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1

TEACHING NOTES: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES AND SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study surveyed social work educators about the importance of multiple intelligences for social work practice and social work education. The sample consisted of 91 faculty members who responded to an online survey that asked them to rate the importance of 7 intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, interpersonal, and intrapersonal) for overall social work practice, culturally competent practice, and

Holly Matto; Shirley A. Bryant; Janice Berry-Edwards; Amy Waldbillig; Elizabeth D. Hutchison

2006-01-01

2

Models that Work: Case Studies in Effective Undergraduate Mathematics Programs. MAA Notes Number 38.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report complements the Mathematical Association of America's curriculum recommendations about the undergraduate program in mathematics with a case studies approach that describes effective practices in undergraduate mathematics programs. The primary focus of this case studies project is not course content, but more general issues in the…

Tucker, Alan C., Ed.

3

NOTES. Study on patients' perspective  

PubMed Central

Introduction Rapid development of minimally invasive surgery has led to escalation of the demands placed on health care professionals. Nowadays the patient is the one to choose where and how she/he wants to be operated on. Perioperative and postoperative quality of life is the most common item impacting the patients’ choice. Laparoscopic surgery is undoubtedly advantageous in several applications; however a further improvement of medical services has been introduced: the NOTES technique. This novel surgical approach definitively eliminates the problem of having scars. Though NOTES is still in the clinical trial stage, it might become an alternative for selected procedures soon. At this point it is necessary to define the patients’ expectations and preferences. Aim To evaluate patients’ opinions on the four surgical approaches: open, laparoscopic, transvaginal and transgastric. Material and methods For this purpose a special questionnaire was designed and one hundred randomly selected women were asked to complete it. Results The laparoscopic access was preferable in most aspects, closely followed by the transvaginal access. Open and transgastric approaches were considered as dangerous and disadvantageous. Conclusions Currently NOTES is a possible reality of tomorrow for some procedures. The transvaginal access was scored as “attractive”, “cosmetically attractive” and “technologically advanced”, as opposed to the transgastric access. The fact of manipulation in the intimate region requires thorough attention in future NOTES studies. Though the patients currently prefer the laparoscopic approach, this study proves that further development of transvaginal NOTES technology is acceptable and to some extent desired by the patients.

Stefaniak, Tomasz; Laski, Dariusz; Mackowiak, Malgorzata; Czurylo, Alicja; Hac, Stanislaw; Lachinski, Andrzej J.; Sledzinski, Zbigniew

2013-01-01

4

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

5

5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK OF THE PARAPET WALL AND REMAINS OF 1920 TIMBER AND CONCRETE FLOORING SYSTEM. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

6

Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often…

Dimitriadis, Greg

2011-01-01

7

Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals  

SciTech Connect

In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

Garbey, M. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-07-01

8

University Clinic of Toxicology - historical note and present work.  

PubMed

(Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). The University Clinic of Toxicology (UCT) in Skopje was founded as the Clinic for Toxicology and Emergency Internal Medicine on January 15th 1976. Today UCT has a modern building with office space of 1,300 m(2) on 4 floors, 40 hospital beds and 72 employees including 18 doctors. UCT works in accordance with the public healthcare services in the Republic of Macedonia through the use of specialist / consultative and hospital healthcare for people over the age of 14 years. The Clinic also provides services in the field of emergency internal medicine, acute poisoning with medications, pesticides, corrosives, poisonous gases and mus-hrooms, heavy metals and other chemicals. The Clinic takes an active part in the detoxification programme for users of opiates and psychotropic substances, protocols for enteral and parenteral nutrition and guides for home treatment. Yearly there are more than 14,000 ambulance admissions, over 1,400 hospitalized patients, over 4,000 urgent EHO checks, more than 1,000 urgent upper endoscopies and over 700 other toxicological analyses and other interventions. The educational services and activities are realized through the chair for internal medicine. The Clinic offers undergraduate and graduate level education for medical students and dentists, for medical nurses, radiology technicians, speech therapists and physiotherapists. Over 300 papers and reports have been published to date by the medical staff at the UCT in the form of abstracts and integrated projects in the Republic of Macedonia and aboard. 8 doctorates have been successfully completed by employees from the Clinic as well as 4 master's theses and 1 in-depth project. UCT employees are the authors of some textbooks and monographs. UCT have undertaken some scientific projects. Employees from the Clinic of Toxicology are members taking an active part in many domestic and international associations. Key words: Toxicology Clinic, historical note, healthcare, education, research. PMID:23928801

Bozinovska, C

2013-01-01

9

Transvesical NOTES: Survival Study in Porcine Model  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: The optimal access route and method for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has not been established. A transvesical approach, with its low rate of peritoneal contamination, is an effective clean portal of entry, but a safe urinary bladder closure has been a challenge. We developed a new technique for a safe, pure transvesical NOTES approach. Methods: Four female piglets were used in the study. With the pigs under anesthesia, a flexible cystoscope (15Fr) was used to make an endoscopic cystotomy; diagnostic peritoneoscopy of the abdominal quadrants was done with biopsies and hemostasis. At the end, a Vicryl loop was pushed to close the bladder incision while the incision edges were pulled inwards. The pigs were euthanized after 2 wk, and necropsies were performed. Results: No bowel injury was noted in any of the 4 pigs. Satisfactory bladder closure was done in 2 pigs, while a partial closure was achieved in 1 case. In the postoperative period, the pigs showed no signs of pain or distress, voided normally, and had a good appetite. On necropsy, we noted healed cystotomy incisions, no intraabdominal adhesions, and no adhesions at the site. Conclusion: Our new technique for endoscopic cystotomy overcomes previously reported risks for bowel injuries. Using this route gives good spatial orientation and access to all quadrants, including the pelvis. Biopsies with good hemostasis can be easily achieved. Lack of intraperitoneal changes postoperatively indicate that this procedure may be safe for humans.

Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Gupta, Aditya; Jacobs, Michael J.; Decker, Melissa; Silberberg, Boris; Mittal, Vijay K.

2012-01-01

10

Noted  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

Nunberg, Geoffrey

2013-01-01

11

Noted  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

Nunberg, Geoffrey

2013-01-01

12

Editor's Note: Scientists at Work in Earth Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working with outside resources almost always strengthens our classrooms. Whether it is taking a trip to a university lab or inviting scientists in, excitement builds as students experience the world of scientists. Whether partnering with scientists or not, we hope this issue helps you get your students motivated about science--hands-on or out in the field.

Ohana, Chris

2009-04-01

13

Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

Barley, Stephen R.

1990-01-01

14

Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

Barley, Stephen R.

1990-01-01

15

Katharina: Working out anxiety. Notes on Freud's early case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Freud's conversation with a young woman, reported in ‘Studies on hysteria’ (Breuer & Freud, 1895), provides an early account of the way hysterical anxiety might be structured and how it could be treated. This paper focuses on the case of Katharina to show how the concept of ‘anxiety’ was being delimited by Freud at the time he wrote about this

Ian Parker

2006-01-01

16

C. Reviews and notes: bibliographies and works of reference  

Microsoft Academic Search

KNOW THE MIDDLE EAST. By John Laffin. Gloucester, Alan Sutton Publishing, 1985. 188pp. £3.95.INFORMATION SERVICES IN MUSLIM COUNTRIES: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF EXPERT STUDIES AND REPORTS ON LIBRARY, INFORMATION AND ARCHIVE SERVICES. Compiled by Mumtaz A. Anwar. (Libraries and Librarianship in the Muslim World.) London, Mansell, 1985. 146pp. £21.00.MUSLIMS IN BRITAIN: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 1960–1984. By Daniel Joly and Jørgen

Derek Hopwood; Frances Abercromby; M. M. Ahsan; Jørgen S. Nielsen; Paul Auchterlonie; Rodney Wilson; Brian Beeley; Denis MacEoin; Adam Gacek; Katherine van der Vate; Geoffrey Khan; Robin Bidwell; Fred Halliday; Noah Lucas; J. A. Allan; Wolfgang H. Behn

1986-01-01

17

B. Reviews and notes bibliographies and works of reference  

Microsoft Academic Search

INDEX ISLAMICUS 1665–1905: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ARTICLES ON ISLAMIC SUBJECTS IN PERIODICALS AND OTHER COLLECTIVE PUBLICATIONS. Compiled by W.H. BEHN. Millersville, Adiyok, 1989. xxx, 870pp. US$ 125.— or DM 225.— or £72.00.CATALOGUE OF THE ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS IN THE DAIBER COLLECTION, INSTITUTE OF ORIENTAL CULTURE, UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO. By HANS DAIBER. Tokyo, Documentation Center for Asian Studies, Institute of Oriental Culture,

J. D. Latham; Geoffrey Roper; Frances M. Abercromby; John K. Cooley; Charles Tripp; Robin Bidwell; Adrian Brockett; Edmund Bosworth; C. H. Bleaney; J. M. Wagstaff; Philip Sadgrove; Geoffrey Khan; Sayed Shoukry; Haskell D. Isaacs; Jørgen Nielsen; Brian W. Beeley; Frances Bostock; Paul Starkey; Ernest Noble; Clive Holes; Charles Melville; Behruz Morvaridi; Annemarie Schimmel; Levon Avdoyan; Robert Hillenbrand; Michael Rogers; Mounira Khemir; Gillian M. Grant

1989-01-01

18

A Study of Actions in Operative Notes  

PubMed Central

Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report ‘procedure description’ section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes.

Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E.; Ryan, James O.; Melton, Genevieve B.

2012-01-01

19

A study of actions in operative notes.  

PubMed

Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report 'procedure description' section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman's Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E; Ryan, James O; Melton, Genevieve B

2012-11-03

20

3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKERS AT THE FAR END ARE ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

21

4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI77A2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. SIMILAR VIEW AS WI-77-A-2; NOTE THE DUCT TAPE WORK THAT EXTENDS FROM EACH ROLLING MILL INTO A CENTRAL DUCT; THE WORKER IN THE CENTER IS ADJUSTING THE ROLLS PRIOR TO THE OPERATION OF THE MILLS - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

22

Studying for social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essential guide to study skills takes social work students through every step of their degree journey, providing them with the academic tools they will need to thrive along the way. Inventively informed by the insights and reflections of qualifying students, the book offers effective guidance that is grounded in real experience of the social work degree. It is particularly

Eileen Baldry; Mark Hughes; Linda Burnett; Ian Collinson

2011-01-01

23

Minority Work Study Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report covers a work-study program in the East-West Gateway area to provide employment and training for minority and economically disadvantaged graduate and upper-division undergraduate students enrolled in planning and related curricula. The program has aided students in continuing their education who might otherwise be financially unable to…

East-West Gateway Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

24

Exploration of GPs' views and use of the fit note: a qualitative study in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Sickness certification constitutes daily clinical practice for GPs. In April 2010, the UK sickness certification system changed to reflect the evidence that work is generally good for health and a new Statement of Fitness for Work — the ‘fit note’ — was introduced. Sickness certification is a contentious topic among GPs and the proposed fit note generated mixed reviews. Aim To explore GPs' views and use of the fit note during its first year of operation. Design and setting Qualitative interview study of GPs based in different geographical locations across the UK. Method GPs (n = 15), who were recruited from a national sample, participated in semi-structured telephone interviews which were subject to constant comparative analysis. Results Overall, the fit note was well received. GPs recognised that work is generally good for health and felt the fit note facilitated using an earlier return to work as a negotiation tool. GPs perceive employers as the major obstacle to early return to work. There were reports of scepticism towards the system that negatively impacted on some GPs' operation of sickness certification. Feedback over the fit note's impact on employer behaviour and the return of a mechanism that enables GPs to request early independent assessments would be welcomed. Conclusion A revised approach is needed to address the scepticism towards the sickness certification system that persists among some GPs. New strategies need to be designed to engage employers in facilitating an early return to work and to enable the objectives of the medical statement reforms to be achieved.

Welsh, Victoria K; Mallen, Christian D; Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Jinks, Clare

2012-01-01

25

Note-Taking Made Easy. The Study Smart Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book describes two successful methods of organizing notes (outlining and patterning), providing shortcuts to make note taking easy. Eight chapters include: (1) "There's No Substitute for Taking Your Own Good Notes" (e.g., note taking helps in paying attention and remembering); (2) "How to Tell What's Worth Noting" (criteria for deciding what…

Kesselman-Turkel, Judi; Peterson, Franklynn

26

Work Study - Cases in Textiles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Work study is a management tool to improve efficiency without big capital expenditure. This report covers three cases in which substantial benefits were obtained through work study: Transport of bales to the blow room; low productivity and high waste in a...

S. P. Patel K. Subrahmanyam S. B. Vaidya

1976-01-01

27

[Brief notes on the life and works of the Bordeaux pharmacist Jean-Pierre Prat].  

PubMed

After a short biography of Jean-Pierre Prat, pharmacist, chemist and industrial unjustly forgotten, we discuss his scientific work which comprised varied fundamental scientific studies (fluor isolation essays, research on gold derivatives, on a mineral of Ariege, on the volumetric dosage of nitrogen on the nature of the sweet principle of the Bordeaux white wines ...). We emphasize also his work in the field of applied chemistry. PMID:11625032

Viel, C

1996-01-01

28

Method for objective assessment of physical work load at the workplace Technical Note  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accelerometry; Ambulatory monitoring; Case study. This report presents a method for objective assessment of physical work load at the workplace. The method is based on the DynaPort ADL monitor. Using accelerometry this monitor enables the assess- ment of gross motor activity as it occurs during the activities of daily living (ADL). A case study is conducted to explore the usefulness

H. J. Busser; W. G. de Korte; E. B. C. Glerum; R. C. van Lummel

29

The most-cited scholars and works in police studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although numerous studies recently have appeared that identify the most-cited scholars and works in the general criminology and criminal justice literature and in several specialty areas, no previous citation study has specifically examined the police studies literature. Through an analysis of 370 articles and research notes appearing from 1991 to 1995 in the areas of police studies, published in Criminology,

Richard A. Wright; J. Mitchell Miller

1998-01-01

30

ADIFOR case study: VODE + ADIFOR. ADIFOR working note No. 10  

SciTech Connect

ADIFOR can be used to generate the Jacobians required by VODE in a manner that is easy to use. We provide a template to interface the ADIFOR-generated code with VODE and show how the template is used in a sample system of stiff ordinary differential equation. The ADIFOR-generated code is about 10% faster than the hand-coded Jacobian for this example.

Corliss, G.

1992-08-01

31

Vocational Education and the Work Establishment of Youth: Equity and Effectiveness Issues. A Rand Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined data from literature and from three surveys of high school students to analyze the equity of the way in which high schools assign students to the vocational track and the effectiveness of vocational education in preparing students for work. Data revealed that while students' junior high abilities, achievement, and curricular…

Berryman, Sue E.

32

Lives and Deaths: Biographical Notes on Selections from the Works of Edwin S. Shneidman  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Edwin S. Shneidman (DOB: 1918-05-13; DOD: 2009-05-15) is a father of contemporary suicidology. His work reflects the intensive study of lives lived and deaths, especially suicides, and is the mirror to his mind. His contributions can be represented by five categories: psychological assessment, logic, Melville and Murray, suicide, and death. His…

Leenaars, Antoon A.

2010-01-01

33

Primary teacher work study report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research was conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) in 2005. The study was a result of the Primary Teachers Collective Agreement 2004-2007 which specified that a workload study be complete to consider how the work of a teacher could be better stuctured, resourced and organised to support more effective classroom teaching. The purpose of the study

Jenny Wilkinson; Lawrence Ingvarson; Elizabeth Kleinhenz; Adrian Beavis

2005-01-01

34

Student Study Habits Using Notes from a Speech-to-Text Support Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Interviews with 36 high school and college students with hearing impairments and 36 teachers indicated variable use of study strategies with notes among students and a lack of knowledge among teachers about the use of notes for studying. Results suggest the need for instruction on note usage and study skills. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)|

Elliot, Lisa; Foster, Susan; Stinson, Michael

2002-01-01

35

Literacy, Welfare & Work: Preliminary Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between literacy, welfare, and work was examined in an exploratory study that included a literature review and focus group interviews with a total of 17 literacy instructors and 10 literacy students from two locations in Manitoba: Winnipeg and Brandon with the rural area surrounding it. Particular attention was paid to the…

Smith, Janet

36

Literacy, Welfare & Work: Preliminary Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The relationship between literacy, welfare, and work was examined in an exploratory study that included a literature review and focus group interviews with a total of 17 literacy instructors and 10 literacy students from two locations in Manitoba: Winnipeg and Brandon with the rural area surrounding it. Particular attention was paid to the…

Smith, Janet

37

[Cartographic notes on the work in the Family Health Strategy: relationships between workers and the population].  

PubMed

The objective of this intervention study was to map instituted and instituting movements present in the work of the Family Health Strategy in the development of their care practices. The theoretical framework is based on institutional analysis, using the schizoanalytic approach. Group meetings were carried out with the staff to discuss how they provided collective care in continuing health education. The study subjects were professionals from the team and students who were engaged in academic activity in the service. The average attendance was twelve people per meeting, and there were a total of eight meetings from March to July 2010. Data were grouped into two immanent strata: the relationships of the team and the relationship with clients. The strata point to the intersection of education and legal institutions and the social and technical division of labor. Collective thinking in groups appeared to be effective in denaturalizing established processes and interrogating places, knowledge and practices. PMID:22773487

Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Silveira, Fernando; de Oliveira, Nunila Ferreira

2012-06-01

38

Learning from Lecture: Investigations of Study Strategies Involving Note Taking.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Navy's continued reliance upon the lecture form of instruction requires the optimization of this learning strategy. Two experiments were conducted with college students as subjects in an effort to determine the note-taking strategy most effective for ...

N. H. Van Matre E. G. Aiken J. F. Carter W. A. Shennum G. S. Thomas

1975-01-01

39

How to Study Communication: Notes on a Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carey's call for a uniquely American form of cultural studies challenged the dominant paradigm of media effects research in the late 1970s. Even today, his work cannot be easily categorized. How then can we replicate his method in order to teach his way of doing scholarship? The discipline of communication has the potential to reveal how the structures of cities,

C. Waite

2009-01-01

40

A Note on Economic Losses Due to Theft, Infringement, and Piracy of Protected Works  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enforcement of copyright and related intellectual property rights is designed to halt loss of economic value to the rights holders. This article explores the nature of losses when protected works are stolen, infringed, or pirated and how the losses differ significantly for materials in physical and virtual form. The author shows unauthorized uses create both supply and demand issues and

Robert Picard

2004-01-01

41

The Moment of Nothing: A Philosophical Note on the Work of Kristin Linklater  

Microsoft Academic Search

: This paper explores some philosophical presuppositions about the human voice that have been dominant since Plato. It sees in the work of Kristin Linklater a theoretical and practical application of ideas in Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jacques Derrida that challenge the ancient presuppositions.

David Farrell Krell

2011-01-01

42

The Moment of Nothing: A Philosophical Note on the Work of Kristin Linklater  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores some philosophical presuppositions about the human voice that have been dominant since Plato. It sees in the work of Kristin Linklater a theoretical and practical application of ideas in Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jacques Derrida that challenge the ancient presuppositions.

David Farrell Krell

2011-01-01

43

Provisional Prescriptions for Work during Frost. Commentary Notes on Specifications N 800 1967.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains specific standardized rules to be followed in order to establish the continuation of construction work during frost. These rules are provisional and will be followed for a certain amount of time after which an evaluation will be made a...

1971-01-01

44

National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Programmatic Research and Development. A Working Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different management systems used by the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Air Force in managing programmatic research and…

Lieberman, Arnold; And Others

45

Shooting Crows with a Canon: Notes on the Poetics of Shaul Tshernikhovski's Early Works  

Microsoft Academic Search

:As thinking about canon formation becomes ever more sophisticated, the connections between canons and culture are likewise understood as equally complicated. This article seeks to look at one poem by Shaul Tshernikhovski in order to shed light on that complex. Despite the fact that Tshernikhovski's position as a canonical Hebrew poet continues to be secure, his works often challenge many

Jordan Finkin

2010-01-01

46

Shooting Crows with a Canon: Notes on the Poetics of Shaul Tshernikhovski's Early Works  

Microsoft Academic Search

As thinking about canon formation becomes ever more sophisticated, the connections between canons and culture are likewise understood as equally complicated. This article seeks to look at one poem by Shaul Tshernikhovski in order to shed light on that complex. Despite the fact that Tshernikhovski's position as a canonical Hebrew poet continues to be secure, his works often challenge many

Jordan Finkin

2010-01-01

47

Why do doctors issue sick notes? An experimental questionnaire study in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results. The doctors rated the patient with the psychological problem as more ill, less work- shy, more unfit for work and described feeling more sympathy towards him compared with the patient with the physical problem. The presence of adverse family circumstances generated more sympathy and doctors considered this patient as less work-shy. A patient demand for a sick note had

Amaryllis Campbell; Jane Ogden

48

Some Nuances in Intersubjective Attachment Systems: Discussion of Shelley Doctors' Article, “Notes on Incorporating Attachment Theory and Research Into Self Psychological and Intersubjective Clinical Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article I discuss Doctors's (2006) inclusive model presented in her paper, “Notes on Incorporating Attachment Theory and Research Into Self Psychological\\/Intersubjective Clinical Work.” I distinguish between linear stabilities of patterning emphasized by many attachment researchers and nonlinear properties of dyadic systems emphasized by relational and intersubjective systems, self–psychologists, and infant researchers, noting that Doctors brings both sensibilities into

Judith Pickles

2008-01-01

49

Race, space, place: notes on the racialisation and spatialisation of commercial sex work in Dubai, UAE.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the perceived racialisation and resultant spatialisation of commercial sex in Dubai. In recent years, the sex industry in Dubai has grown to include women from the Middle East, Eastern Europe, East Asia and Africa. With the increase in sex workers of different nationalities has come a form of localised racism that is embedded in structures and desires seen within specific locations. The physical spatialisation of sex work hinges on perceived race and produces distinct income generating potential for women engaged in the sex industry in Dubai. The social and physical topography of Dubai is important in marginalising or privileging these various groups of sex workers, which correlates race, space and place with rights and assistance. I begin with a description of the multidirectional flows of causality between race, space, place and demand. I then discuss how these various groups are inversely spatialised within the discourse on assistance, protection and rights. The findings presented here are based on ethnographic research conducted with transnational migrants in the UAE in 2004, 2008 and 2009. PMID:20936551

Mahdavi, Pardis

2010-11-01

50

ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment. ADIFOR Working Note No. 5  

SciTech Connect

The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carle, A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Center for Research on Parallel Computation

1992-07-01

51

Note To The Student: How To Study And Discuss Cases (V. 2.3)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This technical note, written for students, gives a first "how to do it" introduction to studying by the case method. The note argues that success follows from a combination of good attitude, good "infrastructure," and good execution. This could be distributed along with a course syllabus or advance materials and was written with the objective of helping students more quickly

Robert Bruner

52

The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The…

Lawanto, O.

2012-01-01

53

Social work’s ‘electronic turn’: notes on the deployment of information and communication technologies in social work with children and families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming central to the remaking of social work with children and families in England and Wales. Factors helping to steer this development include ‘joined up thinking’, the ‘e-government agenda’, and marketization. Examples of ‘e-practice’ discussed include: the envisaged databases for children, featured in the Children Act 2004; the utilization by local authorities of the

Paul Michael Garrett

2005-01-01

54

The library of the Study Hall in Volozhin, 1762: Some notes on the basis of a newly discovered manuscript  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief note about a recently discovered manuscript listing books purchased for the Study Hall [beit midrash] in Volozhin in the 1760s. About one-third of the books fall into the category of Jewish Law [Halakha], one-quarter can be classed as ethical works [mussar], and sixteen percent as Bible and Biblical commentary. Just over eleven percent can be classed as Kabbalah.

Gershon David Hundert

2000-01-01

55

Notes toward an African Cultural Studies of Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this paper, the author attempts to sketch out both an argument for and the outlines of what might be termed an African cultural studies of education. This formation would actually be composed of several fields and discourses that are often taken up as quite distinct, namely critical approaches to education, cultural studies, and African…

Wright, Handel Kashope

2006-01-01

56

Research note: a study of direct selling perceptions in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct selling as a type of non-store retailing continues to increase internationally and in Australia in its use and popularity. One non-store retailing method, multilevel marketing or network marketing, has recently incurred a degree of consumer suspicion and negative perceptions. A study was developed to investigate consumer perceptions and concerns in New South Wales and Victoria. Consumers were surveyed to

Richard A. Kustin; Robert A. Jones

1995-01-01

57

Notes of the recent structural studies on lead zirconate titanate.  

PubMed

Atomic scale structure has a central importance for the understanding of functional properties of ferroelectrics. The X-ray and neutron diffraction studies used for the average symmetry determination of lead zirconate titanate [Pb(ZrxTi(1- x))O3, PZT] ceramics and powders are reviewed. The results obtained through two frequently used local probes, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with electron diffraction (ED) and Raman scattering measurements, are summarized. On the basis of these studies, structural trends as a function of composition x and temperature are outlined. There are two distinguished intrinsic structural features, (i) lead-ion shifts and (ii) local structural distortions related to different B cations and the spatial composition variation of x, which have a pronounced effect on the functional properties of PZT. Particular attention is paid to the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) compositions for which a large number of different structural models have been proposed. Earlier symmetry considerations show that the monoclinic phase cannot serve as a continuous bridge between tetragonal and rhombohedral phases. This suggests that the two-phase coexistence has an important role for the piezoelectric properties. Near the MPB, the extrinsic contribution to piezoelectricity includes pressure (or electric-field)-induced changes in phase fractions and domain wall motion. It was recently shown that the domain contribution is crucial for the electromechanical properties of PZT in the vicinity of the MPB. The dependence of domain widths on crystal size and shape should also be properly accounted for when TEM/ED measurements complement X-ray and/or neutron diffraction experiments. The structure-piezoelectric property relations are summarized. PMID:18433161

Frantti, J

2008-04-24

58

How Should Middle-School Students with LD Approach Online Note Taking? A Mixed-Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This explanatory sequential mixed-methods study explored how the encoding of text ideas is affected when students with learning disabilities (LD) take notes from Web-based text. In the quantitative phase of the study, 15 students took three kinds of notes--typed, copy and paste, and written--with each kind of notes addressing a different topic.…

Igo, L. Brent; Riccomini, Paul J.; Bruning, Roger H.; Pope, Ginger G.

2006-01-01

59

What drives the persistence of presenteeism as a managerial value in hotels?: Observations noted during an Irish work-life balance research project  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research project on work-life balance and Irish hotel managers by McLaughlin and Cullen (Managers and work-life balance: a case of Irish hospitality industry, Irish Management Institute, Dublin) noted high levels of presenteeism amongst focus group participants. This paper analyses the qualitative data obtained during this project with a view to identifying drivers of this finding and discusses possible consequences

John Cullen; Andrew McLaughlin

2006-01-01

60

Curriculum Study of Public Works Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study reports on a curriculum, based on input from the U.S. Navy and the American Public Works Association, for a Public Works Management Program. The report proposes a standard curriculum that can be universally recognized and designed to enhance th...

J. M. Ellwood

1999-01-01

61

Public Works Construction Safety Project. Case Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Case studies of three public works construction projects were reviewed (Maryland State Highway Administration Construction, the Denver Airport Project, and the Boston Harbor Project) which took into consideration historical risk of worker fatalities, the ...

J. A. Kinney

1994-01-01

62

FIELD STUDY OF HOOF WALL PROBLEMS IN UNSHOD WORKING HORSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population of 100 native breed unshod working horses was examined for hoof wall problems. The diagnosis of hoof wall defects was performed by close visual observation and via physical examina- tion. The location, extent and types of defects were then determined and recorded. Out of 100 horses, 124 hoof wall defects were noted in ninety working horses. The number

A. S. BIGHAM; A. N. TABATABAEI

63

New Study Finds Substance That Helps Working Memory Work Better  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Maura Furey and her colleagues have found that the drug physostigmine apparently aids and improves performance of everyday working memory. Working memory is the process which temporarily holds information such as a phone number until a person is able to dial the number. Working with a variety of taxa from mice to monkeys, scientists interested in the causes of aging have recently made significant advances in scientists' understanding of the aging process. Researchers have long realized that aging and the pathologies associated with it have evolutionary, physiological and genetic causes, although the relative influence of each of these has been debated. By testing hypotheses in diverse fields, and with a variety of species (from short-lived to long-lived), researchers are growing closer to building an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the aging process.

1997-01-01

64

Management System for EMR Work Study Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A computerized information management system involving the specification of objectives, the coding of teacher evaluations of students, and a variety of possible outputs has been used in a work study program for educable mentally retarded adolescents. Instructional objectives are specified and coded by number and category. Evaluation is by means…

Columbia County Board of Public Instruction, Lake City, FL. Exceptional Child Education Dept.

65

In Situ Vitrification Treatability Study Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Program was established in October, 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a recommended long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Feasibility Study format to identify methods for the long-term management of the mixed waste buried. This In Situ Vitrification Treatability Study Work Plan gives a brief description of the site, work breakdown structure, and project organization: the in situ vitrification technology; the purpose of the tests and demonstrations; and the equipment and materials required for the tests and demonstration. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Charboneau, B.L.; Landon, J.L.

1989-03-01

66

Working-Class Students Need More Friends at University: A Cautionary Note for Australia's Higher Education Equity Initiative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2008, Denise Bradley and colleagues published their "Review of Australian Higher Education." A key point of the Bradley Review was to highlight the long-standing under-representation of working-class people at Australia's universities. Working-class people represent 25% of Australia's general population; however, they represent only 15% of…

Rubin, Mark

2012-01-01

67

GeoNotes: a real-use study of a public location-aware community system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of context-aware application research has dealt with the technical aspects of context capturing and how to interpret the context of a user. Little effort, however, has been spent on the experience and usage of these systems. This paper describes a real-use study of a location-aware community system - GeoNotes. Over the one-month trial, 78 users published 283 information items

Per Persson; Petra Fagerberg

2002-01-01

68

Like Father, Like Son? A Note on the Intergenerational Transmission of IQ Scores. NBER Working Paper No. 14274  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|More able parents tend to have more able children. While few would question the validity of this statement, there is little large-scale evidence on the intergenerational transmission of IQ scores. Using a larger and more comprehensive dataset than previous work, we are able to estimate the intergenerational correlation in IQ scores, examining not…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2008-01-01

69

Like Father, Like Son? A Note on the Intergenerational Transmission of IQ Scores. NBER Working Paper No. 14274  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More able parents tend to have more able children. While few would question the validity of this statement, there is little large-scale evidence on the intergenerational transmission of IQ scores. Using a larger and more comprehensive dataset than previous work, we are able to estimate the intergenerational correlation in IQ scores, examining not…

Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

2008-01-01

70

The Unbearable Fatigue of Compassion: Notes from a Substance Abuse Counselor Who Dreams of Working at Starbuck’s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current research has determined that a larger percent of social workers and other counselors are affected by PTSD types of\\u000a symptoms when working with traumatized clients than the general population. While much of this research addresses workers\\u000a in specific trauma areas like sexual assault centers or child welfare agencies, little specific thought has been given towards\\u000a the special stress that

Annie Fahy

2007-01-01

71

Should Middle School Students with Learning Problems Copy and Paste Notes from the Internet? Mixed-Methods Evidence of Study Barriers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the experimental phase of this mixed-methods study, 49 middle school students receiving special education services took notes from the Internet under either a written notes or a copy-and-paste notes condition. Immediate, cued-recall measures of factual learning showed that students who wrote their notes were better able to recall what they had…

Igo, L. Brent; Bruning, Roger A.; Riccomini, Paul J.

2009-01-01

72

Delaware Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Delaware Library has been expanding their online offerings in the past few years, and this addition of the "Delaware Notes" archive is most welcome. The series consists of a variety of publications created by the University from 1923 to the present, and the subject matter covered within these pages is quite diverse. Here visitors will find a very exhaustive history of the University of Delaware ("University of Delaware: Ancestors, Friends and Neighbors"), an academic appraisal of Longfellow's wanderings ("Longfellow and Germany"), and an early paper on aerodynamics titled "Aerodynamics of the Psychrometer". Visitors are encouraged to search the collection by author, title, subject, or date. It's an impressive potpourri of scholarly works, and one that might pique a new interest among curious visitors.

73

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

74

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)|

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

75

Work Groups: From the Hawthorne Studies to Work Teams of the 1990s and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the Hawthorne studies related to work groups and their legacy and traces applications of work groups and related empirical research through the 1990s. A selective review of empirical studies of work group effectiveness conducted in work settings and published in the last 20 years addresses 4 questions: (a) What identifying features have field researchers used in operationally

Eric Sundstrom; Michael McIntyre; Terry Halfhill; Heather Richards

2000-01-01

76

Junior doctor skill in the art of physical examination: a retrospective study of the medical admission note over four decades  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate the hypothesis that junior doctors’ examination skills are deteriorating by assessing the medical admission note examination record. Design Retrospective study of the admission record. Setting Tertiary care hospital. Methods The admission records of 266 patients admitted to Wellington hospital between 1975 and 2011 were analysed, according to the total number of physical examination observations (PEOtot), examination of the relevant system pertaining to the presenting complaint (RelSystem) and the number of body systems examined (Nsystems). Subgroup analysis proceeded according to admission year, level of experience of the admitting doctor (registrar, house surgeon (HS) and trainee intern (TI)) and medical versus surgical admission notes. Further analysis investigated the trend over time in documentation with respect to cardiac murmurs, palpable liver, palpable spleen, carotid bruit, heart rate, funduscopy and apex beat location and character. Results PEOtot declined by 34% from 1975 to 2011. Surgical admission notes had 21% fewer observations than medical notes. RelSystem occurred in 94% of admissions, with no decline over time. Medical notes documented this more frequently than surgical notes (98% and 86%, respectively). There were no differences between registrars and HS, except for the 2010s subgroup (97% and 65%, respectively). Nsystems declined over the study period. Medical admission notes documented more body systems than surgical notes. There were no differences between registrars, HSs and TIs. Fewer examinations were performed for palpable liver, palpable spleen, cardiac murmur and apex beat location and character over the study period. There was no temporal change in the positive findings of these observations or heart rate rounding. Conclusions There has been a decline in the admission record at Wellington hospital between 1975 and 2011, implying a deterioration in local doctors’ physical examination skills. Measures to counter this trend are discussed.

Oliver, Charlotte M; Hunter, Selena A; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Galletly, Duncan C

2013-01-01

77

It's about Time: A Study of Hours Worked and Work Spillover among Law Firm Lawyers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study set out to address two basic questions: why do law firm lawyers work as much as they do and why do they feel that their work is invading their nonwork life? The results show that the factors related to the number of hours worked do not necessarily translate into feelings of work spillover and that the number of

Jean E. Wallace

1997-01-01

78

Studies of Education and Work. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Experimental Projects Branch of the Department of Manpower and Immigration contracted with the McGill University Industrial Relations Center to assess the bearing of the social science literature upon work and educational organizations and, in particular, their relevance to the construction of training programs. This paper presents a summary…

Westley, William A.

79

Cundy's Harbor Working Waterfront Study Village Profile and Policy Options.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study provides a profile of the Cundys Harbor village and its working waterfront. It also sets out some strategies for protecting the character and vitality of Cundys Harbors working waterfront and for addressing some of the challenges facing working...

2004-01-01

80

A descriptive study of work aggravated asthma  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims: Work related asthma (WRA) is one of the most frequently reported occupational lung diseases in a number of industrialised countries. A better understanding of work aggravated asthma (WAA), as well as work related new onset asthma (NOA), is needed to aid in prevention efforts. Methods: WAA and NOA in the United States were compared using cases reported to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) from four state Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) surveillance programmes for 1993–95. Results: A total of 210 WAA cases and 891 NOA cases were reported. WAA cases reported mineral and inorganic dusts as the most common exposure agent, as opposed to NOA cases, in which diisocyanates were reported most frequently. A similar percentage of WAA and NOA cases still experienced breathing problems at the time of the interview or had visited a hospital or emergency room for work related breathing problems. NOA cases were twice as likely to have applied for workers' compensation compared with WAA cases. However, among those who had applied for worker compensation, approximately three-fourths of both WAA and NOA cases had received awards. The services and manufacturing industrial categories together accounted for the majority of both WAA (62%) and NOA (75%) cases. The risk of WAA, measured by average annual rate, was clearly the highest in the public administration (14.2 cases/105) industrial category, while the risk of NOA was increased in both the manufacturing (3.2 cases/105) and public administration (2.9 cases/105) categories. Conclusions: WAA cases reported many of the same adverse consequences as NOA cases. Certain industries were identified as potential targets for prevention efforts based on either the number of cases or the risk of WAA and NOA.

Goe, S; Henneberger, P; Reilly, M; Rosenman, K; Schill, D; Valiante, D; Flattery, J; Harrison, R; Reinisch, F; Tumpowsky, C; Filios, M

2004-01-01

81

Three Studies on Training Work Skills and Work Adjustment with the Severely Retarded.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document reports experiments conducted at the Lubbock State School in Texas on training the mentally retarded for vocational functioning. The studies were on: (1) developing work tolerance in the severely retarded; (2) stimulating self initiated work...

A. S. Martin R. W. Flexer

1975-01-01

82

Call-handlers’ working conditions and their subjective experience of work: a transversal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The present study sought to describe call-center working conditions and call-handlers’ subjective experience of their work.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A transversal study was performed in companies followed by the 47 occupational physicians taking part. A dedicated questionnaire\\u000a included one part on working conditions (work-station organization, task types, work schedules, and controls) and another\\u000a on the perception of working conditions. Psychosocial risk factors were

Sophie Croidieu; Barbara Charbotel; Michel Vohito; Liliane Renaud; Joelle Jaussaud; Christian Bourboul; Dominique Ardiet; Isabelle Imbard; Anne Céline Guerin; Alain Bergeret

2008-01-01

83

The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate that group work supervisors experience a process of conceptualization and critical reflection that

Jane E. Atieno Okech; Deborah Rubel

2009-01-01

84

Protest suicide among Korean students and laborers: a study of suicide notes.  

PubMed

Suicide notes from two groups of protest suicides in South Korea during the period 1975-2003 were compared: suicide notes from students (n =16) and suicide notes from workers (n = 15). The students appeared to be acting upon abstract ideals, including the oppression of the masses by the government and the American forces in Korea, and they typically urged the reunification of Korea. The workers were acting upon more local concerns, such as the oppression of their union by the government and the companies and the policies of their specific companies. PMID:20099554

Ben Park, B C; Lester, David

2009-12-01

85

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents seven notes on new equipment, techniques, or materials of interest to teachers of physics. A circuit of a low-cost computer terminal to audiovisual device interface, and a demonstration of the buoyancy of air are among notes presented. (HM)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

86

Hybrid natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) sleeve gastrectomy: a feasibility study using an animal model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The indications for natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) are yet to be determined. Morbidly obese patients may be\\u000a one population that would benefit from this approach due to the elimination of wound complications and possibly a faster recovery.\\u000a As a bariatric restrictive procedure, sleeve gastrectomy could be one indication for NOTES. To test the feasibility of this\\u000a procedure with a

Yoav Mintz; Santiago Horgan; Michelle K. Savu; John Cullen; Alana Chock; Sonia Ramamoorthy; David W. Easter; Mark A. Talamini

2008-01-01

87

Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how academic burnout shifts over the semester versus work-related burnout. Whereas academic

Vasti Torres; Craig S. Galbraith; Gregory B. Merrill

2012-01-01

88

Interest in Working with the Elderly: A Cross-National Study of Graduating Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents a cross-national study of social work students' interest in working with the elderly, based on a sample of 679 graduating BSW students from 7 countries: Australia, Brazil, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel, and the United States. The findings among all the national cohorts show that the motivation to work with the elderly was…

Weiss, Idit

2005-01-01

89

Psychological career resources and subjective work experiences of working adults: an exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the psychological career resources (as measured by the Psychological Career Resources Inventory) and the subjective work experiences of a sample of working adults (as measured by a four- item global work experiences scale). The research also aimed to explore broad trends regarding how the participants diff ered on these

M. Coetzee; Z. C. Bergh

90

Barriers to working with sexual assault survivors: a qualitative study of rape crisis center workers.  

PubMed

To better understand barriers service providers may face when advocating for survivors, a study using grounded theory and qualitative, semistructured interviews was conducted of rape victim advocates (N= 25) working in rape crisis centers in a large metropolitan area. Broader societal attitudes framed and were reflected in institutional responses to victims and in barriers faced by advocates working with survivors. Organizational barriers noted by advocates related to resources, environmental factors, professionalization, and racism. Staff burnout was a major barrier affecting advocates' ability to help survivors. Finally, the most salient direct service barrier was secondary victimization by criminal justice and medical or mental health systems. PMID:17420518

Ullman, Sarah E; Townsend, Stephanie M

2007-04-01

91

Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75% during ON, 89% during ON+RSC, and 99.5% during GNSC+RSC. The class mean scores on next-day quizzes during ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 39%, 68%, and 90%, respectively. The class mean score on review quizzes following ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 2.1, 5.3, and 7.8 (maximum score, 10), respectively. Results for five of the seven students provide convincing evidence of functional relationships between ON+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON and between GNSC+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON+RSC. Students', teachers', and parents' opinions regarding the RSC and GNSC procedures were highly favorable.

Wood, Charles L.

92

Working parents of children with behavioral problems: a study on the family–work interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the process by which child behavioral problems are related to parents’ well-being. We developed a family–work spillover model that was tested among 225 working parents. It was hypothesized that family–self conflict (FSC) mediates the relationship between child behavioral problems and parental strain, and that family–work conflict (FWC) mediates the relationship between parental strain and work engagement. Further,

Kimberley Breevaart; Arnold B. Bakker

2011-01-01

93

A longitudinal study exploring the relationships between occupational stressors, non-work stressors, and work performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of intricate research into the relationships between work performance and other variables. This study examined the causal relationship between work, non-work stressors, and work performance. Using longitudinal multi-group data from three groups—university staff, trainee nurses, and part-time employees (overall N=244)—structural equation modelling was employed to explore one-way and reverse competing models. The results produced a good

Julian A. Edwards; Andrew Guppy; Tracey Cockerton

2007-01-01

94

Denver Home-To-Work Transportation Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The particular study discussed in the report is concerned primarily with establishing better access between jobs and low income homes. It also deals with improving access between these homes and recreational, cultural and other opportunities in the metrop...

1969-01-01

95

29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study program. 570.37 Section 570.37...Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study program. (a) This section varies...school-supervised and school-administered work-study program that meets the...

2013-07-01

96

The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results…

Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

2009-01-01

97

A qualitative study of work and work return in cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Few studies have examined the impact of cancer on the survivor's quality of work life. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe the work experiences among a diverse group of cancer survivors and to explore factors influencing decisions about work after cancer diagnosis and treatment. We interviewed 28 participants with a broad range of socioeconomic backgrounds and primary cancer sites. Qualitative results indicate that after learning about their cancer diagnosis, participants had diverse and complex patterns of work return and work change, and experienced a variety of factors that influenced post-cancer decisions. Experiences at work after cancer also varied in relation to how others responded, changes in productivity, effects of cancer and treatment on work, and feelings about work. Most respondents received little guidance from their physicians about work, and many participants described their cancer as impacting their priority of work relative to other aspects of their lives. Our findings reinforce the complexity of measuring employment outcomes and the range of adaptations made to improve the quality of work life. Additional research is needed to identify prognostic factors that can guide clinical or workplace efforts to restore cancer survivors to their desired level of work function and economic productivity. PMID:15744780

Main, Deborah S; Nowels, Carolyn T; Cavender, Tia A; Etschmaier, Martine; Steiner, John F

2005-11-01

98

Shift work and work injury in the New Zealand Blood Donors' Health Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate associations between work patterns and the occurrence of work injury. Methods A cross sectional analysis of the New Zealand Blood Donors Health Study conducted among the 15?687 (70%) participants who reported being in paid employment. After measurement of height and weight, a self?administered questionnaire collected information concerning occupation and work pattern, lifestyle behaviour, sleep, and the occurrence of an injury at work requiring treatment from a doctor during the past 12?months. Results Among paid employees providing information on work pattern, 3119 (21.2%) reported doing shift work (rotating with nights, rotating without nights, or permanent nights) and 1282 (8.7%) sustained a work injury. In unadjusted analysis, work injury was most strongly associated with employment in heavy manual occupations (3.6, 2.8 to 4.6) (relative risk, 95% CI), being male (1.9, 1.7 to 2.2), being obese (1.7, 1.5 to 2.0), working rotating shifts with nights (2.1, 1.7 to 2.5), and working more than three nights a week (1.9, 1.6 to 2.3). Snoring, apnoea or choking during sleep, sleep complaints, and excessive daytime sleepiness were also significantly associated with work injury. When mutually adjusting for all significant risk factors, rotating shift work, with or without nights, remained significantly associated with work injury (1.9, 1.5 to 2.4) and (1.8, 1.2 to 2.6), respectively. Working permanent night shifts was no longer significantly associated with work injury in the adjusted model. Conclusion Work injury is highly associated with rotating shift work, even when accounting for increased exposure to high risk occupations, lifestyle factors, and excessive daytime sleepiness.

Fransen, M; Wilsmore, B; Winstanley, J; Woodward, M; Grunstein, R; Ameratunga, S; Norton, R

2006-01-01

99

Sex work and students: an exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N = 130) in the south of England, who completed a cross?sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological well?being, substance use and lifestyle. A response rate of

Ron Roberts; Sandra Bergström; David La Rooy

2007-01-01

100

Individual Differences and Intervention Flaws: A Sequential Explanatory Study of College Students' Copy-and-Paste Note Taking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, qualitative themes and quantitative findings from previous research were used to justify the exploration of four experimental, note-taking conditions and the impact of those conditions on student learning from Web-based text. However, puzzling results obtained from dependent measures of student learning were quite inconsistent with…

Igo, L. Brent; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Bruning, Roger

2008-01-01

101

Individual Differences and Intervention Flaws: A Sequential Explanatory Study of College Students' Copy-and-Paste Note Taking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, qualitative themes and quantitative findings from previous research were used to justify the exploration of four experimental, note-taking conditions and the impact of those conditions on student learning from Web-based text. However, puzzling results obtained from dependent measures of student learning were quite inconsistent with…

Igo, L. Brent; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Bruning, Roger

2008-01-01

102

Conduct disorder, enuresis and specific developmental delays in two types of encopresis: a case-note study of 63 boys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Encopresis, defined as the passage of stool in an unacceptable place, may occur either as a failure to establish toilet training (primary encopresis), or as a subsequent breakdown in that training (secondary encopresis). A case-note study of sixty-three encopretic boys was undertaken to test the hypothesis that primary and secondary encopresis differed in their associated psychopathology. Boys with primary encopresis

D. M. Foreman; M. S. Thambirajah

1996-01-01

103

Minnesota Nurses' Study: Perceptions of Violence and the Work Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-related violence is an important problem worldwide, and nurses are at increased risk. This study identified rates of violence against nurses in Minnesota, USA, and their perceptions of the work environment. A sample of 6,300 randomly selected nurses described their experience with work-related violence in the previous year. Differences in perceptions of the work environment and work culture were assessed,

Nancy M. NACHREINER; Susan G. GERBERICH; Andrew D. RYAN; Patricia M. McGOVERN

2007-01-01

104

Balancing Work with Study: Impact on Marketing Students' Experience of Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Approximately 57% of students in the United States work while attending college. For most of these students (81%), this is more than 20 hours a week. There has been shown to be a negative relationship between hours worked and academic achievement in studies in the United States as well as the United Kingdom and Australia. There is, however, no…

D'Alessandro, Steven; Volet, Simone

2012-01-01

105

Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how…

Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

2012-01-01

106

Bullying and harassment at work and their relationships to work environment quality: An exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to explore relationships between organizational and social work conditions and the occurrence of bullying and harassment at work. Bullying and harassment are situations where a worker or supervisor is systematically mistreated and victimized by fellow workers or supervisors through repeated negative acts like insulting remarks and ridicule, verbal abuse, offensive teasing, isolation, and social

Ståle Einarsen; Bjørn Inge Raknes; Stig Berge Matthiesen

1994-01-01

107

DESIGN NOTE: Simulation study for a single TOF scintillator using GEANT4  

Microsoft Academic Search

A time-of-flight (TOF) detector system based on plastic scintillators will be used in the Beijing spectrometer III (BSE-III) at Beijing Electron Positron Collider. In this note the result of a detailed Monte Carlo simulation for single TOF scintillator modules, based on GEANT4, is presented. The intrinsic time resolution is obtained. Also given is a comparison of two kinds of plastic

Zhang Li-Ming; Peng Hai-Ping; Zhang Zi-Ping; Chen Hong-Fang; Shao Ming; Wu Jian

2004-01-01

108

Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Authored and curated by David P. Stern, these web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

2009-04-29

109

Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

2009-01-01

110

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of notes describes (1) an optoelectronic apparatus for classroom demonstrations of mechanical laws, (2) a more efficient method for demonstrated nuclear chain reactions using electrically energized "traps" and ping-pong balls, and (3) an inexpensive demonstration for qualitative analysis of temperature-dependent resistance. (CS)

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1980-01-01

111

Biology Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)|

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

112

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

113

Classroom Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

2007-01-01

114

Technical Note: EGSnrc-based dosimetric study of the BEBIG {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this work is to calculate two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions around the BEBIG (Eckert and Ziegler, BEBIG GmbH, Germany) models GK60M21 (old) and Co0.A86 (new) {sup 60}Co high dose rate brachytherapy sources in an unbounded liquid water phantom. The study includes calculation of absorbed dose to water-kerma ratio D/K around the BEBIG sources and a {sup 60}Co point source in water. A comparison is made with previously published data. Methods: The EGSnrcMP Monte Carlo code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose and water-kerma in water and air-kerma strength in vacuum. EGSnrcMP-based user codes such as EDKnrc, FLURZnrc, and DOSRZnrc are employed in the work. Results: The value of D/K reaches a maximum of 1.040{+-}0.002 for the {sup 60}Co point source (constant between 3.6 and 4.5 mm from the source) and 1.076{+-}0.002 for the BEBIG sources (constant between 2.6 and 3.2 mm along the transverse axis of the sources). Dose rate data for the new and old sources are comparable to published data for radial distances r>0.5 cm. Differences up to 9% are observed at points close to the source (r=0.25 cm). In addition for the new source, compared to previously published data, dose rate data are higher by 14% along the longitudinal axis where the source cable is connected. Dose rate differences on the longitudinal axis ({theta}=180 deg.) of this source are explained by varying the length of the simulated source cable. Conclusions: The 2D rectangular data set calculated in the present work could be considered for quality control on radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

Selvam, T. Palani; Bhola, Subhalaxmi [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Health, Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400094 (India)

2010-03-15

115

Working beyond 65: A qualitative study of perceived hazards and discomforts at work.  

PubMed

Objective: This qualitative study explored self-reports of hazards and discomforts in the workplace and coping strategies among those choosing to work beyond the age of 65 years. Participants: 30 people aged 66-91 years took part. Most worked part-time in professional or administrative roles. Methods: Each participant engaged in one semi-structured interview. Results: Participants described some hazards and discomforts in their current work, but no recent accidents. The main age-related discomfort was tiredness. Other hazards that recurred in participants' accounts were physical demands of the job, driving, and interpersonal difficulties such as client or customer complaints, and in very rare cases, bullying. Most work-related hazards (e.g. prolonged sitting at computers, lifting heavy items and driving) were thought likely to affect any worker regardless of age. Coping strategies included making adaptations to age-related changes (such as decreased stamina) by keeping fit and being open about difficulties to colleagues, reducing hours of work, altering roles at work, limiting driving, applying expertise derived from previous work experiences, being assertive, using authority and status, and (among the minority employed in larger organisations) making use of supportive company/organisational policies and practices. Conclusions: Participants described taking individual responsibility for managing hazards at work and perceived little or no elevation of risk linked to age. PMID:23241711

Reynolds, Frances; Farrow, Alexandra; Blank, Alison

2012-12-14

116

Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.  

PubMed

Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments. PMID:20962033

Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

2010-10-20

117

Returning to Work after Cancer: Quantitative Studies and Prototypical Narratives  

PubMed Central

Objective A combination of quantitative data and illustrative narratives may allow cancer survivorship researchers to disseminate their research findings more broadly. We identified recent, methodologically rigorous quantitative studies on return to work after cancer, summarized the themes from these studies, and illustrated those themes with narratives of individual cancer survivors. Methods We reviewed English-language studies of return to work for adult cancer survivors through June, 2008, and identified 13 general themes from papers that met methodological criteria (population-based sampling, prospective and longitudinal assessment, detailed assessment of work, evaluation of economic impact, assessment of moderators of work return, and large sample size). We drew survivorship narratives from a prior qualitative research study to illustrate these themes. Results Nine quantitative studies met 4 or more of our 6 methodological criteria. These studies suggested that most cancer survivors could return to work without residual disabilities. Cancer site, clinical prognosis, treatment modalities, socioeconomic status, and attributes of the job itself influenced the likelihood of work return. Three narratives - a typical survivor who returned to work after treatment, an individual unable to return to work, and an inspiring survivor who returned to work despite substantial barriers - illustrated many of the themes from the quantitative literature while providing additional contextual details. Conclusion Illustrative narratives can complement the findings of cancer survivorship research if researchers are rigorous and transparent in the selection, analysis, and retelling of those stories.

Steiner, John F.; Nowels, Carolyn T.; Main, Deborah S.

2009-01-01

118

DESIGN NOTE: Simulation study for a single TOF scintillator using GEANT4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A time-of-flight (TOF) detector system based on plastic scintillators will be used in the Beijing spectrometer III (BSE-III) at Beijing Electron Positron Collider. In this note the result of a detailed Monte Carlo simulation for single TOF scintillator modules, based on GEANT4, is presented. The intrinsic time resolution is obtained. Also given is a comparison of two kinds of plastic scintillation material—BC404 and BC408 of different thicknesses, coupling mode with PMT and geometry. These simulation results could serve as an important guide for the BES-III TOF design.

Li-Ming, Zhang; Hai-Ping, Peng; Zi-Ping, Zhang; Hong-Fang, Chen; Ming, Shao; Jian, Wu

2004-07-01

119

Technical Note: Use of remote sensing for landslide studies in Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the framework of FP7, an EU-funded SafeLand project, a questionnaire was prepared to collect information about the use of remote sensing for landslide study and to evaluate its actual application in landslide detection, mapping and monitoring. The questionnaire was designed using a Google form and was disseminated among end-users and researchers involved in landslide studies in Europe. In total, 49 answers from 17 different European countries were collected. The outcomes showed that landslide detection and mapping is mainly performed with aerial photos, often associated with optical and radar imagery. Concerning landslide monitoring, satellite radars prevail over the other types of data. Remote sensing is mainly used for detection/mapping and monitoring of slides, flows and lateral spreads with a preferably large scale of analysis (1:5000-1:25 000). All the compilers integrate remote sensing data with other thematic data, mainly geological maps, landslide inventory maps and DTMs and derived maps. According to the research and working experience of the compilers, remote sensing is generally considered to have a medium effectiveness/reliability for landslide studies. The results of the questionnaire can contribute to an overall sketch of the use of remote sensing in current landslide studies and show that remote sensing can be considered a powerful and well-established instrument for landslide mapping, monitoring and hazard analysis.

Tofani, V.; Segoni, S.; Agostini, A.; Catani, F.; Casagli, N.

2013-02-01

120

Relation between policies and work related assault: Minnesota Nurses' Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To assess the relation between violence prevention policies and work related assault. Methods: From Phase 1 of the Minnesota Nurses' Study, a population based survey of 6300 Minnesota nurses (response 79%), 13.2% reported experiencing work related physical assault in the past year. In Phase 2, a case-control study, 1900 nurses (response 75%) were questioned about exposures relevant to violence,

N M Nachreiner; S G Gerberich; P M McGovern; T R Church; H E Hansen; M S Geisser; A D Ryan

2006-01-01

121

Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

Brett, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

122

Social policy and social work education: A historical comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a historical comparative study (Babbie, 1999) in which legislative policy developments and social work curriculum were paralleled to determine the relationship of one to the other. This study explores whether social work education led or lagged the legislative policy process. More specifically, legislative policy developments were considered in terms of dominant paradigms in accordance with the ideas of

Thomas E. Brenner

2004-01-01

123

Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the…

Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

2012-01-01

124

Generational differences in work values: a study of hospitality management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – While many studies focusing on work values have been conducted, few of them were specifically focused on generational differences within the hospitality context. This study aims to explore the structure of hospitality management work values and the perceived differences among three generations of managers and supervisors in the hospitality industry. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey of 398 managers and

Po-Ju Chen; Youngsoo Choi

2008-01-01

125

Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two individual-level psychotherapy interventions: (a) treatment as usual consisting of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and (b) work-focused CBT (W-CBT) that integrated work aspects early into the treatment. Both interventions were carried out by psychotherapists with employees on sick leave because of common mental disorders (depression, anxiety, or adjustment disorder). In

Suzanne E. Lagerveld; Roland W. B. Blonk; Veerle Brenninkmeijer; Leoniek Wijngaards-de Meij; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

2012-01-01

126

Teaching Notes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If you would like to contribute a teaching note for any of these sections please contact ped@iop.org. Contents: LET'S INVESTIGATE: Standing waves on strings MY WAY: Physics slips, trips and falls PHYSICS ON A SHOESTRING The McOhm: using fast food to explain resistance Eggs and a sheet STARTING OUT: After a nervous start, I'm flying ON THE MAP: Christ's Hospital CURIOSITY: The Levitron TECHNICAL TRIMMINGS: Brownian motion smoke cell LET'S INVESTIGATE

2001-05-01

127

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

128

Work on the Super and the Study of Atmospheric Ignition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By 1951, the group of young faculty (Bob Gluckstern and me), post doctoral fellows and graduate students, was comfortably established in Sloane Laboratory, and as "The Breit Group", in the department of physics at Yale. We didn't consciously separate ourselves from others in the department, and no one seemed to put us apart, but the association with Breit gave us a special "aura"--sometimes as objects of pity. Any project that involved the group as a whole, or a significant part of it, was discussed with Bob and me, and sometime in 1951 Breit called us in to consider a request that we look at the possibility of atmospheric ignition by a "Super" - as we still called it then, after Edward Teller. At the end of my stay at Los Alamos, in the summer of 1946, we youngsters had many bull sessions about that "Super", and the possibility of controlled fusion energy. We were confident that the former would be working in perhaps five years, and the latter within ten. After all, Han Bethe had shown us how the sun made its energy, and all that was needed to do was to replace a couple of his slow beta decays with something faster. As I write, some fifty-four years later, we still haven't got fusion energy for power. Our crystal balls were cloudier than Vicky Weisskopf's were to be! But I knew some of the lingo, and had worked out the way radiation penetrates the atmosphere (for understanding the Bikini tests), so in 1951, initially drew the task of looking at opacity, a key question in the bomb itself, and in the possibility of atmospheric ignition. Most of our limited work on the bomb was checking calculations that had been done by others as the Teller-Ulam design was being put together. At least some work on atmospheric ignition had already been done as well, but Teller wanted the "most careful physicist he knew" to do the definitive calculations, so Breit got the call. I do not recall all the members of the group who worked on the project and for that I apologize - no private notes were allowed because the work was classified. But in addition to Bob Gluckstern, I recall, for reasons that will appear, that John McHale was one of the project workers. At one point I think we were all working on nitrogen reactions ...

Hull, Mcallister

2001-03-01

129

A Win-Win Paradigm for Quality of Work Life and Business Performance. [and] Invited Reaction: Comments on Lau and May's Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Lau and May's study of 58 "best U.S. companies to work for" and 88 top Standard and Poor's companies suggests that companies with high quality of working life can also enjoy exceptional growth and profitability. Schurman's critique notes that their sample does not reflect conditions in the majority of U.S. employers. (SK)|

Lau, R. S. M.; May, Bruce E.; Schurman, Susan J.

1998-01-01

130

Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPrivatisation and private sector practices have been increasingly applied to the public sector in many industrialised countries. Over the same period, long-term work disability has risen substantially. We examined whether a major organisational change—the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines—was associated with an increased risk of work disability.MethodsThe study uses self-reported data from

M. Virtanen; M. Kivimaki; A. Singh-Manoux; D. Gimeno; M. J. Shipley; J. Vahtera; T. N. Akbaraly; M. G. Marmot; J. E. Ferrie

2010-01-01

131

Establishing worker identity: a study of people in craft work.  

PubMed

Having a work-related identity is central to being an adult in America. Going to work and engaging in prescribed work behaviors in the workplace is the usual or typical way that adults achieve worker identities. The purpose of this study, developed from an ethnography of people who make crafts at home and sell their work at craft fairs, was to examine how worker identity is constructed when individuals do not have the external markers of a socially identified job and workplace. I used participant observation of craft fairs and other craft venues, and interviews of people who do this work, as major sources of data. Results of the analysis of the data related to worker identity demonstrated that these crafters followed basic steps, or rules, to achieve such a worker identity. These rules, some for work at home and some for other social contexts, encompassed complex behaviors learned through the process of doing the work as well as from other crafters. The conclusions of the study are first, that individual and social identity formation as a worker involves complex processes for which rules and guidelines do exist. Second, these rules are often discovered through the process of doing the work. Third, the meaning of work and the individual and social identities of being a worker are individual, and finally, knowledge of worker identity formation is gained through the study of both those who successfully achieve such an identity and those who do not. PMID:12785663

Dickie, Virginia Allen

132

Work schedules and fatigue: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Aims: (1) To describe the prevalence of fatigue among employees in different work schedules (day work, three-shift, five-shift, and irregular shift work); (2) to investigate whether different work schedules are related to increasing fatigue over time, while taking into account job title and job characteristics; and (3) to study fatigue among shift workers changing to day work. Methods: Data from nine consecutive four-monthly self administered questionnaires from the Maastricht Cohort Study on Fatigue at work (n = 12 095) were used with 32 months of follow up. Day and shift workers were matched on job title. Results: The prevalence of fatigue was 18.1% in day workers, 28.6% in three-shift, 23.7% in five-shift, and 19.1% in irregular shift workers. For three-shift and five-shift workers substantial higher fatigue levels were observed compared to day workers at baseline measurement. In the course of fatigue over the 32 months of follow up there were only small and insignificant differences between employees in different work schedules. However, among employees fatigued at baseline, fatigue levels decreased faster over time among five-shift workers compared to fatigued day workers. Shift workers changing to day work reported substantially higher fatigue levels prior to change, compared to those remaining in shift work. Conclusions: Substantial differences in fatigue existed between day and shift workers. However, as no considerable differences in the course of fatigue were found, these differences have probably developed within a limited time span after starting in a shift work job. Further, evidence was found that fatigue could be an important reason for quitting shift work and moving to day work. Finally, in the relation between work schedules and fatigue, perceived job characteristics might play an important role.

Jansen, N; van Amelsvoort, L G P M; Kristensen, T; van den Brandt, P A; Kant, I.

2003-01-01

133

Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work

Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

2005-01-01

134

Workplace Skills in Practice. Case Studies of Technical Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to explore skills and work-related dispositions in technical work. It used a sociocultural approach to examine skills in seven target jobs in worksites representing diverse industries--health care, traffic management, transportation, and semiconductor manufacturing. It explored employers' strategies for obtaining the skills…

Stasz, Cathleen; And Others

135

Postgraduate study and managers’ subsequent work experience: an exploratory evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on an exploratory qualitative study, this article considers the link between business school teaching at graduate level and subsequent work behaviour and experiences of former students. It evaluates the student experience some time after graduation. The findings of the retrospective evaluation point to the value of classroom peer discussion, the testing of ideas against prior work experience and the

Jane Andrews; Margaret Harris

2009-01-01

136

Single-shell tank systems engineering study work plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents a work plan for a systems engineering study to be conducted in fiscal year 1990. The scope of the work addresses alternative means to permanently dispose of the nuclear and hazardous wastes contained in 149 single-shell tanks located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Garfield

1990-01-01

137

NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK  

EPA Science Inventory

The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

138

Function allocation: a perspective from studies of work practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Function allocation is a central component of systems engineering and its main aim is to provide a rational means of determining which system-level functions should be carried out by humans and which by machines. Such allocation it is assumed can take place early in design life cycle. Such a rational approach to work design sits uneasily with studies of work

Peter C. Wright; Andy Dearden; Bob Fields

2000-01-01

139

College Adults Are Not Good at Self-Regulation: A Study on the Relationship of Self-Regulation, Note Taking, and Test Taking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using difficult materials, the authors attempted to improve college students' self-regulation by allowing extended study time before taking a test. The authors also examined whether background knowledge and note-taking strategies would be positively related to self-regulation. Results imply that test performance is more related to note taking and…

Peverly, Stephen T.; Brobst, Karen E.; Graham, Mark; Shaw, Ray

2003-01-01

140

Minnesota nurses' study: perceptions of violence and the work environment.  

PubMed

Work-related violence is an important problem worldwide, and nurses are at increased risk. This study identified rates of violence against nurses in Minnesota, USA, and their perceptions of the work environment. A sample of 6,300 randomly selected nurses described their experience with work-related violence in the previous year. Differences in perceptions of the work environment and work culture were assessed, based on a nested case-control study, comparing nurses who experienced assault to non-assaulted nurses. Annual rates of physical and non-physical assault, per 100 nurses, were 13.2 (95% CI: 12.2-14.3), and 38.8 (95% CI: 37.4-40.4). Cases were more likely than controls to report: higher levels of work stress; that assault was an expected part of the job; witnessing all types of patient-perpetrated violence in the previous month; and taking corrective measures against work-related assault. Controls versus cases were more likely to perceive higher levels of morale, respect and trust among personnel, and that administrators took action against assault. Nurses frequently experienced work-related violence, and perceptions of the work environment differed between nurses who had experienced physical assault, and those who had not. Employee safety, morale, and retention are particularly important in light of the nursing shortage, and knowledge of nurses' perceptions will assist in tailoring interventions aimed at reducing the substantial risk of physical assault in health care settings. PMID:18057810

Nachreiner, Nancy M; Gerberich, Susan G; Ryan, Andrew D; McGovern, Patricia M

2007-10-01

141

Optics Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

OpticsNotes.com was created for engineers, scientists, technicians, students, and others to find resources, references, and tutorial information available about Optics and Photonics on the Web. This deliberately graphic free site is simple to use and offers an abundant amount of great information on a unique subject. Users can choose from several links that include optics fundamentals, design, components, manufacture, applications, reference, and industry. Other quick links are provided, such as a dictionary, formulas, standards, newsgroups, and more, making this an overall great resource for all you optics lovers out there.

2000-01-01

142

NOTE: Cellphone interference with pocket dosimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference.

David Djajaputra; Ramasamy Nehru; Philip M. Bruch; Komanduri M. Ayyangar; Natarajan V. Raman; Charles A. Enke

2005-01-01

143

Working Abroad: A Qualitative Study On Cultural Adjustments And Difficulties While Working With Other Cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to increase our understanding about how United States employees interact with cultural rules and norms while working in another culture as well as how the abroad experience affects employees when they return to the United States. More specifically, this research was done to gain a deeper understanding of experiences and tactics used by abroad

Liz Truax

2008-01-01

144

NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited dataset, and further investigation on a larger patient population has to be done before its clinical implementation.

Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

2009-10-01

145

Shift work and cognition in the nurses' health study.  

PubMed

Rotating night-shift work, which can disrupt circadian rhythm, may adversely affect long-term health. Experimental studies indicate that circadian rhythm disruption might specifically accelerate brain aging; thus, we prospectively examined shift-work history at midlife as associated with cognitive function among older women in the Nurses' Health Study. Women reported their history of rotating night-shift work in 1988 and participated in telephone-based cognitive interviews between 1995 and 2001; interviews included 6 cognitive tests that were subsequently repeated 3 times, at 2-year intervals. We focused on shift work through midlife (here, ages 58-68 years) because cognitive decline is thought to begin during this period. Using multivariable-adjusted linear regression, we evaluated mean differences in both "average cognitive status" at older age (averaging cognitive scores from all 4 interviews) and rates of cognitive decline over time across categories of shift-work duration at midlife (none, 1-9, 10-19, or ?20 years). There was little association between shift work and average cognition in later life or between shift work and cognitive decline. Overall, this study does not clearly support the hypothesis that shift-work history in midlife has long-term effects on cognition in older adults. PMID:24076971

Devore, Elizabeth E; Grodstein, Francine; Schernhammer, Eva S

2013-09-27

146

Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: A content analysis study.  

PubMed

Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement. PMID:24093736

Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

2013-05-29

147

White matter hyperintensities and working memory: an explorative study.  

PubMed

White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are commonly observed in elderly people and may have the most profound effect on executive functions, including working memory. Surprisingly, the Digit Span backward, a frequently employed working memory task, reveals no association with WMH. In the present study, it was investigated whether more detailed analyses of WMH variables and study sample selection are important when establishing a possible relationship between the Digit Span backward and WMH. To accomplish this, the Digit Span backward and additional working memory tests, WMH subscores, and cardiovascular risk factors were examined. The results revealed that performance on the Digit Span backward test is unrelated to WMH, whereas a relationship between other working memory tests and WMH was confirmed. Furthermore, a division between several white matter regions seems important; hyperintensities in the frontal deep white matter regions were the strongest predictor of working memory performance. PMID:18421629

Oosterman, Joukje M; Van Harten, Barbera; Weinstein, Henry C; Scheltens, Philip; Sergeant, Joseph A; Scherder, Erik J A

2008-05-01

148

Micropower Integrated Circuits Study Program Extension to Scope of Work.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Extension to Scope of Work provides further study of items not investigated completely by the original basic contract. These are the items dealing with computerized models of the field effect transistor. The primary computer model is the SCEPTRE progr...

B. O. Jordan D. E. Mullins J. L. Farley P. Pringle

1971-01-01

149

38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible individual...

2013-07-01

150

A Qualitative Study of the Work Environments of Mexican Nurses  

PubMed Central

Background Studies of the nursing work environment are increasingly common in developed countries, but few exist in developing countries. Because of resource differences between the two contexts, researchers need to clarify what aspects of the work environments are similar and different. Objectives To study the perspectives of Mexican nurses about their work environments to determine similarities and differences to results from developed world studies. Design A secondary, directed content analysis of qualitative data from 46 Spanish language interviews using workplace-oriented themes Setting Purposively selected Mexican states from four regions of the country that reflect the country’s socioeconomic differences. Participants Practicing Mexican nurses with at least one year of clinical experience and currently working in nursing. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Methods Initial data collection occurred in 2006 and 2008 during a broader study about professionalization processes that occurred in Mexican nursing between 1980 and 2005. The secondary, directed content analysis focused on an in-depth exploration of a central theme that emerged from the two original studies: The Workplace. The directed content analysis used themes from the global nursing work environment literature to structure the analysis: Professional relationships, organizational administrative practices, and quality of care and services. Results The three themes from the global literature were relevant for the Mexican context and a new one emerged related to hiring practices. By category, the same factors that created positive or negative perceptions of the work environment matched findings from other international studies conducted in developed countries. The descriptors of the category, however, had different conceptual meanings that illustrate the health system challenges in Mexico. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that studies that seek to measure nursing work environments will most likely apply in Mexico and other Latin American or middle-income countries. Instruments designed to measure the work environment of nurses in these countries may prove relevant in those contexts, but require careful adaptation and systematic translations to ensure it.

Squires, Allison; Juarez, Adrian

2012-01-01

151

Notes in Support of a Relational Social Work Perspective: A Critical Review of the Relational Literature with Implications for Macro Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors review the literature that calls for the incorporation of relational theory into social work practice. Two strands of relational theory are important to developing a relational social work perspective: the psychoanalytic and the feminist. Based on a feminist understanding of relationality, Dorothy Smith has provided an alternative sociological perspective that can inform social work practice on the macro

Richard Pozzuto; Paige Averett

2009-01-01

152

Social support and work engagement: a study of Malaysian nurses.  

PubMed

othman n. & MOHD nasurdin a. (2012) Journal of Nursing Management Social support and work engagement: a study of Malaysian nurses Aim? This study addressed the question of whether social support (supervisor support and co-worker support) could contribute to the variance in work engagement. Background? Nurses, as customer-contact employees, play an important role in representing the organization's competence. Their attitudes and behaviour toward patients has a significant influence on patients' satisfaction and perception of quality of service. Methods? The sample comprised 402 staff nurses working in three general hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. Variables included demographic information, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and Social Support Scale. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations and regression analysis. Results? Findings indicated that supervisor support was positively related to work engagement. Co-worker support was found to have no effect on work engagement. Conclusions? Supervisory support is an important predictor of work engagement for nurses. Implications for nursing management? Nursing management should provide more training to nurse supervisors and develop nurse mentoring programmes to encourage more support to nurses. PMID:23409702

Othman, Noraini; Nasurdin, Aizzat Mohd

2012-08-16

153

Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II study  

PubMed Central

Background Privatisation and private sector practices have been increasingly applied to the public sector in many industrialised countries. Over the same period, long-term work disability has risen substantially. We examined whether a major organizational change - the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines - was associated with an increased risk of work disability. Methods The study uses self-reported data from the prospective Whitehall II cohort study. Associations between transfer to an executive agency assessed at baseline (1991–1994) and work disability ascertained over a period of approximately 8 years at three follow-up surveys (1995–1996, 1997–1999, 2001) were examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results In age- and sex-adjusted models, risk of work disability was higher among the 1263 employees who were transferred to an executive agency (hazard ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.46–2.48) compared with the 3419 employees whose job was not transferred. These findings were robust to additional adjustment for physical and mental health, and health behaviours at baseline. Conclusions Increased work disability was observed among employees exposed to the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines. This may highlight an unintentional cost for employees, employers and society.

Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Gimeno, David; Shipley, Martin J.; Vahtera, Jussi; Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Marmot, Michael G.; Ferrie, Jane E.

2010-01-01

154

Working in the Sky: A Diary Study on Work Engagement Among Flight Attendants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to gain insight in the motivational process of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model by examining whether daily fluctuations in colleague support (i.e., a typical job resource) predict day-levels of job performance through self-efficacy and work engagement. Forty-four flight attendants filled in a questionnaire and a diary booklet before and after consecutive flights to three intercontinental destinations. Results

Despoina Xanthopoulou; Arnold B. Baker; Ellen Heuven; Evangelia Demerouti; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

2008-01-01

155

Children's Perceptions of ‘Work’—an exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

While there is a growing case?study literature on school?industry links in the primary school, most of it tends to be entrepreneurial or concerned with simulating industrial processes. This article reports an attempt to ground a school?industry curriculum in the primary school in the perceptions children already have of ‘work'and in their attempts to make sense of ‘work’ as an aspect

R. J. Roberts; J. Dolan

1989-01-01

156

A Study of Variance Estimation Methods. Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This working paper contains reports of five studies of variance estimation methods. The first, An Empirical Study of Poststratified Estimator, by Fan Zhang uses data from the National Household Education Survey to illustrate use of poststratified estimation. The second paper, BRR Variance Estimation Using BPLX Hadamard Procedure, by Stanley Weng…

Zhang, Fan; Weng, Stanley; Salvucci, Sameena; Hu, Ming-xiu

157

How to Critically Evaluate Case Studies in Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this article is to develop guidelines to assist practitioners and researchers in evaluating and developing rigorous case studies. The main concern in evaluating a case study is to accurately assess its quality and ultimately to offer clients social work interventions informed by the best available evidence. To assess the quality of…

Lee, Eunjung; Mishna, Faye; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

2010-01-01

158

How to Critically Evaluate Case Studies in Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to develop guidelines to assist practitioners and researchers in evaluating and developing rigorous case studies. The main concern in evaluating a case study is to accurately assess its quality and ultimately to offer clients social work interventions informed by the best available evidence. To assess the quality of…

Lee, Eunjung; Mishna, Faye; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

2010-01-01

159

Patient Experiences With Full Electronic Access to Health Records and Clinical Notes Through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. Objective A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients’ views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Methods Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Results Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Conclusions Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full record access on patient well-being. While shared records may or may not impact overall clinic workload, it is likely to change providers’ work, necessitating new types of skills to communicate and partner with patients.

Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W. Paul

2013-01-01

160

Predictors for postpartum pelvic girdle pain in working women: the Mom@Work cohort study.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine which factors during pregnancy and postpartum predict pelvic girdle pain (PGP) at 12 weeks postpartum among working women. A total of 548 Dutch pregnant employees were recruited in 15 companies, mainly health care, child care, and supermarkets. The definition of PGP was any pain felt in the pelvic girdle region at 12 weeks postpartum. Participants received questionnaires at 30 weeks of pregnancy and at 6 and 12 weeks postpartum with demographic, work-related, pregnancy-related, fatigue, psychosocial, PGP-related and delivery-related questions. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the women experienced pain in their pelvic girdle at 12 weeks postpartum. However, the level of pain and the degree of disability due to postpartum PGP was low. Pregnancy-related predictors for PGP at 12 weeks were history of low back pain, higher somatisation, more than 8 hours of sleep or rest per day, and uncomfortable postures at work. The pregnancy and postpartum-related predictors were: more disability at 6 weeks, having PGP at 6 weeks, higher mean pain at 6 weeks, higher somatisation during pregnancy and at 6 weeks postpartum, higher birth weight of the baby, uncomfortable postures at work and number of days of bed rest. Based on these results, it is concluded that extra attention should be given to women who experience PGP during pregnancy to prevent serious PGP during late pregnancy and postpartum. More research is needed to confirm the roles of hours of sleep, somatisation, and bed rest in relation to PGP. PMID:23137900

Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne G M; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Bruinvels, David J; Twisk, Jos W R; van Mechelen, Willem; van Poppel, Mireille N M

2012-12-01

161

Mortality among women and men relative to unemployment, part time work, overtime work, and extra work: a study based on data from the Swedish twin registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo examine mortality before 70 years of age among women and men relative to unemployment, part time work, overtime work, and extra work. Age, marital status, children, smoking and alcohol habits, use of sleeping pills and tranquilisers, stress, shift work, personality factors, and long lasting or serious illness were taken into account as potential confounding factors.METHODSThe study group comprised a

L Nylén; M Voss; B Floderus

2001-01-01

162

Editor's Note (May 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wherever you live, the weather provides a backdrop for studying science, and weather patterns play a critical role in our daily lives. They can determine everything from indoor recess to global economic patterns. This selection includes notes from the Field Editor of Science and Children about the study of weather with elementary students.

Ohana, Chris

2004-05-01

163

Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity  

SciTech Connect

A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

2012-02-15

164

A Study of Work Histories of Married Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study dealt with married women as past, present, and future members of the nursing force. Respondents were 53 married women, aged 22 to 68, in the Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Health Region who had been registered nurses. Data were gathered on personal, family, and work history, motives for entering the nursing profession, and satisfactions and…

Willis, Lucy Dorothea

165

Curriculum Guide for the Work-Study Program, 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is the 1974 work-study program curriculum guide from Fairfax County, Virginia for mildly retarded secondary school students. The vocational program's four-fold goal is to develop curriculum materials, train personnel, develop instructional techniques, and provide logistics support to future the employment potential of students. The…

Yamagata, Barbara; And Others

166

A Nationwide Study of Group Work in Nursing Homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a nationwide study, the authors investigated the place of group work in skilled nursing facilities. A survey questionnaire focusing on: (a) educational, (b) support, and (c) therapy\\/counseling groups, was sent to the directors of social service departments. Results indicated that the majority of the 304 respondents offered each type of group. The majority of facilities also held educational and

Nicholas Mazza; Linda Vinton

1999-01-01

167

Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

168

Does Work Affect Personality? A Study in Horses  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been repeatedly hypothesized that job characteristics are related to changes in personality in humans, but often personality models still omit effects of life experience. Demonstrating reciprocal relationships between personality and work remains a challenge though, as in humans, many other influential factors may interfere. This study investigates this relationship by comparing the emotional reactivity of horses that differed

Martine Hausberger; Christine Muller; Christophe Lunel; Sarah Frances Brosnan

2011-01-01

169

Study of Intercohort Change in Women's Work Patterns and Earnings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study has investigated how the successive cohorts of women have changed with respect to their acccumulation of work-related skills, in terms of level of schooling, career orientation, and attachment to the labor force. We consider how the nature of e...

J. E. O'Neill M. A. Hill

1990-01-01

170

A Study of Imputation Algorithms. Working Paper Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many imputation techniques and imputation software packages have been developed over the years to deal with missing data. Different methods may work well under different circumstances, and it is advisable to conduct a sensitivity analysis when choosing an imputation method for a particular survey. This study reviewed about 30 imputation methods…

Hu, Ming-xiu; Salvucci, Sameena

171

Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

2012-01-01

172

Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Fiscal Year 1997 Grant Allocations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report contains project synopses and evaluations supporting recommendations for funding 25 continuing and 7 new projects in public and nonpublic colleges and universities included in the $1.5 million appropriated for fiscal year 1997 for the Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Selection criteria included: strengthening cooperation among…

Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

173

Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

174

A Note on Issues in Meta-Analysis for Behavioral Genetic Studies Using Categorical Phenotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meta-analysis of behavioral genetic studies would provide (i) tighter confidence intervals around parameter estimates, (ii) clarification of apparently discrepant study findings, and (iii) a mechanism for analyzing systematic causes of between-study differences. We examined some key issues that arise in the meta-analysis of categorical phenotypes. Data were simulated under a multifactorial threshold model that assumed an underlying normal liability distribution,

Ty Andrew Ridenour; Andrew C. Heath

1999-01-01

175

Ergonomic study of an operator's work of a molybdenum plant.  

PubMed

This study was part of an ergonomic program which is being carried out through an agreement between the University of Concepción and a Chilean private mining company. The purpose of this case study was to identify working conditions in which the physical and mental workload could be over the capabilities of the operator. He was responsible for loading trucks with sacks of molybdenum and for downloading reagents and handles them. The methods employed in this study included electronic records, interviews, surveys, review of the company standards, a time study and physical and mental workload analysis. Results showed that 84% of the time the operator was carrying out principal and secondary activities and no break periods were detected. It was found that the pace of work and the shift system generated unfavorable conditions by imbalance in the workload on the different days of the week. In the light of the results recommendations were made for a number of ergonomic changes. Most of them were accepted by the company. The most important achievement was a change in the shift system. The overload of the operator was due to the fact that he was in a shift working 5 days and resting on weekends. The imbalance was mainly because the work of the week end was accumulated for Monday. As a result of the study, the company contracted a second worker for this job and adopted a 7x7 shift system, meaning that they work seven days and rest seven days. An evaluation carried out two month after adopting the new shift revealed that changes were well accepted by the worker. PMID:22317731

Oñate, Esteban; Meyer, Felipe

2012-01-01

176

Health among hospital employees in Europe: A cross-national study of the impact of work stress and work control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyses the effect of working conditions on the health of hospital employees across Europe. Hospital employees often have demanding jobs that increase their stress levels and, consequently, their risk of health problems. Work control – typified by employee autonomy and working time flexibility – helps them cope with high levels of work stress. Researchers have traditionally studied the

Tjasa Pisljar; Tanja van der Lippe; Laura den Dulk

2011-01-01

177

STUDY ABROAD AND VALUES DEVELOPMENT IN SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents results of a qualitative study of values development in U.S. and Scottish social work students who participated in a study-abroad program. Six themes emerged: opening the mind to new ways of thinking; awareness and insight into one's own values and beliefs; social awareness and challenges to societal values and beliefs; appreciation of difference, cultural sensitivity, and anti-discriminatory

Elizabeth W. Lindsey

2005-01-01

178

Section 6 Schools in Six States: Eleven Case Studies of Transfer Issues. A RAND Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The case studies in this report analyze the issues surrounding possible transfer of 11 Section 6 school systems (federally run schools on military bases) to state and local responsibility. Each case study addresses the extent to which a site is ready for transfer and what type of transfer option might be appropriate to that particular site. An…

Purnell, Susanna W.; And Others

179

[Recommendations and notes for Manual RP 2.2.-013-94, "Hygienic criteria in the evaluation of work conditions according to indicators of harmfulness and risks of industrial environment factors and hardness and intensity of the work process"].  

PubMed

Some modifications need to be set in Classification of work conditions, adopted in Manual R rho 2.2.013-94 "Hygienic criteria to evaluate work conditions through occupational hazards and jeopardy, work hardness and intensity". We suggest to modify maximal allowable levels of general vibration, local vibration and infrasound. A recommended formula characterizes total vibration dose received through exposure to several factors, calculates work duration in accordance with all acting hazards. PMID:9072154

Dudarev, G A

1997-01-01

180

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Notes on The 1966 Summer Study Program. Volume II. Fellowship Lectures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: A laboratory study of the western boundary layer; Second-order wave effects on surface films; Thermal stability of an optically thick gas; Decoupling and thermonuclear instabilities in an expanding universe; Self-gravitating isothermal gas; A ge...

1966-01-01

181

Note: A high Mach number arc-driven shock tube for turbulence studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high Mach arc-driven shock tube has been built at the Center for Plasma Science and Technology of Florida A&M University to study shock waves. A larger apparatus with higher voltage was built to study more stable shock waves and subsequent plasmas. Initial measurements of the apparatus conclude that the desired Mach numbers can be reached using only two-thirds the maximum possible energy that the circuit can provide.

Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Johnson, J. A.

2013-04-01

182

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions.

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

183

Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

2012-01-01

184

Nuer Field Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The complicated process of creating meaningful field notes is a problem that vexes many scholars who rely on these important primary documents, including anthropologists, geographers, and sociologists. Currently, there aren't many websites that feature digital archives of fieldnotes, but this joint project undertaken by Indiana University and the University of Michigan is one step in the right direction. The essential goal of the project is to make the linguistic field notes recorded by Eleanor Vandevort (a missionary and researcher) in the South Sudan between 1949 and 1963 available on the web. The digital archive succeeds mightily, as it includes the linguistic field notes, and also photographs from her work there, various letters from the field, and a biographical sketch of her work there in the South Sudan. Along with these materials, visitors can read Vandevort's book about her time in Africa, titled _A Leopard Tamed_ and some fine essays on the history of colonial and missionary linguistics in the Sudan by Edward Miner.

185

DESIGN NOTE: An opposed jet burner for the study of high-intensity combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

bla***An opposed jet burner for the study of high-intensity combustion in the distributed reaction regime is described. The Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence is smaller than the laminar flame thickness. This burner can be applied to both premixed and diffusion flame studies. A stable annular turbulent premixed or diffusion flame can be stabilized between two ceramic plates, which ensure the adiabaticity of the flame. A characteristic feature of this burner is its easy optical access and probe measurements. The NOx emission characteristics of this burner are described in relation to the high-intensity combustion.

Yoshida, Akira

1999-12-01

186

Relation between policies and work related assault: Minnesota Nurses' Study  

PubMed Central

Aims: To assess the relation between violence prevention policies and work related assault. Methods: From Phase 1 of the Minnesota Nurses' Study, a population based survey of 6300 Minnesota nurses (response 79%), 13.2% reported experiencing work related physical assault in the past year. In Phase 2, a case-control study, 1900 nurses (response 75%) were questioned about exposures relevant to violence, including eight work related violence prevention policy items. A comprehensive causal model served as a basis for survey design, analyses, and interpretation. Sensitivity analyses were conducted for potential exposure misclassification and the presence of an unmeasured confounder. Results: Results of multiple regression analyses, controlling for appropriate factors, indicated that the odds of physical assault decreased for having a zero tolerance policy (OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.8) and having policies regarding types of prohibited violent behaviours (OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.9). Analyses adjusted for non-response and non-selection resulted in wider confidence intervals, but no substantial change in effect estimates. Conclusions: It appears that some work related violence policies may be protective for the population of Minnesota nurses.

Nachreiner, N; Gerberich, S; McGovern, P; Church, T; Hansen, H; Geisser, M; Ryan, A

2005-01-01

187

Justice at Work and Metabolic Syndrome: the Whitehall II Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Growing evidence shows that high levels of justice are beneficial for employee health, although biological mechanisms underlying this association are yet to be clarified. We aim to test whether high justice at work protects against metabolic syndrome. Methods A prospective cohort study of 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II study) including 6123 male and female British civil servants aged 35 to 55 years without prevalent CHD at baseline (1985-1990). Perceived justice at work was determined by means of questionnaire on two occasions between 1985 and 1990. Follow-up for metabolic syndrome and its components occurring from 1990 through 2004 was based on clinical assessments on three occasions over more than 18 years. Results Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, ethnicity and employment grade showed that men who experienced a high level of justice at work had a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome than employees with a low level of justice (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.89). There was little evidence of an association between organizational justice and metabolic syndrome or its components in women (hazard ratio 0.88; 95%CI: 0.67-1.17). Conclusions Our prospective findings provide evidence of an association between high levels of justice at work and the development of metabolic syndrome in men.

Gimeno, David; Tabak, Adam G.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Shipley, Martin J.; De Vogli, Roberto; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimaki, Mika

2011-01-01

188

Technical Notes: An Incubation System Allowing Multiple Dissolved Oxygen and Temperature Combinations for Salmonid Emergence Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system described here provides a means to concurrently study the effects of multiple combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen on salmonid emergence. The incubation chambers were filled with a gravel substrate to simulate natural conditions within a salmonid redd. The system operated for more than 2 months at three concurrent temperatures and four dissolved oxygen levels at each temperature.

William J. Miller

1992-01-01

189

Technical Note: Pig Model for Studying Nutrient Assimilation by the Intestine and Colon1  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a system for chronically catheterizing 10- to 25-d-old pigs that permits stable isotope tracer studies of intestinal or colonic assimilation of nutrients. This model also can be used to ensure constant enteral feeding or to assess the rate of entry into the terminal ileum of carbohy- drates, fats, and amino acids. A plastic cannula with a luminal

C. Lawrence Kien; Anton H. Ailabouni; Robert D. Murray; Priscilla A. Powers; Richard E. McClead; Jon Kepner

190

Organizational Economics: Notes on the Use of Transaction-Cost Theory in the Study of Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews transaction-cost approaches to organizational analysis, examines their use in microeconomic theory, and identifies some important flaws in the study. Advocates transaction-cost theory as a powerful tool for organizational and strategic analysis when set within the famework of more general organizational theory. Includes 61 references.…

Robins, James A.

1987-01-01

191

Beyond the Notes: A Qualitative Study of the Information-Seeking Behavior of Ethnomusicologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the information-seeking behavior of fourteen ethnomusicologists in New Zealand via interviews. The findings shed light on what information ethnomusicologists seek, the sources and services they use, and the barriers they face in information seeking and use. A number of ways in which libraries can create collections and…

Liew, Chern Li; Ng, Siong Ngor

2006-01-01

192

Notes: Suitability of a Cyanoacrylate Adhesive to Close Incisions in Black Crappies Used in Telemetry Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared healing rates of incisions closed with sutures or a cyanoacrylate adhesive to determine the suitability of adhesive in closing incisions in black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus used in telemetry studies. Postoperative survival of test fish and control fish was 100% over the course of the experiment. Use of adhesive reduced surgery time by 38% but sutured incisions healed faster.

Raymond W. Petering; David L. Johnson

1991-01-01

193

Children's Note Taking as a Mnemonic Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When given the opportunity to take notes in memory tasks, children sometimes make notes that are not useful. The current study examined the role that task constraints might play in the production of nonmnemonic notes. In Experiment 1, children played one easy and one difficult memory game twice, once with the opportunity to make notes and once…

Eskritt, Michelle; McLeod, Kellie

2008-01-01

194

A study of work injuries in eight Asian countries.  

PubMed

This study is based on a survey conducted in Hong Kong, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka and Thailand on occupational injuries during the years 1975-1980. The number of work accidents have risen rapidly during this period in all of the 8 countries studied. In the case of Thailand, the total number of work injuries increased four fold from 1975-1978, whereas, in Singapore it has almost doubled in 6 years. The number of permanent disablement nearly trebled in Korea, and the Philippines for the year 1967-1980. The largest percentage of accidents are lost-time injuries in all of the 8 countries. Thailand had a three fold increase in lost-time injuries whilst in Hong Kong the figure doubled. Six out of the 8 countries indicated that the building construction industry had the largest number of fatal accidents, followed by the manufacturing industry. PMID:6497348

Ong, C N; Phoon, W O; Tan, T C; Jeyaratnam, J; Cho, S C; Suma'mur, P K; Mahathevan, R; Reverente, B R; Wongphanich, W; Kogi, K

1984-04-01

195

Drying firewood in a temporary solar kiln: a case study. Forest Service research note  

SciTech Connect

A pilot study was undertaken to determine drying rates for small-diameter, unsplit paper birch firewood that was dried: (1) in a conventional top-covered pile; (2) in a simple, temporary solar kiln; and (3) in tree length. Drying rates were the same for firewood piles whether they were in the temporary kiln or only covered on top to keep rain or snow from entering the pile. Trees that were severed at the stump and left to dry in tree length form, complete with branches and leaves, however, dried slower than firewood cut to length, stacked and top-covered or placed in the temporary solar kiln.

Sampson, G.R.; Gasbarro, A.F.

1986-08-01

196

Note on the applicability of the James-Stein estimator in regional hydrologic studies.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

By means of computer simulation studies the James-Stein estimator, subject to the Lindley modification and adoption of the positive part rule suggested by Efron and Morris and conditioned on the assumption of independence, was shown to be robust in the case of the hydrologically plausible distribution considered here, namely, Weibull distributions with coefficient of skewness ranging from 0 to 10. However, in contrast to traditional methods of regionalization the effect of cross correlation is a diminishment of the relative risk advantage of the James-Stein estimator, even in the best case of normal variables: this is discussed and illustrated. -from Authors

Landwehr, J. M.; Matalas, N. C.; Wallis, J. R.

1984-01-01

197

Prevention of work related skin problems: an intervention study in wet work employees  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the effect of implementation of an evidence based skin care programme for wet work employees as part of an occupational health and safety management system. Methods: 375 wet work employees were included in a prospective randomised controlled trial, allocated to either intervention (n = 207) or control (n = 168). The intervention group was exposed to a skin care programme during the five month study period. The intervention included an educational programme for a group of frontline employees, who underwent formalised training, and subsequently introduced the information to their colleagues. As part of the intervention a skin care policy including written instructions was established at each workplace. Both groups answered a test quiz, completed questionnaires on behaviour and symptoms, and underwent clinical examination of their hands before and after the five month period. Results: No difference between the intervention and the control group was found at baseline with respect to clinical symptoms or behaviour. Evaluation after the five months of intervention revealed a significantly higher information level on skin care in the intervention group compared to the control group, a significant change in behaviour in the intervention group but not in the control group, and significantly less skin symptoms as evaluated clinically in the intervention group but not in the control group. No significant difference was found for self reported skin problems. Conclusions: The intervention was successful with respect to information level (knowledge), behaviour, and clinical symptoms. Implementation of a skin care programme as part of an occupational health and safety management system is recommended as a prophylactic measure for employees in wet occupations.

Held, E; Mygind, K; Wolff, C; Gyntelberg, F; Agner, T

2002-01-01

198

Project Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)|

School Science Review, 1979

1979-01-01

199

Social strategies during university studies predict early career work burnout and engagement: 18-year longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal study spanning 18years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10–18years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ questionnaire three times while at university and the work

Katariina Salmela-Aro; Asko Tolvanen; Jari-Erik Nurmi

2011-01-01

200

76 FR 15052 - Proposed Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request AGENCY...the actual number of hours worked by a work-study claimant. DATES: Written comments...information technology. Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program)), VA Form...

2011-03-18

201

Physics Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes physics experiments and apparatus construction for studies in astronomy, electricity, wave measurement and speed, the behavior of steel, and intermolecular forces. Includes a detailed description of how to simulate apparent trajectories of the moon and sun. (CS)

School Science Review, 1976

1976-01-01

202

Chemistry Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes eleven laboratory experiments, including the catalytic effect of copper in zinc-acid reaction; a study of the rate of polymerization of some aldehydes; and a demonstration automatic potentiometric titrator. (MLH)|

Pinkney, J. N.; And Others

1976-01-01

203

Science Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)

School Science Review, 1987

1987-01-01

204

Science Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)|

School Science Review, 1987

1987-01-01

205

Apparatus Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)|

Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

1978-01-01

206

The relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported paediatric medication administration errors: a pan canadian study.  

PubMed

Paediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs) occur frequently, with devastating consequences for children and their families. This study explored the relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported PMAEs. In total, 127 potential and 245 actual PMAEs were reported. Workload, distraction, and ineffective communication were identified as significant contributors to the occurrence of PMAEs. Medical/surgical units reported more errors than critical care environments (p=.000) and a 2.9% increase in the frequency of reported PMAEs was noted for each additional bed on units (p=.001). This study supports the awareness that a systems reform is required to reduce PMAEs. PMID:23290866

Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

2013-01-02

207

Considerations of circadian impact for defining ‘shift work’ in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human

Richard G Stevens; Johnni Hansen; Giovanni Costa; Erhard Haus; Timo Kauppinen; Kristan J Aronson; Gemma Castaño-Vinyals; Scott Davis; Monique H W Frings-Dresen; Lin Fritschi; Manolis Kogevinas; Kazutaka Kogi; Jenny-Anne Lie; Arne Lowden; Beata Peplonska; Beate Pesch; Eero Pukkala; Eva Schernhammer; Ruth C Travis; Roel Vermeulen; Tongzhang Zheng; Vincent Cogliano; Kurt Straif

2010-01-01

208

Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix B. Regulatory Works.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Regulatory Works Appendix describes the engineering works that would be necessary to accomplish limited regulation of Lake Erie. It also describes the remedial works that would be required in the St. Lawrence River to accommodate combined regulation p...

1981-01-01

209

Wegener's work included studies of noctilucent clouds, auroras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 120th anniversary of the birth of Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) occurs next year and the event gives us an opportunity to commemorate his work. While the study of continental drift was a significant part of that work, Wegener's influence is also apparent in other areas of the geosciences, including solar-terrestrial physics, the physics of the upper atmosphere, and meteorology.Wegener's research in these areas was a continuation of a series of early studies by a number of scientists trying to explain atmospheric phenomena with the known laws of physics. His studies of noctilucent clouds and of auroras, for example, are significant in the context of the history of science as early experiments to explain the terrestrial atmosphere from a profoundly physical point of view. His contributions are building blocks to modern, comprehensive, physical interpretations, just as previous studies were building blocks to his. Wegener followed the same goal, namely the physical explanation of observed and recorded phenomena, and he belonged therefore to that group of researchers who contributed to the early development of geoscience and cosmoscience and whose heritage should be conserved.

Schröder, Wilfried

210

Safety in Work Vehicles: A Multilevel Study Linking Safety Values and Individual Predictors to Work-Related Driving Crashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although work-related driving is associated with high accident rates, limited research has investigated the factors influencing driving crashes in the work setting. This study explored multilevel influences on self-reported crashes in the workplace by surveying a sample of work-related drivers (n = 380), their workgroup supervisors (n = 88), and fleet managers (n = 47). At the driver level of

Sharon Newnam; Mark A. Griffin; Claire Mason

2008-01-01

211

The loss spiral of work pressure, work–home interference and exhaustion: Reciprocal relations in a three-wave study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested the ‘loss spiral’ hypothesis of work–home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency offered strong support for this hypothesis.

Evangelia Demerouti; Arnold B Bakker; Annemieke J Bulters

2004-01-01

212

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

213

Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family…

Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

2013-01-01

214

Environmental Studies - Class Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of four units (chapters) focusing on evolution (chapter I), civilization of man (chapter II), ecological concepts (chapter III), and limnological concepts (Chapter IV). Each chapter contains "text material" on the topic indicated. In addition: (1) a list of key vocabulary words, questions, reading list, and questions related…

Canipe, Stephen L.

215

Environmental Studies - Class Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document consists of four units (chapters) focusing on evolution (chapter I), civilization of man (chapter II), ecological concepts (chapter III), and limnological concepts (Chapter IV). Each chapter contains "text material" on the topic indicated. In addition: (1) a list of key vocabulary words, questions, reading list, and questions…

Canipe, Stephen L.

216

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

217

Book notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gorbachev's Gamble: The 19th All?Union Party Conference edited by Baruch A. Hazan (Westview Special Studies on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe). Boulder, CO, and Oxford: Westview, 1990. Pp. x + 485. $33 (paperback). ISBN 0 8133 7779 XLes nouveaux secrets des communistes by Jean Fabien. Paris: Albin Michel, 1990. Pp.199. Ff 85. ISBN 2 226 04101 XSoviet Military Intelligence

Ronald J. Hill; David Hanley; Owen A. Hartley; Conan Fischer; Mary Buckley; Tamas Meszerics; C. W. Madge; G. N. Madge; P. R. Noone

1991-01-01

218

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)|

School Science Review, 1984

1984-01-01

219

Chemistry Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Included is information regarding: sucrose dehydration by sulphuric acid; an example of school-industry link in studying zinc oxide production; viscous flow in inorganic silicate glass; construction of a peristaltic pump; electrolysis; carbon dioxide preparation; electrophoresis; safety in using hydrogen and sulphuric acid; and approaches to…

School Science Review, 1979

1979-01-01

220

Chemistry Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Short articles on the determination of the activation energy of the thiosulphate-acid reaction, an experiment on hydrolysis of similar metal salt solutions, the preparation and electrolytic properties of iodine monochloride and iodine trochloride, and instructions for apparatus enabling laboratory study of the thermal cracking of ethylbenzene.…

School Science Review, 1972

1972-01-01

221

Work organisation and unintentional sleep: results from the WOLF study  

PubMed Central

Background: Falling asleep at work is receiving increasing attention as a cause of work accidents. Aims: To investigate which variables (related to work, lifestyle, or background) are related to the tendency to fall asleep unintentionally, either during work hours, or during leisure time. Methods: 5589 individuals (76% response rate) responded to a questionnaire. A multiple logistic regression analysis of the cross sectional data was used to estimate the risk of falling asleep. Results: The prevalence for falling asleep unintentionally at least once a month was 7.0% during work hours and 23.1% during leisure time. The risk of unintentional sleep at work was related to disturbed sleep, having shift work, and higher socioeconomic group. Being older, being a woman, and being a smoker were associated with a reduced risk of unintentionally falling asleep at work. Work demands, decision latitude at work, physical load, sedentary work, solitary work, extra work, and overtime work were not related to falling asleep at work. Removing "disturbed sleep" as a predictor did not change the odds ratios of the other predictors in any significant way. With respect to falling asleep during leisure time, disturbed sleep, snoring, high work demands, being a smoker, not exercising, and higher age (>45 years) became risk indicators. Conclusion: The risk of involuntary sleep at work is increased in connection with disturbed sleep but also with night work, socioeconomic group, low age, being a male, and being a non-smoker.

Akerstedt, T; Knutsson, A; Westerholm, P; Theorell, T; Alfredsson, L; Kecklund, G

2002-01-01

222

Book notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

American Congregations Volume 1: Portraits of Twelve Religious Communities James P. Wind & James W. Lewis, eds., 1998 Chicago, London: University of Chicago Press xi + 712 pp., US$18.00, £14.50 ISBN 0–226–90187–4Volume 2: New Perspectives in the Study of Congregations James P. Wind & James W. Lewis, eds., 1998 ix + 292 pp., US$13.00, £10.50 ISBN 0–226–90189–0Religions in the UK:

Elisabeth Arweck

1999-01-01

223

Publishers' Note  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS codes 10 and 20. This offer will remain open until the SCOAP3 agreement at CERN takes effect. Authors submitting any article to EPL will continue to be offered the opportunity to make their published letter open access for a one-off payment. However, with effect from 1 November 2008, any author who submits work related to subject areas within PACS 10 and 20 will benefit from open access at no charge, meaning their published article will be available free to all readers, forever. ``Physics of Elementary Particles and Fields'' and ``Nuclear Physics'' are two research areas focusing on the HEP community, that the EPLA Directors recognize as significant to the broadband development of EPL, and they endeavour to increase the number of high-quality research letters published in these fields, to engage more closely with the High Energy Physics community, and to strengthen and promote the journal. All submitted articles will still be subject to rigorous peer review to maintain the high standard of articles published in EPL, and will benefit from expert leadership within the Editorial Board and rapid publication in addition to open access. You are invited to submit your paper now on https://www.epletters.net to take advantage of this fantastic offer. If you have comments or questions about changes taking place in 2009, please e-mail us at info@epljournal.org or editorial.office@epletters.net. With our best wishes for 2009!

EPL Management Team

2008-12-01

224

Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

Meagher, Thomas Francis

225

[Efficacy of vaccination against influenza among working people--results of epidemiological studies].  

PubMed

Influenza among working people is responsible for the enhanced sickness absenteeism, limited work capacity and efficiency, as well as for the increased health service demand. The efficacy of vaccination against influenza has been assessed most frequently on the basis of clinical symptoms without taking virological tests to confirm the presence of virus in the patients' serum. According to current epidemiological studies on the occurrence of the influenza-like symptoms, the efficacy of vaccination usually range between 18.3-23%. However, values reaching 54% or even 88% have also been noted. Only a few single studies did not show significant effects of vaccination against influenza. Savings due to vaccination have ranged from several to 20, and in one study even to 46 dollars per one vaccinated worker. These economic differences should be mainly attributed to the differences in the structure of direct and indirect costs taken into account. The direct costs depend, to a great extent, on whether savings due to the number of visits not attended by patients who had been vaccinated and thus, not suffered from flue, as well as the costs incurred in vaccination-promoting programmes and their implementation by nurses have been taken into account. In the structure of indirect costs, the largest difference was noted in regard to savings due to not wasted working time. These savings ranged from 9.9 dollars per one worker in Poland to 52.87 dollars in Canada. The range of savings obtained depends on the index of workers' participation in the vaccination programme, and this index is usually a derivative of the input of resources into the promotion of such kind of health conducive behaviour. It seems that in view of preliminary positive results of the economic assessment, the employers will encourage their workers to undergo preventive vaccination against influenza. It may be expected that appropriate promotion actions of much wider scope will be undertaken that will contribute to the increased number of vaccinated workers. However, the final decision in this respect will always depend on the worker's good will. PMID:11199177

Hanke, W

2000-01-01

226

Work Discretion and Work Satisfaction: A Study of British Factory Workers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper presents and discusses a portion of empirical data collected from a large sample of British factory workers and relates these workers' perception of the discretion available to them to their work satisfaction. Perceived discretion is measured fo...

T. C. Taveggia R. A. Hedley

1974-01-01

227

CASE STUDY FOR WORK STRUCTURING: INSTALLATION OF METAL DOOR FRAMES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work structuring means developing a project's process design while trying to align engineering design, supply chain, resource allocation, and assembly efforts. The goal of work structuring is to make work flow more reliable and quick while delivering value to the customer. Current work structuring practices are driven by contracts, the history of trades, and the traditions of craft. As a

Cynthia C. Y. Tsao; Iris D. Tommelein; Eric Swanlund; Gregory A. Howell

2000-01-01

228

Perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work: a qualitative study in Guatemala  

PubMed Central

Background Each year medical providers from wealthy countries participate in short-term medical volunteer work in resource-poor countries. Various authors have raised concern that such work has the potential to be harmful to recipient communities; however, the social science and medical literature contains little research into the perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work from the perspective of members of recipient communities. This exploratory study examines the perception of short-term medical volunteer work in Guatemala among groups of actors affected by or participating in these programs. Methods The researchers conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 72 individuals, including Guatemalan healthcare providers and health authorities, foreign medical providers, non-medical personnel working on health projects, and Guatemalan parents of children treated by a short-term volunteer group. Detailed notes and summaries of these interviews were uploaded, coded and annotated using Atlas.ti (Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin) to identify recurrent themes from the interviews. Results Informants commonly identified a need for increased access to medical services in Guatemala, and many believed that short-term medical volunteers are in a position to offer improved access to medical care in the communities where they serve. Informants most frequently cited appropriate patient selection and attention to payment systems as the best means to avoid creating dependence on foreign aid. The most frequent suggestion to improve short-term medical volunteer work was coordination with and respect for local Guatemalan healthcare providers and their communities, as insufficient understanding of the country's existing healthcare resources and needs may result in perceived harm to the recipient community. Conclusion The perceived impact of short-term medical volunteer projects in Guatemala is highly variable and dependent upon the individual project. In this exploratory study, project characteristics were identified that are consistently perceived to be either positive or negative. These findings have direct implications for anyone involved in the planning and execution of short-term medical volunteer projects, including local and foreign medical team members, project planners and coordinators, and health authorities. Most importantly, this preliminary study suggests avenues for future study and evaluation of the impact of short-term medical volunteer programs on local health care services.

Green, Tyler; Green, Heidi; Scandlyn, Jean; Kestler, Andrew

2009-01-01

229

What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

2007-01-01

230

NOTE: Does the option to rotate the Elekta Beam Modulator MLC during VMAT IMRT delivery confer advantage?—a study of 'parked gaps'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique on an Elekta accelerator equipped with the Elekta Beam Modulator multileaf collimator (MLC), the orientation of the MLC, relative to the accelerator head, is generally fixed during the delivery. However, it has the ability to rotate about its axis as the gantry simultaneously rotates. This note shows that this can confer a potential advantage when planning and delivering IMRT via VMAT. A computer model has been built in which the MLC rotation angle could be varied with each control point (gantry location) within the constraints of the specified MLC rotation speed and the time available for rotation. The model was used to optimize the orientation trajectory in such a way as to minimize the number of parked gaps between leaves which are needed for some gantry orientations but not for others (and which cannot reach the shielding safety of surrounding jaws in the time available). The presented work started with the simple situation of collimating gantry-successive single convex shapes. As a broad statement some 40% reduction in such parked gaps could be achieved. The study was then extended to investigate the optimized trajectories for multiple separate concave shapes with, once again, a saving in unwanted parked gaps or unwanted over-irradiation.

Webb, S.

2010-06-01

231

A Chinese Longitudinal Study on Work/Family Enrichment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore reciprocal relationships between work/family resources, work/family enrichment (WFE), and work/family satisfaction in a Chinese society. Design/methodology/approach: A longitudinal design was adopted using a three-wave panel sample. Data were obtained from 310 Taiwanese employees on three…

Lu, Luo

2011-01-01

232

Stress Among Graduate Social Work Students: an Empirical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 82 graduate social work students revealed low levels of physical and psychological stress associated with graduate work. Physical and psychological symptoms were reported at higher levels in relation to classroom work than in relation to field practice. No major differences in stress were reported on the basis of sex or marital status, but class standing did produce

Carlton E. Munson

1984-01-01

233

A note on Skinner and Pavlov's physiology.  

PubMed

These short notes describe the way in which Skinner considers and resolves his differences with Pavlov in the question of the relation between psychology and physiology as forms of knowledge. After establishing his viewpoint in the general epistemological issue, Skinner is concerned about linking his study of behavior to the work of Pavlov, who considered it to be of a physiological nature. Skinner contrasts Pavlov's empirical and theoretical work and characterizes the latter in terms of the notion of the "Conceptual Nervous System." PMID:15581236

García-Hoz, Víctor

2004-11-01

234

Taking Notes - Cornell Style  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning to take notes using the Cornell System There are many different ways and methods out there in which you can learn to take notes, with the most popular method being the Cornell Method. Click on the following links to learn more about the Cornell Note Method Cornell Note System Cornell Note System Cornell System Now that you are familiar with the Cornell System, think about ...

Freeman, Luke

2005-11-28

235

Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2011-01-01

236

A study on the peer relationships, social support perceptions and perfectionism of working and non-working children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was planned to investigate working and non-working children's peer relationships, social support perceptions and perfectionism. Data from 1,390 children were analyzed. Data collection instruments included General Information Form, Peer Relationships Scale, Social Support Evaluation Scale for Children and Adolescents, and Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. Data were analyzed by using Mann Whitney U-Test. The results showed that working caused a

Güne? Sail; Aysel Köksal Akyol

2010-01-01

237

Notes on Computers, Work, and Class  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whatever else sociology may be, it is a result of consistently asking: (1) What is the meaning of this — whatever we are examining — for our society as a whole, and what is this social world like? (2) What is the meaning of this for the types of men and women that prevail in this society? (3) How does

Jostein Gripsrud

2010-01-01

238

76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment...determine a claimant's eligibility for work-study benefits. DATES: Written comments...technology. Titles: a. Application for Work-Study Allowance, VA Form...

2011-11-01

239

Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of note-leavers of the same population at 2 different

Paul W. C. Wong; April W. M. Yeung; Wincy S. C. Chan; Paul S. F. Yip; Arthur K. H. Tang

2009-01-01

240

Water's contribution and enzyme's work: a KITA study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enzyme dynamics control and contribute to myriads of mostly well-characterized metabolic processes. Yet, understanding the role of the aqueous reaction matrix remains an experimental challenge. By kinetic THz absorption (KITA) spectroscopy, we have studied the dynamic interplay between water and a human metalloenzyme at work in realtime. In our KITA setup, we combined a THz-time domain spectrometer (THz-TDS) with a stopped-flow mixer to study reactions with millisecond time resolution. We used picosecond THz pulses which directly probe hydrogen bond formation and breaking in the water network to observe enzyme-water interactions upon enzyme catalysis at the active site of a matrix-metalloprotease. During formation of the productive Michaelis complex, we detected a perturbation of coupled enzyme-water network dynamics. Supplemented by real-time biophysical techniques and molecular dynamics simulations we characterized the enzyme-water interplay in the particular case of enzyme catalysis. Our results suggest a polarization-induced gradient of water dynamics at the remote active site of a metalloenzyme with decelerated hydration water dynamics towards the active site. The observed long-range gradient of collective water motions might facilitate productive binding of substrates to enzyme active sites. Further KITA experiments shall improve our understanding of water's contribution to biological function.

Born, Benjamin; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

2012-02-01

241

Notes on notes on postmodern programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

These notes have the status of letters written to ourselves: we wrote them down because, without doing so, we found ourselves making up new arguments over and over again. So began the abstract of our earlier paper Notes on Postmodern Programming. We now revisit the issue of postmodern programming, and attempt to address some of the questions raised by our

James Noble; Robert Biddle

2004-01-01

242

Work-system risk factors for permanent work disability among home-care workers: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. There is a growing need for home-care services in western societies. As home-care workers show high levels of absence related to poor health it is important that we broaden our knowledge about what factors in the work system contribute to this. The aim of this study was to explore and estimate the impact of the work system on permanent

Lotta Dellve; Monica Lagerström; Mats Hagberg

2003-01-01

243

A Study on the Employee's Work Situation and Work Tiredness for Sports and Recreational Business in the Middle of Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the employee's work situation and work tiredness in the sports and recreational business. Convenience sampling was used among 250 employees from sports and recreational industry in the middle of Taiwan and collected data was analyzed by factor analysis, correlation analysis and

Lin Yuan-Ming

244

Breaking the Myth of Flexible Work: Contingent Work in Toronto. A Study Conducted by the Contingent Workers Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 205 people, 4 group interviews with approximately 30 people, and 6 design and analysis meetings involving approximately 40 people were conducted in a 1999 participatory study of contingent workers in Toronto. (Contingent work was defined to be lower-waged forms of non-permanent work arrangements that include contracting, employment…

de Wolff, Alice

245

Comparison of Sheltered and Supported Work Programs: A Pilot Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares two random samples of developmentally disabled workers, one from sheltered workshops, the other from a supported work program, in terms of client characteristics, program effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and job satisfaction. Suggests that the sheltered workshop program was more effective than the supported work program in terms of the…

Lam, Chow S.

1986-01-01

246

[Dentistry and auxology. Preliminary note].  

PubMed

The relationship between dental disease and auxology is again discussed. Work at the "G. de Toni" Auxology and Neaniology Centre is discussed, including a case of pachysomic nanism described in 1957 by Prof. Lagonigro. Attention is drawn to the importance of the relationship, often overlooked by physicians. Further notes on other cases of dental disease in subjects with auxiopathies are promised. PMID:1059872

Papa, L

247

A note on Fermat's problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The General Fermat Problem asks for the minimum of the weighted sum of distances fromm points inn-space. Dozens of papers have been written on variants of this problem and most of them have merely reproduced known results. This note calls attention to the work of Weiszfeld in 1937, who may have been the first to propose an iterative algorithm. Although

Harold W. Kuhn

1973-01-01

248

The Work Activity of School Principals: An Observational Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The content and characteristics of the work of three Australian principals who were observed for three weeks are described with the findings expressed in a set of propositions about the principalship. (Author/IRT)

Willis, Quentin

1980-01-01

249

A Study of Work-Producing Characteristics of Underwater Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of alterations in task nature/task workload configuration upon the work-producing characteristics of humans performing specific underwater manual tasks were examined. The tasks examined were: (1) A simple repetitive rotary task requiring conti...

I. Streimer D. P. W. Turner K. Volkmer

1969-01-01

250

Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic…

Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

2005-01-01

251

Isocyanate exposures in autobody shop work: the SPRAY study.  

PubMed

Isocyanates, known to cause respiratory sensitization and asthma, are widely used in automotive refinishing where exposures to aliphatic polyisocyanates occur by both inhalation and skin contact. The work reported here, the characterization of isocyanate exposure in the autobody industry, was part of an epidemiologic study of workers in 37 autobody shops in Connecticut. This article describes workplaces, tasks, and controls, and outlines the frequency, duration, and intensity of isocyanate exposures. Personal air samples taken outside of respirators had median concentrations of 66.5 microg NCO/m3 for primer, 134.4 microg (NCO)/m3 for sealer, and 358.5 microg NCO/m3 for clearcoat. Forty-eight percent of primer, 66% of sealer, and 92% of clearcoat samples exceeded the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive guideline for isocyanate, though none exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended exposure limit for monomer. Nonisocyanate-containing primers and sealers are used in more than half the shops, but nonisocyanate clearcoats are rare. Eighty-two percent of personal samples taken within a spray booth exceeded the U.K. guideline: 81% of those in downdraft spray booths, 74% in semidowndraft booths, and 92% in crossdraft booths. Only 8% of shops reported that spraying is done exclusively in spray booths. All painters wore some type of respirator. In 30% of shops, painters used supplied air respirators; the rest relied on half face organic vapor cartridge respirators with N95 overspray pads. All shops provided some type of gloves, usually latex, not recommended for isocyanate protection. Despite improvements in autobody shop materials, practices, and controls, there are still opportunities for substantial exposures to isocyanates. PMID:15559329

Sparer, Judy; Stowe, Meredith H; Bello, Dhimiter; Liu, Youcheng; Gore, Rebecca J; Youngs, Fred; Cullen, Mark R; Redlich, Carrie A; Woskie, Susan R

2004-09-01

252

A feasibility study of work group monitoring for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Present Hanford internal dosimetry policy recommends placing a worker on a routine bioassay monitoring program if the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) in a single calendar year may exceed 100 mrem for all radionuclides. Nearly all Hanford workers who enter contamination zones are on routine bioassay programs. Site environmental restoration and remediation now require an even larger number of workers to enter contamination zones, therefore increasing the number of workers requiring routine bioassay monitoring. Work group bioassay is a method which demonstrates, at a reduced cost, that workers who are assumed to be essentially at no risk for incurring intakes are, in fact, not incurring intakes. For the proposed program, a work group will be identified by a letter to their exposure history file. The analytical result for a work group bioassay sample will be placed in the dosimetry record of the person actually providing the sample and will be identified as pertaining to a work group by an appropriate code. Any positive result will be followed up using the same procedure as for individual-specific bioassay, which limits false positives to less than 0.5%. Workers who (1) have radioactive material depositions that interfere with detecting and assessing additional intakes, (2) use any form of respiratory protection, or (3) enter airborne radioactivity areas will be excluded from a work group bioassay program and placed on an individual-specific bioassay program.

MacLellan, J.A.

1994-04-01

253

The work to make a network work: studying CSCW in action  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a field study of the procurement, implementation and use of a local area network devoted to running CSCW-related applications in an organization within the U.K.'s central government. In this particular case, the network ran into a number of difficulties, was resisted by its potential users for a variety of reasons, was faced with being withdrawn from

John Bowers

1994-01-01

254

The Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory: A Validity Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory (SWAI) developed by J. F. Efstation, M. J. Patton, and C. M. Kardash (1990) was further evaluated for its psychometric properties and relationships with the Personal Reactions Scale--Revised (PRS-R) developed by E. L. Holloway and B. E. Wampold (1984), the only other measure of the relationship in…

Patton, M. J.; And Others

255

Technical Work Plan for: Fracture and Lithophysal Studies  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work scope described in this technical work plan (TWP) is to enhance the descriptions of fracture and lithophysal parameters for the repository host horizon (RHH) over the repository footprint utilizing a predictive model. This work is planned to address U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) additional information needs (AINs) associated with the Structural Deformation and Seismicity (SDS) Key Technical Issues (KTI) agreement SDS 3.03 (Schlueter 2000 [DIRS 166615]). The results of the planned work are expected to enhance the technical basis and confirm the results of the fracture analyses presented in ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107], Section 6.1.6). This model is not intended to provide an alternative for the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models currently used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Nor are the outputs of this model intended to address the SDS 3.03 AINs related to the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models.

n

2006-09-11

256

Critical perspectives in the study of nursing work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to critique extant nursing research on nursing practice environments by juxtaposing it with critical sociological perspectives on nurses' work and to propose an alternative paradigm for future research based on these perspectives. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The extant nursing\\/health services research on nursing practice environments is reviewed. Sociological concepts are introduced, expanded on, and

Sarah Wall

2010-01-01

257

Music Training and Working Memory: An ERP Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While previous research has suggested that music training is associated with improvements in various cognitive and linguistic skills, the mechanisms mediating or underlying these associations are mostly unknown. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that previous music training is related to improved working memory. Using event-related potentials…

George, Elyse M.; Coch, Donna

2011-01-01

258

Veterinarian Work, Enhanced by Mobile Technology--An Empirical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to find out if mobile technology can be used to enhance a veterinarian's work during house calls. The main focus is toward Equine medicine veterinarians. The results obtained from this research, which were conducted with Finnish veterinarians, are also transferable, to some degree, to other countries. We will find out what the current situation

Sonja Leskinen

2012-01-01

259

A work-study course in an ADN program.  

PubMed

This article describes a nursing student practicum in which students enrolled in the ADN program experience the real world of work over a five week period of time. The student's role and the RN mentor's role are described, as well as a report on the findings of this unique clinical elective in a basic nursing program. PMID:1987981

Farley, V M; Tyree, A

260

Industrial Work Experience I. Curriculum Guide. General Related Study Units.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The primary purpose of this guide is to present basic sample instructional materials for the Industrial Work Experience (IWE) Program. It is designed to aid those charged with local administration and coordination of programs in secondary level trade and industrial education, referred to as the IWE training program. The guide contains 10 units of…

Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

261

Does Practical Work Really Motivate? A study of the affective value of practical work in secondary school science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper reports on a study that examined whether practical work can be said to have affective outcomes, and if so in what sense. The term ‘affective’ is used here to refer to the emotions, or feelings, engendered amongst pupils towards school science in general, or one of the sciences in particular. The study is based on 25 multi?site

Ian Abrahams

2009-01-01

262

Understanding China's Post80 employees' work attitudes: an explorative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among job and career satisfactions, work commitment, and turnover intentions for the Post-80 employees in China. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 290 of China's Post-80 employees from 19 knowledge-intensive companies were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used for data analysis. Findings – The perceptions of selected Post-80 employees

Qinxuan Gu; Lihong Wang; Judy Y. Sun; Yanni Xu

2010-01-01

263

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPublic health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes.Methodology\\/Principal Findings70 participants took part

David Carlton Taylor-Robinson; Ffion Lloyd-Williams; Lois Orton; May Moonan; Martin OFlaherty; Simon Capewell

2012-01-01

264

Many Hands Make Light Work: Further Studies in Group Evolution.  

PubMed

Abstract When niching or speciation is required to perform a task that has several different component parts, standard genetic algorithms (GAs) struggle. They tend to evaluate and select all individuals on the same part of the task, which leads to genetic convergence within the population. The goal of evolutionary niching methods is to enforce diversity in the population so that this genetic convergence is avoided. One drawback with some of these niching methods is that they require a priori knowledge or assumptions about the specific fitness landscape in order to work; another is that many such methods are not set up to work on cooperative tasks where fitness is only relevant at the group level. Here we address these problems by presenting the group GA, described earlier by the authors, which is a group-based evolutionary algorithm that can lead to emergent niching. After demonstrating the group GA on an immune system matching task, we extend the previous work and present two modified versions where the number of niches does not need to be specified ahead of time. In the random-group-size GA, the number of niches is varied randomly during evolution, and in the evolved-group-size GA the number of niches is optimized by evolution. This provides a framework in which we can evolve groups of individuals to collectively perform tasks with minimal a priori knowledge of how many subtasks there are or how they should be shared out. PMID:23373977

Tomko, Nicholas; Harvey, Inman; Virgo, Nathaniel; Philippides, Andrew

2013-02-01

265

Assessment of work ability and vitality—a study of teachers of different age groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was performed to analyse work ability and vitality of teachers of different age groups (group 1: <45 years, group 2: ?45 years) working at comprehensive secondary schools. Particularly, we were interested in detecting factors influencing work ability. 100 female teachers were included in this analysis. A multidisciplinary approach was applied, including life style analysis, work anamnesis, work ability

Gabriele Freude; Reingard Seibt; Eberhard Pech; Peter Ullsperger

2005-01-01

266

Environmental effects of dredging. Lower limits of organic carbon normalization: Results of fish/sediment/water equilibrium partitioning studies. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This technical note reports the initial results of studies measuring biota/ sediment/water equilibrium partitioning of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener. The focus of this technical note is on the validity of normalizing concentrations of neutral organic chemicals on sediment total organic carbon (TOC) when sediment TOC concentrations are low. Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has aggressively pursued development of single-chemical sediment quality criteria (SQC). Equilibrium partitioning of neutral organic chemicals between the organic carbon fraction of bedded sediments and the interstitial water of the sediments provides the theoretical basis for the most popular approach to development of SQC. The solution phase of the chemical in equilibrium with the sediment is considered to represent the bioavailable fraction and to enable the conversion of existing water quality criteria (WQC) into SQC or sediment quality standards.

McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.E.; Feldhaus, J.; Ace, L.N.; Brannon, J.M.

1996-03-01

267

Does work stress make you shorter? An ambulatory field study of daily work stressors, job control, and spinal shrinkage.  

PubMed

Body height decreases throughout the day due to fluid loss from the intervertebral disk. This study investigated whether spinal shrinkage was greater during workdays compared with nonwork days, whether daily work stressors were positively related to spinal shrinkage, and whether job control was negatively related to spinal shrinkage. In a consecutive 2-week ambulatory field study, including 39 office employees and 512 days of observation, spinal shrinkage was measured by a stadiometer, and calculated as body height in the morning minus body height in the evening. Physical activity was monitored throughout the 14 days by accelerometry. Daily work stressors, daily job control, biomechanical workload, and recreational activities after work were measured with daily surveys. Multilevel regression analyses showed that spinal disks shrank more during workdays than during nonworkdays. After adjustment for sex, age, body weight, smoking status, biomechanical work strain, and time spent on physical and low-effort activities during the day, lower levels of daily job control significantly predicted increased spinal shrinkage. Findings add to knowledge on how work redesign that increases job control may possibly contribute to preserving intervertebral disk function and preventing occupational back pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24099165

Igic, Ivana; Ryser, Samuel; Elfering, Achim

2013-10-01

268

Physical spaces, virtual places and social worlds: a study of work in the virtual  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through a case study of a group of systems administra- tors, we explore the nature of collaborative work when that work is carried out in virtual workspaces. This study shows the many ways that work in the virtual is different to work in the physical domain. Through it, we suggest a new interpretation of spatial metaphors for the design and

Geraldine Fitzpatrick; Simon M. Kaplan; Tim Mansfield

1996-01-01

269

78 FR 14776 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EDUCATION Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational...for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental...Falls Church, VA 22042- 4548. 3. The Work Colleges Program Report of The Work...

2013-03-07

270

77 FR 4547 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EDUCATION Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational...for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental...Falls Church, VA 22042-4548. 3. The Work Colleges Program Report of The Work...

2012-01-30

271

Connecting Work and School: A Statewide Study of Employer Participation in Florida School-to-Work Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study assessed the characteristics and practices of employers participating in Florida school-to-work (STW) initiatives, the factors influencing their participation, and the quality and value of their partnerships with schools. Data were gathered through a statewide mail survey of a random sample of employers drawn from more than 15,000 Florida…

Haley, Mary

272

Connecting Work and School: A Statewide Study of Employer Participation in Florida School-to-Work Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed the characteristics and practices of employers participating in Florida school-to-work (STW) initiatives, the factors influencing their participation, and the quality and value of their partnerships with schools. Data were gathered through a statewide mail survey of a random sample of employers drawn from more than 15,000 Florida…

Haley, Mary

273

An Information Foraging Analysis of Note Taking and Note Sharing While Browsing Campaign Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an experimental study of political information foraging in the context of e-voting. Participants were observed while searching and browsing the internet for campaign information in a mock-voting situation in three online note-taking conditions: No Notes, Private Notes, and Shared Notes. Interaction analysis of the study data consisted of applying Information Foraging Theory to understand participants'

Ravi K. Vatrapu; Scott P. Robertson

2010-01-01

274

Lesson Study: Still a Work in Progress in America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the years since the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) focused on the success of Japanese students, much has been written about Japanese lesson study and its possible benefits for mathematics classrooms in America. Lesson study is a professional development process used in Japanese schools that brings teachers (and other…

Tolle, Penelope P.

2010-01-01

275

Comparative study of working fluids for OTEC power plants  

SciTech Connect

The effect of three different working fluids (ammonia, propane, and freon-114) on the size of OTEC heat exchangers is analyzed. Seven different combinations of shell-and-tube heat exchangers are considered. For each combination, a simple computer model of the OTEC power system is used to compare the three fluids. The comparison is made on the basis of A/W/sub net/, where A is the total heat transfer area (evaporator plus condenser) and W/sub net/ is the net power output of the plant. Overall, ammonia is shown to be the best fluid (i.e., it yields the lowest value of A/W/sub net/), although in some cases only by a small margin. The thermophysical property that gives ammonia its general superiority is its relatively high thermal conductivity. The report also discusses heat exchanger design problems associated with liquid entrainment and boiling liquid superheat.

Ganic, E N; Wu, J

1979-01-01

276

Case study - fast work in Chesapeake on a wastewood boiler  

SciTech Connect

The project began in April 1980 and was on an extremely tight ''fast-track'' schedule to take advantage of available funding and energy tax credits. It was completed in December 1981, 19 months after the boiler was purchased. In spite of the congested location and the need to maintain normal mill operations, the work was completed on schedule. The project included a 190,000-kg/hour (420,000-lb/hour) waste-fuel-fired boiler, auxiliaries, and a new woodyard complete with flume, slasher, barking drum, chipper, screens, and materials-handling system. The boiler is designed to burn bark, oil as an auxiliary fuel, wastewater sludge, and strong waste gases.

Hammond, S.L.; Habeishi, F.G.

1983-08-01

277

Note Taking and Note Sharing While Browsing Campaign Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants were observed while searching and browsing the internet for campaign information in a mock-voting situation in three online note-taking conditions: No Notes, Private Notes, and Shared Notes. Note taking significantly influenced the manner in which participants browsed for information about candidates. Note taking competed for time and cognitive resources and resulted in less thorough browsing. Effects were strongest when

Scott P. Robertson; Ravi K. Vatrapu; George Abraham

2009-01-01

278

Student perception about working in rural Nepal after graduation: a study among first- and second-year medical students  

PubMed Central

Background The Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is a developing country in South Asia with a population of 29.8 million. In September 2011, there were 18 medical schools with 14 being in the private sector. KIST Medical College is a private school in Lalitpur district. The present study was conducted to obtain information on student perceptions about working in rural Nepal after graduation. Methods The study was conducted among first- and second-year undergraduate medical students using a semi-structured questionnaire developed by the authors using inputs from the literature and their experiences of teaching medical students. Year of study, gender, method of financing of medical education, place of family residence and occupation of parents were noted. Participant responses were analysed, grouped together and the number of respondents stating a particular response was noted. Results Of the 200 students, 185 (92.5%) participated with 95 being from the first year and 90 from the second. Most students were self-financing and from urban areas. Regarding the question of working in rural Nepal after graduation, 134 (72.4%) said they will work after their undergraduate course. Students preferred to work in the government or nongovernmental sector. Student felt doctors are reluctant to serve in rural Nepal due to inadequate facilities, low salary, less security, problems with their professional development, less equipment in health centres, decreased contact with family and difficulties in communicating with an illiterate, rural population. About 43% of respondents felt medical education does not adequately prepare them for rural service. Repeated rural exposure, postings in rural hospitals and health centres, and training students to diagnose and treat illness with less technology were suggested. The median monthly salary expected was 60 000 Nepalese rupees (US$ 820) and was significantly higher among first-year students. Conclusions The majority of respondents were in favour of working in rural Nepal after graduation. They wanted facilities in rural areas and health centres to be improved. Changes in the education system were suggested. Providing relatively better facilities for rural doctors compared with urban doctors and reorienting medical education for producing doctors for rural Nepal can be considered. Further studies are required in other private medical schools.

2012-01-01

279

Solutions to Faculty Work Overload: A Study of Job Sharing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated the opinions of a national sample of counselor education chairs and college of education deans regarding the advantages and disadvantages of faculty job sharing. Results showed favorable responses toward faculty job sharing from approximately half the sample, despite limited experience with job sharing. The study found few…

Freeman, Brenda J.; Coll, Kenneth M.

2009-01-01

280

Ecology and Human Values: A Course of Study. (Working Draft).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This interdisciplinary course is designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is made of the case study

Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

281

Longitudinal Study of Mobile Technology Adoption: Evolution at Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplaces are changing as new technologies are introduced in an effort to improve efficiency and increase business turnover. Although there has been an explosion of mobile technologies and devices in recent time, very few in situ studies of the adoption of these technologies have been undertaken. This paper reports on the results of a longitudinal case study of a business

Elaine Lawrence; Er Michael

2007-01-01

282

Work-Study Abroad Courses in International Development Studies: Some Ethical and Pedagogical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A strong presumption in many international development studies programs appears to be that field or work placements are intrinsically effective and good. But what does it really mean to put relatively affluent, mostly white undergraduates in a “real world” situation abroad for a short stint of time? What are the specific risks in terms of development ethics and educational goals?

Marc Epprecht

2004-01-01

283

Institute for the Study of Human Development. Study Report: Youth and the Meaning of Work.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study has sought to provide data that will contribute to an understanding of how a select group of American youth (graduating college seniors) perceive and feel about work. The sample was composed of 1,860 male and female members of the class of 1972 ...

D. Gottlieb V. H. Sibbison A. L. Heinsohn M. Ford

1973-01-01

284

Recent Stirrings: A Note on the Seminar on Latin American Studies, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, Summer 1963  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mr. Heussler, a staff member of the International Training and Research Program of the Ford Foundation, reports on an interdisciplinary seminar which investigated the work accomplished in Latin American Studies, possibilities for future research, and questions of method and methodology of social research in the Latin American context.

Robert Heussler

1964-01-01

285

Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility test (MAC-1). Analysis of the outgassing signature of removable epoxy foam (REF) revealed unusually high levels of volatile organic compounds in the material. REF was replaced

C Alviso; C Harvey; A Vance

2005-01-01

286

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...If there are more candidates for a work-study allowance than there are work-study positions available in the area in which the services...of this section either have been given work-study contracts or have withdrawn their...

2009-07-01

287

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...If there are more candidates for a work-study allowance than there are work-study positions available in the area in which the services...of this section either have been given work-study contracts or have withdrawn their...

2010-07-01

288

78 FR 18629 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations...collection request (ICR) titled, ``Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations...school-supervised and school-administered Work-Study Program (WSP) of the Child...

2013-03-27

289

An Examination of the Federal College Work-Study Program at Monterey Peninsula College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work-study program at Monterey Peninsula College was evaluated through questionnaires distributed to students in the program and to their supervisors. In particular, the issues involved in work-study education as related to disadvantaged students were examined. Analysis of the questionnaire data revealed that the work-study students felt that…

Bobrow, William

290

38 CFR 1.929 - Reduction of debt through performance of work-study services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...shall not apply in any case in which the individual...candidates for a work-study allowance than there are...performance of work-study services after the completion...of services (or in the case of any remaining hours...covered by the work-study debt-liquidation...

2013-07-01

291

A Shifting Paradigm of Work-Life Balance in Service Context-An Empirical Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The study examined the effect of various ‘work-life balance’ determinants such as employee benefits, work environment, workload, flextime and discrimination on work culture and job satisfaction. Introduction: In the second half of the last century, tremendous environmental, economic, political, and socio cultural changes contributed to the restructuring of couples in their relation to work. Literature review: Several fundamental changes

A. K. M. Mominul Haque Talukder

2011-01-01

292

The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

2012-01-01

293

Student to Practitioner: A Study of Preparedness for Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Australian social work graduates face an increasingly complex work environment where the role of the social worker is often overlooked or misunderstood. In order to examine the anticipated and concrete practice reality for social workers, this qualitative study examined the expectations of social work students preparing to enter the workforce (n=29) and the experiences of new social work graduates in

Kylie Agllias

2010-01-01

294

The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

2012-01-01

295

Job strain and rumination about work issues during leisure time: A diary study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has suggested that high job strain (high demand, low control at work) is associated with an inability to “unwind” physiologically after work. It was speculated that one mechanism related to the “unwinding process” is an individual's ability to “cognitively switch-off” about work related issues after work. This hypothesis was tested in a diary study of primary and secondary

Mark Cropley; Lynne Millward Purvis

2003-01-01

296

Sticky-Note Murals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

Sands, Ian

2011-01-01

297

Name Those Notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The names of the notes on the treble clef staff are not currently taught in the Indiana State Music Curriculum. This concept is essential to the understanding, reading, and writing of music. Therefore, it is important that research based curriculum is developed for this topic. Fourth grade students will complete a pre-test and series of lessons about learning the note

Emily Prough

2012-01-01

298

Note On Islam  

Microsoft Academic Search

This note provides a brief overview of Islam, including the geographical representation of its believers, a description of its basic tenets, and a sketch of its historical development. Also provided are a synopsis of the life of the Prophet Muhammad and a discussion of the Sh'ia and the Sunni faiths. The note is intended to complement the teaching of any

R. Freeman; Rosalyn Berne; Patricia Werhane; Jenny Mead

299

Functional MRI studies of spatial and nonspatial working memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-unit recordings in monkeys have revealed neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex that increase their firing during a delay between the presentation of information and its later use in behavior. Based on monkey lesion and neurophysiology studies, it has been proposed that a dorsal region of lateral prefrontal cortex is necessary for temporary storage of spatial information whereas a more

M D'Esposito; G. K Aguirre; E. Zarahn; D. Ballard; R. K. Shin; J. Lease

1998-01-01

300

A diary study of information capture in working life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the increasing number of new devices entering the market allowing the capture or recording of information (whether it be marks on paper, scene, sound or moving images), there has been little study of when and why people want to do these kinds of activities. In an effort to systematically explore design requirements for new kinds of information capture devices,

Barry A. T. Brown; Abigail J. Sellen; Kenton P. O'Hara

2000-01-01

301

A Qualitative Study of a Nutrition Working Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Behavioral Change Consortium (BCC) Nutrition Workgroup (NWG) is a multidisciplinary collaboration of representatives from BCC sites and federal agencies. Its mission is to improve measurement of dietary variables. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of perceived effectiveness of the workgroup collaboration. Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted and examined for common themes using the constant comparison method. Themes

Geoffrey W. Greene; Linda C. Nebeling; Mary L. Greaney; Ana C. Lindsay; Cary K. Hardwick; Deborah J. Toobert; Ken Resnicow; Geoffrey C. Williams; Diane L. Elliot; Tamara Goldman Sher; Holly A. McGregor; Andrea Domas; Carol A. DeFrancesco; Karen E. Peterson

2007-01-01

302

How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Detailing the false starts, uncertainty, and internal questioning that occur as companies organize and manage language simplification projects, the 12 case studies contained in the two sections of this book reveal how some business organizations have benefited by simplifying consumer documents. Descriptions of each case contain information on the…

Office of Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

303

Experimental Studies of Plows with Active Working Tools.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experimental studies of an RP-200 rotary plow and a POD-5-35 moldboard plow with a rotor showed a greater degree of soil breakup can be secured with active tillage tools. The POD-5-35 plow provided a soild condition adequate for seeding but the soil break...

V. V. Melikhov I. M. Panov V. A. Shmonin

1970-01-01

304

Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology…

Pollitt, David. Ed.

2000-01-01

305

What Really Works? An Exploratory Study of Condom Negotiation Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Verbal-direct strategies are assumed to be the most effective strategies in negoti- ating condom use. Both cultural and gender differences in communication styles suggest that individuals may negotiate condoms in ways that are not exclusively verbal and direct. This study examined the use of other forms of condom negoti- ations by developing an exploratory scale that distinguished strategies on how

Amy G. Lam; Amy Mak; Patricia D. Lindsay; Stephen T. Russell

2004-01-01

306

'Work systems, Quality of Working Life and Attitudes of Workers. An Empirical Study towards the effects of Team and non-Teamwork'  

Microsoft Academic Search

Steijn, B. (2001), 'Work systems, Quality of Working Life and Attitudes of Workers. An Empirical Study towards the effects of Team and non-Teamwork', New Technology, Work, and Employment, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 191-203. summary In this article four different work systems are distinguished: the traditional Tayloristic system, 'lean' teamwork, 'sociotechnical' teamwork, and the professional work system. Using a survey

Bram Steijn

2001-01-01

307

Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05)  

SciTech Connect

Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility test (MAC-1). Analysis of the outgassing signature of removable epoxy foam (REF) revealed unusually high levels of volatile organic compounds in the material. REF was replaced with the polyurethane PMDI. Laboratory compatibility tests of high priority materials were performed and revealed incompatibilities between Viton A (LX-07 binder) and syntactic polysulfide as well as Viton A and REF. With the removal of REF from the system, the incompatibility with Viton A is not an issue. In the case of the viton/polysulfide, both of these materials have a history of reliability in the stockpile, and the observed results, while scientifically interesting, appear to be a laboratory anomaly. Participation in the MAC-1 test led to a detailed study of Viton A degradation. At elevated temperatures up to 70 C, the Viton A samples darkened and exhibited increased crosslinking. Laboratory experiments were pursued to correlate the observed changes to exposure to specific compounds that were present in the MAC-1 canister atmospheres. Exposure to siloxanes resulted in changes similar to those seen in the MAC-1 samples. Knowledge gained from the MAC-1 test will be applied to the upcoming MAC-2 test planned for FY06. Finally, the suitability of isotopically labeled nitrogen fill gas ({sup 15}N{sub 2}) was addressed. This gas will behave as standard nitrogen with no compatibility concerns expected.

Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Vance, A

2005-11-23

308

Working conditions and weight gain: a 28-year follow-up study of industrial employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Longitudinal studies observing working conditions and weight gain are rare. We aimed to study whether weight gain can be predicted\\u000a by working conditions or changes in them in a 28-year follow-up. The study population consisted of working-aged industrial\\u000a employees (n = 449). Data on height and weight were collected in clinical examinations in 1973, 1983 and 2001, and information on working\\u000a conditions

Tea Lallukka; Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva; Leena Kaila-Kangas; Janne Pitkäniemi; Ritva Luukkonen; Päivi Leino-Arjas

2008-01-01

309

A longitudinal study of work-based, adult–youth mentoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a longitudinal design, this study explored the relation of urban high school student attitudes toward school, work, and self-esteem beliefs to work-based mentoring, mentor satisfaction, and employment status. Participants included high school students taking part in a formal work-based mentoring program, students who established informal mentoring relationships at work, students who worked without a mentor, and students who were

Frank Linnehan

2003-01-01

310

Job Characteristics, Alienation, and Work-Related Behavior: A Study of Professional Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines relationships between job characteristics, alienation from work, and work-related behavior for a group of professional-level technical and managerial employees of a large manufacturing firm. Results indicate a lack of significant relationships between the nature of jobs and experienced work alienation. However, a broad pattern of relationships exists between alienation from work and measures of work-related behavior. Overall,

Rupert F. Chisholm; Thomas G. Cummings

1979-01-01

311

Note-taking review - Practical value for learners  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review article aims (1) to determine what kind of spontaneously taken notes are effective in text comprehension, (2) to review the research findings about various conditions under which notes are taken and used, and (3) to suggest guidelines for learners and teachers for more effective note-taking. During our research project we have studied the notes of more than 1200

Virpi Slotte; Kriti Lonka

2003-01-01

312

Notes in Spanish  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Notes in Spanish has been described as the best free Spanish language learning podcast/blog on the Internet. Notes in Spanish publishes two podcasts: an intermediate and an advanced podcast. Each podcast is accompanied by a worksheet (available for an additional small fee), which includes a full transcript of the podcast and a list of relevant vocabulary terms and phrases, along with useful exercises. Apart from the podcasts, the Notes in Spanish blog contains regular updates of useful tips and resources for learning Spanish.

Curtis, Benjamin; Diez, Marina

2007-01-31

313

Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega Studies: A Case Study at Argonne National Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Between 1952 and 1992 more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the life span and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology mega studies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals, and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

2013-01-01

314

Working Unusual Hours and Its Relationship to Job Satisfaction: A Study of European Maritime Pilots  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our study focuses on maritime pilotage in seven European countries and analyzes the level of job satisfaction and its predictors.\\u000a Like most existing studies in the field of job satisfaction, we show that job satisfaction is an outcome of the work of maritime\\u000a pilots. Stressful working conditions, such as working unsocial hours and irregular working patterns, create strains that together

Maike Andresen; Michel E. Domsch; Annett H. Cascorbi

2007-01-01

315

Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of…

Wong, Paul W. C.; Yeung, April W. M.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Yip, Paul S. F.; Tang, Arthur K. H.

2009-01-01

316

Past and future work on radiobiology mega-studies: a case study at Argonne National Laboratory.  

PubMed

Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research. PMID:22004930

Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

2011-06-01

317

Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

2011-09-06

318

Note Regarding Covert Channels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This note presents an overview of some abstract concepts regarding covert channels. It discusses primary means of synchronization and illicit interference between subjects in a multilevel computing environment, and it describes a detailed laboratory exerc...

T. E. Levin P. C. Clark

2004-01-01

319

Editor's Note (January 2006)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section provides notes from the field editor regarding several articles in the journal and offers anecdotes for making science available to all students, regardless of language, ability, and interest.

Ohana, Chris

2006-01-01

320

Influence of gender on IT professional work identity: outcomes from a PLS study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the impact of gender on the work identity for IT professionals. Work identity directly and indirectly affects job satisfaction and intent to leave the organization. The model is empirically evaluated using the partial least squares technique. Survey data was collected from 240 IT professionals using on-line distribution. The results demonstrate that the work identity of female IT

Mari W. Buche

2008-01-01

321

Learning through Working: A Case Study of Chinese College Students in South Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study was designed to provide an understanding of the work experience of Chinese college students in South Korea. A growing number of Chinese students are coming to South Korea for college education, and their aspirations for better work materialize into work experiences in South Korean businesses. In-depth interviews were…

Cha, Minyoung; Chang, Wonsup

2009-01-01

322

Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

2010-01-01

323

Assessing Social Work's Contribution to Controlled Outcome Studies in the Alcohol Dependence Treatment Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcohol use disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling conditions encountered by social work practitioners. Although a substantial body of research findings has accrued evaluating the effectiveness of available alcohol dependence treatments, few efforts have been made to assess the contribution that social work has made to this database. Thus, this study examined the contribution of social work to

Michael G. Vaughn; Matthew O. Howard; Jeffrey M. Jenson

2004-01-01

324

Work Redesign and the Job Characteristics Model: A Longitudinal Field Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Jobs that are dull, repetitive, and seemingly meaningless cause personal and work problems, and many organizations are turning to work redesign to solve these problems. The purpose of this study was to perform a work redesign project in a military organiz...

D. H. Wilson

1982-01-01

325

Employer Attitudes, Training, and Return-to-Work Outcomes: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work was concerned with investigating and changing employer attitudes and practices that impede return to work and rehabilitation for injured workers. Prior studies have shown that employer responses to workers reporting work-related musculoskeletal discomfort have significant and independent effects on disability outcomes. Based on these findings, a pilot training program was developed by occupational rehabilitation specialists to improve the

Glenn Pransky; William Shaw; Robert McLellan

2001-01-01

326

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work

Willy Eriksen; Kristian Tambs; Stein Knardahl

2006-01-01

327

Challenging Racial Silences in Studies of Emotion Work: Contributions from Anti-Racist Feminist Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little or no attention has been paid to the racialized dimensions of the emotion work done by individuals as part of their paid jobs. I argue that this exclusion of racial analyses is symptomatic of a static conceptualization of the subject underlying many studies of emotion work. While theorists illuminate the different forms of emotion work required by women and

Kiran Mirchandani

2003-01-01

328

Factors predicting work status 3 months after injury: results from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Few studies examine predictors of work status following injury beyond injuries presenting to a hospital or emergency department. This paper examines the combined influences of socio-demographic, occupational, injury and pre-existing health and lifestyle factors as predictors of work status 3?months after hospitalised and non-hospitalised injury in a cohort of injured New Zealand workers. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study, New Zealand. Participants 2626 workforce active participants were identified from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study; 11 participants with missing outcome responses were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome of interest was ‘not working’ at the time of interview. Results 720 (27%) reported ‘not working’ 3?months after injury. The most important pre-injury predictors of not working following injury found by multidimensional modelling were as follows: low or unknown income, financial insecurity, physical work tasks, temporary employment, long week schedules, obesity, perceived threat to life and hospital admission. Contrary to expectations, workers reporting less frequent exercise pre-injury had lower odds of work absence. Pre-injury psychosocial and health factors were not associated with not working. Conclusion Certain pre-injury socio-demographic, physical work, work organisation, lifestyle and injury-related factors were associated with not working 3?months after injury. If these findings are confirmed, intervention strategies aimed at improving return to work should address multiple dimensions of both the worker and the workplace.

Davie, Gabrielle; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Derrett, Sarah

2012-01-01

329

Antecedents and consequences of work-family conflict: a prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

This study examined both risk factors for the onset of work-family conflict and consequences in terms of need for recovery and prolonged fatigue for men and women separately. Two-year follow-up data from the Maastricht Cohort Study on "Fatigue at Work" (n = 12,095) were used. At baseline, the prevalence of work-family conflict was 10.8% (9.0% in women; 11.1% in men), the cumulative incidence at 1 year follow-up was 5.1%. For men, several work-related demands, shift work, job insecurity, conflicts with coworkers or supervisor, having full responsibility for housekeeping, and having to care for a chronically ill child or other family member at home were risk factors for the onset of work-family conflict, whereas decision latitude and coworker and supervisor social support protected against work-family conflict. In women, physical demands, overtime work, commuting time to work, and having dependent children were risk factors for work-family conflict, whereas domestic help protected against work-family conflict at 1 year follow-up. Work-family conflict was further shown to be a strong risk factor for the onset of elevated need for recovery from work and fatigue. PMID:12769054

Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, Ijmert; Kristensen, Tage S; Nijhuis, Frans J N

2003-05-01

330

Patterns of working and living conditions: A holistic, multivariate approach to occupational health studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to develop a multivariate approach to occupational health studies that is: capable of identifying groups with similar working conditions; relevant for studies of associations between working and living conditions and health; and an appropriate basis for preventive actions. Data at the individual level were obtained through measurements, observations, interviews and questionnaires, and at the

Annika Härenstam; Lena Karlqvist; Lennart Bodin; Gun Nise; Patrik Schéele

2003-01-01

331

Laboratory work with automatic pipettes: a study on how pipetting affects the thumb  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to assess the strain that is exerted on the thumb when working with automatic pipettes. The study consisted of three parts: a survey concerning stress-related symptoms in general and in the thumb in particlar, a study of the working conditions in the laboratory with the help of a video-film, and a power test. In

Kerstin Fredriksson

1995-01-01

332

The Region of the Study [and] Outline Methodology of the Study. Patterns of Participation in Adult Education and Training. Working Paper 1 [and] Working Paper 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These two working papers are products of a regional study in industrial South Wales of the determinants of participation and non-participation in post-compulsory education and training, with special reference to processes of change in the patterns of these determinants over time and to variations between geographical areas. The study combines…

Gorard, Stephen; Rees, Gareth; Furlong, John; Fevre, Ralph

333

Improving return-to-work after childbirth: design of the Mom@Work study, a randomised controlled trial and cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Many women suffer from health problems after giving birth, which can lead to sick leave. About 30% of Dutch workers are on sick leave after maternity leave. Structural contact of supervisors with employees on maternity leave, supported by early medical advice of occupational physicians, may increase the chances of return-to-work after maternity leave. In addition, to understand the process of sick leave and return-to-work after childbirth it is important to gain insight into which factors hinder return-to-work after childbirth, as well, as which prognostic factors lead to the development of postpartum health complaints. In this paper, the design of the Mom@Work study is described. Methods The Mom@Work study is simultaneously a randomised controlled trial and a cohort study. Pregnant women working for at least 12 hours a week at one of the 15 participating companies are eligible to participate. The supervisors of these pregnant employees are randomised at 35 weeks pregnancy into the intervention group or control group. During maternity leave, supervisors in the intervention group contact their employee six weeks after delivery using a structured interview. When employees do not expect to return to their jobs at the end of their scheduled maternity leave due to health problems, the supervisor offers early support of the occupational physician. Supervisors in the control group have no structural contact with their employees during maternity leave. Measurements take place at 30 weeks pregnancy and at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks postpartum. In addition, cost data are collected. For the RCT, primary outcome measures are sick leave and return-to-work, and secondary outcome measures are costs, health, satisfaction with intervention and global feelings of recovery. Outcome measures for the cohort are pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain, fatigue and depression. Finally, a number of prognostic factors for return-to-work and for the development of complaints will be measured. Discussion The Mom@Work study will provide important information about return-to-work of employees after giving birth. Results will give insight in prognosis of postpartum sick leave and complaints. Also, the role of supervisors and occupational physicians in successful return-to-work after childbirth will be clarified.

Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne GM; van Poppel, Mireille NM; Hendriksen, Ingrid JM; Bruinvels, David J; Uegaki, Kimi; de Bruijne, Martine C; van Mechelen, Willem

2007-01-01

334

How to do a grounded theory study: a worked example of a study of dental practices  

PubMed Central

Background Qualitative methodologies are increasingly popular in medical research. Grounded theory is the methodology most-often cited by authors of qualitative studies in medicine, but it has been suggested that many 'grounded theory' studies are not concordant with the methodology. In this paper we provide a worked example of a grounded theory project. Our aim is to provide a model for practice, to connect medical researchers with a useful methodology, and to increase the quality of 'grounded theory' research published in the medical literature. Methods We documented a worked example of using grounded theory methodology in practice. Results We describe our sampling, data collection, data analysis and interpretation. We explain how these steps were consistent with grounded theory methodology, and show how they related to one another. Grounded theory methodology assisted us to develop a detailed model of the process of adapting preventive protocols into dental practice, and to analyse variation in this process in different dental practices. Conclusions By employing grounded theory methodology rigorously, medical researchers can better design and justify their methods, and produce high-quality findings that will be more useful to patients, professionals and the research community.

2011-01-01

335

Night work and mortality: prospective study among Finnish employees over the time span 1984 to 2008.  

PubMed

There is considerable evidence showing that night work is associated with increased morbidity, but only a few studies have focused on its relation to mortality. This study investigates the relationship between the type of working-time arrangement (weekly night work/daytime work) and total and cause-specific mortality among men and women. The data consist of a representative working conditions survey of Finnish employees conducted in 1984 (2286 men/2216 women), which has been combined with register-based follow-up data from Statistics Finland covering the years 1985-2008. In the 1984 survey, the employees were asked if they worked during the night (23:00-06:00 h) and if so, how often. In this study, the authors compare employees who worked at night (121 men/89 women) to daytime employees who did not do night work (1325 men/1560 women). The relative risk of death was examined by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for background (age, level of education, family situation, and county), health (longstanding illness, pain symptoms, smoking status, and psychological symptoms), and work-related factors (weekly working hours, physical and psychological demands, demands of learning at work, and perceived job insecurity). Female employees working at night had a 2.25-fold higher risk of mortality than female dayworkers (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-4.20) after adjustment for background and health- and work-related factors. In addition to total mortality, night work was also associated with tumor mortality. Female night workers had a 2.82-fold higher risk of tumor mortality than female dayworkers (95% CI 1.20-6.65) in the adjusted model. Among men, no such significant association was observed. The present study indicated that female night workers had a higher risk of both total and tumor mortality compared to female daytime employees. Additional research on the potential factors and mechanisms behind the association between night work and mortality is required. PMID:22621357

Nätti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Oinas, Tomi; Mustosmäki, Armi

2012-06-01

336

Michigan Emergency Response Study: Phase III : Implications of the failure to report pursuits and inaccurate accident reporting - a research note  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis is the result of Phase III of the Michigan Emergency Response Study. A check of traffic tickets issued by the State Police officers during Phase II MERS revealed that officers issued twice the the number of tickets for fleeing and eluding than the number of pursuits reported. This study was conducted to determine the number of unreported pursuits

Dennis M. Payne

1997-01-01

337

Work and Energy Problem: Calculating Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A 12-kg box slides down a 30 degree frictionless ramp at constant speed as shown in the animation (position is in meters and time is in seconds). Note that both gravity and the hand do work on the box.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-21

338

Orienting the Work-Based Curriculum Towards Work Process Knowledge: A Rationale and a German Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term 'work process knowledge' refers to the knowledge needed for working in flexible and innovative business environments, including those in which information and communication technologies have been introduced to integrate previously separated production functions. It involves a systems-level understanding of the work process in the…

Boreham, Nick

2004-01-01

339

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

340

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

341

Effect of skill level on recall of visually presented patterns of musical notes.  

PubMed

Expertise effects in music were studied in a new task: the construction of mental representations from separate fragments. Groups of expert musicians and non-musicians were asked to recall note patterns presented visually note by note. Skill-level, musical well-formedness of the note patterns and presentation mode were varied. The musicians recalled note patterns better than the non-musicians, even though the presentation was visual and successive. Furthermore, only musicians' performance was affected by musical well-formedness of the note patterns when visual gestalt properties, verbal rehearsability, and familiarity of the stimuli were controlled. Musicians were also able to use letter names referring to notes as efficiently as visual notes, which indicates that the better recall of musicians cannot be explained by perceptual visual chunking. These results and the effect of skill level on the distribution of recall errors indicate that the ability to chunk incoming information into meaningful units does not require that complete familiar patterns are accessible to encoding processes, yet previous knowledge stored in long-term memory affects representation construction in working memory. The present method offers a new reliable tool, and its implications to the research on construction of representations and musical imagery are discussed. PMID:17430362

Kalakoski, Virpi

2007-04-01

342

Factors associated with hospital staff nurses working on-call hours: a pilot study.  

PubMed

When nurses work on-call hours, they have limited ability to control the hours they work. Nurses may be required to work extra hours and, if they are unable to detach from work during break time, can experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Previous studies have not examined factors associated with on-call work. In this pilot study, the authors examined state regulatory, organizational, and personal factors related to nurse on-call hours. Data were collected from registered nurses working in hospitals in two states; the final analytic sample consisted of 219 nurses. The authors found that four variables (teaching hospital employment, patient-to-nurse ratio, race/ethnicity of the nurse, and living with children) were significantly related to working on-call hours. Additional research is needed to understand nurse on-call hours and develop agency policies to promote nurses' health and well-being. PMID:23650895

Bae, Sung-Heui; Trinkoff, Alison; Jing, Hongjuan; Brewer, Carol

2013-04-25

343

The impact of a social work study abroad program in Australia on multicultural learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internationalizing the US social work curriculum with programs of study abroad is an effective method to develop students’ awareness of the importance of global interdependence and increase multicultural knowledge. Results from the Multicultural Awareness\\/Knowledge\\/Skill Survey and pre-post focus groups indicate the merits of a US-Australian social work program of study abroad for master’s-level social work students.

Sherry R. Fairchild; Vijayan K. Pillai; Carolyn Noble

2006-01-01

344

Working conditions and health behaviours among employed women and men: the Helsinki Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Working conditions influence health, but previous studies on the associations between work-related factors and health behaviours are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyse whether unfavourable working conditions are associated with diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking.Methods. The data derive from postal questionnaires collected in 2000–2001 from 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki

Tea Lallukka; Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva; Eva Roos; Mikko Laaksonen; Ossi Rahkonen; Eero Lahelma

2004-01-01

345

Chewing gum, occupational stress, work performance and wellbeing. An intervention study.  

PubMed

An intervention study was carried out to examine the effects of chewing gum on occupational stress and related outcomes. 101 volunteers from Cardiff University completed the study. The results showed that chewing gum reduced stress (both at work and outside work), reduced fatigue, reduced anxiety and depression and led to a more positive mood. Chewing gum was also associated with perceptions of better performance (both at work and outside). PMID:22390954

Smith, Andrew P; Chaplin, Katherine; Wadsworth, Emma

2012-03-03

346

NOTE: Simulation study of spatial resolution and sensitivity for the tapered depth of interaction PET detectors for small animal imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improvements to current small animal PET scanners can be made by improving the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of the scanner. In the past, efforts have been made to minimize the crystal dimensions in the axial and transaxial directions to improve the spatial resolution and to increase the crystal length to improve the sensitivity of the scanner. We have designed tapered PET detectors with the purpose of reducing the gaps between detector modules and optimizing the sensitivity of a future-generation small animal PET scanner. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution and sensitivity of a scanner based on tapered detector elements using Monte Carlo simulations. For tapered detector elements more scintillation material is used per detector resulting in a higher sensitivity of the scanner. However, since the detector elements are not uniform in size, degradation in spatial resolution is also expected. To investigate characteristics of tapered PET detectors, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of a one-ring scanner were simulated for a system based on traditional cuboid detectors and a scanner based on tapered detectors. Additionally, the effect of depth of interaction (DOI) resolution on the spatial resolution for the traditional and tapered detectors was evaluated. All simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo simulation package GATE. Using the tapered arrays, a 64% improvement in the sensitivity across the field of view was found compared with traditional detectors for the same ring diameter. The level of DOI encoding was found to be the dominating factor in determining the radial spatial resolution and not the detector shape. For all levels of DOI encoding, no significant difference was found for the spatial resolution when comparing the tapered and the cuboid detectors. Detectors employing the tapered crystal design along with excellent DOI resolution will lead to PET scanners with higher sensitivity and uniform spatial resolution across the field of view.

St. James, Sara; Yang, Yongfeng; Bowen, Spencer L.; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R.

2010-01-01

347

UC Berkeley Lab Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of California at Berkeley College of Engineering publishes Lab Notes, a newsletter from the Public Affairs Office. The mission is "to illuminate groundbreaking research underway today at the College of Engineering that will dramatically change our lives tomorrow." Lab Notes is available online free of charge. Articles in the November 2004 issue highlight robot technology, satellite communications, and a radio observatory project. Each short article includes images or videos and links to related articles and researchers' websites. Previous issues are saved in an online archive.

348

NOTES: a gastroenterologist's perspective.  

PubMed

Once in a few decades in science or medicine, an idea emerges that is so powerful that it changes forever how we think about the field. Such is the case of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). NOTES has yet to prove its value in patients. However, having challenged one of the most fundamental and deeply entrenched dogmas in surgery and endoscopy, many of us feel that "we will never be the same again." In this article I will discuss the implications of this paradigm shift and suggest strategies for both gastroenterologists and surgeons that will allow us to test its full potential. PMID:17640587

Pasricha, Pankaj Jay

2007-07-01

349

STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom...

G. K. Johnson K. S. Ransom

2013-01-01

350

Lower Level Mediation Effect Analysis in Two-Level Studies: A Note on a Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents a didactic discussion of a multilevel covariance structure modeling approach to estimation of lowest level mediation effect indexes in two-level studies. The procedure is useful when addressing questions about relations among total and indirect effects between variables of interest while accounting for the hierarchical…

Raykov, Tenko; Mels, Gerhard

2007-01-01

351

Lower Level Mediation Effect Analysis in Two-Level Studies: A Note on a Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a didactic discussion of a multilevel covariance structure modeling approach to estimation of lowest level mediation effect indexes in two-level studies. The procedure is useful when addressing questions about relations among total and indirect effects between variables of interest while accounting for the hierarchical…

Raykov, Tenko; Mels, Gerhard

2007-01-01

352

Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software. Items covered this month include: (1) a recommendation that dam designers give more consideration to earthquake resistance, (2) the development of a new wave rotor design, (3) the development of a small hydro database in China, and (4) an ICOLD bulletin on the optimization of constuction costs.

NONE

1993-12-31

353

A Study inside the English Working-class Home Problems of Participant Observer Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper presents a study, currently in progress, concerned with changing aspects of Man-environment interaction inside the English work- ing class home. The paper concentrates upon the theoretical implications of taking a phenomenological stance in Man-environment studies, the methodology of participant observation, and the creation of original data about the inside of the English working class home. The paper

Robert MacDonald

354

Burnout among Turkish High School Teachers Working in Turkey and Abroad: A Comparative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine perceived levels of burnout among Turkish high school teachers working in Turkey and abroad. Method: A total of 255 Turkish teachers working at public schools in Germany (n=78), Cyprus (n=94) and Turkey (n=83) comprised our study group. In Germany and Cyprus, the participants were selected…

Aydogan, Ismail; Dogan, Ahmet Atilla; Bayram, Nuran

2009-01-01

355

The Effect of International Social Work Education: Study Abroad versus On-Campus Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite a growing emphasis on international offerings within social work education, researchers have conducted few outcomes studies regarding the implications of these courses for students' professional development. This study addressed this gap by analyzing data from a survey of 122 social work students at Rutgers, the State University of New…

Greenfield, Emily A.; Davis, Rebecca T.; Fedor, James P.

2012-01-01

356

Working to live : Why university students balance full-time study and employment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of this study is to investigate why students work during their degree programme, what influences their choice of employment and to examine students' perception of their ability to balance work and study. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A questionnaire was completed by 42 first- and second-year students from a single degree programme at the end of Semester 2. Findings

Valerie Holmes

2008-01-01

357

Working memory dysfunction in obsessive–compulsive disorder: A neuropsychological and functional MRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous neuropsychological studies indicate that OCD subtypes such as checking rituals might be associated with a working memory deficit. On the other hand, functional neuroimaging studies found functional abnormalities of the frontal cortex and subcortical structures in OCD. Combined with functional imaging method, we applied neuropsychological batteries to demonstrate a working memory deficit in OCD by comparison with normal controls.

Tomohiro Nakao; Akiko Nakagawa; Eriko Nakatani; Maiko Nabeyama; Hirokuni Sanematsu; Takashi Yoshiura; Osamu Togao; Mayumi Tomita; Yusuke Masuda; Kazuko Yoshioka; Toshihide Kuroki; Shigenobu Kanba

2009-01-01

358

Working to Live: Why University Students Balance Full-Time Study and Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate why students work during their degree programme, what influences their choice of employment and to examine students' perception of their ability to balance work and study. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire was completed by 42 first- and second-year students from a single degree programme…

Holmes, Valerie

2008-01-01

359

Treatment Fidelity in Social Work Intervention Research: A Review of Published Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study investigated treatment fidelity in social work research. Method: The authors systematically reviewed all articles published in five prominent social work journals over a 5- year period. Sixty-three outcome studies were identified and reviewed for how well treatment fidelity was monitored using eight review criteria. Results:…

Naleppa, Matthias J.; Cagle, John G.

2010-01-01

360

Linking Work Events, Affective States, and Attitudes: An Empirical Study of Managers' Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the paper is to contribute to knowledge on the causes and consequences of affective states at work by identifying several job-related events likely to produce affective states and then studying the impact of the latter on work attitudes. Affective Events Theory was the theoretical framework used for the study and two main hypotheses were stated: experiencing certain

Karim Mignonac; Olivier Herrbach

2004-01-01

361

Prevalence of widespread pain and associations with work status: a population study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This population study based on a representative sample from a Swedish county investigates the prevalence, duration, and determinants of widespread pain (WSP) in the population using two constructs and estimates how WSP affects work status. In addition, this study investigates the prevalence of widespread pain and its relationship to pain intensity, gender, age, income, work status, citizenship, civil status,

Björn Gerdle; Jonas Björk; Lars Cöster; KG Henriksson; Chris Henriksson; Ann Bengtsson

2008-01-01

362

Community Development Corporations and Reuse Operations: Four Case Studies of Working Relationships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to increase understanding of reuse and community development corporations (CDCs) by presenting four case studies of existing reuse operations and of the CDCs with which they work. Rehab Resource's work with five CDCs in Indian...

M. Lewis J. Vandall R. Clark N. Seldman

1996-01-01

363

Study of School-to-Work Reform Initiatives. [Volume I: Findings and Conclusions.] Studies of Education Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The United States is the only industrialized nation in the world that has no institutionalized school-to-work transition system for helping young people move from education to employment. The Academy for Educational Development's National Institute for Work and Learning (AED/NIWL) undertook a 4-year study of school-to-work transition education…

Charner, Ivan

364

Notes From the Field: Brokering Service Learning Between a Rural Community and Large Undergraduate Class: Insights From a Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a service-learning partnership between a first-year Environmental Studies\\/Science course at Trent University and the Haliburton–Muskoka Children's Water Festival, an event held in rural Ontario about 125 km from the university. The partnership was brokered by the U-Links Centre for Community-Based Research, an independent, Haliburton-based nonprofit. Key issues explored in the article include the challenges of rural service

Stephen D. Hill; Robert K. Loney; Heather Reid

2010-01-01

365

Respondent-Driven Sampling in a Study of Drug Users in New York City: Notes from the Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department\\u000a of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City\\u000a in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations,\\u000a police and community relations,

Courtney McKnight; Don Des Jarlais; Heidi Bramson; Lisa Tower; Abu S. Abdul-Quader; Chris Nemeth; Douglas Heckathorn

2006-01-01

366

Effect of excipients on dissolution enhancement of aceclofenac solid dispersions studied using response surface methodology: a technical note.  

PubMed

The aim of present study was to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug aceclofenac by solid dispersion technique using corn starch, dicalcium phosphate, lactose, and microcrystalline cellulose as carriers. Solid dispersions were prepared by solvent wetting method using 3(2) full factorial design for each of the carrier. The prepared solid dispersions were evaluated for differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and angle of repose. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) and 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2). The results of solid state characterization bring to view that in solid dispersions the crystalline drug gets converted to its amorphous form. FTIR study results indicated the absence of interaction between aceclofenac and carriers. For prepared solid dispersions, angle of repose was found to be in the range of 26.19° to 35.29°, which indicates good flowability. Enhanced drug dissolution was obtained with carrier in order lactose > corn starch > microcrystalline cellulose > dicalcium phosphate. Hence, these carriers could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug. PMID:23674128

Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish Kumar

2013-05-15

367

Effects of team work on the working conditions of short cycled track work: A case study from the European automobile industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most unfavourable conditions for the introduction of team work in the automotive industry is in most cases the pre-determination of technical equipment which will remain unchanged because of the investment costs of installations. Still assembly processes with short cycle times less than 90 s prevail. For this reason the work organization has to adapt to given limitations

Ekkehart Frieling; Michael Freiboth; Detlef Henniges; Carsten Saager

1997-01-01

368

The influence of psychosocial work characteristics on the need for recovery from work: a prospective study among computer workers.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of high job demands, low job control, and high social support on need for recovery (NFR) among computer workers. METHODS: Data was obtained from a longitudinal cohort study, including 5 consecutive measurements, with an in-between period of 6 months. General estimating equations analyses were performed to assess the risk for high NFR 6 months later. Odds ratios (ORs) for high NFR were calculated for high job demands, low job control and low social support, separately. Likewise, ORs were calculated for combinations of job demands and job control, as well as for combinations of job demands, job control and social support. RESULTS: High job demands resulted in an increased risk for high NFR 6 months later, particularly in older workers. Low social support showed also an increased risk for future high NFR, but this was not the case for low job control. Furthermore, a combination of high job demands and low job control, as well as a combination of high job demands, low job control and low social support demonstrated an increased risk for future high NFR where older workers showed higher risks. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that adverse psychosocial work characteristics predicted future NFR among computer workers. PMID:23443734

Kraaijeveld, Ruben A; Huysmans, Maaike A; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Van der Beek, Allard J; Speklé, Erwin M

2013-02-27

369

A Study of the Motivating and Dissatisfying Forces in an Isolated Work Situation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study presented in this dissertation investigated the factors which contribute to worker motivation and dissatisfaction in an isolated work situation. Specifically, the study focused on the maritime industry, with the objective of determining underlyi...

R. A. Ullrich

1968-01-01

370

Book reviews and notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

GENERAL. A MEDIEVAL MUSLIM SCHOLAR AT WORK:IBN TAWUS AND HIS LIBRARY. By Etan Kohlberg. Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science: Texts and Studies. Edited by H. Daiber and D. Pingree. Vol. XXII. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1992. 470pp. Hb. $120.00. ISBN 90-04-09549-7. AL-FARABI AND HIS SCHOOL. By Ian Richard Netton. London and New York: Routledge, 1992. 128pp. £10.99. Pb. ISBN 0-415-03595-3; Hb.

Christian W. Troll; J. S. Nielsen; Aliya Abdulaziz; David Marshall; S. v. Sicard; Edward R. Kajivora; Clinton Bennett; H. Vocking

1993-01-01

371

A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs British  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings – For both the Taiwanese and

Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao; Mao-Ting Huang

2006-01-01

372

Burnout, working conditions and gender - results from the northern Sweden MONICA Study  

PubMed Central

Background Sick-leave because of mental and behavioural disorders has increased considerably in Sweden since the late nineties, and especially in women. The aim of this study was to assess the level of burnout in the general working population in northern Sweden and analyse it's relation to working conditions and gender. Methods In this cross-sectional study the survey from the MONICA-study (Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) in northern Sweden 2004 was used. A burnout instrument, the Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), was incorporated in the original survey which was sent to a random sample of 2500 individuals with a response rate of 76%. After including only actively working people, aged 25-64 years, our study population consisted of 1000 participants (497 women and 503 men). ANOVA and multiple linear regression models were used. Results The prevalence of a high level of burnout (SMBQ >4.0) was 13%. Women had a higher level of burnout than men with the most pronounced difference in the age group 35-44 years. In both sexes the level of burnout decreased with age. Demand and control at work, and job insecurity were related to burnout. In women the level of education, socioeconomic position, work object, and working varying hours were of importance. Interaction effects were found between sex and work object, and sex and working hours. In a multiple regression analysis almost half of the gender difference could be explained by work related and life situational factors. Conclusions Working life conditions contributed to the level of burnout in this actively working sample from the general population in northern Sweden. Especially in women, socioeconomic position was associated with burnout. The high level of burnout in women compared to men was partly explained by more unfavourable working conditions and life situational factors. Efforts to level out gender differences in burnout should probably focus on improving both working and socioeconomic conditions for women.

2010-01-01

373

Study protocol: the effects of work-site exercise on the physical fitness and work-ability of older workers  

PubMed Central

Background Older workers have a higher rate and cost of injury than younger workers and with a rapidly ageing work force there is a need to identify strategies to address this problem. Older workers are less physically active and fit than younger workers and so have reduced work ability. The reduced work ability means they are more likely to be fatigued at work and so at greater risk of injury. Exercise could potentially assist this problem. Exercise training has been previously shown to improve fitness in older people however there has been no evaluation of workplace exercise program for older workers. We do not know if the programs are feasible and can improve the fitness and work ability of older workers. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to evaluate whether exercise improves fitness and perceived work-ability of older workers. Methods/Design This paper describes the protocol for a trial examining the effects of a 12-week physical training program in workers over the age of 45. Participants will be randomized to an exercise or no-intervention control group. The primary outcomes are cardiorespiratory endurance, lifting capacity, upper and lower limb strength and perceived work-ability. Discussion This trial will test the feasibility of implementing a worksite-based exercise program as a means of improving the physical fitness and work-ability of older workers performing physically demanding work. If we demonstrate the feasibility of the program we will conduct a larger trial that additionally measures injury outcomes.

Mackey, Martin; Maher, Chris G; Wong, Terry; Collins, Kathleen

2007-01-01

374

DESIGN NOTE: Technical problems encountered with the laser induced pressure pulse method in studies of high voltage cable insulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The laser induced pressure wave propagation method is often used to measure the space charge distribution in solid insulators. This method gives rise to many advantages, so it is widely used both in industrial and in research laboratories. However, it is necessary to take some precautions before treating induced signals in order to minimize calculation errors. Here, some quantitative information about the effects of approximations and the technical problems arising from this method used to study cable insulators are presented. Data from semiconductor/polyethylene samples have been obtained. Some recommendations defining an appropriate experimental protocol of space charge measurement in high voltage cable insulators are given.

Malec, David

2000-05-01

375

Respondent-driven sampling in a study of drug users in New York City: notes from the field.  

PubMed

Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and effective in recruiting a diverse sample of drug users. PMID:16977493

McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

2006-11-01

376

Note: Matching index technique for avoiding higher order mode resonance in accelerators: INDUS-2 accelerator as a case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resonance between circulating beam frequencies and RF cavity Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of accelerators can lead to coupled-bunch instabilities. Shifting these HOMs to avoid the resonance is a topic of active interest. A study has been carried out for the accelerating cavities of the INDUS-2. For quantitative measure of deciding which modes have to be moved and by how much, we introduce a new index called the matching index (IM), as a measure of how close a HOM is to the nearest beam mode. Depending on the value of IM, the operating scenarios are classified as safe and unsafe.

Jain, V.; Bhandarkar, U. V.; Joshi, S. C.; Krishnagopal, S.

2013-08-01

377

Farewell to the World: Suicide Notes from Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There has been limited study of suicide in Islamic countries. This paper marks the first study of suicide notes in Turkey, an Islamic country. Using a classification scheme, 49 suicide notes (a rate of 34.5%) were studied. The results show that note writers do not differ greatly from other suicides. Further analysis of younger (less than 40) and…

Demirel, Birol; Akar, Taner; Sayin, Aslihan; Candansayar, Selcuk; Leenaars, Antoon A.

2008-01-01

378

CyberNotes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Is my network secure? Are there holes in our security? If you're directly or indirectly responsible for maintaining computers connected to the Internet, those are questions you've probably asked yourself from time to time. Unfortunately, certain answers are difficult to come by, considering the rapid rate at which networks and operating systems are evolving and the staggering complexity of some of the software involved. Any resource that can bring you closer to that certainty is worth a look. CyberNotes, maintained by the National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC), is one of the wide array of useful security resources available. Given their mandate "to detect, deter, assess, warn of, respond to, and investigate computer intrusions and unlawful acts," NIPC is obviously concerned with tracking and alerting system administrators to potential security holes, and CyberNotes is one of their primary tools to achieve that goal. CyberNotes features an appropriately detailed list of recently discovered bugs and security holes, including the software involved, information about potential patches or workarounds, and a rating indicating the severity of the problem. The newsletter's "Trends" section discusses specific trends in attack techniques and origination points and security vulnerabilities that have recently been in frequent use by intruders. In general, CyberNotes can be a very valuable tool if hands-on computer security is part of your job, and it's worth browsing if you are indirectly involved in any fashion with the maintenance of networked computers.

1999-01-01

379

Student Math Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first "Note" concerns magic squares in which the numbers in every row, column, and diagonal add up to the same sum. An etching by Albrecht Durer is presented, with four questions followed by…

Maletsky, Evan, Ed.

1985-01-01

380

Notes on Linguistics, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 1999 issues of "Notes on Linguistics," published quarterly, include the following articles, review articles, reviews, book notices, and reports: "A New Program for Doing Morphology: Hermit Crab"; "Lingualinks CD-ROM: Field Guide to Recording Language Data"; "'Unruly' Phonology: An Introduction to Optimality Theory"; "Borrowing vs. Code…

Payne, David, Ed.

1999-01-01

381

Notes and Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)

American Journal of Physics, 1978

1978-01-01

382

FORMALIZING CONTEXT (Expanded Notes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

These notes discuss formalizing contexts as first class objects. The basic relation is ist(c,p). It asserts that the pro-position ? is true in the context c. The most important formulas relate the propositions true in different contexts. Introducing contexts as formal objects will permit axiomatizations in limited contexts to be expanded to tran- scend the original limitations. This seems necessary

John McCarthy; Sasa Buvac

1997-01-01

383

Notes and Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)|

American Journal of Physics, 1978

1978-01-01

384

Editor's Note (May 2003)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this edition of the Editor's Note, outgoing editor Joan McShane bids farewell to readers and ushers in a new era for NSTA. She reflects on the past 10 years and recounts technology being the most dramatic change in our classrooms and lives. She parts with wisdom on loving and encouraging our children whom are not only our future but our legacy.

Mcshane, Joan

2003-05-01

385

Building Material Notes (CBRI).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a compilation of 15 building materials notes. They are: Use of Coal Ash in the Building Industry; Use of Fly Ash as Pozzolana; Production of Cement Clinker Using Fly Ash; Magnesium Oxychloride Cement (Sorel Cement); Milled Granulated Slag...

S. S. Rehsi M. Rai R. S. Strivastava C. A. Taneja V. V. Sasidaran

1980-01-01

386

Notes on Formalizing Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

These notes discuss formalizing contexts as rst class objects. The basic relation is ist(c; p). It asserts that the proposition p is true in the context c. The most important formulas relate the propositions true in dieren t contexts. Introducing contexts as formal objects will permit ax- iomatizations in limited contexts to be expanded to transcend the original limitations. This

John Mccarthy

1993-01-01

387

Notes Toward a Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the annual Puget Sound Writing Program Institute for Teachers of Writing. Explains that teacher-participants, who were assigned to discuss in writing their writing processes, challenged the program codirectors to do the same. Includes a codirector's notes on her thoughts about writing. (SG)|

Clifton, Linda J.

1990-01-01

388

Paid work, unpaid work and social support: A study of the health of male and female nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paid work, unpaid work in the home and social support are important elements of the social production of health and illness, though their combined effects on both women and men have only recently become a focus of research. This paper examines their association with the health problems of nurses, presenting data from a survey of a proportional random sample of

Vivienne Walters; Rhonda Lenton; Susan French; John Eyles; Janet Mayr; Bruce Newbold

1996-01-01

389

Working Girls: Abuse or Choice in Street-Level Sex Work? A Study of Homeless Women in Nottingham  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryThis paper uses fifteen indices of abuse and a definition of ‘coercion’ as ‘constraint, restraint, compulsion; the application of force to control the action of a voluntary agent’ (OED Online, 2006) to explore how homeless women understand their choice to sex work. Twenty-six homeless women were interviewed, nine of whom had sex worked. A structured, qualitative questionnaire was used in

Rachel Harding; Paul Hamilton

2009-01-01

390

The relationship between job tenure and work disability absence among adults: a prospective study.  

PubMed

Little population-based, prospective research has been conducted to examine the demographic and work-related determinants of occupational injury or illness. This study examined the relative contribution of sociodemographic characteristics and work factors to the likelihood of a work-related disability or illness. In a representative sample of adult Canadians 25-70 years old from a prospective survey, a hazard modelling approach of time to work disability absence from the start of a new job was estimated with the following predictors: age, gender, type of job (manual, non-manual, and mixed), hours worked, highest education achieved, multiple concurrent job, job tenure, school activity, union membership and living in a rural or urban area. Workers holding manual or mixed jobs and having a low education level were factors independently associated with the increased likelihood of a work disability absence. Gender was not independently associated with work disability absences. A strong job tenure gradient in the unadjusted work disability absence rates was virtually eliminated when controlling for demographic/individual and other work factors. In multivariate analyses, work-related factors remained predictors of work disability absence whereas individual characteristics such as gender did not. The exception was workers with less education who appeared to be particularly vulnerable, even after controlling of physical demands on the job. This may be due to inadequate job training or increased hazard exposure even in the same broad job category. PMID:18215570

Breslin, F Curtis; Tompa, Emile; Zhao, Ryan; Pole, Jason D; Amick Iii, Benjamin C; Smith, Peter M; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

2007-07-31

391

Pregnant women's working conditions and their changes during pregnancy: a national study in France.  

PubMed Central

In a study of 2387 employed women who had worked for more than three months of their pregnancy the data were extracted from a survey carried out on a national sample of births in France in 1981. Manual, service and shop workers had a higher preterm delivery rate than professional, administrative, or clerical workers. Assembly line work was associated with a higher preterm delivery rate even when production workers only were considered. Cumulated physically tiring working conditions--standing work, carrying of heavy loads, assembly line work, and considerable physical effort--were related to higher preterm delivery and low birthweight rate. During pregnancy, sickness absences were commoner when the working conditions were arduous. Changes in the working conditions were less clearly related to arduous work than sick leaves; they were not significantly more frequent for standing work or for assembly line work. Refusals from employers to grant favourable arrangements were more frequent when the working conditions were tiring and sick leaves were more common among women whose requests had been refused.

Saurel-Cubizolles, M J; Kaminski, M

1987-01-01

392

Could Work Be a Source of Behavioural Disorders? A Study in Horses  

PubMed Central

Stress at work, as shown by a number of human studies, may lead to a variety of negative and durable effects, such as impaired psychological functioning (anxiety, depression…). Horses share with humans this characteristic of working on a daily basis and are submitted then to work stressors related to physical constraints and/or more “psychological” conflicts, such as potential controversial orders from the riders or the requirement to suppress emotions. On another hand, horses may perform abnormal repetitive behaviour (“stereotypies”) in response to adverse life conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether the type of work the horses are used for may have an impact on their tendency to show stereotypic behaviour (and its type) outside work. Observations in their box of 76 horses all living in the same conditions, belonging to one breed and one sex, revealed that the prevalence and types of stereotypies performed strongly depended upon the type of work they were used for. The stereotypies observed involved mostly mouth movements and head tossing/nodding. Work constraints probably added to unfavourable living conditions, favouring the emergence of chronic abnormal behaviours. This is especially remarkable as the 23 hours spent in the box were influenced by the one hour work performed every day. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of potential effects of work stressors on the emergence of abnormal behaviours in an animal species. It raises an important line of thought on the chronic impact of the work situation on the daily life of individuals.

Hausberger, Martine; Gautier, Emmanuel; Biquand, Veronique; Lunel, Christophe; Jego, Patrick

2009-01-01

393

Work, Recovery Activities, and Individual Well-Being: A Diary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends previous research on respite from work and addresses the question of how individuals use their leisure time to recover from work. It is hypothesized that time spent on work-related and household activities has a negative effect on well-being, whereas low-effort, social, and physical activities are assumed to have a positive effect. One hundred Dutch teachers completed a

Sabine Sonnentag

2001-01-01

394

A diary study to open up the black box of overtime work among university faculty members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives This study aimed at opening up the black box of overtime work among university faculty members by providing information on (i) when faculty members work overtime, (ii) what activities are undertaken during overtime, and (iii) how overtime is experienced.\\u000aMethods Data were collected among 120 Dutch faculty members who completed a general questionnaire (addressing general overtime hours, work characteristics,

D. G. J. Beckers; M. L. M. van Hooff; D. van der Linden; M. A. J. Kompier; T. W. Taris; S. A. E. Geurts

2008-01-01

395

Organizational Influences, Public Service Motivation and Work Outcomes: An Australian Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the influence of organizational factors—intrinsic rewards, extrinsic rewards, work relations with management, and work relations with co-workers—on the relationship between public service motivation (PSM) and two work outcomes: job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Using data from the 2005 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes of over 2,200 employees in the Australian public and private sectors, this study found

Jeannette Taylor

2008-01-01

396

The relationship between job tenure and work disability absence among adults: A prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little population-based, prospective research has been conducted to examine the demographic and work-related determinants of occupational injury or illness. This study examined the relative contribution of sociodemographic characteristics and work factors to the likelihood of a work-related disability or illness. In a representative sample of adult Canadians 25–70 years old from a prospective survey, a hazard modelling approach of time

F. Curtis Breslin; Emile Tompa; Ryan Zhao; Jason D. Pole; Benjamin C. Amick III; Peter M. Smith; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson

2008-01-01

397

Positive and negative work–family interaction and burnout: A longitudinal study of reciprocal relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the longitudinal relationship between work–family interaction (WFI) in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation) and burnout. A sample of 2235 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, bus drivers, employees within information technology, physicians, teachers, church ministers, employees within advertisement, and nurses) supplied data at two points

Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Erik Falkum; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

2008-01-01

398

Work resumption at the price of distrust: a qualitative study on return to work legislation in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background Return to work (RTW) after sick leave is considered necessary to support the employees’ health. Cooperation between employees and employers may encourage employees’ RTW, but is hampered by bottlenecks that we do not completely understand. Dutch legislation means to support this cooperation and allows trying RTW during two years. The Resource Dependence Institutional Cooperation (RDIC) model has been developed for studying cooperation in public health. Study aims were to get insight into the degree of cooperation between Dutch sick-listed employees and employers, how this (lack of) cooperation can be understood, and how valid the RDIC model is for understanding this (lack of) cooperation. Methods This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 8 employees and 8 employers. Employees reported sick for 1.5-20 months for various reasons. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach and pattern matching. Results Cooperation was lacking early during sick leave. Later on there were regular meetings, but employers decided about RTW without consulting the employees. Particularly employers were motivated to cooperate during the first year, while employees were especially motivated during the second. This could be understood by experienced dependence; employees (first year) and employers (second year) did not consider cooperation to be important for achieving medical recovery (employees) or RTW (employers). These divergent goals may be understood by personal norms about the timing of medical recovery and RTW. Legislation was particularly effective regarding employer behaviour in year 1 and employee behaviour in year 2. Employees distrusted their employers during the first year, while employers reported to distrust the employees during the second year. Besides, employees and employers experienced a moderate ability to cooperate. This could be understood particularly by having moderate knowledge about legislation. The RDIC model appeared to be valid to understand the cases studied, but the additional factor distrust also played a role. Conclusions Legislation appeared to support cooperation, but awareness of a mutual dependence, trust, knowledge about the legislation and personal norms regarding recovery and RTW are also important. Professionals such as occupational physicians should support this to attain a degree of cooperation that is necessary for effective RTW.

2013-01-01

399

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life conflict leads to poor health satisfaction. Methods The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing seven waves of data collection. The sample includes 1261 persons, with 636 men and 625 women. Data was analysed by multi-level mixed models and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results In the overall sample, there was no linear increase or decrease of work-life conflict detected, in either its time-based or strain-based form. People with higher education were more often found to have a strong work-life conflict (time- and strain-based), and more men demonstrated a strong time-based work-life conflict than women (12.2% vs. 5%). A negative relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction over time was found. People reporting strong work-life conflict at every wave reported lower health satisfaction than people with consistently weak work-life conflict. However, the health satisfaction of those with a continuously strong work-life conflict did not decrease during the study period. Conclusions Both time-based and strain-based work-life conflict are strongly correlated to health satisfaction. However, no evidence was found for a persistent work-life conflict leading to poor health satisfaction.

2011-01-01

400

Balancing work, life and other concerns: a study of mobile technology use by Australian freelancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present initial findings from an empirical study of the mobile technology use and mobile work practices of freelancers in the domain of Film and Television. Our findings demonstrate that mobile phones were primarily used to manage other personal activities and concerns unrelated to the local work. They were used only intermittently to support local practice when

Kirsten Sadler; Toni Robertson; Melanie Kan; Penny Hagen

2006-01-01

401

Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.…

Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

2011-01-01

402

The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

2004-01-01

403

Spatial working memory in heavy cannabis users: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale Many neuropsychological studies have documented deficits in working memory among recent heavy cannabis users. However, little is known about the effects of cannabis on brain activity. Objective We assessed brain function among recent heavy cannabis users while they performed a working memory task. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine brain activity in 12 long-term heavy cannabis

Gen Kanayama; Jadwiga Rogowska; Harrison G. Pope; Staci A. Gruber; Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd

2004-01-01

404

Married Thai Working Mothers: Coping with Initial Part-Time Doctoral Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Advanced educational attainment can "grow" a career. But acquiring a doctoral qualification adds study to existing work and family responsibilities, especially for women. This phenomenological research explores the experiences of eight Thai working mothers enrolled in the initial stage of part-time doctoral programs in Thailand. A majority…

Thinnam, Thanit

2011-01-01

405

An Exploratory Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Innovative Model for Teaching Multicultural Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective social work practice with diverse populations requires the successful incorporation of multicultural knowledge, awareness, and skills.As a result, there is a pressing need for innovative and evidencebased teaching strategies and methods that provide social work students with these key multicultural tools. This paper describes one such teachingmodel and presents the findings of an exploratory study to empirically evaluate its

J. Camille Hall; Matthew T. Theriot

2007-01-01

406

Strategies for Research Development in Hospital Social Work: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This article identifies salient components in the advancement of social work research leadership within health care. Method: Using tenets of a modified retrospective case study approach, processes and outcomes of social work research progression at a pediatric hospital are reviewed. Results: Capacity-building processes were…

McNeill, Ted; Nicholas, David Bruce

2012-01-01

407

Working-Class Students, Habitus, and the Development of Student Roles: A Canadian Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As their numbers at university grow, we need to gain a better understanding of the different ways in which working-class students negotiate their potential outsider status in what is often considered an essential middle-class institution. Based on data from a four-year longitudinal, qualitative study of working-class students at a Canadian…

Lehmann, Wolfgang

2012-01-01

408

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to School Social Work Practice: A Mixed-Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Understanding barriers to practice is a growing area within school social work research. Using a convenience sample of 284 school social workers, this study replicates the efforts of a mixed-method investigation designed to identify barriers and facilitators to school social work practice within different geographic locations. Time constraints…

Teasley, Martell; Canifield, James P.; Archuleta, Adrian J.; Crutchfield, Jandel; Chavis, Annie McCullough

2012-01-01

409

Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

2008-01-01

410

Mood, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate at Work: An Experience-Sampling Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a study that examined the distinctiveness of momentary positive and negative affect (PA and NA) and their relationships with blood pressure and heart rate at work in a sample of 67 full-time employees who provided psychological and physiological measurements multiple times a day, over 10 working days. These employees recorded their subjective ratings on personal digital assistant devices

Remus Ilies; Nikos Dimotakis; David Watson

2010-01-01

411

A Study of Teachers' Views on Practical Work in Secondary Schools in England and Wales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many teachers view practical work as an essential feature of science education. This study examined whether there had been any changes in the relative importance of the aims science teachers assign to the use of practical work, across the full secondary age range (11-18), since the last such national survey undertaken by Kerr 46 years ago. A…

Abrahams, Ian; Saglam, M.

2010-01-01

412

Work stress and risk of cardiovascular mortality: prospective cohort study of industrial employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine the association between work stress, according to the job strain model and the effort›reward imbalance model, and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Baseline examination in 1973 determined cases of cardiovascular disease, behavioural and biological risks, and stressful characteristics of work. Biological risks were measured at 5 year and 10 year follow

Mika Kivim; Jussi Vahtera

2002-01-01

413

Strategies for Research Development in Hospital Social Work: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives: This article identifies salient components in the advancement of social work research leadership within health care. Method: Using tenets of a modified retrospective case study approach, processes and outcomes of social work research progression at a pediatric hospital are reviewed. Results: Capacity-building processes were…

McNeill, Ted; Nicholas, David Bruce

2012-01-01

414

A diary study of work-related reading: design implications for digital reading devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we describe a diary study of how people read in the course of their daily working lives. Fifteen people from a wide variety of professions were asked to log their daily document activity for a period of 5 consecutive working days. Using structured interviews, we analysed their reading activities in detail. We examine the range of reading

Annette Adler; Anuj Gujar; Beverly L. Harrison; Kenton O'Hara; Abigail Sellen

1998-01-01

415

Pain and Depression in Injured Workers and Their Return to Work: A Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the long-term relationships between depression, pain, and return to work in injured workers with chronic pain. Clients (N = 185) completing the Pain Disability Prevention Program were evaluated for pain and depression at three points in time: on admission to the treatment program, at mid-treatment, and at the end of treatment. The return to work (RTW) was

Marc Corbière; Michael J. L. Sullivan; William D. Stanish; Heather Adams

2007-01-01

416

A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

2012-01-01

417

Earnings and Work Expectations of Social Security Disability Beneficiaries. Washington, DC: Center for Studying Disability Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 prompted changes in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) programs to help beneficiaries get and stay employed. This brief, the first in a new series from the Center for Studying Disability Policy at Mathematica, highlights the extent to which SSI and SSDI beneficiaries are

Gina A. Livermore

2008-01-01

418

The Lull of Tradition: A Grounded Theory Study of Television Violence, Children and Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article results from a study of television violence and social work practice with children. Twenty-one social workers who work primarily with children in schools, in community mental health agencies and in private practice were interviewed. A qualitative analysis using grounded theory indicates that social workers do little to elicit television content or information about children's television viewing. They do

Bonnie A. Lazar

1998-01-01

419

Federal Student aid Handbook, 2002-2003. Volume 6: Federal Work-Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program allows undergraduate and graduate students to work part-time to help pay for the cost of their education. Schools must use 75% of their FSW Program funds to compensate students employed in community service jobs. This volume describes the ways schools are required to use money from FSW program funds to…

Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

420

Interactive Process Notes: An Innovative Tool in Counseling Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to begin to explore the use of interactive process notes in a women's counseling group. The use of interactive process notes is a new technique, which consists of weekly written input regarding group member and group counselor feedback. This preliminary study describes the use of interactive process notes results in a…

Hall, Jewell; Hawley, Lisa

2004-01-01

421

Interactive Process Notes: An Innovative Tool in Counseling Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to begin to explore the use of interactive process notes in a women's counseling group. The use of interactive process notes is a new technique, which consists of weekly written input regarding group member and group counselor feedback. This preliminary study describes the use of interactive process notes results in a 14-week women's counseling

Jewell Hall; Lisa Hawley

2004-01-01

422

Employment, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross sectional study of Dutch patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo evaluate employment status, work disability, and work days lost in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).METHODSA questionnaire was sent to 709 patients with AS aged 16–60. The results of 658 of the patients could be analysed.RESULTSAfter adjustment for age, labour force participation was decreased by 15.4% in male patients and 5.2% in female patients compared with the general Dutch population.

A Boonen; A Chorus; H Miedema; D van der Heijde; H van der Tempel; Sj van der Linden

2001-01-01

423

Inventions of Note  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Inventions of Note Sheet Music Collection was created in 1997 by the Lewis Music Library at MIT. It includes popular songs and piano compositions that portray technologies as revealed through song texts and cover art. As the introductory notes state, "The initial appearance of inventions such as the automobile, airplane, radio, and telephone created a myriad of responses in American society ranging from excitement and delight to anxiety and scorn." The collection includes 50 pieces of sheet music, ranging from "The Bell Telephone Girl" to "The Wireless Man." This last piece contains lyrics like "With his brave steady hand/keeps in touch with the land." It's interesting to ruminate on what songs today might celebrate in video game systems, wireless mobile devices, and laptop computers. For students of the history of technology and popular culture, this site is quite a find and perhaps it will inspire a few sing-a-long sessions for those with a talent for vocalizing.

2012-08-17

424

Farewell to the world: suicide notes from Turkey.  

PubMed

There has been limited study of suicide in Islamic countries. This paper marks the first study of suicide notes in Turkey, an Islamic country. Using a classification scheme, 49 suicide notes (a rate of 34.5%) were studied. The results show that note writers do not differ greatly from other suicides. Further analysis of younger (<40) and older (>40) suicide note writers reveal few significant differences. Our results, together with the results of classification studies in different countries, suggest that caution is in order in transposing findings from one country to other countries. Future study of suicide notes should, in fact, focus on cross-cultural investigation. PMID:18355114

Demirel, Birol; Akar, Taner; Sayin, Aslihan; Candansayar, Selçuk; Leenaars, Antoon A

2008-02-01

425

Maryland Marine Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online newsletter archive provides back issues, April 1990 to December 2001, of Marine Notes in downloadable PDF format. Articles cover news of research, education and outreach services of Maryland Sea Grant. Topics include: fisheries management, issues and advances; biology of keystone species like blue crabs, oysters, seagrasses, striped bass; coastal zone management; Chesapeake Bay habitats and restoration; seafood; aquaculture; impacts of exotic species; coastal history; and more.

426

Growth hormone: Historical notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief review of important contributions to our present knowledge of growth hormone is given. In 1887 it had been noted that\\u000a a pituitary tumor was present in most patients with acromegaly. Even at the beginning of the 20. Century relationship between\\u000a growth disorders and the pituitary was contested. From 1908 pituitary surgery became established treatment in GH hypersecretion.\\u000a In

J. Lindholm

2006-01-01

427

Editor's Note (September 2004)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The act of having students commit to an outcome makes them think. It is different than oral brainstorming because everyone is accountable. Students may not volunteer exactly what they are thinking. Like everyone else, they may just summarize. Students deserve an opportunity to explain their answers, even if they seem far-fetched. This selection includes notes from the Field Editor of Science and Children on assessment tools and strategies.

Ohana, Chris

2004-09-01

428

Evaluation of Work Place Stress in Health University Workers: A Study from Rural India  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare providers being over-worked and under staffed are prone to poor mental health. Unhealthy work place compounds it further. Aims: This study was aimed at to assess the mental health status of a medical university employee with special reference to work place stressors. Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was designed and carried out at a Rural Health University. Materials and Methods: Both the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 and Holmes–Rahe Scale were used to evaluate 406 participants. Statistical analysis: Multivariate analysis, correlation, and ANOVA by SPSS 11.0. Results: The minimum age of the participant was 19 years and the maximum 64 years, with an average age at 35.09 years. On the GHQ scale 239(58.9%) recorded psychiatric morbidity out of which 201(49.5%) had moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Doctors were the highest stressed group (P ? 0.04). Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ? 0.001, Pearson correlation). Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ? 0.001 on Pearson correlation). Harassment, favoritism, discrimination, and lack of self-expression (P ? 0.003) were other factors responsible for work dissatisfaction. Conclusions: A high stress level was detected in the study population. The principal stressors were work environment related. Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

Mishra, Badrinarayan; Mehta, SC; Sinha, Nidhi Dinesh; Shukla, Sushil Kumar; Ahmed, Nadeem; Kawatra, Abhishek

2011-01-01

429

Some Working Parameters and Energy Use in a Pistachio Nut Processing Plant: A Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was performed with the objective to investigate the work process, work capacity, work effectiveness, energy consumption and labor force requirements of basic units such as washing, dehulling, sorting, separating, roasting and packing in a pistachio processing plant which has been mechanized in the last years. As a result of this study, the work capacity in washing, sorting, breaking, drying, separating units was found to be 1.5, 1.5, 2, 1, 1.6 t h-1, respectively. The work effectiveness in sorting and breaking units was found to be 95% and that of separating unit was 99%. The total energy consumption of the units was found to be 20.42 kW h-1 and the total labor force requirement was found to be five workers.

Polat, Refik; Erol Ak, Bekir; Acar, Izzet

430

[Community health agents and their experiences of pleasure and distress at work: a qualitative study].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to identify the situations that cause pleasure or distress at work among the Community Health Agents (CHA) in a city in Rio Grande do Sul state/Brazil. A qualitative study was performed with 24 agents as the participants. Data collection took place in 2009 through the use of focal groups, using the thematic analysis technique. The situations causing pleasure at work were: being recognized, solving problems, working with peers and being creative. Situations causing distress were: deficiencies in the health service; lack of knowledge regarding their roles; lack of recognition; the stress of teamwork; the obligation of living and working in the same area; daily living and becoming involved with the social problems of the community; and being exposed to violence, which resulted in fear. It was verified that there is a need for adopting interventions with a view to promoting better working conditions, professional satisfaction and the health of community agents. PMID:22773484

Lopes, Denise Maria Quatrin; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Prestes, Francine Cassol; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; Colomé, Juliana Silveira; da Silva, Gilson Mafacioli

2012-06-01

431

Rotating Night Shift Work and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Two Prospective Cohort Studies in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Pan and colleagues examined data from two Nurses' Health Studies and found that extended periods of rotating night shift work were associated with a modestly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, partly mediated through body weight.

An Pan; Eva S. Schernhammer; Qi Sun; Frank B. Hu

2011-01-01

432

Working Group on Information Exchange on Technical and Economic Studies Related to Educational Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sixteen international experts comprised the working group charged with indexing technical and cost effectiveness studies related to new educational media. This report, resulting from their meeting in January 1975, contains: (1) introductory report on the ...

1975-01-01

433

Statement of Work for Site Characterization Study for Electron Beam Remediation at Edwards AFB.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this work effort is to conduct a Phase I site characterization study to assess the applicability of portable electron beam transformation technology to remediate subsurface hazardous waste depositions at Edwards AFB. This effort involves th...

1992-01-01

434

Schools at Work in 48 States: A Study of Elementary School Practices. Bulletin, 1952, No. 13  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Schools at Work in 48 States" is a record of a cooperative study made over a period of two and a half years by nine staff members of the elementary school section of the Office of Education, with the advice and help of their co-workers. Such a study requires that the group of persons working together arrive at some commonly accepted principles of…

Bathurst, Effie, G.; Blough, Glenn O.

1952-01-01

435

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and\\u000a (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life\\u000a conflict leads to poor health satisfaction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing\\u000a seven

Michaela K Knecht; Georg F Bauer; Felix Gutzwiller; Oliver Hämmig

2011-01-01

436

Offender experiences and opinions of mixed-gender group work in the community: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

The National Probation Service in England and Wales currently delivers community-based accredited offending behavior programs in mixed-gender groups. There is at present a lack of research on the potential impact of mixed-gender group work on female offenders, who are often the minority within the group. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the area using qualitative methods. Sixteen offenders who had participated in a mixed-gender offending behavior program were interviewed as part of this study. Themes from the interviews were analyzed using Grounded Theory techniques. The findings illustrated an overall preference among all participants for mixed-gender rather than single-gender group work. The specific advantages of mixed-gender group work included increased learning about the opposite sex and a more relaxed atmosphere within the group. Although this study reflects positive attitudes to mixed-gender group work, the findings need to be tested further using empirical methodology. PMID:20940342

Burrowes, Nina; Day, Jo

2010-10-12

437

Note-Taking: Different Notes for Different Research Stages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the need to teach students different strategies for taking notes for research, especially at the exploration and collecting information stages, based on Carol Kuhlthau's research process. Discusses format changes; using index cards; notes for live presentations or media presentations versus notes for printed sources; and forming focus…

Callison, Daniel

2003-01-01

438

The psychosocial impact of child domestic work: a study from India and the Philippines.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to explore the effects of domestic employment on the well-being of child domestic workers (CDWs) in India and the Philippines. A questionnaire was administered to 700 CDWs and 700 school-attending controls in the two countries. In India, 36% of CDWs started work before age 12, 48% worked because of poverty or to repay loans, 46% worked >10 h per day, and 31% were physically punished by employers. Filipino CDWs were mainly migrants from rural areas, 47% were working to continue their studies and 87% were attending school, compared with 35% of Indians. In India, 67% of CDWs and 25% of controls scored in the lowest tertile (p<0.001) compared with 36% and 30%, respectively, in the Philippines (p=02). Key significant correlates of low psychosocial scores were non-attendance at school, long working hours, physical punishment, limited support networks and poor health. This study shows that it is not domestic work that is intrinsically harmful, but rather the circumstances and conditions of work, which could be improved through pragmatic regulatory measures. PMID:22685048

Hesketh, Therese M; Gamlin, Jennie; Ong, Michelle; Camacho, Agnes Zenaida V; Camacho, Agnes Zeneida V

2012-06-09

439

Bank note recognition for the vision impaired.  

PubMed

Blind Australians find great difficulty in recognising bank notes. Each note has the same feel, with no Braille markings, irregular edges or other tangible features. In Australia, there is only one device available that can assist blind people recognise their notes. Internationally, there are devices available; however they are expensive, complex and have not been developed to cater for Australian currency. This paper discusses a new device, the MoneyTalker that takes advantage of the largely different colours and patterns on each Australian bank note and recognises the notes electronically, using the reflection and transmission properties of light. Different coloured lights are transmitted through the inserted note and the corresponding sensors detect distinct ranges of values depending on the colour of the note. Various classification algorithms were studied and the final algorithm was chosen based on accuracy and speed of recognition. The MoneyTalker has shown an accuracy of more than 99%. A blind subject has tested the device and believes that it is usable, compact and affordable. Based on the devices that are available currently in Australia, the MoneyTalker is an effective alternative in terms of accuracy and usability. PMID:16845929

Hinwood, A; Preston, P; Suaning, G J; Lovell, N H

2006-06-01

440

Mathematical Knowledge and School Work: A Case Study of the Teaching of Developing Mathematical Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study considered the meaning that was given to knowing/doing mathematics in classrooms comprising the observational study conducted by the Wisconsin Center for Education Research during 1978-81. The study interprets the work of teachers and students, and considers what constitutes appropriate mathematical knowledge for children to learn. A…

Stephens, Walter Maxwell

441

StudyWorks! A Model Project Establishing a Coalition between Two Diverse Groups of Exceptional Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The StudyWorks Project was a 1-year unit of study designed for implementation with gifted/talented (G/T) students and developmentally handicapped (DH) students. The project involved four major areas of study (economic development, career education, social/interpersonal skills, and health/nutrition) and provided practical application of these…

Metzger, Rebecca Griffeth

442

Climate change impacts on working people (the HOTHAPS initiative): findings of the South African pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background It is now widely accepted that climate change is occurring as a result of the accumulation of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere. With the prospect of a warmer world, increased attention is being devoted to the implications for worker well-being and work performance. Objectives The ‘high occupational temperature health and productivity suppression’ (HOTHAPS) programme is a multi-centre health research and prevention programme aimed at characterising and quantifying the extent to which working people are affected by, or adapt to, heat exposure while working. The main aim of the current South African pilot study was to look at the perceptions of outdoor workers regarding their work environment in hot weather and how this affected their health and productivity levels. Design A qualitative study utilising focus group discussions was employed in two sites, Johannesburg (which has a temperate climate) and Upington (located in the hottest part of South Africa). Results In summary, the pilot study demonstrated that especially in Upington, where daily maximum temperatures may reach +40°C, workers reported a wide range of heat-related effects, including sunburn, sleeplessness, irritability, and exhaustion leading to difficulty in maintaining work levels and output during very hot weather. Few, if any, measures were being undertaken by employers to protect health or improve worker comfort. Conclusion This pilot study has demonstrated that people working in sun-exposed conditions in hot parts of South Africa currently experience heat-related health effects, with implications for their well-being and ability to work and that further research is warranted. In this regard, the pilot study has proved valuable in informing the design, site, sample selection, and logistical planning for a proposed main study on the health and performance aspects of work in hot weather in South Africa.

Mathee, Angela; Oba, Joy; Rose, Andre

2010-01-01

443

Working memory and parent-rated components of attention in middle childhood: a behavioral genetic study.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current study was to investigate potential genetic and environmental correlations between working memory and three behavioral aspects of the attention network (i.e., executive, alerting, and orienting) using a twin design. Data were from 90 monozygotic (39% male) and 112 same-sex dizygotic (41% male) twins. Individual differences in working memory performance (digit span) and parent-rated measures of executive, alerting, and orienting attention included modest to moderate genetic variance, modest shared environmental variance, and modest to moderate nonshared environmental variance. As hypothesized, working memory performance was correlated with executive and alerting attention, but not orienting attention. The correlation between working memory, executive attention, and alerting attention was completely accounted for by overlapping genetic covariance, suggesting a common genetic mechanism or mechanisms underlying the links between working memory and certain parent-rated indicators of attentive behavior. PMID:21948215

Wang, Zhe; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Cutting, Laurie; Thompson, Lee A; Petrill, Stephen A

2011-09-27

444

The Influence of Practice Standards on Massage Therapists' Work Experience: A Phenomenological Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a “one size fits all” categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy.

Fortune, Luann D.; Gillespie, Elena

2010-01-01

445

Lecture notes on stellar dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

These Lecture Notes contain the main topics presented in a series of lectures given at the Scuola Normale di Pisa. The audience was made of students of the third and fourth year of the Physics program. The lectures address selected topics in Stellar Dynamics, presented in a deductive approach. Completeness is by no means the final goal of this work. The course is divided into two parts. In the first part (Chapters 1-8), basic mathematical concepts are introduced, with some discussion of their physical meaning. In the second part (Chapters 9-12), the tools developed in the first part are applied to an extensive discussion of selected problems offered by the Stellar Dynamics of collisionless systems of stars.

Ciotti, L.

2000-10-01

446

Neural Adaptations for Processing the Two-Note Call of the Puerto Rican Treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male Puerto Rican treefrogs, Eleutherodactylus coqui, produce a two-note call: a 100-msec constant frequency 'Co' note, followed by a longer, upward sweeping 'Qui' note. Previous behavioral studies have shown that males respond selectively to natural and synthetic call notes of 100 msec duration, whereas preliminary results suggest that females respond preferentially to the second note in the male's call. In

Peter M. Narins; Robert R. Capranica

1980-01-01

447

Note: Studies on target placement in TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for the enhancement of x-ray dose  

SciTech Connect

X-ray source based on electron cyclotron resonance principle has been constructed using TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity. At present the device is used to provide low energy x-ray field for thermoluminescent dosimeter badge calibration. Theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of target placement inside the TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity for enhancing the x-ray output are carried out and the results are presented in this note. Optimum target location is identified by theoretical analysis on the electric field distribution inside the cavity using MICROWAVE STUDIO program. By modifying the magnetic field configuration, the resonance region is shifted to the optimum target location. The microwave transmission line is upgraded with a three stub tuner which improves the microwave coupling from the source to the target loaded cavity. Molybdenum target is located at a radial distance of 2.5 cm from the cavity center and the x-ray dose rate is measured at 20 cm from the exit port for different microwave power. With the introduction of the target, the x-ray output has improved nearly from 70% to 160% in the microwave power of 150-500 W.

Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.; Singh, A. K. [Safety Group, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sista, V. L. S. Rao [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2010-03-15

448

Filochat: handwritten notes provide access to recorded conversations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a novel application which integrates handwriting and recorded audio in a semi-portable device. Based on user interviews, it allows people to straightforwardly access particular points in recorded spontaneous speech via handwritten notes, using temporal indexing. Laboratory studies showed objective benefits of combined notes and audio over notes alone. The utility of the access method was shown by improved

Steve Whittaker; Patrick Hyland; Myrtle Wiley

1994-01-01

449

Fulfillment of Work-Life Balance From the Organizational Perspective: A Case Study.  

PubMed

Context :? Researchers studying work-life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. Objective :? To investigate what factors influence work-life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Design :? Qualitative study. Setting :? Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants :? Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis :? Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Results :? Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work-life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. Conclusions :? The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work-life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance. PMID:23725516

Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

2013-04-18

450

Fulfillment of work-life balance from the organizational perspective: a case study.  

PubMed

Context: Researchers studying work-life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. Objective: To investigate what factors influence work-life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Results: Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work-life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. Conclusions: The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work-life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance. PMID:24067152

Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

451

Working Memory Training for Children With Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7–15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated using parent report and measures of children’s performance on the training exercises. Efficacy measures of working memory and sentence repetition were obtained prior to training, immediately after training, and 1 month and 6 months after training. Results Children’s performance improved on most training exercises, and parents reported no problems with children’s hearing or understanding of the exercises. After completion of working memory training, children demonstrated significant improvement on measures of verbal and nonverbal working memory, parent-reported working memory behavior, and sentence-repetition skills. The magnitude of improvement in working memory decreased slightly at the 1-month follow-up and more substantially at 6-month follow-up. However, sentence repetition continued to show marked improvement at 6-month follow-up. Conclusions Working memory training may produce benefit for some memory and language skills for children with CIs, supporting the importance of conducting a large-scale, randomized clinical trial with this population.

Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

2012-01-01

452

Work factors as predictors of sickness absence: a three month prospective study of nurses' aides  

PubMed Central

Aims: To identify the work factors that predict sickness absence in nurses' aides. Methods: The sample comprised 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave because of illness or pregnancy when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4931 (88.6%) completed a second questionnaire three months later. The outcome measure was the three month incidence proportion of certified sickness absence (>3 days), as assessed by self reports at follow up. Results: Perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit (odds ratio (OR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 2.34), working in psychiatric and paediatric wards, having injured the neck in an accident, and health complaints were associated with higher risk of sickness absence, after adjustments for a series of physical, psychological, and organisational work factors, personal engagement in the work unit, demographic characteristics, and daily consumption of cigarettes. Having untraditional jobs (for nurses' aides) (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.77), and engaging in aerobics or gym were associated with a lower risk of sickness absence. Conclusions: The study suggests that the three month effects of work factors on rates of certified sickness absence are modest in nurses' aides. The most important work factor, in terms of predicting sickness absence, seems to be perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit.

Eriksen, W; Bruusgaard, D; Knardahl, S

2003-01-01

453

Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work factors that predict the level of psychological distress in nurses' aides. Methods The sample of this prospective study comprised 5076 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4076 (80.3 %) completed a second questionnaire 15 months later. A wide spectrum of physical, psychological, social, and organisational work factors were measured at baseline. Psychological distress (anxiety and depression) was assessed at baseline and follow-up by the SCL-5, a short version of Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Results In a linear regression model of the level of psychological distress at follow-up, with baseline level of psychological distress, work factors, and background factors as independent variables, work factors explained 2 % and baseline psychological distress explained 34 % of the variance. Exposures to role conflicts, exposures to threats and violence, working in apartment units for the aged, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that were reported to result in less support and encouragement were positively associated with the level of psychological distress. Working in psychiatric departments, and changes in the work situation between baseline and follow-up that gave lower work pace were negatively associated with psychological distress. Conclusion The study suggests that work factors explain only a modest part of the psychological distress in nurses' aides. Exposures to role conflicts and threats and violence at work may contribute to psychological distress in nurses' aides. It is important that protective measures against violent patients are implemented, and that occupational health officers offer victims of violence appropriate support or therapy. It is also important that health service organisations focus on reducing role conflicts, and that leaders listen to and consider the views of the staff.

Eriksen, Willy; Tambs, Kristian; Knardahl, Stein

2006-01-01

454

Editor's Note (March 2003)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the "special, special" issue to which so many of us look forward every year. Indeed, you will find the lists of Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 and Libros de Ciencias en Espa�ol in this March issue. Books will always be important to children and it is our responsibility as educators to provide the stimulus and ignite the enthusiasm for reading for our children. This article includes notes from the field editor on the importance of instilling a value in reading and literacy in children.

Mcshane, Joan

2003-03-01

455

SPSS Class Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Authored by the University of California, Los Angeles, this page provides class notes and online movie lectures for beginning SPSS users. Students will learn to enter, explore, modify, manage, and analyze data in SPSS and will gain hands-on experience using SPSS for doing statistics, graphics, and data management. This is a great resource for almost anyone just learning to use electronic spreadsheets. The step by step approach employed by these authors is quite effective. The data files used in the instructions are available in Winzip format.

2009-03-11

456

Difficulties with multitasking on return to work after TBI: a critical case study.  

PubMed

Work performance research highlights that psychometric cognitive measures and cognitive component information processing measures are strong predictors of success in multitasking work environments [14]. People with a mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) returning to a job requiring multitasking, may have difficulty succeeding despite pre-morbid equivalent cognitive scores. A critical case study is presented to begin to determine what aspects of information processing contribute to difficulties in multitasking work performance, for people with a TBI. The Perceive Recall Plan and Perform (PRPP) System of Task Analysis: Workplace Interview (i.e. PRPP@WORK) is used with the employer to obtain information processing scores. Results indicate substantial information processing deficits were perceived by the employer for the employee with a TBI. Future larger studies of people with a TBI who return to work that requires multitasking are needed to more clearly indicate: the level of multitasking they perform; what aspects of information processing hinder their work performance; the impact on performance of perceived cognitive load by the person with a TBI and the type and impact of support provided to improve their work performance. PMID:20634614

Bootes, Kylie; Chapparo, Christine

2010-01-01

457

Freebie Notes 3.31  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Do you have an important commitment on Arbor Day? Perhaps you need to remember to send out an email to colleagues? Never fear, Freebie Notes is here. This versatile application allows users to create quick notes that sit on their computer desktop. The notes come in all different colors (including neon yellow, of course). Also, notes can be customized to include simple alarms. This version is compatible with computers running Windows 98 and newer.

2009-09-18

458

NOTES: current status and expectations  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Zusammenfassung  GRUNDLAGEN: Um die Größe von Hautinzisionen zu minimieren, hat sich die minimal invasive Chirurgie in den letzten Jahren weiterentwickelt.\\u000a Der faszinierendste Schritt ist nun Natural Orifice Tranlumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES), also endoskopische Chirurgie über\\u000a natürliche Körperöffnungen. In dieser Arbeit wird der derzeitige Stand von NOTES evaluiert. METHODIK: Übersicht zu NOTES.\\u000a ERGEBNISSE: NOTES wird derzeit an Tiermodellen optimiert und findet auch

A. Hussain; H. Mahmood

2008-01-01

459

The work compatibility improvement framework: preliminary findings of a case study for defining and measuring the human-at-work system.  

PubMed

Although researchers traditionally examined the 'risk' characteristics of work settings in health studies, few work models, such as the 'demand-control' and 'motivation-hygiene theory', advocated the study of the positive and the negative aspects of work for the ultimate improvement of work performance. The objectives of the current study were: (a) to examine the positive and negative characteristics of work in the machining department in a small manufacturing plant in the Midwest USA, and, (b) to report the prevalence of musculoskeletal and stress outcomes. A focus group consisting of worker experts from the different job categories in the machining department confirmed the management's concerns. Accordingly, 56 male and female workers, employed in three shifts, were surveyed on the demand/energizer profiles of work characteristics and self-reported musculoskeletal/stress symptoms. On average, one-fourth to one-third of the workers reported 'high' demand, and over 50% of the workers documented 'low' energizers for certain work domains/sub-domains, such as 'physical task content'/'organizational' work domains and 'upper body postural loading'/'time organization' work sub-domains. The prevalence of workers who reported 'high' musculoskeletal/stress disorder cases, was in the range of 25-35% and was consistent with the results of 'high' demands and 'low' energizers. The results of this case study confirm the importance of adopting a comprehensive view for work improvement and sustainable growth opportunities. It is paramount to consider the negative and positive aspects of work characteristics to ensure optimum organizational performance. The Work Compatibility Improvement Framework, proposed in the reported research, is an important endeavor toward the ultimate improvement and sustainable growth of human and organizational performance. PMID:17972202

Genaidy, A; Karwowski, W; A-Rehim, A

2007-11-01

460

Iowa Certified Nursing Assistants Study: Self-Reported Ratings of the Nursing Home Work Environment  

PubMed Central

Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are the principal bedside caregivers in nursing homes, yet little is known about their perceptions of the work environment. This population-based, cross-sectional study used a mailed questionnaire to a random sample of Iowa CNAs (N = 584), representing 166 nursing homes. Of the respondents, 88.5% (n = 517) were currently employed in long-term care settings; however, 11.5% (n = 67) indicated they had left their jobs. When CNA responses were compared with those of other occupational groups, general workers reported higher scores on involvement, coworker cohesion, work pressure, and supervisor support. Those who left their CNA jobs rated their work environment as characteristic of excessive managerial control and task orientation. Results of this study emphasize the importance of the relationship between CNAs and their supervisors, CNAs’ need for greater autonomy and innovation, and the need for the work environment to change dramatically in the area of human resource management.

Culp, Kennith; Ramey, Sandra; Karlman, Susan

2011-01-01

461

Work and Health, a Blind Spot in Curative Healthcare? A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction Most workers with musculoskeletal disorders on sick leave often consult with regular health care before entering a specific\\u000a work rehabilitation program. However, it remains unclear to what extent regular healthcare contributes to the timely return\\u000a to work (RTW). Moreover, several studies have indicated that it might postpone RTW. There is a need to establish the influence\\u000a of regular healthcare

Freek J. B. LottersMarleen; Marleen Foets; Alex Burdorf

2010-01-01

462

Stability and change in burnout profiles over time: A prospective study in the working population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a prospective study on the development of burnout in the general Swedish working population from a person-oriented perspective. A large random sample of the general working population (N=1118) was cluster analyzed, using scores on the subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. The individual and structural stability of the configurations over time, as

Katja Boersma; Karin Lindblom

2009-01-01

463

The Impact of Urinary Incontinence in Working Women: A Study in a Production Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to identify the impact of self-reported UI on working women, to describe urine loss symptoms, strategies used to control urine loss, and help-seeking behavior among full-time women working in a rural production facility.Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used and questionnaires were distributed to 500 women (response rate, 54%). Items elicited information on

Sheila T. Fitzgerald; Mary H. Palmer; Victoria L. Kirkland; Leslie Robinson

2002-01-01

464

Work engagement and financial returns : a diary study on the role of job and personal resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates how daily fluctuations in job resources (autonomy, coaching, and team climate) are related to employees' levels of personal resources (self-efficacy, self- esteem, and optimism), work engagement, and financial returns. Forty-two employees working in three branches of a fast-food company completed a questionnaire and a diary booklet over 5 consecutive workdays. Consistent with hypotheses, multi-level analyses revealed that

Despoina Xanthopoulou; Arnold B. Bakker; Evangelia Demerouti; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

2009-01-01

465

Long Work Hours and Family LifeA Cross-National Study of Employees' Concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family conflict is a pressing research and policy issue. The authors extend previous scholarship on this issue by studying elite employees’worries about the effects of longwork hours on those in their personal life. This issue is researched cross-nationally in a sample of managers and professionals based in the United States, London, and Hong Kong, all of whom work for one

Amy S. Wharton; Mary Blair-Loy

2006-01-01

466

Contagious flexibility? A study on whether schedule flexibility facilitates work-life enrichment.  

PubMed

Schedule flexibility defines an important generating resource for work-life enrichment; however, our knowledge about how such spillovers take place is limited. This multiple case study examines how workers from different working time contexts with varying levels of schedule flexibility experience work-life interplay. Given the adopted explorative design, it is important to interpret the findings in a tentative light. Nonetheless, the study offers important insight into work-life enrichment that may guide future research in this field. The findings indicate that schedule flexibility may act as a boundary-spanning resource owing to the agency potential it offers workers. Thus, it seemed that flexible schedule opportunities enabled workers to engage more fully in personal life activities, which in turn had a positive influence on their work involvement through positive affect. Such positive role engagements appeared, however, to be greatly determined by workers' boundary management and by time conditions of work and family. In conclusion, the major findings and limitation of the study are discussed against existing research and theory. PMID:22672055

Pedersen, Vivi Bach; Jeppesen, Hans Jeppe

2012-06-04

467

The Role of Professional School Counselors in Working with Students in Gangs: A Grounded Theory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to propose a grounded theory that contributed to the understanding of the professional school counselor's role at the secondary school level in working with students in gangs. The study explored the role of the professional school counselor from the first person perspective of the professional school counselor and…

Barrow, Jennifer Cahoon

2011-01-01

468

On the study of phonological working memory: A specific relative weakness in children with Down syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Not all children acquire language easily and well. The study of language disorders in children represents an attempt at applying the findings on normal language acquisition to solve a practical problem in children experiencing difficulty in both learning and using language. This study was aimed at investigating the phonological working memory, known as the most significant aspect of speech perception

Jila Naeini

469

Uptake of antineoplastic agents in pharmacy personnel. Part II: study of work-related risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study aimed to find working conditions related to internal exposure of substances handled in centralised cytostatic drug preparation units in hospitals. Recommendations to avoid this uptake should be deduced from the results. Method. In a longitudinal study over 3 years, 87 pharmacy technicians and pharmacists of 14 different hospitals in Germany provided 24-h urine samples separately up to

Claudia Schreiber; Katja Radon; Angelika Pethran; Rudolf Schierl; Karlheinz Hauff; Carl-Heinz Grimm; Karl-Siegfried Boos; Dennis Nowak

2003-01-01

470

Paternal psychosocial work conditions and mental health outcomes: A case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The role of social and family environments in the development of mental health problems among children and youth has been widely investigated. However, the degree to which parental working conditions may impact on developmental psychopathology has not been thoroughly studied. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of several mental health outcomes of 19,833 children of sawmill workers and their

Stefania Maggi; Aleck Ostry; James Tansey; James Dunn; Ruth Hershler; Lisa Chen; Clyde Hertzman

2008-01-01

471

Relationships between organizational support, customer orientation, and work outcomes : A study of frontline bank employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to examine the nature of relationships between six organizational support mechanisms, a personal resource, and selected psychological and behavioral work outcomes. A related objective of the study is to uncover whether these relationships exhibit similar patterns between employees with different characteristics. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data for the study were collected from the employees of a large

Ugur Yavas; Emin Babakus

2010-01-01

472

Study of the Job Satisfaction of Professional Air Force Social Work Officers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The job satisfaction levels of 149 Air Force Social Work Officers were studied by using the Professional Satisfaction Inventory originally developed by Jayaratne and Chess (1982) to study the job satisfaction and job stress of a sample of members of the N...

D. W. Jablonski

1984-01-01

473

A Meta-Analysis of Published School Social Work Practice Studies: 1980-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This systematic review examined the effectiveness of school social work practices using meta-analytic techniques. Method: Hierarchical linear modeling software was used to calculate overall effect size estimates as well as test for between-study variability. Results: A total of 21 studies were included in the final analysis.…

Franklin, Cynthia; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

474

The Causal Effect of Federal Work-Study Participation: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from West Virginia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Since 1964, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program has provided funds to subsidize the wages of student employees, but it has never been studied directly. I use an instrumental variables difference-in-difference framework with administrative data from West Virginia to identify causal effects, comparing eligible and ineligible students across…

Scott-Clayton, Judith

2011-01-01

475

Work Preferences of Students over a Three Year Degree Course in Intellectual Disability Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the work preferences of 42 Australian students both on entering a degree course in intellectual disability studies and on completion three years later. At both times, altruism and self-development were students' dominant preferences with only weak preferences for co-workers, money, security, and detachment. Follow-up found…

Jenkinson, Josephine

1998-01-01

476

The Work of Community College Faculty: A Study through In-Depth Interviews. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the results of a study conducted to explore the nature and meaning of the work of community college faculty through a process of in-depth phenomenological interviewing of 76 faculty and staff and 24 students from community colleges in Massachusetts, New York, and California. Section 1 provides an overview of the study,…

Seidman, Earl; And Others

477

The Role of the Directorate of Studies in the Legislative Work of the Hellenic Parliament.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper discusses the role of the Directorate of Studies in the legislative work of the Hellenic Parliament (Greece). The first section describes the establishment and organization of the Directorate of Studies, which consists of three departments: the department for the elaboration of bills and law proposals, the department for parliamentary…

Vassilouni, Stavroula

478

A Meta-Analysis of Published School Social Work Practice Studies: 1980-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This systematic review examined the effectiveness of school social work practices using meta-analytic techniques. Method: Hierarchical linear modeling software was used to calculate overall effect size estimates as well as test for between-study variability. Results: A total of 21 studies were included in the final analysis.…

Franklin, Cynthia; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

479

Job Strain and Shift Work Influences on Biomarkers and Subclinical Heart Disease Indicators: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study is one of the first to examine the impact of job strain and shift work on both the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis using two salivary stress biomarkers and two subclinical heart disease indicators. This study also tested the feasibility of a rigorous biological sampling protocol in a busy workplace setting. Paramedics (n

Imelda S. Wong; Aleck S. Ostry; Paul A. Demers; Hugh W. Davies

2012-01-01

480

Longitudinal study on work related and individual risk factors affecting radiating neck pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo study the effects of work related and individual factors affecting radiating neck pain.METHODSA longitudinal study was carried out with repeated measurements. A total of 5180 Finnish forest industry workers replied to a questionnaire survey in 1992 (response rate 75%). Response rates to follow up questionnaires in 1993, 1994, and 1995 were 83%, 77%, and 90%, respectively. The outcome variable

E Viikari-Juntura; R Martikainen; R Luukkonen; P Mutanen; E-P Takala; H Riihimäki

2001-01-01

481

Research, Study, Travel & Work Abroad: Opportunities and Information for Students and Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The material in this pamphlet, compiled by the Institute of International Studies, is based on requests for information by students and teachers concerning research, study, travel, and work abroad. Two major sections are provided. The first treats United States government-sponsored opportunities and includes: (1) lecturing and advanced research…

Bruner, Karen, Comp.

482

A nested case-control study of fatal work related injuries among Brazilian steel workers.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the relative risk of death from work related injury in a steelworks, associated with exposure to various occupational hazards, sociodemographic factors, and medical history. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a nested case-control design. It was based on a cohort of men employed in the steel plant of USIMINAS, Brazil between January 1977 and August 1990, who were followed up to November 1992. The cases were defined as all workers in the cohort who died from injury in the study period and whose death had been notified to the Brazilian Ministry of Labour as being related to work. Four controls per case, matched to cases on year of birth, were randomly selected from among workers employed in the plant at the time of death of the matching case. Data on potential risk factors for occupational injury were extracted from company records; for the controls these data were abstracted for the period preceding the death of the matching case. RESULTS: There were 37 deaths related to work injuries during the study period. Four surviving workers were selected as controls for each case, but for eight the personnel records were incomplete, leaving 140 controls in all. Significantly increased risk of fatal injury related to work was associated with exposure to noise, heat, dust and fumes, gases and vapours, rotating shift work, being a manual worker, and working in the steel mill, coke ovens, blast furnaces, and energy and water supply areas. Risk of fatal injury related to work increased with intensity of exposure to noise (P (trend) = 0.004) and heat (P < 0.001), and increased greatly with a hazard score that combined information on noise, heat, dust, and gas exposure (P < 0.001). Number of years of schooling (P = 0.03) and salary level (P = 0.03) were both negatively associated with risk. In a multivariate analysis including all these significant factors, only hazard score and area of work remained associated with death from injury related to work. The highest risks were for men exposed to all four environmental hazards (odds ratio (OR) 19.4; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 352.1) and those working in the energy supply area (OR 18.0; 1.6 to 198.1). CONCLUSIONS: The study identified parts of the steelworks and types of hazard associated with greatly increased risk of fatal accident. Research and measures to prevent accidents need to concentrate on these areas and the people working in them. The use of a hazard score was successful in identifying high risk, and similar scoring might prove useful in other industrial situations.

Barreto, S M; Swerdlow, A J; Smith, P G; Higgins, C D

1997-01-01

483

Work ethics and general work attitudes in adolescents are related to quality of life, sense of coherence and subjective health - a Swedish questionnaire study  

PubMed Central

Background Working life is an important arena in most people's lives, and the working line concept is important for the development of welfare in a society. For young people, the period before permanent establishment in working life has become longer during the last two decades. Knowledge about attitudes towards work can help us to understand young people's transition to the labour market. Adolescents are the future workforce, so it seems especially important to notice their attitudes towards work, including attitudes towards the welfare system. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse upper secondary school students' work attitudes, and to explore factors related to these attitudes. Methods The sample consisted of 606 upper secondary school students. They all received a questionnaire including questions about quality of life (QOL), sense of coherence (SOC), subjective health and attitudes towards work. The response rate was 91%. A factor analysis established two dimensions of work attitudes. Multivariate analyses were carried out by means of logistic regression models. Results Work ethics (WE) and general work attitudes (GWA) were found to be two separate dimensions of attitudes towards work. Concerning WE the picture was similar regardless of gender or study programme. Males in theoretical programmes appeared to have more unfavourable GWA than others. Multivariate analyses revealed that good QOL, high SOC and good health were significantly related to positive WE, and high SOC was positively related to GWA. Being female was positively connected to WE and GWA, while studying on a practical programme was positively related to GWA only. Among those who received good parental support, GWA seemed more favourable. Conclusion Assuming that attitudes towards work are important to the working line concept, this study points out positive factors of importance for the future welfare of the society. Individual factors such as female gender, good QOL, high SOC and good health as well as support from both parents, positive experience of school and work contacts related positively to attitudes towards work. Further planning and supportive work have to take these factors into account.

Axelsson, Lars; Andersson, Ingemar; Hakansson, Anders; Ejlertsson, Goran

2005-01-01

484

Logistical and ergonomic transportation capacity for refuse collection workers: a work physiology field study.  

PubMed

In a work physiology field study, the work flow and the electrocardiogram were recorded throughout whole shifts for six male refuse (garbage) collection workers who transported and emptied 1.1 m3 refuse containers. The work rate (WR), indicated by the number of 1.1 m3 containers emptied per unit of time, and the work pulse rate (WPR) were determined in the data evaluation. The work pulse rate increases with the work rate. The functional relationship can be approximated by a linear regression function (WPR = 20.9 + 35.8.WR). The work pulse rate reaches such high values that it must be assumed that the work cannot be performed continuously throughout the whole working day. Consequently, regular breaks should be provided. When determining the necessary duration of the breaks, it was assumed that an equilibrium between fatigue and recovery should be maintained during the working day. The recovery breaks should be at least long enough for the heart rate to return to the resting level. The necessary duration of the breaks was determined on the basis of the present field study and the laboratory investigations described in the literature. A minimum duration of 10 min per working hour results from the calculations. The breaks should be taken regularly at about hourly intervals. A transportation-capacity model is provided for the planning of the deployment of refuse workers. It permits calculation of the number of 1.1 m3 containers a three-man crew, comprising the refuse collection truck driver and two loaders, can empty during one shift. Both the logistical and ergonomic transportation capacities can be determined using the model. The logistical transportation capacity (TCL) indicates the number of containers which can be emptied per shift by a crew when only criteria such as the optimal utilization of the working time are considered. The ergonomic transportation capacity (TCE) is understood as the number of containers which can be emptied per shift taking into consideration the workers' strain and the recovery breaks they require. TCE amounts to between about 140 and 160 containers per shift depending on the type of city district. TCL is higher by between 20 and 30 containers per shift. In order to meet the demand of protecting workers' health, the number of containers to be emptied per shift by a three-man crew should not exceed the ergonomic transportation capacity. PMID:1505505

Luttmann, A; Laurig, W; Jäger, M

1992-09-01

485

Practice area and work demands in nurses' aides: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge of how work demands vary between different practice areas could give us a better understanding of the factors that influence the working conditions in the health services, and could help identify specific work-related challenges and problems in the different practice areas. In turn, this may help politicians, and healthcare administrators and managers to develop healthy work units. The aim of this study was to find out how nurses' aides' perception of demands and control at work vary with the practice area in which the aides are working. Methods In 1999, 12 000 nurses' aides were drawn randomly from the member list of the Norwegian Union of Health – and Social Workers, and were mailed a questionnaire. 7478 (62.3 %) filled in the questionnaire. The sample of the present study comprised the 6485 nurses' aides who were not on leave. Respondents working in one practice area were compared with respondents not working in this area (all together). Because of multiple comparisons, 0.01 was chosen as statistical significance level. Results Total quantitative work demands were highest in somatic hospital departments, nursing homes, and community nurse units. Physical demands were highest in somatic hospital departments and nursing homes. Level of positive challenges was highest in hospital departments and community nurses units, and lowest in nursing homes and homes or apartment units for the aged. Exposure to role conflicts was most frequent in nursing homes, homes or apartment units for the aged, and community nurse units. Exposure to threats and violence was most frequent in psychiatric departments, nursing homes, and institutions for mentally handicapped. Control of work pace was highest in psychiatric departments and institutions for mentally handicapped, and was lowest in somatic hospital departments and nursing homes. Participation in decisions at work was highest in psychiatric departments and community nurse units, and was lowest in somatic hospital departments and nursing homes. Conclusion The demands and control experienced by Norwegian nurses' aides at work vary strongly with the practice area. Preventive workplace interventions should be tailored each area.

Eriksen, Willy

2006-01-01

486

Spanish for Working Medical Professionals: Linguistic Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This qualitative case study examined the Spanish linguistic needs of working health care professionals. Data from observation field notes, interviews, document analysis, and member checks were coded, triangulated, and analyzed following the premises of grounded theory. Results indicated that participants were able to produce routinely used words…

Lear, Darcy W.

2005-01-01

487

A pilot study of the reliability of the dynamic mode of one BTE Work Simulator.  

PubMed

This paper presents the results of a study of the reliability of the manual dynamic mode of one BTE Work Simulator. The study was part of an effort to develop a simple method of calibrating the BTE Work Simulator as an evaluation instrument. Weights attached to a 12-in nylon cylinder rotated the shaft of the exercise head against resistance generated by the Work Simulator. A timing device recorded drop times for one complete revolution of the nylon cylinder. The timing device consisted of a digital clock, a photo detector circuit, and a switching circuit. The photo detector recorded one revolution of the cylinder, and the switching circuit started and stopped the clock. Drop times were recorded as fixed weights attached to the nylon cylinder were allowed to drop. The test was repeated a number of times at each combination of weight and exercise level. A minimum of 40 tests were recorded with 4.96-, 10-, 15-, 25-, 30-, and 40-lb weights. This provided accurate measurement of the performance of the Work Simulator in the dynamic mode. Fluctuation in resistance caused drop times for any given weight to vary from -47% to +183.7% from the mean. In some cases the resistance fluctuation was sufficient to either prevent the weight from dropping or stop the weight before the cylinder had rotated one revolution. Resistance variation in the dynamic mode of the BTE Work Simulator was found to produce inconsistent performance. Testing that includes other Work Simulators is in progress. PMID:8535482

Cetinok, E M; Renfro, R R; Coleman, E F

488

Attending work or not when sick - what makes the decision? A qualitative study among car mechanics  

PubMed Central

Background High prevalence of sickness absence in countries with generous welfare schemes has generated debates on mechanisms that may influence workers’ decisions about calling in sick for work. Little is known about the themes at stake during the decision-making process for reaching the choice of absence or attendance when feeling ill. The aim of the study was to examine decisions of absence versus attendance among car mechanics when feeling ill. Methods Interviews with 263 male car mechanics from 19 companies were used for the study, analysed by systematic text condensation and presented as descriptions and quotations of experiences and opinions. Results Three major themes were at stake during the decision-making process: 1) Experienced degree of illness, focusing on the present health condition and indicators of whether you are fit for work or not; 2) daily life habits, where attending work was a daily routine, often learned from childhood; 3) the importance of the job, with focus on the importance of work, colleagues, customers and work environment. Conclusions The car mechanics expressed a strong will to attend work in spite of illness. Knowledge about attitudes an