing closer to building an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the aging process.

1997-01-01

43

Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.  

PubMed

Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. PMID:23694704

Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

2013-09-01

44

Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,…

Feiman, Sharon

45

Total transvaginal endoscopic abdominal wall hernia repair: a NOTES survival study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothesis Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has gained widespread interest as a potentially less invasive alternative\\u000a to laparoscopic surgery or, else, an evolution as the next-generation surgery. The main objective of this study was to assess\\u000a the safety of transluminal abdominal wall hernia repair for potential human application by specifically investigating the\\u000a feasibility and challenges of using a transvaginal

D. Lomanto; U. Dhir; J. B. Y. So; W. K. Cheah; M. A. Moe; K. Y. Ho

2009-01-01

46

Note on the Incorporation of Hours-Worked Hours Paid-Ratios from the Employment Cost Index into Hours at Work Measures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beginning with the August 2003 Productivity and Costs news release, measures of hours at work used in the calculation of quarterly productivity measures will incorporate information from the Employment Cost Index (ECI) of the National Compensation Survey ...

2003-01-01

47

Editor's Note (April 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever worked with your students on some authentic problem? An issue in the school or community comes up and your class studies it? Most of you probably have. You have taught using some instructional technique for years, then someone "invents" it and it is suddenly in vogue. Project-based learning is one of these techniques. This selection includes notes from the Science and Children Field Editor about the value of project-based science.

Ohana, Chris

2004-04-01

48

Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

2013-01-01

49

Like Father, Like Son? A Note on the Intergenerational Transmission of IQ Scores. NBER Working Paper No. 14274  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More able parents tend to have more able children. While few would question the validity of this statement, there is little large-scale evidence on the intergenerational transmission of IQ scores. Using a larger and more comprehensive dataset than previous work, we are able to estimate the intergenerational correlation in IQ scores, examining not…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2008-01-01

50

A note on the working principle of rocket-borne nose tip d.c.-probes in the middle atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results obtained with rocket-borne nose tip probes which measured the full current/voltage characteristics by linearly sweeping the probe's driving potential between positive and negative against the rocket's body as a reference suggest that such probes work in the middle atmosphere as mobility probes. It was found that the electron current depends upon positive ion composition in the sheath of the probe and rather strongly upon ambient air temperature.

Widdel, H.-U.

1993-01-01

51

A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change  

SciTech Connect

The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Heerwagen, J.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

1995-02-01

52

Desegregation Case Studies. Volume II: Appendixes, Case Study Working Reports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the working report case studies of five urban school districts studied to determine the role of the Emergency School Aid Act (ESAA), Title IV of the Civil Rights Act, and Title IV enforcement by the Office of Civil Rights in school desegregation. Desegregation processes were examined in Dayton, Ohio, San Francisco,…

Russell, Susan Higley; And Others

53

A Prospective Study of the Case-Notes of MRSA-Positive Patients: A Vehicle of MRSA Spread  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received much publicity and remains a major problem for the health service. The aim of this study was to determine whether case-notes of MRSA-positive patients can act as a vehicle for MRSA transmission. PATIENTS AND METHODS A prospective study was performed of patients with active MRSA infection identified from a microbiology department database. Two swabs were taken from the cover of the case-notes and the page with the most recent entry for identification of MRSA using MRSA ID (Chromogenic agar medium), Pastorex and DNase tests. Positive case-notes were re-swabbed 96 h later. RESULTS A total of 50 MRSA-positive patients were identified from medical, surgical, high dependency and intensive care Three sets of notes were MRSA positive (3/50; 6%). None of the positive case-notes was positive on re-swabbing at 96 h. CONCLUSIONS Case-notes of MRSA-positive patients can act as carriers of MRSA with the potential to spread MRSA to both healthcare and non-healthcare workers without direct contact with infected patients. We recommend extending the universal precautions to the handling of case-notes belonging to MRSA-infected patients.

Hamza, N; Bazoua, G; Al-Shajerie, Y; Kubiak, E; James, P; Wong, C

2007-01-01

54

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

55

Physics Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents nine physics notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) speed of sound in a steel rod; (2) physics extracts-part four (1978); and (3) a graphical approach to acceleration. (HM)

School Science Review, 1980

1980-01-01

56

It's about Time: A Study of Hours Worked and Work Spillover among Law Firm Lawyers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study set out to address two basic questions: why do law firm lawyers work as much as they do and why do they feel that their work is invading their nonwork life? The results show that the factors related to the number of hours worked do not necessarily translate into feelings of work spillover and that the number of

Jean E. Wallace

1997-01-01

57

Cundy's Harbor Working Waterfront Study Village Profile and Policy Options.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study provides a profile of the Cundys Harbor village and its working waterfront. It also sets out some strategies for protecting the character and vitality of Cundys Harbors working waterfront and for addressing some of the challenges facing working...

2004-01-01

58

Flexible work arrangements in Greece: a study of employee perceptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to explore factors that affect employees' perceptions towards flexible work options; second, to examine whether the perceived benefits and barriers associated with work flexibility predict one's decision to participate in flexible work arrangements or not. A total of 362 Greek employees participated in the study to determine their attitudes towards flexible work

Stefanos K. Giannikis; Dimitrios M. Mihail

2011-01-01

59

A longitudinal study exploring the relationships between occupational stressors, non-work stressors, and work performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of intricate research into the relationships between work performance and other variables. This study examined the causal relationship between work, non-work stressors, and work performance. Using longitudinal multi-group data from three groups—university staff, trainee nurses, and part-time employees (overall N=244)—structural equation modelling was employed to explore one-way and reverse competing models. The results produced a good

Julian A. Edwards; Andrew Guppy; Tracey Cockerton

2007-01-01

60

International scoping study: accelerator working group report  

SciTech Connect

During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

2006-09-30

61

Sex Work and Students: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N=130) in the south of England, who completed a cross-sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological…

Roberts, Ron; Bergstrom, Sandra; La Rooy, David

2007-01-01

62

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

School Science Review, 1980

1980-01-01

63

Hybrid natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) sleeve gastrectomy: a feasibility study using an animal model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The indications for natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) are yet to be determined. Morbidly obese patients may be\\u000a one population that would benefit from this approach due to the elimination of wound complications and possibly a faster recovery.\\u000a As a bariatric restrictive procedure, sleeve gastrectomy could be one indication for NOTES. To test the feasibility of this\\u000a procedure with a

Yoav Mintz; Santiago Horgan; Michelle K. Savu; John Cullen; Alana Chock; Sonia Ramamoorthy; David W. Easter; Mark A. Talamini

2008-01-01

64

The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

2009-01-01

65

Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75% during ON, 89% during ON+RSC, and 99.5% during GNSC+RSC. The class mean scores on next-day quizzes during ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 39%, 68%, and 90%, respectively. The class mean score on review quizzes following ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 2.1, 5.3, and 7.8 (maximum score, 10), respectively. Results for five of the seven students provide convincing evidence of functional relationships between ON+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON and between GNSC+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON+RSC. Students', teachers', and parents' opinions regarding the RSC and GNSC procedures were highly favorable.

Wood, Charles L.

66

Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software are covered. This month`s Tech Notes include: (1) a study linking development and reservoir silting in El Salvador, (2) publication of a guide for small hydro operatos, and (3) publication of a text outlining the development of hydroelectric power in Russia.

NONE

1993-12-31

67

Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

Stern, David

2006-07-16

68

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

School Science Review, 1978

1978-01-01

69

General practitioner notes as a source of information for case-control studies in young women. UK National Case-Control Study Group.  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE--The UK National Case-Control Study was carried out to investigate the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk. This study investigates whether general practitioner notes could be used as the sole data source for epidemiological studies of young women and what the effect would be on non-response and recall bias. DESIGN--Case-control study with data on gynaecological, obstetric, and contraceptive history collected at interview and from general practitioners' notes. Information from these two sources was compared. SETTING--This was a population-based study. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 755 women with breast cancer aged under 36 years at diagnosis, each with an age-matched control, participated in the study. Response rates at interview were 72% and 89% for cases and controls but GP data were available for 90% of the 1049 case and first-selected control pairs. MAIN RESULTS--There was generally good agreement between the two data sources with respect to obstetric history and gynaecological procedures (hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and tubal ligation). The use of intra-uterine devices, or diaphragm, and partner's vasectomy were not reliably recorded in the GP's notes. The overall results of the UK study would have been qualitatively the same with respect to the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk if GP notes only had been used, in spite of the fact that only about half of all oral contraceptive usage was recorded in the notes. Response rates would have been higher, recall bias eliminated, and the cost of the study halved. CONCLUSIONS--When planning case-control studies in young women, the possibility of using GP notes as the primary data source should be considered. Lack of data on potential confounding factors is a possible drawback to such use. The practice of destroying GP's notes shortly after the death of patients seriously restricts the possibility of using these notes when studying rapidly fatal conditions.

Chilvers, C E; Pike, M C; Taylor, C N; Hermon, C; Crossley, B; Smith, S J

1994-01-01

70

Balancing Work with Study: Impact on Marketing Students' Experience of Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 57% of students in the United States work while attending college. For most of these students (81%), this is more than 20 hours a week. There has been shown to be a negative relationship between hours worked and academic achievement in studies in the United States as well as the United Kingdom and Australia. There is, however, no…

D'Alessandro, Steven; Volet, Simone

2012-01-01

71

Flexible work schedules and mental and physical health. A study of a working populationwithnon-traditionalworkinghours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The relationship between health complaints and flexible work schedules was studied in a patient population selected by general practitioners. Four hundred and eighty patients between 20 and 60 years, currently employed or on sick leave, completed questionnaires which compiled data on their work situation, subjective physical health, psychological well-being, and quality of sleep. Subjective health measurements were performed by

M. F. J. MARTENS; F. J. N. NIJHUIS; M. P. J. VAN BOXTEL

72

Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Routing protocols are subject to attacks that can harm individual users or network operations as a whole. This document provides a description and a summary of generic threats that affects routing protocols in general. This work describes threats, including threat sources and capabilities, threat actions, and threat consequences as well as a breakdown of routing functions that might be separately

S. Murphy

73

The Work Components Study: A Set of Measures for Work Motivation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of a set of measures for work motivation is described. Six scores, based on series of factor analytic studies, are identified as: (1) Challenge of job, (2) Tolerance for uncertainty, (3) Conservative security, (4) Competitiveness desirabil...

E. F. Borgatta

1967-01-01

74

Note: optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems.  

PubMed

A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time. PMID:24593402

Moscicki, J K; Sokolowska, D; Kwiatkowski, L; Dziob, D; Nowak, J

2014-02-01

75

U.S. Taxation of Business: Relevance of the European Experience. German Studies Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

American and European business taxation policies are compared in this booklet. Topics discussed in the paper include effects of the corporation income tax, integration of income taxation, and the value added tax. Two major differences between the American and European systems are noted. First, European countries derive substantial portions of…

McLure, Charles E., Jr.

76

Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

2009-01-01

77

Note: Design of a dose-controlled phototherapy system based on hyperspectral studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phototherapy consists in applying radiation on a part of the human body in order to treat an illness. A radiation dose is established for each treatment. In order to apply the correct dose a treatment time is set. However, in this work we have carried out some hyperspectral imaging studies that conclude that the radiation sources and the absorption properties of each patient can change. Therefore, the same treatment time does not ensure that the patient receive the appropriate dose. Thus, an optimized therapy system must measure the radiation emitted by the source and absorbed by the patient on real time to calculate the optimal dose at which the treatment is effective. In this work, we have developed and designed a custom system to measure the effectiveness of a radiative therapy treatment to adapt the appropriate dose for a specific patient in real time.

Ugarte, M. F.; Chávarri, L.; Briz, S.

2013-02-01

78

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

79

Should Middle School Students with Learning Problems Copy and Paste Notes from the Internet? Mixed-Methods Evidence of Study Barriers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the experimental phase of this mixed-methods study, 49 middle school students receiving special education services took notes from the Internet under either a written notes or a copy-and-paste notes condition. Immediate, cued-recall measures of factual learning showed that students who wrote their notes were better able to recall what they had noted, although recall was low for all students. However, after a one-week delay (which included two classroom opportunities to study their notes), students who pasted their notes performed significantly better on two different measures of factual learning than students who wrote their notes. Follow-up student interviews and analyses of notes revealed a robust explanatory theme: many written notes contained barriers to learning (e.g., illegible handwriting, spelling errors, and/or indecipherable paraphrases), which likely reduced the benefit of study time. Implications for instructing this population of students to use copy and paste while gathering information on the Internet are discussed.

Igo, L. B.; Brunning, Roger A.; Riccomini, Paul J.

2009-01-01

80

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

81

Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the…

Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

2012-01-01

82

What Works Clearinghouse[TM] Reporting Guide for Study Authors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides guidance about how to describe studies and report their findings in a way that is clear, complete, and transparent. This document does not include information about how studies are judged against What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards. For information about What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards, please refer to…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

2012-01-01

83

Generational differences in work values: a study of hospitality management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – While many studies focusing on work values have been conducted, few of them were specifically focused on generational differences within the hospitality context. This study aims to explore the structure of hospitality management work values and the perceived differences among three generations of managers and supervisors in the hospitality industry. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey of 398 managers and

Po-Ju Chen; Youngsoo Choi

2008-01-01

84

The Structure and Equilibrium Conditions of a Generalized Economic Canopy: A Note Working Paper 2005(2) Version 1 Draft 1 (May)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This note draws upon ecological models to describe the structure and equilibrium conditions of a generalized economic canopy consisting of three interactive economies assumed to be in competitive epiphytic, parasitic, and host relationships to each other. The maintained hypothesis is that generally (a) parasites are a drag on their hosts, (b) epiphytes interfere with normal functioning of both parasites and

V. Heinrich; S. Amavilah

85

Study of chaotic oscillations in practical work on radio physics  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a laboratory study of chaotic oscillations in deterministic dynamical systems. This work utilizes mathematical modeling and a computer experiment, as well as a direct study of the chaotic behavior of nonlinear electrical circuits.

Ezdov, A.A.; Il`in, V.A.; Petrova, E.B. [Moscow State Pedagogical Univ. (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01

86

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of notes describes (1) an optoelectronic apparatus for classroom demonstrations of mechanical laws, (2) a more efficient method for demonstrated nuclear chain reactions using electrically energized "traps" and ping-pong balls, and (3) an inexpensive demonstration for qualitative analysis of temperature-dependent resistance. (CS)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

87

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

88

Biology Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

89

Work on the Super and the Study of Atmospheric Ignition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By 1951, the group of young faculty (Bob Gluckstern and me), post doctoral fellows and graduate students, was comfortably established in Sloane Laboratory, and as "The Breit Group", in the department of physics at Yale. We didn't consciously separate ourselves from others in the department, and no one seemed to put us apart, but the association with Breit gave us a special "aura"--sometimes as objects of pity. Any project that involved the group as a whole, or a significant part of it, was discussed with Bob and me, and sometime in 1951 Breit called us in to consider a request that we look at the possibility of atmospheric ignition by a "Super" - as we still called it then, after Edward Teller. At the end of my stay at Los Alamos, in the summer of 1946, we youngsters had many bull sessions about that "Super", and the possibility of controlled fusion energy. We were confident that the former would be working in perhaps five years, and the latter within ten. After all, Han Bethe had shown us how the sun made its energy, and all that was needed to do was to replace a couple of his slow beta decays with something faster. As I write, some fifty-four years later, we still haven't got fusion energy for power. Our crystal balls were cloudier than Vicky Weisskopf's were to be! But I knew some of the lingo, and had worked out the way radiation penetrates the atmosphere (for understanding the Bikini tests), so in 1951, initially drew the task of looking at opacity, a key question in the bomb itself, and in the possibility of atmospheric ignition. Most of our limited work on the bomb was checking calculations that had been done by others as the Teller-Ulam design was being put together. At least some work on atmospheric ignition had already been done as well, but Teller wanted the "most careful physicist he knew" to do the definitive calculations, so Breit got the call. I do not recall all the members of the group who worked on the project and for that I apologize - no private notes were allowed because the work was classified. But in addition to Bob Gluckstern, I recall, for reasons that will appear, that John McHale was one of the project workers. At one point I think we were all working on nitrogen reactions ...

Hull, Mcallister

2001-03-01

90

Women's working conditions in hospital cleaning: a case study.  

PubMed

Hospital cleaning work, as health care work, is mainly performed by women all over Europe. Hospital cleaning activities represent a poorly studied sector although very important also for patient's health. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies to study cleaning work in three typical hospital units (Emergency Room, Haematology, General Medicine) of a roman University hospital where 198 women cleaners work. We analyzed the 731 technical actions performed in the three shifts and the related Organizational Constraints (OC). Working outsourcing, no occupational risks training, washing personal equipment at home, standing, long walking, early morning and night shift in emergency room, high monotony (>10 actions per hour) contact with biological and chemicals materials, risk conditions of accidents, artificial lights, hot microclimate and working in a cure setting represent the main Organizational Constraints. Differences among the three Units are discussed together with the importance of considering cleaning hospital as a preventive action towards hospital clinical risk. PMID:22317382

Salerno, Silvana; Kolman, Valentina; Livigni, Lucilla; Magrini, Andrea; Bosco, Maria Giuseppina; Talamanca, Irene Figà

2012-01-01

91

NOTES: Issues and Technical Details With Introduction of NOTES Into a Small General Surgery Residency Program  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a development of recent origin. In 2004, Kalloo et al first described NOTES investigation in an animal model. Since then, several investigators have pursued NOTES study in animal survival and nonsurvival models. Our objectives for this project included studying NOTES intervention in a laboratory environment using large animal (swine) models and learning to do so in a safe, controlled manner. Ultimately, we intend to introduce NOTES methodology into our surgical residency training program. The expertise of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon, fellowship-trained laparoendoscopic surgeon, and veterinarian along with a senior surgical resident was utilized to bring the input of several disciplines to this study. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM/COP) approved this study. Methods: A series of 5 laboratory sessions using mixed breed farm swine varying in weight from 37 kg to 43.1 kg was planned for the initial phase of NOTES introduction into our residency program. Animals were not kept alive in this investigation. All animals were anesthetized using a standard swine protocol and euthanized following guidelines issued by the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on Euthanasia. Equipment included a Fujinon EVE endoscope 0.8 cm in diameter with a suction/irrigation channel and one working channel. Initially, a US Endoscopy gastric overtube, 19.5 mm OD and 50 cm in length, was used to facilitate passage of the endoscope. However, this device was found to have insufficient length. Subsequently, commercially available 5/8” diameter clear plastic tubing, 70 cm to 80 cm in length, was adapted for use as an overtube. Standard endoscopic instruments included Boston Scientific biopsy forceps, needle-knife, papillotome, endoscopic clip applier, and Valley Lab electrosurgical unit. A Karl Storz laparoscope and tower were used for laparoscopic observation of NOTES maneuvers. Necropsy was performed to determine specific details of surgical intervention. Results: NOTES intervention is feasible in an animal model. Insight into the potential of NOTES was obtained in this investigation. Conclusions: NOTES investigation in a controlled, laboratory setting using an animal model proved to have value for our program. A steep learning curve was encountered despite the availability of an investigator familiar with elementary NOTES procedures. The authors strongly suggest investigators adopt the ASGE/SAGES working group recommendations for a multidisciplinary team possessing advanced therapeutic endoscopic and advanced laparoscopic skills to study NOTES before human investigation. Animal laboratory facilities to perform research and training should be available to the multidisciplinary team for exploration of NOTES techniques and procedures. Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval must be obtained before introduction of NOTES procedures in human patients.

Mirza, Brian; Horne, Walter; Moskowitz, Jesse B.

2008-01-01

92

What Works? Countermeasures to Terrorism: A Case Study of PKK  

Microsoft Academic Search

What works? This can be the ultimate question in the war on terrorism. How can we reduce and hopefully eliminate this type of human suffering? A good many ideas or suggestions are available; however, we are still uncertain what counter terrorism measures or tactics do indeed work. By using the case study method, this paper attempts to answer this question.

Eunyoung Kim; Minwoo Yun

2008-01-01

93

Workshop on the Work-Study Experience Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The publication, a summary of a two-day workshop for education and rehabilitation personnel working with the mentally retarded student-client, contains the rationale for work-study experience programs, guidelines for establishing and maintaining a program, and information on various stages of the process. The following papers, which are included…

Plummer, Jack M., Ed.

94

Workplace Skills in Practice. Case Studies of Technical Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to explore skills and work-related dispositions in technical work. It used a sociocultural approach to examine skills in seven target jobs in worksites representing diverse industries--health care, traffic management, transportation, and semiconductor manufacturing. It explored employers' strategies for obtaining the skills…

Stasz, Cathleen; And Others

95

Shift Work, Leisure, and the Leisure Time Studying of Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effects that shift work (working between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. either partly or wholly) has on the amount of leisure time adults have available, their use of this time, and their participation in leisure time studying or adult education activities. (EM)

Pantzar, Eero

1977-01-01

96

Alternating Currents: Integrating Study and Work in the Undergraduate Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the meaning and importance of alternating currents of study and work in the Antioch College (Ohio) cooperative program from student and teacher perspectives. Examples are given of how students integrate their work and academic experiences and how teachers find their teaching is influenced by the school's cooperative program.…

Linn, Patricia L.; Jako, Katherine L.

1992-01-01

97

A Study of the Annealing Kinetics in Cold Worked Copper  

Microsoft Academic Search

The resoftening kinetics for cold work in copper have been studied using residual resistance as a measure of the degree of recovery. The specimens were quickly heated to the annealing temperature, held at temperature for a measured time, and quenched for measurement. It was assumed that the cold work could be characterized by a number of lattice defects n and

Dwain Bowen; R. R. Eggleston; R. H. Kropschot

1952-01-01

98

Diagnostic Study of the U.S. Work Glove Industry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study undertaken by the work Glove Manufacturers Association (WGMA) was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) to develop a detailed profile of the U.S. work glove industry and its problems; (2) to identify the areas where possible opportuniti...

1980-01-01

99

Function allocation: a perspective from studies of work practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Function allocation is a central component of systems engineering and its main aim is to provide a rational means of determining which system-level functions should be carried out by humans and which by machines. Such allocation it is assumed can take place early in design life cycle. Such a rational approach to work design sits uneasily with studies of work

Peter C. Wright; Andy Dearden; Bob Fields

2000-01-01

100

Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work

Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

2005-01-01

101

Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in…

Ashby, Sjon F.

2011-01-01

102

Social Work in Academia: A Case Study of Survival.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During 1992-93, the school of social work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was confronted with proposals for elimination, merger, and consolidation. This case study examines the proposals and rationales behind the school's strategies to counter them. Implications for social work programs in similar circumstances are discussed.…

Reinardy, James; Halter, Anthony

1994-01-01

103

A FIELD STUDY OF REPETITIVE MANUAL WORK IN RELATION TO ACCIDENTS AT THE WORK PLACE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four hundred and twenty-seven reported accidents in the course of repetitive, self-paced work in the machine shop of a light engineering factory were analysed for time of occurrence. Four critical peak periods were found. During these periods observational studies of variability of speed of operation were conducted, particularly on lathes, which revealed thai machine loading times varied more than cutting

PAUL BRANTON

1970-01-01

104

Ab initio study of metal gate electrode work function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work function of metal multilayers and monolayers on bulk metals was studied using the first principle pseudopotential method within the local density approximation in order to find a way to modulate the work function of metal gate electrodes. Various multilayer stacks and bilayer stacks of two systems, Al-Pt and Al-Ni, were examined. It was found that two or three layers of the metal are enough to shift the work function to that of the surface metal. Also, it was found that even a submonolayer could affect the work function of the bulk metal significantly.

Park, Seongjun; Colombo, Luigi; Nishi, Yoshio; Cho, Kyeongjae

2005-02-01

105

Does Work Affect Personality? A Study in Horses  

PubMed Central

It has been repeatedly hypothesized that job characteristics are related to changes in personality in humans, but often personality models still omit effects of life experience. Demonstrating reciprocal relationships between personality and work remains a challenge though, as in humans, many other influential factors may interfere. This study investigates this relationship by comparing the emotional reactivity of horses that differed only by their type of work. Horses are remarkable animal models to investigate this question as they share with humans working activities and their potential difficulties, such as “interpersonal” conflicts or “suppressed emotions”. An earlier study showed that different types of work could be associated with different chronic behavioural disorders. Here, we hypothesised that type of work would affect horses' personality. Therefore over one hundred adult horses, differing only by their work characteristics were presented standardised behavioural tests. Subjects lived under the same conditions (same housing, same food), were of the same sex (geldings), and mostly one of two breeds, and had not been genetically selected for their current type of work. This is to our knowledge the first time that a direct relationship between type of work and personality traits has been investigated. Our results show that horses from different types of work differ not as much in their overall emotional levels as in the ways they express emotions (i.e. behavioural profile). Extremes were dressage horses, which presented the highest excitation components, and voltige horses, which were the quietest. The horses' type of work was decided by the stall managers, mostly on their jumping abilities, but unconscious choice based on individual behavioural characteristics cannot be totally excluded. Further research would require manipulating type of work. Our results nevertheless agree with reports on humans and suggest that more attention should be given to work characteristics when evaluating personalities.

Hausberger, Martine; Muller, Christine; Lunel, Christophe

2011-01-01

106

Does work affect personality? A study in horses.  

PubMed

It has been repeatedly hypothesized that job characteristics are related to changes in personality in humans, but often personality models still omit effects of life experience. Demonstrating reciprocal relationships between personality and work remains a challenge though, as in humans, many other influential factors may interfere. This study investigates this relationship by comparing the emotional reactivity of horses that differed only by their type of work. Horses are remarkable animal models to investigate this question as they share with humans working activities and their potential difficulties, such as "interpersonal" conflicts or "suppressed emotions". An earlier study showed that different types of work could be associated with different chronic behavioural disorders. Here, we hypothesised that type of work would affect horses' personality. Therefore over one hundred adult horses, differing only by their work characteristics were presented standardised behavioural tests. Subjects lived under the same conditions (same housing, same food), were of the same sex (geldings), and mostly one of two breeds, and had not been genetically selected for their current type of work. This is to our knowledge the first time that a direct relationship between type of work and personality traits has been investigated. Our results show that horses from different types of work differ not as much in their overall emotional levels as in the ways they express emotions (i.e. behavioural profile). Extremes were dressage horses, which presented the highest excitation components, and voltige horses, which were the quietest. The horses' type of work was decided by the stall managers, mostly on their jumping abilities, but unconscious choice based on individual behavioural characteristics cannot be totally excluded. Further research would require manipulating type of work. Our results nevertheless agree with reports on humans and suggest that more attention should be given to work characteristics when evaluating personalities. PMID:21347405

Hausberger, Martine; Muller, Christine; Lunel, Christophe

2011-01-01

107

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS...Between 14 and 16 Years of Age (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study...is not deemed to be oppressive child labor. (b)(1) A...

2013-07-01

108

Study Links Shift Work to Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Study Links Shift Work to Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Researchers cite many possible reasons for the ... July 24, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Diabetes Type 2 Occupational Health Sleep Disorders THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 ( ...

109

A Qualitative Study of the Work Environments of Mexican Nurses  

PubMed Central

Background Studies of the nursing work environment are increasingly common in developed countries, but few exist in developing countries. Because of resource differences between the two contexts, researchers need to clarify what aspects of the work environments are similar and different. Objectives To study the perspectives of Mexican nurses about their work environments to determine similarities and differences to results from developed world studies. Design A secondary, directed content analysis of qualitative data from 46 Spanish language interviews using workplace-oriented themes Setting Purposively selected Mexican states from four regions of the country that reflect the country’s socioeconomic differences. Participants Practicing Mexican nurses with at least one year of clinical experience and currently working in nursing. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Methods Initial data collection occurred in 2006 and 2008 during a broader study about professionalization processes that occurred in Mexican nursing between 1980 and 2005. The secondary, directed content analysis focused on an in-depth exploration of a central theme that emerged from the two original studies: The Workplace. The directed content analysis used themes from the global nursing work environment literature to structure the analysis: Professional relationships, organizational administrative practices, and quality of care and services. Results The three themes from the global literature were relevant for the Mexican context and a new one emerged related to hiring practices. By category, the same factors that created positive or negative perceptions of the work environment matched findings from other international studies conducted in developed countries. The descriptors of the category, however, had different conceptual meanings that illustrate the health system challenges in Mexico. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that studies that seek to measure nursing work environments will most likely apply in Mexico and other Latin American or middle-income countries. Instruments designed to measure the work environment of nurses in these countries may prove relevant in those contexts, but require careful adaptation and systematic translations to ensure it.

Squires, Allison; Juarez, Adrian

2012-01-01

110

NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited dataset, and further investigation on a larger patient population has to be done before its clinical implementation.

Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

2009-10-01

111

Facilitating Collaborative Work in Tertiary Teaching: A Self-Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a self-study undertaken by the author to better understand the educational practices of scaffolding in pre-service teachers' collaborative group work. The method included student interviews, conversations with a critical friend, and the researcher's diary. The self-study allowed for fine-tuning theoretical understanding and…

Verenikina, Irina

2012-01-01

112

A Study of Variance Estimation Methods. Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This working paper contains reports of five studies of variance estimation methods. The first, An Empirical Study of Poststratified Estimator, by Fan Zhang uses data from the National Household Education Survey to illustrate use of poststratified estimation. The second paper, BRR Variance Estimation Using BPLX Hadamard Procedure, by Stanley Weng…

Zhang, Fan; Weng, Stanley; Salvucci, Sameena; Hu, Ming-xiu

113

Editors' note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This topical issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes is a collection of reference articles covering the GREGOR solar telescope, its science capabilities, its subsystems, and its dedicated suite of instruments for high-resolution observations of the Sun. Because ground-based telescopes have life spans of several decades, it is only natural that they continuously reinvent themselves. Literally, the GREGOR telescope builds on the foundations of the venerable Gregory-Coudé Telescope (GCT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Acknowledging the fact that new discoveries in observational solar physics are driven by larger apertures to collect more photons and to scrutinize the Sun in finer detail, the GCT was decommissioned and the building was made available to the GREGOR project.

Denker, Carsten; Feller, Alex; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar

2012-11-01

114

Predictors for postpartum pelvic girdle pain in working women: the Mom@Work cohort study.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine which factors during pregnancy and postpartum predict pelvic girdle pain (PGP) at 12 weeks postpartum among working women. A total of 548 Dutch pregnant employees were recruited in 15 companies, mainly health care, child care, and supermarkets. The definition of PGP was any pain felt in the pelvic girdle region at 12 weeks postpartum. Participants received questionnaires at 30 weeks of pregnancy and at 6 and 12 weeks postpartum with demographic, work-related, pregnancy-related, fatigue, psychosocial, PGP-related and delivery-related questions. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the women experienced pain in their pelvic girdle at 12 weeks postpartum. However, the level of pain and the degree of disability due to postpartum PGP was low. Pregnancy-related predictors for PGP at 12 weeks were history of low back pain, higher somatisation, more than 8 hours of sleep or rest per day, and uncomfortable postures at work. The pregnancy and postpartum-related predictors were: more disability at 6 weeks, having PGP at 6 weeks, higher mean pain at 6 weeks, higher somatisation during pregnancy and at 6 weeks postpartum, higher birth weight of the baby, uncomfortable postures at work and number of days of bed rest. Based on these results, it is concluded that extra attention should be given to women who experience PGP during pregnancy to prevent serious PGP during late pregnancy and postpartum. More research is needed to confirm the roles of hours of sleep, somatisation, and bed rest in relation to PGP. PMID:23137900

Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne G M; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Bruinvels, David J; Twisk, Jos W R; van Mechelen, Willem; van Poppel, Mireille N M

2012-12-01

115

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Split-YFP/BiFC in Plant Protein-Protein Interaction Studies  

PubMed Central

Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein), has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginner’s guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments.

Horstman, Anneke; Nougalli Tonaco, Isabella Antonia; Boutilier, Kim; Immink, Richard G. H.

2014-01-01

116

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Split-YFP/BiFC in Plant Protein-Protein Interaction Studies.  

PubMed

Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein), has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginner's guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments. PMID:24886811

Horstman, Anneke; Tonaco, Isabella Antonia Nougalli; Boutilier, Kim; Immink, Richard G H

2014-01-01

117

Electrochemical Studies and Absolute Work Function Measurements in Gas Ambient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple, direct and convenient method for making absolute work function measurements in gas ambient is presented. The method consists of making measurements with a kelvin probe that has been calibrated using the clean solution surface of an electrochemical half-cell. It is shown here that the outer potential of the half-cell solution surface is constant, reliable and readily reproducible. This makes the method possible. This method for making absolute work function measurements in gas ambient requires a knowledge of the absolute work function of the half-cell. This is related to the absolute half-cell potential. The absolute half-cell potential is discussed. Previous measurements of its value disagree and are controversial. The work function of clean Hg in gas ambient is studied. Using the work function of mercury as measured in vacuum as a reference, the absolute half-cell potential for the SCE (saturated calomel electrode) is measured to be E_{rm SCE}(abs) = -4.670 +/-.027 V. A carbon sample was also used as a reference to measure the SCE. The carbon sample's work function was measured in vacuum photoelectrically immediately before comparing to the SCE in gas ambient. Using this method, the absolute half-cell potential for the SCE was measured to be E _{rm SCE}(abs) = -4.635 +/-.050 V. Measurements on gold show that its work function decreases rapidly when removed from vacuum and that it is unstable in air. A study of the chi (chi) potential of solution-gas ambient surface (electrostatic potential difference across the interphase) is included. It was found that chi is constant for many different electrolyte solutions at varying concentrations. This allows liquid junction potentials to be measured. Also, an acoustically modulated kelvin probe was designed and built for use in gas ambient on liquid and solid surfaces.

Johnson, Kendall B.

118

An Empirical Study of Occupational Stress Transmission in Working Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The associations between work demands, supports, and levels of psychological and physical health have been clearly established by research. There is growing evidence that occupational stressors are transmitted to spouses, with a possible subsequent effect on disease risks and life expectancy of both marital partners. The present study investigates the extent and direction of occupational stress transmission and the possible

Fiona Jones

1993-01-01

119

Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

Xu, F. Grace

2009-01-01

120

Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Fiscal Year 1997 Grant Allocations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains project synopses and evaluations supporting recommendations for funding 25 continuing and 7 new projects in public and nonpublic colleges and universities included in the $1.5 million appropriated for fiscal year 1997 for the Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Selection criteria included: strengthening cooperation among…

Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

121

Studying mathematical discussion through the work of other teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study concerns the use of mathematical talk in the teaching of mathematics. It looks at two teachers' pedagogical issues and how one of them translates ideas of classroom discussion into practice in mathematics lessons. Literature on group work which I had learned in the course of my M. Ed programme claimed that mathematical discussion enhances pupils' understanding of mathematics.

Pancras Khatta

1995-01-01

122

A Study of Imputation Algorithms. Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many imputation techniques and imputation software packages have been developed over the years to deal with missing data. Different methods may work well under different circumstances, and it is advisable to conduct a sensitivity analysis when choosing an imputation method for a particular survey. This study reviewed about 30 imputation methods…

Hu, Ming-xiu; Salvucci, Sameena

123

Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

124

Some Considerations for Training Work-Study Coordinators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Briefly describes the role of the work study coordinator, a special educator responsible for aiding the mentally retarded adolescent to reach his vocational goals, and suggests some areas of skill development that have not generally been included in pre-service training programs of the WSC but that are supplementary to those traditionally…

Westling, David L.; Schwartz, Stuart E.

1978-01-01

125

Authentic Intellectual Work: Common Standards for Teaching Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors summarize important and promising research on what they call "authentic intellectual work." It is important because so often schoolwork, not only in social studies but across the curriculum, requires little in the way of deep conceptual learning that also connects to life beyond school, and it is promising because the…

King, M. Bruce; Newmann, Fred M.; Carmichael, Dana L.

2009-01-01

126

Coordinated Study Individual Interview Procedures. Working Paper No. 290.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the various procedures associated with the individual interviews that are part of the data gathering processes of the Coordinated Study being carried out by the Mathematics Work Group of the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Individualized Schooling. The first major section describes the six basic verbal addition…

Cookson, Connie; Moser, James M.

127

Patient Experiences With Full Electronic Access to Health Records and Clinical Notes Through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. Objective A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients’ views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Methods Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Results Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Conclusions Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full record access on patient well-being. While shared records may or may not impact overall clinic workload, it is likely to change providers’ work, necessitating new types of skills to communicate and partner with patients.

Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W. Paul

2013-01-01

128

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions.

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

129

Project Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

School Science Review, 1977

1977-01-01

130

Editor's Note (May 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wherever you live, the weather provides a backdrop for studying science, and weather patterns play a critical role in our daily lives. They can determine everything from indoor recess to global economic patterns. This selection includes notes from the Field Editor of Science and Children about the study of weather with elementary students.

Ohana, Chris

2004-05-01

131

Preparing for the World of Work: An Exploratory Study of Disabled Students' Experiences of Work Placement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For people with disabilities, one of the best ways to achieve independence is through work. Experience gained by undertaking a work placement whilst a student provides valuable knowledge and understanding of the demands of work, and enhances employability on graduation for both students with disabilities and for their non-disabled peers. The aims…

Georgiou, Catherine Elizabeth; Espahbodi, Shima; De Souza, Lorraine Hilary

2012-01-01

132

Plans for Further Development of Experimental Teaching Units. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note V-2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the problems related to control of or variety in curriculum in studies of teaching and the procedures used in one phase of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study to control to some extent the curriculum in reading and mathematics. The major focus of the document is the plan for further study of aspects of Experimental…

Filby, Nikola N.

133

Notes on Teaching an Independent-Study Class in the Short Story.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how the author addresses his independent study students. Suggests that teachers who write study guides and "teach" independent-study courses in literature should try to invent effective instructional aids that will mitigate the disadvantages of not having the everyday-classroom experience and provide maximum opportunity for freedom of…

Mayer, Charles W.

2003-01-01

134

Evaluation of post-ERCP pancreatitis: potential causes noted during controlled study of differing contrast media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Possible sources of post-ERCP pancreatitis were evaluated during a prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing different contrast media. Methods: A total of 1979 patients were randomized and subdivided into groups during the study. Patients were grouped for comparison depending on the type of procedure performed during ERCP. Diagnostic patients studied with pancreatograms (Group I) were compared with other groups, specifically,

G. Kenneth Johnson; Joseph E. Geenen; John F. Johanson; Stuart Shermal; Walter J. Hogan; Oliver Cass

1997-01-01

135

Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity  

SciTech Connect

A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

2012-02-15

136

Prevention of work related skin problems: an intervention study in wet work employees  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the effect of implementation of an evidence based skin care programme for wet work employees as part of an occupational health and safety management system. Methods: 375 wet work employees were included in a prospective randomised controlled trial, allocated to either intervention (n = 207) or control (n = 168). The intervention group was exposed to a skin care programme during the five month study period. The intervention included an educational programme for a group of frontline employees, who underwent formalised training, and subsequently introduced the information to their colleagues. As part of the intervention a skin care policy including written instructions was established at each workplace. Both groups answered a test quiz, completed questionnaires on behaviour and symptoms, and underwent clinical examination of their hands before and after the five month period. Results: No difference between the intervention and the control group was found at baseline with respect to clinical symptoms or behaviour. Evaluation after the five months of intervention revealed a significantly higher information level on skin care in the intervention group compared to the control group, a significant change in behaviour in the intervention group but not in the control group, and significantly less skin symptoms as evaluated clinically in the intervention group but not in the control group. No significant difference was found for self reported skin problems. Conclusions: The intervention was successful with respect to information level (knowledge), behaviour, and clinical symptoms. Implementation of a skin care programme as part of an occupational health and safety management system is recommended as a prophylactic measure for employees in wet occupations.

Held, E; Mygind, K; Wolff, C; Gyntelberg, F; Agner, T

2002-01-01

137

[Experimental study of Vicryl used as a filling material. Preliminary note].  

PubMed

The combination VICRYL and bone wax is studied as filling material in periodontal locations in dogs. Histological studies were carried out at one, two, six and nine months. Bone formation is already quite marked at two months, and total at six months. A desmodont and a secondary cement are formed. At six and nine month, reattachment is excellent. PMID:2635563

Bertrand, G; Bonfil, J J; Mouchebeuf, J L

1989-09-01

138

The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in…

Dyson, Anne Haas

2013-01-01

139

A Note on Sample Size Determination for Bioequivalence Studies with Higher-Order Crossover Designs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Similar to Liu and Chow, approximate formulas for sample size determination are derived based on Schuirmann's two one-sided tests procedure for bioequiealence studies for the additive and the multiplicative models under various higher order crossover designs for comparing two formulations of a drug product. The higher order crossover designs under study include Balaam's design, the two-sequence dual design, and two

Keh-Wei Chen; Shein-Chung Chow; Gang Li

1997-01-01

140

Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

2012-01-01

141

Notes on the Simplex Models in the Study of Multicomponent Mixtures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The theory is developed from basic analytical geometry and presents a systematic approach to the study of binary and ternary mixtures. Topics include: definition of the simplex, simplex coordinate systems, properties and applications of the coordinate sys...

D. R. Cruise I. S. Kurotori J. M. Bownds

1965-01-01

142

Technical Note - Project Icarus: The Origins and Aims of the Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A brief summary is presented on the origins and aims of Project Icarus, the joint British Interplanetary Society (BIS) and Tau Zero Foundation (TZF) theoretical engineering study for the design of an unmanned interstellar probe. This paper is intended to represent an introduction to the set of technical papers presented in this special issue as well as discussing some of the early history regarding the formation of Project Icarus. This is a submission of the Project Icarus Study Group.

Long, K. F.; Obousy, R.; Tziolas, A.

143

Briefly noted  

Microsoft Academic Search

SPEECH FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER. By Dorothy I. Mulgrave. (Revised edition). New York: Prentice?Hall, Inc., 1951; pp. xxvi+423. $4.50.PRACTICAL BUSINESS SPEAKING. By W. P. Sandford and W. H. Yeager. (Third edition). New York: McGraw?Hill Book Co., 1952; pp. 322. $4.50.WORKING FOR DEMOCRACY. By Lyman Bryson and George Kerry Smith. (Revised edition). New York: The Macmillan Company, 1952; pp. xvi+425. $2.40.GREAT

Hugh F. Seabury; Clara K. Mawhinney; Gregg Phifer; W. Norwood Brigance; Cullen B. Owens; Waldo W. Braden; William Ringler; Don Streeter

1953-01-01

144

[Suicide and work in Brazilian metropolises: an ecological study].  

PubMed

The scope of this study was to correlate suicide mortality with health indicators and work in six Brazilian metropolises: Porto Alegre, Recife, Salvador, Belo Horizonte, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. It was an ecological study, the outcome of which is the death rate from suicide in the historical series from 2002 to 2010, and the independent variables are the indicators of occupational activity and mental suffering. Statistical association using the Pearson Correlation test was conducted and the variables associated with suicide (p < 0.05) were included in a multivariate linear regression model. The suicide mortality was higher in Porto Alegre, followed by São Paulo, and the trend of the phenomenon was in the ascendant (p = 0.03). It was observed that the economically active and gainfully employed population remained in the final regression model in the city of São Paulo. The association between suicide mortality and occupational variables suggests that work in the context of insecurity worsens the quality of life of the working population, causing physical and mental suffering and increasing the risk of self-harm. PMID:25014301

Ceccon, Roger Flores; Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Tavares, Juliana Petri; Lautert, Liana

2014-07-01

145

ENDING ON A HIGH NOTE: Adding a Better End to Effortful Study  

PubMed Central

Remembered utility is the retrospective evaluation about the pleasure and pain associated with a past experience. It has been shown to influence prospective choices about whether to repeat or to avoid similar situations in the future (Kahneman 2000; Kahneman, Fredrickson, Schreiber & Redelmeier, 1993). Evaluations about our hedonic past often disregard the duration of the experience and are influenced more by the peak and the final levels of discomfort (Fredrickson & Kahneman, 1993). Two experiments explored the remembered discomfort of an effortful learning experience and the influence of this evaluation on prospective study choices. The design of the studies mimicked Kahneman et al.'s, (1993) cold-pressor study, but used an exceptionally challenging learning experience in place of the painful experience of submerging one's hand in ice water. An extremely effortful study episode extended by a more moderate interval was preferred to a shorter, unextended interval, despite better test performance following the shorter interval. Future study choices reflected this preference. These findings suggest that the act of acquiring knowledge has value in the learning process.

Finn, Bridgid

2010-01-01

146

NOTE Contrast enhancement of EPID images via difference imaging: a feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the feasibility of difference imaging for improving the contrast of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images is investigated. The difference imaging technique consists of the acquisition of two EPID images (with and without the placement of an additional layer of attenuating medium on the surface of the EPID) and the subtraction of one of these images from the other. The resulting difference image shows improved contrast, compared to a standard EPID image, since it is generated by lower-energy photons. Results of this study show that, firstly, this method can produce images exhibiting greater contrast than is seen in standard megavoltage EPID images and secondly, the optimal thickness of attenuating material for producing a maximum contrast enhancement may vary with phantom thickness and composition. Further studies of the possibilities and limitations of the difference imaging technique, and the physics behind it, are therefore recommended.

Kairn, T.; Khoei, S.; Markwell, T. S.; Fielding, A. L.; Trapp, J. V.

2010-11-01

147

Description of Patterns of Teaching Behavior Within and Across Classes During the B-C Period. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study: Technical Note Series. Technical Note IV-3b.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides descriptive statistical information from Phase III-B of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Within the sample of second and fifth grade teachers in classrooms in public schools in California, approximately six students were identified as target students to be studied during the school year. These students were observed…

Filby, Nikola N.; Fisher, Charles W.

148

Descriptions of the Distributions of ALT Within and Across Classes During the A-B Period. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study; Technical Note Series. Technical Note IV-1a.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides descriptive statistical information from Phase III-B of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Within the sample of second and fifth grade classrooms in public schools in California, approximately six students were identified as target students to be studied during the school year. These students were observed approximately…

Filby, Nikola N.; Marliave, Richard

149

Beyond the Notes: A Qualitative Study of the Information-Seeking Behavior of Ethnomusicologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the information-seeking behavior of fourteen ethnomusicologists in New Zealand via interviews. The findings shed light on what information ethnomusicologists seek, the sources and services they use, and the barriers they face in information seeking and use. A number of ways in which libraries can create collections and…

Liew, Chern Li; Ng, Siong Ngor

2006-01-01

150

Internet access in UK public libraries: notes and queries from a small scale study : EDITORIAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this editorial is to discuss the findings of a small scale study of internet access in UK public libraries. It aims to examine all aspects of access, from the moment the service is requested, to the acceptable use policy (AUP) for each library, to specific Internet sites that are banned. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The methodology involved

David McMenemy

2008-01-01

151

Contribution to the Study of the Lymphatic Circulation in Organs. Note I: The Renal Lymphatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The authors have studied in 10 dogs the consequences which the tying of the efferent lymphatic vessels has had on the renal function. On the basis of the experimental results they affirm that the renal lymphatic system plays a role of fundamental importance in the regulation of the complex mechanism of urinary concentration and dilution by means of which

A. Tormene; O. Zangrando; R. Millini; G. Fazzini

1965-01-01

152

Organizational Economics: Notes on the Use of Transaction-Cost Theory in the Study of Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews transaction-cost approaches to organizational analysis, examines their use in microeconomic theory, and identifies some important flaws in the study. Advocates transaction-cost theory as a powerful tool for organizational and strategic analysis when set within the famework of more general organizational theory. Includes 61 references. (MLH)

Robins, James A.

1987-01-01

153

NOTE: Spectral sensitivity study of dose distributions for a commercial convolution\\/superposition algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this study is to validate whether the sensitivity of dose distribution following the interface of different media can be used to distinguish between small variations of photon energy spectra in the context of the convolution\\/superposition algorithm in the polyenergetic implementation (Philips Pinnacle3, ADAC Laboratories, Milpitas, CA). Calculations were performed in homogeneous water and heterogeneous lung\\/water phantoms. Spectra

P. S. Torres; P. M. Charland; L. D. Paniak

2004-01-01

154

The Loss Spiral of Work Pressure, Work-Home Interference and Exhaustion: Reciprocal Relations in a Three-Wave Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the "loss spiral" hypothesis of work-home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency…

Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Bulters, Annemieke J.

2004-01-01

155

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

156

On the interpretation of synchronization in EEG hyperscanning studies: a cautionary note  

PubMed Central

EEG Hyperscanning is a method for studying two or more individuals simultaneously with the objective of elucidating how co-variations in their neural activity (i.e., hyperconnectivity) are influenced by their behavioral and social interactions. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of different hyper-connectivity measures using (i) simulated data, where the degree of coupling could be systematically manipulated, and (ii) individually recorded human EEG combined into pseudo-pairs of participants where no hyper-connections could exist. With simulated data we found that each of the most widely used measures of hyperconnectivity were biased and detected hyper-connections where none existed. With pseudo-pairs of human data we found spurious hyper-connections that arose because there were genuine similarities between the EEG recorded from different people independently but under the same experimental conditions. Specifically, there were systematic differences between experimental conditions in terms of the rhythmicity of the EEG that were common across participants. As any imbalance between experimental conditions in terms of stimulus presentation or movement may affect the rhythmicity of the EEG, this problem could apply in many hyperscanning contexts. Furthermore, as these spurious hyper-connections reflected real similarities between the EEGs, they were not Type-1 errors that could be overcome by some appropriate statistical control. However, some measures that have not previously been used in hyperconnectivity studies, notably the circular correlation co-efficient (CCorr), were less susceptible to detecting spurious hyper-connections of this type. The reason for this advantage in performance is discussed and the use of the CCorr as an alternative measure of hyperconnectivity is advocated.

Burgess, Adrian P.

2013-01-01

157

Role of microcomputer geologic work station in exploration: case study  

SciTech Connect

Microcomputer-based geologic work stations are becoming increasing popular and are proving to be effective and efficient tools in exploration. They allow an explorationist to produce interactively many different types of maps and to formulate and test multiple geologic models. Maps can be updated and reproduced rapidly with the addition of data points. To illustrate the power and versatility of microcomputer work stations, data from Raven Creek field were used to generate several sequences of maps that use a progressively larger number of data points, simulating the increasing number of wells available through time. The map sequences bring out early the nature of the Raven Creek oil trap, even with fewer data points than might be expected. Sequences of several different maps were made for this study. These include isopach, trend, and residual maps of the Opeche, porosity and permeability distributions in the Minnelusa sands, structural contour maps (Minnelusa and Minnekahta), facies maps, as well as structural and stratigraphic cross sections. Perspective block diagrams were useful in visualizing many of these maps. These maps, cross sections, and diagrams, and the changes in them brought about by sequentially adding data through time, show how an explorationist can rapidly formulate, test, and refine geologic and exploration models. The speed, versatility, and interactivity of the work station lets this be done in minimal time.

Mathews, G.W.

1985-02-01

158

Work organisation and unintentional sleep: results from the WOLF study  

PubMed Central

Background: Falling asleep at work is receiving increasing attention as a cause of work accidents. Aims: To investigate which variables (related to work, lifestyle, or background) are related to the tendency to fall asleep unintentionally, either during work hours, or during leisure time. Methods: 5589 individuals (76% response rate) responded to a questionnaire. A multiple logistic regression analysis of the cross sectional data was used to estimate the risk of falling asleep. Results: The prevalence for falling asleep unintentionally at least once a month was 7.0% during work hours and 23.1% during leisure time. The risk of unintentional sleep at work was related to disturbed sleep, having shift work, and higher socioeconomic group. Being older, being a woman, and being a smoker were associated with a reduced risk of unintentionally falling asleep at work. Work demands, decision latitude at work, physical load, sedentary work, solitary work, extra work, and overtime work were not related to falling asleep at work. Removing "disturbed sleep" as a predictor did not change the odds ratios of the other predictors in any significant way. With respect to falling asleep during leisure time, disturbed sleep, snoring, high work demands, being a smoker, not exercising, and higher age (>45 years) became risk indicators. Conclusion: The risk of involuntary sleep at work is increased in connection with disturbed sleep but also with night work, socioeconomic group, low age, being a male, and being a non-smoker.

Akerstedt, T; Knutsson, A; Westerholm, P; Theorell, T; Alfredsson, L; Kecklund, G

2002-01-01

159

Working memory and DLPFC inefficiency in schizophrenia: The FBIRN study  

PubMed Central

Background: The Functional Imaging Biomedical Informatics Network is a consortium developing methods for multisite functional imaging studies. Both prefrontal hyper- or hypoactivity in chronic schizophrenia have been found in previous studies of working memory. Methods: In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of working memory, 128 subjects with chronic schizophrenia and 128 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited from 10 universities around the United States. Subjects performed the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm1,2 with memory loads of 1, 3, or 5 items. A region of interest analysis examined the mean BOLD signal change in an atlas-based demarcation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), in both groups, during both the encoding and retrieval phases of the experiment over the various memory loads. Results: Subjects with schizophrenia performed slightly but significantly worse than the healthy volunteers and showed a greater decrease in accuracy and increase in reaction time with increasing memory load. The mean BOLD signal in the DLPFC was significantly greater in the schizophrenic group than the healthy group, particularly in the intermediate load condition. A secondary analysis matched subjects for mean accuracy and found the same BOLD signal hyperresponse in schizophrenics. Conclusions: The increase in BOLD signal change from minimal to moderate memory loads was greater in the schizophrenic subjects than in controls. This effect remained when age, gender, run, hemisphere, and performance were considered, consistent with inefficient DLPFC function during working memory. These findings from a large multisite sample support the concept not of hyper- or hypofrontality in schizophrenia, but rather DLPFC inefficiency that may be manifested in either direction depending on task demands. This redirects the focus of research from direction of difference to neural mechanisms of inefficiency.

Potkin, S. G.; Turner, J. A.; Brown, G. G.; McCarthy, G.; Greve, D. N.; Glover, G. H.; Manoach, D. S.; Belger, A.; Diaz, M.; Wible, C. G.; Ford, J. M.; Mathalon, D. H.; Gollub, R.; Lauriello, J.; O'Leary, D.; van Erp, T. G. M.; Toga, A. W.; Preda, A.; Lim, K. O.

2009-01-01

160

The impact of a worker health study on working conditions.  

PubMed

A research partnership of representatives from labor, academia, and public health enabled unionized San Francisco hotel workers to achieve important policy changes in workplace health and safety. Known as the "Housekeeping Study," the project took sixteen months to complete. A unique aspect of the project was that it utilized participatory action research methods, involving workers themselves as full participants in the study. A core group of 25 hotel room cleaners was involved in each phase of the project. The study developed health data which enabled room cleaners and their union to formulate and justify a contract proposal calling for a significant reduction in housekeeping workloads. The employer association agreed to a contract which reduced the maximum required room assignment from 15 rooms to 14 rooms per day in 14 San Francisco hotels. By lowering the maximum work assignment, these workers set a new standard which can potentially protect the health of room cleaners across the country. The project can serve as a model for worker and union participation in academic research, as well as for the application of research to improving working conditions, particularly for low-wage immigrant workers. PMID:12325285

Lee, Pam Tau; Krause, Niklas

2002-01-01

161

Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

Meagher, Thomas Francis

162

Progress Report on Reactivity Analyses (October-December Test Data). Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note III-5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and refinement of the measures of student achievement in reading and mathematics for the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study are described. The concept of reactivity to instruction is introduced: the tests used to evaluate instructional processes must be sensitive indicators of classroom learning overtime. Data collection activities…

Filby, Nikola N.

163

Description of Patterns of Teaching Behavior Within and Across Classes During the A-B Period. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study; Technical Note Series. Technical Note IV-3a.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides a description of the data collection procedures and the results of data collection for observation of teaching behaviors in the sample classrooms in Phase III-B of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. During the 1976-77 school year, the behaviors of the teachers within the Phase III-B sample were observed approximately…

Filby, Nikola N.

164

The violence of heteronormativity in communication studies: notes on injury, healing, and queer world-making.  

PubMed

Heteronormativity is everywhere. It is always already present in our individual and collective psyches, social institutions, cultural practices, and knowledge systems. In this essay, I provide some sketches for a critical analysis of heteronormativity in the communication discipline. More specifically, I examine the symbolic, discursive, psychological, and material violence of heteronormativity, and begin exploring ways to heal, grow, transform, and contemplate new possibilities in our social world. To accomplish this, this essay is divided into live sections. First, I discuss the study of sexuality in Communication. Next, through the notion of injury, I focus on the violence of heteronormativity. Third, using the concept of healing, I discuss ways of unpacking heteronormativity through a critique of hegemonic heterosexuality. Further, I offer potential ways for queer world-making through the lens of queer theory. I conclude by exploring the need for more sexuality research in the discipline by engaging the productive tensions between constructive and deconstructive impulses. PMID:14651173

Yep, Gust A

2003-01-01

165

Note: Multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer to study highly charged ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the design and implementation of a multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer setup to study physics of highly charged ions at high resolution in a direct way. A unique Soller slit assembly coupled with a long one dimensional position sensitive proportional counter enables us to get distinct x-ray peaks at different angles, which allows us to cover large number of angle in one shot. By using this setup, 1s2s 3S1 - 1s2 1S0 M1 transition in He-like Fe has been resolved from its satellite line 1s2s2p { }^4 P^0_{5/2} - 1s22s 2S1/2 M2 transition in Li-like Fe and measured the lifetime of their respective upper levels with high precision.

Karn, Ranjeet K.; Mishra, C. N.; Ahmad, Nissar; Saini, S. K.; Safvan, C. P.; Nandi, T.

2014-06-01

166

Note: Multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer to study highly charged ions.  

PubMed

We describe the design and implementation of a multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer setup to study physics of highly charged ions at high resolution in a direct way. A unique Soller slit assembly coupled with a long one dimensional position sensitive proportional counter enables us to get distinct x-ray peaks at different angles, which allows us to cover large number of angle in one shot. By using this setup, 1s2s (3)S1 - 1s(2) (1)S0 M1 transition in He-like Fe has been resolved from its satellite line [Formula: see text] - 1s(2)2s (2)S1/2 M2 transition in Li-like Fe and measured the lifetime of their respective upper levels with high precision. PMID:24985874

Karn, Ranjeet K; Mishra, C N; Ahmad, Nissar; Saini, S K; Safvan, C P; Nandi, T

2014-06-01

167

Project Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

School Science Review, 1979

1979-01-01

168

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1978-01-01

169

Science Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)

School Science Review, 1987

1987-01-01

170

Prevalence and consequences of low back problems in the Netherlands, working vs non-working population, the MORGEN-study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the burden of illness of low back problems—prevalence and consequences—in the working and the non-working population.Methods: Data from the Monitoring Project on Risk factors for Chronic Diseases, the MORGEN-study, were used. This project provided data on a probability sample of the general population aged 20–59 y in the Netherlands. Cross-sectional questionnaire data on 6317 men (24% non-working)

HSJ Picavet; JSAG Schouten; HA Smit

1999-01-01

171

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

172

The Transition from School to Work; A Study of the Child's Changing Perception of Work from the Age of Seven.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To further clarify the problems relating to the transition from school to work, this pilot project was undertaken to study the way children's perceptions of adult work develop over the course of time. Information for the study was collected through a series of intensive, individual, private interviews with 162 children (ages 7-20) concerning their…

Hill, J. M. M.

173

Publishers' Note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS codes 10 and 20. This offer will remain open until the SCOAP3 agreement at CERN takes effect. Authors submitting any article to EPL will continue to be offered the opportunity to make their published letter open access for a one-off payment. However, with effect from 1 November 2008, any author who submits work related to subject areas within PACS 10 and 20 will benefit from open access at no charge, meaning their published article will be available free to all readers, forever. ``Physics of Elementary Particles and Fields'' and ``Nuclear Physics'' are two research areas focusing on the HEP community, that the EPLA Directors recognize as significant to the broadband development of EPL, and they endeavour to increase the number of high-quality research letters published in these fields, to engage more closely with the High Energy Physics community, and to strengthen and promote the journal. All submitted articles will still be subject to rigorous peer review to maintain the high standard of articles published in EPL, and will benefit from expert leadership within the Editorial Board and rapid publication in addition to open access. You are invited to submit your paper now on https://www.epletters.net to take advantage of this fantastic offer. If you have comments or questions about changes taking place in 2009, please e-mail us at info@epljournal.org or editorial.office@epletters.net. With our best wishes for 2009!

EPL Management Team

2008-12-01

174

A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three occasions,…

Lu, Luo

2011-01-01

175

A qualitative study of factors influencing different generations of Newfoundland and Saskatchewan trained physicians to leave a work location  

PubMed Central

Background Some studies have suggested that young physicians may have different expectations and practice behaviours than their older generational counterparts, including their reasons for wanting to remain or leave a community. This study examined the factors associated with a physician’s decision to leave a work location. We compared different generations of physicians to assess whether these factors have changed over generations. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 physicians who graduated from two Canadian medical schools. We asked each physician about the number and nature of work location changes and the factors related to their decisions to leave each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Dissatisfaction with the working environment was the most frequently cited reason for leaving a location for physicians of all generations. Elements which contributed to the quality of the work environment included the collaborative nature of the practice, the relationship with administrators, and access to resources and personnel. For younger physicians, the work environment had to meet their personal expectations for work-life balance. While remuneration level was given by some physicians as the key reason for leaving a location, for others it was the “last straw” if the work environment was poor. A small number of older generation physicians moved in response to political events and/or policies Conclusions We documented generational differences in physicians’ reasons for choosing a work location. We found that a poor work environment was universally the most important reason why a physician chose to leave a location. A few physicians who were unsatisfied with their work location identified level of remuneration as an additional reason for leaving. Some older generation physicians cited political climate as a reason for leaving a work location. While economic factors have largely been the focus of recruitment and retention initiatives, our findings highlight the importance of the work environment and organizational culture on the retention of physicians of all generations.

2012-01-01

176

Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2011-01-01

177

Tritium Related Studies Within the JET Fusion Technology Work Programme  

SciTech Connect

The JET Fusion Technology (FT) work programme was launched in 2000, in the frame of the European Fusion Development Agreement, to address issues related to JET and ITER. In particular, there are four topics related to tritium being investigated. Based on the experience gained on the existing tokamaks, first calculations indicate that in-vessel tritium retention could represent a burden for ITER operation. Therefore erosion/deposition studies are being performed in order to better understand the layer co-deposition and tritium retention processes in tokamaks. Moreover, testing of in-situ detritiation processes, in particular laser and flash lamp treatments, should assess detritiation techniques for in-vessel components in the ITER-relevant JET configuration.To reduce the constraints on waste disposal, dedicated procedures are being developed for detritiation of metals, graphite, carbon-fibre composites, process and housekeeping waste. During the operational and decommissioning phases of a fusion reactor, many processes will produce tritiated water. Key components for an ITER relevant water detritiation facility are being studied experimentally with the aim of producing a complete design that could be implemented and tested at JET. This paper describes these topics of the FT-programme, the strategy developed and the results obtained so far.

Rosanvallon, S. [Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Bekris, N. [Association Euratom/Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Braet, J. [Association Euratom/SCK-CEN (Belgium)] (and others)

2005-07-15

178

The information-seeking behavior of pastoral clergy: A study of the interaction of their work worlds and work roles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study asked whether the information-seeking behavior of pastoral clergy was governed by the interaction of their work worlds and work roles. It was proposed that the pastor operates in a closed system when world and role are significantly dependent upon each other and in an open system of information-seeking when world and role are less dependent upon each other.

Donald A. Wicks

1999-01-01

179

78 FR 18629 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Request; Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations ACTION: Notice...Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations,'' to the Office...Work-Study Program (WSP) of the Child Labor Regulations. This program...

2013-03-27

180

NOTE: Does the option to rotate the Elekta Beam Modulator MLC during VMAT IMRT delivery confer advantage?—a study of 'parked gaps'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique on an Elekta accelerator equipped with the Elekta Beam Modulator multileaf collimator (MLC), the orientation of the MLC, relative to the accelerator head, is generally fixed during the delivery. However, it has the ability to rotate about its axis as the gantry simultaneously rotates. This note shows that this can confer a potential advantage when planning and delivering IMRT via VMAT. A computer model has been built in which the MLC rotation angle could be varied with each control point (gantry location) within the constraints of the specified MLC rotation speed and the time available for rotation. The model was used to optimize the orientation trajectory in such a way as to minimize the number of parked gaps between leaves which are needed for some gantry orientations but not for others (and which cannot reach the shielding safety of surrounding jaws in the time available). The presented work started with the simple situation of collimating gantry-successive single convex shapes. As a broad statement some 40% reduction in such parked gaps could be achieved. The study was then extended to investigate the optimized trajectories for multiple separate concave shapes with, once again, a saving in unwanted parked gaps or unwanted over-irradiation.

Webb, S.

2010-06-01

181

Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. METHODS: Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was

Jens Peter E Bonde; Torsten Munch-Hansen; Joanna Wieclaw; Niels Westergaard-Nielsen; Esben Agerbo

2009-01-01

182

Capturing Work Practice Applying Combined Ethnographical Approaches in Field Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has become obvious that a prerequisite for systems design is a thorough understanding of the work practice in which it will be applied. This paper utilizes different qualitative research methods to explore how these may improve our understanding of work practice in various ways. We argue for the possibilities of using several ethnographic approaches, such as interviews, (participant) observation,

Nina Lundberg; Magnus Bergquist

183

A Study of Work-Producing Characteristics of Underwater Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of alterations in task nature/task workload configuration upon the work-producing characteristics of humans performing specific underwater manual tasks were examined. The tasks examined were: (1) A simple repetitive rotary task requiring conti...

I. Streimer D. P. W. Turner K. Volkmer

1969-01-01

184

Project Work Plan Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform Attenuation Parameter Studies: Heterogeneous Hydrolytic Reactions  

SciTech Connect

Between 1955 and 1973, an estimated 750,000 kg of carbon tetrachloride were discharged to the soil in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site as part of the plutonium production process. Of this amount, some carbon tetrachloride reached the groundwater more than 70 m below the ground surface and formed a plume of 10 km2. Recent information has shown that the carbon tetrachloride plume extends to a depth of at least 60 m below the water table. Some carbon tetrachloride has been degraded either by the original process or subsequent transformations in the subsurface to form a co-existing chloroform plume. Although current characterization efforts are improving the conceptual model of the source area, more information is needed to effectively assess the fate and transport of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform to support upcoming remediation decisions for the plume. As noted in a simulation study by Truex et al. (2001), parameters describing porosity, sorption, and abiotic degradation have the largest influence on predicted plume behavior. The work proposed herein will improve the ability to predict future plume movement by better quantifying abiotic degradation mechanisms and rates. This effort will help define how much active remediation may be needed and estimate where the plume will eventually stabilize – key factors in determining the most appropriate remedy for the plume.

Amonette, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2006-06-01

185

A feasibility study of work group monitoring for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Present Hanford internal dosimetry policy recommends placing a worker on a routine bioassay monitoring program if the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) in a single calendar year may exceed 100 mrem for all radionuclides. Nearly all Hanford workers who enter contamination zones are on routine bioassay programs. Site environmental restoration and remediation now require an even larger number of workers to enter contamination zones, therefore increasing the number of workers requiring routine bioassay monitoring. Work group bioassay is a method which demonstrates, at a reduced cost, that workers who are assumed to be essentially at no risk for incurring intakes are, in fact, not incurring intakes. For the proposed program, a work group will be identified by a letter to their exposure history file. The analytical result for a work group bioassay sample will be placed in the dosimetry record of the person actually providing the sample and will be identified as pertaining to a work group by an appropriate code. Any positive result will be followed up using the same procedure as for individual-specific bioassay, which limits false positives to less than 0.5%. Workers who (1) have radioactive material depositions that interfere with detecting and assessing additional intakes, (2) use any form of respiratory protection, or (3) enter airborne radioactivity areas will be excluded from a work group bioassay program and placed on an individual-specific bioassay program.

MacLellan, J.A.

1994-04-01

186

Technical Work Plan for: Fracture and Lithophysal Studies  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work scope described in this technical work plan (TWP) is to enhance the descriptions of fracture and lithophysal parameters for the repository host horizon (RHH) over the repository footprint utilizing a predictive model. This work is planned to address U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) additional information needs (AINs) associated with the Structural Deformation and Seismicity (SDS) Key Technical Issues (KTI) agreement SDS 3.03 (Schlueter 2000 [DIRS 166615]). The results of the planned work are expected to enhance the technical basis and confirm the results of the fracture analyses presented in ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107], Section 6.1.6). This model is not intended to provide an alternative for the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models currently used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Nor are the outputs of this model intended to address the SDS 3.03 AINs related to the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models.

n

2006-09-11

187

The Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory: A Validity Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory (SWAI) developed by J. F. Efstation, M. J. Patton, and C. M. Kardash (1990) was further evaluated for its psychometric properties and relationships with the Personal Reactions Scale--Revised (PRS-R) developed by E. L. Holloway and B. E. Wampold (1984), the only other measure of the relationship in…

Patton, M. J.; And Others

188

Minority Access and Persistence Study: A Working Bibliography with Annotations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this contribution offers an annotated bibliography on minority access and persistence. It cites the following: nine books (e.g., "Student Outcome Questionnaires: An Implementation Handbook" by P. Ewell and…

Cowart, Vinette; And Others

189

Work injury rehabilitation in Guangzhou: 380 case cohort study.  

PubMed

Work injury rehabilitation is a new concept in Mainland China. In 2001, the first work injury rehabilitation centre was established in Guangzhou under the management of the Guanghzhou Bureau of Labour and Security. This paper reviews the profile of a cohort of workers with injuries who received rehabilitation services at this centre. The changes in the physical capacity, daily function, and quality of life of the workers with injuries before and after the treatment services were also reviewed. A total of 380 were extracted from the database which occupied 79% of the total patient population admitted to the centre between 2003 to 2004. The assessment results suggested that workers with injuries showed increases in physical capacity in terms of the range of motion, muscle strength and walking tolerance. The daily functioning by using Barthel Index was also improved. Quality of life assessed with the WHOQOL also demonstrated an increase in the physical and psychological domains. Work injury rehabilitation in Guangzhou is at its infancy stage. The cooperation between the rehabilitation centre, employers and workers is of the utmost importance for a successful return to work outcome. The workers' compensation and rehabilitation policy also dictates the future of success of the rehabilitation services. PMID:18198443

Tang, Dan

2008-01-01

190

Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

2013-01-01

191

Music Training and Working Memory: An ERP Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While previous research has suggested that music training is associated with improvements in various cognitive and linguistic skills, the mechanisms mediating or underlying these associations are mostly unknown. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that previous music training is related to improved working memory. Using event-related potentials…

George, Elyse M.; Coch, Donna

2011-01-01

192

Industrial Work Experience I. Curriculum Guide. General Related Study Units.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this guide is to present basic sample instructional materials for the Industrial Work Experience (IWE) Program. It is designed to aid those charged with local administration and coordination of programs in secondary level trade and industrial education, referred to as the IWE training program. The guide contains 10 units of…

Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

193

Peace with Work To Do: The Academic Study of Peace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two lectures concerning the nature and status of peace studies. Adam Curle, in "The Scope and Dilemmas of Peace Studies" presents: (1) the study of peace and related subjects; (2) diversities and contradictions in peace studies; (3) personal interpretations; (4) teaching peace studies; and (5) moral and practical dilemmas.…

O'Connell, James; Curle, Adam

194

A collection of Schottky-scan notes  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a republication of ISR-RF notes and performance reports on work done in 1974-1975. The original notes have been edited, corrected and, in most cases, shortened. Discussed in this note are the following topics: noise, errors and the Schottky scan; speeding up the Schottky scan; Schottky markers and fast Schottky scans; and some engineering aspects of the fast Schottky scan.

Sabersky, A.P.

1980-10-01

195

X-Ray Study of Cold Work in Thoriated Tungsten  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectrometer measurements were made of the x-ray diffraction peaks for cold-worked filings of thoriated tungsten: 99.25 tungsten, 0.75 thoria. A Fourier analysis was made of the peak shapes, and the instrumental broadening corrected by using the peaks of annealed material. When the particle size and the distortion effects were separated, it was found that the particle size broadening corresponded to

M. McKeehan; B. E. Warren

1953-01-01

196

Understanding China's Post80 employees' work attitudes: an explorative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among job and career satisfactions, work commitment, and turnover intentions for the Post-80 employees in China. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 290 of China's Post-80 employees from 19 knowledge-intensive companies were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used for data analysis. Findings – The perceptions of selected Post-80 employees

Qinxuan Gu; Lihong Wang; Judy Y. Sun; Yanni Xu

2010-01-01

197

Chronic stress at work and the metabolic syndrome: prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjectives To investigate the association between stress at work and the metabolic syndrome.Risk of having the metabolic syndrome by relative index of inequality of employment grade. Multivariate multiple imputation logistic regression models: non-retired men and women in the Whitehall II cohort at phase 5Odds ratio (95% CI)P for linear trendReduction in log odds from model IAge+sex (model I)2.33 (1.38 to

Tarani Chandola; Eric Brunner; Michael Marmot

2006-01-01

198

Float on a Note  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the U.S. National Banking System (NBS), in effect from 1863--1914, banks with national charters could issue notes under four main restrictions: full collateral in the form of government bonds, a per-period tax on outstanding notes, redemption of notes into (outside) money on demand, and a clearing fee per issued note that is cleared through the Treasury's clearing system. The

Tao Zhu; Neil Wallace

2004-01-01

199

A study of emotion work in student paramedic practice.  

PubMed

Student paramedics are exposed to the harsh reality of paramedic practice early within preregistration education (British Paramedic Association (BPA) 2006). Active involvement in the emergency assessment, management and treatment of potentially life threatening and traumatic incidents involves exposure to human suffering, pain, trauma and death. Managing their own and others' emotions would appear to be integral. There is however, a paucity of research evidencing the emotional aspects of paramedic practice and none which specifically captures the student perspective. A qualitative, exploratory design and semi-structured interviews were undertaken with eight second year undergraduate paramedic science students to explore their perceptions and experiences of emotion work and the strategies used to deal with it. Thematic content analysis revealed three main themes, 'getting on with the job', 'struggling with emotion' and 'talking it through'. This paper presents the findings on the first two themes. Emergency resuscitation and getting on with the job emerged as a priority in a number of the experiences and subthemes included control and suppression of emotion, 'got to deal with it' and 'don't see them as a person'. Students struggled to deal with patients' and relatives' emotions and their own in some situations and subthemes included 'not sure of what to say', 'stop myself crying', and 'personal links'. The findings provide evidence of the emotional demands of student paramedic practice and have important implications for the curriculum content which must prepare and support students to perform emotion work effectively. PMID:22476010

Williams, Angela

2013-05-01

200

Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility t...

A. Vance C. Alviso C. Harvey

2005-01-01

201

Transforming English Language Learners' Work Readiness: Case Studies in Explicit, Work-Specific Vocabulary Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study examined the impact of a six-step framework for work-specific vocabulary instruction in adult English language learners (ELLs). Guided by research in English as a second language (ESL) methodology and the transactional theory, the researchers sought to unveil how these processes supported the acquisition and application of…

Madrigal-Hopes, Diana L.; Villavicencio, Edna; Foote, Martha M.; Green, Chris

2014-01-01

202

A Prospective Study of Return to Work Across Health Conditions: Perceived Work Attitude, Self-efficacy and Perceived Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The aim of the present study was to conduct subgroup-analyses in a prospective cohort of workers on long-term sickness absence\\u000a to investigate whether associations between perceived work attitude, self-efficacy and perceived social support and time to\\u000a RTW differ across different health conditions. Methods The study was based on a sample of 926 workers on sickness absence (6–12 weeks). The participants

Sandra BrouwerMichiel; Michiel F. Reneman; Ute Bültmann; Johan W. Groothoff

2010-01-01

203

Ecology and Human Values: A Course of Study. (Working Draft).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This interdisciplinary course is designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is made of the case study

Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

204

Graphic Cigarette-Label Warnings Work, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... study published online recently in the journal Health Psychology . Among smokers who paid attention to warning labels, ... about the health risks of smoking. SOURCE: Health Psychology , news release, July 10, 2014 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

205

Excitation-contraction coupling properties in women with work-related myalgia: a preliminary study.  

PubMed

We investigated the potential role of selected excitation-contraction coupling processes in females with work-related myalgia (WRM) by comparing WRM with healthy controls (CON) using tissue from extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and trapezius (TRAP) muscles. For the ECRB, age (mean ± SE) was 29.6 ± 3.5 years for CON (n = 9) and 39.2 ± 2.8 years for WRM (n = 13), while for the TRAP, the values were 26.0 ± 2.1 years for CON (n = 7) and 44.6 ± 2.9 years for WRM (n = 11). For the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of the ECRB, WRM displayed concentrations (nmol·(mg protein)(-1)·min(-1)) that were lower (P < 0.05) for Total (202 ± 4.4 vs 178 ± 7.1), Basal (34 ± 1.6 vs 30.1 ± 1.3), and maximal Ca(2+)-ATPase activity (Vmax, 168 ± 4.9 vs 149 ± 6.3), and Ca(2+)-uptake (5.06 ± 0.31 vs 4.13 ± 0.29), but not SERCA1a and SERCA2a isoforms, by comparison with CON. When age was incorporated as a co-variant, Total, Basal, and Ca(2+)-uptake remained different from CON (P < 0.05), but not Vmax (P = 0.13). For TRAP, none of the ATPase properties differed between groups (P > 0.05) either before or following adjustment for age. No differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the groups for Ca(2+)-release in the SR for either TRAP or ECRB. Similarly, no deficiencies, regardless of muscle, were noted for either the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase content or the ? and ? subunit isoform distribution in WRM. This preliminary study provides a basis for further research, with expanded numbers, investigating the hypothesis that abnormalities in SR Ca(2+)-regulation are involved in the cellular etiology of WRM. PMID:24886407

Green, Howard J; Ranney, Don; Burnett, Margaret; Galvin, Patti; Kyle, Natasha; Lounsbury, David; Ouyang, Jing; Smith, Ian C; Stewart, Riley; Tick, Heather; Tupling, A Russell

2014-06-01

206

A Qualitative Study of a Nutrition Working Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Behavioral Change Consortium (BCC) Nutrition Workgroup (NWG) is a multidisciplinary collaboration of representatives from BCC sites and federal agencies. Its mission is to improve measurement of dietary variables. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of perceived effectiveness of the workgroup collaboration. Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted and examined for common themes using the constant comparison method. Themes

Geoffrey W. Greene; Linda C. Nebeling; Mary L. Greaney; Ana C. Lindsay; Cary K. Hardwick; Deborah J. Toobert; Ken Resnicow; Geoffrey C. Williams; Diane L. Elliot; Tamara Goldman Sher; Holly A. McGregor; Andrea Domas; Carol A. DeFrancesco; Karen E. Peterson

2007-01-01

207

Interactive Multimedia: An Alternative Context for Studying Works of Art.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the effectiveness of two types of instructional aids, interactive multimedia and slide studies, for art-history students. Reveals that multimedia users searched more extensively for information, demonstrated more understandings and misunderstandings, and experienced carryover effects between experiments. Indicates that interactive…

Cason, Nancy F.

1998-01-01

208

Learning to Speak: Student Work. Female Studies X.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The tenth volume in a series, this publication is a collection of papers produced by college students in women's studies classes around the country. The major purpose of the collection is to provide teachers and students in the field with access to the products of classes other than their own. Most of the writings come from the humanities or from…

Rosenfelt, Deborah Silverton, Ed.

209

Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology…

Pollitt, David. Ed.

2000-01-01

210

Academic and Personal Development through Group Work: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study linked academic and personal development within a group counseling intervention. A pre-test post-test research design compared social skills, learning behaviors, and achievement with a convenience sample and control group of students from three elementary schools. For the treatment group, grade point average in Language Arts…

Steen, Sam

2011-01-01

211

Functional MRI studies of spatial and nonspatial working memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-unit recordings in monkeys have revealed neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex that increase their firing during a delay between the presentation of information and its later use in behavior. Based on monkey lesion and neurophysiology studies, it has been proposed that a dorsal region of lateral prefrontal cortex is necessary for temporary storage of spatial information whereas a more

M D'Esposito; G. K Aguirre; E. Zarahn; D. Ballard; R. K. Shin; J. Lease

1998-01-01

212

How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailing the false starts, uncertainty, and internal questioning that occur as companies organize and manage language simplification projects, the 12 case studies contained in the two sections of this book reveal how some business organizations have benefited by simplifying consumer documents. Descriptions of each case contain information on the…

Office of Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

213

Investigating the Work of Industrial Schedulers through Field Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

:   The study of planning and scheduling from a human factors perspective has re-emerged as an important area for research in\\u000a contemporary manufacturing enterprises. Improved decision support systems are needed that optimally integrate people with\\u000a computer-based systems in order to increase productivity and responsiveness. However, there is a dearth of knowledge on the\\u000a reality of the human factors of planning

S. Crawford; B. L. MacCarthy; J. R. Wilson; C. Vernon

1999-01-01

214

76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request...determine a claimant's eligibility for work-study benefits. DATES: Written comments and...technology. Titles: a. Application for Work-Study Allowance, VA Form 22-8691. b....

2011-11-01

215

Environmental effects of dredging: Long-term biological studies in bottomland hardwood wetlands, Cache River, Arkansas. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

A wetland evaluation technique developed for the Federal Highway Administration (Adamus 1983) was revised by the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and published as an operational draft (Adamus et al. 1987). The Wetlands Evaluation Technique (WET) provides an assessment of 11 different functions. This operational draft will be revised and refined during the next several years to improve its technical accuracy. One major revision planned during this period Is improving the technical accuracy by developing regionalized wetland evaluation models. Research initiated by WES in bottomland hardwood wetlands will provide information necessary to develop these regional models for this wetland type. This technical note describes biological research underway in bottomland hardwood wetlands along the Cache River in Arkansas.

Clairain, E.J.; Engler, R.M.

1988-06-01

216

Does volunteer work during leisure time buffer negative effects of job stressors? A diary study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined volunteer work engagement as a buffer in the relationship between two types of job stressors and two job-related outcomes: positive affect and active listening at work. Fifty-one employees from different organizations who were involved in various volunteer work activities during their leisure time completed a daily survey over a period of one working week with two daily

Eva J. Mojza; Sabine Sonnentag

2010-01-01

217

Problem-Based Learning in Social Work: A Study of Student Learning Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) in social work education. The participants were 132 second-year social work students who took the core courses of Social Work Theory and Practice and Skills Laboratory in the PBL mode. A 40-item scale was used to measure the students' perceptions of their social work knowledge,…

Wong, Donna Kam Pun; Lam, Debbie Oi Bing

2007-01-01

218

Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design…

Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

2009-01-01

219

Construing Systems of Management among Primary Headteachers: Moving Forward from Work Activity Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study used a Personal Construct Theory/Repertory Grid approach to examine the work of 12 Welsh primary headteachers. Analysis of thematic work-activity grids suggests principals have a more coherent view of their work (as centered on children and education) than Henry Mintzberg's observational studies portrayed. (Contains 36 references.) (MLH)

Jones, Norah; Connolly, Michael

2001-01-01

220

28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial Administration...TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or...

2013-07-01

221

Ethical and Practical Guidelines for Reporting Genetic Research Results To Study Participants: Updated Guidelines from an NHLBI Working Group  

PubMed Central

In January 2009 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 NHLBI Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening five years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that the technologic and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals which would not have been possible a decade ago. While unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the Working Group produced five recommendations. The Working Group offers two recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The Group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final Recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to IRBs, investigators, research institutions and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants.

Fabsitz, Richard R.; McGuire, Amy; Sharp, Richard R.; Puggal, Mona; Beskow, Laura M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Bookman, Ebony; Burke, Wylie; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Church, George; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Eckfeldt, John H.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Fisher, Rebecca; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gachupin, Francine; James, Cynthia; Jarvik, Gail P.; Kittles, Rick; Leib, Jennifer R.; O'Donnell, Christopher; O'Rourke, P. Pearl; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Schully, Sheri D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sze, Rebecca K.F.; Thakuria, Joseph V.; Wolf, Susan M.; Burke, Gregory L.

2011-01-01

222

Studies to Assess the Impact of Nighttime Work Zone Lighting on Motorists.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to assess the impact of work zone lighting on motorists. Field studies were conducted to provide insight into how drivers eyes react to typical temporary work zone lighting configurat...

G. L. Ullman J. D. MIles M. D. Finley M. P. Pratt

2013-01-01

223

Challenging the "Cliffs Notes" Syndrome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an approach to teaching Pierre Boulle's novella, "Face of a Hero," in which students produce their own "Cliffs Notes" for the text. Stresses the importance of using nontraditional literature, and shows how students can discover their own richer responses to literature instead of relying on study aids. (MM)

Karsten, Ernie

1989-01-01

224

Notes in Spanish  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Notes in Spanish has been described as the best free Spanish language learning podcast/blog on the Internet. Notes in Spanish publishes two podcasts: an intermediate and an advanced podcast. Each podcast is accompanied by a worksheet (available for an additional small fee), which includes a full transcript of the podcast and a list of relevant vocabulary terms and phrases, along with useful exercises. Apart from the podcasts, the Notes in Spanish blog contains regular updates of useful tips and resources for learning Spanish.

Curtis, Benjamin; Diez, Marina

2007-01-31

225

Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of…

Wong, Paul W. C.; Yeung, April W. M.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Yip, Paul S. F.; Tang, Arthur K. H.

2009-01-01

226

Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes  

SciTech Connect

These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns 'doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement. For a survey on the 'what', the 'why' and the 'hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

Coecke, Bob [Oxford University Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Parks rd, OX1 3QD Oxford (United Kingdom)

2006-01-04

227

Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns `doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I in [3, 4]) which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement [11]. For a survey on the `what', the `why' and the `hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes [12, 13]. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

Coecke, Bob

2006-01-01

228

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work

Willy Eriksen; Kristian Tambs; Stein Knardahl

2006-01-01

229

Work Redesign and the Job Characteristics Model: A Longitudinal Field Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Jobs that are dull, repetitive, and seemingly meaningless cause personal and work problems, and many organizations are turning to work redesign to solve these problems. The purpose of this study was to perform a work redesign project in a military organiz...

D. H. Wilson

1982-01-01

230

Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

2010-01-01

231

Sensitivity of profitability to working capital management: a study of Indian corporate hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working capital management almost always determines the ability of a firm to earn profit. Efficiency with which a firm handles working capital ensures prosperity while neglect would spell danger for the very survival of the firm. The study focuses on the impact of working capital management on profitability of selected Indian corporate hospitals. The time span is ten years from

Mohammad Talha; S. Benjamin Christopher; A. L. Kamalavalli

2010-01-01

232

An International Study of Management Perceptions of the Working Capital Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working capital literature is rather limited and the process of managing short?term resources is not understood well by academicians. In contrast, corporate managers are continuously involved in the working capital decision-making process, but their perspective is limited to the practices within their firm. In order to fill this gap in the working capital literature, a study of management perceptions of

James A. Gentry; Dileep R. Mehta; S. K. Bhattacharyya; Robert Cobbaut; Jean-louis Scaringella

1979-01-01

233

An International Study of Management Perceptions of the Working Capital Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working capital literature is rather limited and the process of managing short?term resources is not understood well by academicians. In contrast, corporate managers are continuously involved in the working capital decision-making process, but their perspective is limited to the practices within their firm. In order to fill this gap in the working capital literature, a study of management perceptions of

James A. Gentry; Dileep R. Mehta; S. K. Bhattacharyya; Robert Cobbaut; Jean-louis Scaringella

234

Factors predicting work status 3 months after injury: results from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Few studies examine predictors of work status following injury beyond injuries presenting to a hospital or emergency department. This paper examines the combined influences of socio-demographic, occupational, injury and pre-existing health and lifestyle factors as predictors of work status 3?months after hospitalised and non-hospitalised injury in a cohort of injured New Zealand workers. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study, New Zealand. Participants 2626 workforce active participants were identified from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study; 11 participants with missing outcome responses were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome of interest was ‘not working’ at the time of interview. Results 720 (27%) reported ‘not working’ 3?months after injury. The most important pre-injury predictors of not working following injury found by multidimensional modelling were as follows: low or unknown income, financial insecurity, physical work tasks, temporary employment, long week schedules, obesity, perceived threat to life and hospital admission. Contrary to expectations, workers reporting less frequent exercise pre-injury had lower odds of work absence. Pre-injury psychosocial and health factors were not associated with not working. Conclusion Certain pre-injury socio-demographic, physical work, work organisation, lifestyle and injury-related factors were associated with not working 3?months after injury. If these findings are confirmed, intervention strategies aimed at improving return to work should address multiple dimensions of both the worker and the workplace.

Davie, Gabrielle; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Derrett, Sarah

2012-01-01

235

Could Work Be a Source of Behavioural Disorders? A Study in Horses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress at work, as shown by a number of human studies, may lead to a variety of negative and durable effects, such as impaired psychological functioning (anxiety, depression…). Horses share with humans this characteristic of working on a daily basis and are submitted then to work stressors related to physical constraints and\\/or more “psychological” conflicts, such as potential controversial orders

Martine Hausberger; Emmanuel Gautier; Véronique Biquand; Christophe Lunel; Patrick Jégo; Daphne Soares

2009-01-01

236

Basic Structure of Work-Relevant Abilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study seeks to determine whether the dimensions underlying a comprehensive set of 15 work-relevant abilities were similar to the Data/Ideas and Things/People Work Task Dimensions underlying J. L. Holland's (1987) hexagonal model of interest and occupational types. Results are discussed and implications for practice are noted. (Author/GCP)

Prediger, Dale J.

1999-01-01

237

Is Complexity of Work Associated with Risk of Dementia? The Canadian Study of Health and Aging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated the association of complexity of work with data, people, and things with the incidence of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, while adjusting for work-related physical activity. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a 10-year population study, from 1991 to 2001, of a representative sample of persons

Edeltraut Kroger; Ross Andel; Joan Lindsay; Zohra Benounissa; Danielle Laurin

2008-01-01

238

Academic Performance of College Students: Influence of Time Spent Studying and Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's college students are less prepared for college-level work than their predecessors. Once they get to college, they tend to spend fewer hours studying while spending more hours working, some even full time (D. T. Smart, C. A. Kelley, & J. S. Conant, 1999). In this study, the authors examined the effect of both time spent studying and time…

Nonis, Sarath A.; Hudson, Gail I.

2006-01-01

239

Work-life conflict and musculoskeletal disorders: a cross-sectional study of an unexplored association  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The health consequences of work-family or rather work-life conflict (WLC) have been studied by numerous researchers. The work-related\\u000a causes of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are also well explored. And stress (at work) has been found to be a consequence\\u000a of WLC as well as a cause of MSD. But very little is known about a potential association between WLC and MSD

Oliver Hämmig; Michaela Knecht; Thomas Läubli; Georg F Bauer

2011-01-01

240

Numerical Methods Lecture Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains lecture notes from the Spring 1998 Numerical Methods course taught in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, UK. The topics include finding roots, linear equations, numerical integration, and differential equations.

Dalziel, Stuart

2003-10-10

241

Study protocol: the effects of work-site exercise on the physical fitness and work-ability of older workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Older workers have a higher rate and cost of injury than younger workers and with a rapidly ageing work force there is a need to identify strategies to address this problem. Older workers are less physically active and fit than younger workers and so have reduced work ability. The reduced work ability means they are more likely to be

Martin Mackey; Chris G Maher; Terry Wong; Kathleen Collins

2007-01-01

242

Orienting the Work-Based Curriculum Towards Work Process Knowledge: A Rationale and a German Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term 'work process knowledge' refers to the knowledge needed for working in flexible and innovative business environments, including those in which information and communication technologies have been introduced to integrate previously separated production functions. It involves a systems-level understanding of the work process in the…

Boreham, Nick

2004-01-01

243

Associations between infections and fatigue in a Dutch working population: results of the Maastricht Cohort Study on Fatigue at Work.  

PubMed

The relationship between fatigue and common infections was further explored, as part of a 3 year prospective cohort study on Fatigue at Work. The current study is based on seven successive questionnaires, covering the first 2 years of follow-up. The overall response at baseline was 45% (n = 12,140). On T1 10,592 (87.2% compared to baseline response) employees returned the questionnaire. For T2, T3, T4, T5 and T6, 10,270 (84.6%), 9655 (79.5%), 8956 (73.8%), 8692 (71.6%) and 8070 (66.5%) employees respectively returned the questionnaire. Self-administered questionnaires were used to determine the level of fatigue with the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS) and the occurrence of common cold, flu-like illness and gastroenteritis. Regression analysis using generalized estimated equations (GEE) were used for data analysis. We found a cross-sectional relationship between fatigue and the infections flu-like illness and gastroenteritis, and a longitudinal relationship between an infection as a predictor of fatigue. For fatigue as a predictor of an infection, we found odds ratios (ORs) of 1.35 (confidence interval (CI) 1.28-1.42) for flu-like illness and 1.33 (CI: 1.25-1.42) for gastroenteritis. The highest incidence of infections was found among employees who reported high fatigue levels on two successive occasions. The increased incidence of infections, is regarded as a substantial effect of fatigue because it is associated with significant absenteeism from work and leads to discomfort. PMID:12530766

Mohren, D C; Swaen, G M; Kant, I J; Borm, P J; Galama, J M

2001-01-01

244

The effects of new ways of work in the Netherlands: national data and a case study.  

PubMed

In 2010 15.2% of the work force in the Netherlands works with a computer at another location than at the office or at the clients' location. 27% of the Dutch working population is not satisfied about the possibility to work at home and 18% is not satisfied on the possibility to plan your own working time. The case control study affirms what has been reported as effects of new ways of work: the experienced productivity by communication and the representativeness of the office interior are improved and attention is needed for workers that need concentration space and need to personalize their work environment. In implementing new ways of work these issues need attention. PMID:22317113

Vink, P; Blok, M; Formanoy, M; de Korte, E; Groenesteijn, L

2012-01-01

245

The effects of new ways of work in the Netherlands: national data and a case study.  

PubMed

In 2010 15.2% of the work force in the Netherlands works with a computer at another location than at the office or at the clients' location. 27% of the Dutch working population is not satisfied about the possibility to work at home and 18% is not satisfied on the possibility to plan your own working time. The case control study affirms what has been reported as effects of new ways of work: the experienced productivity by communication and the representativeness of the office interior are improved and attention is needed for workers that need concentration space and need to personalize their work environment. In implementing new ways of work these issues need attention. PMID:22317508

Vink, P; Blok, M; Formanoy, M; de Korte, E; Groenesteijn, L

2012-01-01

246

Distributing working memory resources during problem solving.  

PubMed

This study examines how problem solvers distribute working memory demands over internal and external resources. Participants recorded notes while performing an arithmetic task. They recorded a majority of intermediate results and labeled many of those results (e.g., "C = 10"). When more effort was required to take notes, participants recorded fewer results. Participants with a consistent goal structure recorded fewer results and with practice labeled fewer recorded results than those with varied goal structures. When notes were displayed in a consistent spatial arrangement participants labeled fewer recorded results than when notes appeared in varied locations. These findings indicate that individuals use explicit and implicit strategies for indexing intermediate results. The data support the view that individuals flexibly distribute working memory over internal and external resources in response to situational cost-benefit considerations. PMID:11394683

Cary, M; Carlson, R A

2001-05-01

247

Is working in culturally diverse working environment associated with physicians' work-related well-being? A cross-sectional survey study among Finnish physicians.  

PubMed

International mobility of health care professionals is increasing, though little is known about how working in a culturally diverse team affects the native physicians' psychosocial work environment. We examined Finnish physicians' perceptions of work-related wellbeing according to whether they had foreign-born colleagues (FBCs) in their work unit. We also examined whether work-related resources moderate the potential association between work-related wellbeing and working alongside FBCs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted for a random sample of physicians in Finland in 2010 (3826 respondents, response rate 55%). Analyses were restricted to native Finnish physicians working in public health care. The results were analyzed by ANCOVA. In unadjusted analyses, having FBCs was related to poor team climate (p<0.001) and poor job satisfaction (p=0.001). Those physicians who reported high procedural justice and high job control perceived also higher job satisfaction even if they had many FBCs in the work unit (p=0.007 for interaction between FBCs and procedural justice and p<0.001 for interaction between FBCs and job control). These associations were robust to adjustments for age, sex, health care sector, specialization, on-call duty, employment contract, full-time employment and leadership position. The results indicate that culturally diverse work units face challenges related to team climate and job satisfaction. The results also show that leadership plays an important role in culturally diverse work units. The potential challenges of culturally diverse teams for native physicians may be reduced by fair decision-making and by increasing physicians' job control. PMID:24602375

Aalto, Anna-Mari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Väänänen, Ari; Bergbom, Barbara; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko

2014-08-01

248

Factors associated with hospital staff nurses working on-call hours: a pilot study.  

PubMed

When nurses work on-call hours, they have limited ability to control the hours they work. Nurses may be required to work extra hours and, if they are unable to detach from work during break time, can experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Previous studies have not examined factors associated with on-call work. In this pilot study, the authors examined state regulatory, organizational, and personal factors related to nurse on-call hours. Data were collected from registered nurses working in hospitals in two states; the final analytic sample consisted of 219 nurses. The authors found that four variables (teaching hospital employment, patient-to-nurse ratio, race/ethnicity of the nurse, and living with children) were significantly related to working on-call hours. Additional research is needed to understand nurse on-call hours and develop agency policies to promote nurses' health and well-being. PMID:23650895

Bae, Sung-Heui; Trinkoff, Alison; Jing, Hongjuan; Brewer, Carol

2013-05-01

249

Work-Based Learning: A Practical Approach for Learning to Work and Working to Learn. A Case Study on Decision-Makers' Professional Development in Iran  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work-based learning model of human resource development has captured a great deal of attention and has gained increasing importance in higher education in recent years. Work-based learning is a powerful phenomenon that attempts to help policy-makers, managers and curriculum developers improve the quality of the decision and organizational…

Arani, Mohammad Reza Sarkar; Alagamandan, Jafar; Tourani, Heidar

2004-01-01

250

Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models.

2013-01-01

251

No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement after Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations…

Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Fried, David E.; Hambrick, David Z.; Kane, Michael J.; Engle, Randall W.

2013-01-01

252

Treatment Fidelity in Social Work Intervention Research: A Review of Published Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study investigated treatment fidelity in social work research. Method: The authors systematically reviewed all articles published in five prominent social work journals over a 5- year period. Sixty-three outcome studies were identified and reviewed for how well treatment fidelity was monitored using eight review criteria. Results:…

Naleppa, Matthias J.; Cagle, John G.

2010-01-01

253

The Effect of International Social Work Education: Study Abroad versus On-Campus Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite a growing emphasis on international offerings within social work education, researchers have conducted few outcomes studies regarding the implications of these courses for students' professional development. This study addressed this gap by analyzing data from a survey of 122 social work students at Rutgers, the State University of New…

Greenfield, Emily A.; Davis, Rebecca T.; Fedor, James P.

2012-01-01

254

Reducing vividness and emotional intensity of recurrent “flashforwards” by taxing working memory: An analogue study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have found that making eye movements while retrieving visual images about past negative events reduces their vividness and emotional intensity. A working memory account states that eye movements tax working memory and interfere with visual imagery, thus degrading images. This study examined whether eye movements also affect recurrent, intrusive visual images about potential future catastrophes (“flashforwards”) in a

Iris M. Engelhard; Marcel A. van den Hout; Eliane C. P. Dek; Catharina L. Giele; Jan-Willem van der Wielen; Marthe J. Reijnen; Birgit van Roij

2011-01-01

255

The Development of Work-Study and School Enterprises in China's Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the historical development of work-study programs from the early days of communist government to current practices in China. Traditional Chinese culture separated mental and manual labor according to Confucian edicts. After a slow start, work-study was integrated into the national curriculum in the late 1950s. (MJP)

Fouts, Jeffrey T.; Chan, Jack C. K.

1997-01-01

256

The Limits of the Economic Ideology: A Comparative Anthropological Study of Work Concepts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a comparative study of folk concepts of work in six cultures--Norway, Shetland Islands, Lesotho, Papua New Guinea, Kenya, and Columbia. Concludes that in all cases studied, work represents a means of personal and social fulfillment as well as an economic necessity. (DB)

Schwimmer, Erik

1980-01-01

257

Increased frontocerebellar activation in alcoholics during verbal working memory: an fMRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is clear evidence of alcoholism-related damage to the frontal lobes and cerebellum from neuroimaging, neuropathological, and neuropsychological studies, the functional role of the cerebellum and cerebrocerebellar circuits related to verbal working memory deficits of alcoholics have not been well studied. Alcoholic and nonalcoholic subjects performed a Sternberg verbal working memory task while receiving an fMRI scan in a

John E Desmond; S. H. Annabel Chen; Eve DeRosa; Michelle R Pryor; Adolf Pfefferbaum; Edith V Sullivan

2003-01-01

258

Job Demands and Resources as Antecedents of Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By utilizing a 2-year longitudinal design, the present study investigated the experience of work engagement and its antecedents among Finnish health care personnel (n = 409). The data were collected by questionnaires in 2003 (Time 1) and in 2005 (Time 2). The study showed that work engagement--especially vigor and dedication--was relatively…

Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Ruokolainen, Mervi

2007-01-01

259

Payload specialist station study. Volume 3: Program study cost estimates. Part 1: Work breakdown structure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Payload Specialist Station (PSS) is presented. The WBS is divided into two elements--PSS contractor and mission unique requirements. In accordance with the study ground rules, it is assumed that a single contractor, hereafter referred to as PSS Contractor will perform the following: (1) provide C and D hardware (MFDS and elements of MMSE), except for GFE; (2) identify software requirements; (3) provide GSE and ground test software; and (4) perform systems engineering and integration in support of the Aft Flight Deck (AFD) C and D concept. The PSS Contractor WBS element encompasses a core or standardized PSS concept. Payload peculiar C and D requirements identified by users will originate as a part of the WBS element mission unique requirements; these requirements will be provided to the PSS Contractor for implementation.

1976-01-01

260

Applied Mathematics E-Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Applied Mathematics E-Notes "is a fully-refereed electronic journal that welcomes short original research articles that report interesting and potentially important ideas" in virtually any area of mathematics. Published annually and distributed freely online, it features works contributed by professional and academic mathematicians from all over the world. Each volume contains about 25 papers and is roughly 200 pages in length when complete. Visitors to the journal's website can download every paper published from the first volume in 2001 to the present -- papers for 2004 are already being accepted and made available online. Additionally, the Posters section of the website contains preprints of books, reports, and other documents.

2006-01-20

261

Gifts on a High Note: A Case Study of Major Donors to Music Programs in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is an examination of the giving decision-making process, as well as the factors, characteristics, and motivators of major donors to music programs in higher education. The college and the conservatory of music selected for this study are part of large, public, doctoral, research universities in metropolitan areas with at least three…

Barascout, Roger

2012-01-01

262

Michigan Emergency Response Study: Phase III : Implications of the failure to report pursuits and inaccurate accident reporting - a research note  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis is the result of Phase III of the Michigan Emergency Response Study. A check of traffic tickets issued by the State Police officers during Phase II MERS revealed that officers issued twice the the number of tickets for fleeing and eluding than the number of pursuits reported. This study was conducted to determine the number of unreported pursuits

Dennis M. Payne

1997-01-01

263

News Note: Multi-center Study Validates ProPSA Test for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Past studies have found a form of free PSA, called proenzyme PSA (pro-PSA), to be elevated in cancerous prostate tissue. Results from a multi-center study, supported by the NCI Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), have validated proPSA as a detector of early stage prostate cancer.

264

Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees’ health. However, the dimensionality of the work–family conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbach’s alpha, of the work–family conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the Work–Family Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women.

SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

2014-01-01

265

Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

2011-01-01

266

A preliminary exploration on transformative social work model in China: a case study on social work with migrant construction workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Migrant workers in the Chinese construction industry have been described as ‘indenture labourers of the twenty-first Century’. Under the guise of flexible work and high salary, there exist serious problems such as lack of an employment contract, poor working conditions, and the delay of payment. The origin of these problems lies in the subcontracting production regime of the construction industry

Weihe Guo

2012-01-01

267

Linkages to Work: A Study of the "Central Life Interests" and "Work Attachments" of Male and Female Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated overall central life interests and attachments to work of 1112 male and female employees of six Southern California manufacturing firms. Male employees have a slight tendency to be more work oriented in their overall central life interests than female employees. (Author)

Taveggia, Thomas C.; Ziemba, Thomas

1978-01-01

268

Emerging Themes on the Efficacy of Ballet Barre Work and Its Connection to Center Work: An Investigatory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the efficacy of traditional ballet barre exercises in relation to student learning and performance in technique class essentially is non-existent. This research explored how students described their experiences with barre work as well as how they saw these experiences as developing desired skills for moving in the center work.…

Martinell, Nicole Antonette

2009-01-01

269

Confirmation Bias in Studies of Nestmate Recognition: A Cautionary Note for Research into the Behaviour of Animals  

PubMed Central

Confirmation bias is a tendency of people to interpret information in a way that confirms their expectations. A long recognized phenomenon in human psychology, confirmation bias can distort the results of a study and thus reduce its reliability. While confirmation bias can be avoided by conducting studies blind to treatment groups, this practice is not always used. Surprisingly, this is true of research in animal behaviour, and the extent to which confirmation bias influences research outcomes in this field is rarely investigated. Here we conducted a meta-analysis, using studies on nestmate recognition in ants, to compare the outcomes of studies that were conducted blind with those that were not. Nestmate recognition studies typically perform intra- and inter colony aggression assays, with the a priori expectation that there should be little or no aggression among nestmates. Aggressive interactions between ants can include subtle behaviours such as mandible flaring and recoil, which can be hard to quantify, making these types of assays prone to confirmation bias. Our survey revealed that only 29% of our sample of 79 studies were conducted blind. These studies were more likely to report aggression among nestmates if they were conducted blind (73%) than if they were not (21%). Moreover, we found that the effect size between nestmate and non-nestmate treatment means is significantly lower in experiments conducted blind than those in which colony identity is known (1.38 versus 2.76). We discuss the implications of the impact of confirmation bias for research that attempts to obtain quantitative synthesises of data from different studies.

van Wilgenburg, Ellen; Elgar, Mark A.

2013-01-01

270

34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

2013-07-01

271

Work resumption at the price of distrust: a qualitative study on return to work legislation in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background Return to work (RTW) after sick leave is considered necessary to support the employees’ health. Cooperation between employees and employers may encourage employees’ RTW, but is hampered by bottlenecks that we do not completely understand. Dutch legislation means to support this cooperation and allows trying RTW during two years. The Resource Dependence Institutional Cooperation (RDIC) model has been developed for studying cooperation in public health. Study aims were to get insight into the degree of cooperation between Dutch sick-listed employees and employers, how this (lack of) cooperation can be understood, and how valid the RDIC model is for understanding this (lack of) cooperation. Methods This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 8 employees and 8 employers. Employees reported sick for 1.5-20 months for various reasons. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach and pattern matching. Results Cooperation was lacking early during sick leave. Later on there were regular meetings, but employers decided about RTW without consulting the employees. Particularly employers were motivated to cooperate during the first year, while employees were especially motivated during the second. This could be understood by experienced dependence; employees (first year) and employers (second year) did not consider cooperation to be important for achieving medical recovery (employees) or RTW (employers). These divergent goals may be understood by personal norms about the timing of medical recovery and RTW. Legislation was particularly effective regarding employer behaviour in year 1 and employee behaviour in year 2. Employees distrusted their employers during the first year, while employers reported to distrust the employees during the second year. Besides, employees and employers experienced a moderate ability to cooperate. This could be understood particularly by having moderate knowledge about legislation. The RDIC model appeared to be valid to understand the cases studied, but the additional factor distrust also played a role. Conclusions Legislation appeared to support cooperation, but awareness of a mutual dependence, trust, knowledge about the legislation and personal norms regarding recovery and RTW are also important. Professionals such as occupational physicians should support this to attain a degree of cooperation that is necessary for effective RTW.

2013-01-01

272

Finnish occupational health nurses' view of work-related stress: a cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

Occupational stress at work has been increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for chronic disease and poor quality of work life among employees. The purpose of this study was to examine how occupational health nurses in Finland manage work-related stress. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used with a sample of 354 Finnish occupational nurses who responded to the survey. No specific standardized tools to assess or handle work-related stress in occupational health services or their client companies were identified. Open-ended interviews together with burnout questionnaires were the most frequently used methods to assess the stress of employees. Interventions were directed at individual employees. A need for standardized stress assessment instruments and stress management by work organizations was found. Methods to cope with work-related stress should be developed by the occupational health team and companies' health resources departments to ensure the adoption of common protocols. PMID:24811696

Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta; Liira, Juha

2014-03-01

273

Work, Recovery Activities, and Individual Well-Being: A Diary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends previous research on respite from work and addresses the question of how individuals use their leisure time to recover from work. It is hypothesized that time spent on work-related and household activities has a negative effect on well-being, whereas low-effort, social, and physical activities are assumed to have a positive effect. One hundred Dutch teachers completed a

Sabine Sonnentag

2001-01-01

274

Could Work Be a Source of Behavioural Disorders? A Study in Horses  

PubMed Central

Stress at work, as shown by a number of human studies, may lead to a variety of negative and durable effects, such as impaired psychological functioning (anxiety, depression…). Horses share with humans this characteristic of working on a daily basis and are submitted then to work stressors related to physical constraints and/or more “psychological” conflicts, such as potential controversial orders from the riders or the requirement to suppress emotions. On another hand, horses may perform abnormal repetitive behaviour (“stereotypies”) in response to adverse life conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether the type of work the horses are used for may have an impact on their tendency to show stereotypic behaviour (and its type) outside work. Observations in their box of 76 horses all living in the same conditions, belonging to one breed and one sex, revealed that the prevalence and types of stereotypies performed strongly depended upon the type of work they were used for. The stereotypies observed involved mostly mouth movements and head tossing/nodding. Work constraints probably added to unfavourable living conditions, favouring the emergence of chronic abnormal behaviours. This is especially remarkable as the 23 hours spent in the box were influenced by the one hour work performed every day. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of potential effects of work stressors on the emergence of abnormal behaviours in an animal species. It raises an important line of thought on the chronic impact of the work situation on the daily life of individuals.

Hausberger, Martine; Gautier, Emmanuel; Biquand, Veronique; Lunel, Christophe; Jego, Patrick

2009-01-01

275

Could work be a source of behavioural disorders? A study in horses.  

PubMed

Stress at work, as shown by a number of human studies, may lead to a variety of negative and durable effects, such as impaired psychological functioning (anxiety, depression...). Horses share with humans this characteristic of working on a daily basis and are submitted then to work stressors related to physical constraints and/or more "psychological" conflicts, such as potential controversial orders from the riders or the requirement to suppress emotions. On another hand, horses may perform abnormal repetitive behaviour ("stereotypies") in response to adverse life conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether the type of work the horses are used for may have an impact on their tendency to show stereotypic behaviour (and its type) outside work. Observations in their box of 76 horses all living in the same conditions, belonging to one breed and one sex, revealed that the prevalence and types of stereotypies performed strongly depended upon the type of work they were used for. The stereotypies observed involved mostly mouth movements and head tossing/nodding. Work constraints probably added to unfavourable living conditions, favouring the emergence of chronic abnormal behaviours. This is especially remarkable as the 23 hours spent in the box were influenced by the one hour work performed every day. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of potential effects of work stressors on the emergence of abnormal behaviours in an animal species. It raises an important line of thought on the chronic impact of the work situation on the daily life of individuals. PMID:19862328

Hausberger, Martine; Gautier, Emmanuel; Biquand, Véronique; Lunel, Christophe; Jégo, Patrick

2009-01-01

276

UC Berkeley Lab Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of California at Berkeley College of Engineering publishes Lab Notes, a newsletter from the Public Affairs Office. The mission is "to illuminate groundbreaking research underway today at the College of Engineering that will dramatically change our lives tomorrow." Lab Notes is available online free of charge. Articles in the November 2004 issue highlight robot technology, satellite communications, and a radio observatory project. Each short article includes images or videos and links to related articles and researchers' websites. Previous issues are saved in an online archive.

277

Low back pain patients' experiences of work modifications; a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Research indicates that work modifications can reduce sickness absence and work disability due to low back pain. However, there are few studies that have described modified work from the perspective of patients. A greater understanding of their experiences may inform future workplace management of employees with this condition. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Data was analysed thematically. Results Many participants had made their own work modifications, which were guided by the extent of control they had over their hours and duties, colleague support, and their own beliefs and attitudes about working with back pain. A minority of the participants had received advice or support with work modifications through occupational health. Access to these services was limited and usually followed lengthy sickness absence. Implementation largely rested with the manager and over-cautious approaches were common. Conclusions There was little evidence of compliance with occupational health guidance on modified work. There appears to be insufficient expertise among managers and occupational health in modifying work for employees with low back pain and little indication of joint planning. On the whole, workers make their own modifications, or arrange them informally with their manager and colleagues, but remain concerned about working with back pain. More effective and appropriate application of modifications may increase employees' confidence in their ability to work.

2010-01-01

278

This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026. Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Robust Checksum-based header Compression (ROCCO) scheme is a header compression scheme designed to work over error prone channels. The scheme is adaptable to the characteristics of the link over which it is used and also to the properties of the packet streams it compresses.

Lars-Erik Jonsson

279

Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software. Items covered this month include: (1) a recommendation that dam designers give more consideration to earthquake resistance, (2) the development of a new wave rotor design, (3) the development of a small hydro database in China, and (4) an ICOLD bulletin on the optimization of constuction costs.

NONE

1993-12-31

280

Technical note Cold storage and autonomy in a three compartments photovoltaic solar refrigerator: experimental and thermodynamic study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we report the results of the study of the first model of solar photovoltaic refrigerator with three compartments: one for vaccine and medicines storage, the second one for the personal use of the medical staff, and the third one for water freezing. A cold storage is made around the evaporator in order to give the system several

Siaka Toure; Wanignon Ferdinand Fassinou

1999-01-01

281

Baseline study of effects of ionizing radiation on the chromosomes of the marine worm, 'Neanthes arenaceodentata'. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

Between 1946 and 1970 the United States disposed of low level radioactive waste at several sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In 1972 the Environmental Protection Agency was authorized under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act (PL-92-532) to regulate all ocean disposal activities. This Act requires EPA to establish a program for reviewing and evaluating ocean dumping permit applications. Before EPA can approve permits for ocean dumping of radioactive waste, it will be necessary to determine how such wastes may affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using a marine coastal worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata, as a cytogenetic model for assessing radiation damage to ocean organisms. Groups of worms were exposed to cobalt-60, then slide preparations were made and scored for gross chromosome aberrations and damage. All the levels of ionizing radiation tested from 180-680 rads were found to cause significant chromosome damage in N. arenaceodentata. The nature of this damage depended on dose, dose-rate and DNA repair capability of the worm. Worms responded to the same dose range as do mice. Since mice are accepted models for studying radiation effects on humans, this study supports the utility of using this species to study radiation effects on marine organisms.

Pesch, G.G.; Young, J.S.

1981-09-01

282

An in-depth study of Australian nurses’ and midwives’ work-life interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing and midwifery are priority professions for which there are current and future (projected) workforce shortages. This study takes a work—life perspective to examine the key workplace factors that impact on retention and well-being. Two qualitative studies are described. Study 1 explores the meaning of work—life interaction for these professionals, to inform the focus and emphasis of policy and practice

Natalie Skinner; Paul van Dijk; Jude Elton; Jocelyn Auer

2011-01-01

283

Video Support for Shared WorkSpace Interaction: An Empirical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study has been carried out to identify the ef fects of different human-to-human communica- tion modes on dyadic computer supported group work. A pilot study evaluated an available shared work-space software system, supplemented by face-to-face, telephone-based, and text-based communication modes between the two users. The findings from this study were then used to design an extensive experiment to explore

Masood Masoodian; Mark D. Apperley; Lesley Frederickson

1995-01-01

284

Employment, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross sectional study of Dutch patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo evaluate employment status, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).METHODSA questionnaire was sent to 709 patients with AS aged 16–60. The results of 658 of the patients could be analysed.RESULTSAfter adjustment for age, labour force participation was decreased by 15.4% in male patients and 5.2% in female patients compared with the general Dutch population.

A Boonen; A Chorus; H Miedema; D van der Heijde; H van der Tempel; Sj van der Linden

2001-01-01

285

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life conflict leads to poor health satisfaction. Methods The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing seven waves of data collection. The sample includes 1261 persons, with 636 men and 625 women. Data was analysed by multi-level mixed models and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results In the overall sample, there was no linear increase or decrease of work-life conflict detected, in either its time-based or strain-based form. People with higher education were more often found to have a strong work-life conflict (time- and strain-based), and more men demonstrated a strong time-based work-life conflict than women (12.2% vs. 5%). A negative relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction over time was found. People reporting strong work-life conflict at every wave reported lower health satisfaction than people with consistently weak work-life conflict. However, the health satisfaction of those with a continuously strong work-life conflict did not decrease during the study period. Conclusions Both time-based and strain-based work-life conflict are strongly correlated to health satisfaction. However, no evidence was found for a persistent work-life conflict leading to poor health satisfaction.

2011-01-01

286

Have we studied, should we study, and can we study the development of commitment? Methodological issues and the developmental study of work-related commitment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of developmental trajectories involves examining how and why a measure or index of behavior changes over time. Within the huge body of work devoted to different forms of work commitment, very little has directly and explicitly addressed developmental issues. Theory suggests that some forms of work commitment develop prior to actual experience of the focus of the commitment

Karen Beck; Carlene Wilson

2001-01-01

287

The Phenomenon of Studying While Working in Nigerian Universities: Preliminary Report on NCE Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Nigeria, 340 male and 160 female certified teachers studying for bachelor's degrees while working were surveyed. Primary motives for combining work and education were improvement of academic qualifications (85%), self-actualization (76%), effective job performance (58%), and job security (53%). (SK)

Duyilemi, B. O.

1997-01-01

288

Training and Work Organisation: An Action-Research Study in a Sales and Distribution Company  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to define a method of designing work-linked training, based on day-to-day work practices and the collaboration between all those involved. From diagnosis to evaluation, no training is designed or given without considering the opinions and interests of the parties involved. The method used is based on action research (AR) and on…

Bernardes, Alda Cristina; Lopes, Albino Pedro

2005-01-01

289

Ab-initio study of the work functions of elemental metal surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ab initio study is performed to determine precisely the work functions of metals from thin-slab calculations. We show here that a technique based on macroscopic averages of electrostatic potential with the Fermi energy of a bulk. The method is applied to both clean and absorbed metal surface to discuss the change of work function due to the surface orientation and

Xiang Ma

290

A statistical study on temporary work and occupational accidents: Specific risk factors and risk management strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temporary work, supplied by temporary-help agencies and sometimes referred to as “job in leasing”, was only recently introduced in Italy, and has since spread considerably thanks to its flexibility and cost effectiveness. In this study, trends in the rates of occupational injuries in different sectors of Italian industries in the period 2000–2004 are explored, contrasting direct employment and temporary work.

Bruno Fabiano; Fabio Currò; Andrea P. Reverberi; Renato Pastorino

2008-01-01

291

Stressful Work, Psychological Job Strain, and Turnover: A 2Year Prospective Cohort Study of Truck Drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a model that combines existing organizational stress theory and job transition theory, this 2-year longitudinal study examined antecedents and consequences of turnover among Dutch truck drivers. For this purpose, self-reported data on stressful work (job demands and control), psychological strain (need for recovery after work and fatigue), and turnover were obtained from 820 drivers in 1998 and 2000.

Einar M. de Croon; Judith K. Sluiter; Roland W. B. Blonk; Jake P. J. Broersen; Monique H. W. Frings-Dresen

2004-01-01

292

A Study of Teachers' Views on Practical Work in Secondary Schools in England and Wales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many teachers view practical work as an essential feature of science education. This study examined whether there had been any changes in the relative importance of the aims science teachers assign to the use of practical work, across the full secondary age range (11-18), since the last such national survey undertaken by Kerr 46 years ago. A…

Abrahams, Ian; Saglam, M.

2010-01-01

293

The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

2004-01-01

294

Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and…

LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

2013-01-01

295

Strategies for Research Development in Hospital Social Work: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This article identifies salient components in the advancement of social work research leadership within health care. Method: Using tenets of a modified retrospective case study approach, processes and outcomes of social work research progression at a pediatric hospital are reviewed. Results: Capacity-building processes were…

McNeill, Ted; Nicholas, David Bruce

2012-01-01

296

Intentions to Work During Terminal Illness: An Exploratory Study of Antecedent Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facing a terminal illness is an unimaginably difficult experience, yet many individuals intend to work despite their prognosis. However, research has not systematically examined the potential antecedents underlying such intentions. Using behavioral intention theory as an underlying framework, this study hypothesized that reasons for working (intrinsic and extrinsic), the will to live, disability severity, accessibility of travel, and age would

James D. Westaby; Andrea Versenyi; Robert C. Hausmann

2005-01-01

297

Specific Language or Working Memory Impairments: A Small Scale Observational Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study of the developmental relationship between language and working memory skills has only just begun, despite the prominent role of their interdependency in some theoretical accounts of developmental language impairments. Recently, Archibald and Joanisse (2009) identified children with specific language impairment (SLI), or specific working

Archibald, Lisa M. D.; Joanisse, Marc; Edmunds, Alan

2011-01-01

298

Married Thai Working Mothers: Coping with Initial Part-Time Doctoral Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced educational attainment can "grow" a career. But acquiring a doctoral qualification adds study to existing work and family responsibilities, especially for women. This phenomenological research explores the experiences of eight Thai working mothers enrolled in the initial stage of part-time doctoral programs in Thailand. A majority…

Thinnam, Thanit

2011-01-01

299

Impact of Working Capital Management Policies on Corporate Performance—An Empirical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is felt that there is the need to study the role of working capital management policies on profitability of a company. Conventionally, it has been seen that if a company desires to take a greater risk for bigger profits and losses, it reduces the size of its working capital in relation to its sales. If it is interested in

Sushma Vishnani; Bhupesh Kr. Shah

2007-01-01

300

Working environment and respiratory health: A case study of western coal miners  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case study of 102 surface and underground coal miners in the western United States randomly selected from a telephone survey of two mining communities was conducted, examining their perceptions of working conditions and health both before and after the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. Miners working since 1970 reported lower amounts of dust breathed in,

Susan E. Dawson; Gary E. Madsen; David S. James; William C. Hunt

1998-01-01

301

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to School Social Work Practice: A Mixed-Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding barriers to practice is a growing area within school social work research. Using a convenience sample of 284 school social workers, this study replicates the efforts of a mixed-method investigation designed to identify barriers and facilitators to school social work practice within different geographic locations. Time constraints and…

Teasley, Martell; Canifield, James P.; Archuleta, Adrian J.; Crutchfield, Jandel; Chavis, Annie McCullough

2012-01-01

302

The Study of Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Its Design, Efficiency, and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, a Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work paradigm is proposed. Recently, multitouch technology has become widely available for human-computer interaction. We found it has great potential to facilitate more awareness of human-to-human interaction than personal computers (PCs) in colocated collaborative work. However, other…

Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han

2012-01-01

303

Effects of Client Violence on Social Work Students: A National Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study uses a work stress theoretical framework to examine the effects of direct and indirect client violence on a randomly selected national sample of MSW and BSW social work students from the National Association of Social Workers (N=595). Client violence variables were analyzed in relationship to fear of future violence and occupational…

Criss, Pam

2010-01-01

304

Work stress and risk of cardiovascular mortality: prospective cohort study of industrial employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine the association between work stress, according to the job strain model and the effort›reward imbalance model, and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Baseline examination in 1973 determined cases of cardiovascular disease, behavioural and biological risks, and stressful characteristics of work. Biological risks were measured at 5 year and 10 year follow

Mika Kivim; Jussi Vahtera

2002-01-01

305

Mood, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate at Work: An Experience-Sampling Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a study that examined the distinctiveness of momentary positive and negative affect (PA and NA) and their relationships with blood pressure and heart rate at work in a sample of 67 full-time employees who provided psychological and physiological measurements multiple times a day, over 10 working days. These employees recorded their subjective ratings on personal digital assistant devices

Remus Ilies; Nikos Dimotakis; David Watson

2010-01-01

306

Working-Class Students, Habitus, and the Development of Student Roles: A Canadian Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As their numbers at university grow, we need to gain a better understanding of the different ways in which working-class students negotiate their potential outsider status in what is often considered an essential middle-class institution. Based on data from a four-year longitudinal, qualitative study of working-class students at a Canadian…

Lehmann, Wolfgang

2012-01-01

307

From Laura Ingalls to Wing Biddlebaum: A Study of Teacher Identity in Works of Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to systemically analyze the types of teachers that appear in works of literature, and to explore the various teacher identities that are depicted. The data consists of 44 works of literature representing a wide variety of genres, settings, cultures, and historical periods. They include 20 adult novels, 6 young adult…

Muchmore, James A.

2010-01-01

308

Brief Whiplash Treatment Works as Well as Lengthy Therapy, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Brief Whiplash Treatment Works as Well as Lengthy Therapy, Study Finds Results similar for patients ... HealthDay News) -- Just one exercise education session works as well as expensive, long-term physical therapy in ...

309

Study of Hand Function in a Group of Shoe Factory Workers Engaged in Repetitive Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Work related hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders are well known. The contributing factors could be repetitive movements, forceful work and awkward posture. It is not known how these movements affect grip or pinch strength and other functional aspects of the hand. Aims: To study a group of shoe factory workers doing repetitive thumb and wrist movements for prevalence of

Anupam Datta Gupta; Dilip Mahalanabis

2006-01-01

310

Note: Matching index technique for avoiding higher order mode resonance in accelerators: INDUS-2 accelerator as a case study  

SciTech Connect

Resonance between circulating beam frequencies and RF cavity Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of accelerators can lead to coupled-bunch instabilities. Shifting these HOMs to avoid the resonance is a topic of active interest. A study has been carried out for the accelerating cavities of the INDUS-2. For quantitative measure of deciding which modes have to be moved and by how much, we introduce a new index called the matching index (I{sub M}), as a measure of how close a HOM is to the nearest beam mode. Depending on the value of I{sub M}, the operating scenarios are classified as safe and unsafe.

Jain, V.; Joshi, S. C. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India)] [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Bhandarkar, U. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai 400076, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai 400076, Mumbai (India); Krishnagopal, S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India) [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098 (India)

2013-08-15

311

News Note: Long-term Results from Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene Shows Lower Toxicities of Raloxifene  

Cancer.gov

Initial results in 2006 of the NCI-sponsored Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) showed that a common osteoporosis drug, raloxifene, prevented breast cancer to the same degree, but with fewer serious side-effects, than the drug tamoxifen that had been in use many years for breast cancer prevention as well as treatment. The longer-term results show that raloxifene retained 76 percent of the effectiveness of tamoxifen in preventing invasive disease and grew closer to tamoxifen in preventing noninvasive disease, while remaining far less toxic – in particular, there was significantly less endometrial cancer with raloxifene use.

312

Respondent-Driven Sampling in a Study of Drug Users in New York City: Notes from the Field  

PubMed Central

Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and effective in recruiting a diverse sample of drug users.

Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S.; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

2006-01-01

313

Respondent-driven sampling in a study of drug users in New York City: notes from the field.  

PubMed

Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and effective in recruiting a diverse sample of drug users. PMID:16977493

McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

2006-11-01

314

STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom setting to help students develop skills related to decision-making. Students will read about the engine cut-off sensor anomaly which created challenges during the STS-114 mission and have the opportunity to make decisions as lead NASA engineers and Mission Management Team members. Included within this document are three case study presentation options - class discussion, group activity, and open-ended research. Please read the full case prior to in-class presentation to allow ample time for students' analysis and reflection, as well as to prepare additional questions. activities or exercises, material selection, etc. Depending upon the setting of your presentation and the number of participants, please choose at least one presentation format beforehand and plan accordingly. You may expect the following learning objectives by using the proposed formats. Learning Objectives: To enable students to experience the responsibilities of NASA management, engineers, and analysis; to discover possible procedures for investigating system anomalies; to become familiar with the liquid hydrogen low level engine cut-off sensor, including its function, connecting components, and location within the Space Shuttle; and to encourage critical analysis and stimulating discussion of Space Shuttle mission challenges.

Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

2013-01-01

315

Waste management personal notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

These notes report on strontium and cesium storage capabilities in B- Plant. Construction of tanks is discussed, including cost. Other aspects of waste management are recorded including neptunium- plutonium 238 separation waste, heat generation rates for fission products, and radioisotope production in Purex processing.

Ritter

1967-01-01

316

CyberNotes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Is my network secure? Are there holes in our security? If you're directly or indirectly responsible for maintaining computers connected to the Internet, those are questions you've probably asked yourself from time to time. Unfortunately, certain answers are difficult to come by, considering the rapid rate at which networks and operating systems are evolving and the staggering complexity of some of the software involved. Any resource that can bring you closer to that certainty is worth a look. CyberNotes, maintained by the National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC), is one of the wide array of useful security resources available. Given their mandate "to detect, deter, assess, warn of, respond to, and investigate computer intrusions and unlawful acts," NIPC is obviously concerned with tracking and alerting system administrators to potential security holes, and CyberNotes is one of their primary tools to achieve that goal. CyberNotes features an appropriately detailed list of recently discovered bugs and security holes, including the software involved, information about potential patches or workarounds, and a rating indicating the severity of the problem. The newsletter's "Trends" section discusses specific trends in attack techniques and origination points and security vulnerabilities that have recently been in frequent use by intruders. In general, CyberNotes can be a very valuable tool if hands-on computer security is part of your job, and it's worth browsing if you are indirectly involved in any fashion with the maintenance of networked computers.

1999-01-01

317

Building Material Notes (CBRI).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a compilation of 15 building materials notes. They are: Use of Coal Ash in the Building Industry; Use of Fly Ash as Pozzolana; Production of Cement Clinker Using Fly Ash; Magnesium Oxychloride Cement (Sorel Cement); Milled Granulated Slag...

S. S. Rehsi M. Rai R. S. Strivastava C. A. Taneja V. V. Sasidaran

1980-01-01

318

Notes and Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)

American Journal of Physics, 1978

1978-01-01

319

Editor's Note (October 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Instead of tedious labeling of rocks, geology is a dynamic, relevant field that in many ways provides a context and connection for all other fields of science. This selection includes notes from the field editor of Science and Children regarding the dynamic and critical importance of geology.

Ohana, Chris

2004-10-01

320

Notes Toward a Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the annual Puget Sound Writing Program Institute for Teachers of Writing. Explains that teacher-participants, who were assigned to discuss in writing their writing processes, challenged the program codirectors to do the same. Includes a codirector's notes on her thoughts about writing. (SG)

Clifton, Linda J.

1990-01-01

321

Programmable Logic Application Notes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will continue a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issue's section discussing the use of Root-Sum-Square calculations for digital delays.

Katz, Richard; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

322

Notes on Formalizing Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

These notes discuss formalizing contexts as rst class objects. The basic relation is ist(c; p). It asserts that the proposition p is true in the context c. The most important formulas relate the propositions true in dieren t contexts. Introducing contexts as formal objects will permit ax- iomatizations in limited contexts to be expanded to transcend the original limitations. This

John Mccarthy

1993-01-01

323

Gas Chromatography Application Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site includes application notes on gas chromatography from 2000-2005 which have been presented at conferences. The applications could serve as a source of experiments for advanced teaching labs and may also assist those interested in solving analytical problems that involve separations.

2011-05-20

324

Notes and News  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contribitions to the notes and news section are welcome. They should be sent to: Meteorological Applications, Met. Office College, Shinfield Park, Reading RG2 9AU, UK (Fax +44 (0) 1344 85 5410, E-mail: rwriddaway@meto.gov.uk,)

2000-12-01

325

Notes and news  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contribitions to the notes and news section are welcome. They should be sent to: Meteorological Applications, Met. Office College, Shinfield Park, Reading RG2 9AU, UK (Fax +44 (0) 1344 85 5410, E-mail: rwriddaway@meto.gov.uk)

2000-06-01

326

Notes and news  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contribitions to the notes and news section are welcome. They should be sent to: Meteorological Applications, Met. Office College, Shinfield Park, Reading RG2 9AU, UK (Fax +44 (0) 1344 85 5410,E-mail: rwriddaway@meto.gov.uk)

2000-09-01

327

NCTM Student Math Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first Note concerns mathematics on postage stamps. Historical procedures and mathematicians, metric conversion, geometric ideas, and formulas are among the topics considered. Successful…

Maletsky, Evan, Ed.; Yunker, Lee E., Ed.

1986-01-01

328

Programmable Logic Application Notes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will start a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issues section discussing worst-case analysis requirements.

Katz, Richard

2000-01-01

329

Student Math Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first "Note" concerns magic squares in which the numbers in every row, column, and diagonal add up to the same sum. An etching by Albrecht Durer is presented, with four questions followed by…

Maletsky, Evan, Ed.

1985-01-01

330

Work happiness among teachers: a day reconstruction study on the role of self-concordance.  

PubMed

Self-concordant work motivation arises from one's authentic choices, personal values, and interests. In the present study, we investigated whether self-concordant motivation may fluctuate from one work-related task to the next. On the basis of self-determination theory, we hypothesized that momentary self-concordance buffers the negative impact of momentary work demands on momentary happiness. We developed a modified version of the day reconstruction method to investigate self-concordance, work demands, and happiness during specific work-related tasks on a within-person and within-day level. In total, 132 teachers completed a daily diary on three consecutive work days as well as a background questionnaire. The daily diary resulted in 792 reported work activities and activity-related work demands, self-concordance, and happiness scores. Multilevel analysis showed that-for most work activities-state self-concordant motivation buffered the negative association of work demands with happiness. These findings add to the literature on motivation and well-being by showing that the levels of self-concordance and happiness experienced by employees vary significantly on a within-day level and show a predictable pattern. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings to increase employees' well-being. PMID:24295146

Tadi?, Maja; Bakker, Arnold B; Oerlemans, Wido G M

2013-12-01

331

Technical note: Heterogeneity dose calculation accuracy in IMRT: Study of five commercial treatment planning systems using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of five commonly used intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems (TPSs), 3 using convolution superposition algorithms or the analytical anisotropic algorithm (CSA?AAAs) and 2 using pencil beam algorithms (PBAs), in calculating the absorbed dose within a low-density, heterogeneous region when compared with measurements made in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. The dose predicted in the target center met the test criteria (5% of the dose normalization point or 3 mm distance to agreement) for all TPSs tested; however, at the tumor-lung interface and at the peripheral lung in the vicinity of the tumor, the CSA?AAAs performed better than the PBAs (85% and 50%, respectively, of pixels meeting the 5%?3-mm test criteria), and thus should be used to determine dose in heterogeneous regions.

Davidson, Scott E.; Popple, Richard A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Followill, David S.

2008-01-01

332

TECHNICAL NOTE: Study of a reduced and internally biased oxide wafer PZT actuator and its integration with shape memory alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large displacement piezoelectric actuators of a new kind—RAINBOW (reduced and internally biased oxide wafer) actuators, which are composed of reduced and unreduced layers—were prepared from PZT (Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3) by chemical reduction. The distribution of stress inside the RAINBOW structure and its actuating properties were both studied. It is found that the optimal ratio of reduced layer thickness for the RAINBOW structure is 0.3; reduced RAINBOW PZT has a lower resonance frequency and a three-times-larger displacement than traditional PZT; furthermore, the possibility of integration of PZT and SMA (shape memory alloy) was also explored. The PVD (physical vapor deposition) method was applied to deposit SMA coatings on the reduced layers of RAINBOW PZT patches. Results of mechanical and actuating experiments show that this is a reasonable idea for manufacturing actuators with better performance.

Shen, Xing; Han, Jae-Hung; Lee, In

2006-08-01

333

NOTE: Computational study of the required dimensions for standard sized phantoms in boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The minimum size of a water phantom used for calibration of an epithermal neutron beam of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at the VTT FiR 1 research reactor is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The criteria for the size of the phantom were established relative to the neutron and photon radiation fields present at the thermal neutron fluence maximum in the central beam axis (considered as the reference point). At the reference point, for the most commonly used beam aperture size at FiR 1 (14 cm diameter), less than 1% disturbance of the neutron and gamma radiation fields in a phantom were achieved with a minimum a 30 cm × 30 cm cross section of the phantom. For the largest 20 cm diameter beam aperture size, a minimum 40 cm × 40 cm cross-section of the phantom and depth of 20 cm was required to achieve undisturbed radiation field. This size can be considered as the minimum requirement for a reference phantom for dosimetry at FiR 1. The secondary objective was to determine the phantom dimensions for full characterization of the FiR 1 beam in a rectangular water phantom. In the water scanning phantom, isodoses down to the 5% level are measured for the verifications of the beam model in the dosimetric and treatment planning calculations. The dose distribution results without effects caused by the limited phantom size were achieved for the maximum aperture diameter (20 cm) with a 56 cm × 56 cm × 28 cm rectangular phantom. A similar approach to study the required minimum dimensions of the reference and water scanning phantoms can be used for epithermal neutron beams at the other BNCT facilities.

Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Kosunen, A.; Kotiluoto, P.; Seppälä, T.; Savolainen, S.

2003-11-01

334

Methods for recruiting white, black, and hispanic working-class women and men to a study of physical and social hazards at work: the United for Health study.  

PubMed

Despite research on work and health having a long-standing concern about unjust exposures and inequitable burdens of disease, there are few studies that document the joint distribution and health effects of physical and psychosocial hazards (e.g., noise, dusts, fumes, and job strain) and social hazards (e.g., racial discrimination and gender harassment) encountered at work. Also, there is a paucity of data on how these exposures, singly and combined, are distributed in relation to sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, and nativity. This article presents a conceptual model for redressing these knowledge gaps and describes recruitment strategies and the characteristics of study participants in the United for Health study. Working with labor unions, the authors recruited 14 (67%) of 21 worksites from manufacturing, meat processing, retail, and transportation, and 1,282 workers (72% response rate), of whom 62 percent were men, 36 percent were women, 39 percent were black, 23 percent were Hispanic, 25 percent were white, 31% earned less than a living wage, 40 percent were below the poverty level, and 23 percent had less than a high school education. PMID:17436989

Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Hartman, Cathy; Quinn, Margaret M; Stoddard, Anne M; Krieger, Nancy

2007-01-01

335

NOTE: Comparison of correction techniques for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging: a dog study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compared two correction methods for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Both approaches use the information from the third energy window placed between the photopeak windows of the 201Tl and 99mTc. The first approach, described by Moore et al, corrects only for the contribution of the 99mTc to the 201Tl primary 70 keV window. We developed the three-window transformation dual-isotope correction method, which is a simultaneous cross-talk correction. The two correction methods were compared in a simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc sestamibi cardiac dog study. Three separate acquisitions were performed in this dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope acquisition. The 201Tl single-isotope images were used as references. The total number of counts, and the contrast between the left ventricular cavity (LVC) and the myocardium, were used in 70 keV short-axis slices as parameters for evaluating the results of the dual-isotope correction methods. Three consecutive short-axis slices were used to calculate averaged contrast and the averaged total number of counts. The total number of the counts was 667 000 ± 500 and 414 500 ± 400 counts for the dual-isotope (201Tl + 99mTc) and single-isotope (201Tl-only) 70 keV images, respectively. The corrected dual-isotope images had 514 700 ± 700 and 368 000 ± 600 counts for Moore's correction and our approach, respectively. Moore's method improved contrast in the dual-isotope 70 keV image to 0.14 ± 0.03 from 0.11 ± 0.02, which was the value in the 70 keV non-corrected dual-isotope image. Our method improved the same contrast to 0.22 ± 0.03. The contrast in the 201Tl single-isotope 70 keV image was 0.28 ± 0.02. Both methods improved the 70 keV dual-isotope images. However, our approach provided slightly better images than Moore's correction when compared with 201Tl-only 70 keV images.

Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

2000-11-01

336

Merozoite surface protein-3 alpha as a genetic marker for epidemiologic studies in Plasmodium vivax: a cautionary note  

PubMed Central

Background Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread of the human malaria parasites in terms of geography, and is thought to present unique challenges to local efforts aimed at control and elimination. Parasite molecular markers can provide much needed data on P. vivax populations, but few such markers have been critically evaluated. One marker that has seen extensive use is the gene encoding merozoite surface protein 3-alpha (MSP-3?), a blood-stage antigen known to be highly variable among P. vivax isolates. Here, a sample of complete msp-3? gene sequences is analysed in order to assess its utility as a molecular marker for epidemiologic investigations. Methods Amplification, cloning and sequencing of additional P. vivax isolates from different geographic locations, including a set of Venezuelan field isolates (n?=?10), yielded a sample of 48 complete msp-3? coding sequences. Characterization of standard population genetic measures of diversity, phylogenetic analysis, and tests for recombination were performed. This allowed comparisons to patterns inferred from the in silico simulation of a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol used widely. Results The larger sample of MSP-3? diversity revealed incongruence between the observed levels of nucleotide polymorphism, which were high in all populations, and the pattern of PCR-RFLP haplotype diversity. Indeed, PCR-RFLP haplotypes were not informative of a population’s genetic diversity and identical haplotypes could be produced from analogous bands in the commonly used protocol. Evidence of frequent and variable insertion-deletion mutations and recurrent recombination between MSP-3? haplotypes complicated the inference of genetic diversity patterns and reduced the phylogenetic signal. Conclusions The genetic diversity of P. vivax msp-3? involves intragenic recombination events. Whereas the high genetic diversity of msp-3? makes it a promising marker for some epidemiological applications, the ability of msp-3? PCR-RFLP analysis to accurately track parasites is limited. Local studies of the circulating alleles are needed before implementing PCR-RFLP approaches. Furthermore, evidence from the global sample analysed here suggests such msp-3? PCR-RFLP methods are not suitable for broad geographic studies or tracking parasite populations for an extended period of time.

2013-01-01

337

VOLUMESERIES: a software tool for target volume follow-up studies with computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note.  

PubMed

In clinical follow-up studies after radiosurgery, imaging modalities such as computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are used. Accurate determination of the residual lesion volume is necessary for realistic assessment of the effects of treatment. Usually, the diameters rather than the volume of the lesion are measured. To determine the lesion volume without using stereotactically defined images, the software program VOLUMESERIES has been developed. VOLUMESERIES is a personal computer-based image analysis tool. Acquired DICOM CT scans and MR image series can be visualized. The region of interest is contoured with the help of the mouse, and then the system calculates the volume of the contoured region and the total volume is given in cubic centimeters. The defined volume is also displayed in reconstructed sagittal and coronal slices. In addition, distance measurements can be performed to measure tumor extent. The accuracy of VOLUMESERIES was checked against stereotactically defined images in the Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning program. A discrepancy in target volumes of approximately 8% was observed between the two methods. This discrepancy is of lesser interest because the method is used to determine the course of the target volume over time, rather than the absolute volume. Moreover, it could be shown that the method was more sensitive than the tumor diameter measurements currently in use. VOLUMESERIES appears to be a valuable tool for assessing residual lesion volume on follow-up images after gamma knife radiosurgery while avoiding the need for stereotactic definition. PMID:11143250

Scheib, S G; Gianolini, S; Haller, D; Wellis, G N; Siegfried, J

2000-12-01

338

The effects of improving hospital physicians working conditions on patient care: a prospective, controlled intervention study  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians, particularly in hospitals, suffer from adverse working conditions. There is a close link between physicians’ psychosocial work environment and the quality of the work they deliver. Our study aimed to explore whether a participatory work-design intervention involving hospital physicians is effective in improving working conditions and quality of patient care. Methods A prospective, controlled intervention study was conducted in two surgical and two internal departments. Participants were 57 hospital physicians and 1581 inpatients. The intervention was a structured, participatory intervention based on continuous group meetings. Physicians actively analyzed problematic working conditions, developed solutions, and initiated their implementation. Physicians’ working conditions and patients’ perceived quality of care were outcome criteria. These variables were assessed by standardized questionnaires. Additional data on implementation status were gathered through interviews. Results Over the course of ten months, several work-related problems were identified, categorized, and ten solutions were implemented. Post-intervention, physicians in the intervention departments reported substantially less conflicting demands and enhanced quality of cooperation with patients’ relatives, compared to control group physicians. Moreover, positive changes in enhanced colleague support could be attributed to the intervention. Regarding patient reports of care quality of care, patient ratings of physicians organization of care improved for physicians in the intervention group. Five interviews with involved physicians confirm the plausibility of obtained results, provide information on implementation status and sustainability of the solutions, and highlight process-related factors for re-design interventions to improve hospital physicians work. Conclusions This study demonstrates that participatory work design for hospital physicians is a promising intervention for improving working conditions and promoting patient quality of care.

2013-01-01

339

Electronic merger of large health care data sets: cautionary notes from a study of agricultural morbidity in New York State.  

PubMed

Agriculture ranks among industries with the highest rates of occupational injury and fatality. Administrative medical data sets have long been thought to have potential for occupational injury surveillance. This research explores the feasibility of establishing an agricultural injury surveillance system in New York State that combines data from existing electronic sources. Prehospital Care Report (PCR) data containing the nature of the accident, type of injury, time and date, and patient disposition were received. Researchers also obtained both hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) records for 2007 through 2009 from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). For SPARCS data, a computer algorithm identified all potential cases of agricultural injury using International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes. An attempt was then made to match PCR and SPARCS data using accident date, gender, age, and admitting hospital. Of the PCR records that were matched to SPARCS, 46.8% were found on subsequent inspection to not actually relate to the same incident. Total PCR counts for 2007 and 2008 showed considerable fluctuation, at 2,512,828 and 2,948,841, respectively. A total of 1275, 1336, and 1393 farm injuries were identified in the SPARCS records for 2007, 2008, and 2009, respectively. This study demonstrates that accurate matching of PCR and SPARCS records requires the use of unique personal identifiers. Further, annual fluctuations in PCR counts preclude their current use in a surveillance system. An electronic data set consisting of SPARCS data could be used for surveillance, but would benefit from the addition of PCR data as these become more consistent. PMID:24125048

Scott, Erika E; Krupa, Nicole L; Sorensen, Julie; Jenkins, Paul L

2013-01-01

340

Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischaemic heart disease in women: the Danish Nurse Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo investigate the effect of work pressure and job influence on the development of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in women.MethodsThe effect of work pressure and job influence on the 15-year incidence of IHD in women participating in the Danish Nurse Cohort Study was prospectively studied. A total of 12 116 participants, aged 45–64 years, were examined in 1993 using a

Karen Allesøe; Yrsa Andersen Hundrup; Jane Frølund Thomsen; Merete Osler

2010-01-01

341

A Study of the Social Security Work Incentives and Their Relation to Perceived Barriers to Work Among Persons With Psychiatric Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study use and awareness of the Social Security Work Incentives (SSWIs) and to obtain empirical data on barriers to returning to work. Study Design: Using parallel surveys and multiple sampling and recruitment strategies, the authors administered a brief survey about the SSWIs. Participants: Persons with a psychiatric disability (n = 539), service providers (n = 120), and family

Kim L. MacDonald-Wilson; E. Sally Rogers; Marsha Langer Ellison; Asya Lyass

2003-01-01

342

Steps on the Au/Cu(111) surface studied by local work function measurement with STM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work function variation around step edges has been studied with a scanning tunneling microscope by taking local work function images on the Au/Cu(111) surface. While the local work function measured from large terraces is in good agreement with the results obtained by non-local techniques, the local work function around step edges is significantly lower than that on terraces. The lower work function is mainly due to the dipole moment formation at step edges. The measured local work function around steps can be reproduced nicely with a simple simulation which includes a potential formed by an array of dipole moments with a proper linear density as well as an effect of the topographic change at the steps. From the simulation, dipole moments formed at AuAu and CuCu steps were obtained. Our results show that the dipole moment at CuCu step edges is about 2 times larger than that at AuAu step edges. This study demonstrated that STM has the capability to reveal the details of how local work function varies around steps and other defects and that more information can be obtained by combining local work function measurements with STM topographic information.

Jia, J. F.; Hasegawa, Y.; Inoue, K.; Yang, W. S.; Sakurai, T.

343

Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.  

PubMed

Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on specific populations, such as nurses. We used data on night work collected in the Dutch Labor Force Surveys of 1996 until 2009, and individually linked these with National registers on hospital admission. Among 285,723 women without breast cancer at baseline, 2,531 had a hospital admission for breast cancer during an average of 7 years of follow up in the registers. Occasional and regular night work were not associated with the risk of hospital admission for breast cancer (adjusted hazard ratios 1.04; 95 % confidence interval 0.85-1.27, and 0.87; 0.72-1.05, respectively). Working more hours per week, or more years in a job entailing night work did not show increased breast cancer risks. Hazard ratios neither differed between nurses and women with other occupations. Our results show no association of night work with incident breast cancer, and suggest that night work generally does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women in the Dutch working population. PMID:25012051

Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; de Vroome, Ernest M M

2014-08-01

344

The characteristics of an effective physician-hospital working relationship: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

The working relationship between a private practice physician, whose medical practice was acquired by a health system, and the health system that sponsored the medical practices was studied using a dyadic perspective and drawing from agency theory to identify those characteristics that are present in an effective working relationship. In-depth interviews with currently employed physicians and those whose contracts were terminated within the last 3 years were used to identify why some working relationships failed and others succeeded. Hospital administrators and practice managers that provided the support services to the acquired medical practices were also interviewed for their assessment of the working relationship. As a result of the research, a model for developing an effective working relationship is presented to be considered as a framework for developing future working relationships. Based upon the data, this study posits that the physicians and the hospitals can have a more effective working relationship if specific characteristics are evident before, during, and after the contract is signed. Understanding the factors that contribute to an effective working relationship can help in designing contracts with physicians and better utilize resources at the physician private practice level, as well as at the hospital level. PMID:17628927

Schramko, Tim D

2007-06-01

345

Mathematical Knowledge and School Work: A Case Study of the Teaching of Developing Mathematical Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considered the meaning that was given to knowing/doing mathematics in classrooms comprising the observational study conducted by the Wisconsin Center for Education Research during 1978-81. The study interprets the work of teachers and students, and considers what constitutes appropriate mathematical knowledge for children to learn. A…

Stephens, Walter Maxwell

346

Cancer prevention for working class, multi-ethnic populations through health centers: the healthy directions study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This paper presents the study design and baseline data from Healthy Directions-Health Centers (HCs), a study designed to address social contextual factors in cancer prevention interventions for working class, multi-ethnic populations. This study is part of the Harvard Cancer Prevention Program Project. Methods: Ten community HCs were paired and randomly assigned to intervention or control. Patients who resided in

Karen M. Emmons; Anne M. Stoddard; Caitlin Gutheil; Elizabeth Gonzalez Suarez; Rebecca Lobb; Robert Fletcher

2003-01-01

347

Combined Study and Work Paths in VET: Policy Implications and Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated ways in which Australian vocational education and training (VET) students in the 1990s combined study and work to prepare for future long-term career paths. The study was conducted throughout 1998 in three technical and further education (TAFE) institutes in three states, using the following methods: a survey of about 1,400…

Dwyer, Peter; Harwood, Aramiha; Costin, Glen; Landy, Mark; Towsty, Lidia; Wyn, Johanna

348

No evidence of intelligence improvement after working memory training: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.  

PubMed

Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations (no-contact control groups, single measures of cognitive constructs), mixed results (transfer of training gains to some tasks but not others, inconsistent transfer to the same tasks across studies), and lack of theoretical grounding (identifying the mechanisms responsible for observed transfer). The current study compared young adults who received 20 sessions of practice on an adaptive dual n-back program (working memory training group) or an adaptive visual search program (active placebo-control group) with a no-contact control group that received no practice. In addition, all subjects completed pretest, midtest, and posttest sessions comprising multiple measures of fluid intelligence, multitasking, working memory capacity, crystallized intelligence, and perceptual speed. Despite improvements on both the dual n-back and visual search tasks with practice, and despite a high level of statistical power, there was no positive transfer to any of the cognitive ability tests. We discuss these results in the context of previous working memory training research and address issues for future working memory training studies. PMID:22708717

Redick, Thomas S; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L; Hicks, Kenny L; Fried, David E; Hambrick, David Z; Kane, Michael J; Engle, Randall W

2013-05-01

349

The Influence of Practice Standards on Massage Therapists' Work Experience: A Phenomenological Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a “one size fits all” categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy.

Fortune, Luann D.; Gillespie, Elena

2010-01-01

350

Working memory and parent-rated components of attention in middle childhood: a behavioral genetic study.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current study was to investigate potential genetic and environmental correlations between working memory and three behavioral aspects of the attention network (i.e., executive, alerting, and orienting) using a twin design. Data were from 90 monozygotic (39% male) and 112 same-sex dizygotic (41% male) twins. Individual differences in working memory performance (digit span) and parent-rated measures of executive, alerting, and orienting attention included modest to moderate genetic variance, modest shared environmental variance, and modest to moderate nonshared environmental variance. As hypothesized, working memory performance was correlated with executive and alerting attention, but not orienting attention. The correlation between working memory, executive attention, and alerting attention was completely accounted for by overlapping genetic covariance, suggesting a common genetic mechanism or mechanisms underlying the links between working memory and certain parent-rated indicators of attentive behavior. PMID:21948215

Wang, Zhe; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Cutting, Laurie; Thompson, Lee A; Petrill, Stephen A

2012-03-01

351

Maryland Marine Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online newsletter archive provides back issues, April 1990 to December 2001, of Marine Notes in downloadable PDF format. Articles cover news of research, education and outreach services of Maryland Sea Grant. Topics include: fisheries management, issues and advances; biology of keystone species like blue crabs, oysters, seagrasses, striped bass; coastal zone management; Chesapeake Bay habitats and restoration; seafood; aquaculture; impacts of exotic species; coastal history; and more.

352

Maryland Marine Notes Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online newsletter archive provides back issues, April 1990 to December 2001, of Marine Notes in downloadable PDF format. Articles cover news of research, education and outreach services of Maryland Sea Grant. Topics include: fisheries management, issues and advances; biology of keystone species like blue crabs, oysters, seagrasses, striped bass; coastal zone management; Chesapeake Bay habitats and restoration; seafood; aquaculture; impacts of exotic species; coastal history; and more.

2011-05-02

353

Fulfillment of Work-Life Balance From the Organizational Perspective: A Case Study.  

PubMed

Context :? Researchers studying work-life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. Objective :? To investigate what factors influence work-life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Design :? Qualitative study. Setting :? Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants :? Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis :? Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Results :? Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work-life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. Conclusions :? The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work-life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance. PMID:23725516

Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

2013-04-18

354

Psychosocial factors at work and sickness absence in the Gazel cohort: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To test whether psychosocial factors at work are predictors of rates of sickness absence. METHODS: The study population consisted of middle aged men and women employed by the French national electricity and gas company (EDF-GDF) in various occupations and followed up since 1989 by annual self administered questionnaires and independent data obtained from the medical and personnel departments of EDF-GDF. The 1995 questionnaire provided information about three psychosocial work factors: psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support at work. Sick-ness absence data were provided by the company's social security department. The occurrence of spells and days of absence in the 12 months after completion of the 1995 questionnaire was studied. Potential confounding variables were age, smoking, alcohol, and marital status, assessed in the 1995 questionnaire, and educational level and occupation, assessed from data provided by the personnel department. This study was restricted to the 12,555 subjects of the initial cohort who were still working and answered the self administered questionnaire in 1995. RESULTS: Low levels of decision latitude were associated with more frequent and longer sickness absences among men and women. Low levels of social support at work increased the numbers of spells and days of absence among men only. These associations weakened after adjustment for potential confounding factors, but remained significant. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that psychosocial factors at work, especially decision latitude, are predictive of sickness absence.  

Niedhammer, I.; Bugel, I.; Goldberg, M.; Leclerc, A.; Gueguen, A.

1998-01-01

355

Work factors as predictors of sickness absence: a three month prospective study of nurses' aides  

PubMed Central

Aims: To identify the work factors that predict sickness absence in nurses' aides. Methods: The sample comprised 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave because of illness or pregnancy when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4931 (88.6%) completed a second questionnaire three months later. The outcome measure was the three month incidence proportion of certified sickness absence (>3 days), as assessed by self reports at follow up. Results: Perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit (odds ratio (OR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 2.34), working in psychiatric and paediatric wards, having injured the neck in an accident, and health complaints were associated with higher risk of sickness absence, after adjustments for a series of physical, psychological, and organisational work factors, personal engagement in the work unit, demographic characteristics, and daily consumption of cigarettes. Having untraditional jobs (for nurses' aides) (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.77), and engaging in aerobics or gym were associated with a lower risk of sickness absence. Conclusions: The study suggests that the three month effects of work factors on rates of certified sickness absence are modest in nurses' aides. The most important work factor, in terms of predicting sickness absence, seems to be perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit.

Eriksen, W; Bruusgaard, D; Knardahl, S

2003-01-01

356

Working Memory Training in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background. There is evidence that patients with schizophrenia suffer from decline in working memory performance with consequences for psychosocial outcome. Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of a computerized working memory training program (BrainStim) in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Methods. Twenty-nine inpatients with chronic schizophrenia were assigned to either the intervention group receiving working memory training (N = 15) or the control group without intervention (N = 14). Training was performed four times a week for 45 minutes during four weeks under neuropsychological supervision. At baseline and followup all participants underwent neuropsychological testing. Results. Pre-post comparisons of neuropsychological measures showed improvements in visual and verbal working memories and visual short-term memory with small and large effect sizes in the intervention group. In contrast, the control group showed decreased performance in verbal working memory and only slight changes in visual working memory and visual and verbal short-term memories after 4 weeks. Analyses of training profiles during application of BrainStim revealed increased performance over the 4-week training period. Conclusions. The applied training tool BrainStim improved working memory and short-term memory in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The present study implies that chronic schizophrenic patients can benefit from computerized cognitive remediation training of working memory in a clinical setting.

Hubacher, Martina; Weiland, Marcus; Calabrese, Pasquale; Stoppe, Gabriela; Stocklin, Markus; Fischer-Barnicol, David; Opwis, Klaus; Penner, Iris-Katharina

2013-01-01

357

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work factors that predict the level of psychological distress in nurses' aides. Methods The sample of this prospective study comprised 5076 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4076 (80.3 %) completed a second questionnaire 15 months later. A wide spectrum of physical, psychological, social, and organisational work factors were measured at baseline. Psychological distress (anxiety and depression) was assessed at baseline and follow-up by the SCL-5, a short version of Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Results In a linear regression model of the level of psychological distress at follow-up, with baseline level of psychological distress, work factors, and background factors as independent variables, work factors explained 2 % and baseline psychological distress explained 34 % of the variance. Exposures to role conflicts, exposures to threats and violence, working in apartment units for the aged, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that were reported to result in less support and encouragement were positively associated with the level of psychological distress. Working in psychiatric departments, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that gave lower work pace were negatively associated with psychological distress. Conclusion The study suggests that work factors explain only a modest part of the psychological distress in nurses' aides. Exposures to role conflicts and threats and violence at work may contribute to psychological distress in nurses' aides. It is important that protective measures against violent patients are implemented, and that occupational health officers offer victims of violence appropriate support or therapy. It is also important that health service organisations focus on reducing role conflicts, and that leaders listen to and consider the views of the staff.

Eriksen, Willy; Tambs, Kristian; Knardahl, Stein

2006-01-01

358

Development of work participation in young adults with cerebral palsy: A longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Objective: To document the development of work participation in young adults with cerebral palsy who are transitioning into adulthood, examine associated characteristics, and investigate work limitations and barriers among employed persons. Design: Observational longitudinal cohort study. Subjects: Seventy-four young adults with cerebral palsy of average intelligence, aged 16-20 years at baseline. Methods: Work participation in 3 categories (employed, unemployed, studying) was assessed at baseline, 2-year and 4-year follow-ups using structured interviews. At 4-year follow-up, associations of work participation with demographic and clinical characteristics were examined using multinomial logistic regression. Work limitations and barriers among employed persons were evaluated using questionnaires. Results: From age range 16-20 years to age range 20-24 years the proportions of subjects who were employed and unemployed increased from 12% to 49% and 3% to 17%, respectively; the proportion who were students decreased from 85% to 34%. In the age range 20-24 years, the employment rate of young adults with cerebral palsy was lower and the unemployment rate higher, than that of the general population. A lower level of gross motor function and younger age were associated with unemployment. Employed persons experienced few work limitations; 28% experienced situational or health barriers. Conclusion: Young adults with cerebral palsy and average intelligence are at risk of experiencing unfavourable developments in work participation. Rehabilitation services should offer support to prevent unemployment and occupational disability. PMID:24858956

Verhoef, Joan A C; Bramsen, Inge; Miedema, Harald S; Stam, Henk J; Roebroeck, Marij E

2014-06-25

359

Effect of shift work on body mass index: results of a study performed in 319 glucose-tolerant men working in a Southern Italian industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of shift work on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in subjects working in an industry sited in Apulia, Southern Italy.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of metabolic effects of shift work in glucose tolerant workers in a chemical industry in southern Italy.SUBJECTS: The subjects included 319 glucose tolerant male individuals, aged 35–60 y.MEASUREMENTS: Anthropometric parameters (body mass index

L Di Lorenzo; G De Pergola; C Zocchetti; N L'Abbate; A Basso; N Pannacciulli; M Cignarelli; R Giorgino; L Soleo

2003-01-01

360

Korean working mothers' parenting style in Korea and in the United STates: a qualitative comparative study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences of cultural influences on the parenting styles of Korean working mothers who live in South Korea versus Korean American working mothers living in the U.S. Four major themes were identified: (a) expression of affection for children, (b) parental control, (c) feelings for children, and (d) feelings for themselves. The findings indicate that acculturation to the American culture affected the Korean American working mothers to grant higher self-regulation to their children and to have more positive feelings for their children and themselves. PMID:24855813

Im, Hyesang; Kim, Eunjung; Sung, Kyungsuk

2014-01-01

361

Note About HARP's State Trimming Method.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This short note provides some additional insight into how the HARP program works. In some cases, it is possible for HARP to tdm away too many states and obtain an optimistic result. The HARP Version 7.0 manual warns the user that 'Unlike the ALL model, th...

K. J. Hayhurst R. W. Butler S. C. Johnson

1998-01-01

362

Notes & Reflections. Issue 6, Spring 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Notes & Reflections" newsletter offers practical information--ideas, strategies, tools, and resources--about topics of special interest to professional developers who are working to improve school performance. Today, professional development services to schools are provided by variety of people: teacher leaders; principals; and district,…

Miller, Linda, Ed.

2004-01-01

363

Work factors as predictors of sickness absence: a three month prospective study of nurses' aides  

Microsoft Academic Search

cigarettes. Having untraditional jobs (for nurses' aides) (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.77), and engag- ing in aerobics or gym were associated with a lower risk of sickness absence. Conclusions: The study suggests that the three month effects of work factors on rates of certified sick- ness absence are modest in nurses' aides. The most important work factor, in

W Eriksen; D Bruusgaard; S Knardahl

2006-01-01

364

Prolonged high-altitude residence impacts verbal working memory: an fMRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxygen is critical to normal brain functioning and development. In high altitude where the oxygen concentration and pressure\\u000a are very low, human cognitive capability such as working memory has been found to be jeopardized. Such effect might persist\\u000a with long-term high-altitude residence. The current study investigated the verbal working memory of 28 high-altitude residents\\u000a with blood level oxygen dependent (BOLD)

Xiaodan Yan; Jiaxing Zhang; Qiyong Gong; Xuchu Weng

2011-01-01

365

Individual and work related risk factors for neck pain among office workers: a cross sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work related neck disorders are common problems in office workers, especially among those who are intensive computer users.\\u000a It is generally agreed that the etiology of work related neck disorders is multidimensional which is associated with, and\\u000a influenced by, a complex array of individual, physical and psychosocial factors. The aim of the current study was to estimate\\u000a the one-year prevalence

B. Cagnie; L. Danneels; D. Van Tiggelen; V. De Loose; D. Cambier

2007-01-01

366

A Study on the Transition from School to the World of Work in Korea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The school-to-work transition in Korea was examined in a comprehensive study that included an overview of the realities of the school-to-work transition in Korea and a survey of 694 Koreans aged 15-29 years who had completed high school. The sample included 366 respondents who were in enrolled in a two-year college or higher level of postsecondary…

Chang, Wonsup

367

More Students Seek Campus Jobs as Work-Study Positions Dwindle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As more college students are relying on part- or full-time work to help pay for their education, federally financed work-study jobs are becoming harder to find. The percentage of freshmen who planned to hold full-time jobs while in college jumped to 4.7 percent this year, from 2.7 percent in 2000. But as more students are seeking jobs, federal…

Lipka, Sara

2007-01-01

368

Development of Working Memory and Performance in Arithmetic: A Longitudinal Study with Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: This study has aimed to investigate the relationship between the development of working memory and performance on arithmetic activities. Method: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study of a sample of 90 children, that was followed during the first, second and third year of primary school. All children were tested on measures of WM…

López, Magdalena

2014-01-01

369

The Role of the Directorate of Studies in the Legislative Work of the Hellenic Parliament.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the role of the Directorate of Studies in the legislative work of the Hellenic Parliament (Greece). The first section describes the establishment and organization of the Directorate of Studies, which consists of three departments: the department for the elaboration of bills and law proposals, the department for parliamentary…

Vassilouni, Stavroula

370

Study of the Job Satisfaction of Professional Air Force Social Work Officers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The job satisfaction levels of 149 Air Force Social Work Officers were studied by using the Professional Satisfaction Inventory originally developed by Jayaratne and Chess (1982) to study the job satisfaction and job stress of a sample of members of the N...

D. W. Jablonski

1984-01-01

371

Work plan for waste receiving and processing module 2A waste characterization study  

SciTech Connect

This WRAP 2A Waste Characterization Study effort addresses those certification strategy functions related to characterization by defining criteria associated with each function, identifying administrative and design mechanisms for accomplishing each of these functions and evaluating alternatives where applicable. This work plan provides direction for completing the study.

Bergeson, C.L.

1994-11-01

372

Job Strain and Shift Work Influences on Biomarkers and Subclinical Heart Disease Indicators: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study is one of the first to examine the impact of job strain and shift work on both the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis using two salivary stress biomarkers and two subclinical heart disease indicators. This study also tested the feasibility of a rigorous biological sampling protocol in a busy workplace setting. Paramedics (n

Imelda S. Wong; Aleck S. Ostry; Paul A. Demers; Hugh W. Davies

2012-01-01

373

The Causal Effect of Federal Work-Study Participation: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from West Virginia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1964, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program has provided funds to subsidize the wages of student employees, but it has never been studied directly. I use an instrumental variables difference-in-difference framework with administrative data from West Virginia to identify causal effects, comparing eligible and ineligible students across…

Scott-Clayton, Judith

2011-01-01

374

Sleep Patterns in Air Traffic Controllers Working Rapidly Rotating Shifts: A Field Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was part of a research program in shift work and fatigue in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) environment. The purpose of the study was to investigate three different shift schedules in use at ATC facilities with respect to potential disruption of ...

C. E. Cruz P. S. Dellarocco

1995-01-01

375

A Meta-Analysis of Published School Social Work Practice Studies: 1980-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This systematic review examined the effectiveness of school social work practices using meta-analytic techniques. Method: Hierarchical linear modeling software was used to calculate overall effect size estimates as well as test for between-study variability. Results: A total of 21 studies were included in the final analysis.…

Franklin, Cynthia; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

376

Filochat: handwritten notes provide access to recorded conversations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a novel application which integrates handwriting and recorded audio in a semi-portable device. Based on user interviews, it allows people to straightforwardly access particular points in recorded spontaneous speech via handwritten notes, using temporal indexing. Laboratory studies showed objective benefits of combined notes and audio over notes alone. The utility of the access method was shown by improved

Steve Whittaker; Patrick Hyland; Myrtle Wiley

1994-01-01

377

Work-related burn injuries in Ontario, Canada: A follow-up 10-year retrospective study.  

PubMed

Work-related burn injuries contribute to a quarter of all burns in the USA. In 2009, the provincial Workplace Safety and Insurance Board reported 64,824 work-related injuries that resulted in time lost, 1188 injuries (2%) were a result of burns. There were two previous studies performed at a regional burn centre (1984-1990 and 1998-2000) that examined incidence and characteristics of work-related burns. There was no significant change between these two groups. The purpose of this study was to identify the recent pattern of work-related burns from 2001 to 2010 and to compare it to the previous studies. During the study period, 1427 patients were admitted for an acute injury to the regional burn centre. Of these, 330 were due to a work-related incident (23%). The mean age of patients was 40.5±11.9 years, 95% were male. The mean total body surface area burn was 11.9±16.2%. The most common mechanism of injury was flame (32.7%) followed by electrical (27%) and scald (19.7%), inhalation injury was present in 4.8% of patients and the mortality was 1.8%. Our study shows a significant decrease in the incidence in work-related burns treated at the regional burn centre (23.1% vs. 28.2% vs. 30.2%, p<0.01), flame burns have now become the leading cause of injury, there was a significant reduction in inhalation injury (4.8% vs. 23% vs. 14.8%, p<0.00001), and mortality over time (1.8% vs. 4% vs. 6.7% p=0.02). These findings strongly suggest a change in the cause of work-related burns, improvement in burn care, and that prevention strategies may have been more effective. PMID:23352030

Clouatre, Elsa; Gomez, Manuel; Banfield, Joanne M; Jeschke, Marc G

2013-09-01

378

Semiannual report for the period April 1-September 30, 1979 of work on: (1) Superconducting power transmission development; (2) Cable insulation development. Power Transmission Project Technical Note No. 99  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program is to develop an underground superconducting power transmission system which is economical and technically attractive to the utility industry. The system would be capable of carrying very large blocks of electric power, thus enabling it to supplant overhead lines in urban and suburban areas and regions of natural beauty. The program consisted initially of work in the laboratory to develop suitable materials, cryostats, and cable concepts. The materials work covers the development and testing of suitable superconductors and dielectric insulation. The laboratory work has now been extended to an outside test facility which represents an intermediate step between the laboratory scale and a full-scale system. The facility will allow cables several hundred feet long to be tested under realistic conditions. In addition, the refrigerator has been designed for optimum service for utility applications.

Not Available

1980-01-15

379

Semiannual report for the period October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980 of work on: (1) superconducting power transmission system development; (2) cable insulation development. Power Transmission Project Technical Note No. 106  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in a program whose objective is to develop an underground superconducting power transmission system which is economical and technically attractive to the utility industry. The system would be capable of carrying very large blocks of electric power, and would supplant overhead lines in urban and suburban areas and regions of natural beauty. The program consisted initially of work in the laboratory to develop suitable materials, cryostats, and cable concepts. The materials work covers the development and testing of suitable superconductors and dielectric insulation. The laboratory work has now been extended to an outside test facility which represents an intermediate step between the laboratory scale and a full-scale system. The facility will allow cables several hundred feet long to be tested under realistic conditions. In addition, the refrigerator has been designed for optimum service for utility applications.

Not Available

1980-07-07

380

The role of experience in night work: Lessons from two ergonomic studies.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to analyze some connections between experience, health and work, especially in the field of night work. As a result of the baby boom, the proportion of elderly workers is steadily increasing, while at the same time many workers are reaching retirement age and being replaced by younger people. And, in the same time, there is an overall gradual increase in shift work and night work. To our knowledge, worker experience has not been extensively studied in this context. This was our focus in studying work activity in two very different situations, in a hospital and in a steel industry. In these two studies we observed that the experienced workers endeavor to plan ahead, especially at night. They do this to limit fatigue and to avoid emergencies and ensure that work is stress-free and as far as possible under control. But experience not only brings workers to plan ahead, it also enables them to do so, thanks to the resources it confers: gaining familiarity with tasks and acquiring the ability to identify critical situations, gaining knowledge about themselves and awareness of situations that cause difficulty; and gaining a better overview of the collective aspects of their work and of ways to share tasks or obtain assistance. They are able to undertake these strategies thanks to specific skills and capacities they have built along their professional career, which notably leads them to find the best trade-off between several goals, possibly contradictory. Such experience is especially valuable at night, when the worker is tired, and when there are fewer supervisors present. This experience can only be gained, however, if the work environment fosters its acquisition and provides an opportunity to make use of it, especially during the night shift and especially with respect to planning tasks ahead of time. PMID:20673571

Pueyo, Valérie; Toupin, Cathy; Volkoff, Serge

2011-01-01

381

A morphological study to note the variable patterns of cutaneous innervation on the dorsum of foot in south Indian human foetuses and its clinical implications  

PubMed Central

Background: Cutaneous nerves on the dorsum of foot are at risk for iatrogenic damage while performing arthroscopy, local anaesthetic block, surgical approach to the fibula, open reduction and internal fixation of lateral malleolar fractures, application of external fixators, elevation of a fasciocutaneous or fibular flaps for grafting, surgical decompression of neurovascular structures, or miscellaneous surgery on leg, foot and ankle. Hence the present study was undertaken to classify the different patterns of cutaneous innervation on the dorsum of foot of foetuses which will help in minimizing iatrogenic damage to the nerves. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 lower limbs from 20 foetuses were dissected and the branching patterns of nerves were noted and specimens were photographed. Results: Four distinct patterns of innervation with additional subtypes were identified and designated as Type 1 a-g; 2 a-d; 3; 4 a-c. Conclusion: Detailed knowledge about the pattern of cutaneous innervation of dorsum of foot may decrease the damage to these nerves during operative procedures near the foot and ankle.

Gupta, Chandni; Kiruba, N. Lakshmi; Dsouza, Antony Sylvan; Radhakrishnan, P.

2013-01-01

382

Return to work and sick leave after radical prostatectomy: A prospective clinical study.  

PubMed

Abstract Background. To evaluate work status at three months after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in relation to socio-demographics, urinary incontinence and bother, medical complications health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and surgical methods. To identify pre-RP available factors that can predict the duration of immediate post-RP sick leave. Material and methods. This prospective questionnaire-based study included 264 men with PCa < 65 years, who were active in the work force before RP. Urinary incontinence and bother were assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-50 (EPIC-50). HRQOL was measured using SF-12. Medical complications comprised self- reported new morbidities and re-hospitalizations within three months after RP. Patients' work status was defined as either "stable/improved" or "declined" at three months compared to work status at baseline. Duration of immediate post-RP sick leave was considered as prolonged when lasting > 6 weeks. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Results. Almost 30% of the patients had declined work status three months after RP. Change of physical HRQOL was the only factor remaining significantly associated with declined work status in the multivariate analysis. Half of the patients had prolonged immediate sick leave. Having physically strenuous work was the strongest predictor for this outcome. Conclusions. Long periods of sick leave and reduced workforce participation after RP should be considered potential adverse effects of this treatment. PMID:24195691

Dahl, Sigrun; Steinsvik, Eivind A S; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D

2014-06-01

383

Logistical and ergonomic transportation capacity for refuse collection workers: a work physiology field study.  

PubMed

In a work physiology field study, the work flow and the electrocardiogram were recorded throughout whole shifts for six male refuse (garbage) collection workers who transported and emptied 1.1 m3 refuse containers. The work rate (WR), indicated by the number of 1.1 m3 containers emptied per unit of time, and the work pulse rate (WPR) were determined in the data evaluation. The work pulse rate increases with the work rate. The functional relationship can be approximated by a linear regression function (WPR = 20.9 + 35.8.WR). The work pulse rate reaches such high values that it must be assumed that the work cannot be performed continuously throughout the whole working day. Consequently, regular breaks should be provided. When determining the necessary duration of the breaks, it was assumed that an equilibrium between fatigue and recovery should be maintained during the working day. The recovery breaks should be at least long enough for the heart rate to return to the resting level. The necessary duration of the breaks was determined on the basis of the present field study and the laboratory investigations described in the literature. A minimum duration of 10 min per working hour results from the calculations. The breaks should be taken regularly at about hourly intervals. A transportation-capacity model is provided for the planning of the deployment of refuse workers. It permits calculation of the number of 1.1 m3 containers a three-man crew, comprising the refuse collection truck driver and two loaders, can empty during one shift. Both the logistical and ergonomic transportation capacities can be determined using the model. The logistical transportation capacity (TCL) indicates the number of containers which can be emptied per shift by a crew when only criteria such as the optimal utilization of the working time are considered. The ergonomic transportation capacity (TCE) is understood as the number of containers which can be emptied per shift taking into consideration the workers' strain and the recovery breaks they require. TCE amounts to between about 140 and 160 containers per shift depending on the type of city district. TCL is higher by between 20 and 30 containers per shift. In order to meet the demand of protecting workers' health, the number of containers to be emptied per shift by a three-man crew should not exceed the ergonomic transportation capacity. PMID:1505505

Luttmann, A; Laurig, W; Jäger, M

1992-09-01

384

Kepler Data Release 4 Notes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

2010-01-01

385

Accidents at work among people with epilepsy. Results of a European prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

Studies on accidents at work in people with epilepsy are scarce and the evidence that epilepsy carries an increased risk of accidents at work is mostly anecdotal. The present survey is a multicentre prospective cohort study of everyday life risks recently conducted in eight European countries (Estonia, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia and United Kingdom) comparing referral children and adults with epilepsy to age- and sex-matched non-epileptic controls. In this context, every accident occurring during work over a 1-3 year follow-up was prospectively reported by patients and controls. Six hundred and thirty-one adult patients with epilepsy and 592 controls from this cohort have been studied here. Each patient and his/her control received a diary to record any accident or illness, with severity, circumstances, causes, consequences (including days off-work) and (for the cases) the possible relation to a seizure. A slightly higher number of unskilled workers were present among patients with epilepsy than in controls. Twenty-two patients with epilepsy and nine controls reported accidents during work (p<0.05). Only two cases reported seizure-related accidents. In both groups the injuries were mild (only one requiring hospitalization) and caused abstention from work to the same extent. In patients with epilepsy, the risk of accidents was unaffected by seizure type and frequency. This study confirms that patients with epilepsy are at higher risk of accidents compared to the general population. However, injuries provoked by work accidents are generally mild and unrelated to seizures. PMID:16632385

Cornaggia, Cesare Maria; Beghi, Massimiliano; Moltrasio, Luca; Beghi, Ettore

2006-07-01

386

[De Quervain's tenosynovitis and work with hand tools: a case study].  

PubMed

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs are a frequent complaint and their pathogenetic mechanism is often related to mechanical overload of the body region involved without traumatic events. The occupational origin of such disorders is much debated, since the clinical pictures are often not specific and may be found in subjects who do not perform hazardous work tasks. A better understanding of the relationship between clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and functional capacity would provide a deeper knowledge in decision making for return to work and rehabilitation strategies. In this paper we present a case study of a worker using scissors who developed De Quervain's syndrome in the dominant hand. A methodology for the biomechanical investigation of the work task and the possible occupational aetiology of the clinical picture are discussed according to the findings of the specific literature. PMID:15551954

Capodaglio, P; Mancin, N; Cornaggia, N; Capodaglio, E M; Saretto, G; Catenacci, G; Danesino, P

2004-01-01

387

Explaining the social gradient in sickness absence: a study of a general working population in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Background Some previous studies have proposed potential explanatory factors for the social gradient in sickness absence. Yet, this research area is still in its infancy and in order to comprise the full range of socioeconomic positions there is a need for studies conducted on random population samples. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if somatic and mental symptoms, mental wellbeing, job strain, and physical work environment could explain the association between low socioeconomic position and belonging to a sample of new cases of sick-listed employees. Methods This study was conducted on one random working population sample (n?=?2763) and one sample of newly sick-listed cases of employees (n?=?3044), drawn from the same random general population in western Sweden. Explanatory factors were self-rated 'Somatic and mental symptoms', 'Mental well-being', 'job strain', and 'physical work conditions' (i.e. heavy lifting and awkward work postures). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results Somatic and mental symptoms, mental well-being, and job strain, could not explain the association between socioeconomic position and sickness absence in both women and men. However, physical work conditions explained the total association in women and much of this association in men. In men the gradient between Non-skilled manual OR 1.76 (1.24;2.48) and Skilled manual OR 1.59 (1.10;2.20), both in relation to Higher non-manual, remained unexplained. Conclusions The present study strengthens the scientific evidence that social differences in physical work conditions seem to comprise a key element of the social gradient in sickness absence, particularly in women. Future studies should try to identify further predictors for this gradient in men.

2013-01-01

388

Notes on Laser Acceleration  

SciTech Connect

This note intends to motivate our effort toward the advent of new methods of particle acceleration, utilizing the fast rising laser technology. By illustrating the underlying principles in an intuitive manner and thus less jargon-clad fashion, we seek a direction in which we shall be able to properly control and harness the promise of laser acceleration. First we review the idea behind the laser wakefield. We then go on to examine ion acceleration by laser. We examine the sheath acceleration in particular and look for the future direction that allows orderly acceleration of ions in high energies.

Tajima, T. [Kansai Photon Science Institute and Photon Medical Research Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan)

2008-06-24

389

SPSS Class Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Authored by the University of California, Los Angeles, this page provides class notes and online movie lectures for beginning SPSS users. Students will learn to enter, explore, modify, manage, and analyze data in SPSS and will gain hands-on experience using SPSS for doing statistics, graphics, and data management. This is a great resource for almost anyone just learning to use electronic spreadsheets. The step by step approach employed by these authors is quite effective. The data files used in the instructions are available in Winzip format.

2009-03-11

390

Note on RHIC polarimetry.  

SciTech Connect

For physics measurements with polarized colliding beams, beam polarizations and relative luminosities must both be determined. Predictions for spin observables of many interesting physics processes at RHIC are quite small in magnitude. This requires high statistics measurements of relative luminosities and careful control of systematic errors. Discussions about the polarized beams at RHIC often presume that the polarization and intensity of each bunch within a will be known quite well from measurements by the RHIC polarimeters. The purpose of this note is to give a description of the knowledge that can actually be obtained from these polarimeters.

Spinka, H.

1999-11-12

391

A Note About HARP's State Trimming Method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This short note provides some additional insight into how the HARP program works. In some cases, it is possible for HARP to tdm away too many states and obtain an optimistic result. The HARP Version 7.0 manual warns the user that 'Unlike the ALL model, the SAME model can automatically drop failure modes for certain system models. The user is cautioned to insure that no important failure modes are dropped; otherwise, a non-conservative result can be given.' This note provides an example of where this occurs and a pointer to further documentation that gives a means of bounding the error associated with trimming these states.

Butler, Ricky W.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Johnson, Sally C.

1998-01-01

392

Computing chronodisruption: how to avoid potential chronobiological errors in epidemiological studies of shift work and cancer.  

PubMed

We ask if epidemiological studies into shift work and cancer may be prone to chronobiological errors. We illustrate how ignoring internal time (IT), or chronotype, may lead to what we call IT errors. Errors from truncating relevant external time (ET) information (activities start before and do not end with the shift) we call ET errors. We develop how observational research may avoid potential chronobiological biases and how chronodisruption can be computed. We assess how IT and ET errors may have affected studies published so far with a focus on those that considered chronobiological information but were confined to night work. PMID:24417520

Erren, Thomas C; Morfeld, Peter

2014-05-01

393

An exploratory study of the hardy personality at work in the health care industry.  

PubMed

The concept of personality hardiness is tested for its contribution to perceptions of the nursing work environment. Hardiness has been traditionally linked to positive health outcomes and stress resistance, but the traits which lead to disease-resistance logically have other effects on the individual. Results of this exploratory study indicate that hardiness is negatively linked to perceptions of work pressure and role ambiguity. Positive relationships were found between hardiness and job clarity, organizational involvement, and peer cohesion. Suggestions for additional study are enumerated. PMID:10710975

Turnipseed, D L

1999-12-01

394

Introduction to Composites: Instructor Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Microsoft Word document from the Aerospace Manufacturing Education Project provides instructor notes for an introduction to composite materials in the aerospace industry course. The document includes notes to accompany a PowerPoint presentation, which may be found here along with other accompanying materials. A number of useful web links are included in these instructor notes.

2011-11-16

395

Is living near a coking works harmful to health? A study of industrial air pollution.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether there was excess ill health in people living near a coking works, and if so whether it was related to exposure to coking works' emissions. DESIGN--Populations varying in proximity to the coking works were compared with control populations. Health data were correlated with available environmental data. METHODS--Analysis of routinely collected mortality, cancer registration, and birth statistics; community survey using self completed postal questionnaires; retrospective analysis of general practice (GP) records; tests of respiratory function; and analysis of available environmental data. MAIN RESULTS--Study and control populations were comparable in terms of response rates, gender, and most socioeconomic indicators. For adults, age standardised mortality and cancer rates of the population closest to the coking works were comparable with those for the district as a whole. Gender ratios, birthweight, and stillbirth rates were comparable in the study and control populations. For several indicators of respiratory health including cough, sinus trouble, glue ear, and wheeze (but not for asthma and chronic bronchitis) there was a gradient of self reported ill health, with the highest prevalence in areas closest to the works. For example, sinus trouble was reported by 20% of adults and 13% of children in the area closest to the works compared with 13% and 6% respectively in the control area. GP consultations for respiratory disorders increased when pollution (measured by SO2 levels) was high: annual consultation rates per 1000 varied from 752 in the top group of daily pollution levels to 424 in the bottom group. Analysis of locally collected smoke and SO2 data indicated that SO2 concentrations were highest closest to the works and, after closure of the coking works, the number of days on which SO2 and smoke levels exceeded 100 micrograms/m3 and 90 micrograms/m3, respectively, fell steeply. CONCLUSION--Routinely available indicators failed to provide convincing evidence that the coking works had harmed health. Self report and GP consultations indicated that respiratory ill health in the people living close to the works was worse than expected. Some of the excess probably resulted from exposure to coking works emissions. The health effects of relatively low level but intermittently high air pollution from a point source may be subtle, contributing to respiratory morbidity, but not apparent in analysis of routine health indicators.

Bhopal, R S; Phillimore, P; Moffatt, S; Foy, C

1994-01-01

396

A study of work changes due to cancer in tumor-free primary-treated cancer patients. A NOCWO study  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a Goals of work  The goal of this study is to explore the characteristics of tumor-free cancer survivors (CSs) who after their primary treatment\\u000a were still working but made work changes due to cancer and compare them to survivors who did not.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  The sample consisted of 431 CSs (219 females with breast cancer, 212 males with testicular (N?=?150) or

Sævar Berg Gudbergsson; Sophie D. Fosså; Alv A. Dahl

2008-01-01

397

Rediscovering nursing: a study of overseas nurses working in Western Australia.  

PubMed

The shortage of nurses worldwide has taken its toll on the Australian healthcare system and, as a result, there is an increased migration of overseas-qualified nurses, some of them with a non-English-speaking background. Despite Australia's regulations that assess the eligibility for nursing registration, many migrant nurses who have been successful in gaining their nursing license feel only partially prepared to work. This article presents the findings of a study, based on Husserlian phenomenology, that describes the work experience of 13 female nurses who were working in Western Australia, Australia. The participants, who could recognize the core components of nursing, were taken aback by the way that nursing is practised in Western Australia. The major differences that they encountered were related to clinical skills, holistic care, the work dynamic with doctors and patients, and the overall societal status of the nursing profession. As a result, they had to adjust their practice to conform to the new work environment. In this study, the participants elaborated on some positive and some not-so-positive aspects of their experiences in their endeavor to integrate into the Western Australian metropolitan hospital setting. PMID:21729223

Smith, Christine D A; Fisher, Colleen; Mercer, Annette

2011-09-01

398

Heavy physical work under time pressure: the garbage collection service--a case study.  

PubMed

The increased generation of garbage has become a problem in large cities, with greater demand for collection services. The collector is subjected to high workload. This study describes the work in garbage collection service, highlighting the requirements of time, resulting in physical and psychosocial demands to collectors. Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA) - a method focused on the study of work in real situations was used. Initially, technical visits, global observations and unstructured interviews with different subjects of a garbage collection company were conducted. The following step of the systematic observations was accompanied by interviews conducted during the execution of tasks, inquiring about the actions taken, and also interviews about the actions, but conducted after the development of the tasks, photographic records and audiovisual recordings, of workers from two garbage collection teams. Contradictions between the prescribed work and activities (actual work) were identified, as well as the variability present in this process, and strategies adopted by these workers to regulate the workload. It was concluded that the insufficiency of means and the organizational structure of management ensue a situation where the collection process is maintained at the expense of hyper-requesting these workers, both physically and psychosocially. PMID:22316767

Camada, Ilza Mitsuko de Oliveira; Pataro, Silvana Maria Santos; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira

2012-01-01

399

The Working Postures among Schoolchildren--Controlled Intervention Study on the Effects of Newly Designed Workstations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: School workstations are often inappropriate in not offering an optimal sitting posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of individually adjustable saddle-type chairs with wheels and desks with comfort curve and arm support on schoolchildren's working postures compared to conventional workstations. Methods:…

Saarni, Lea; Nygrd, Clas-H kan; Rimpel, Arja; Nummi, Tapio; Kaukiainen, Anneli

2007-01-01

400

Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

2012-01-01

401

Radon concentration and working level in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Radon-222 ((sup 222)Rn) and (sup 222)Rn progeny working level (WL) monitoring in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) was initiated to support regulatory compliance. Measurements were taken over two periods, in Test Alcove No. 1 of the ESF, about 60 m f...

J. H. Stiver C. H. Tung

1995-01-01

402

A Pilot Study Connecting Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties to Summer Work Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the potential contributions of adolescent employment to postschool success, many youth who experience emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) do not access these opportunities. This intervention study examined the effects of a package of strategies designed to increase access to summer work experiences. Fifty-seven youth with EBD from…

Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Ditchman, Nicole; Owens, Laura

2011-01-01

403

The ECLS-K Study and Database: A Resource for School Social Work Practitioners and Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to introduce the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) database to school social work practitioners and researchers. This database not only serves as a viable source for evidence-based practice pertaining to the influences of families and schools on the academic achievement of children beginning at…

Williams, Sheara A.

2008-01-01

404

Mathematical Knowledge and School Work. A Case Study of the Teaching of Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the aspirations of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program and sought to ascertain the extent to which it has been implemented in observed classrooms. DMP was intended to reshape conceptions of mathematical knowledge and school work and to create a pedagogy in which children would be active in creating and testing…

Stephens, W. M.; Romberg, T. A.

405

Historical Work in Mass Communication Studies: Literacy, Libraries, and Popular Reading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent work in both the history of education and the influence of popular culture suggests that libraries can be studied as sites where the public is taught--through a variety of mechanisms--important lessons about communication, knowledge and society. Researchers have addressed the interpretive question of whether literacy is tied to progress and…

Inglesby, Pamela

406

The Use of Adjunct Faculty: An Exploratory Study of Eight Social Work Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of social work practitioners as adjunct college faculty (AFs) surveyed 6 administrators, 43 AFs, and 175 students in 8 institutions. Results showed students regarded AFs as somewhat less effective teachers than full-time faculty but appreciated their expertise on contemporary and specialized practice. Administrators appreciated financial…

Klein, Waldo C.; And Others

1996-01-01

407

Work enrichment and employee voice in human resource management-performance studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies assessing the link between human resource management and performance were spawned by the high commitment or high involvement models. We show that work enrichment and employee voice were central to these models, yet as resource-based theory was increasingly used to justify the association of such models with high performance the seeds for a diminishing role for employee involvement were

Stephen J. Wood; Toby D. Wall

2007-01-01

408

The labor practices of service mediation: a study of the work practices of food assistance outreach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the results of a study of the work practices of food assistance outreach workers. We introduce the construct of service mediation, which includes the technical, social, and knowledge labor practices involved in enabling access to and use of an e-government service. We explore the service mediation activities of outreach, technological assistance, providing knowledge, and ongoing

Lynn Dombrowski; Amy Voida; Gillian R. Hayes; Melissa Mazmanian

2012-01-01

409

Counting on Working Memory when Learning to Count and to Add: A Preschool Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the author aimed at measuring how much limited working memory capacity constrains early numerical development before any formal mathematics instruction. To that end, 4- and 5-year-old children were tested for their memory skills in the phonological loop (PL), visuo-spatial sketchpad (VSSP), and central executive (CE); they also…

Noel, Marie-Pascale

2009-01-01

410

White Working Class Achievement: An Ethnographic Study of Barriers to Learning in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to examine the key barriers to learning to raise achievement of White British pupils with low-income backgrounds. The main findings suggest that the worryingly low-achievement levels of many White working class pupils have been masked by the middle class success in the English school system and government statistics that fail to…

Demie, Feyisa; Lewis, Kirstin

2011-01-01

411

Work Experiences of People with Mental Illness in Malaysia: A Preliminary Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a preliminary qualitative study, using a basic interpretive approach, to investigate the work experiences of people with mental illness in Malaysia. Six females and four males (aged 30-70) from a residential home for the mentally ill participated in semi-structured interviews. Three inter-relating themes emerged, namely the experience of…

Boo, Su-Lyn; Loong, Jaymee; Ng, Wai-Sheng

2011-01-01

412

A Case Study on the Relationships between Participation in Online Discussion and Achievement of Project Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the study is to discuss about the correlation between each group's performances of participation in online discussion and their achievements of project-based works. Performances of online discussion consist of content, frequency, and frequency of participation in discussion after each login into the Web community system. Research…

Chang, Chi-Cheng

2008-01-01

413

Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades 2 and 3. The results were that (a)

H. Lee Swanson

2011-01-01

414

Baltimore Metropolitan Area Library Study, Short Range Work Program: Tasks, Schedule, and Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a six-month work program, financed with Library Service and Construction Act funds, which applies systems analysis to public library organization, services, and facilities. The three public library systems of Baltimore City (Enoch Pratt Free Library), Baltimore County, and Anne Arundel County, Maryland are to be studied. Investigated…

CONSAD Research Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.

415

Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades…

Swanson, H. Lee

2011-01-01

416

Comparability work and the management of difference in research synthesis studies  

PubMed Central

The new imperative to be more methodologically inclusive has generated a burgeoning interest in synthesizing the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies, or mixed research synthesis. Yet, the very diversity seen to define the mixed research synthesis enterprise is also considered to defy it as it intensifies the problem of comparing the seemingly incomparable to enable the combination of the seemingly uncombinable. We propose here that the research synthesis enterprise, in general, and the mixed research synthesis enterprise, in particular, entail comparability work whereby reviewers impose similarity and difference on the studies to be reviewed. The very study diversity requiring management does not exist a priori but rather is itself an outcome of comparability work already done whereby judgments have been made about what constitutes methodological and topical diversity and uniformity. Conceiving the research synthesis process as defined by comparability work moves the backstage interpretive work of systematic review to center stage and, thereby, sets a new stage for addressing the methodological issues involved. These issues are explored by reference to the synthesis of empirical studies of antiretroviral adherence in HIV-positive women in the US.

Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Barroso, Julie

2008-01-01

417

Instructor Immediacy Strategies to Facilitate Group Work in Online Graduate Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An increasing number of online graduate study programs require students to participate in collaborative work projects. And yet, educational research examining instructional strategies that facilitate learning in small groups online is limited. This article describes findings from a qualitative research project that investigated instructor…

Melrose, Sherri; Bergeron, Kim

2007-01-01

418

Operable Unit 7-13\\/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its

P. Shaw; D. Nickelson; R. Hyde

1999-01-01

419

Establishing a Comprehensive Group Work Program in an Elementary School: An In-Depth Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creating and maintaining a successful and comprehensive school counseling program built on group work requires far more than excellent group skills. Results derived from an in-depth case study illustrate how an elementary school counselor's knowledge and skills (e.g., vision, identity, beliefs and values, capabilities, and behaviors) contributed…

Littrell, John M.; Peterson, Jean Sunde

2002-01-01

420

Cardiac Improvement During Mechanical Circulatory Support A Prospective Multicenter Study of the LVAD Working Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Myocardial recovery after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support has been reported. The LVAD Working Group Recovery Study was a prospective multicenter trial to assess the incidence of myocardial recovery in patients bridged to cardiac transplantation. Methods and Results—After LVAD implantation, patients were evaluated with the use of rest echocardiograms with partial LVAD support and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Dobutamine echocardiography

Simon Maybaum; Donna Mancini; Steve Xydas; Randall C. Starling; Keith Aaronson; Francis D. Pagani; Leslie W. Miller; Kenneth Margulies; Susan McRee; O. H. Frazier; Guillermo Torre-Amione

2010-01-01

421

A Study of Korean Working Mothers with Infants: Implications for Research and Social Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine a broad range of variables that predict maternal self-efficacy with a sample of 92 Korean working mothers whose infants are cared for at non-maternal child care settings. In addition, differences between mothers of infants on welfare roll and their socioeconomic status (SES) counterparts (not on welfare)…

Seo, So-Jung

2006-01-01

422

Functional architecture of verbal and tonal working memory: An FMRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the functional architecture of working memory (WM) for verbal and tonal information during rehearsal and articulatory suppression. Participants were presented with strings of four sung syllables with the task to remember either the pitches (tonal informa- tion) or the syllables (verbal information). Rehearsal of verbal, as well as of tonal information activated a network comprising ventrolateral premotor

Stefan Koelsch; Katrin Schulze; Daniela Sammler; Thomas Fritz; Karsten Müller; Oliver Gruber

2009-01-01

423

Confirmatory Factor Analytical Study of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated psychometric properties of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale (RDWPS). Results yielded a 14-item three-factor model that aligns with the original DWPS and fits the data very well. RDWPS scores were useful in predicting the resolution of Erikson's fourth stage of development, indicating construct validity.…

Wong, Alex W. K.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.

2012-01-01

424

Work, Productivity, and Human Performance: Practical Case Studies in Ergonomics, Human Factors and Human Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 12 case histories, each based on a real-life problem, that show how a manager can use common sense, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to solve problems in human performance at work. Each case study describes a worker's problem and provides background information and an assignment; solutions are suggested. The following cases…

Fraser, T. M.; Pityn, P. J.

425

Principal Documents Issued by the Ministry of Education and Relevant Departments Concerning Study-Abroad Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the past twenty-five years, the Ministry of Education of the Republic of China and relevant departments have formulated a total of more than 400 documents with regard to the selection and sending of personnel for studies abroad, management abroad, work after returning to China, serving the country, convenience in entering and exiting China's…

Chinese Education and Society, 2005

2005-01-01

426

Do credit card redemption reward programs work in China? An empirical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a redemption reward program of credit card works in China. The study also seeks to assess Chinese credit card users' level of awareness about the reward-point programs. Additionally, the factors affecting the redemption of reward points, one customer loyalty program used by many credit card issuers worldwide, are also

Matthew Tingchi Liu

2009-01-01

427

Public Welfare and Work Incentives: Theory and Practice. Studies in Public Welfare. Paper No. 14.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chart book summarizes two volumes in the subcommittee's series, "Studies in Public Welfare." Paper No. 4 (Dec. 22, 1972) explored work incentive and disincentive features in existing and proposed public welfare programs (cash welfare, unemployment insurance, social security, veterans' benefits, food stamps, public housing, and medicaid).…

Burke, Vee; Townsend, Alair A.

428

Studies on perilla, agarwood, and cinnamon through a combination of fieldwork and laboratory work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fieldwork is one of the primary methods for studying medicinal plants and materials, and information thus obtained can be\\u000a valuable for experiments performed in the laboratory. Meanwhile, results of experiments in the laboratory can be brought back\\u000a to the field for verification and further investigation. A combination of field and laboratory work has led to effective progress\\u000a in studies of

Michiho Ito

2008-01-01

429

Symbolic processes in the implementation of technological change: a symbolic interactionist study of work computerization.  

PubMed

This study examined the symbolic processes involved in the computerization of work in a health maintenance organization. Guided by symbolic interaction as a methodological framework, this inductive study used the methods of participant observation and in-depth interviewing for gathering data. It documents the multiple symbols associated with computerization in the organization and discusses local interpretations of those symbolic realities. It also explores the influence of this symbolism on the computerization process. PMID:10145944

Prasad, P

1993-12-01

430

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

431

WWC Review of the Report "National Charter School Study: 2013." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study reviewed here examined the effect of charter schools on annual student achievement growth in reading and math in 25 states, the District of Columbia, and New York City. The study primarily used data on students in grades 3-8, but additional elementary and high school grades were included for several states. The authors reported that…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

2014-01-01

432

Work-related lesions of the supraspinatus tendon: a case–control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  To examine the dose–response relationship between cumulative duration of work with highly elevated arms (work above shoulder\\u000a level) as well as of manual material handling and ruptures of the supraspinatus tendon in a population-based case–control\\u000a study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In 14 radiologic practices, we recruited 483 male patients aged 25–65 with radiographically confirmed partial (n = 385) or total (n = 98) supraspinatus tears associated with shoulder

Andreas Seidler; Ulrich Bolm-Audorff; Gabriela Petereit-Haack; Elke Ball; Magdalena Klupp; Noëlle Krauss; Gine Elsner

2011-01-01

433

Do outcomes differ between work and non-work-related injury in a universal injury compensation system? Findings from the New Zealand Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study  

PubMed Central

Background Poorer recovery outcomes for workers injured in a work setting, as opposed to a non-work setting, are commonly attributed to differences in financial gain via entitlement to compensation by injury setting (ie. workers compensation schemes). To date, this attribution hasn’t been tested in a situation where both work and non-work-related injuries have an equivalent entitlement to compensation. This study tests the hypothesis that there will be no differences in recovery outcomes for workers by injury setting (work and non-work) within a single universal entitlement injury compensation scheme. Methods Workforce active participants from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study (POIS) cohort were followed up at 3- and 12-months following injury. Participants who were injured in the period June 2007- May 2009 were recruited from New Zealand’s universal entitlement injury compensation scheme managed by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). An analysis of ten vocational, disability, functional and psychological recovery outcomes was undertaken by injury setting. Modified Poisson regression analyses were undertaken to examine the relationship between injury setting and recovery outcomes. Results Of 2092 eligible participants, 741 (35%) had sustained an injury in a work setting. At 3 months, workers with work-related injuries had an elevated risk of work absence however, this difference disappeared after controlling for confounding variables (adjusted RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.29). By 12 months, workers with work-related injuries had poorer recovery outcomes with a higher risk of absence from work (aRR 1.37, 95% CI 1.10-1.70), mobility-related functional problems (aRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.60), disability (aRR 1.32, 95% CI 1.04-1.68) and impaired functioning related to anxiety/depression (aRR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00-1.46). Conclusion Our study, comparing recovery outcomes for workers by injury setting within a single universal entitlement injury compensation scheme, found mixed support for the hypothesis tested. After adjustment for possible covariates recovery outcomes did not differ by injury setting at 3 months following injury, however, by 12 months vocational, disability and some functional outcomes, were poorer for workers with work-related injuries. Given our findings, and other potential mechanisms for poorer outcomes for workers with work-related injuries, further research beyond differences in entitlement to compensation should be undertaken to inform future interventions.

2013-01-01

434

Working memory network plasticity after anterior temporal lobe resection: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.  

PubMed

Working memory is a crucial cognitive function that is disrupted in temporal lobe epilepsy. It is unclear whether this impairment is a consequence of temporal lobe involvement in working memory processes or due to seizure spread to extratemporal eloquent cortex. Anterior temporal lobe resection controls seizures in 50-80% of patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of surgery on working memory are poorly understood both at a behavioural and neural level. We investigated the impact of temporal lobe resection on the efficiency and functional anatomy of working memory networks. We studied 33 patients with unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (16 left) before, 3 and 12 months after anterior temporal lobe resection. Fifteen healthy control subjects were also assessed in parallel. All subjects had neuropsychological testing and performed a visuospatial working memory functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm on these three separate occasions. Changes in activation and deactivation patterns were modelled individually and compared between groups. Changes in task performance were included as regressors of interest to assess the efficiency of changes in the networks. Left and right temporal lobe epilepsy patients were impaired on preoperative measures of working memory compared to controls. Working memory performance did not decline following left or right temporal lobe resection, but improved at 3 and 12 months following left and, to a lesser extent, following right anterior temporal lobe resection. After left anterior temporal lobe resection, improved performance correlated with greater deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant and the contralateral right hippocampus. There was a failure of increased deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant at 3 months after left temporal lobe resection compared to control subjects, which had normalized 12 months after surgery. Following right anterior temporal lobe resection there was a progressive increase of activation in the right superior parietal lobe at 3 and 12 months after surgery. There was greater deactivation of the right hippocampal remnant compared to controls between 3 and 12 months after right anterior temporal lobe resection that was associated with lesser improvement in task performance. Working memory improved after anterior temporal lobe resection, particularly following left-sided resections. Postoperative working memory was reliant on the functional capacity of the hippocampal remnant and, following left resections, the functional reserve of the right hippocampus. These data suggest that working memory following temporal lobe resection is dependent on the engagement of the posterior medial temporal lobes and eloquent cortex. PMID:24691395

Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka K; Winston, Gavin P; Bartlett, Philippa; McEvoy, Andrew W; Symms, Mark R; Koepp, Matthias J; Thompson, Pamela J; Duncan, John S

2014-05-01

435

Working memory network plasticity after anterior temporal lobe resection: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study  

PubMed Central

Working memory is a crucial cognitive function that is disrupted in temporal lobe epilepsy. It is unclear whether this impairment is a consequence of temporal lobe involvement in working memory processes or due to seizure spread to extratemporal eloquent cortex. Anterior temporal lobe resection controls seizures in 50–80% of patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of surgery on working memory are poorly understood both at a behavioural and neural level. We investigated the impact of temporal lobe resection on the efficiency and functional anatomy of working memory networks. We studied 33 patients with unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (16 left) before, 3 and 12 months after anterior temporal lobe resection. Fifteen healthy control subjects were also assessed in parallel. All subjects had neuropsychological testing and performed a visuospatial working memory functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm on these three separate occasions. Changes in activation and deactivation patterns were modelled individually and compared between groups. Changes in task performance were included as regressors of interest to assess the efficiency of changes in the networks. Left and right temporal lobe epilepsy patients were impaired on preoperative measures of working memory compared to controls. Working memory performance did not decline following left or right temporal lobe resection, but improved at 3 and 12 months following left and, to a lesser extent, following right anterior temporal lobe resection. After left anterior temporal lobe resection, improved performance correlated with greater deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant and the contralateral right hippocampus. There was a failure of increased deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant at 3 months after left temporal lobe resection compared to control subjects, which had normalized 12 months after surgery. Following right anterior temporal lobe resection there was a progressive increase of activation in the right superior parietal lobe at 3 and 12 months after surgery. There was greater deactivation of the right hippocampal remnant compared to controls between 3 and 12 months after right anterior temporal lobe resection that was associated with lesser improvement in task performance. Working memory improved after anterior temporal lobe resection, particularly following left-sided resections. Postoperative working memory was reliant on the functional capacity of the hippocampal remnant and, following left resections, the functional reserve of the right hippocampus. These data suggest that working memory following temporal lobe resection is dependent on the engagement of the posterior medial temporal lobes and eloquent cortex.

Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka K.; Winston, Gavin P.; Bartlett, Philippa; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Thompson, Pamela J.

2014-01-01

436

Intentions to work during terminal illness: an exploratory study of antecedent conditions.  

PubMed

Facing a terminal illness is an unimaginably difficult experience, yet many individuals intend to work despite their prognosis. However, research has not systematically examined the potential antecedents underlying such intentions. Using behavioral intention theory as an underlying framework, this study hypothesized that reasons for working (intrinsic and extrinsic), the will to live, disability severity, accessibility of travel, and age would predict intentions to work during terminal illness. A representative sample of medically diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease) patients with a mean life expectancy of approximately 3 years participated (mean age=57.8 years). Controlling for length of diagnosis, employment status, and demographic variables, results indicated that intrinsic reasons were particularly strong predictors of intentions, followed by age, disability severity, and accessibility of travel. Exploratory findings also indicated that behavioral intentions were positively related to future employment status, consistent with past theory. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:16316283

Westaby, James D; Versenyi, Andrea; Hausmann, Robert C

2005-11-01

437

Social stressors at work, sleep quality and psychosomatic health complaints--a longitudinal ambulatory field study.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality--objectively assessed sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality--as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow-up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. PMID:23824588

Pereira, Diana; Elfering, Achim

2014-02-01

438

Moving Beyond Dualistic Models: Working Single Mothers and Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research study examines the stressors that impact the lives of working mothers (N=11). Ethnographic field notes, personal interviews, and a series of eight weekly group meetings were used to collect data. The prevailing stress discourse does not adequately describe working single mothers' experiences of stress, but instead separates…

May-Stewart, Valerie D.

439

PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], ?lg cos ? = ?sg - ?sl (1) In modern terms, ? denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that ? may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., ? = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally [20,21]. However, the requirements concerning resolution of the measurements, as well as the sta

Herminghaus, S.

2005-03-01

440

Theoretical and Empirical Consideration of Design Issues Related to Experimental Teacher Units. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note V-3 For Phase III-A Continuation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alternative theoretical approaches influencing the research design of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study are discussed. One line of research used an Experimental Teaching Unit (ETU) to create a semi-standardized situation for comparison of teachers. Though this approach introduces a uniformity which appears to increase comparability, it is at…

Filby, Nikola N.

441

A Study of Equating in NAEP. NAEP Validity Studies. Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer simulation study was conducted to investigate the amount of uncertainty added to National Assessment of Educational Progress estimates by equating error under three different equating methods and while varying a number of factors that might affect accuracy of equating. Data from past NAEP administrations were used to guide the…

Hedges, Larry V.; Vevea, Jack L.

442

Helping postacute traumatically brain injured clients return to work: three case studies.  

PubMed

This paper presents three case studies of individuals who had sustained a severe brain injury and who are clients of a return to work programme emphasizing a supported employment approach. The case studies illustrate the types of interventions which are utilized, including job placement; job site and off-site training, advocacy, and compensatory strategies; and ongoing assessment and maintenance of social and productive gains in order to assist with job retention. The results of the case studies may be generalized to the population of brain injury survivors who require intensive and long-term intervention and support in order to return to employment. PMID:2100296

West, M; Fry, R; Pastor, J; Moore, G; Killam, S; Wehman, P; Stonnington, H

1990-01-01

443

Psychological and Social Work Factors as Predictors of Mental Distress: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. “caseness” level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline “cases” were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45–3.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.43–0.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.40–0.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.41–0.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model.

Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

2014-01-01

444

Psychological and social work factors as predictors of mental distress: a prospective study.  

PubMed

Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. "caseness" level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline "cases" were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45-3.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.43-0.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.40-0.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.41-0.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. PMID:25048033

Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

2014-01-01

445

Psychological factors at work and musculoskeletal disorders: a one year prospective study.  

PubMed

The etiology of musculoskeletal disorders is complex, with physical and psychosocial working conditions playing an important role. This study aimed to determine the relationship between psychosocial work conditions, such as psychological job demands, decision latitude, social support and job insecurity and musculoskeletal complains (MSCs) and (repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) in a 1-year prospective study. The job content questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and provocation tests were used to study 725 employees aged 20-70 years. Pain in the lower back (58 % of subjects), neck (57 %), wrists/hands (47 %) and upper back (44 %) was most frequent. The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (33.6 %), rotator cuff tendinitis (15.4 %), Guyon's canal syndrome (13.4 %), lateral epicondylitis (7.6 %), medial epicondylitis (5.3 %), tendinitis of forearm-wrist extensors (7.8 %) and tendinitis of forearm-wrist flexors (7.3 %) were the most frequent RSIs. Logistic analysis showed that increased psychological job demands statistically significantly increased the probability of lateral and medial epicondylitis, and increased control (decision latitude) statistically significantly decreased the risk of CTS. There was no relationship between job insecurity, social support and the studied RSIs. Psychosocial factors at work predict prevalence of MSCs and RSIs, irrespectively of demographic factors, e.g., age or gender, and organizational and physical factors. PMID:23934521

Bugajska, Joanna; Zo?nierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; J?dryka-Góral, Anna; Gasik, Robert; Hildt-Ciupi?ska, Katarzyna; Mali?ska, Marzena; Bedy?ska, Sylwia

2013-12-01

446

NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

2005-05-01

447

Impact of endometriosis on quality of life and work productivity: a multicenter study across ten countries  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the impact of endometriosis on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and work productivity. Design Multicenter cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment. Setting Sixteen clinical centers in ten countries. Patient(s) A total of 1,418 premenopausal women, aged 18–45 years, without a previous surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, having laparoscopy to investigate symptoms or to be sterilized. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Diagnostic delay, HRQoL, and work productivity. Result(s) There was a delay of 6.7 years, principally in primary care, between onset of symptoms and a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, which was longer in centers where women received predominantly state-funded health care (8.3 vs. 5.5 years). Delay was positively associated with the number of pelvic symptoms (chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, and heavy periods) and a higher body mass index. Physical HRQoL was significantly reduced in affected women compared with those with similar symptoms and no endometriosis. Each affected woman lost on average 10.8 hours (SD 12.2) of work weekly, mainly owing to reduced effectiveness while working. Loss of work productivity translated into significant costs per woman/week, from US$4 in Nigeria to US$456 in Italy. Conclusion(s) Endometriosis impairs HRQoL and work productivity across countries and ethnicities, yet women continue to experience diagnostic delays in primary care. A higher index of suspicion is needed to expedite specialist assessment of symptomatic women. Future research should seek to clarify pain mechanisms in relation to endometriosis severity.

Nnoaham, Kelechi E.; Hummelshoj, Lone; Webster, Premila; d'Hooghe, Thomas; Nardone, Fiorenzo de Cicco; Nardone, Carlo de Cicco; Jenkinson, Crispin; Kennedy, Stephen H.; Zondervan, Krina T.

2013-01-01

448

The work of commissioning: a multisite case study of healthcare commissioning in England's NHS  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the work of commissioning care for people with long-term conditions and the factors inhibiting or facilitating commissioners making service change. Design Multisite mixed methods case study research, combining qualitative analysis of interviews, documents and observation of meetings. Participants Primary care trust managers and clinicians, general practice-based commissioners, National Health Service trust and foundation trust senior managers and clinicians, voluntary sector and local government representatives. Setting Three ‘commissioning communities’ (areas covered by a primary care trust) in England, 2010–2012. Results Commissioning services for people with long-term conditions was a long drawn-out process involving a range of activities and partners. Only some of the activities undertaken by commissioners, such as assessment of local health needs, coordination of healthcare planning and service specification, appeared in the official ‘commissioning cycle’ promoted by the Department of Health. Commissioners undertook a significant range of additional activities focused on reviewing and redesigning services and providing support for implementation of new services. These activities often involved partnership working with providers and other stakeholders and appeared to be largely divorced from contracting and financial negotiations. At least for long-term condition services, the time and effort involved in such work appeared to be disproportionate to the anticipated or likely service gains. Commissioners adopting an incremental approach to service change in defined and manageable areas of work appeared to be more successful in terms of delivering planned changes in service delivery than those attempting to bring about wide-scale change across complex systems. Conclusions Commissioning for long-term condition services challenges the conventional distinction between commissioners and providers with a significant amount of work focused on redesigning services in partnership with providers. Such work is labour-intensive and potentially unsustainable at a time of reduced finances. New clinical commissioning groups will need to determine how best to balance the relational and transactional elements of commissioning.

Shaw, Sara E; Smith, Judith A; Porter, Alison; Rosen, Rebecca; Mays, Nicholas

2013-01-01

449

8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE STONE WORK, 1920 CONCRETE REPAIRS, AND STEEL BRACES ADDED BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CIRCA 1962. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

450

5. Interior of showroom and offices. Note ship motifs in ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Interior of showroom and offices. Note ship motifs in balcony and pilot house. Restored boats include a 1955 Standard (forward) and 1953 Clipper (background). - Barbour Boat Works, Tryon Palace Drive, New Bern, Craven County, NC

451

Downstream elevation, looking north by 20 degrees. Note projecting stones ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Downstream elevation, looking north by 20 degrees. Note projecting stones for yet-unbuilt extension. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Conestoga Creek Viaduct, Spanning Conestoga River, South of City Water Works, Lancaster, Lancaster County, PA

452

View of rear façade of office building; note projecting bay, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of rear façade of office building; note projecting bay, above the basement level, which commanded a view of the iron works - Everett Iron Company, Office Building, 0.25 mile Southwest of Everett, Earlston, Bedford County, PA

453

Reducing vividness and emotional intensity of recurrent "flashforwards" by taxing working memory: an analogue study.  

PubMed

Several studies have found that making eye movements while retrieving visual images about past negative events reduces their vividness and emotional intensity. A working memory account states that eye movements tax working memory and interfere with visual imagery, thus degrading images. This study examined whether eye movements also affect recurrent, intrusive visual images about potential future catastrophes ("flashforwards") in a sample of female undergraduates who had indicated on a screening-scale that they suffer from such intrusions. They were asked to recall two intrusive images with or without making eye movements. Before and after each condition, participants retrieved the image, and rated its vividness and emotionality. Results showed that vividness of intrusive images was lower after recall with eye movement, relative to recall only, and there was a similar trend for emotionality. Potential implications are discussed. PMID:21376527

Engelhard, Iris M; van den Hout, Marcel A; Dek, Eliane C P; Giele, Catharina L; van der Wielen, Jan-Willem; Reijnen, Marthe J; van Roij, Birgit

2011-05-01

454

Goals of telephone nursing work - the managers' perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish healthcare direct  

PubMed Central

Background Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD. Methods The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis. Results The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: ‘create feelings of trust’, ‘achieve patient safety’, ‘assess, refer and give advice’, and ‘teach the caller’. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given. Conclusions The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers’ expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems.

2014-01-01

455

Recovery at home and performance at work: A diary study on self–family facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This 5-day diary study among 65 Dutch employees focuses on the interplay between time on and off the job. We examined how daily off-job (work-related, physical, household) activities, in combination with the degree to which people want to engage in these activities relate to self–family facilitation (i.e., the positive influence of the fulfilment of one's own interests on one's family

Felieke E. Volman; Arnold B. Bakker; Despoina Xanthopoulou

2012-01-01

456

My Research Life through Studies in Art Education: A Body of Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lecture is based on a dozen articles that Enid Zimmerman had published in Studies in Art Education as author and co-author from 1977 to the present as well as several articles that are in-progress. She makes an analogy of this body of research to a body of work produced by a practicing artist. She also refers to the intellectual climate in…

Zimmerman, Enid

2005-01-01

457

Study on EEG power and coherence in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory task  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) power and coherence at rest and during a working memory task of\\u000a patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty-five patients (17 males, 18 females; 52:_71 years old) and 34 sex-and\\u000a age-matched controls (17 males, 17 females; 51:_63 years old) were recruited in the present study. Mini-Mental State Examination\\u000a (MMSE) of 35 patients with

Zheng-yan Jiang

2005-01-01

458

The depressine Syndrome: a follow-up study of 130 professionals working overseas.  

PubMed

A four-year follow-up of professional personnel who had been working overseas indicates that the depressive syndrome was the most common diagnosable psychiatric illness in this population. The study also shows that in this content the syndrome had a good prognosis. It therefore seems reasonable not to exclude persons with diagnosable depression from assignment abroad but, rather, to identify the syndrome and recommend necessary treatment. PMID:1124808

King, L J

1975-06-01

459

Evaluation Research on Social Work Interventions: A Study on the Impact of Social Worker Staffing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the impact of social worker staffing on depression and health-related quality of life (QOL) of end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis. Social workers in most dialysis units work a 5-day week. Patients are usually dialyzed three times per week. Patients on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule have access to their social worker 3 days a week, while the Tuesday-Thursday-Saturday

Joan Beder

2008-01-01

460

A Counselor-Based Work-Study Program for Educable Mentally Retarded Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper describes a public school delivery system which provides counseling for educable mentally retarded students (pre-primer through sixth grade). The system is noted to incorporate the following guidelines: (1) exceptional students have the same counseling needs as "normal" students, but their disabilities create special needs of which…

Gardner, Jacqueline

461

A Fifteen Year Follow Up Study of the North Kansas City Public Schools Work Study Graduates. 1966-1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data were collected at a 15 year class reunion of 100 graduates of a work study program for educable mentally retarded students in the North Kansas City Public Schools. Ss were interviewed personally by one of their former teachers or the vocational adjustment coordinator. Among findings were the following: 64% had their own automobile; 56% lived…

Coonley, Pat; And Others

462

Lecture Notes on General Relativity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site contains lecture notes of a class taught on General Relativity. The main subjects that these notes cover are: Introduction to General Relativity, a review of Special Relativity, Geometry of the Universe and Differential Geometry, Gravitation and Cosmology. It also provides the user with links to other resources, such as lectures and courses, from other authors. The notes are formatted in postscript, additionally there are links to html and pdf versions.

Carroll, Sean M.

2009-06-09

463

Editor's Note (July 2005)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Summer is the time to work on next year with the luxury of time. This section gives an overview of ideas that involve time for preparation or coordination. This is time that November may not provide but that summer does.

Ohana, Chris

2005-07-01

464

Health care costs and the socioeconomic consequences of work injuries in Brazil: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Work injuries are a worldwide public health problem but little is known about their socioeconomic impact. This prospective longitudinal study estimates the direct health care costs and socioeconomic consequences of work injuries for 406 workers identified in the emergency departments of the two largest public hospitals in Salvador, Brazil, from June through September 2005. After hospital discharge workers were followed up monthly until their return to work. Most insured workers were unaware of their rights or of how to obtain insurance benefits (81.6%). Approximately half the cases suffered loss of earnings, and women were more frequently dismissed than men. The most frequently reported family consequences were: need for a family member to act as a caregiver and difficulties with daily expenses. Total costs were US$40,077.00 but individual costs varied widely, according to injury severity. Out-of-pocket costs accounted for the highest proportion of total costs (50.5%) and increased with severity (57.6%). Most out-of-pocket costs were related to transport and purchasing medicines and other wound care products. The second largest contribution (40.6%) came from the public National Health System - SUS. Employer participation was negligible. Health care funding must be discussed to alleviate the economic burden of work injuries on workers. PMID:23803496

Santana, Vilma Sousa; Souza, Luis Eugênio Portela Fernandes de; Pinto, Isabela Cardoso de Matos

2013-01-01

465

[Breastfeeding practices among paid working mothers in Paraíba State, Brazil: a cross-sectional study].  

PubMed

Paid work should not be an obstacle to women's breastfeeding. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months. In Brazil, women are legally entitled to 4 months of maternity leave, but in practice few women enjoy such benefits. How is it possible to practice exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months? We analyzed both the breastfeeding rates and whether paid jobs interfere with breastfeeding in Paraíba State, Northeast Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 70 of 223 municipalities (counties) during the annual immunization campaign in 2002. Among 11,076 infants (< 12 months of age), the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 0-4 months was 22.4% and was significantly higher among working women receiving maternity leave as compared to those who did not. The prevalence of total and predominant breastfeeding for 4 months was significantly lower among working women. In rural areas, having paid work was associated with a reduction in exclusive breastfeeding. The results show that breastfeeding practices in Paraíba fall far short of WHO recommendations, especially when mothers return to their paid jobs. PMID:17891300

Vianna, Rodrigo Pinheiro de Toledo; Rea, Marina Ferreira; Venancio, Sonia Isoyama; Escuder, Maria Mercedes

2007-10-01

466

Land surface model (LSM version 1.0) for ecological, hydrological, and atmospheric studies: Technical description and user`s guide. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This technical note describes version 1 of the LSM land surface model. In this model, land surface processes are described in terms of biophysical fluxes (latent heat, sensible heat, momentum, reflected solar radiation, emitted longwave radiation) and biochemical fluxes (CO2) that depend on the ecological and hydrologic state of the land. Consequently, ecological and hydrological sub-models are needed to simulate temporal changes in terrestrial biomass and water.

Bonan, G.B.

1996-01-01

467

Job satisfaction among public health professionals working in public sector: a cross sectional study from Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background Job satisfaction largely determines the productivity and efficiency of human resource for health. It literally depicts the extent to which professionals like or dislike their jobs. Job satisfaction is said to be linked with the employee’s work environment, job responsibilities and powers and time pressure; the determinants which affect employee’s organizational commitment and consequently the quality of services. The objective of the study was to determine the level of and factors influencing job satisfaction among public health professionals in the public sector. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted in Islamabad, Pakistan. Sample size was universal including 73 public health professionals, with postgraduate qualifications and working in government departments of Islamabad. A validated structured questionnaire was used to collect data from April to October 2011. Results Overall satisfaction rate was 41% only, while 45% were somewhat satisfied and 14% of professionals highly dissatisfied with their jobs. For those who were not satisfied, working environment, job description and time pressure were the major causes. Other factors influencing the level of satisfaction were low salaries, lack of training opportunities, improper supervision and inadequate financial rewards. Conclusion Our study documented a relatively low level of overall satisfaction among workers in public sector health care organizations. Considering the factors responsible for this state of affairs, urgent and concrete strategies must be developed to address the concerns of public health professionals as they represent a highly sensitive domain of health system of Pakistan. Improving the overall work environment, review of job descriptions and better remuneration might bring about a positive change.

2013-01-01

468

Effects of marijuana on visuospatial working memory: an fMRI study in young adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The effects of marijuana use on visuospatial working memory were investigated in 19–21-year-olds using functional magnetic\\u000a resonance imaging (fMRI).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Participants were members of the Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study, a longitudinal study that collected a unique body of information\\u000a on participants from infancy to young adulthood including: prenatal drug history, detailed cognitive\\/behavioral performance,\\u000a and current and past drug usage. This information

Andra M. Smith; Carmelinda A. Longo; Peter A. Fried; Matthew J. Hogan; Ian Cameron

2010-01-01

469

Exploring the Work/Life/Study Balance: The Experience of Higher Education Students in a Scottish Further Education College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the dimensions of the work/life/study balance and its influence on student participation in higher education, through a case study of the experience of higher education students, studying both full time and part time, in a Scottish further education college. The experience of the students and the work/life/study challenges that…

Lowe, Janet; Gayle, Vernon

2007-01-01

470

Extended Program Notes for Thesis Guitar Recital  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis presents extended program notes for a sixty-minute guitar graduate recital consisting of the following repertoire in order: Benin; Pure; Home; Closure all by Aaron Lebos; Pat Methany’s Uniquity Road; Sonny Rollins’s Airegin; and Aaron Lebos’s Nothing. These works encompass and display a variety of musical influences and styles. The content of this thesis features detailed information on rhythmic,

Aaron Lebos

2011-01-01

471

[An occupational physiology study at the Asarel Mining and Milling Works. The evaluation of the work load in the basic jobs in an open-pit mine].  

PubMed

This occupational physiology study was undertaken within a wider applied-research framework designed to evaluate the occupational environment and its impact on workers at "Asarel" Mining and Milling Works. Analysis of activities showed physical effort (dynamic and static) to be the major problem at the open pit, though varying in extent between jobs (most prominent for blasters and bulldozerists). Nervous/emotional strain, while not leading, was sustained mostly by diggers and blasters, followed by drivers. Organization of work (shift regimen, no regulated breaks, stepwise schedule of days off work) was hardly appropriate and did not allow for recovery. Interviewed workers qualified working conditions as extremely unfavorable; they disapproved with the physical factors of the occupational environment, the workplace, the state of machines and devices, and remuneration for work performed. Exertion from work, assessed by pulse rate and energy expended, was moderate for most activities of diggers, drivers, and drillers. The burden of physical effort was great for blasters at the open pit and for diggers and drillers performing extra repair operations (pulse rate, 100-110 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.2-5.5 Kcal/min). Hardest and least attractive was the work of blasters at stores for explosive materials (pulse rate, 120-141 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.5-6.5 Kcal/min). These adverse factors of labor activities might produce a negative impact on worker health and performance, leading to occupational impairment of their musculoskeletal system, to labor-related disorders of their cardiovascular and nervous systems, etc. Preventive measures are thus necessary to limit physical exertion, optimize the work-and-rest regimen; also, there is a need for conducting pertinent preventive medical examinations, providing social measures (conditions for transportation, rest, nutrition, sports), etc. PMID:8524750

Mincheva, L; Khadzhiolova, I; Deianov, Kh

1995-01-01