Sample records for work study note

  1. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes…

  2. Social Work NoteS Research Holding the Torch of Knowledge

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Jerry

    Social Work NoteS Research Holding the Torch of Knowledge Bronze icon at the main entrance I S S O U R I #12;2 | Social Work Notes Greetings from the School of Social Work! The cover places on the generation of knowl- edge and the application of knowledge in the practice of social work

  3. Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. 7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD TRAVERSING DISTANT RIDGE BEYOND BRIDGE. SEEN FROM WEST OF HIGHWAY FROM OLD HIGHWAY LOOP. LOOKING E. - Lassen Park Road, Mineral, Tehama County, CA

  5. Working Note WN/CMGC/02/113

    E-print Network

    Working Note WN/CMGC/02/113 vair2cdf: convertisseur Vairmer/Netcdf de fichiers de données #12: ............. 32.2 Installation sur d'autres machines: - i - #12;#12;vair2cdf VERSION 1.2 Le convertisseur de

  6. These notes are from 2010 Cap and Trade Working Already

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Acid Rain These notes are from 2010 #12;Cap and Trade Working Already December 15, 2009 10:14 AM across the country decreased emissions of SO2, a precursor to acid rain, to 7.6 million tons in 2008. #12;Overview of Acid Rain Phenomenon Most common term for acidification of the environment, which can occur

  7. Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-07-01

    In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

  8. Working and Studying Abroad

    E-print Network

    their studies, and any student or graduate looking to explore career opportunities in a new country. It contains web sites: http://europa.eu information on living, working and studying in the EU. Includes links

  9. Work Environment It is important to note the specific criteria you are seeking in a work environment

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Work Environment It is important to note the specific criteria you are seeking in a work environment as you consider various career paths and again as you evaluate actual job opportunities. Circle work environment preferences

  10. Work-Study Job Directory* Job Publish Request Form

    E-print Network

    Guenther, Frank

    Work-Study Job Directory* Job Publish Request Form Please note: Work-Study jobs can be posted via-mail address students may contact: Job Description Changes (if any): Help us keep the directory up that we may remove your listing(s) from the directory. This form is for posting existing work-study job

  11. LAPACK Working Note #224 QR Factorization of Tall and Skinny Matrices in a

    E-print Network

    Dongarra, Jack

    LAPACK Working Note #224 QR Factorization of Tall and Skinny Matrices in a Grid Computing factorization ­ one of the main dense linear algebra kernels ­ of tall and skinny matrices in a grid computing

  12. Asymptotic analysis: Working note {number_sign}3, boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France). Laboratoire d`Analyse Numerique; Kaper, H.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In this chapter the authors discuss the asymptotic approximation of functions that display boundary-layer behavior. The purpose here is to introduce the basic concepts underlying the phenomenon, to illustrate its importance, and to describe some of the fundamental tools available for its analysis. To achieve their purpose in the clearest way possible, the authors will work with functions that are assumed to be given explicitly -- that is, functions f : (0,{epsilon}{sub 0}) {yields} X whose expressions are known, at least in principle. Only in the following chapter will they begin the study of functions that are given implicitly as solutions of boundary value problems -- the real stuff of which singular perturbation theory is made. Boundary-layer behavior is associated with asymptotic expansions that are regular {open_quotes}almost everywhere{close_quotes} -- that is, expansions that are regular on every compact subset of the domain of definition, but not near the boundary. These regular asymptotic expansions can be continued in a certain sense all the way up to the boundary, but a separate analysis is still necessary in the boundary layer. The boundary-layer analysis is purely local and aims at constructing local approximations in the neighborhood of each point of the singular part of the boundary. The problem of finding an asymptotic approximation is thus reduced to matching the various local approximations to the existing regular expansion valid in the interior of the domain. The authors are thinking, for example, of fluid flow (viscosity), combustion (Lewis number), and superconductivity (Ginzburg-Landau parameter) problems. Their solution may remain smooth over a wide range of parameter values, but as the parameters approach critical values, complicated patterns may emerge.

  13. The Development of Working Memory: Further Note on the Comparability of Two Models of Working Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ribaupierre, Anik; Bailleux, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes similarities and differences between the working memory models of Pascual-Leone and Baddeley. Debates whether each model makes a specific contribution to explanation of Kemps, De Rammelaere, and Desmet's results. Argues for necessity of theoretical task analyses. Compares a study similar to that of Kemps et al. in which different…

  14. Selective eaters: a retrospective case note study.

    PubMed

    Timimi, S; Douglas, J; Tsiftsopoulou, K

    1997-05-01

    The literature on children who present with selective eating is limited to single case studies. This study aims to provide a descriptive clinical profile for these children. Case notes of 33 patients between 4 and 14 years of age, seen in two clinics over a 4-year-period were studied. Over two-thirds of the cases were boys. A significant minority had poor growth or weight gain. The children suffered from anxiety, obsessive compulsive symptoms, both food and non-food related and often had social and school difficulties. Mealtimes caused immense anxiety for family members and frequent mealtime battles was reported by the parents of the younger selective eaters, whereas parents of older children seemed to have given up trying to change their child's eating habits. A history of depression in at least one parent was found in a third of the parental couples. PMID:9158914

  15. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method.

    PubMed

    Sabik, A; Go?ek, F; Antczak, G

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers. PMID:26026572

  16. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, A.; Go?ek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-01

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  17. B. Reviews and notes bibliographies and works of reference

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Latham; Geoffrey Roper; Frances M. Abercromby; John K. Cooley; Charles Tripp; Robin Bidwell; Adrian Brockett; Edmund Bosworth; C. H. Bleaney; J. M. Wagstaff; Philip Sadgrove; Geoffrey Khan; Sayed Shoukry; Haskell D. Isaacs; Jørgen Nielsen; Brian W. Beeley; Frances Bostock; Paul Starkey; Ernest Noble; Clive Holes; Charles Melville; Behruz Morvaridi; Annemarie Schimmel; Levon Avdoyan; Robert Hillenbrand; Michael Rogers; Mounira Khemir; Gillian M. Grant

    1989-01-01

    INDEX ISLAMICUS 1665–1905: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ARTICLES ON ISLAMIC SUBJECTS IN PERIODICALS AND OTHER COLLECTIVE PUBLICATIONS. Compiled by W.H. BEHN. Millersville, Adiyok, 1989. xxx, 870pp. US$ 125.— or DM 225.— or £72.00.CATALOGUE OF THE ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS IN THE DAIBER COLLECTION, INSTITUTE OF ORIENTAL CULTURE, UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO. By HANS DAIBER. Tokyo, Documentation Center for Asian Studies, Institute of Oriental Culture,

  18. Teaching Note--Heterosexism as Experienced by LGBT Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    As social work educators, much of our practice involves helping students think critically about complex political, economic, and social issues. One of the most complex and contentious sociopolitical issues of our time has been civil rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. This teaching note considers how we, as LGBT…

  19. Sex work: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bill; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Explanations of adult involvement in sex work typically adopt one of two approaches. One perspective highlights a variety of negative experiences in childhood and adolescence, including physical and sexual abuse, family instability, poverty, associations with "pimps" and other exploiters, homelessness, and drug use. An alternative account recognizes that some of these factors may be involved, but underscores the contribution of more immediate circumstances, such as current economic needs, human capital, and employment opportunities. Prior research offers a limited assessment of these contrasting claims: most studies have focused exclusively on people working in the sex industry and they have not assessed the independent effects of life course variables central to these two perspectives. We add to this literature with an analysis that drew on insights from life course and life-span development theories and considered the contributions of factors from childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Our comparative approach examined predictors of employment in sex work relative to two other low-income service or care work occupations: food and beverage serving and barbering and hairstyling. Using data from a study of almost 600 workers from two cities, one in Canada and the other in the United States, we found that both immediate circumstances and negative experiences from early life are related to current sex work involvement: childhood poverty, abuse, and family instability were independently associated with adult sex work, as were limited education and employment experience, adult drug use, and marital status. PMID:24671729

  20. Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/swws Social Work and Women's Studies can lead Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America because it focuses on social

  1. Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Women's Studies can lead Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America because it focuses on social

  2. Exploration of GPs' views and use of the fit note: a qualitative study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Victoria K; Mallen, Christian D; Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Jinks, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickness certification constitutes daily clinical practice for GPs. In April 2010, the UK sickness certification system changed to reflect the evidence that work is generally good for health and a new Statement of Fitness for Work — the ‘fit note’ — was introduced. Sickness certification is a contentious topic among GPs and the proposed fit note generated mixed reviews. Aim To explore GPs' views and use of the fit note during its first year of operation. Design and setting Qualitative interview study of GPs based in different geographical locations across the UK. Method GPs (n = 15), who were recruited from a national sample, participated in semi-structured telephone interviews which were subject to constant comparative analysis. Results Overall, the fit note was well received. GPs recognised that work is generally good for health and felt the fit note facilitated using an earlier return to work as a negotiation tool. GPs perceive employers as the major obstacle to early return to work. There were reports of scepticism towards the system that negatively impacted on some GPs' operation of sickness certification. Feedback over the fit note's impact on employer behaviour and the return of a mechanism that enables GPs to request early independent assessments would be welcomed. Conclusion A revised approach is needed to address the scepticism towards the sickness certification system that persists among some GPs. New strategies need to be designed to engage employers in facilitating an early return to work and to enable the objectives of the medical statement reforms to be achieved. PMID:22546596

  3. Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Disability Studies can or family practice. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

  4. Social Work and Diaspora Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Diaspora Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Diaspora Studies can lead, children's services, residential centres and family services. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Social Work

  5. Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and Women's Studies can lead to careers in child and youth protection services, women's shelters, sexual. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America. We

  6. Noted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunberg, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

  7. University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers to differences in ethnic, religious, and

    E-print Network

    University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a sophisticated awareness · discusses personal experience within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a working

  8. RENEWAL OF WORK PERMITS/STUDENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR MSP Please note that copies of work permits/student authorizations must be submitted to

    E-print Network

    RENEWAL OF WORK PERMITS/STUDENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR MSP Please note that copies of work permits in which a Work Permit or Student Authorization expires. If they are renewed, coverage will only) If the renewal date is the day immediately following the expiration of the previous permit

  9. Social Work and Applied Social Studies

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate 1 #12;www.bath.ac.uk/sps Undergraduate Social Work and Applied Social Studies What is Social Work? `The social work profession promotes social change' (International Federation of Social Workers, 2000) Social work is an exceptionally interesting, challenging

  10. Algebraic cobordism of filtered vector bundles on varieties: Notes on a work of Lee and Pandharipande

    E-print Network

    Chien-Hao Liu; Yu-jong Tzeng; Shing-Tung Yau

    2011-04-02

    The construction of double point cobordism groups of vector bundles on varieties in the work [Lee-P] (arXiv:1002.1500 [math.AG]) of Yuan-Pin Lee and Rahul Pandharipande gives immediately double point cobordism groups of filtered vector bundles on varieties. We note also that among the four basic operations -- direct sum, tensor product, dual, and Hom -- on vector bundles on varieties, only taking dual is compatible with double point cobordisms of vector bundles on varieties in general, by a demonstration on an example of vector bundles on Calabi-Yau 3-folds. A question on refined and/or higher algebraic cobordisms of vector bundles on varieties is posed in the end.

  11. SHORT COMMUNICATION The utility of ITS2 in spider phylogenetics: notes on prior work and an example from Anelosimus

    E-print Network

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    SHORT COMMUNICATION The utility of ITS2 in spider phylogenetics: notes on prior work and an example of spiders. Here, I examine the potential utility of this marker for spider phylogenetics based on preliminary data for Anelosimus spiders and a brief summary of prior work. The secondary structure of ITS2

  12. Social Work and Applied Social Studies

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate #12;Undergraduate Social and Policy Sciences 2, social policy, international development and social work. Many of our staff are at the forefront Guide 2015, for example, social work at Bath is ranked 1st, sociology 2nd, social policy 3rd. Bath

  13. ADIFOR case study: VODE + ADIFOR. ADIFOR working note No. 10

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, G.

    1992-08-01

    ADIFOR can be used to generate the Jacobians required by VODE in a manner that is easy to use. We provide a template to interface the ADIFOR-generated code with VODE and show how the template is used in a sample system of stiff ordinary differential equation. The ADIFOR-generated code is about 10% faster than the hand-coded Jacobian for this example.

  14. Learning to work or working to learn? A university–work transition case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Zucchermaglio; Francesca Alby

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the case of an innovative project on the transition between university and work. The project examined sustains\\u000a two social dimensions of learning: education as a shared social institution in which university studies and work can be productively\\u000a interconnected and alternated in order to enhance learning, and learning as identity projects and significant participation\\u000a in situated activities. Working

  15. Who leaves suicide notes? A six-year population-based study.

    PubMed

    Cerel, Julie; Moore, Melinda; Brown, Margaret M; van de Venne, Judy; Brown, Sabrina L

    2015-06-01

    Popular culture insists on the significance of suicide notes, but research has yielded conflicting results about who leaves notes. Utilizing 6 years of suicides from a comprehensive statewide data surveillance system, differences were examined between cases with suicide notes and those without in terms of demographics, circumstances of the suicide, and precipitating circumstances. Of the 2,936 suicides, 18.25% included a note. Demographics and circumstances did not differ for cases with a note compared to cases with no note. Results have implications for working with people bereaved by suicide in helping understand that the notes are uncommon and not systematic. However, it is also possible that for some individuals, the content of a note is meaningful and can help or hinder their course of bereavement. PMID:25308893

  16. [Work capacity perceived by nurses: descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Tomietto, Marco; Zanini, Antonietta; Sgrazzutti, Sasha; Palese, Alvisa

    2011-01-01

    Perceived work ability is the worker perception of his/her job performances. There are many factors involved in this perception: individual characteristics (such as health status, motivation, and attitudes), job characteristics (such as technological resources, physical and mental demands) and working climate (such as job organization and leadership styles). The promotion of a good work ability could decrease the premature loss of workers and could help them in facing job demands and stress. In the health care settings the risk to perceive a low work ability could be higher due to nurses' shortage. The main aim of this pilot study was to measure the perceived work ability among nurses in order to find the work ability predictors. 78 nurses were recruited and had filled the Work Ability Index (WAI). The main work ability predictors found were: age over 45 years (OR=4,56; IC 95% 1,14 to 19,14), working years over 15 (OR=3,18; IC 95% 1,09 to 9,45) and more than 3 diseases (OR=25,00; IC95% 3,17 to 531,90). These results give useful information to health care managers in order to improve human resources management strategies and to find solutions about nurses' shortage and aging workforce. PMID:22452097

  17. FIELD STUDY OF HOOF WALL PROBLEMS IN UNSHOD WORKING HORSES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. BIGHAM; A. N. TABATABAEI

    A population of 100 native breed unshod working horses was examined for hoof wall problems. The diagnosis of hoof wall defects was performed by close visual observation and via physical examina- tion. The location, extent and types of defects were then determined and recorded. Out of 100 horses, 124 hoof wall defects were noted in ninety working horses. The number

  18. Work Study/Work Learn Prepared by Liz Hilliard and Spencer Hunt

    E-print Network

    Handy, Todd C.

    Work Study/Work Learn proposals Prepared by Liz Hilliard and Spencer Hunt workstudy.worklearn@ubc.ca #12;Overview: the Work Study and Work Learn program · Work Study ­ undergraduate and graduate domestic students · Work Learn ­ undergraduate international students · Funded by tuition dollars #12;Changes

  19. Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

  20. A Note on Some Common Problems in Current Field Work in Sociology and Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Record, Wilson

    This paper compares research interests of anthropologists and sociologists. The hypothesis is that similarities in the way in which anthropologists and sociologists define and gather data may produce convergences in style and methods of research, particularly in field work situations. Field work is interpreted to include practical and/or research…

  1. Teaching Notes: Reframing Multicultural Education--Teaching White Privilege in the Social Work Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Laura S.; Gibson, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a model of teaching diversity in social work education that includes significant content on White privilege. The authors first discuss some limitations of social work's current multicultural framework. Next, they introduce concepts and pedagogical strategies concerning White identity and privilege that are drawn from…

  2. Study Strategies and Generative Learning: What Works?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Blerkom, Dianna L.; Van Blerkom, Malcolm L.; Bertsch, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    One hundred nine college students participated in an experiment that involved reading a passage and responding to a 20-item multiple choice test. The students were randomly assigned to one of four groups. The four conditions involved reading and copying, reading and highlighting, reading and taking notes, and reading and generating questions.…

  3. SLICOT Working Note 199911 A MATLAB MEXfile environment of SLICOT 1

    E-print Network

    Xu, Hongguo

    ­5040) and is distributed by the Working Group on Software WGS. WGS secretariat: Mrs. Ida Tassens, ESAT ­ Katholieke by anonymous ftp from wgs.esat.kuleuven.ac.be in the directory pub/WGS/REPORTS/SLWN1999­11.ps.Z 2 Fakult¨at f

  4. Teaching Note--Integrating Prevention Content into Clinical Social Work Practice Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid changes in health care services and delivery suggest an upcoming paradigm shift in the field of mental health. Recent national reports, health care policy changes, and growing evidence support a shift toward prevention-focused mental health care. The social work profession is uniquely positioned to act as leaders in this shift as the…

  5. Teaching Note--Incorporating Social Innovation Content into Macro Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Cosner Berzin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The practice of social innovation offers promising approaches for addressing social issues. Although many social innovation strategies are congruent with macro social work theory and practice, some of the insights and tactics that have emerged in the social innovation field have the potential to strengthen current macro practice. Based on our…

  6. National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Programmatic Research and Development. A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Arnold; And Others

    This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different management systems used by the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Air Force in managing programmatic research and…

  7. Travel, Sabbatical, and Study Leave Policies in College Libraries. CLIP Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Carolyn, Comp.; Morrill, Allen S., Comp.

    The "College Library Information Packet (CLIP) Note" series is known for providing college and university libraries with reviews and current documentation on library practices and procedures of relevance to them. This "CLIP Note" provides information and sample policies on travel, sabbaticals, and study leaves of absence in small academic…

  8. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

  9. A study on the relationships between age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaeyeop; Park, Juhyung; Cho, Milim; Park, Yunhee; Kim, DeokJu; Yang, Dongju; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation of age, work experience, cognition, and work ability in older employees working in heavy industry. [Subjects and Methods] The study was conducted using 100 subjects who were over 55?years old and worked in heavy industry. To obtain data, we first had the subjects complete the MoCA-K test and Work Ability Index (WAI). The data were then analyzed by frequency and correlation using statistical software (SPSS 21.0). [Results] Through this study, we discovered a significant positive correlation between WAI and MoCA-K, age, and work experience. [Conclusion] This study revealed that work ability in older employees increases not with the number of years worked but with the enhancement of cognitive ability. Special management that focuses on cognition is therefore required for senior employees working in the field of heavy industry. PMID:25642062

  10. A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Heerwagen, J.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

  11. LAPACK Working Note #224 QR Factorization of Tall and Skinny Matrices in a Grid Computing Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Agullo; Camille Coti; Jack Dongarra

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that common dense linear algebra operations do not achieve speed up by using multiple geographical sites of a computational grid. Because such operations are the building blocks of most scientific applications, conventional supercomput ers are still strongly predominant in high-performance computing and the use of grids for speeding up large-scale scientific problems is limited to applications

  12. ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment. ADIFOR Working Note No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carle, A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Center for Research on Parallel Computation

    1992-07-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

  13. Studies of Education and Work. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westley, William A.

    The Experimental Projects Branch of the Department of Manpower and Immigration contracted with the McGill University Industrial Relations Center to assess the bearing of the social science literature upon work and educational organizations and, in particular, their relevance to the construction of training programs. This paper presents a summary…

  14. Study of Quality of Work Life (QWL)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Nasl Saraji; H Dargahi

    2006-01-01

    A high quality of work life (QWL) is essential for organizations to continue to attract and retain employees. QWL is a com- prehensive program designated to improve employee satisfaction. This research aimed to provide insights into the positive and negative attitudes of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) Hospitals' employees from their quality of life. A cross- sectional, descriptive and

  15. Study Shows Arthritis' Toll on Work, Social Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_152907.html Study Shows Arthritis' Toll on Work, Social Life Joint disease plus other chronic health conditions ... chronic health conditions can often harm a person's social life and ability to work, a new study finds. About one in seven ...

  16. This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw the structures of B and C.

    E-print Network

    Taber, Douglass

    This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw (6) 4. (20 points) Deduce the stucture of F, and draw an arrow-pushing mechanism2O OH OH Br HO E #12;5. (20 points) Draw a detailed arrow-pushing mechanism for the following

  17. This working notes on the concept of "Relational Categories" is circulated at the Midlands Graduate School in Foundations of Computing Science, 2014.

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Uday S.

    This working notes on the concept of "Relational Categories" is circulated at the Midlands Graduate School in Foundations of Computing Science, 2014. 1 Relational structures I will use a new term "relational structure" for what has been called a reflexive graph in [1]: Definition 1 A relational structure

  18. Resource Allocation and Budgeting for the 1972-73 Mini-Schools of the Alum Rock Voucher Demonstration. Analysis of the Education Voucher Demonstration. A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggart, S. A.; Furry, W. S.

    This Working Note documents the first year's events and outcomes in developing the budgeting system and resource allocation rules to support the Education Voucher Demonstration. The district now has systems for per pupil resource allocation and school/minischool cost center accounting. The basic voucher of $1,041 for grades 7-8, and $788 for…

  19. islmprog@indiana.edu * 812-856-3977 "My note": error and emendation in copies of the works of 'Ali Shir Nava'i

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    islmprog@indiana.edu * 812-856-3977 "My note": error and emendation in copies of the works of 'Ali of the fifteenth-century Central Asian statesman and poet 'Ali Shir Nava'i exist in hundreds of manuscript copies

  20. Struggling at work - a qualitative study of working Danes with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Andersen, Malene Friis; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Ulla

    2014-10-28

    Abstract Purpose: Little is known on how employees at work with mental health problems experience their work environment. This study explores how a selected sample of Danish employees with depressive symptoms experience the interaction with their work environment and how they respond to and deal with problems at work. Methods: From a survey study on work and mental health in Denmark, we invited participants for in-depth interviews. Using grounded theory, we conducted 13 semi structured interviews with employees, at work, experiencing depressive symptoms. Findings: Work was pivotal for the informants who were in an on-going process that we conceptualised as struggling at work. Informants struggled with the negative experiences of work that led to emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms. Relationships with supervisors and colleagues, work load and work pressure and their self-image as a good worker conditioned the struggle. The informants found themselves unable to change their problematic working situation. This gradually led to different strategies to endure work and take care of one-self. These strategies were as follows: tending to symptoms and altering prospects for their future. The consequence of the on-going struggle was that the informants distanced themselves from their work. Conclusions: This study provided insight to the process of struggling at work, which the interviewed employees with depressive symptoms experienced. Implications for Rehabilitation Behaviour of supervisors is a key element for employees with depressive symptoms struggling at work. Practitioners and other health and rehabilitation practitioners working with people with depressive symptoms and other mental health problems could inquire about supervisor's behaviour and relation between supervisors and employees. Interventions that targets both the individual employee as well as work environment focused interventions at the organisational level could be beneficial for employees with mental health problems as well as the workplaces. PMID:25350663

  1. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  2. COURSE OF STUDY: DISTANCE OPTION MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    COURSE OF STUDY: DISTANCE OPTION MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM Three-year curriculum grid example First Year ­ 19 credits Fall Winter Spring SW 520 Social Work and Social Welfare Policy (4 credit hours) SW 550 Foundation of Social Work Research (3 credit hours) SW 551 Data Analysis in Social Work

  3. A longitudinal study exploring the relationships between occupational stressors, non-work stressors, and work performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian A. Edwards; Andrew Guppy; Tracey Cockerton

    2007-01-01

    There is a lack of intricate research into the relationships between work performance and other variables. This study examined the causal relationship between work, non-work stressors, and work performance. Using longitudinal multi-group data from three groups—university staff, trainee nurses, and part-time employees (overall N=244)—structural equation modelling was employed to explore one-way and reverse competing models. The results produced a good

  4. Sex Work and Students: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ron; Bergstrom, Sandra; La Rooy, David

    2007-01-01

    Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N=130) in the south of England, who completed a cross-sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological…

  5. Study in Germany / Work in Germany

    E-print Network

    Peak, Derek

    CAUTG-based; currently run through U of Alberta Yearly: Six ½ weeks (5. May-18. June 2011 - August for 9 credit units Format: 14 weeks web-based plus 4 weeks (August) in Heidelberg U, e-mail: ejwarken@mun.ca http://www.mun.ca/german/german/scholarships.php #12;I.B. Study in Germany

  6. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 2: Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The construction portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines the requirements and selects the concepts for the crewman work system required to support the construction of large structures in space.

  7. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  8. C:\\Backup\\Plan 5\\Portfolio Work\\Olivia\\SAAC 2010\\110202 SAAC Meeting\\Notes\\110202 SAAC minutes 110520.docx Page 1 110202 SAAC minutes 110520.docx

    E-print Network

    C:\\Backup\\Plan 5\\Portfolio Work\\Olivia\\SAAC 2010\\110202 SAAC Meeting\\Notes\\110202 SAAC minutes a resource portfolio. Finally he described the general requirements of any computer model designed to address\\Portfolio Work\\Olivia\\SAAC 2010\\110202 SAAC Meeting\\Notes\\110202 SAAC minutes 110520.docx Page 2

  9. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

  10. EDITORIAL NOTES Long-term field studies of old-growth forests on Changbai

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    EDITORIAL NOTES Long-term field studies of old-growth forests on Changbai Mountain in Northeast-broadleaved mixed forest (700­ 1,100 m), coniferous forest (1,100­1,700 m), Erman birch forest (1,700­2,000 m by Prof. Zhan Wang, who was among the first generation of forest ecologists in China (Shao et al. 2000

  11. Notes on Study The exam will be divided into an ID (identification) section, a short answer

    E-print Network

    Callender, Craig

    Notes on Study The exam will be divided into an ID (identification) section, a short answer section needn't be a genius to answer these correctly. One need only have carefully done the reading, paid answer section then asks questions with fairly specific answers that don't require much analysis

  12. Graph homomorphisms II: some examples Combinatorics Study Group Notes 2, October 2006

    E-print Network

    Banaji,. Murad

    Graph homomorphisms II: some examples Taoyang Wu Combinatorics Study Group Notes 2, October 2006 October 6, 2006 Abstract Following the talk on graph homomorphisms given by Peter last week, we continue to discuss some examples of graph homomorphisms. More precisely, the graph parameters which can

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE Open Access Improved molecular toolkit for cAMP studies in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TECHNICAL NOTE Open Access Improved molecular toolkit for cAMP studies in live cells Kwan Pyo Hong1 Nicol et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms for visuali- zation in live cells [6]. However, the excitation wavelength of this visible reporter overlaps

  14. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-print Network

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon we learn from past climate variations? How can we best adapt to climate change? This report attempts

  15. Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how…

  16. Bullying and harassment at work and their relationships to work environment quality: An exploratory study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ståle Einarsen; Bjørn Inge Raknes; Stig Berge Matthiesen

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore relationships between organizational and social work conditions and the occurrence of bullying and harassment at work. Bullying and harassment are situations where a worker or supervisor is systematically mistreated and victimized by fellow workers or supervisors through repeated negative acts like insulting remarks and ridicule, verbal abuse, offensive teasing, isolation, and social

  17. Cutting healthcare costs through work force reductions. Studies find what works and what doesn't.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M; Murphy, E C

    1996-07-01

    Restructuring to cut costs often involves work force reductions. Two recent studies of restructuring in healthcare organizations have found that how an organization reduces its work force is just as important as whether it does. Organizations that implemented across-the-board staff cuts achieved limited cost savings. They also experienced decreased clinical quality, reduced patient satisfaction, and increased staff turnover. However, organizations that reduced their work forces only after a thorough assessment of work processes and job roles achieved greater cost savings, improved clinical quality, higher patient satisfaction, and less staff turnover. PMID:10158697

  18. 2012 2013 Federal Work Study Employer Handbook Introduction

    E-print Network

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    additional applications. Assistance may include scholarships, grants, loans, and work- study. Scholarships and Scholarships participates in a variety of financial aid programs. The primary application for these financial and grants are "gift" awards that do not have to be repaid. Loans and work-study opportunities are considered

  19. What Works Clearinghouse[TM] Reporting Guide for Study Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document provides guidance about how to describe studies and report their findings in a way that is clear, complete, and transparent. This document does not include information about how studies are judged against What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards. For information about What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards, please refer to…

  20. Novice Nurses’ Perception of Working Night Shifts: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohsen; Moattari, Marzieh; Sharif, Farkhondeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing is always accompanied by shift working and nurses in Iran have to work night shifts in some stages of their professional life. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe the novice nurses’ perception of working night shifts. Methods: The present qualitative study was conducted on 20 novice nurses working in two university hospitals of Jahrom, Iran. The study data were collected through focus group interviews. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative analysis and qualitative content analysis. Results: The study findings revealed five major themes of value system, physical and psychological problems, social relationships, organizational problems, and appropriate opportunity. Conclusion: The study presented a deep understanding of the novice nurses’ perception of working night shifts, which can be used by the managers as a basis for organizing health and treatment systems. PMID:25276724

  1. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

    2011-02-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments. PMID:20962033

  2. A Win-Win Paradigm for Quality of Work Life and Business Performance. [and] Invited Reaction: Comments on Lau and May's Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, R. S. M.; May, Bruce E.; Schurman, Susan J.

    1998-01-01

    Lau and May's study of 58 "best U.S. companies to work for" and 88 top Standard and Poor's companies suggests that companies with high quality of working life can also enjoy exceptional growth and profitability. Schurman's critique notes that their sample does not reflect conditions in the majority of U.S. employers. (SK)

  3. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  4. Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Sjon F.

    2011-01-01

    English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in…

  5. Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-01-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  6. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible individual...

  7. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible individual...

  8. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible individual...

  9. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work-study allowance. An eligible individual...

  10. A Qualitative Study of the Work Environments of Mexican Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Juarez, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of the nursing work environment are increasingly common in developed countries, but few exist in developing countries. Because of resource differences between the two contexts, researchers need to clarify what aspects of the work environments are similar and different. Objectives To study the perspectives of Mexican nurses about their work environments to determine similarities and differences to results from developed world studies. Design A secondary, directed content analysis of qualitative data from 46 Spanish language interviews using workplace-oriented themes Setting Purposively selected Mexican states from four regions of the country that reflect the country’s socioeconomic differences. Participants Practicing Mexican nurses with at least one year of clinical experience and currently working in nursing. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Methods Initial data collection occurred in 2006 and 2008 during a broader study about professionalization processes that occurred in Mexican nursing between 1980 and 2005. The secondary, directed content analysis focused on an in-depth exploration of a central theme that emerged from the two original studies: The Workplace. The directed content analysis used themes from the global nursing work environment literature to structure the analysis: Professional relationships, organizational administrative practices, and quality of care and services. Results The three themes from the global literature were relevant for the Mexican context and a new one emerged related to hiring practices. By category, the same factors that created positive or negative perceptions of the work environment matched findings from other international studies conducted in developed countries. The descriptors of the category, however, had different conceptual meanings that illustrate the health system challenges in Mexico. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that studies that seek to measure nursing work environments will most likely apply in Mexico and other Latin American or middle-income countries. Instruments designed to measure the work environment of nurses in these countries may prove relevant in those contexts, but require careful adaptation and systematic translations to ensure it. PMID:22386989

  11. Work and Productivity Loss in the Rizatriptan Multiple Attack Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E J Dasbach; G W Carides; W C Gerth; N C Santanello; J G Pigeon; M S Kramer

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the self-reported effect of acute migraine and its treatment on paid work and productivity loss. Patients self-administered a questionnaire in which the impact of a recent migraine on paid work and productivity activities was assessed. We included the questionnaire in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, out-patient study designed to examine the safety

  12. Occupational classification according to work demands: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    de Zwart, B C; Broersen, J P; van der Beek, A J; Frings-Dresen, M H; van Dijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    The use of job title as crude exposure measure in epidemiological studies is often inevitable when the available exposure data is scarce. In this study, an existing classification scheme of all job titles in the Netherlands into six categories of physical and mental work demands, constructed by expert judgement, was evaluated. Furthermore, a revision of this classification scheme for a research project on the relation between age, physical work demands, and musculoskeletal complaints was proposed and evaluated as well. For the evaluation, self-reported work demands, derived from questionnaire data of 38,921 employees and quantified by a scale of physical work demands and mental work demands, were used. Based on comparison of the mean scale scores of the several categories of work demands at group level, both classification schemes showed construct validity. Notwithstanding several limitations, the use of the presented classification schemes in epidemiological studies seems particularly challenging and rewarding when analysing data at group level from large and heterogeneous occupational populations. These kind of exploratory studies may generate new hypothesis on the basic patterns concerning work-related disorders, and can also be informative from a policy making perspective. PMID:9524406

  13. Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    Authored and curated by David P. Stern, these web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

  14. Association of overtime work and hypertension in a Japanese working population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Imai, Teppei; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Nishihara, Akiko; Nakagawa, Tohru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Honda, Toru; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Kochi, Takeshi; Eguchi, Masafumi; Uehara, Akihiko; Kuroda, Reiko; Omoto, Daisuke; Nagata, Tomohisa; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Kurotani, Kayo; Nanri, Akiko; Akter, Shamima; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Sone, Tomofumi; Dohi, Seitaro

    2014-12-01

    Long working hours have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but its relationship with hypertension remains unclear. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between overtime and presence of hypertension using data from a large-scale multi-company study in Japan. Participants were 52?365 workers of four companies that provided both health-checkup data and self-reported data on overtime worked. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ?140?mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ?90?mmHg, and/or the use of antihypertensive drug. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the odds ratio for hypertension for each category of overtime work (<45, 45-79, 80-99 or ?100?h/month) with adjustments for age, sex, company, smoking status and body mass index. The prevalence of hypertension tended to decrease with increasing overtime work: 17.5, 12.0, 11.1 and 9.1% for the shortest (<45?h/month) through the longest overtime category (?100?h/month). The age-, sex- and company-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.00 (reference), 0.81 (0.75-0.86), 0.73 (0.62-0.86), 0.58 (0.44-0.76), respectively (p for linear trend <0.001). In a sub-cohort, the inverse association remained statistically significant after an additional adjustment for other potential confounders. Results of the present large-scale study among Japanese workers suggest an inverse association between overtime work and presence of hypertension. PMID:25229210

  15. Editor's Note (April 2004)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chris Ohana

    2004-04-01

    Have you ever worked with your students on some authentic problem? An issue in the school or community comes up and your class studies it? Most of you probably have. You have taught using some instructional technique for years, then someone "invents" it and it is suddenly in vogue. Project-based learning is one of these techniques. This selection includes notes from the Science and Children Field Editor about the value of project-based science.

  16. Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2013 Note: the same question is sometimes asked in different ways.

    E-print Network

    Lively, Curt

    1 Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2013 Note: the same (Darwin's cousin) reject Darwin's view of evolution by natural selection? Why genetics? What is the heritability of two ears on a population of mice, all

  17. Working in the Sky: A Diary Study on Work Engagement Among Flight Attendants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Despoina Xanthopoulou; Arnold B. Baker; Ellen Heuven; Evangelia Demerouti; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to gain insight in the motivational process of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model by examining whether daily fluctuations in colleague support (i.e., a typical job resource) predict day-levels of job performance through self-efficacy and work engagement. Forty-four flight attendants filled in a questionnaire and a diary booklet before and after consecutive flights to three intercontinental destinations. Results

  18. Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW)

    E-print Network

    Raja, Anita

    Page 1 | Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 30, 2014 Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) Academic Plan of Study College of Health and Human Services Department of Social Work the BSW graduate for generalist social work practice. Students will need to complete SOWK 1101, 2182, 2183

  19. Working

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

  20. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  1. Engineering Our work is focused on the study of Powder

    E-print Network

    powder transport and burning, electrostatic precipitation and heat transfer. At CCNY, he did researchChemical Engineering Abstract Our work is focused on the study of Powder Mechanics and the ultimate goal is to develop a quantitative description of flows for a wide variety of powders using a continuous

  2. Putting Disability Studies to Work in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penketh, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Putting disability studies to work in art education suggests a form of action or industry, a creative opportunity for something to be done, recognising the relationship between theory and practice. Drawing on discourse analysis, this article offers an initial theoretical discussion of some of the ways in which disability is revealed and created…

  3. What makes a knowledge management system work: a case study

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    What makes a knowledge management system work: a case study Thomas Martine Tech-CICO, University why a knowledge management system, if conceived strictly from the point of view of organizational, an engineer, a product, a procedure) [3]. Doing knowledge management, then, consists in identifying

  4. An Empirical Study of Occupational Stress Transmission in Working Couples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiona Jones

    1993-01-01

    The associations between work demands, supports, and levels of psychological and physical health have been clearly established by research. There is growing evidence that occupational stressors are transmitted to spouses, with a possible subsequent effect on disease risks and life expectancy of both marital partners. The present study investigates the extent and direction of occupational stress transmission and the possible

  5. At-Risk Students in Work and Family Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This manual is designed to help work and family studies teachers meet the needs of students who are at risk. It uses a systematic approach to adapting the learning environment that consists of an intervention checklist and intervention strategies. The manual is divided into two general sections: Common Skills Area and Applied Skills Areas. The…

  6. The Work-Study Experience of Indigenous Undergraduates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large number of universities in Taiwan and the increased availability of scholarships for disadvantaged students, the number of college students from indigenous families has been on the rise in recent years. However, many indigenous students still find it necessary to work part-time. In this study, indigenous students were interviewed…

  7. Course of Study for the Cooperative Work Experience Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Designed to prepare students (grades 11 and 12) for employment entry through a cooperative work/study program, this course guide assists the teacher-coordinator by providing instructional objectives, suggested performance tasks, sample assessment measures, and activities for each unit of instruction. The instruction covers two broad areas:…

  8. Postgraduate Study and Managers' Subsequent Work Experience: An Exploratory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jane; Harris, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on an exploratory qualitative study, this article considers the link between business school teaching at graduate level and subsequent work behaviour and experiences of former students. It evaluates the student experience some time "after" graduation. The findings of the retrospective evaluation point to the value of classroom peer…

  9. Adult Education and the Working Class: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Tom; Mackay, Libby

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a successful pilot project developed by a staff member of the Institute of Continuing Education, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, to help combat the failure of adult education to reach the working class women in the city. A part-time tutor-organizer was employed to create study/action groups offering an alternative educational experience…

  10. Dimensions of Field Work in Teacher Education: A Demonstration Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Gertrude

    A demonstration study was initiated under the auspices of the Department of Education, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, and designed to determine the interactive roles that can be undertaken by college, students in teacher training, the public school, and the community. To test the hypothesis that saturation field work would…

  11. Employee availability for work and family: three Swedish case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Bergman; Jean Gardiner

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of availability, both empirically and theoretically, in the context of three Swedish organisations, and identifies the structural influences on availability patterns for work and family. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The article is based on quantitative case studies using employer records and an employee questionnaire in three organisations. Multivariate descriptive statistics

  12. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

  13. editor's note Editor's Note

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    to the contemporary American consensus--which holds, in effect, that World War I was a botched rehearsal for America World War I: the world simply could not get along without us. This assumption animated the foreigneditor's note Editor's Note Home Before Dark This issue of Raritan marks the centenary of World War

  14. Returning home to work: Malaysian students who studied medicine overseas.

    PubMed

    Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2004-06-01

    International students' medical training often includes an elective placement in their home country to prepare them for practice on graduation. Seven Malaysian students in their final year of medicine were interviewed pre- and post-graduation and asked to reflect on whether they felt adequately prepared for working in Malaysia. These seven international students, who studied medicine in Australia, all returned to Malaysia for six weeks for their elective, and the interviews canvassed their perceptions of this experience, along with their thoughts on how well their training in Australia had prepared them for working in their country of origin. The interview data were qualitatively analysed, and case studies were constructed. Main themes were identified and tabulated. Students voiced similar concerns about how ready they were for working at home. These included a lack of practical skills relative to their Malaysian-trained counterparts, language difficulties, medical communication skill incompatibilities across cultures, expectations to perform complex or unfamiliar tasks with minimal supervision and substantial burdens of responsibility with long working hours. These students did not feel greatly prepared for their return home to practise medicine. The elective placement was not well utilized by the majority of students in this study. PMID:15203848

  15. Study of heat exposure in the work environment in Jeddah.

    PubMed

    Noweir, M H; Moreb, A A; Bafail, A O

    1996-05-01

    The present work was conducted to define the magnitude of the problem of heat exposure in Jeddah and the role of both the climatic and the industrial factors on the total heat load. Indoor heat exposure was studied in an industrial complex of 5 plants for cables' manufacturing. Outdoor heat exposure was studied in shaded and unshaded operations in Jeddah Islamic Port (JIP). The heat exposure parameters, including air temperature (Ta), wet bulb temperature (Tw), and globe temperature (Tg), as well as the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) heat stress index, the relative humidity and the air velocity, were assessed at representative locations. Results of the study indicated that: (a) the levels of heat exposure exceeded the TLV in mostly all the work areas where no air-conditioning is provided. (b) the ambient heat is the factor contributing most to the heat load both in summer and in winter. (c) the radiant heat from furnaces and hot metal rolling and milling adds more heat load to the work environment in specific operations. An outline of a control strategy has been suggested, emphasizing evaporative engineering heat control, work and hygienic practices and auxiliary cooling clothing. PMID:24198153

  16. A note on the working principle of rocket-borne nose tip d.c.-probes in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdel, H.-U.

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained with rocket-borne nose tip probes which measured the full current/voltage characteristics by linearly sweeping the probe's driving potential between positive and negative against the rocket's body as a reference suggest that such probes work in the middle atmosphere as mobility probes. It was found that the electron current depends upon positive ion composition in the sheath of the probe and rather strongly upon ambient air temperature.

  17. Predictors for postpartum pelvic girdle pain in working women: the Mom@Work cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne G M; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Bruinvels, David J; Twisk, Jos W R; van Mechelen, Willem; van Poppel, Mireille N M

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine which factors during pregnancy and postpartum predict pelvic girdle pain (PGP) at 12 weeks postpartum among working women. A total of 548 Dutch pregnant employees were recruited in 15 companies, mainly health care, child care, and supermarkets. The definition of PGP was any pain felt in the pelvic girdle region at 12 weeks postpartum. Participants received questionnaires at 30 weeks of pregnancy and at 6 and 12 weeks postpartum with demographic, work-related, pregnancy-related, fatigue, psychosocial, PGP-related and delivery-related questions. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the women experienced pain in their pelvic girdle at 12 weeks postpartum. However, the level of pain and the degree of disability due to postpartum PGP was low. Pregnancy-related predictors for PGP at 12 weeks were history of low back pain, higher somatisation, more than 8 hours of sleep or rest per day, and uncomfortable postures at work. The pregnancy and postpartum-related predictors were: more disability at 6 weeks, having PGP at 6 weeks, higher mean pain at 6 weeks, higher somatisation during pregnancy and at 6 weeks postpartum, higher birth weight of the baby, uncomfortable postures at work and number of days of bed rest. Based on these results, it is concluded that extra attention should be given to women who experience PGP during pregnancy to prevent serious PGP during late pregnancy and postpartum. More research is needed to confirm the roles of hours of sleep, somatisation, and bed rest in relation to PGP. PMID:23137900

  18. Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles L.

    Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75% during ON, 89% during ON+RSC, and 99.5% during GNSC+RSC. The class mean scores on next-day quizzes during ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 39%, 68%, and 90%, respectively. The class mean score on review quizzes following ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 2.1, 5.3, and 7.8 (maximum score, 10), respectively. Results for five of the seven students provide convincing evidence of functional relationships between ON+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON and between GNSC+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON+RSC. Students', teachers', and parents' opinions regarding the RSC and GNSC procedures were highly favorable.

  19. Study of the extinction of a note in reed instruments Laboratoire d'acoustique de l'universite du Maine, B^at. IAM -UFR Sciences Avenue Olivier

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Study of the extinction of a note in reed instruments A. Almeida Laboratoire d'acoustique de l focuses on the extinction transients in reed instruments. Firstly, the most relevant methods for characterising the extinction of the note are briefly discussed. The extinction duration of recorded notes using

  20. Exploring the experiences of EU qualified doctors working in the United Kingdom: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Saliba, Vanessa; McKee, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This qualitative study of 23 doctors from other EU member states working in the UK highlights that, contrary to media reports, doctors from other member states working in the UK were well prepared and their main motivation to migrate was to learn new skills and experience a new health care system. Interviewees highlighted some aspects of their employment that work well and others that need improving. Some interviewees reported initially having language problems, but most noted that this was resolved after a few months. These doctors overwhelmingly reported having very positive experiences with patients, enjoying a NHS structure that was less hierarchical structure than in their home systems, and appreciating the emphasis on evidence-based medicine. Interviewees mostly complained about the lack of cleanliness of hospitals and gave some examples of risk to patient safety. Interviewees did not experience discrimination other than some instances of patronising and snobbish behaviour. However, a few believed that their nationality was a block to achieving senior positions. Overall, interviewees reported having enjoyable experiences with patients and appreciating what the NHS had to offer. PMID:25239032

  1. Prevention of work related skin problems: an intervention study in wet work employees

    PubMed Central

    Held, E; Mygind, K; Wolff, C; Gyntelberg, F; Agner, T

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of implementation of an evidence based skin care programme for wet work employees as part of an occupational health and safety management system. Methods: 375 wet work employees were included in a prospective randomised controlled trial, allocated to either intervention (n = 207) or control (n = 168). The intervention group was exposed to a skin care programme during the five month study period. The intervention included an educational programme for a group of frontline employees, who underwent formalised training, and subsequently introduced the information to their colleagues. As part of the intervention a skin care policy including written instructions was established at each workplace. Both groups answered a test quiz, completed questionnaires on behaviour and symptoms, and underwent clinical examination of their hands before and after the five month period. Results: No difference between the intervention and the control group was found at baseline with respect to clinical symptoms or behaviour. Evaluation after the five months of intervention revealed a significantly higher information level on skin care in the intervention group compared to the control group, a significant change in behaviour in the intervention group but not in the control group, and significantly less skin symptoms as evaluated clinically in the intervention group but not in the control group. No significant difference was found for self reported skin problems. Conclusions: The intervention was successful with respect to information level (knowledge), behaviour, and clinical symptoms. Implementation of a skin care programme as part of an occupational health and safety management system is recommended as a prophylactic measure for employees in wet occupations. PMID:12151613

  2. Working memory and DLPFC inefficiency in schizophrenia: The FBIRN study

    PubMed Central

    Potkin, S. G.; Turner, J. A.; Brown, G. G.; McCarthy, G.; Greve, D. N.; Glover, G. H.; Manoach, D. S.; Belger, A.; Diaz, M.; Wible, C. G.; Ford, J. M.; Mathalon, D. H.; Gollub, R.; Lauriello, J.; O'Leary, D.; van Erp, T. G. M.; Toga, A. W.; Preda, A.; Lim, K. O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Functional Imaging Biomedical Informatics Network is a consortium developing methods for multisite functional imaging studies. Both prefrontal hyper- or hypoactivity in chronic schizophrenia have been found in previous studies of working memory. Methods: In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of working memory, 128 subjects with chronic schizophrenia and 128 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited from 10 universities around the United States. Subjects performed the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm1,2 with memory loads of 1, 3, or 5 items. A region of interest analysis examined the mean BOLD signal change in an atlas-based demarcation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), in both groups, during both the encoding and retrieval phases of the experiment over the various memory loads. Results: Subjects with schizophrenia performed slightly but significantly worse than the healthy volunteers and showed a greater decrease in accuracy and increase in reaction time with increasing memory load. The mean BOLD signal in the DLPFC was significantly greater in the schizophrenic group than the healthy group, particularly in the intermediate load condition. A secondary analysis matched subjects for mean accuracy and found the same BOLD signal hyperresponse in schizophrenics. Conclusions: The increase in BOLD signal change from minimal to moderate memory loads was greater in the schizophrenic subjects than in controls. This effect remained when age, gender, run, hemisphere, and performance were considered, consistent with inefficient DLPFC function during working memory. These findings from a large multisite sample support the concept not of hyper- or hypofrontality in schizophrenia, but rather DLPFC inefficiency that may be manifested in either direction depending on task demands. This redirects the focus of research from direction of difference to neural mechanisms of inefficiency. PMID:19042912

  3. The impact of a worker health study on working conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pam Tau; Krause, Niklas

    2002-01-01

    A research partnership of representatives from labor, academia, and public health enabled unionized San Francisco hotel workers to achieve important policy changes in workplace health and safety. Known as the "Housekeeping Study," the project took sixteen months to complete. A unique aspect of the project was that it utilized participatory action research methods, involving workers themselves as full participants in the study. A core group of 25 hotel room cleaners was involved in each phase of the project. The study developed health data which enabled room cleaners and their union to formulate and justify a contract proposal calling for a significant reduction in housekeeping workloads. The employer association agreed to a contract which reduced the maximum required room assignment from 15 rooms to 14 rooms per day in 14 San Francisco hotels. By lowering the maximum work assignment, these workers set a new standard which can potentially protect the health of room cleaners across the country. The project can serve as a model for worker and union participation in academic research, as well as for the application of research to improving working conditions, particularly for low-wage immigrant workers. PMID:12325285

  4. Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meagher, Thomas Francis

    To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

  5. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  6. Safety in Work Vehicles: A Multilevel Study Linking Safety Values and Individual Predictors to Work-Related Driving Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Newnam; Mark A. Griffin; Claire Mason

    2008-01-01

    Although work-related driving is associated with high accident rates, limited research has investigated the factors influencing driving crashes in the work setting. This study explored multilevel influences on self-reported crashes in the workplace by surveying a sample of work-related drivers (n = 380), their workgroup supervisors (n = 88), and fleet managers (n = 47). At the driver level of

  7. Tech notes: Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Ongoing or planned hydro research, results of recent studies, and reviews of new books, publications, and software are covered. This month`s Tech Notes include: (1) a study linking development and reservoir silting in El Salvador, (2) publication of a guide for small hydro operatos, and (3) publication of a text outlining the development of hydroelectric power in Russia.

  8. Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

  9. Social Work/Ethnic Studies Joint Faculty Position The University of Utah Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work invite applications for a

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Social Work/Ethnic Studies Joint Faculty Position The University of Utah Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work invite applications for a fulltime (ongoing 9-month contract) tenure-track position in the Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Social Work. Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary

  10. Considerations of circadian impact for defining ‘shift work’ in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G Stevens; Johnni Hansen; Giovanni Costa; Erhard Haus; Timo Kauppinen; Kristan J Aronson; Gemma Castaño-Vinyals; Scott Davis; Monique H W Frings-Dresen; Lin Fritschi; Manolis Kogevinas; Kazutaka Kogi; Jenny-Anne Lie; Arne Lowden; Beata Peplonska; Beate Pesch; Eero Pukkala; Eva Schernhammer; Ruth C Travis; Roel Vermeulen; Tongzhang Zheng; Vincent Cogliano; Kurt Straif

    2010-01-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human

  11. Prevention of work related skin problems: an intervention study in wet work employees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Held; K Mygind; C Wolff; F Gyntelberg; T Agner

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of implementation of an evidence based skin care programme for wet work employees as part of an occupational health and safety management system.Methods: 375 wet work employees were included in a prospective randomised controlled trial, allocated to either intervention (n = 207) or control (n = 168). The intervention group was exposed to a skin

  12. 76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...claimant to extend his or her work-study contract. d. VA Form...by claimants who do not want a work- study advanced allowance payment...applicant's eligibility for work-study allowance and the amount payable. Affected Public:...

  13. A qualitative study of factors influencing different generations of Newfoundland and Saskatchewan trained physicians to leave a work location

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested that young physicians may have different expectations and practice behaviours than their older generational counterparts, including their reasons for wanting to remain or leave a community. This study examined the factors associated with a physician’s decision to leave a work location. We compared different generations of physicians to assess whether these factors have changed over generations. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 physicians who graduated from two Canadian medical schools. We asked each physician about the number and nature of work location changes and the factors related to their decisions to leave each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Dissatisfaction with the working environment was the most frequently cited reason for leaving a location for physicians of all generations. Elements which contributed to the quality of the work environment included the collaborative nature of the practice, the relationship with administrators, and access to resources and personnel. For younger physicians, the work environment had to meet their personal expectations for work-life balance. While remuneration level was given by some physicians as the key reason for leaving a location, for others it was the “last straw” if the work environment was poor. A small number of older generation physicians moved in response to political events and/or policies Conclusions We documented generational differences in physicians’ reasons for choosing a work location. We found that a poor work environment was universally the most important reason why a physician chose to leave a location. A few physicians who were unsatisfied with their work location identified level of remuneration as an additional reason for leaving. Some older generation physicians cited political climate as a reason for leaving a work location. While economic factors have largely been the focus of recruitment and retention initiatives, our findings highlight the importance of the work environment and organizational culture on the retention of physicians of all generations. PMID:22830486

  14. Easier and more productive study and desk work.

    PubMed

    Francke, A W; Kaplan, W J

    1978-08-01

    This article is a uniquely optometric public service. Working from an optometric model of vision, the authors collected and condensed extensive information from many professions and scientific fields, developed additional material, field-tested the information, and created an original, easy-to-apply handbook to help the very large segment of the population that does near tasks. Only an optometric model of vision can tell us how near tasks produce a general tightening of the musculature and undesirable changes in visual status, which in turn lower efficiency at near tasks; and that the way to counteract this process is to have minimal obstructions to movement at such tasks (thus, the information on chair and table design, shoes, etc.). Only an optometric model of vision makes us aware of the value of breaks to offset tightening, and tells us when to take breaks, what to do during breaks, and specific exercises to reduce near task stress. Only an optometric model tells us that the lighting which others consider adequate is often excessive and leads to fatigue, and allows us to determine the proper amount of lighting in general and for the individual. And only an optometric model of vision tells us of the value of adjustable arm typing stands. Because of its approach, "Easier and More Productive Study and Desk Work" reinforces the view of optometry as a broad-based discipline which relates vision to all areas of human performance. PMID:701718

  15. Continuous interprofessional coordination in perioperative work: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Lillebo, Borge; Faxvaag, Arild

    2015-03-01

    Coordination of perioperative work is challenging. Advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities have not been followed by similar advancements in the ability to coordinate care. In this paper, we report on a study that explored the nature of continuous coordination as practiced by perioperative staff in order to coordinate their own activities with respect to those of their colleagues. We conducted in-depth interviews (n?=?14), and combined observations and focused interviews (n?=?31) with perioperative staff (physicians, nurses, technicians, and cleaners) at a major university hospital in Norway. Data were analysed qualitatively with systematic text condensation. The results indicated that a surgical schedule was important for informing staff members about the cases and tasks they had been assigned. Staff also depended on ad hoc, explicit communication to ensure timeliness of particular perioperative activities. This, however, left little room for adjustments of other activities. Hence, to be able to proactively coordinate their own work some staff tried to predict future perioperative activities by observing the workplace, monitoring the surgical scheduling software for changes, and sharing their colleagues' progress updates and predictions. These findings could be important for those developing support for perioperative coordination. PMID:25158118

  16. Medical work Assessment in German hospitals: a Real-time Observation study (MAGRO) – the study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background The increasing economic pressure characterizes the current situation in health care and the need to justify medical decisions and organizational processes due to limited financial resources is omnipresent. Physicians tend to interpret this development as a decimation of their own medical influence. This becomes even more obvious after a change in hospital ownership i.e. from a public to a private profit oriented organization. In this case each work procedure is revised. To date, most research studies have focused mainly on differences between hospitals of different ownership regarding financial outcomes and quality of care, leaving important organizational issues unexplored. Little attention has been devoted to the effects of hospital ownership on physicians' working routines. The aim of this observational real time study is to deliver exact data about physicians' work at hospitals of different ownership. Methods The consequences of different management types on the organizational structures of the physicians' work situation and on job satisfaction in the ward situation are monitored by objective real time studies and multi-level psycho diagnostic measurements. Discussion This study is unique in its focus. To date no results have been found for computer-based real time studies on work activity in the clinical field in order to objectively evaluate a physician's work-related stress. After a complete documentation of the physicians' work processes the daily work flow can be estimated and systematically optimized. This can stimulate an overall improvement of health care services in Germany. PMID:19505318

  17. Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2006 Note: the same question is sometimes asked in different ways.

    E-print Network

    Lively, Curt

    Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2006 Note: the same question is sometimes asked and covariance? Why did Francis Galton (Darwin's cousin) reject Darwin's view of evolution by natural selection by "fixation" in population genetics? What is the heritability of two ears on a population of mice, all having

  18. Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2010 Note: the same question is sometimes asked in different ways.

    E-print Network

    Lively, Curt

    1 Study questions. First Exam. Evolution (L567) 2010 Note: the same question is sometimes asked and covariance? Why did Francis Galton (Darwin's cousin) reject Darwin's view of evolution by natural selection" in population genetics? What is the heritability of two ears on a population of mice, all having two ears? What

  19. Should Middle School Students with Learning Problems Copy and Paste Notes from the Internet? Mixed-Methods Evidence of Study Barriers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    L. Brent Igo

    2009-01-01

    In the experimental phase of this mixed-methods study, 49 middle school students receiving special education services took notes from the Internet under either a written notes or a copy-and-paste notes condition. Immediate, cued-recall measures of factual learning showed that students who wrote their notes were better able to recall what they had noted, although recall was low for all students. However, after a one-week delay (which included two classroom opportunities to study their notes), students who pasted their notes performed significantly better on two different measures of factual learning than students who wrote their notes. Follow-up student interviews and analyses of notes revealed a robust explanatory theme: many written notes contained barriers to learning (e.g., illegible handwriting, spelling errors, and/or indecipherable paraphrases), which likely reduced the benefit of study time. Implications for instructing this population of students to use copy and paste while gathering information on the Internet are discussed.

  20. Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: these instructions will work on OS X 10.5 (Leopard) and OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard). For help configuring previous OS X versions, please

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: these instructions will work on OS X 10, select System Preferences. Navigate to Print & Fax 3. Click the plus (+) to add a printer 4. The Add: Another Device · Print Using: Generic PostScript Printer 11.The parameters for the Name and URL fields

  1. This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw the structures of B and C. You do not have to show mechanisms, but you do need to

    E-print Network

    Taber, Douglass

    This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw.4, t (2) 24.5, d (2) 22.6, q (4) 4. (20 points) Deduce the stucture of E, and draw an arrow;5. (20 points) Draw a detailed arrow-pushing mechanism for the following transformation. 5/20 points

  2. Getting back to work after injury: the UK Burden of Injury multicentre longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Injuries to working age adults are common and place a considerable burden on health services accounting for more than 10% of GP sick notes and 14% of those claiming benefits because they are unable to work in the UK. General practitioners (GPs) currently assess fitness to work and provide care and referral to other services to facilitate return to work (RTW). Recent UK recommendations suggest replacing GP sickness certification with independent assessments of fitness to work after four weeks sick leave. The impact of a wide range of injuries on RTW and subsequent need for independent fitness to work assessments has not been well studied in the UK. The aim of this study was to quantify RTW and factors predicting RTW following a wide range of injuries. Methods We used a multicentre longitudinal study, set in four acute NHS Trusts in the UK which recruited emergency department (ED) attenders and hospital admissions for injury and included those aged 16–65years that were employed or self-employed before the injury. Participants were followed up by postal questionnaire at 1, 4 and 12 months post injury to measure health status (EQ-5D), recovery, use of health and social services, time off work in the preceding month and work problems amongst those who had RTW. Multivariable Poisson regression with a robust variance estimator was used to estimate relative risks for factors associated with RTW. Results One month after injury 35% of ED attenders had fully RTW. The self employed were more likely (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.47 compared with employed) and the moderate/severely injured less likely to RTW (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.72 compared with minor injuries). At four months, 83% of ED attenders had RTW and self employment and injury severity remained significant predictors of RTW (self employment RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.30; moderate/severe injury RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.92). At four months 57% of hospital admissions had RTW. Men were more likely than women to RTW (RR 1.94, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.82), whilst those injured at work (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.87 compared with at home) and those living in deprived areas (most deprived tertile RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.85 and middle tertile RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.93) were less likely to RTW. Health status was significantly poorer at one and four months after injury than before the injury and was significantly poorer amongst those that had not RTW compared to those that had. Problems with pain control, undertaking usual activities, mobility and anxiety and depression were common and persisted in a considerable proportion of participants up to four months post injury. Conclusions Injuries have a large impact on time off work, including amongst those whose injuries did not warrant hospital admission. The majority of injured people would require an in-depth fitness for work assessment if recent UK recommendations are implemented. Many people will have on-going pain, mobility problems, anxiety and depression at the point of assessment and it is important that patients are encouraged to use primary care services to address these problems. A range of factors may be useful for identifying those at risk of a slower recovery and a delayed RTW so that appropriate interventions can be provided to this group. PMID:22853715

  3. This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw the structures of B and C. You do not have to show mechanisms, but you do need to

    E-print Network

    Taber, Douglass

    This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw the stucture of E, and draw an arrow-pushing mechanism for the transformation. 3. (20 points) Outline CN MgBr ; H+ / H2O work up C9H18O D C D #12;5. (20 points) Draw a detailed arrow-pushing mechanism

  4. Work Status and Work Performance of People With DisabilitiesAn Empirical Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha N. Ozawa; Yeong Hun Yeo

    2006-01-01

    As the U.S. economy is thrust into the global economy and meets global economic competition, the country needs to mobilize people with disabilities to participate in the labor force and enable them to work and earn money optimally. Therefore, it is important to investigate the extent to which disability affects the employment rate and the levels of hourly wages and

  5. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of working memory in youth after sports-related concussion: is it still working?

    PubMed

    Keightley, Michelle L; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory strategies to maintain cognitive performance after mTBI. This has significant implications for safe return to daily activities, including competitive sport. PMID:24070614

  6. What Is Not Working in Working Memory of Children with Literacy Disorders? Evidence from a Three-Year-Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbach, Anne; Könen, Tanja; Rietz, Chantal S.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to explore the deficits in working memory associated with literacy disorders (i.e. developmental disorders of reading and/or spelling) and the developmental trajectories of these working memory deficits. The performance of 28 children with literacy disorders was compared to a non-disabled control group with the same…

  7. Cape Blanco Wind Farm Feasibility Study : Environmental Studies Work Plan, November 1983.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-12-01

    This study work plan outlines the tasks to be performed in completing the environmental feasibility studies portion of the Cape Blanco Wind Generation Feasibility Study. The contractor, WNW, is to conduct and document a comprehensive interdisciplinary study comparatively evaluating the environmental consequences of contructing alternative wind farm generator designs at the Cape Blanco site. Studies will address the construction and operating requirements for all practical wind generator designs as well as the impacts thereof.

  8. Note: optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, J K; Sokolowska, D; Kwiatkowski, L; Dziob, D; Nowak, J

    2014-02-01

    A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time. PMID:24593402

  9. Note: Optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, J. K.; Sokolowska, D.; Dziob, D.; Nowak, J. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)] [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kwiatkowski, L. [Department of Econometrics and Operations Research, Cracow University of Economics, Rakowicka 27, 31-510 Krakow (Poland)] [Department of Econometrics and Operations Research, Cracow University of Economics, Rakowicka 27, 31-510 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time.

  10. Here is a quick run-down on these notes, with various terms to be learned in boldface. Much of scientific work involves relationships called maps

    E-print Network

    Liblit, Ben

    ) (barometric pressure, humidity, temperature); mother's age frequency of newborn with Down syndrom availablev overview Here is a quick run-down on these notes, with various terms to be learned in boldface

  11. Delaware Notes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Delaware Library has been expanding their online offerings in the past few years, and this addition of the "Delaware Notes" archive is most welcome. The series consists of a variety of publications created by the University from 1923 to the present, and the subject matter covered within these pages is quite diverse. Here visitors will find a very exhaustive history of the University of Delaware ("University of Delaware: Ancestors, Friends and Neighbors"), an academic appraisal of Longfellow's wanderings ("Longfellow and Germany"), and an early paper on aerodynamics titled "Aerodynamics of the Psychrometer". Visitors are encouraged to search the collection by author, title, subject, or date. It's an impressive potpourri of scholarly works, and one that might pique a new interest among curious visitors.

  12. Federal Work Study Program Job Listings (On Campus Jobs)

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    at the Mission Rd greenhouse. While working with your hands, you can still listen to your lectures, music, etc. The setting is a beautiful greenhouse and you will have exposure to cool plants used in research and teaching

  13. Note: Design of a dose-controlled phototherapy system based on hyperspectral studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, M. F.; Chávarri, L.; Briz, S.

    2013-02-01

    Phototherapy consists in applying radiation on a part of the human body in order to treat an illness. A radiation dose is established for each treatment. In order to apply the correct dose a treatment time is set. However, in this work we have carried out some hyperspectral imaging studies that conclude that the radiation sources and the absorption properties of each patient can change. Therefore, the same treatment time does not ensure that the patient receive the appropriate dose. Thus, an optimized therapy system must measure the radiation emitted by the source and absorbed by the patient on real time to calculate the optimal dose at which the treatment is effective. In this work, we have developed and designed a custom system to measure the effectiveness of a radiative therapy treatment to adapt the appropriate dose for a specific patient in real time.

  14. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

  15. Physics Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents nine physics notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) speed of sound in a steel rod; (2) physics extracts-part four (1978); and (3) a graphical approach to acceleration. (HM)

  16. Student perception about working in rural United States/Canada after graduation: a study in an offshore Caribbean medical school

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Nandy, Atanu; Herz, Burton L; Little, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rural residents of the United States (US) and Canada face problems in accessing healthcare. International medical graduates (IMGs) play an important role in delivering rural healthcare. IMGs from Caribbean medical schools have the highest proportion of physicians in primary care.  Xavier University School of Medicines admits students from the US, Canada and other countries to the undergraduate medical (MD) course and also offers a premedical program. The present study was conducted to obtain student perception about working in rural US/Canada after graduation.   Methods: The study was conducted among premedical and preclinical undergraduate medical (MD) students during October 2014. The questionnaire used was modified from a previous study. Semester of study, gender, nationality, place of residence and occupation of parents were noted. Information about whether students plan to work in rural US/Canada after graduation, possible reasons why doctors are reluctant to work in rural areas, how the government can encourage rural practice, possible problems respondents anticipate while working in rural areas were among the topics studied. Results: Ninety nine of the 108 students (91.7%) participated. Forty respondents were in favor of working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Respondents mentioned good housing, regular electricity, water supply, telecommunication facilities, and schools for education of children as important conditions to be fulfilled. The government should provide higher salaries to rural doctors, help with loan repayment, and provide opportunities for professional growth.  Potential problems mentioned were difficulty in being accepted by the rural community, problems in convincing patients to follow medical advice, lack of exposure to rural life among the respondents, and cultural issues. Conclusions: About 40% of respondents would consider working in rural US/Canada. Conditions required to be fulfilled have been mentioned above. Graduates from Caribbean medical schools have a role in addressing rural physician shortage. Similar studies in other offshore Caribbean medical schools are required as Caribbean IMGs make an important contribution to the rural US and Canadian health workforce. PMID:25901275

  17. Bibliography Science (Policy) Studies and Notes on New Institutional Developments, No. 4, November 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefuna, M.

    Presented is a bibliography of science policy literature. This issue contains more than 60 pages of categorized listings, as well as additional materials on resources, positions, teaching programs, and activities of scientific associations. The series of four issues is terminated with this issue. Notes on new institutional developments relate to…

  18. Lotus Notes and Collaboration: Le plus ça Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty Vandenbosch; Michael J. Ginzberg

    1996-01-01

    Work in organizations is becoming increasingly focused on collaborative work in groups. Groupware is widely touted as the information technology that can support this new mode of work by fostering collaboration. In a study of Lotus Notes, a popular groupware product, implemented throughout the professional staff of a large American insurance company, we found the impact of groupware to be

  19. Work and non-work stressors, psychological distress and obesity: evidence from a 14-year study on Canadian workers

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Alain; Beauregard, Nancy; Blanc, Marie-Eve

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of work, non-work and individual factors to obesity with regard to gender-related differences, and to clarify the mediating role that psychological distress plays in these dynamics in Canada from 1994 to 2008 using the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS). Design Longitudinal. Settings The NPHS is a randomised longitudinal cohort study with biennial interviews of the Canadian adult population from 18 to 64. Participants 5925 non-obese workers in cycle 1 (49% were women). Measurements Obesity was measured using the body mass index (BMI), with a threshold of BMI >30?kg/m2. BMI was corrected in accordance with the recommendations of Connor Gorber et al to adjust for gender bias in responses. Results Of the work characteristics evaluated, only decision authority was associated with obesity for women but not for men. Living as a couple, child-related strains, psychotropic drug use, hypertension, being physically inactive and low psychological distress were obesity risk factors but were not moderated by gender. Overall, psychological distress did not mediate the associations that work factors have on obesity. Conclusions Our study suggests that men and women differ little in the extent to which work, non-work and individual factors predict obesity. However, for women, the level of decision authority is associated with a lower obesity risk. In addition, psychological distress did not mediate the contribution of work factors and actually seems, contrary to expectations, to decrease the obesity risk when work, non-work and individual factors are taken into account. PMID:25740022

  20. English Learning Support for Working Staff: A Case Study of Bimonthly Bilingual Posters for Staff Working in an Academic University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suthee Ploisawaschai

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impacts of providing English learning support for non-academic staff working in King Mongkut‘s University of Technology Thonburi. Staffs working in fields other than academia lack an opportunity to practice English. To do this, a series of bimonthly bilingual poster called KMUTT: I‘m Learning English was proposed. First released in March, the

  1. STUDY OF WORKING FLUID MIXTURES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE WORKING FLUIDS FOR COMPRESSOR DRIVEN SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Discussion 17 Heat transfer in condensation 19 References 20 3. SYSTEM ASPECTS OF HEAT PUMPS WITH NONAZEOTROPIC MIXTURES 23 Conclusions 32 4. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE FIELD OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HEAT PUMPS 33 study with finite heat exchanger areas and realistic compressor efficiencies 50 Industrial case 51 Space

  2. A Case Study of Work in Long Island Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of the past few decades, technology has shaped the way people interact, work, learn, and retrieve and disperse information. The advent of the 21st Century includes new forms of knowledge and information, requiring tools and skills previously unseen by generations of learners. New tools are meant to be used for expansion of…

  3. ATHLETICS & RECREATION Job Posting for WORK STUDY position

    E-print Network

    Boonstra, Rudy

    participants through posters, interactive booths and social media. They will assist in planning and initiating. Experience: Must have a passion for health promotion and working knowledge of our and informative manner. Must be able to be part of a team in supporting Departmental

  4. Minority Access and Persistence Study: A Working Bibliography with Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Vinette; And Others

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this contribution offers an annotated bibliography on minority access and persistence. It cites the following: nine books (e.g., "Student Outcome Questionnaires: An Implementation Handbook" by P. Ewell and…

  5. Work Study @ Seattle Pacific University What is it?

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    -campus employers to earn money to pay towards college expenses. Eligibility is determined by the FAFSA in the form of a paycheck. At this point, you may use the earnings to pay down your tuition and fees that allows financially eligible undergraduate students to work on-campus or with approved off

  6. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  7. Making Standards Work: A Case Study of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robin J.; Hill, Paul T.; O'Toole, Lauren; Celio, Mary Beth

    This report examines the implementation of standards-based reform in Washington and whether the reform strategy has worked. The report is based on a survey of two statewide samples of elementary schools at which students had taken the Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) fourth-grade test in 1997 and 1998. The first was a sample of 30…

  8. This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw the structures of B and C, and give IUPAC names for A, B, and C. You do not have to

    E-print Network

    Taber, Douglass

    This is an open-book, open notes exam. Please show your work in detail. 1. (20 points) Draw 128.3, d (2) 129.0, d (2) 137.8, s 200.8, d 4. (20 points) Deduce the stucture of F, and draw an arrow) Draw a detailed arrow-pushing mechanism for the following transformation. 5/20 points for correctly

  9. Chronic stress at work and the metabolic syndrome: prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarani Chandola; Eric Brunner; Michael Marmot

    2006-01-01

    AbstractObjectives To investigate the association between stress at work and the metabolic syndrome.Risk of having the metabolic syndrome by relative index of inequality of employment grade. Multivariate multiple imputation logistic regression models: non-retired men and women in the Whitehall II cohort at phase 5Odds ratio (95% CI)P for linear trendReduction in log odds from model IAge+sex (model I)2.33 (1.38 to

  10. Understanding China's Post80 employees' work attitudes: an explorative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qinxuan Gu; Lihong Wang; Judy Y. Sun; Yanni Xu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among job and career satisfactions, work commitment, and turnover intentions for the Post-80 employees in China. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 290 of China's Post-80 employees from 19 knowledge-intensive companies were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used for data analysis. Findings – The perceptions of selected Post-80 employees

  11. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  12. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  13. An epidemiological approach to study fatigue in the working population: the Maastricht Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kant, I.; Bultmann, U; Schroer, K; Beurskens, A; van Amelsvoort, L G P M; Swaen, G

    2003-01-01

    In 1998, a large scale prospective cohort study of prolonged fatigue in the working population was started in the Netherlands. The ultimate goal of this Maastricht Cohort Study was to identify risk factors involved in the aetiology and natural course of prolonged fatigue in the working population and to develop preventive measures and treatments that can be used in occupational health settings. In this paper, a conceptual model for epidemiological research on prolonged fatigue is presented. This model is the basis for the Maastricht Cohort Study. Alongside the model and design, the characteristics of the study population, the prevalence and one year cumulative incidence of prolonged fatigue, as well as its relation with secondary health outcomes (psychological distress, need for recovery, and burnout) are presented. Furthermore, model, design, and the presented results are discussed. PMID:12782745

  14. Isolated perfused working heart preparation for in vitro biomechanical studies 

    E-print Network

    Shroff, Manish Vikram

    2003-01-01

    diseased states. In this study, one of the simplest biomechanical parameters, fractional shortening of left ventricular external diameter was computed. The preliminary findings of this in vitro mode of study were then compared to data from an established...

  15. CSc 155 Lecture Note Slides Overview of

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Scott

    CSc 155 Lecture Note Slides Overview of OpenGL CSc 155 Lecture Note Slides OpenGL overview 2 support #12;CSc 155 Lecture Note Slides OpenGL overview 3 OpenGL ARB: Khronos WG · The Khronos Group: an "Open Standard API" industry consortium · OpenGL "ARB" is a "Khronos Working Group" CSc 155 Lecture Note

  16. Transforming English Language Learners' Work Readiness: Case Studies in Explicit, Work-Specific Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal-Hopes, Diana L.; Villavicencio, Edna; Foote, Martha M.; Green, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of a six-step framework for work-specific vocabulary instruction in adult English language learners (ELLs). Guided by research in English as a second language (ESL) methodology and the transactional theory, the researchers sought to unveil how these processes supported the acquisition and application of…

  17. 77 FR 2351 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance): Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ...claimant to extend his or her work-study contract. d. VA Form...by claimants who do not want a work- study advanced allowance payment...applicant's eligibility for work-study allowance and the amount payable. An agency may not...

  18. 76 FR 31682 - Agency Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...INFORMATION: Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program), VA Form...22-8690 to report the number of work-study hours a claimant has...collected to ensure that the amount of benefits payable to a claimant who is pursuing work-study is correct. An...

  19. 76 FR 15052 - Proposed Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...technology. Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program)), VA Form...22-8690 to report the number of work-study hours a claimant has...collected to ensure that the amount of benefits payable to a claimant who is pursuing work-study is correct....

  20. A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia

    E-print Network

    A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia Therese Jefferson Alison Preston University of Technology Perth Western Australia http://www.cbs.curtin.edu/wiser #12;A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia ii A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western

  1. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Rigouin, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Brunet, René; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:25479968

  2. Return to work expectation predicts work in chronic musculoskeletal and behavioral health disorders: Prospective study with clinical implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bodil Heijbel; Malin Josephson; Irene Jensen; Stefan Stark; Eva Vingård

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study with 18-month follow-up. Objective: To investigate if long-term sick listed persons’ own predictions of their future return to work (RTW) have an impact on their RTW when controlling for other established factors. Method: Postal questionnaires at baseline were sent to persons who had been on sick leave for more than 90 days, and were employed

  3. Solutions to Faculty Work Overload: A Study of Job Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Brenda J.; Coll, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the opinions of a national sample of counselor education chairs and college of education deans regarding the advantages and disadvantages of faculty job sharing. Results showed favorable responses toward faculty job sharing from approximately half the sample, despite limited experience with job sharing. The study found few…

  4. The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

  5. Patient Experiences With Full Electronic Access to Health Records and Clinical Notes Through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. Objective A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients’ views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Methods Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Results Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Conclusions Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full record access on patient well-being. While shared records may or may not impact overall clinic workload, it is likely to change providers’ work, necessitating new types of skills to communicate and partner with patients. PMID:23535584

  6. FEDERAL WORK STUDY ACADEMIC YEAR 2010-11

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Asst. -Student Asst. James Marino (856) 225-6046 Center for Children & Childhood Studies 325 Cooper Doreen Wheeler (856) 225-6349 Economics Rm. 332 Armitage Hall -Student Asst. Dr. T. Yamada Joyce-6251 Foreign Language 4th Floor Armitage Hall -Research Asst. Dr. Jonathan Tittler Joyce Nathanson (856) 225

  7. Southeast Alternatives: A Working Paper on Comparative School Culture Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Hal; And Others

    This report contains three topic centered studies. Each provides a description of the similarities and differences between four elementary alternative schools: a free school, an open school, a continuous progress school, and a contemporary school. Dimensions of the instructional process provide a comparison of the four instructional programs in…

  8. Making a place for escort work: A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacqueline Lewis

    2005-01-01

    This case study focused on the steps taken by a Canadian city bordering the United States to manage the commercial sex component of an adult entertainment package that draws many American visitors. It explored how the city dealt with the potential of community stigmatization resulting from its growing reputation as a place for easily accessible sex trade. The distinctive Canadian

  9. What Really Works? An Exploratory Study of Condom Negotiation Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy G. Lam; Amy Mak; Patricia D. Lindsay; Stephen T. Russell

    2004-01-01

    Verbal-direct strategies are assumed to be the most effective strategies in negoti- ating condom use. Both cultural and gender differences in communication styles suggest that individuals may negotiate condoms in ways that are not exclusively verbal and direct. This study examined the use of other forms of condom negoti- ations by developing an exploratory scale that distinguished strategies on how

  10. Women's Work and Women's Studies, 1973-1974: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

    The bibliography lists almost 4,000 books, articles, pamphlets, and research papers about women and feminism. All items in this third volume were published or in progress in 1973-1974. The items are classified by the topics of abortion, arts and media, contemporary women's movement, cultural studies, education, employment, family organization,…

  11. How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

    Detailing the false starts, uncertainty, and internal questioning that occur as companies organize and manage language simplification projects, the 12 case studies contained in the two sections of this book reveal how some business organizations have benefited by simplifying consumer documents. Descriptions of each case contain information on the…

  12. Bullying, disability and work: a case study of workplace bullying

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret H. Vickers

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a woman diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) who was bullied out of her workplace. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper commences with a narrative about our protagonist, Miranda (a pseudonym), before offering some important contextual theoretical information, including: a discussion of employment concerns for people with disability generally,

  13. Cultural Diversity and Work Group EffectivenessAn Experimental Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Changes in workforce demographics resulting from globalization, combined with the rising popularity of team-based management techniques, has resulted in a practical concern with the management of multicultural groups. In this experimental study, three mechanisms that are proposed to influence group effectiveness are examined. Results supported the notion that the cultural diversity of the group, the sociocultural norms of group members,

  14. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial Administration...TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or...

  15. Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design…

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  17. Staying at work with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain: a qualitative study of workers' experiences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP) have decreased work ability. The majority, however, stays at work despite their pain. Knowledge about workers who stay at work despite chronic pain is limited, narrowing our views on work participation. The aim of this study was to explore why people with CMP stay at work despite pain (motivators) and how they manage to maintain working (success factors). Methods A semi-structured interview was conducted among 21 subjects who stay at work despite CMP. Participants were included through purposeful sampling. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and imported into computer software Atlas.ti. Data was analyzed by means of thematic analysis. The interviews consisted of open questions such as: "Why are you working with pain?" or "How do you manage working while having pain?" Results A total of 16 motivators and 52 success factors emerged in the interviews. Motivators were categorized into four themes: work as value, work as therapy, work as income generator, and work as responsibility. Success factors were categorized into five themes: personal characteristics, adjustment latitude, coping with pain, use of healthcare services, and pain beliefs. Conclusions Personal characteristics, well-developed self-management skills, and motivation to work may be considered to be important success factors and prerequisites for staying at work, resulting in behaviors promoting staying at work such as: raising adjustment latitude, changing pain-coping strategies, organizing modifications and conditions at work, finding access to healthcare services, and asking for support. Motivators and success factors for staying at work may be used for interventions in rehabilitation and occupational medicine, to prevent absenteeism, or to promote a sustainable return to work. This qualitative study has evoked new hypotheses about staying at work; quantitative studies on staying at work are needed to obtain further evidence. PMID:21639884

  18. What really works? An exploratory study of condom negotiation strategies.

    PubMed

    Lam, Amy G; Mak, Amy; Lindsay, Patricia D; Russell, Stephen T

    2004-04-01

    Verbal-direct strategies are assumed to be the most effective strategies in negotiating condom use. Both cultural and gender differences in communication styles suggest that individuals may negotiate condoms in ways that are not exclusively verbal and direct. This study examined the use of other forms of condom negotiations by developing an exploratory scale that distinguished strategies on how verbal and direct they were (i.e., verbal-direct, verbal-indirect, nonverbal-direct, nonverbal-indirect). The study compared the use of negotiation strategies among Asian and White American students at a northern California university. Results indicated that although direct strategies (verbal and nonverbal) were more frequently used, condom users also employed indirect strategies (verbal and nonverbal) to negotiate condom use. Moreover, Asians used verbal-indirect strategies more than Whites. Women used nonverbal-indirect strategies more than men. HIV preventions seeking to be culturally sensitive to Asians and women may benefit from incorporating these strategies into their interventions. PMID:15134124

  19. Work characteristics predict psychiatric disorder: prospective results from the Whitehall II Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Stansfeld; R. Fuhrer; M. J. Shipley; M. G. Marmot

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of work on the risk of future psychiatric disorder has been examined in few longitudinal studies. This was examined prospectively in a large epidemiological study of civil servants. METHODS: In the Whitehall II study, a longitudinal, prospective cohort study of 6895 male and 3413 female London based civil servants, work characteristics measured at baseline (phase 1: 1985-8)

  20. NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited dataset, and further investigation on a larger patient population has to be done before its clinical implementation.

  1. Bone Marrow work-up: report of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Lenze, Dido; Hummel, Michael; Dietel, Manfred; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study we changed several pre-analytical variables of bone marrow trephine biopsy processing with the task to achieve not only a preservation of morphology and antigens but also of nucleic acids. The changes involved employment of a newly established decalcification solution in conjunction with a short fixation time (2 h after receiving the specimens) and performance of decalcification at 37 °C. The comparison of the obtained results from three specimens with those of our routinely established protocol unequivocally revealed that the novel decalcification solution results in a superior preservation of nucleic acids, with only slight differences in preservation of morphology and cellular antigens. These encouraging results imply that this novel decalcification solution will allow a widely accepted standardization of bone marrow trephine biopsy processing. PMID:25636433

  2. Notes in Support of a Relational Social Work Perspective: A Critical Review of the Relational Literature with Implications for Macro Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Pozzuto; Paige Averett

    2009-01-01

    The authors review the literature that calls for the incorporation of relational theory into social work practice. Two strands of relational theory are important to developing a relational social work perspective: the psychoanalytic and the feminist. Based on a feminist understanding of relationality, Dorothy Smith has provided an alternative sociological perspective that can inform social work practice on the macro

  3. Europe Note Europe note number

    E-print Network

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    1 Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/03 Date 15 April 2012 Distribution Vice degrees and collaborative degrees; · recognition of UK qualifications elsewhere in Europe; · institutional by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES. This compares with 87% in 2009 and 81% in 2007

  4. Europe Note Europe note number

    E-print Network

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    1 Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/05 Date 23 April 2012 Distribution Vice qualifications elsewhere in Europe; · institutional strategies and responsibility for the Bologna Process (or 60%) use the standard format developed by the European Commission, the Council of Europe

  5. Europe Note Europe note number

    E-print Network

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Europe Note Europe note number: E/2012/04 Date 23 April 2012 Distribution Vice of UK qualifications elsewhere in Europe; · institutional strategies and responsibility for the Bologna by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES. This contrasts with the 2009 results, when

  6. Factors predicting work status 3?months after injury: results from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Davie, Gabrielle; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Derrett, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Objective Few studies examine predictors of work status following injury beyond injuries presenting to a hospital or emergency department. This paper examines the combined influences of socio-demographic, occupational, injury and pre-existing health and lifestyle factors as predictors of work status 3?months after hospitalised and non-hospitalised injury in a cohort of injured New Zealand workers. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study, New Zealand. Participants 2626 workforce active participants were identified from the Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study; 11 participants with missing outcome responses were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome of interest was ‘not working’ at the time of interview. Results 720 (27%) reported ‘not working’ 3?months after injury. The most important pre-injury predictors of not working following injury found by multidimensional modelling were as follows: low or unknown income, financial insecurity, physical work tasks, temporary employment, long week schedules, obesity, perceived threat to life and hospital admission. Contrary to expectations, workers reporting less frequent exercise pre-injury had lower odds of work absence. Pre-injury psychosocial and health factors were not associated with not working. Conclusion Certain pre-injury socio-demographic, physical work, work organisation, lifestyle and injury-related factors were associated with not working 3?months after injury. If these findings are confirmed, intervention strategies aimed at improving return to work should address multiple dimensions of both the worker and the workplace. PMID:22389359

  7. Work factors and psychological distress in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willy Eriksen; Kristian Tambs; Stein Knardahl

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' aides (assistant nurses), the main providers of practical patient care in many countries, are doing both emotional and heavy physical work, and are exposed to frequent social encounters in their job. There is scarce knowledge, though, of how working conditions are related to psychological distress in this occupational group. The aim of this study was to identify work

  8. Influence of gender on IT professional work identity: outcomes from a PLS study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mari W. Buche

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of gender on the work identity for IT professionals. Work identity directly and indirectly affects job satisfaction and intent to leave the organization. The model is empirically evaluated using the partial least squares technique. Survey data was collected from 240 IT professionals using on-line distribution. The results demonstrate that the work identity of female IT

  9. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  10. Impact of Diabetes on Work Cessation Data from the GAZEL cohort study

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Impact of Diabetes on Work Cessation Data from the GAZEL cohort study ELÉONORE HERQUELOT, MSC ALICE of diabetes on work cessation, i.e., on the risks of work disability, early retirement, and death while with diabetes and randomly selected 2,530 nondiabetic employed control subjects matched for major socio

  11. Briefly noted

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. W. Mabbett; Howard Dick; Theresa F. Munford; Alaric Maude; David Pong; Andrew Watson; Ken Scott; George Miller; Robert Springborg; Leith Morton; Paul Alexander; John Ingleson

    1983-01-01

    L.G. Bagshawe (trans.). The Maniyadanabon of Shin Sandalinka, Data Paper No. 115, Southeast Asia Program, Cornelll University, Ithaca (N.Y.), 1981. 132 pp, foreword, translator's preface, glossary, preface to 1968 edition by U Myint Hswei. Paper: US$7.00.A. Chamid, The Poorest of the Poor: Three Case Studies from Indonesia, trans, by K. Foulcher, Center of Southeast Asian Studies Working Paper No. 26,

  12. Editor's Notes

    E-print Network

    206 EDITOR'S NOTES The Philosophy Documentation Center is happy to announce that THE PHILOSOPHER'S INDEX data base has been placed into Lockheed Corporation's DIALOG Information Retrieval System. This means that philosophers now have on...

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  14. Parametric studies on the elastic work factor for the CLS specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, K. Y.

    Parametric studies were conducted to see the effects of geometric conditions on the elastic work factor for the CLS specimen. Elastic work factors were calculated in two different ways: numerically using a finite element analysis and analytically from a beam analysis. The results showed that the elastic work factors determined from both methods are comparable. In addition, the results showed that the elastic work factor is not greatly affected by L2/L1 but is significantly affected by t1/t2.

  15. Work-life conflict and musculoskeletal disorders: a cross-sectional study of an unexplored association

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Hämmig; Michaela Knecht; Thomas Läubli; Georg F Bauer

    2011-01-01

    Background  The health consequences of work-family or rather work-life conflict (WLC) have been studied by numerous researchers. The work-related\\u000a causes of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are also well explored. And stress (at work) has been found to be a consequence\\u000a of WLC as well as a cause of MSD. But very little is known about a potential association between WLC and MSD

  16. Improving return-to-work after childbirth: design of the Mom@Work study, a randomised controlled trial and cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stomp-van den Berg, Suzanne GM; van Poppel, Mireille NM; Hendriksen, Ingrid JM; Bruinvels, David J; Uegaki, Kimi; de Bruijne, Martine C; van Mechelen, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Background Many women suffer from health problems after giving birth, which can lead to sick leave. About 30% of Dutch workers are on sick leave after maternity leave. Structural contact of supervisors with employees on maternity leave, supported by early medical advice of occupational physicians, may increase the chances of return-to-work after maternity leave. In addition, to understand the process of sick leave and return-to-work after childbirth it is important to gain insight into which factors hinder return-to-work after childbirth, as well, as which prognostic factors lead to the development of postpartum health complaints. In this paper, the design of the Mom@Work study is described. Methods The Mom@Work study is simultaneously a randomised controlled trial and a cohort study. Pregnant women working for at least 12 hours a week at one of the 15 participating companies are eligible to participate. The supervisors of these pregnant employees are randomised at 35 weeks pregnancy into the intervention group or control group. During maternity leave, supervisors in the intervention group contact their employee six weeks after delivery using a structured interview. When employees do not expect to return to their jobs at the end of their scheduled maternity leave due to health problems, the supervisor offers early support of the occupational physician. Supervisors in the control group have no structural contact with their employees during maternity leave. Measurements take place at 30 weeks pregnancy and at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks postpartum. In addition, cost data are collected. For the RCT, primary outcome measures are sick leave and return-to-work, and secondary outcome measures are costs, health, satisfaction with intervention and global feelings of recovery. Outcome measures for the cohort are pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain, fatigue and depression. Finally, a number of prognostic factors for return-to-work and for the development of complaints will be measured. Discussion The Mom@Work study will provide important information about return-to-work of employees after giving birth. Results will give insight in prognosis of postpartum sick leave and complaints. Also, the role of supervisors and occupational physicians in successful return-to-work after childbirth will be clarified. PMID:17394629

  17. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and exposure to phenoxyherbicides, chlorophenols, fencing work, and meat works employment: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, N E; Smith, A H; Howard, J K; Sheppard, R A; Giles, H J; Teague, C A

    1986-01-01

    A previous case-control study which used the occupational information available on the New Zealand Cancer Registry found that agricultural workers were at increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The findings are now presented for the second phase of the study which entailed interviewing 83 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma registered under code 202 of the International Classification of Diseases together with 168 controls with other types of cancer and 228 general population controls. The findings for the two control groups were similar, and there were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding potential exposure to phenoxy-herbicides (odds ratio = 1.4, 90% confidence limits 0.7-2.5, p = 0.26) or chlorophenols (odds ratio = 1.3, 90% confidence limits 0.6-2.7, p = 0.39). The odds ratio for fencing work, necessitating exposure to several potential risk factors including arsenic and sodium pentachlorophenate was 2.0 (90% confidence limits 1.3-3.0, p = 0.01). The odds ratio for employment in a meat works, necessitating potential exposure to 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol and zoonotic viruses, was 1.8 (90% confidence limits 1.1-3.1, p = 0.04). There was a significant statistical interaction between the risks associated with these two activities, the odds ratio for involvement in both activities compared with involvement in neither being 5.7 (90% confidence limits 2.3-14.3, p = 0.03). PMID:3753879

  18. Burnout among Turkish High School Teachers Working in Turkey and Abroad: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogan, Ismail; Dogan, Ahmet Atilla; Bayram, Nuran

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine perceived levels of burnout among Turkish high school teachers working in Turkey and abroad. Method: A total of 255 Turkish teachers working at public schools in Germany (n=78), Cyprus (n=94) and Turkey (n=83) comprised our study group. In Germany and Cyprus, the participants were selected…

  19. The Limits of the Economic Ideology: A Comparative Anthropological Study of Work Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwimmer, Erik

    1980-01-01

    Presents a comparative study of folk concepts of work in six cultures--Norway, Shetland Islands, Lesotho, Papua New Guinea, Kenya, and Columbia. Concludes that in all cases studied, work represents a means of personal and social fulfillment as well as an economic necessity. (DB)

  20. Background State-space model Simulation study Future work Analysis and interpretation of acoustic array data

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Background State-space model Simulation study Future work Analysis and interpretation of acoustic Equipment for acoustic data collection Photo credit: Vemco. #12;Background State-space model Simulation Receivers 100 m radius Ref tags #12;Background State-space model Simulation study Future work Acoustic array

  1. Studying institutional work in organizations : Uses and implications of ethnographic methodologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toke Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – In order to provide new and other directions to institutional studies in organization theory, Lawrence and Suddaby forward the notion of institutional work of actors aimed at maintaining, changing and disrupting institutions. The purpose of this paper is to further theory and method in studying the institutional work of people in organizations. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Methodological insights from the

  2. Factors associated with hospital staff nurses working on-call hours: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Trinkoff, Alison; Jing, Hongjuan; Brewer, Carol

    2013-05-01

    When nurses work on-call hours, they have limited ability to control the hours they work. Nurses may be required to work extra hours and, if they are unable to detach from work during break time, can experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Previous studies have not examined factors associated with on-call work. In this pilot study, the authors examined state regulatory, organizational, and personal factors related to nurse on-call hours. Data were collected from registered nurses working in hospitals in two states; the final analytic sample consisted of 219 nurses. The authors found that four variables (teaching hospital employment, patient-to-nurse ratio, race/ethnicity of the nurse, and living with children) were significantly related to working on-call hours. Additional research is needed to understand nurse on-call hours and develop agency policies to promote nurses' health and well-being. PMID:23650895

  3. Welfare to Work: Does It Work for Kids? Research on Work and Income Welfare Experiments. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Stephanie A.

    Noting that a central tenet of the 1996 welfare reform law was that work was the best way to improve the lives of single parents and their children, this fact sheet summarizes research on the impact of parental work on children in families receiving welfare. The fact sheet delineates key research findings from experimental studies of the effects…

  4. Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

  5. Study of Agency Work Contexts: Program Application Reports, National Study of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Workers, Work and Organization Contexts. Professional Paper No. 18-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstead, Joseph A.; Christensen, Harold E.

    This report summarizes selected results and implications of an intensive field study of the effects of work contexts on the attitudes and performance of personnel employed in social welfare and rehabilitation agencies. A principal objective of this research was to determine the impacts of organizational structure and climate on social welfare and…

  6. A didactical note on the advantage of using two parameters in Hopf bifurcation studies

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, O.; Korvasová, K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to maximize the information that a linearized stability analysis provides, one should work with two free parameters rather than one. Moreover, it is recommended to first consider coefficients in the characteristic equation as parameters and in a second step (try to) invert the map that defines the coefficients in terms of the parameters as they occur in the original equation. Our aim is to substantiate these claims by way of a delay equation example taken from the literature. AMS Subject Classification: 34K18; 34K20; 34K60; 92C99 PMID:23327443

  7. Need satisfaction and employees' recovery state at work: A daily diary study.

    PubMed

    van Hooff, Madelon L M; Geurts, Sabine A E

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to advance insight in the associations between employees' daily effort expenditure at work and their recovery state during the workday, and specifically focused on the role of daily work-related need satisfaction in this process. We examined (a) if high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort act as mediating mechanisms underlying the beneficial role of need satisfaction, and (b) to what extent need satisfaction mitigates the adverse effects of high job demands (work pressure and cognitive demands) on employee recovery. Data were collected by means of a 5-day daily diary study (2 measurements daily: in the morning before work, and at the end of the workday) among 68 participants. Multilevel analyses showed that need satisfaction at work was related to a beneficial recovery state at the end of the workday, and that this association was mediated by high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort. Furthermore, need satisfaction attenuated the adverse effects of high work pressure on employee recovery. All in all, this study increased our understanding of employees' daily effort and recovery processes at work, and highlighted the beneficial role of need satisfaction at work. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25705912

  8. Transgastric NOTES: Current experience and potential implications for urologic applications.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Keith; Gupta, Mantu; Landman, Jaime

    2009-05-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in its current form uses flexible endoscopy technology to perform surgical procedures in the abdomen. NOTES is emerging as a potential alternative to both open and laparoscopic surgery, and the technique eliminates the requirement of abdominal incisions. To date, multiple intraperitoneal procedures have been reported in animal models while only a few reports of NOTES performed in humans exist. Several potential advantages of NOTES include the elimination of visible scars, less postoperative pain, and the reduction of postoperative complications, such as wound infection, abdominal wall pain, hernias, and adhesions. Current clinical applications of NOTES that are being studied heavily include its use in percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube rescue and diaphragmatic pacing in intensive care unit patients. A number of barriers still exist regarding the technical challenges of transgastric NOTES, including access to the peritoneal cavity, the need for endoscope retroflexion for upper abdominal procedures, and endoscopic closure of the gastrotomy. The application of transgastric NOTES in urology has been limited to case reports in the porcine model, and no urologic procedure has been performed solely through a transgastric route. This article discusses the rationale of transgastric NOTES, its potential advantages and disadvantages, past and present work performed, current clinical applications, and its potential use in the future of urology. PMID:19438291

  9. Orienting the Work-Based Curriculum Towards Work Process Knowledge: A Rationale and a German Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    The term 'work process knowledge' refers to the knowledge needed for working in flexible and innovative business environments, including those in which information and communication technologies have been introduced to integrate previously separated production functions. It involves a systems-level understanding of the work process in the…

  10. Reviewing Applicants: Research on Bias and Assumptions (Note: To gain access to full text versions of articles see our RefWorks Bibliography )

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    , 2002): 573-598. Foschi, Martha. "Double Standards in the Evaluation of Men and Women." Social, William T. and James N. Baron. "Men and Women at Work: Sex Segregation and Statistical Discrimination of Attentional and Memory Demands on Performance Ratings of Men and Women." Journal of Applied Social Psychology

  11. A Follow-Up Note on Prescriptive Statements in Nonintervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Shana M.; Walls, Stephen M.; Dacy, Breana Sylvester; Levin, Joel R.; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Robinson, Levin, Thomas, Pituch, and Vaughn (2007) examined 74 articles reporting nonintervention studies (i.e., studies with no researcher-manipulated variables) that appeared in 5 educational journals in 1994. Of these articles, 22 contained prescriptive statements (e.g., if teachers or students did X, then student outcome Y would result). In…

  12. The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    2013-01-01

    Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in…

  13. Work Time Control and Sleep Disturbances: Prospective Cohort Study of Finnish Public Sector Employees

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Paula; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Tucker, Philip; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Employee control over work times has been associated with favorable psychosocial and health-related outcomes, but the evidence regarding sleep quality remains inconclusive. We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between work time control and sleep disturbances in a large working population, taking into account total hours worked. Methods: The data were from a full-panel longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work time control and sleep disturbances in years 2000-2001, 2004-2005, 2008-2009, and 2012. The analysis of cross-sectional associations was based on 129,286 person measurements from 68,089 participants (77% women) aged 17-73 years (mean 43.1). Data from 16,503 participants were used in the longitudinal analysis. Log-binomial regression analysis with the generalized estimating equations method was used. Results: Consistently in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, less control over work time was associated with greater sleep disturbances in the total population and among those working normal 40-hour weeks. Among participants working more than 40 hours a week, work time that was both very high (cross-sectional prevalence ratio compared to intermediate work time control [PR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.65) and very low (PR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.39) was associated with sleep disturbances, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: These data suggest that having few opportunities to influence the duration and positioning of work time may increase the risk of sleep disturbances among employees. For persons working long hours, very high levels of control over working times were also associated with increased risk of sleep disturbances. Citation: Salo P, Ala-Mursula L, Rod NH, Tucker P, Pentti J, Kivimäki M, Vahtera J. Work time control and sleep disturbances: prospective cohort study of Finnish public sector employees. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1217-1225. PMID:25061250

  14. Positive and negative work–family interaction and burnout: A longitudinal study of reciprocal relations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siw Tone Innstrand; Ellen Melbye Langballe; Geir Arild Espnes; Erik Falkum; Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationship between work–family interaction (WFI) in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation) and burnout. A sample of 2235 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, bus drivers, employees within information technology, physicians, teachers, church ministers, employees within advertisement, and nurses) supplied data at two points

  15. Spatial working memory maintenance: Does attention play a role? A visual search study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis K. H. Chan; William G. Hayward; Jan Theeuwes

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that a common mechanism may underlie spatial attention and spatial working memory. One proposal is that spatial working memory is maintained by attention-based rehearsal [Awh, E., Jonides, J., & Reuter-Lorenz, P. A. (1998). Rehearsal in spatial working memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 24(3), 780–790], and so a spatial attention shift during the

  16. Procedures for using the Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs The Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs function has been created to allow departments to

    E-print Network

    Guenther, Frank

    Procedures for using the Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs The Add/Change Supervisor(s) for Work-Study Jobs function has been created to allow departments to maintain supervisor information for hourly paid work-study students. Work-Study jobs have an assigned supervisor when they are created

  17. Specific determinants of intrinsic work motivation, burnout and turnover intentions: a study among nurses.

    PubMed

    Janssen, P P; Jonge, J D; Bakker, A B

    1999-06-01

    This study of 156 Dutch general hospital nurses tested a theoretically derived model of specific relationships between work stressors and stress reactions. The model proposes four central domains of the work situation, namely work content, working conditions, social and labour relations, and conditions of employment. In addition, the model proposes three important stress reactions, namely a diminished intrinsic work motivation, occupational burnout and an inclination to leave the job. More specifically, it was hypothesized that (i) intrinsic work motivation is primarily determined by work content variables, (ii) burnout is primarily determined by both work load and limited social support, and (iii) propensity to leave is primarily determined by conditions of employment. All these relationships were simultaneously tested using a structural equations modelling technique. The results of a series of LISREL analyses indicate that the postulated model fits well to the data. The present study used conceptually integrated measures that cover the area of work stress and stress reactions, and provides directions for interventions aimed at preventing or reducing specific negative outcomes of work-related stress in general hospitals. PMID:10354230

  18. Statistical power of tests of the situational specificity hypothesis in validity generalization studies: A cautionary note

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. Osburn; John C. Callender; Jack M. Greener; Steven Ashworth

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated the statistical power of the Callender-Osburn method for testing the situational specificity hypothesis in validity generalization studies. The Schmidt-Hunter 75% rule for testing the situational specificity hypothesis was also studied with regard to its sensitivity for detecting both Type I and Type II errors. Results show that both the Callender-Osburn procedure and Schmidt-Hunter 75% rule lacked sufficient statistical power

  19. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  20. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  1. Work Factors and Occupational Class Disparities in Sickness Absence: Findings From the GAZEL Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, Maria; Krieger, Nancy; Kawachi, Ichiro; Berkman, Lisa F.; Niedhammer, Isabelle; Goldberg, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the contribution of stress-related and physical work factors to occupational class disparities in sickness absence from work. Methods. Our sample consisted of 8847 men and 2886 women participating in the French GAZEL cohort study. Occupational class and medically certified sickness absence data (1995–2001) were obtained from the participants’ employer. Work characteristics (physical and stress-related) were self-reported. We calculated rate ratios with Poisson regression models; fractions of sickness absence attributable to work factors were estimated with the Miettinen formula. Results. Sickness absence was distributed along an occupational gradient. Work characteristics accounted for 19% (women) and 21% (men) of all absences. Physical work conditions accounted for 42% and 13% of absences for musculoskeletal reasons, and work stress accounted for 48% and 40% of psychiatric absences. Overall, about 20% of the occupational class gradient in sickness absence could have been associated with deleterious work conditions. Conclusion. Work conditions contribute to sickness absence, particularly among manual workers and clerks. Policies that decrease ergonomic constraints and work stress also could reduce the burden of ill health and sickness absence among the lowest strata of working populations. PMID:15933236

  2. The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

  3. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  4. Exercise after work, psychological mediators, and affect: A day-level study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Feuerhahn; Sabine Sonnentag; Alexander Woll

    2012-01-01

    In this diary study, we tested the recovery potential of exercise activities during leisure time and examined the psychological mechanisms underlying the relation between exercise activities and affect. We hypothesized that spending time on exercise activities after work will be related to subsequent affect in the evening, and that psychological detachment from work, sense of belonging, and physical self-perceptions explain

  5. A diary study of work-related reading: design implications for digital reading devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Adler; Anuj Gujar; Beverly L. Harrison; Kenton O'Hara; Abigail Sellen

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we describe a diary study of how people read in the course of their daily working lives. Fifteen people from a wide variety of professions were asked to log their daily document activity for a period of 5 consecutive working days. Using structured interviews, we analysed their reading activities in detail. We examine the range of reading

  6. Supervisor Support, Work-Family Conflict, and Satisfaction Outcomes: An Empirical Study in the Hotel Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman M. Karatepe; Orhan Uludag

    2008-01-01

    The current study developed and tested a model that investigated the relationship of supervisor support with work-family conflict and family-work conflict and the effects of both directions of conflict with family satisfaction, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. The model also examined the impact of supervisor support on family and career satisfaction outcomes and the effects of these satisfaction variables on

  7. MSU America Reads*America Counts Tutor (Volunteer and Work-Study)

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU America Reads*America Counts Tutor (Volunteer and Work-Study) Position Description The Office experiences in the Bozeman area community. OAE administers and oversees the MSU America Reads* America Counts. The MSU America Reads*America Counts tutors are responsible for working with the students to whom

  8. The Effect of Job Resources on Work Engagement: A Study on Academicians in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunel, Mustafa C.; Kocak, Omer Erdem; Cankir, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Conducting research and publishing these research papers in academic journals is an accepted norm in the academic world. Previous studies prove that work engagement is a significant predictor of performance. Herein, the relationship between work engagement, which is assumed as a substitute for performance, and job resources is examined. At least…

  9. SFU LABOUR STUDIES PROGRAM The meaning of work. The role of trade unions.

    E-print Network

    SFU LABOUR STUDIES PROGRAM The meaning of work. The role of trade unions. The changing structure that will serve the interests of students, working people, the trade unions and their membership. Get in touch saadvise@sfu.ca 778.782.9452 labour.sfu.ca MADE WITH UNION LABOUR. CUPE 3338. LBST 101 Intro to Labour

  10. Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2013-01-01

    Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and…

  11. From Laura Ingalls to Wing Biddlebaum: A Study of Teacher Identity in Works of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchmore, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to systemically analyze the types of teachers that appear in works of literature, and to explore the various teacher identities that are depicted. The data consists of 44 works of literature representing a wide variety of genres, settings, cultures, and historical periods. They include 20 adult novels, 6 young adult…

  12. Pregnant women's working conditions and their changes during pregnancy: a national study in France

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M J Saurel-Cubizolles; M Kaminski

    1987-01-01

    In a study of 2387 employed women who had worked for more than three months of their pregnancy the data were extracted from a survey carried out on a national sample of births in France in 1981. Manual, service and shop workers had a higher preterm delivery rate than professional, administrative, or clerical workers. Assembly line work was associated with

  13. Working-Class Students, Habitus, and the Development of Student Roles: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    As their numbers at university grow, we need to gain a better understanding of the different ways in which working-class students negotiate their potential outsider status in what is often considered an essential middle-class institution. Based on data from a four-year longitudinal, qualitative study of working-class students at a Canadian…

  14. Supervising Counsellors and Psychotherapists Who Work with Trauma: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Angela

    2010-01-01

    In this study the Delphi technique was used to identify the main supervision issues that require attention and consideration when supervising counsellors and psychotherapists working with trauma. A panel of supervisors, who were additionally experienced in working with trauma in adulthood, completed a series of three questionnaires comprising two…

  15. A Study of Teachers' Views on Practical Work in Secondary Schools in England and Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ian; Saglam, M.

    2010-01-01

    Many teachers view practical work as an essential feature of science education. This study examined whether there had been any changes in the relative importance of the aims science teachers assign to the use of practical work, across the full secondary age range (11-18), since the last such national survey undertaken by Kerr 46 years ago. A…

  16. Mood, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate at Work: An Experience-Sampling Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Remus Ilies; Nikos Dimotakis; David Watson

    2010-01-01

    We describe a study that examined the distinctiveness of momentary positive and negative affect (PA and NA) and their relationships with blood pressure and heart rate at work in a sample of 67 full-time employees who provided psychological and physiological measurements multiple times a day, over 10 working days. These employees recorded their subjective ratings on personal digital assistant devices

  17. Effects of Client Violence on Social Work Students: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This study uses a work stress theoretical framework to examine the effects of direct and indirect client violence on a randomly selected national sample of MSW and BSW social work students from the National Association of Social Workers (N=595). Client violence variables were analyzed in relationship to fear of future violence and occupational…

  18. Note-Taking with T-Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Archie; Clark, Elvis G.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the T-Notes system of note-taking, which divides notes according to category; i.e., main idea, vocabulary, visual aids, handouts, and general information. Explains the T-Notes format and review and self-testing procedures. Feels unique format allows easy note-taking in class and later reviewing. (DMM)

  19. SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours-45 credits of classroom work and 18 credits of

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours- 45 credits the program. The Master's of Social Work Program is designed for people who are interested in entering the social work profession at an advanced professional level and for people currently in the profession who

  20. Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

  1. Note: A stand on the basis of atomic force microscope to study substrates for imaging optics.

    PubMed

    Chkhalo, N I; Salashchenko, N N; Zorina, M V

    2015-01-01

    A description of a stand based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for roughness measurements of large optical components with arbitrary surfaces is given. The sample under study is mounted on a uniaxial goniometer which allows the sample to be tilted in the range of ±30°. The inclination enables the local normal along the axis of the probe to be established at any point of the surface under study. A comparison of the results of the measurement of noise and roughness of a flat quartz sample, in the range of spatial frequencies 0.025-70 ?m(-1), obtained from "standard" AFM and developed versions is given. Within the experimental error, the measurement results were equivalent. Examples of applications of the stand for the study of substrates for X-ray optics are presented. PMID:25638129

  2. Note: A stand on the basis of atomic force microscope to study substrates for imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhalo, N. I.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Zorina, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    A description of a stand based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for roughness measurements of large optical components with arbitrary surfaces is given. The sample under study is mounted on a uniaxial goniometer which allows the sample to be tilted in the range of ±30°. The inclination enables the local normal along the axis of the probe to be established at any point of the surface under study. A comparison of the results of the measurement of noise and roughness of a flat quartz sample, in the range of spatial frequencies 0.025-70 ?m-1, obtained from "standard" AFM and developed versions is given. Within the experimental error, the measurement results were equivalent. Examples of applications of the stand for the study of substrates for X-ray optics are presented.

  3. NOTE: A preliminary study for non-invasive quantification of manganese in human hand bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam; Pejovi?-Mili?, A.; Chettle, D. R.; McNeill, F. E.; Pysklywec, M. W.; Oudyk, J.

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a nutrient essential for regulating neurological and skeletal functions in the human body, but it is also toxic when humans are excessively exposed to Mn. Blood (or serum/plasma) and other body fluids reflect only the most recent exposure and rapidly return to within normal ranges, even when there has been a temporary excursion in response to exposure. In this context, we have been developing a non-invasive measurement of Mn stored in bone, using in vivo neutron activation analysis. Following feasibility studies, a first pilot study, using neutron activation analysis to measure Mn in the bones of the hand of ten healthy male human subjects, was conducted with the approval of the concerned research ethics boards. The participants of this study had no known history of exposure to Mn. Two volunteers were excluded from this study due to technical problems with their measurements. The inverse variance weighted mean value of Mn/Ca for the participants of this study is 0.12 ± 0.68 µg Mn/g Ca which is comparable within uncertainties with the estimated range of 0.16 0.78 µg Mn/g Ca and mean value of 0.63 ± 0.30 µg Mn/g Ca derived from cadaver data. It is recommended to investigate the use of the diagnostic technique for in vivo measurements of workers exposed occupationally to excessive amounts of Mn who could develop many-fold increased levels of Mn in bones as demonstrated through various animal studies. The technique needs further development to improve the precision of in vivo measurements in the non-exposed population.

  4. Statistics: Notes and Examples. Study Guide for the Doctor of Arts in Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    This study guide presents lessons on hand calculating various statistics: Central Tendency and Dispersion; Tips on Data Presentation; Two-Tailed and One-Tailed Tests of Significance; Error Types; Standard Scores; Non-Parametric Tests such as Chi-square, Spearman Rho, Sign Test, Wilcoxon Matched Pairs, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Rank Sums;…

  5. Internet access in UK public libraries: notes and queries from a small scale study : EDITORIAL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David McMenemy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this editorial is to discuss the findings of a small scale study of internet access in UK public libraries. It aims to examine all aspects of access, from the moment the service is requested, to the acceptable use policy (AUP) for each library, to specific Internet sites that are banned. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The methodology involved

  6. A Note on the Use of Multiple Regression Analysis in Studies of Achievement in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipps, Paul H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This short article presents some preliminary findings of a study which explores the effects on the statistical findings of using alternative forms for specifying Test of Understanding in College Economics (TUCE) scores as the dependent variable in the regression model. (Author/RM)

  7. TECHNICAL NOTES An optimized hair trap for non-invasive genetic studies

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005). The source of sample material together with DNA extraction methods and PCR conditions is among to remotely pluck a sufficient amount of hair bulbs from our study animal the common hamster (Cricetus). Hair samples are a widely used, non-lethal source of DNA, and recent advantages in molecular techniques

  8. Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP). This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses' knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment. PMID:25548662

  9. A cross-cultural study of work\\/family demands, work\\/family conflict and wellbeing: the Taiwanese vs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    British Luo Lu; Robin Gilmour; Shu-Fang Kao

    Purpose - The aim of the research is twofold: to explore relations between work\\/family demands, work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC) and wellbeing outcomes, and to contrast employees from an individualistic (UK) and a collectivistic (Taiwan) society. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Heterogeneous samples of full-time employees in Taiwan and UK were surveyed using structured questionnaires. Findings - For both the Taiwanese and

  10. Self-rostering and psychosocial work factors - a mixed methods intervention study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Albertsen, Karen; Hogh, Annie; Lund, Henrik; Hvid, Helge; Garde, Anne Helene

    2015-03-01

    This study aims at 1) examining the effect of self-rostering on emotional demands, quantitative demands, work pace, influence, social community at work, social support from leaders and colleagues, job satisfaction, and negative acts, 2) examining whether this effect was mediated through increased influence on the scheduling of working hours, and interpreting the results in light of the different implementation processes that emerged in the study and by including qualitative data. We conducted a 12 months follow-up, quasi-experimental study of self-rostering among 28 workplaces out of which 14 served as reference workplaces. We also interviewed 26 employees and 14 managers about their expectations of introducing self-rostering. In the present study implementation of self-rostering had a positive effect on job demands and the social environment of the workplace, especially if the intervention does not comprise drastic changes of the organisation of the employees' work and private life. PMID:25479989

  11. A preliminary pharmacokinetic study of liposomal leuprolide dry powder inhaler: A technical note

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aliasgar Shahiwala; Ambikanandan Misra

    2005-01-01

    Summary and Conclusions  The developed liposomal DPI of LEU (LLEUn-DPI) demonstrated approximately 50% bioavailability compared with SC route. The\\u000a studies justify the role of the pulmonary route as a promising alternative to the presently available SC route. The components\\u000a of liposomal vesicles may be suitably changed to achieve higher bioavailability. Pulmonary delivery of LEU is expected to\\u000a help in improving patient

  12. NOTE: Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the BEBIG Co60 HDR source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Ballester; D. Granero; J. Pérez-Calatayud; E. Casal; S. Agramunt; R. Cases

    2005-01-01

    Although not as widespread as Ir-192, Co-60 is also available on afterloading equipment devoted to high dose rate brachytherapy, mainly addressed to the treatment of gynaecological lesions. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of the Co-60 source used by the BEBIG MultiSource remote afterloader (BEBIG GmbH, Germany) for which there are no dosimetric data available

  13. Research Excellence Framework: Impact pilot exercise Example case studies from Social Work and Social Policy

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    1 Research Excellence Framework: Impact pilot exercise Example case studies from Social Work and Social Policy November 2010 Introduction 1. This document provides some examples of case studies the highest-scoring case studies submitted to the pilot, to show a range of types of impacts that were

  14. Methods for recruiting white, black, and hispanic working-class women and men to a study of physical and social hazards at work: the United for Health study.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Hartman, Cathy; Quinn, Margaret M; Stoddard, Anne M; Krieger, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Despite research on work and health having a long-standing concern about unjust exposures and inequitable burdens of disease, there are few studies that document the joint distribution and health effects of physical and psychosocial hazards (e.g., noise, dusts, fumes, and job strain) and social hazards (e.g., racial discrimination and gender harassment) encountered at work. Also, there is a paucity of data on how these exposures, singly and combined, are distributed in relation to sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, and nativity. This article presents a conceptual model for redressing these knowledge gaps and describes recruitment strategies and the characteristics of study participants in the United for Health study. Working with labor unions, the authors recruited 14 (67%) of 21 worksites from manufacturing, meat processing, retail, and transportation, and 1,282 workers (72% response rate), of whom 62 percent were men, 36 percent were women, 39 percent were black, 23 percent were Hispanic, 25 percent were white, 31% earned less than a living wage, 40 percent were below the poverty level, and 23 percent had less than a high school education. PMID:17436989

  15. Some life lessons in the work place: personal narrative/case study.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Michael Schwartz, a lawyer deaf since birth, describes his journey as a professional for the last 32 years since his graduation from NYU School of Law in 1981. He offers a case study of his experiences with accommodations on the job as required by federal and state law. The study includes specific examples of what worked and what did not work for a deaf lawyer like him working at his craft. Schwartz wraps up with the lessons he learned over the last three decades as we moved from the model of non-compliance to that of compliance, even beyond compliance, with the mandates of law in the employment context. PMID:24284683

  16. Psychosocial Safety Climate, Work Conditions, and Emotions in the Workplace: A Malaysian Population-Based Work Stress Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd Awang Idris; Maureen F. Dollard

    2011-01-01

    We integrated psychosocial safety climate (PSC) with the job demands and resources (JD-R; Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) framework to examine the impact of both job demands and job resources at work on employee depression, anger, and engagement. PSC refers to a climate for the protection of employee psychological health and safety. As PSC theoretically influences the working environment, we hypothesized

  17. How Does the New TANF Work Requirement "Work" in Rural Minority Communities? A Case Study of the Northern Cheyenne Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Erin Feinauer; Ward, Carol; Villa, Rita Hiwalker; Davis, Judith

    2005-01-01

    In August of 1996 Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), which President Bill Clinton then signed into law. This essay will address the question, how have American Indian reservation residents fared in relation to the new work requirements? The authors are interested in the consequences of…

  18. Working Girls: Abuse or Choice in Street-Level Sex Work? A Study of Homeless Women in Nottingham

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Harding; Paul Hamilton

    2009-01-01

    SummaryThis paper uses fifteen indices of abuse and a definition of ‘coercion’ as ‘constraint, restraint, compulsion; the application of force to control the action of a voluntary agent’ (OED Online, 2006) to explore how homeless women understand their choice to sex work. Twenty-six homeless women were interviewed, nine of whom had sex worked. A structured, qualitative questionnaire was used in

  19. PATHS TO PEACE STUDENT APPLICATION FORM Intended Semester of Study (Important Note: Successful applicants are required to arrive at the start of the program -

    E-print Network

    Rimon, Elon

    PATHS TO PEACE STUDENT APPLICATION FORM Intended Semester of Study (Important Note: Successful of the Paths to Peace Program. 5. Resume or equivalent description of recent professional, academic and extra away from Israel / Palestine, and any previous experience with peace or dialogue programs. 7. Letters

  20. Note: Multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer to study highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Karn, Ranjeet K; Mishra, C N; Ahmad, Nissar; Saini, S K; Safvan, C P; Nandi, T

    2014-06-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a multi channel Doppler tuned spectrometer setup to study physics of highly charged ions at high resolution in a direct way. A unique Soller slit assembly coupled with a long one dimensional position sensitive proportional counter enables us to get distinct x-ray peaks at different angles, which allows us to cover large number of angle in one shot. By using this setup, 1s2s (3)S1 - 1s(2) (1)S0 M1 transition in He-like Fe has been resolved from its satellite line 1s2s2p ?P(5/2)? - 1s(2)2s (2)S(1/2) M2 transition in Li-like Fe and measured the lifetime of their respective upper levels with high precision. PMID:24985874

  1. Assessment of a manipulator device for NOTES with basic surgical skill tests: a bench study.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Advanced complex surgery performed with the natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery technique requires use of a multitasking platform. The aim of this study is to evaluate the basic functionality of a prototype multitasking platform "EndoSAMURAI" with the use of a biosimulation model and ex vivo porcine stomach. We compared the performance of basic surgical skill tasks between the EndoSAMURAI and standard laparoscopic instrumentation. Basic surgical tasks include cutting, dissection, and suturing and knot tying. Main outcome measurements were the time to complete each task and leak pressure to evaluate the quality of the suturing and knot tying. Although it took longer to perform all basic surgical tasks with the EndoSAMURAI than with laparoscopic instrumentation, all tasks could be performed precisely and with an accuracy comparable to that of the laparoscopic technique. Leak pressures of the gastric closure site between both techniques were also comparable. PMID:24710223

  2. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    An upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 ?s and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  3. NOTE: Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, F.; Granero, D.; Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Casal, E.; Agramunt, S.; Cases, R.

    2005-11-01

    Although not as widespread as Ir-192, Co-60 is also available on afterloading equipment devoted to high dose rate brachytherapy, mainly addressed to the treatment of gynaecological lesions. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of the Co-60 source used by the BEBIG MultiSource remote afterloader (BEBIG GmbH, Germany) for which there are no dosimetric data available in the literature. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 has been used to obtain the TG43 parameters and the 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source. The dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function have been calculated and are presented in a tabular form as well as a detailed 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates. These dosimetric datasets can be used as input data and to validate the treatment planning system calculations.

  4. Editor's Notes

    E-print Network

    of their papers should enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. The XVIIth World Congress of Philosophy will be held in Montreal, Canada, August 21 to 27, 1983. The main theme will be "Philosophy and Culture", but about a dozen sections covering the major...EDITORS NOTES The Bertrand Russell Society announces a call for papers to be presented at its meeting at the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in December 1982. Papers may be on any aspect of Russell's Philosophy...

  5. Theodoricus Gravius (fl. 1600-1661): some biographical notes on a German chymist and scribe working in seventeenth-century England.

    PubMed

    Poole, William

    2009-11-01

    This article establishes the career of Theodoricus Gravius (fl. 1600-1661), a German refugee who worked in Great Linford as a laboratory assistant and scribe to the cleric and practitioner of astrological medicine, Richard Napier (1559-1634). Gravius was the first transmitter to England of the texts of the mystic Jacob Böhme, and although he settled in England, he undertook subsequent foreign visits to attempt the recovery of his property and to learn more about chymical matters. He also visited the Oxonian George Hakewill (1578-1649), and is responsible for scribing one of the manuscripts of the revisions to Hakewill's celebrated Apologie or Declaration Concerning the Power and Providence of God (1635). PMID:20506704

  6. The characteristics of an effective physician-hospital working relationship: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Schramko, Tim D

    2007-06-01

    The working relationship between a private practice physician, whose medical practice was acquired by a health system, and the health system that sponsored the medical practices was studied using a dyadic perspective and drawing from agency theory to identify those characteristics that are present in an effective working relationship. In-depth interviews with currently employed physicians and those whose contracts were terminated within the last 3 years were used to identify why some working relationships failed and others succeeded. Hospital administrators and practice managers that provided the support services to the acquired medical practices were also interviewed for their assessment of the working relationship. As a result of the research, a model for developing an effective working relationship is presented to be considered as a framework for developing future working relationships. Based upon the data, this study posits that the physicians and the hospitals can have a more effective working relationship if specific characteristics are evident before, during, and after the contract is signed. Understanding the factors that contribute to an effective working relationship can help in designing contracts with physicians and better utilize resources at the physician private practice level, as well as at the hospital level. PMID:17628927

  7. Impact of increasing productivity on work content and psychosocial work characteristics in Chaku-Chaku assembly lines - a follow-up study in a German automotive manufacturing company.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Díaz, José-Alonso; Kotzab, Daniel; Sytch, Alina; Frieling, Ekkehart

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims at evaluating the reorganization of work processes on the basis of studies of three assembly lines in a well known component manufacture of the German automotive industry. It is of particular interest to evaluate the impact of the introduction of Chaku-Chaku assembly lines on the production goals, distribution of activities during one typical work day and psychosocial characteristics of the work environment. Findings indicate that the Chaku-Chaku assembly lines could represent a successful production strategy in order to enhance the output levels of work systems. However, the data show that interviewed assembly workers have spent more time on value added activities than before. The intensive perception of the time spent on main work activities (direct value added activities) and a simultaneous decrease of available discretionary time between work tasks seem to be related to the low level of the reported psychosocial work characteristics. PMID:22317514

  8. The stability of fears in children: a two-year prospective study: a research note.

    PubMed

    Spence, S H; McCathie, H

    1993-05-01

    This study investigated the stability of self-reported fears amongst 94 primary school children over a 2-year period using the Fear Survey Schedule for Children--Revised (FSSC--R). Children reported a decrease in fearfulness with increasing age, with girls reporting higher fear scores than boys on both occasions. The most frequently feared stimuli were almost identical for boys and girls and remained the same on both occasions, relating mainly to fears of danger, death and physical injury. Those fears that showed the greatest reduction over time concerned getting sick, parental criticism or punishment and the dark for girls, whereas boys reported the greatest reductions in fears relating to physical injury, parental criticism, the dark and unfamiliar persons. The only fear stimulus to increase with age was "giving a spoken report", which was rated as more fearful by boys on the second occasion. Children identified as unusually fearful at Time 1, were much more likely to report high fear levels two years later, compared to children who did not report high fear levels at Time 1. PMID:8509495

  9. Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59) and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38), and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99). In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over one’s job is likely to help prevent early retirement due to disability. PMID:22537302

  10. Stress situations of daily living in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a retrospective case note study.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Shin; Tashiiro, Nobutada

    2004-02-01

    About 40% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are said to have treatment-refractory symptoms and chronic course of illness in spite of cognitive-behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy. The present purpose was to investigate factors relevant to OCD patients' chronic course and disturbed daily functions in view of human basic needs based on Maslow's hierarchy of five basic needs. Case notes of 101 outpatients with OCD (47 men and 54 women who were 18 to 55 years old) and seen on a psychiatry unit of a general hospital were studied to explore their stressful situations and identify thwarted basic needs. 84 of the 101 patients had Love Needs, and Esteem Needs (n = 47) and Safety Needs (n = 45) were next. The Poor-functioning group mainly had histories with problems of Safety Needs (70.8%), while the Good-functioning group tended to mainly have problems of Esteem Needs (51.5%) rather than Safety Needs (33.3%). 57 patients (23 men and 34 women) who were treated for more than three months were divided into two groups according to their Global Assessment of Functioning score at the final assessment (cut-off point: 61); patients in the Good-functioning group tended to have problems of higher needs. PMID:15077758

  11. Psychosocial factors at work and sickness absence in the Gazel cohort: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Niedhammer, I.; Bugel, I.; Goldberg, M.; Leclerc, A.; Gueguen, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether psychosocial factors at work are predictors of rates of sickness absence. METHODS: The study population consisted of middle aged men and women employed by the French national electricity and gas company (EDF-GDF) in various occupations and followed up since 1989 by annual self administered questionnaires and independent data obtained from the medical and personnel departments of EDF-GDF. The 1995 questionnaire provided information about three psychosocial work factors: psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support at work. Sick-ness absence data were provided by the company's social security department. The occurrence of spells and days of absence in the 12 months after completion of the 1995 questionnaire was studied. Potential confounding variables were age, smoking, alcohol, and marital status, assessed in the 1995 questionnaire, and educational level and occupation, assessed from data provided by the personnel department. This study was restricted to the 12,555 subjects of the initial cohort who were still working and answered the self administered questionnaire in 1995. RESULTS: Low levels of decision latitude were associated with more frequent and longer sickness absences among men and women. Low levels of social support at work increased the numbers of spells and days of absence among men only. These associations weakened after adjustment for potential confounding factors, but remained significant. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that psychosocial factors at work, especially decision latitude, are predictive of sickness absence.   PMID:9924449

  12. The Effects of the Federal Work-Study Program on Student Persistence and Accrued Loan Debt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ronatta Daphne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of participation and non-participation in a federal work-study (FWS) program on student persistence and accrued student debt for undergraduate students enrolled in a small, public, four-year, liberal arts college in the South. Sanford's (1967) theory of Challenge and Support and Tinto's (1986) Integration…

  13. Research, Study, Travel & Work Abroad: Opportunities and Information for Students and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Karen, Comp.

    The material in this pamphlet, compiled by the Institute of International Studies, is based on requests for information by students and teachers concerning research, study, travel, and work abroad. Two major sections are provided. The first treats United States government-sponsored opportunities and includes: (1) lecturing and advanced research…

  14. The Relationship between Working Memory for Serial Order and Numerical Development: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attout, Lucie; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Majerus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the link between verbal working memory (WM) and calculation abilities remains poorly understood. The present longitudinal study focuses specifically on the role of serial order retention capacities, based on recent findings suggesting a link between ordinal processing in verbal WM and numerical processing tasks. Children…

  15. Engagement in Work: Case Study of Four Schools in Suffolk County, New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sean Bayles

    2013-01-01

    The study was a qualitative case study on engagement in work in four schools in Suffolk County, New York. The purpose of this researcher was to investigate how school systems and educators engage students and adults in 21st Century education. The levels of engagement were examined using patterns of instruction, organization, governance, and…

  16. The Federal Work-Study Program: Impacts on Academic Outcomes and Employment. CAPSEE Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers may be interested in the extent to which Federal Work-Study programs (FWS) increase students' access to productive employment, and how they impact students' academic and career success. This brief summarizes findings from a recent study using national data and a propensity score matching approach to examine the overall effects of FWS…

  17. Which Type of Work-Study Experience Is More Beneficial?: Perceptions of Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng Cheng; Ho, Hsuan-Fu; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase of tuition and the reduced financial support from government and families have forced many more students to take part-time jobs, however, different jobs might bear different benefits. The main purposes of this study were to identify the major benefits of part-time jobs or work-study experiences performed by college students, and…

  18. The Role of Professional School Counselors in Working with Students in Gangs: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Jennifer Cahoon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a grounded theory that contributed to the understanding of the professional school counselor's role at the secondary school level in working with students in gangs. The study explored the role of the professional school counselor from the first person perspective of the professional school counselor and…

  19. The Causal Effect of Federal Work-Study Participation: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Since 1964, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program has provided funds to subsidize the wages of student employees, but it has never been studied directly. I use an instrumental variables difference-in-difference framework with administrative data from West Virginia to identify causal effects, comparing eligible and ineligible students across…

  20. The ergonomics analysis of work: a case study in a experimental farm.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Santiago Luz, Maria; Lemos, Syntia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the initial steps of ergonomic analysis of industrial activities, which are being held in the premises of an Agricultural Experimental farm belonging to an institution of higher education. The methods employed in the initial step was confined to desk research, its purpose was to know the demographic profile and understand organizational structure followed by systematic observations in workplaces using semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire of perception to operators. The presentation of the results will provide a summary of the analysis of activity sectors visited, understanding the biomechanical efforts entered (posture and strength), as well as the evaluation according to the perception of officials to respect the constraints, ambience and suggestions. It was noted that 90% of employees surveyed feel some kind of discomfort. It also highlights the age factor of this questionnaire, in which the majority (90%) is above 40 years old, and this fact confirms and reinforces the appearance or accumulation of injuries among the employers. At this stage there was no intention to deploy improvements, but create assumptions and guide future intervention actions that can be performed. PMID:22317562

  1. Long Working Hours and Subsequent Use of Psychotropic Medicine: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental ill health is the most frequent cause of long-term sickness absence and disability retirement in Denmark. Some instances of mental ill health might be due to long working hours. A recent large cross-sectional study of a general working population in Norway found that not only “very much overtime”, but also “moderate overtime” (41-48 work hours/week) was significantly associated with increased levels of both anxiety and depression. These findings have not been sufficiently confirmed in longitudinal studies. Objective The objective of the study is to give a detailed plan for a research project aimed at investigating the possibility of a prospective association between weekly working hours and use of psychotropic medicine in the general working population of Denmark. Methods People from the general working population of Denmark have been surveyed, at various occasions in the time period 1995-2010, and interviewed about their work environment. The present study will link interview data from these surveys to national registers covering all inhabitants of Denmark. The participants will be followed for the first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. Poisson regression will be used to analyze incidence rates as a function of weekly working hours (32-40; 41-48; > 48 hours/week). The analyses will be controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. According to our feasibility studies, the statistical power is sufficient and the exposure is stable enough to make the study worth the while. Results The publication of the present study protocol ends the design phase of the project. In the next phase, the questionnaire data will be forwarded to Statistics Denmark where they will be linked to data on deaths, migrations, socioeconomic status, and redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medication. We expect the analysis to be completed by the end of 2014 and the results to be published mid 2015. Conclusions The proposed project will be free from hindsight bias, since all hypotheses and statistical models are completely defined, peer-reviewed, and published before we link the exposure data to the outcome data. The results of the project will indicate to what extent and in what direction the national burden of mental ill health in Denmark has been influenced by long working hours. PMID:25239125

  2. Work engagement and financial returns : a diary study on the role of job and personal resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Despoina Xanthopoulou; Arnold B. Bakker; Evangelia Demerouti; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how daily fluctuations in job resources (autonomy, coaching, and team climate) are related to employees' levels of personal resources (self-efficacy, self- esteem, and optimism), work engagement, and financial returns. Forty-two employees working in three branches of a fast-food company completed a questionnaire and a diary booklet over 5 consecutive workdays. Consistent with hypotheses, multi-level analyses revealed that

  3. More Students Seek Campus Jobs as Work-Study Positions Dwindle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    As more college students are relying on part- or full-time work to help pay for their education, federally financed work-study jobs are becoming harder to find. The percentage of freshmen who planned to hold full-time jobs while in college jumped to 4.7 percent this year, from 2.7 percent in 2000. But as more students are seeking jobs, federal…

  4. Female part-time work in the European Union : An empirical study based on the ECHP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Chaupain-Guillot; Olivier Guillot; Eliane Jankeliowitch-Laval

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the question of female part-time work in the EU is explored using cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP). Our empirical study has two main objectives : first, to describe the labour market transitions of women working part-time and, second, in the case of mothers with young children, to identify the determinants of

  5. Perspectives and practical applications of medical oncologists on defensive medicine (SYSIPHUS study): a study of the Palliative Care Working Committee of the Turkish Oncology Group (TOG).

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cay-Senler, Filiz; Yavuzsen, Tugba; Turhal, Serdar; Akman, Tulay; Komurcu, Seref; Cehreli, Ruksan; Ozyilkan, Ozgur

    2015-04-01

    Defensive medicine occasionally indulges unnecessary treatment requests to defend against lawsuits for medical errors and the use of unapproved medical applications. This study determines the attitudes and orientations of medical oncologists on defensive medicine. A cross-sectional survey was sent by e-mail to medical oncologists. The survey was designed to determine the participants' demographic characteristics and defensive medicine practices. The survey measured the attitudes about defensive medicine practices of the oncologists based on a five-point Likert scale (never, rarely, sometimes, often, and always). One hundred and forty-six of a total of 402 physicians serving in oncology were fully filled, and the rate of return invitation was 36 %. The majority of participants were male, with a duration of between 7 and 9 years of work as university hospital officials, and the mean age was 46 ± 9 (years). International guidelines were followed in the most common is NCCN, and the majority of respondents felt that the application of these guidelines improves their defensive medicine. All participants of defensive medicine who stand on the basis of the definition were found to be more afraid of complaints by patients' relatives. Physicians of 45 % was noted that applying defensive medicine. Among the participants were the most frequent checkups of positive defensive approach is defined as increasing or shortening the follow-up period, while avoiding high-risk patients were detected as described in the definition of negative defensive medicine. Both professional groups in both the positive and negative defensive medicine approach defensive medicine approach, academic tasks, work experience and job time, there was a significant correlation between the location. Made in single- and multi-variable analyses, positions were identified both positive and negative defensive medicine is an independent risk factor for direction. Improving the working conditions of young physicians to protect against medical error may require additional educational opportunities. PMID:25750041

  6. Work First, Study Second: Adult Undergraduates Who Combine Employment and Postsecondary Enrollment. Postsecondary Educational Descriptive Analysis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berker, Ali; Horn, Laura; Carroll, C. Dennis

    Working adult undergraduates can be broken into two groups: employees who study (those who work full-time and pursue postsecondary education to obtain skills necessary to advance in their careers) and students who work (those who work part-time and attend school full-time). In 1999-2000 roughly two-thirds of working undergraduates aged 24 or older…

  7. Forest Service Research Note

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    U.S.D.A. Forest Service Research Note PSW-184 ABSTRACT: Records of 5 and 6 years' cone crops in old-gr9wth rjdwood (Sequoia sempervirens LD. Don Fndl.) stands in northern California were studied for silvical facts. They show that (a) the principal trees in both cut and uncut stands bore fair to good cone

  8. Work plan addendum for the remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Salmon Site

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document is intended as an addendum to the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the Salmon Site (SS) (formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site) Lamar County, Mississippi. The original work plan - Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Tatum Dome Test Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (herein after called the Work Plan) was approved by the state of Mississippi in 1992 and was intended as the operative document for investigative activities at the Tatum Dome Test Site. Subsequent to the approval of the document a series of activities were undertaken under the auspices of the work plan. This document is organized in the same manner as the original work plan: (1) Introduction; (2) Site Background and History; (3) Initial Evaluation; (4) Data Quality Objectives; (5) RI/FS Tasks; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Management; and (8) Reference. This addendum will identify changes to the original work plan that are necessary because of additional information acquired at the SS. This document is not intended to replace the work plan, rather, it is intended to focus the remaining work in the context of additional site knowledge gained since the development of the original work plan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a focused and phased site characterization as a part, of the RI/FS. The RI/FS is the methodology under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) for evaluating hazardous waste sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The SS is not listed on the NPL, but DOE has voluntarily elected to conduct the evaluation of the SS in accordance with CERCLA.

  9. Anticipated significant work limitation in primary care consulters with osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Ross; Phillipson, Chris; Hay, Elaine M; Pransky, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of expected work limitations (EWL) prior to future retirement age in osteoarthritis consulters, and the associated health, sociodemographic and workplace factors. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting General practices in Staffordshire, England. Participants 297 working adults aged 50–65, who had consulted primary care for osteoarthritis. Outcome EWL was defined using a single question, “Do you think joint pain will limit your ability to work before you reach 69?years old?” Results 51 (17.2%) indicated that joint pain would not limit their ability to work until 69, 79 (26.6%) indicated EWL and 167 (56.2%) did not know if joint pain would limit work before 69. In bivariate analysis, physical function (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.91 to 0.96), depression (4.51; 1.81 to 11.3), cognitive symptom (3.84; 1.81 to 8.18), current smoker (2.75; 1.02 to 7.38), age (0.69; 0.58 to 0.82), physically demanding job (3.18; 1.50 to 6.72), no opportunities to retrain (3.01; 1.29 to 7.05) and work dissatisfaction (3.69; 1.43 to 9.49) were associated with EWL. The final multivariate model included physical function and age. Conclusions Only one in five osteoarthritis consulters expected that joint pain would not limit their work participation before 69?years of age. Given the expectation for people to work until they are older, the results highlight the increasing need for clinicians to include work participation in their consultation and implement strategies to address work loss/limitation. Targeting pain-related functional limitation and effective communication with employers to manage workplace issues could reduce EWL. PMID:25190616

  10. Explaining the social gradient in sickness absence: a study of a general working population in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some previous studies have proposed potential explanatory factors for the social gradient in sickness absence. Yet, this research area is still in its infancy and in order to comprise the full range of socioeconomic positions there is a need for studies conducted on random population samples. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if somatic and mental symptoms, mental wellbeing, job strain, and physical work environment could explain the association between low socioeconomic position and belonging to a sample of new cases of sick-listed employees. Methods This study was conducted on one random working population sample (n?=?2763) and one sample of newly sick-listed cases of employees (n?=?3044), drawn from the same random general population in western Sweden. Explanatory factors were self-rated 'Somatic and mental symptoms', 'Mental well-being', 'job strain', and 'physical work conditions' (i.e. heavy lifting and awkward work postures). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results Somatic and mental symptoms, mental well-being, and job strain, could not explain the association between socioeconomic position and sickness absence in both women and men. However, physical work conditions explained the total association in women and much of this association in men. In men the gradient between Non-skilled manual OR 1.76 (1.24;2.48) and Skilled manual OR 1.59 (1.10;2.20), both in relation to Higher non-manual, remained unexplained. Conclusions The present study strengthens the scientific evidence that social differences in physical work conditions seem to comprise a key element of the social gradient in sickness absence, particularly in women. Future studies should try to identify further predictors for this gradient in men. PMID:23738703

  11. Attending work or not when sick – what makes the decision? A qualitative study among car mechanics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High prevalence of sickness absence in countries with generous welfare schemes has generated debates on mechanisms that may influence workers’ decisions about calling in sick for work. Little is known about the themes at stake during the decision-making process for reaching the choice of absence or attendance when feeling ill. The aim of the study was to examine decisions of absence versus attendance among car mechanics when feeling ill. Methods Interviews with 263 male car mechanics from 19 companies were used for the study, analysed by systematic text condensation and presented as descriptions and quotations of experiences and opinions. Results Three major themes were at stake during the decision-making process: 1) Experienced degree of illness, focusing on the present health condition and indicators of whether you are fit for work or not; 2) daily life habits, where attending work was a daily routine, often learned from childhood; 3) the importance of the job, with focus on the importance of work, colleagues, customers and work environment. Conclusions The car mechanics expressed a strong will to attend work in spite of illness. Knowledge about attitudes and dilemmas in reaching the decision regarding sickness absence or sickness attendance is useful in the prevention of sickness absence. PMID:22994972

  12. Nuer Field Notes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The complicated process of creating meaningful field notes is a problem that vexes many scholars who rely on these important primary documents, including anthropologists, geographers, and sociologists. Currently, there aren't many websites that feature digital archives of fieldnotes, but this joint project undertaken by Indiana University and the University of Michigan is one step in the right direction. The essential goal of the project is to make the linguistic field notes recorded by Eleanor Vandevort (a missionary and researcher) in the South Sudan between 1949 and 1963 available on the web. The digital archive succeeds mightily, as it includes the linguistic field notes, and also photographs from her work there, various letters from the field, and a biographical sketch of her work there in the South Sudan. Along with these materials, visitors can read Vandevort's book about her time in Africa, titled _A Leopard Tamed_ and some fine essays on the history of colonial and missionary linguistics in the Sudan by Edward Miner.

  13. Healthcare workers' attitudes to working during pandemic influenza: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ives, Jonathan; Greenfield, Sheila; Parry, Jayne M; Draper, Heather; Gratus, Christine; Petts, Judith I; Sorell, Tom; Wilson, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Background Healthcare workers (HCWs) will play a key role in any response to pandemic influenza, and the UK healthcare system's ability to cope during an influenza pandemic will depend, to a large extent, on the number of HCWs who are able and willing to work through the crisis. UK emergency planning will be improved if planners have a better understanding of the reasons UK HCWs may have for their absenteeism, and what might motivate them to work during an influenza pandemic. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored UK HCWs' views (n = 64) about working during an influenza pandemic, in order to identify factors that might influence their willingness and ability to work and to identify potential sources of any perceived duty on HCWs to work. Methods A qualitative study, using focus groups (n = 9) and interviews (n = 5). Results HCWs across a range of roles and grades tended to feel motivated by a sense of obligation to work through an influenza pandemic. A number of significant barriers that may prevent them from doing so were also identified. Perceived barriers to the ability to work included being ill oneself, transport difficulties, and childcare responsibilities. Perceived barriers to the willingness to work included: prioritising the wellbeing of family members; a lack of trust in, and goodwill towards, the NHS; a lack of information about the risks and what is expected of them during the crisis; fear of litigation; and the feeling that employers do not take the needs of staff seriously. Barriers to ability and barriers to willingness, however, are difficult to separate out. Conclusion Although our participants tended to feel a general obligation to work during an influenza pandemic, there are barriers to working, which, if generalisable, may significantly reduce the NHS workforce during a pandemic. The barriers identified are both barriers to willingness and to ability. This suggests that pandemic planning needs to take into account the possibility that staff may be absent for reasons beyond those currently anticipated in UK planning documents. In particular, staff who are physically able to attend work may nonetheless be unwilling to do so. Although there are some barriers that cannot be mitigated by employers (such as illness, transport infrastructure etc.), there are a number of remedial steps that can be taken to lesson the impact of others (providing accommodation, building reciprocity, provision of information and guidance etc). We suggest that barriers to working lie along an ability/willingness continuum, and that absenteeism may be reduced by taking steps to prevent barriers to willingness becoming perceived barriers to ability. PMID:19216738

  14. Prevalence of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Physicians, Surgeons and Dentists: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rambabu, T; Suneetha, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the common occupational hazards among health care providers. Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate MSDs in terms of perception of pain experienced by physicians, surgeons and dental surgeons during professional work. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted with 100 physicians practicing either modern or alternative medicine, 100 surgeons of various specialties and 100 dental surgeons. Self-reporting work related questionnaire on MSDs were distributed, including information on the location of MSD symptoms in the past 12 months and the pain experienced. Results: Musculoskeletal pain was most prevalent among dentists 61% (61/100), followed by surgeons 37% (37/100) and physicians 20% (20/100). Nearly 15% of physicians (3/20), 40% (15/37) of Surgeons and 60% (35/61) of Dentists had MSD problems in more than one site. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there is a higher prevalence of MSDs experienced by dental surgeons than physicians and surgeons. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems with dental surgeons and other specialty doctors with an emphasis on a larger sample sizes and correlating other factors such as age and sex of the doctor, duration of practice, working hours per week, physical activity and working environment. PMID:25221708

  15. A Study on the Perfectionist Personality Traits and Empathic Tendencies of Working and Non-Working Adolescents across Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koksal Akyol, Aysel; Sali, Günes

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with the goal of examining the perfectionist personality traits and empathic tendencies of adolescents between the ages of 15 and 17. The study group consisted of 531 children attending a vocational education center and two general high schools located in the city center of Kayseri, Turkey. Data for this study were…

  16. Technical note: a pilot study using a mouse mastitis model to study differences between bovine associated coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Breyne, K; De Vliegher, S; De Visscher, A; Piepers, S; Meyer, E

    2015-02-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a group of bacteria classified as either minor mastitis pathogens or commensal microbiota. Recent research suggests species- and even strain-related epidemiological and genetic differences within the large CNS group. The current pilot study investigated in 2 experiments whether a mouse mastitis model validated for bovine Staphylococcus aureus can be used to explore further differences between CNS species and strains. In a first dose titration experiment, a low inoculum dose of S. aureus Newbould 305 (positive control) was compared with increasing inoculum doses of a Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a chronic bovine intramammary infection to a sham-inoculated mammary glands (negative control). In contrast to the high bacterial growth following inoculation with S. aureus, S. chromogenes was retrieved in very low levels at 24 h postinduction (p.i.). In a second experiment, the inflammation inflicted by 3 CNS strains was studied in mice. The host immune response induced by the S. chromogenes intramammary strain was compared with the one induced by a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from cow bedding sawdust and by a S. chromogenes strain originating from a teat apex of a heifer. As expected, at 28 and 48 h p.i., low bacterial growth and local neutrophil influx in the mammary gland were induced by all CNS strains. As hypothesized, bacterial growth p.i. was the lowest for S. fleurettii compared with that induced by the 2 S. chromogenes strains, and the overall immune response established by the 3 CNS strains was less pronounced compared with the one induced by S. aureus. Proinflammatory cytokine profiling revealed that S. aureus locally induced IL-6 and IL-1? but not TNF-?, whereas, overall, CNS-inoculated glands lacked a strong cytokine host response but also induced IL-1? locally. Compared with both other CNS strains, S. chromogenes from the teat apex inflicted a more variable IL-1? response characterized by a more intense local reaction in several mice. This pilot study suggests that an intraductal mouse model can mimic bovine CNS mastitis and has potential as a complementary in vivo tool for future CNS mastitis research. Furthermore, it indicates that epidemiologically different bovine CNS species or strains induce a differential host innate immune response in the murine mammary gland. PMID:25497801

  17. Working through the Problems of Study Abroad Using the Methodologies of Religious Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    After illustrating the joys of teaching religious studies abroad with an anecdote from my trip to China, I warn of some of its inherent pedagogical and ethical challenges. I argue that teaching some of the "new directions" in religious studies scholarship might address these challenges. These include a turning away from the abstract…

  18. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Haley; Qiong Wang; Beau Wanzer; Stefan Vogt; Lydia Finney; Ping Liu Yang; Tatjana Paunesku; Gayle Woloschak

    2011-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969

  19. Studying and Working: A National Study of Student Finances and Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; James, Richard; Grigg, Gabrielle

    2008-01-01

    A key determinant of the new relationship between students and universities in Australia is the changing nature of higher education funding arrangements and the shift towards "user-pays". In 2007, the Centre for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE) completed a commissioned national study, "Australian University Student Finances 2006: Final Report…

  20. Referrals to an Intellectual Disability Psychotherapy Service in an Inner City Catchment Area--A Retrospective Case Notes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Geosrgina; Mukherjee, Raja A. S.; Karagianni, Efthalia; Attavar, Rajnish; Sinason, Valerie; Hollins, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aims were to identify referral characteristics and outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities referred to a psychodynamic psychotherapy service. Materials and Methods: A retrospective case notes review of anonymized data relating to 100 sequential patient episodes. Results: A total of 81 people out of 100 with a range of…

  1. High Performance Work System, HRD Climate and Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muduli, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to study the relationship between high-performance work system (HPWS) and organizational performance and to examine the role of human resource development (HRD) Climate in mediating the relationship between HPWS and the organizational performance in the context of the power sector of India. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  2. National Centre for Indigenous Studies Working Program for Postgraduate Retreat 24 and 25 February 2009

    E-print Network

    Botea, Adi

    National Centre for Indigenous Studies Working Program for Postgraduate Retreat ­ 24 and 25 Retreat ­ 24 and 25 February 2009 Coach house Marina Resort 49 Beach Road Bateman's Bay (http to Indigenous higher education centres. The main aims of the retreat are: a) To bring together postgraduates

  3. Work factors and smoking cessation in nurses' aides: a prospective cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willy Eriksen

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking in nursing personnel remains high. The aim of this study was to identify work factors that predict smoking cessation among nurses' aides. METHODS: Of 2720 randomly selected, Norwegian nurses' aides, who were smoking at least one cigarette per day when they completed a questionnaire in 1999, 2275 (83.6 %) completed a second questionnaire 15 months

  4. Validation Study of a Gatekeeping Attitude Index for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Dora M. Y.; Coleman, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to validate the Gatekeeping Attitude Index, a 14-item Likert scaling index. The authors collected data from a convenience sample of social work field instructors (N = 188) with a response rate of 74.0%. Construct validation by exploratory factor analysis identified a 2-factor solution on the index after…

  5. Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades…

  6. HR professionals' views on work motivation and retention of older workers: a focus group study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita Claes; Mieke Heymans

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the views of human resource (HR) professionals on work motivation and retention of older workers. Furthermore, it seeks to generate qualitative data to inspire measures for future survey research. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study adopts a qualitative approach, using focus groups. A total of 15 participants were purposefully selected from different organisational settings (e.g.

  7. The Working Postures among Schoolchildren--Controlled Intervention Study on the Effects of Newly Designed Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Lea; Nygrd, Clas-H kan; Rimpel, Arja; Nummi, Tapio; Kaukiainen, Anneli

    2007-01-01

    Background: School workstations are often inappropriate in not offering an optimal sitting posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of individually adjustable saddle-type chairs with wheels and desks with comfort curve and arm support on schoolchildren's working postures compared to conventional workstations. Methods:…

  8. Studies in Public Welfare. Paper Number 13. How Income Supplements Can Affect Work Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Irwin; And Others

    To what extent, if any, will workers in families receiving Government cash benefits reduce their hours of work? The papers by Irwin Garfinkel and by Glen Cain and Harold Watts review large numbers of studies on this question. These authors caution us against having great confidence in the detailed estimates of how workers will respond because…

  9. "I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

  10. Study of an interconnected flashing warning light system for work zone lane closures

    E-print Network

    Finley, Melisa Dayle

    1999-01-01

    effectiveness in encouraging earlier lane-changing upstream of a lane closure compared to a standard lane closure. The studies simulated a work zone with a left lane closure. The following treatments in conjunction with an arrow panel were examined at two...

  11. A study on wear and surface roughness of work roll in cold rolling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongchun Li

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to improve our understanding of the evolution and tribological behaviour of work roll surfaces in cold rolling because surface deterioration affects the quality of products and the efficiency of production. The cost of rolls is almost 25% of the cost of cold steel production. An experimental Lateral Set-testing (LST) mini-mill was developed to make

  12. Public Welfare and Work Incentives: Theory and Practice. Studies in Public Welfare. Paper No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Vee; Townsend, Alair A.

    This chart book summarizes two volumes in the subcommittee's series, "Studies in Public Welfare." Paper No. 4 (Dec. 22, 1972) explored work incentive and disincentive features in existing and proposed public welfare programs (cash welfare, unemployment insurance, social security, veterans' benefits, food stamps, public housing, and medicaid).…

  13. VDT work, oculomotor strain, and subjective complaints: an experimental and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lie, I; Watten, R G

    1994-08-01

    Two studies, one experimental and one clinical, are presented. Study I examines the effect of three hours of continuous VDT work (text-editing) on a set of optometric and health-related variables in an experimental design with two matched groups, one experimental (n = 18) and one control group (n = 19). Doing the same keyboard activities for 3 h as the experimental group, the control group was looking out of a window instead of at the display while working (distance viewing). There were significant group differences in work related effects on the eyes' ciliary and extraocular muscles and on subjective symptoms, indicating that not only visual symptoms but also muscle pain in the head, neck, and upper back regions may result from near-point induced oculomotor strain. Study II shows the health effect of optical corrections on symptomatic VDT workers (n = 14). There is a significant pre-post reduction in symptoms, indicating that visual anomalies contribute to work-related symptoms. The results of both studies are discussed in a visual ecological perspective. PMID:7925264

  14. Instructions for Completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) And accepting Federal Work Study

    E-print Network

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Instructions for Completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) And accepting Federal Work Study 1. Complete the FAFSA by the end of the UCSB priority filing period (By March 2, 2008). The FAFSA may be completed after the priority period but there is no guarantee funds will still be available

  15. A Case Study on the Relationships between Participation in Online Discussion and Achievement of Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study is to discuss about the correlation between each group's performances of participation in online discussion and their achievements of project-based works. Performances of online discussion consist of content, frequency, and frequency of participation in discussion after each login into the Web community system. Research…

  16. Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal Behaviourists

    E-print Network

    Little, Tony

    of interest (e.g. the General Medical Council and the British Medical Association for human medicine, RCVSAssociation for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal for clinical animal behaviourists in the UK, similar to the Animal Behavior Society (ABS) Board of Professional

  17. The Use of Adjunct Faculty: An Exploratory Study of Eight Social Work Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Waldo C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of social work practitioners as adjunct college faculty (AFs) surveyed 6 administrators, 43 AFs, and 175 students in 8 institutions. Results showed students regarded AFs as somewhat less effective teachers than full-time faculty but appreciated their expertise on contemporary and specialized practice. Administrators appreciated financial…

  18. How Does a Box Work? A Study in the Qualitative Dynamics of Solid

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ernest

    How Does a Box Work? A Study in the Qualitative Dynamics of Solid Objects Ernest Davis Dept reasoning about one partic- ular scenario: using a box to carry a collection of objects from one place to another. Specifically we consider the plan, plan1 "Load objects uCargo into box oBox one by one; carry oBox

  19. Work Experiences of People with Mental Illness in Malaysia: A Preliminary Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, Su-Lyn; Loong, Jaymee; Ng, Wai-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary qualitative study, using a basic interpretive approach, to investigate the work experiences of people with mental illness in Malaysia. Six females and four males (aged 30-70) from a residential home for the mentally ill participated in semi-structured interviews. Three inter-relating themes emerged, namely the experience of…

  20. State-Space Analysis of Working Memory in Schizophrenia: An FBIRN Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janoos, Firdaus; Brown, Gregory; Morocz, Istvan A.; Wells, William M., III

    2013-01-01

    The neural correlates of "working memory" (WM) in schizophrenia (SZ) have been extensively studied using the multisite fMRI data acquired by the Functional Biomedical Informatics Research Network (fBIRN) consortium. Although univariate and multivariate analysis methods have been variously employed to localize brain responses under differing task…

  1. Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Lee Swanson

    2011-01-01

    The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades 2 and 3. The results were that (a)

  2. Instructor Immediacy Strategies to Facilitate Group Work in Online Graduate Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melrose, Sherri; Bergeron, Kim

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of online graduate study programs require students to participate in collaborative work projects. And yet, educational research examining instructional strategies that facilitate learning in small groups online is limited. This article describes findings from a qualitative research project that investigated instructor…

  3. N-back working memory paradigm: A meta-analysis of normative functional neuroimaging studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian M. Owen; Kathryn M. McMillan; Angela R. Laird; Ed Bullmore

    2005-01-01

    One of the most popular experimental paradigms for functional neuroimaging studies of working memory has been the n-back task, in which subjects are asked to monitor the identity or location of a series of verbal or nonverbal stimuli and to indicate when the currently presented stimulus is the same as the one presented n trials previously. We conducted a quantitative

  4. Installation for studying resistance of materials to cracking under prolonged loading in working environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. N. Nikiforchin; S. I. Ripetskii; I. A. Berezyuk

    1976-01-01

    The proposed installation is designed for the study of crack resistance in bar test pieces in prolonged static tests in liquid and gaseous media with varying degrees of humidity. It consists of a loading mechanism, test chamber, devices to record crack length and to stabilize temperature, an assembly to regulate saturation with moisture, a working chamber, and a control panel.

  5. Higgs Working Group Report of the Snowmass 2013 Community Planning Study

    E-print Network

    Dawson, S; Logan, H; Qian, J; Tully, C; Van Kooten, R; Ajaib, A; Anastassov, A; Anderson, I; Bake, O; Barger, V; Barklow, T; Batell, B; Battaglia, M; Berge, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Brau, J; Brownson, E; Cahill-Rowley, M; Calancha-Paredes, C; Chen, C -Y; Chou, W; Clare, R; Cline, D; Craig, N; Cranmer, K; de Gruttola, M; Elagin, A; Essig, R; Everett, L; Feng, E; Fujii, K; Gainer, J; Gao, Y; Gogoladze, I; Gori, S; Goncalo, R; Graf, N; Grojean, C; Guindon, S; Han, T; Hanson, G; Harnik, R; Heinemann, B; Heinemeyer, S; Heintz, U; Hewett, J; Ilchenko, Y; Ismail, A; Jain, V; Janot, P; Kawada, S; Kehoe, R; Klute, M; Kotwal, A; Krueger, K; Kukartsev, G; Kumar, K; Kunkle, J; Lewis, I; Li, Y; Linssen, L; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Liss, T; List, J; Liu, T; Liu, Z; Low, I; Ma, T; Mackenzie, P; Mellado, B; Melnikov, K; Moortgat-Pick, G; Mourou, G; Narain, M; Nielsen, J; Okada, N; Okawa, H; Olsen, J; Onyisi, P; Parashar, N; Peskin, M; Petriello, F; Plehn, T; Pollard, C; Potter, C; Prokofiev, K; Rauch, M; Rizzo, T; Robens, T; Rodriguez, V; Roloff, P; Ruiz, R; Sanz, V; Sayre, J; Shafi, Q; Shaughnessy, G; Sher, M; Simon, F; Solyak, N; Stupak, J; Su, S; Tanabe, T; Tajima, T; Telnov, V; Tian, J; Thomas, S; Thomson, M; Un, C; Velasco, M; Wagner, C; Wang, S; Whitbeck, A; Yao, W; Yokoya, H; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zhang, Y; Zhou, Y

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $C\\!P$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

  6. Higgs Working Group Report of the Snowmass 2013 Community Planning Study

    E-print Network

    S. Dawson; A. Gritsan; H. Logan; J. Qian; C. Tully; R. Van Kooten; A. Ajaib; A. Anastassov; I. Anderson; D. Asner; O. Bake; V. Barger; T. Barklow; B. Batell; M. Battaglia; S. Berge; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; J. Brau; E. Brownson; M. Cahill-Rowley; C. Calancha-Paredes; C. -Y. Chen; W. Chou; R. Clare; D. Cline; N. Craig; K. Cranmer; M. de Gruttola; A. Elagin; R. Essig; L. Everett; E. Feng; K. Fujii; J. Gainer; Y. Gao; I. Gogoladze; S. Gori; R. Goncalo; N. Graf; C. Grojean; S. Guindon; H. Haber; T. Han; G. Hanson; R. Harnik; S. Heinemeyer; U. Heintz; J. Hewett; Y. Ilchenko; A. Ishikawa; A. Ismail; V. Jain; P. Janot; S. Kanemura; S. Kawada; R. Kehoe; M. Klute; A. Kotwal; K. Krueger; G. Kukartsev; K. Kumar; J. Kunkle; M. Kurata; I. Lewis; Y. Li; L. Linssen; E. Lipeles; R. Lipton; T. Liss; J. List; T. Liu; Z. Liu; I. Low; T. Ma; P. Mackenzie; B. Mellado; K. Melnikov; A. Miyamoto; G. Moortgat-Pick; G. Mourou; M. Narain; H. Neal; J. Nielsen; N. Okada; H. Okawa; J. Olsen; H. Ono; P. Onyisi; N. Parashar; M. Peskin; F. Petriello; T. Plehn; C. Pollard; C. Potter; K. Prokofiev; M. Rauch; T. Rizzo; T. Robens; V. Rodriguez; P. Roloff; R. Ruiz; V. Sanz; J. Sayre; Q. Shafi; G. Shaughnessy; M. Sher; F. Simon; N. Solyak; J. Strube; J. Stupak; S. Su; T. Suehara; T. Tanabe; T. Tajima; V. Telnov; J. Tian; S. Thomas; M. Thomson; K. Tsumura; C. Un; M. Velasco; C. Wagner; S. Wang; S. Watanuki; G. Weiglein; A. Whitbeck; K. Yagyu; W. Yao; H. Yokoya; S. Zenz; D. Zerwas; Y. Zhang; Y. Zhou

    2014-01-08

    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

  7. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties. PMID:26049515

  8. Social work practitioners and the human-companion animal bond: a national study.

    PubMed

    Risley-Curtiss, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research documents powerful relationships between humans and companion animals, and 62 percent of U.S. households report having a companion animal. Social workers are likely to work with individuals and families with companion animals; thus, the inclusion of such animals in both practice and research as a natural extension of social work with humans, and their challenges, coping mechanisms, and resiliency factors, seems called for. Yet there is little in the social work literature that identifies what social workers are doing in this area. Thus, this descriptive study sought to explore nationally what social work practitioners know and are doing in the area of the human and companion animal relationships. Findings include that social work practitioners appear to have basic knowledge of the negative and positive relationships between humans and companion animals. About one-third are including questions about companion and other animals in their intake assessments, and a little less than 25 percent are including companion and other animals in their intervention practice. The vast majority have had no special training or coursework to do so. Implications for these and other findings are discussed, and recommendations for social work research, education, and practice are offered. PMID:20069939

  9. Spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into nonwork: A daily diary study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Corts, Inés; Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B; Boz, Marina

    2015-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 20(3) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2015-15847-001). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read "High Daily Resilience".] This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work-task and relationship conflict-spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n = 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work-life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25602278

  10. Precision and Recall of Search Strategies for Identifying Studies on Return-To-Work in Medline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Gehanno; Laetitia Rollin; Tony Le Jean; Alexandre Louvel; Stefan Darmoni; William Shaw

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to report on the qualities of various search strategies and keywords to find return to work\\u000a (RTW) studies in the Medline bibliographic database. Methods We searched Medline for articles on RTW published in 2003, using multiple search strings, and hand searched 16 major periodicals\\u000a of rehabilitation or occupational medicine. Among the retrieved articles,

  11. Agricultural work exposures and pulmonary function among hired farm workers in California (the MICASA study).

    PubMed

    Rodriquez, Erik J; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Bennett, Deborah H; Tancredi, Daniel J; Schenker, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    Despite California's dependence on hired farm labor, scarce research has been conducted on the respiratory health of hired farm workers. Agricultural exposures to inorganic and organic dusts can adversely affect an individual's respiratory health and differ by farm type and job task. The purpose of the present analysis was to examine associations between agricultural work exposures and pulmonary function among 450 California farm workers. Data were collected as part of the Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) study, a prospective cohort study examining occupational risk factors and health of hired farm worker families in Mendota, California. Time-weighted self-reported average (TWSRA) dust scores were calculated from assessments of past-12-month agricultural work history. Other dust exposure indicator variables included months worked in agriculture in the past 12 months and years worked in agriculture. Multiple linear regression modeled FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second), FEF(25-75%) (forced midexpiratory flow rate), FVC (forced vital capacity), FEV6, FEV1/FVC, and FEV1/FEV6 separately. Seventy-six percent of participants had worked in agriculture in the past year. In models conducted for crops and tasks separately, high TWSRA dust score was associated with better FEV6. Crop and task models showed associations between greater months worked in agriculture in the past year and better FEV1, FEF(25-75%), and FEV6. Both models also found greater years worked in agriculture to be associated with worse FEV1/FEV6. Results were generally in the opposite direction as expected given past research but not uncommon. Future research should investigate relationships between pulmonary function and agricultural dust exposure over a lifetime and changes in pulmonary function over time. PMID:25275408

  12. Working Notes 1995 AISB Workshop Series

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Michael

    University of Sheffield April 4th, 1995 Programme Chair: Andrew). Thanks also go to Craig MacNish (York) who assisted with publi* *city. We would like to thank AISB. Andrew Irel* *and Programme Cha* *ir

  13. Work-life conflict and musculoskeletal disorders: a cross-sectional study of an unexplored association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The health consequences of work-family or rather work-life conflict (WLC) have been studied by numerous researchers. The work-related causes of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are also well explored. And stress (at work) has been found to be a consequence of WLC as well as a cause of MSD. But very little is known about a potential association between WLC and MSD and the possible mediating role of stress in this relationship. Methods Survey data collected in 2007 among the workforces of four large companies in Switzerland were used for this study. The study population covered 6091 employees. As the exposure variable and hypothesized risk factor for MSD, WLC was measured by using a 10-item scale based on an established 18-item scale on work-family conflict. The outcome variables used as indicators of MSD were (low) back pain and neck/shoulder pain. Stress as the assumed intervening variable was assessed by a validated single-item measure of general stress perception. Correlation coefficients (r), standardized regression coefficients (?) and multiple adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated as measures of association. Results WLC was found to be quite strongly associated with MSD (? = .21). This association turned out to be substantially confounded by physical strain at work, workload and job autonomy and was considerably reduced but far from being completely eliminated after adjusting for general stress as another identified risk factor of MSD and a proven strong correlate of WLC (r = .44). A significant and relevant association still remained (? = .10) after having controlled for all considered covariates. This association could be fully attributed to only one direction of WLC, namely the work-to-life conflict. In subsequent analyses, a clear gradient between this WLC direction and both types of MSD was found, and proved to be consistent for both men and women. Employees who were most exposed to such work-to-life conflict were also most at risk and showed a fivefold higher prevalence rate (19%-42%) and also an up to sixfold increased relative risk (OR = 3.8-6.3) of suffering greatly from these types of MSD compared with the least exposed reference group showing very low WLC in this direction. Including stress in the regression models again reduced the strength of the association significantly (OR = 1.9-4.1), giving an indication for a possible indirect effect of WLC on MSD mediated by stress. Conclusion Future research and workplace interventions for the prevention of MSD need to consider WLC as an important stressor, and the MSD risk factor identified in this study. PMID:21410950

  14. Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic…

  15. Spanish for Working Medical Professionals: Linguistic Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lear, Darcy W.

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative case study examined the Spanish linguistic needs of working health care professionals. Data from observation field notes, interviews, document analysis, and member checks were coded, triangulated, and analyzed following the premises of grounded theory. Results indicated that participants were able to produce routinely used words…

  16. Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in office work: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tânia M; Coelho, Denis A

    2011-01-01

    Twelve recently built office work stations, where jobs imply continued use of information and communication technologies, were analyzed for ergonomic risk factors. Based on a literature review of ergonomic recommendations for computer and general office work, a checklist was devised for assistance in identifying inadequate ergonomic situations, a process that was informed by pain complaints information. RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment) was selected to estimate the risk of MSDs, considering the criteria of applicability and appropriateness to the case studied. This method was applied by an occupational health and safety technician to the most critical job observed in the workplace. Criticality was estimated through observations aided by the systematic use of a checklist tailored to the specific office scenario. Recommendations for change were provided for implementation in all workplaces in the office, in order to improve work conditions, and guide the setup of a MSD prevention training program. PMID:21811030

  17. A Fifteen Year Follow Up Study of the North Kansas City Public Schools Work Study Graduates. 1966-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonley, Pat; And Others

    Data were collected at a 15 year class reunion of 100 graduates of a work study program for educable mentally retarded students in the North Kansas City Public Schools. Ss were interviewed personally by one of their former teachers or the vocational adjustment coordinator. Among findings were the following: 64% had their own automobile; 56% lived…

  18. An Evaluation Study of Youth Participation in Youth Work: A Case Study in Southern Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morciano, Daniele; Scardigno, Anna Fausta; Manuti, Amelia; Pastore, Serafina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an evaluation study of a public programme financing a regional network of 157 youth centres in the South of Italy is presented. A theory-based evaluation model was adopted to explore the causal links between different types of participation experience. Evaluation questions focused on three main issues are: the perception of…

  19. Finnish occupational physicians' and nurses' experience of work related stress management: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta

    2011-01-01

    Work-related stress has a strong influence on the health of workers. Occupational health care has an important role in assessing and managing this stress in collaboration with enterprises. The methods to reduce stress can be directed at the individual and at the organization as a whole. There is little information about stress handling methods in occupational health practices. This study aims to investigate these practices in Finnish occupational health physicians' and nurses' work. The data were generated through semi structured interviews of ten voluntary occupational physicians and eight occupational nurses in the metropolitan area of Finland in June 2009. The work-related stress was experienced as difficult to handle. There was no specific protocol for handling work-related stress in practice. Stress reduction activities were mostly randomly directed at the individual or the organizational level. Activities remained mainly on the individual level and were rarely allocated to the organization. There is a need for structured guidelines on how to manage work-related stress to assure standardized action on both the individual and organizational level. The roles of the physician, nurse and psychologist should be clarified in teamwork. Their collaborative activities should be directed also to the organisational level. PMID:22020021

  20. Shame! Self-stigmatisation as an obstacle to sick doctors returning to work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Max; Brooks, Samantha K; del Busso, Lilliana; Chalder, Trudie; Harvey, Samuel B; Hotopf, Matthew; Madan, Ira; Hatch, Stephani

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the views of sick doctors on the obstacles preventing them returning to work. Design Qualitative study. Setting Single participating centre recruiting doctors from all over the UK. Participants Doctors who had been away from work for at least 6?months with physical or mental health problems, drug or alcohol problems, General Medical Council involvement or any combination of these, were eligible. Eligible doctors were recruited in conjunction with the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund, the General Medical Council and the Practitioner Health Programme. These organisations approached 77 doctors; 19 participated. Each doctor completed an in-depth semistructured interview. We used a constant comparison method to identify and agree on the coding of the data and the identification of a number of central themes. Results The doctors described that being away from work left them isolated and sad. Many experienced negative reactions from their family and some deliberately concealed their problems. Doctors described a lack of support from colleagues and feared a negative response when returning to work. Self-stigmatisation was central to the participants’ accounts; several described themselves as failures and appeared to have internalised the negative views of others. Conclusions Self-stigmatising views, which possibly emerge from the belief that ‘doctors are invincible’, represent a major obstacle to doctors returning to work. From medical school onwards cultural change is necessary to allow doctors to recognise their vulnerabilities so they can more easily generate strategies to manage if they become unwell. PMID:23069770

  1. Social stressors at work, sleep quality and psychosomatic health complaints--a longitudinal ambulatory field study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Diana; Elfering, Achim

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality--objectively assessed sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality--as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow-up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. PMID:23824588

  2. Research studies and their implications for social work practice in a multidisciplinary center for lupus care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Persad, Pretima; Erkan, Doruk; Kirou, Kyriakos; Horton, Roberta; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its psychosocial impact creates management challenges that require a multidisciplinary team approach for optimal patient care and outcomes. This article provides a brief report on current lupus-related research studies at the Mary Kirkland Center for Lupus Care at Hospital for Special Surgery. Studies and their social work implications highlight a comprehensive, integrated model for research, education, and patient care emphasizing interdisciplinary collaboration. Both basic science and clinical research are discussed, with a focus on the role of social workers as an integral part of the health care team in providing assessments and interventions and as support for patients in research studies. PMID:22905980

  3. Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: These instructions will work on OS X 10.5 (Leopard) and OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard). For help configuring previous OS X versions please see the Student Genius Corner.

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Wireless Printing Setup for Mac OS X* *Please note: These instructions will work on OS X 10 Genius Corner. Wireless printing is currently not available on OS X Lion 1 Information Technology on Print & Fax 4. Click + to add a printer. 5. The Add Printer window will appear #12;Wireless Printing

  4. Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

  5. Study on the Influence of the Work Hardening Models Constitutive Parameters Identification in the Springback Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M.C.; Menezes, L. F. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Polo II, 3030 Coimbra (Portugal); Alves, J.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Chaparro, B.M. [Polythecnic Institute of Tomar, Rua 17 de Agosto de 1808, 2200-273 Abrantes (Portugal)

    2005-08-05

    The main goal of this work is to determine the influence of the work hardening model in the numerical prediction of springback. This study will be performed according with the specifications of the first phase of the 'Benchmark 3' of the Numisheet'2005 Conference: the 'Channel Draw'. Several work hardening constitutive models are used in order to allow a better description of the different material mechanical behavior. Two are classical pure isotropic hardening models described by a power law (Swift) or a Voce type saturation equation. Those two models were also combined with a non-linear (Lemaitre and Chaboche) kinematic hardening rule. The final one is the Teodosiu microstructural hardening model. The study is performed for two commonly used steels of the automotive industry: mild (DC06) and dual phase (DP600) steels. The mechanical characterization, as well as the constitutive parameters identification of each work hardening models, was performed by LPMTM, based on an appropriate set of experimental data such as uniaxial tensile tests, monotonic and Bauschinger simple shear tests and orthogonal strain path tests, all at various orientations with respect to the rolling direction. All the simulations were carried out with the CEMUC's home code DD3IMP (contraction of 'Deep Drawing 3-D IMPlicit code')

  6. Study on the Influence of the Work Hardening Models Constitutive Parameters Identification in the Springback Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.; Chaparro, B. M.; Menezes, L. F.

    2005-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to determine the influence of the work hardening model in the numerical prediction of springback. This study will be performed according with the specifications of the first phase of the "Benchmark 3" of the Numisheet'2005 Conference: the "Channel Draw". Several work hardening constitutive models are used in order to allow a better description of the different material mechanical behavior. Two are classical pure isotropic hardening models described by a power law (Swift) or a Voce type saturation equation. Those two models were also combined with a non-linear (Lemaître and Chaboche) kinematic hardening rule. The final one is the Teodosiu microstructural hardening model. The study is performed for two commonly used steels of the automotive industry: mild (DC06) and dual phase (DP600) steels. The mechanical characterization, as well as the constitutive parameters identification of each work hardening models, was performed by LPMTM, based on an appropriate set of experimental data such as uniaxial tensile tests, monotonic and Bauschinger simple shear tests and orthogonal strain path tests, all at various orientations with respect to the rolling direction. All the simulations were carried out with the CEMUC's home code DD3IMP (contraction of `Deep Drawing 3-D IMPlicit code').

  7. Psychological and social work factors as predictors of mental distress: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2014-01-01

    Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. "caseness" level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline "cases" were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45-3.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.43-0.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.40-0.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.41-0.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. PMID:25048033

  8. LSU EE 4720 Cache Notes and Study GuideUpdated F 05, Cor F 07 David M. Koppelman

    E-print Network

    Koppelman, David M.

    is the value of its index bits. In a direct-mapped cache (illustrated) each set holds one line; in an x-way set. They consist of a description of cache structure, a note-sheet-ready diagram, and a discussion of exam problem, the address to load or store from. On a load the index bits (see diagrams) of the effective address are used

  9. A study of work-family conflict, family-work conflict and the contingent effect of self-efficacy of retail salespeople in a transitional economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian Chelariu; Rodney Stump

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The present study aims to contribute to the growing cross-national body of literature on work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) issues by examining the interrelationship of these constructs with other variables in the context of a transitional economy. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected using self-report questionnaires distributed to retail salespeople in Hungary. Hypothesis tests were conducted using

  10. ABSTRACTS OF TECHNICAL NOTES OF THE DIVISION OF OPERATIONS ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STOLLER, DAVID S., ED.

    THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS ABSTRACTS OF TECHNICAL NOTES. THE TECHNICAL NOTES ARE WORKING PAPERS OF THE DIVISION OF OPERATIONS ANALYSIS AND ARE BEING CIRCULATED BY MEANS OF DEPOSIT IN THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. (HW)

  11. 1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology Meeting Notes MEETING DATE: 2 is reviewing gaps (65 identified to date) and how to bridge them. Gap examples: PeopleSoft does not track work

  12. A collection of Schottky-scan notes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabersky, A.P.

    1980-10-01

    This paper is a republication of ISR-RF notes and performance reports on work done in 1974-1975. The original notes have been edited, corrected and, in most cases, shortened. Discussed in this note are the following topics: noise, errors and the Schottky scan; speeding up the Schottky scan; Schottky markers and fast Schottky scans; and some engineering aspects of the fast Schottky scan.

  13. Exploring the Interpersonal Relationships in Street-Based Male Sex Work: Results from an Australian Qualitative Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Leary; Victor Minichiello

    2007-01-01

    While the literature on male sex work has increased significantly over the past decade, few studies examine the influence of relational dynamics in the lives of those engaged in male sex work. This qualitative study, conducted with a sample of male street sex workers in Sydney, Australia, explores how relationships color their involvement with sex work. The findings reveal the

  14. Openness in cross-cultural work settings: a multicountry study of expatriates.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Anne-Grit; Dilchert, Stephan; Deller, Jürgen; Paulus, Frieder M

    2014-01-01

    Openness plays an important role in determining what kind of experiences individuals seek out not only in their personal lives, but also in work environments. The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the influence of openness and its facets on the decision to work abroad and (b) to study whether employees' openness relates to cross-cultural adjustment as well as job and life satisfaction. We investigated these questions among a sample of 2,096 expatriates. In addition to self-reports of openness and cross-cultural adjustment, ratings of subjects' adjustment were also obtained from 928 knowledgeable others. The openness facets of actions, ideas, and values appear to be good predictors of acceptance of international assignments. In addition, global Openness and its facets Openness to actions and feelings relate to self- and other ratings of cross-cultural adjustment. PMID:24003885

  15. Reducing vividness and emotional intensity of recurrent "flashforwards" by taxing working memory: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Iris M; van den Hout, Marcel A; Dek, Eliane C P; Giele, Catharina L; van der Wielen, Jan-Willem; Reijnen, Marthe J; van Roij, Birgit

    2011-05-01

    Several studies have found that making eye movements while retrieving visual images about past negative events reduces their vividness and emotional intensity. A working memory account states that eye movements tax working memory and interfere with visual imagery, thus degrading images. This study examined whether eye movements also affect recurrent, intrusive visual images about potential future catastrophes ("flashforwards") in a sample of female undergraduates who had indicated on a screening-scale that they suffer from such intrusions. They were asked to recall two intrusive images with or without making eye movements. Before and after each condition, participants retrieved the image, and rated its vividness and emotionality. Results showed that vividness of intrusive images was lower after recall with eye movement, relative to recall only, and there was a similar trend for emotionality. Potential implications are discussed. PMID:21376527

  16. Experimental reconstruction of work distribution and study of fluctuation relations in a closed quantum system.

    PubMed

    Batalhão, Tiago B; Souza, Alexandre M; Mazzola, Laura; Auccaise, Ruben; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Goold, John; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro; Serra, Roberto M

    2014-10-01

    We report the experimental reconstruction of the nonequilibrium work probability distribution in a closed quantum system, and the study of the corresponding quantum fluctuation relations. The experiment uses a liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance platform that offers full control on the preparation and dynamics of the system. Our endeavors enable the characterization of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a quantum spin from a finite-time thermodynamics viewpoint. PMID:25325627

  17. Changes in Work Centrality and Other Life Areas in IsraelA Longitudinal Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moshe Sharabi; Itzhak Harpaz

    2007-01-01

    This unique longitudinal study examines the state of work centrality and other life areas (family, leisure, community and religion) in Israel among the same individuals (n=407) over a 12-year period. A new representative sample (serving as a control group) of the Israeli labour force in 1992–93 (n=942) assists us in exploring whether the changes occurred by cohort, life course or

  18. Recovery at home and performance at work: A diary study on self–family facilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felieke E. Volman; Arnold B. Bakker; Despoina Xanthopoulou

    2012-01-01

    This 5-day diary study among 65 Dutch employees focuses on the interplay between time on and off the job. We examined how daily off-job (work-related, physical, household) activities, in combination with the degree to which people want to engage in these activities relate to self–family facilitation (i.e., the positive influence of the fulfilment of one's own interests on one's family

  19. Statement of Work for Studies in BlueGene/L Scalability and Reconfigurability

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, A; McKee, S A

    2005-09-13

    As referenced in the subcontract, the work included three major goals: (1) study the performance of an ASCI application, (2) study tradeoffs in using the second CPU in coprocessor mode to optimize use of the L3 scratchpad memory for performing vector-like gather/scatter and streamlining operations, and (3) perform simulator studies of hardware phase detection and identification. We made some modifications to the work contract. Work involving the integration of a cache-conscious data placement algorithm to improve cache utilization on BlueGene/L has been added and work involving the L3 scratchpad memory has been eliminated. This was explained in the previous milestones. In this milestone, we continue to focus on the last goal by modifying a cycle-accurate simulator, sim-alpha [4]. As premise to hardware phase detection and identification, we need to have an infrastructure for testing various cache-conscious data placement methods. For this milestone, we discuss the completed framework that handles cache-conscious placement optimizations, which includes profiling data accesses and handling remapped addresses. We will also introduce an algorithm (ccdp profiling tool) that we implemented for assigning remapped addresses for a given code. Our performance results show that by using our ccdp profiling tool, we achieve reduced miss rates and an improved overall simulation performance. For our test cases, we use four applications from the SPEC CPU 2000 suite [2]. In our past milestones, we studied research that involves implementing cache-conscious data placement techniques. By becoming more familiar with previous research, we can make better decisions on designing our cache-conscious profiling tool. It is important to have a firm understanding of the existing techniques that have proven to be efficient at improving memory performance, since our tool will produce trace files as input to our enhanced simulator framework.

  20. A study of the hot-working behavior of SiCAl alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Pickens; T. J. Langan; R. O. England; M. Liebson

    1987-01-01

    The hot-working behavior of two metal matrix composites (7090 + 20 vol pct SiC whiskers and 6061 + 20 vol pct SiC whiskers)\\u000a and their powder metallurgy matrix alloys (7090 and 6061) was studied by hot torsion testing. Flow stress (?o) and strain-to-failure (?\\u000a f\\u000a ) data were generated at deformation temperatures and strain rates corresponding to the potential range

  1. Outdoor work and risk for Parkinson's disease: a population-based case–control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Line Kenborg; Christina F Lassen; Beate Ritz; Eva S Schernhammer; Johnni Hansen; Nicole M Gatto; Jørgen H Olsen

    2010-01-01

    ObjectivesSunlight is the main contributor to vitamin D in humans. Since inadequate levels of vitamin D have been linked to increased risks for neurodegenerative diseases, we examined whether outdoor work is associated with a reduced risk for Parkinson's disease in a population-based case–control study of Danish men.MethodsWe identified 3819 men with a primary diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in the period

  2. 24\\/7 Software Development in Virtual Student Exchange Groups: Redefining the Work and Study Week

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Chaczko; R. Klempous; J. Nikodem; J. Rozenblit

    2006-01-01

    A concept of time zone driven, 24\\/7-week software development in a Virtual Student Exchange (VSX) environment is being defined, developed and applied to explore reliable and efficient continuous modes of work\\/study processes. The overall goal is to assess the suitability and benefits of this innovative approach to teaching and learning in order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of these

  3. My Research Life through Studies in Art Education: A Body of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Enid

    2005-01-01

    This lecture is based on a dozen articles that Enid Zimmerman had published in Studies in Art Education as author and co-author from 1977 to the present as well as several articles that are in-progress. She makes an analogy of this body of research to a body of work produced by a practicing artist. She also refers to the intellectual climate in…

  4. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures. PMID:24804914

  5. Goals of telephone nursing work - the managers’ perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish healthcare direct

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD. Methods The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis. Results The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: ‘create feelings of trust’, ‘achieve patient safety’, ‘assess, refer and give advice’, and ‘teach the caller’. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given. Conclusions The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers’ expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems. PMID:24762193

  6. Ethical and practical guidelines for reporting genetic research results to study participants: updated guidelines from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute working group.

    PubMed

    Fabsitz, Richard R; McGuire, Amy; Sharp, Richard R; Puggal, Mona; Beskow, Laura M; Biesecker, Leslie G; Bookman, Ebony; Burke, Wylie; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Church, George; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Eckfeldt, John H; Fernandez, Conrad V; Fisher, Rebecca; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Gabriel, Stacey; Gachupin, Francine; James, Cynthia; Jarvik, Gail P; Kittles, Rick; Leib, Jennifer R; O'Donnell, Christopher; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Schully, Sheri D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sze, Rebecca K F; Thakuria, Joseph V; Wolf, Susan M; Burke, Gregory L

    2010-12-01

    In January 2009, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a 28-member multidisciplinary Working Group to update the recommendations of a 2004 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group focused on Guidelines to the Return of Genetic Research Results. Changes in the genetic and societal landscape over the intervening 5 years raise multiple questions and challenges. The group noted the complex issues arising from the fact that technological and bioinformatic progress has made it possible to obtain considerable information on individuals that would not have been possible a decade ago. Although unable to reach consensus on a number of issues, the working group produced 5 recommendations. The working group offers 2 recommendations addressing the criteria necessary to determine when genetic results should and may be returned to study participants, respectively. In addition, it suggests that a time limit be established to limit the duration of obligation of investigators to return genetic research results. The group recommends the creation of a central body, or bodies, to provide guidance on when genetic research results are associated with sufficient risk and have established clinical utility to justify their return to study participants. The final recommendation urges investigators to engage the broader community when dealing with identifiable communities to advise them on the return of aggregate and individual research results. Creation of an entity charged to provide guidance to institutional review boards, investigators, research institutions, and research sponsors would provide rigorous review of available data, promote standardization of study policies regarding return of genetic research results, and enable investigators and study participants to clarify and share expectations for the handling of this increasingly valuable information with appropriate respect for the rights and needs of participants. PMID:21156933

  7. The effect of individual differences in working memory capacity on sentence comprehension: an FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D; Malaia, Evie; Seo, Roy; Cheng, Hu

    2013-07-01

    This study explores the interaction between working memory systems and language processing by examining how differences in working memory capacity (WMC) modulates neural activation levels and functional connectivity during sentence comprehension. The results indicate that two working memory systems may be involved in sentence comprehension, the verbal working memory system and the episodic buffer, but during different phases of the task. A sub-region of the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) was correlated with WMC during the probe and not during sentence reading while the only region to reveal a correlation with WMC during sentence reading was the posterior cingulate/precuneus area, a region linked to event representation. In addition, functional connectivity analysis suggests that there were two distinct networks affected by WMC. The first was a semantic network that included the middle temporal cortex, an anterior region of the inferior frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal region. The second included the posterior cingulate and BA 45 of the inferior frontal gyrus. We propose here that high capacity readers may generate an event representation of the sentence during reading that aids in comprehension and that this event representation involves the processing of the posterior cingulate cortex. PMID:23124385

  8. Job satisfaction among public health professionals working in public sector: a cross sectional study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction largely determines the productivity and efficiency of human resource for health. It literally depicts the extent to which professionals like or dislike their jobs. Job satisfaction is said to be linked with the employee’s work environment, job responsibilities and powers and time pressure; the determinants which affect employee’s organizational commitment and consequently the quality of services. The objective of the study was to determine the level of and factors influencing job satisfaction among public health professionals in the public sector. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted in Islamabad, Pakistan. Sample size was universal including 73 public health professionals, with postgraduate qualifications and working in government departments of Islamabad. A validated structured questionnaire was used to collect data from April to October 2011. Results Overall satisfaction rate was 41% only, while 45% were somewhat satisfied and 14% of professionals highly dissatisfied with their jobs. For those who were not satisfied, working environment, job description and time pressure were the major causes. Other factors influencing the level of satisfaction were low salaries, lack of training opportunities, improper supervision and inadequate financial rewards. Conclusion Our study documented a relatively low level of overall satisfaction among workers in public sector health care organizations. Considering the factors responsible for this state of affairs, urgent and concrete strategies must be developed to address the concerns of public health professionals as they represent a highly sensitive domain of health system of Pakistan. Improving the overall work environment, review of job descriptions and better remuneration might bring about a positive change. PMID:23298253

  9. Work and Risk: Perceptions of Nuclear-Power Personnel. a Study in Grounded Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Claire Dewitt

    1992-01-01

    The utility industry has devoted time and money to assure personnel within nuclear power plants are informed about occupational risks. Radiation-protection training programs are designed to present information to employees about occupational radiation and protective procedures. Work -related concerns are known to create stress, affect the morale of the workforce, influence collective bargaining, and increase compensation claims. This study was designed to determine perceptions of risk among employees of nuclear power plants and identify variables that influence these perceptions. Four power plants were included in the study, one in Canada and three in the United States. Data were generated through participant observations and interviews of 350 participants during a period of 3 weeks at each plant. Data were gathered and analyzed following procedures advanced by Grounded Theory, a naturalistic methodology used in this study. Training content, information, and communication materials were additional sources of data. Findings indicated employees believed health and safety risks existed within the work environment. Perceptions of risk were influenced by training quality, the work environment, nuclear myths and images of the general public, and fears of family members. Among the three groups of workers, administration personnel, security personnel, and radiation workers, the latter identified a larger number of risks. Workers perceived radiation risks, shift work, and steam pipe ruptures as high-level concerns. Experiencing stress, making mistakes, and fear of sabotage were concerns shared among all employee groups at various levels of concern. Strategies developed by employees were used to control risk. Strategies included teamwork, humor, monitoring, avoidance, reframing, and activism. When risks were perceived as uncontrollable, the employee left the plant. A coping strategy of transferring concerns about radiological risks to nonradiological risks were uncovered in the data. Implications and recommendations include (a) the development of interactive training sessions concerning perceptions and facts of radiological exposures, (b) informational training for nonradiological employees, and (c) educational material development for family members and friends of employees.

  10. NOTES ON TIME SERIES ANALYSIS

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    NOTES ON TIME SERIES ANALYSIS ARIMA MODELS AND SIGNAL EXTRACTION Regina Kaiser and Agustín Maravall practice in applied time series work, mostly at economic policy or dataproducing agencies, relies heavily on using moving average lters to estimate unobserved components (or signals) in time series

  11. Supplementary pension declaration Please note

    E-print Network

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Supplementary pension ­ declaration Please note: 1. The following information is required to pay number/area of work 2. Details regarding supplementary old-age pension and survivors' pension 2.1 Fill der Länder ­ VBL (Pension Institution of the Federal Republic and the Länder) I am /was insured

  12. Comparative study of lung functions in women working in different fibre industries.

    PubMed

    Khanam, F; Islam, N; Hai, M A

    2008-07-01

    A cross sectional work has been done on Bangladeshi females, working in different fibre industries, to study the effect of exposure to fibre dust on pulmonary functions. The ventilatory capacities were measured by VMI ventilometer in 653 apparently healthy women (160, 162 and 167 were jute, textile and garment industry workers, respectively). For the controls 164 females were recruited who never worked in any fibre industry. The observed FVC, FEV1 and PEFR were lower in all groups of fibre industry workers than those of the control. Among the industry workers, the jute mill workers had the lowest ventilatory capacities and garment industry workers had the highest values. The jute and textile mill workers had also significantly lower FEV1 and PEFR than those of garment industry workers. The FEV1 and PEFR were significantly lower in jute mill workers than those of textile ill workers. The low ventilatory capacities were almost proportionate with the length of service of the workers. Thus, the present study indicates that the fibre dust, on regular exposure for longer duration, may limit the lung functions. PMID:18626454

  13. Methods of monitoring menstrual function in field studies: attitudes of working women.

    PubMed

    Wright, D M; Kesner, J S; Schrader, S M; Chin, N W; Wells, V E; Krieg, E F

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the attitudes and compliance of working women toward methods being evaluated for use in the assessment of the effects of toxicants on reproductive potential. Women such as the highly motivated fertility patients and nurses, who are typically familiar with the methods and procedures of fertility assessment and the value of medical research, have been used to validate such methods in a clinical setting. However, the attitudes of a general working female population toward these methods are unknown. Nine participants were selected on the bases, in part, of not seeking fertility assistance, working full-time but not in the medical field, and having less than one year of college education. Attitudes were also evaluated for 193 non-participating women to whom the procedures had been verbally described. Participants measured basal body temperature and salivary and vaginal mucous electrical resistance, evaluated cervical mucus manually (CME), and collected the first morning urine for two menstrual cycles. Blood, saliva, and transvaginal ultrasonograms (US) were obtained at a fertility clinic 6 to 9 days per cycle. Participants brought urine to the laboratory every 3 days. All participants performed all methods. Participants were paid $400; nonparticipants were not compensated. Only 3% of the respondents objected to the proposed methods: principally to CME, US, and giving blood samples. No respondent perceived the study as unimportant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1463920

  14. A search strategy to identify studies on the prognosis of work disability: a diagnostic test framework

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Rob; Verbeek, Jos A H M; Faber, Babs; van Dijk, Frank J H; Hoving, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Searching the medical literature for evidence on prognosis is an important aspect of evidence-based disability evaluation. To facilitate this, we aimed to develop and evaluate a comprehensive and efficient search strategy in PubMed, to be used by either researchers or practitioners and that will identify articles on the prognosis of work disability. Methods We used a diagnostic test analytic framework. First, we created a reference set of 225 articles on the prognosis of work disability by screening a total of 65?692 titles and abstracts from10 journals in the period 2000–2009. Included studies had a minimum follow-up of 6?months, participants in the age of 18–64 with a minimum sick leave of 4?weeks or longer or having serious activity limitations in 50% of the cases and outcome measures that reflect impairments, activity limitations or participation restrictions. Using text mining methods, we extracted search terms from the reference set and, according to sensitivity and relative frequency, we combined these into search strings. Results Both the research and the practice search filter outperformed existing filters in occupational health, all combined with the Yale-prognostic filter. The Work Disability Prognosis filter for Research showed a comprehensiveness of 90% (95% CI 86 to 94) and efficiency expressed more user-friendly as Number Needed to Read=20 (95% CI 17 to 34). Conclusions The Work Disability Prognosis filter will help practitioners and researchers who want to find prognostic evidence in the area of work disability evaluation. However, further refining of this filter is possible and needed, especially for the practitioner for whom efficiency is especially important. PMID:25991444

  15. International variation in absence from work attributed to musculoskeletal illness: findings from the CUPID study

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, José Miguel; Serra, Consol; Benavides, Fernando G; Palmer, Keith T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the variation in rates of absence due to musculoskeletal pain across 47 occupational groups (mostly nurses and office workers) from 18 countries, and to explore personal and group-level risk factors that might explain observed differences. Methods A standardised questionnaire was used to obtain information about musculoskeletal pain, sickness absence and possible risk factors in a cross-sectional survey of 12?416 workers (92–1017 per occupational group). Additionally, group-level data on socioeconomic variables, such as sick pay and unemployment rates, were assembled by members of the study team in each country. Associations of sickness absence with risk factors were examined by Poisson regression. Results Overall, there were more than 30-fold differences between occupational groups in the 12-month prevalence of prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence, and even among office workers carrying out similar occupational tasks, the variation was more than tenfold. Personal risk factors included older age, lower educational level, tendency to somatise, physical loading at work and prolonged absence for non-musculoskeletal illness. However, these explained little of the variation between occupational groups. After adjustment for individual characteristics, prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence was more frequent in groups with greater time pressure at work, lower job control and more adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness of musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusions Musculoskeletal sickness absence might be reduced by eliminating excessive time pressures in work, maximising employees’ responsibility and control and providing flexibility of duties for those with disabling symptoms. Care should be taken not to overstate work as a cause of musculoskeletal injury. PMID:23695413

  16. Meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott T; Grant, Pei C; Depner, Rachel M; Donnelly, James P; Kerr, Christopher W

    2014-10-15

    Objective: Hospice patients often struggle with loss of meaning, while many experience meaningful dreams. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary exploration into the process and therapeutic outcomes of meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients. Method: A meaning-centered variation of the cognitive-experiential model of dream work (Hill, 1996; 2004) was tested with participants. This variation was influenced by the tenets of meaning-centered psychotherapy (Breitbart et al., 2012). A total of 12 dream-work sessions were conducted with 7 hospice patients (5 women), and session transcripts were analyzed using the consensual qualitative research (CQR) method (Hill, 2012). Participants also completed measures of gains from dream interpretation in terms of existential well-being and quality of life. Results: Participants' dreams generally featured familiar settings and living family and friends. Reported images from dreams were usually connected to feelings, relationships, and the concerns of waking life. Participants typically interpreted their dreams as meaning that they needed to change their way of thinking, address legacy concerns, or complete unfinished business. Generally, participants developed and implemented action plans based on these interpretations, despite their physical limitations. Participants described dream-work sessions as meaningful, comforting, and helpful. High scores on a measure of gains from dream interpretation were reported, consistent with qualitative findings. No adverse effects were reported or indicated by assessments. Significance of Results: Our results provided initial support for the feasibility and helpfulness of dream work in this population. Implications for counseling with the dying and directions for future research were also explored. PMID:25315257

  17. Can Multiple Mini Interviews work in an Irish setting? A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M; Dowell, J; Husbands, A; Kropmans, T; Jackson, A E; Dunne, F; O'Flynn, S; Newell, J; Murphy, A W

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) is a new selection tool for medical school applicants. Developed at McMaster University in 2004 it comprises a series of interview stations designed to measure performance across a range of competencies including communication skills, team work, and ethical reasoning. In September 2012, 109 First Year Medical students underwent the MMI. It consisted of 10 stations. The median total score, out of 150, was 100 (min 63, max 129). Cronbach Alphas for the 10 individual stations range from 0.74 to 0.80. Overall Cronbach Alpha of MMI items was 0.78. Staff and student feedback was positive. The outline cost per student was estimated at Euro 145. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to hold a MMI with acceptable levels of reliability and stakeholder approval in an Irish setting. Further work is ongoing to establish the concurrent and predictive validity of MMI in this cohort of medica students. PMID:25226716

  18. Making a successful return to work: the UK burden of injury multicentre longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Denise; Vinogradova, Yana; Coupland, Carol; Christie, Nicola; Lyons, Ronan A; Towner, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Injuries are common and make a significant contribution to sickness absence, but little is known about problems experienced by injured people on return to work (RTW). Aim To quantify work problems on RTW and explore predictors of such problems. Design & setting Multicentre longitudinal study in four UK hospitals. Method Prospective study of injured participants aged 16–65 years who were employed or self-employed prior to the injury and had RTW at 1 or 4 months post injury. Results At 1 month, most (59%) had only made a partial RTW. By 4 months, 80% had fully RTW. Those who had partially RTW had problems related to physical tasks (work limited for median of 25% of time at 1 month, 18% at 4 months), time management (10% at 1 month, 20% at 4 months) and output demands (10% at 1 month, 15% at 4 months). Productivity losses were significantly greater among those with partial than full RTW at 1 month (median 3.3% versus 0.9%, P<0.001) and 4 months (median 4.6% versus 1.1% P = 0.03). Moderate/severe injuries (relative risk [RR] 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35 to 2.77) and sports injuries (RR 1.73, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.67) were associated with significantly greater productivity losses at 1 month while pre-existing long-term illnesses (RR 2.12, 95% CI = 1.38 to 3.27) and upper limb injuries (RR 1.64, 95% CI = 1.06 to 2.53) were at 4 months. Conclusion Injuries impact on successful RTW for at least 4 months. Those who have only partially RTW experience the most problems and GPs should pay particular attention to identifying work problems in this group and ways of minimising such problems. PMID:22520774

  19. New PIC/Postsecondary Alliances. How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work. Six Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Work and Learning, Washington, DC.

    Case studies are provided of the six sites involved in a demonstration project to encourage partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs). These programs represent instances of collaborations between colleges/universities and the Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and…

  20. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.] [eds.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  1. Work domain analysis for enhancing collaborations: a study of the management of microsystems design.

    PubMed

    Durugbo, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is an important process that enables organisations to achieve goals or solve problems and, in design processes, is an important factor for accomplishing interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary tasks. An understanding of the functional configuration of organisations could therefore offer a useful insight into collaborations of designers. This study makes use of work domain analysis (WDA) to analyse the management of design by organisations within the microsystems technology (MST) domain. The WDA considers the functional configuration of MST companies in terms of management constraints and boundaries. This study also makes use of the WDA to suggest ways of establishing collaborative design and enhancing collaboration between organisations. Practitioner Summary: The results of this methodical analysis offer useful insights for managing design functions. This study also presents recommendations for enhancing collaboration in organisations. The ability to manage and collaborate in design functions is valuable for improving the productivity, cost-effectiveness and time-to-market systems. PMID:22506645

  2. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The report describes the work breakdown structure (WBS) and its associated WBS dictionary for task area 1 of contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies (ATSS). This WBS format is consistent with the preliminary design level of detail employed by both task area 1 and task area 4 in the ATSS study and is intended to provide an estimating structure for parametric cost estimates.

  3. Comparative study of the work load between one-man buses and two-man buses.

    PubMed

    Ueno, M; Ohta, T; Nakagiri, S; Ogawa, T; Nakao, S; Arisawa, T; Mino, Y; Kodera, R; Kanazawa, S; Oyama, K

    1985-06-01

    The differences in physiological and safety conditions of one-man buses and two-man buses were examined from the view point of occupational fatigue. This survey consisted of a work load study which included a time study, study of subsidiary behavior, auditory task, memory test, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and physiological function tests and a self-administered questionnaire which involved items concerning safety and subjective fatigue complaints. The visual and postural restrictions in the one-man bus were greater than in the two-man bus. The mental capacity of the one-man bus drivers was found to be less. Greater mental fatigue and stress were observed in the one-man bus. More subjective fatigue complaints were observed in the one-man bus. More cases of near accidents were observed in the one-man bus. From these results it was concluded that the one-man bus caused bus drivers a greater mental and physical work load. PMID:2862758

  4. The impact of computer implementation on nursing work patterns: study design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Burkle, T; Kuch, R; Passian, A; Prokosch, U; Dudeck, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a three phase evaluation of nursing work patterns on two University Hospital Giessen medical wards and the influence of introducing electronic data processing into the nursing environment. Results of the first phase are presented. The first phase was a baseline evaluation prior to the introduction of any electronic data processing functions. Work sampling showed that, on average, 15% of a nurse's time was spent providing general nursing care, 35% on special nursing care, and 30% on administrative activities. The remaining 20% was used for activities not directly related to nursing. In addition, a survey was conducted, revealing that about one third of the nursing staff had had contact with computers prior to start of the study. The enthusiastic attitude toward using computers on the ward was striking. Nursing staff expected that their work would be easier after the introduction of computers, that electronic data processing would save time, and that the computers would be easy to use. The staff did not express such positive expectations for the use of bedside terminals or portable devices. PMID:8591437

  5. First-Trimester Working Conditions and Birthweight: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, Marcel F.; van Eijsden, Manon; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the relationship between women's first-trimester working conditions and infant birthweight. Methods. Pregnant women (N = 8266) participating in the Amsterdam Born Children and Their Development study completed a questionnaire gathering information on employment and working conditions. After exclusions, 7135 women remained in our analyses. Low birthweight and delivery of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant were the main outcome measures. Results. After adjustment, a workweek of 32 hours or more (mean birthweight decrease of 43 g) and high job strain (mean birthweight decrease of 72 g) were significantly associated with birthweight. Only high job strain increased the risk of delivering an SGA infant (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 2.2). After adjustment, the combination of high job strain and a long workweek resulted in the largest birthweight reduction (150 g) and the highest risk of delivering an SGA infant (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.2, 3.2). Conclusions. High levels of job strain during early pregnancy are associated with reduced birthweight and an increased risk of delivering an SGA infant, particularly if mothers work 32 or more hours per week. PMID:19542045

  6. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 3: Satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The satellite service portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines requirements and service equipment concepts for performing satellite service from the space shuttle orbiter. Both normal and contingency orbital satellite service is required. Service oriented satellite design practices are required to provide on orbit satellite service capability for the wide variety of satellites at the subsystem level. Development of additional satellite service equipment is required. The existing space transportation system provides a limited capability for performing satellite service tasks in the shuttle payload bay area.

  7. A pilot study of combined working memory and inhibition training for children with AD\\/HD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart J. Johnstone; Steven Roodenrys; Elise Phillips; Annele J. Watt; Sharlene Mantz

    2010-01-01

    Building on recent favourable outcomes using working memory (WM) training, this study examined the behavioural and physiological\\u000a effect of concurrent computer-based WM and inhibition training for children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder\\u000a (AD\\/HD). Using a double-blind active-control design, 29 children with AD\\/HD completed a 5-week at-home training programme\\u000a and pre- and post-training sessions which included the assessment of overt behaviour, resting

  8. Taking Notes - Cornell Style

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Luke Freeman

    2005-11-28

    Learning to take notes using the Cornell System There are many different ways and methods out there in which you can learn to take notes, with the most popular method being the Cornell Method. Click on the following links to learn more about the Cornell Note Method Cornell Note System Cornell Note System Cornell System Now that you are familiar with the Cornell System, think about ...

  9. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles describe a method of introducing the study of simple harmonic motion, and suggest models that are analogues for impedence matching, electrical transformers, and birefringent crystals. (AL)

  10. Exploring the interpersonal relationships in street-based male sex work: results from an Australian qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Leary, David; Minichiello, Victor

    2007-01-01

    While the literature on male sex work has increased significantly over the past decade, few studies examine the influence of relational dynamics in the lives of those engaged in male sex work. This qualitative study, conducted with a sample of male street sex workers in Sydney, Australia, explores how relationships color their involvement with sex work. The findings reveal the complexity of their relationships and how their interactions with others shape their engagement in sex work. The data also offer insight into how exit pathways are influenced by money and relationships that occur within this particular male sex work setting. Implications for health policy and intervention are considered. PMID:18019070

  11. Standing posture at work and overweight exacerbate varicose veins: Shimane CoHRE Study.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Kunie; Niihara, Hiroyuki; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Miwako; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Mizumoto, Kazuo; Nabika, Toru; Morita, Eishin; Shiwaku, Kuninori

    2014-11-01

    Varicose veins (VV) in legs are commonly observed in the general global population. However, the prevalence of and risk factors for VV in Japan are not clear. This study aimed at clarifying the risk factors for VV in traditional rural areas of Shimane prefecture. Subjects (113 men and 205 women aged ?45 years) were recruited from health examinations in those areas in 2012. VV were defined as a reflux of blood in the great and/or small saphenous vein and incompetent perforating veins detected by ultrasonography. Risk factors for VV were analyzed using logistic regression models that included various parameters. We also investigated the possible interaction between standing at work and overweight and calculated the synergistic index. VV were found in 20.1% of the subjects (12.4% of men and 24.4% of women). The previously known risk factors of prolonged upright standing posture during work, higher body mass index (BMI), female sex, and age were also significant factors for VV. There was a significant combined effect of overweight (BMI ?25) and prolonged upright standing posture at work [adjusted odds ratio = 3.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-10.89], although the synergistic effect was not significant [synergistic index = 1.3; 95% CI, 0.2-8.7]. The prevalence of VV in the traditional rural area of Shimane prefecture was comparable to that reported previously in European countries. Our results confirm that exposure to both prolonged standing at work and overweight exacerbate VV development. This finding is useful to develop strategies for VV prevention. PMID:25298232

  12. Laboratory work and pregnancy outcomes: a study within the National Birth Cohort in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J L; Knudsen, L E; Andersen, A?M N; Hjollund, N H; Olsen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aims To examine pregnancy outcomes in women doing laboratory work. Methods Using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997–2003), the authors conducted a prospective cohort study of 1025 female laboratory technicians and 8037 female teachers (as reference). The laboratory technicians were asked about laboratory work tasks during pregnancy in an interview (at around 16?weeks of gestation). Pregnancy outcomes were obtained by linking the cohort to the national registers. Hazard ratios (HRs) of late fetal loss and diagnosing of congenital malformations were calculated by using Cox regression, and odds ratios (ORs) of preterm birth and small for gestational age were calculated by using logistic regression. Results Overall, there were no significant differences in pregnancy outcomes between laboratory technicians and teachers. However, we found that laboratory technicians working with radioimmunoassay or radiolabelling had an increased risk of preterm birth (OR?=?2.2, 95% CI 0.8 to 6.2 for radioimmunoassay, and OR?=?1.9, 95% CI 0.8 to 4.6 for radiolabelling) and “major” malformations (HR?=?2.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.7 for radioimmunoassay, and HR?=?1.8, 95% CI 0.9 to 3.7 for radiolabelling). The ORs of preterm birth doubled for women working with these tasks every day or several times a week. When an exposure matrix was applied, an increased risk of “major” malformations for exposure to organic solvents was seen. Conclusions The results did not indicate any high risk of reproductive failures in laboratory technicians in general. Exposure to radioisotopes may carry a high risk of preterm birth and congenital malformations. This finding deserves further investigation. PMID:16361406

  13. INCLUSION OF CONTENT ON RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY IN THE SOCIAL WORK CURRICULUM: A STUDY OF FACULTY VIEWS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Sheridan; Charlotte M. Wilmer; Leanne Atcheson

    1994-01-01

    Recently, there have been calls to re-examine the need for instruction on religion and spirituality in the social work curriculum. This study investigated the views of 280 full-time social work educators from 25 schools of social work on including such content in social work programs. Results showed that the majority (82.5%) supported inclusion of a specialized course, primarily as an

  14. Seeking care for neck/shoulder pain: a prospective study of work-related risk factors in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Grooten, Wilhelmus Johannes Andreas; Wiktorin, Christina; Norrman, Linda; Josephson, Malin; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus; Alfredsson, Lars

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the 5-year cumulative incidence of neck/shoulder pain and identified work-related risk factors leading subjects to seek care for this problem. Four to six years after the case-referent MUSIC-Norrtälje Study, a postal questionnaire was sent to the referents of this study, and 81% responded. At baseline, 516 men and 697 women were assessed as to their work-related exposures. The 4- to 6-year cumulative incidence for seeking care for neck/shoulder pain was 29% for women and 18% for men. For men, moderately increased risks were found for manual handling, night work/shift work, hindrances at work, and solitary work. For men, the risk increased with an increasing number of risk indicators. No work-related risk factors were found for women, highlighting the difficulty of identifying risk factors in a general population. PMID:14767216

  15. Before you take out student loans, be sure you are considered for grants, scholarships and/or work study. Work study jobs and Federal Grants are awarded through (FAFSA) Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Scholarships and

    E-print Network

    Steele, Brian

    FREE MONEY Before you take out student loans, be sure you are considered for grants, scholarships and/or work study. Work study jobs and Federal Grants are awarded through (FAFSA) Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Scholarships and non-Federal Grants are awarded mostly through private donors

  16. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes physics experiments and apparatus construction for studies in astronomy, electricity, wave measurement and speed, the behavior of steel, and intermolecular forces. Includes a detailed description of how to simulate apparent trajectories of the moon and sun. (CS)

  17. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkney, J. N.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes eleven laboratory experiments, including the catalytic effect of copper in zinc-acid reaction; a study of the rate of polymerization of some aldehydes; and a demonstration automatic potentiometric titrator. (MLH)

  19. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a technique to produce samples for x-ray diffraction studies on the Tel-X-Ometer 80 x-ray apparatus from readily available crystalline powders and discusses observations of transverse modes of an optical resonator. (SK)

  20. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices - one located in Denmark and one in Australia - negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers. PMID:25442013

  1. Vertical and horizontal trust at work as predictors of retirement intentions: the Finnish Public Sector Study.

    PubMed

    Muurinen, Charlotte; Laine, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Oksanen, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust) and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust) with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000-12 (Finnish Public Sector Study). Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers) and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.67) and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.70) at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement. PMID:25191745

  2. Practice area and work demands in nurses' aides: a cross-sectional study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willy Eriksen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of how work demands vary between different practice areas could give us a better understanding of the factors that influence the working conditions in the health services, and could help identify specific work-related challenges and problems in the different practice areas. In turn, this may help politicians, and healthcare administrators and managers to develop healthy work units. The

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

  4. Methodological Issues in the Study of Specialized Urban Populations: Women Employed in Working Class and Blue Collar Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    Studies of emergent, previously unstudied groups in the context of a complex urban society (such as the Project on Working Women, a three-year study of women in nontraditional blue collar and working class jobs) present methodological problems related to sampling, interviewing, and methods of analysis. Crucial to a successful methodology are…

  5. A study of potential sources of linguistic ambiguity in written work instructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the results of a small experimental study that investigated potential sources of ambiguity in written work instructions (WIs). The English language can be highly ambiguous because words with different meanings can share the same spelling. Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous WIs can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. To study possible sources of ambiguity in WIs, we determined which of the recommended action verbs in the DOE and BWXT writer's manuals have numerous meanings to their intended audience, making them potentially ambiguous. We used cognitive psychology techniques to conduct a survey in which technicians who use WIs in their jobs indicated the first meaning that came to mind for each of the words. Although the findings of this study are limited by the small number of respondents, we identified words that had many different meanings even within this limited sample. WI writers should pay particular attention to these words and to their most frequent meanings so that they can avoid ambiguity in their writing.

  6. Editors' note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The Fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) contains original research that evaluates the role of teletherapy and online language exercises in the treatment of chronic aphasia; investigates whether improvements are maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and studies the use of in-home telerehabilitation for proximal humerus fractures. Within the context of two case studies, authors evaluated three service delivery models (direct, hybrid, and telepractice) for stuttering intervention. The results of a preliminary qualitative investigation are presented for telepractice in rural schools in Australia. And, schemas are offered for privacy and security analyses for store and forward applications in physical and occupational therapy. The Fall 2014 issue also contains a book review, and announcements from the American Telemedicine Association and the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center. PMID:25945224

  7. Epidemiologic study on work-related eye injuries in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Kung; Yen, Ya-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Hsien; Chiang, Hung-Che; Shen, Ying-Ying; Chang, Po-Ya

    2007-09-01

    To describe the epidemiologic features of work-related eye injuries in Kaohsiung, a hospital-based study was performed. Four hundred and eighty-six patients who were treated at emergency service or were admitted to the ophthalmology ward over a 4-year period were reviewed. Among these, 38.9% of eye injuries in the study were work-related. Male workers had a 3.99 higher odds ratio (OR) than females to suffer from eye injuries (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99-8.04). Most of the work-related eye injuries occurred in subjects who were 30-49 years old (OR, 3.02, and 95% CI, 1.56-5.82, when compared with those aged < or = 29 years). The most common type of eye injury in the occupational exposure group was foreign body injury (31.2%), followed by blunt injuries (20.6%), chemical burn (19.6%), UV light radiation (12.7%), and corneal abrasions (11.6%). On the other hand, in the non-occupational exposure group, the most common types of eye injury were blunt injuries (43.4%), corneal abrasions (28.3%), and foreign body injury (20.2%). Our study found that foreign body injury and blunt injuries were the two highest priority injuries for which prevention strategies should be developed in Kaohsiung city. Furthermore, after advanced examination of types of media that caused eye injuries, we found that being hit by wooden objects around the eye, by flying objects in the eye, and by welding flashes are important risk factors for workers to avoid. In conclusion, most of the occupational eye injuries occurred among male workers aged 30-49 years. Due to the lack of an occupational eye injury surveillance system to monitor the incidence of eye injuries and to undertake risk assessment, preventable occupational eye injuries have not been properly controlled. We hope to provide information for further development of preventive strategies. PMID:17766215

  8. Full shift arm inclinometry among dairy parlor workers: a feasibility study in a challenging work environment.

    PubMed

    Douphrate, David I; Fethke, Nathan B; Nonnenmann, Matthew W; Rosecrance, John C; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Over the last 20 years, the US dairy industry has experienced a significant transformation from small farm operations to an industrialization of the milking process. This transformation has resulted in improvements in process efficiency and product quality. Milking tasks in large-herd parlors are highly-repetitive involving awkward postures and high muscle loads of the upper extremity. Field-based direct measures of physical exposures have been limited in challenging work settings such as dairies. This study evaluated full-shift exposures of posture and motion of the upper extremity among large-herd parlor milkers using wireless inclinometry. Results suggest large-herd parlor workers may be exposed to high exposure levels (posture, movement velocity, repetition, and inadequate rest) associated with the development of shoulder pathology. Compared to other high-risk occupations involving shoulder-intensive work, parlor workers may have higher exposure levels. These findings warrant the need for continued field-based research with larger sample sizes to facilitate the development of cost-effective intervention strategies. PMID:22019358

  9. Effects of overnight fasting on working memory-related brain network: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Chechko, Natalia; Vocke, Sebastian; Habel, Ute; Toygar, Timur; Kuckartz, Lisa; Berthold-Losleben, Mark; Laoutidis, Zacharias G; Orfanos, Stelios; Wassenberg, Annette; Karges, Wölfram; Schneider, Frank; Kohn, Nils

    2015-03-01

    Glucose metabolism serves as the central source of energy for the human brain. Little is known about the effects of blood glucose level (BGL) on higher-order cognitive functions within a physiological range (e.g., after overnight fasting). In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study, we assessed the impact of overnight fasting (14 h) on brain activation during a working memory task. We sought to mimic BGLs that occur naturally in healthy humans after overnight fasting. After standardized periods of food restriction, 40 (20 male) healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either glucagon to balance the BGL or placebo (NaCl). A parametric fMRI paradigm, including 2-back and 0-back tasks, was used. Subclinically low BGL following overnight fasting was found to be linked to reduced involvement of the bilateral dorsal midline thalamus and the bilateral basal ganglia, suggesting high sensitivity of those regions to minimal changes in BGLs. Our results indicate that overnight fasting leads to physiologically low levels of glucose, impacting brain activation during working memory tasks even when there are no differences in cognitive performance. PMID:25393934

  10. Skylab task and work performance /Experiment M-151 - Time and motion study/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubis, J. F.; Mclaughlin, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The primary objective of Experiment M151 was to study the inflight adaptation of Skylab crewmen to a variety of task situations involving different types of activity. A parallel objective was to examine astronaut inflight performance for any behavioral stress effects associated with the working and living conditions of the Skylab environment. Training data provided the basis for comparison of preflight and inflight performance. Efficiency was evaluated through the adaptation function, namely, the relation of performance time over task trials. The results indicate that the initial changeover from preflight to inflight was accompanied by a substantial increase in performance time for most work and task activities. Equally important was the finding that crewmen adjusted rapidly to the weightless environment and became proficient in developing techniques with which to optimize task performance. By the end of the second inflight trial, most of the activities were performed almost as efficiently as on the last preflight trial. The analysis demonstrated the sensitivity of the adaptation function to differences in task and hardware configurations. The function was found to be more regular and less variable inflight than preflight. Translation and control of masses were accomplished easily and efficiently through the rapid development of the arms and legs as subtle guidance and restraint systems.

  11. Social Studies: A Multi-media Study Project in the Educational Section of West Germany's South-west Broadcasting Company. German Studies Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebel, Karlheinz

    This study of multimedia political education in West Germany deals specifically with a South-West German Broadcasting Company's educational television project in the social studies. The dual purpose of the study was to assess the rationale behind the TV series and to present an overview of the structure and function of units which have been…

  12. Note-Making with T-Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elvis G.; Davis, Archie D.

    The T-Note system is an easy way for students to take notes, is organized for effective review, and is adaptable because it provides a system for recording five types of information typically presented in the classroom. The student first divides a single loose-leaf notebook page vertically down the middle, and horizontally about one or two inches…

  13. NOTE / NOTE Alarm pheromone induces a transgenerational

    E-print Network

    Mondor, Ed

    2002). Winged morphs have a longer development time, lower fertility, and a shorter life span thanNOTE / NOTE Alarm pheromone induces a transgenerational wing polyphenism in the pea aphid a transgenerational wing- induction polyphenism in response to predators and parasitoids, but the stimuli inducing

  14. NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica

    E-print Network

    Kitajima, Kaoru

    manipulated transpiration rates by changing humidity and air movements around pot-grown plants receivingNOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica accumulation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) under transport Si, through transpiration, from soils to shoots, while others actively transport silica

  15. Preliminary work for SiC-based piezoelectric energy harvester with mathematical modelling and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. N. Fakhzan M., K.; Nasrul F. M., N.; Raman, S.; Muthalif, Asan G. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary work to explore the feasibility of cubic silicon carbide on silicon wafers with integrated proof mass as horizontal cantilever with vertical displacement. The reason of harvesting ambient vibration energy is to convert mechanical energy produces by piezoelectric into useful electrical energy. The collectable energy is useful for powering the low-power devices. Theoretically, the resonant phenomena are a special characteristic in order to optimize the generated output power. The natural frequency of the cantilever can to be tuned with difference proof masses. Another parameter considered in this paper is the damping ratio. Throughout analytical study, small damping ratio will enhance the output power of the piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH). This paper will present a mathematical modelling approach and the simulation validation.

  16. [The work in the Psychosocial Support Centers: a study in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Milhomem, Maria Aparecida das Graças Corrêa; de Oliveira, Alice Guimarães Bottaro

    2009-06-01

    Analyzing the working conditions of Psychosocial Support Centers (CAPS) teams was the objective of this exploratory-descriptive study based on a historical-critical approach that interviewed 47 professionals from five CAPS in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The analysis identified: professional background and training, employment relationship, remuneration and collective organization. Most of the professionals didn't have any specialization in the area; the statutory relationship was predominant in the state public health system and the temporary ones in the city public health system, where 96% earned up to two monthly minimum wages; most of them were not unionized. We consider that those conditions cause difficulties for the attainment of the objectives of the psychosocial support. PMID:20027960

  17. GPACC program cost work breakdown structure-dictionary. General purpose aft cargo carrier study, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The results of detailed cost estimates and economic analysis performed on the updated Model 101 configuration of the general purpose Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) are given. The objective of this economic analysis is to provide the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with information on the economics of using the ACC on the Space Transportation System (STS). The detailed cost estimates for the ACC are presented by a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure that all elements of cost are considered in the economic analysis and related subsystem trades. Costs reported by WBS provide NASA with a basis for comparing competing designs and provide detailed cost information that can be used to forecast phase C/D planning for new projects or programs derived from preliminary conceptual design studies. The scope covers all STS and STS/ACC launch vehicle cost impacts for delivering payloads to a 160 NM low Earth orbit (LEO).

  18. Frontal brain activation during a working memory task: a time-domain fNIRS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, E.; Baselli, G.; Bianchi, A. M.; Caffini, M.; Contini, D.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Cerutti, S.; Cubeddu, R.

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated frontal brain activation during a working memory task with graded levels of difficulty in a group of 19 healthy subjects, by means of time-resolved fNIRS technique. Brain activation was computed, and was then separated into a "block-related" and a "tonic" components. Load-related increases of blood oxygenation were studied for the four different levels of task difficulty. Generalized Linear Models were applied to the data in order to explore the metabolic processes occurring during the mental effort and, possibly, their involvement in short term memorization. Results attest the presence of a persistent attentional-related metabolic activity, superimposed to a task-related mnemonic contribution. Moreover, a systemic component probably deriving from the extra-cerebral capillary bed was detected.

  19. Youth Supervision While Mothers Work: A Daily Diary Study of Maternal Worry.

    PubMed

    Blocklin, Michelle K; Crouter, Ann C; McHale, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a daily diary study of hourly hotel employees in the U.S. and their children, this study examined links between youth supervision arrangements and maternal worry while at work, examining both differences between individuals and day-to-day variation within individuals. Multilevel model analyses revealed both between- and within-person effects linking youth supervision to maternal worry. Mothers' partner status functioned as moderator, and maternal knowledge also emerged as a protective factor when youth were in self-care, highlighting a potential target for future work-family interventions, particularly those for hourly employees with limited access to family-friendly workplace policies.En utilisant les données d'une étude de journal quotidien des employés horaires de l'hôtel aux États-Unis et leurs enfants, cette étude a examiné les liens entre les modalités de supervision des jeunes et l'inquiétude maternelle pendant le travail, en examinant à la fois les différences inter individus et la variation intra individus au jour le jour. Analyses multi-niveaux ont révélé à la fois des effets inter et intra reliant la supervision des jeunes à l'inquiétude maternelle. Statut de partenaire des mères a fonctionné en tant que modérateur, et la connaissance maternelle est également apparue comme un facteur de protection lorsque les jeunes ont pris soins d'eux-mêmes, soulignant une cible potentielle pour des interventions de conciliation travail-famille, en particulier ceux conçus pour des employés horaires avec un accès limité à des politiques favorables à la famille. PMID:23109814

  20. Youth Supervision While Mothers Work: A Daily Diary Study of Maternal Worry

    PubMed Central

    Blocklin, Michelle K.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a daily diary study of hourly hotel employees in the U.S. and their children, this study examined links between youth supervision arrangements and maternal worry while at work, examining both differences between individuals and day-to-day variation within individuals. Multilevel model analyses revealed both between- and within-person effects linking youth supervision to maternal worry. Mothers' partner status functioned as moderator, and maternal knowledge also emerged as a protective factor when youth were in self-care, highlighting a potential target for future work-family interventions, particularly those for hourly employees with limited access to family-friendly workplace policies. En utilisant les données d'une étude de journal quotidien des employés horaires de l'hôtel aux États-Unis et leurs enfants, cette étude a examiné les liens entre les modalités de supervision des jeunes et l'inquiétude maternelle pendant le travail, en examinant à la fois les différences inter individus et la variation intra individus au jour le jour. Analyses multi-niveaux ont révélé à la fois des effets inter et intra reliant la supervision des jeunes à l'inquiétude maternelle. Statut de partenaire des mères a fonctionné en tant que modérateur, et la connaissance maternelle est également apparue comme un facteur de protection lorsque les jeunes ont pris soins d'eux-mêmes, soulignant une cible potentielle pour des interventions de conciliation travail-famille, en particulier ceux conçus pour des employés horaires avec un accès limité à des politiques favorables à la famille. PMID:23109814

  1. Work-related heat stress concerns in automotive industries: a case study from Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Ayyappan, Ramalingam; Sankar, Sambandam; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Balakrishnan, Kalpana

    2009-01-01

    Background Work-related heat stress assessments, the quantification of thermal loads and their physiological consequences have mostly been performed in non-tropical developed country settings. In many developing countries (many of which are also tropical), limited attempts have been made to create detailed job-exposure profiles for various sectors. We present here a case study from Chennai in southern India that illustrates the prevalence of work-related heat stress in multiple processes of automotive industries and the efficacy of relatively simple controls in reducing prevalence of the risk through longitudinal assessments. Methods We conducted workplace heat stress assessments in automotive and automotive parts manufacturing units according to the protocols recommended by NIOSH, USA. Sites for measurements included indoor locations with process-generated heat exposure, indoor locations without direct process-generated heat exposure and outdoor locations. Nearly 400 measurements of heat stress were made over a four-year period at more than 100 locations within eight units involved with automotive or automotive parts manufacturing in greater Chennai metropolitan area. In addition, cross-sectional measurements were made in select processes of glass manufacturing and textiles to estimate relative prevalence of heat stress. Results Results indicate that many processes even in organised large-scale industries have yet to control heat stress-related hazards adequately. Upwards of 28% of workers employed in multiple processes were at risk of heat stress-related health impairment in the sectors assessed. Implications of longitudinal baseline data for assessing efficacy of interventions as well as modelling potential future impacts from climate change (through contributions from worker health and productivity impairments consequent to increases in ambient temperature) are described. Conclusions The study re-emphasises the need for recognising heat stress as an important occupational health risk in both formal and informal sectors in India. Making available good baseline data is critical for estimating future impacts. PMID:20052426

  2. Making short-term international medical volunteer placements work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Elnawawy, Omnia; Lee, Andrew CK; Pohl, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    Background International medical volunteering has grown in recent decades. It has the potential to benefit and harm the volunteer and host countries; but there is a paucity of literature on the impacts of international medical volunteering and a need to find ways to optimise the benefits of such placements. Aim In this study, one example of international medical volunteering was examined involving British GPs on short-term placements in Nepal. The intention was to explore the expectations and experiences of the local health workers, volunteers, and host organisation to try and understand what makes volunteer placements work. Design Qualitative study of key informant interviews. Setting Stakeholders of a short-term international medical volunteer (IMV) placement programme in Nepal. Method Key informant interviews were carried out via face-to-face or telephone/internet interviews with five previous volunteers, three representatives from a non-governmental organisation providing placements, and five local health workers in Nepal who had had contact with the IMVs. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using standard thematic framework approaches. Results All the stakeholders had their own specific motives for participating in the IMV programme. The relationship between volunteers and the Nepalese health workers was complex and characterised by discrepant and occasionally unrealistic expectations. Managing these different expectations was challenging. Conclusion Contextual issues and cultural differences are important considerations in medical volunteer programmes, and this study highlights the importance of robust preparation pre-placement for the volunteer and host to ensure positive outcomes. PMID:24868070

  3. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA.

  4. The relationship between working memory for serial order and numerical development: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Attout, Lucie; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Majerus, Steve

    2014-06-01

    Despite numerous studies, the link between verbal working memory (WM) and calculation abilities remains poorly understood. The present longitudinal study focuses specifically on the role of serial order retention capacities, based on recent findings suggesting a link between ordinal processing in verbal WM and numerical processing tasks. Children were tested when they were in 3rd-year kindergarten (Time 1 [T1]), 1st grade (Time 2 [T2]), and 2nd grade of primary school (Time 3 [T3]), with WM tasks maximizing retention of serial order or item information, as well as with numerical judgment and calculation tasks. We observed that order WM measures at T1 provided a robust predictor of calculation abilities at T2 and T3. Numerical ordinal and magnitude judgment abilities were also associated with calculation abilities and this, independently of order WM abilities. This study highlights the important role of WM for order in early calculation acquisition, in addition to numerical ordinal and magnitude representations, and provides new perspectives for our understanding of the link between verbal WM and numerical abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24684717

  5. Pre-ordering lunch at work. Results of the what to eat for lunch study.

    PubMed

    Stites, Shana D; Singletary, S Brook; Menasha, Adeena; Cooblall, Clarissa; Hantula, Donald; Axelrod, Saul; Figueredo, Vincent M; Phipps, Etienne J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an intervention that combined mindful eating and online pre-ordering to promote healthier lunch purchases at work. The study took place at an urban hospital with 26 employees who were overweight or obese. The design included a contemporaneous comparison with delayed-treatment control and a three-phase prospective study. A minimum 4-week baseline period preceded a 4-week full-intervention, in which participants received mindful eating training, pre-ordered their lunches, and received price discounts toward lunch purchases. In a 4-week reduced intervention phase, participants pre-ordered lunches without price discounts. Participant lunch purchases were tracked electronically at the point of purchase. The primary outcome measures were the amounts of kilocalories and fat grams in purchased lunches. In contemporaneous comparisons, the treatment group purchased lunches with an average of 144.6 fewer kilocalories (p?=?0.01) and 8.9 fewer grams of fat (p?=?0.005) compared to controls. In multivariable longitudinal analyses, participants decreased the average number of calories in their meals by 114.6?kcal per lunch and the average grams of fat by 5.4 per lunch during the partial-intervention compared to the baseline (p?study, a moderate increase was observed in participants' overall mindful eating behaviors as compared to the beginning of the study (p?

  6. Negative emotion modulates prefrontal cortex activity during a working memory task: a NIRS study.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Sachiyo; Matsuda, Goh; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the neural processing underlying the cognitive control of emotions induced by the presentation of task-irrelevant emotional pictures before a working memory task. Previous studies have suggested that the cognitive control of emotion involves the prefrontal regions. Therefore, we measured the hemodynamic responses that occurred in the prefrontal region with a 16-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. In our experiment, participants observed two negative or two neutral pictures in succession immediately before a 1-back or 3-back task. Pictures were selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). We measured the changes in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) during picture presentation and during the n-back task. The emotional valence of the picture affected the oxyHb changes in anterior parts of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) (located in the left and right superior frontal gyrus) and left inferior frontal gyrus during the n-back task; the oxyHb changes during the task were significantly greater following negative rather than neutral stimulation. As indicated in a number of previous studies, and the time courses of the oxyHb changes in our study, activation in these locations is possibly led by cognitive control of emotion, though we cannot deny it may simply be emotional responses. There were no effects of emotion on oxyHb changes during picture presentation or on n-back task performance. Although further studies are necessary to confirm this interpretation, our findings suggest that NIRS can be used to investigate neural processing during emotional control. PMID:24574991

  7. Quickies : intelligent sticky notes

    E-print Network

    Mistry, Pranav (Pranav K.)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis introduces 'Quickies', an attempt to bring one of the most useful inventions of the 20th century into the digital age: the ubiquitous sticky notes. Sticky notes help us manage our to-do lists, tag our objects ...

  8. Work function and gas desorption studies during turn-on of various shelf-stored cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A.; Haas, G. A.; Jensen, J. T.; Hor, C.

    A comparative study has been made of the oxide-type coated powder cathode (CPC), and impregnated types B, M, tungstate and scandate cathodes in their ability to rapidly turn on after extended periods of shelf life. Particular performance objectives were to attain pulsed emission levels in the 4-5 A/cm 2 region within a few seconds after shelf lives corresponding up to several years. Preliminary surface studies indicate that all cathodes significantly poison within a few hours or days after being shut down in a typical sealed-off tube environment. Therefore, apart from bringing the cathode up to thermionic emission temperature, the kinetics of the turn-on step must also involve the kinetics of reactivation. Comparative data are presented of the work function variation with reactivation temperature for the various cathodes, thus showing the degree of poisoning, the thermal reactivation characteristics and the work function-temperature relationship in their respective active states. The results show that in the active state, the CPC has the highest emission, the M and scandate impregnated cathodes are somewhat lower in emission, i.e. ˜50 K higher temperature for the same emission, while the type-B impregnated cathode requires ˜100 K more. The shelf-life poisoning among the impregnated cathodes, on the other hand, was greatest for the M cathodes, a bit less for the scandate and least for the type B. For typical fast turn-on reactivation schedules, the CPC reactivated below its normal operating temperature of ˜1250 K but all impregnated cathodes required activation temperatures of ˜1500 K and above (i.e., about 200 K above their operating temperatures). Studies were also made on the pick-up and desorption of various gases present in the shelf-life vacuum ambient. The data demonstrated a direct correlation between the chemical reactivity that the different cathodes had with the residual ambient gases and the corresponding extent to which these cathodes poisoned during shelf life. While a study of the shelf-life poisoning and reactivation mechanisms for the impregnated-type cathodes is still in progress, initial results have been completed for the oxide-type cathodes and these are presented elsewhere in this issue.

  9. A Study of Supervisor and Employee Perceptions of Work Attitudes in Information Age Manufacturing Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azam, Md. Shafiqul; Brauchle, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    The self-perceived work ethic of industrial employees in information jobs (N=304) and non-information jobs (N=277), and employees' work ethic as assessed by their supervisors, were examined using the Occupational Work Ethic Inventory (OWEI). A Principle Components Analysis yielded four factors (Teamwork, Dependability, Ambition and Self-Control)…

  10. Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…

  11. Value-enhanced collaborative working: case study of a small management advisory firm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Udityasinh Gohil; Patricia Carrillo; Kirti Ruikar; Chimay Anumba

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to propose a conceptual framework to promote value-enhanced collaborative working (VECW) for a small management advisory firm. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The research methodology was qualitative. It involved a comprehensive review of literature leading to a better understanding of collaborative working requirements in a small firm context and the barriers to derive value from collaborative working. Initially,

  12. The Measurement of Work Engagement with a Short Questionnaire: A Cross-National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Salanova, Marisa

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a short questionnaire to measure work engagement--a positive work-related state of fulfillment that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption. Data were collected in 10 different countries (N = 14,521), and results indicated that the original 17-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) can be…

  13. Learning about Work--A Study of Contemporary Fiction for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Patricia R.

    An analysis of 255 books written since 1970 for children in the primary grades reveals that two of every three books do not mention career concepts or provide information on work values. Those books that do refer to work do so in a way that subordinates the concept to the plot and character development, often showing the child that work is done by…

  14. Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Yeung, April W. M.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Yip, Paul S. F.; Tang, Arthur K. H.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of…

  15. The associations between psychosocial working conditions and changes in common mental disorders: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common mental disorders (CMD) are prevalent in working populations and have adverse consequences for employee well-being and work ability, even leading to early retirement. Several studies report associations between psychosocial working conditions and CMD. However, there is a lack of longitudinal research within a broad framework of psychosocial working conditions and improvement in CMD. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between several psychosocial working conditions and deteriorating and improving CMD among ageing employees over a five-to-six-year follow-up period. Methods The study is based on the Helsinki Health Study baseline survey in 2001–2002 and a follow-up in 2007 (N?=?4340, response rate 83%) conducted among 40-60-year-old female and male employees. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to measure common mental disorders. Psychosocial working conditions were measured in terms of job strain, organisational justice, work-family interface, social support and workplace bullying. The covariates included sociodemographic and health factors. Results Following adjustment for all the covariates, family-to-work (OR 1.41, 95% Cl 1.04-1.91) and work-to-family conflicts (OR 1.99, 95% Cl 1.42-2.78) and workplace bullying (OR 1.40, 95% Cl 1.09-1.79) were associated with deterioration, and family-to-work conflicts (OR 1.65, 95% Cl 1.66-2.34) and social support (OR 1.47, 95% Cl 1.07-2.00) with improvement in CMD. Conclusions Adverse psychosocial working conditions contribute to poor mental health among employees. Preventing workplace bullying, promoting social support and achieving a better balance between work and family may help employees to maintain their mental health. PMID:24916716

  16. Associations between strain in domestic work and self-rated health: A study of employed women in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CARIN STALAND-NYMAN; KRISTINA ALEXANDERSON; GUNNEL HENSING

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between strain in domestic work and self-rated health among employed women in Sweden, using two different methods of measuring strain in domestic work. Methods: Questionnaire data were collected on health and living conditions in paid and unpaid work for employed women (n51,417), aged 17-64 years. ''Domestic job strain'' was

  17. Multiple bout rTMS on spatial working memory: a comparison study of two cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Alan J; Lum, Jarrad A G; Seth, Sunaina; Rafael, Olivia; Hsu, Chia-Ming K; Drury, Hannah G K; Tooley, Gregory A

    2014-07-01

    It has been established that acute (within-session) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) improves spatial working memory (SWM). However, questions remain regarding the safety and effectiveness of multiple bouts of rTMS and the optimal cortical area to stimulate. This preliminary study investigated, in healthy participants, multiple bouts of rTMS over the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex (DLPFC), or posterior parietal cortex (PPC) on SWM. Twenty participants (10m, 10f), all naïve to rTMS, where randomized into a DLPFC or PPC group, receiving six sessions of rTMS (5Hz at 80% of motor threshold) every second day over two weeks. Prior to and post rTMS bouts, all participants completed testing for SWM measuring individuals' accuracy, strategy, and speed. Following repeated bouts of rTMS, significant improvements were observed with no contraindications in stimulating PPC but not DLPFC. This preliminary study has demonstrated that repeated rTMS bouts improve SWM safety providing potential for clinical application. PMID:24859422

  18. Assessment of physical work load in epidemiologic studies: common measurement metrics for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Wells, R; Norman, R; Neumann, P; Andrews, D; Frank, J; Shannon, H; Kerr, M

    1997-01-01

    There are many possible means of determining exposure ranging from self-reports of physical exposure to measures of muscle activations and estimated spinal loads. In epidemiologic studies, issues of validity make instrumented measures preferable, however issues of cost and practicability tend to force investigators to less costly but less valid and less reliable measures of exposure, such as self-report questionnaires. This paper presents a method by which estimates of exposure from self-report questionnaires, expert observers, work sampling, video analysis and electromyograms can be reported in a common metric, Newtons of force on a tissue, and show, as an example of its application, estimation of spinal compression on auto workers. A common metric allows a flexible approach to selection of measurement methods in occupational settings: no matter which instrument is used the results can be combined to provide an overall picture of exposure. This approach to exposure assessment for the low back allows for comparability across studies and settings. PMID:8995047

  19. Computer-aided studies on the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation during work transitions.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    In the present polemic paper the application of computer models of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in heart, skeletal muscle and liver to the studies on the regulation of the bioenergetic system in intact cells during work transitions is discussed. Two groups of such models are compared: group I models that involve only a direct activation of ATP usage by Ca²?, and group II models that assume a direct activation by some (probably) Ca²?-related mechanism of essentially all steps of the system. It is argued that group II models reproduce much better a broad range of variable values and system properties encountered in experimental studies. The consequences of the theoretical and experimental development of Metabolic Control Analysis, within the framework of which it has been shown that the control over the flux through the oxidative phosphorylation system is shared by essentially all components of this system, are analyzed. In particular, it is argued that in order to increase the flux very significantly, and at the same time to maintain relatively constant concentrations of such intermediate metabolites as ADP, ATP, P(i), PCr and NADH, it is necessary to activate directly many, if not all components of the system (the 'multi-step parallel activation' mechanism). Generally, it is suggested that this is not a particular form or complexity of computer models, but rather their agreement with a broad range of experimental data concerning 'macroscopic' system properties that really matters. The specificity of the regulation of the energetic system of pancreatic ?-cells is discussed. PMID:21855564

  20. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J.; Norton, Alyssa N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors). t-tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Results. Participants actively commuted 0.51 ± 1.93 times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. Conclusions. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population. PMID:24089620

  1. Processing Speed, Attention, and Working Memory After Treatment for Medulloblastoma: An International, Prospective, and Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Shawna L.; Armstrong, Carol; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Wu, Shengjie; Wallace, Dana; Bonner, Melanie J.; Schreiber, Jane; Swain, Michelle; Chapieski, Lynn; Mabbott, Donald; Knight, Sarah; Boyle, Robyn; Gajjar, Amar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The current study prospectively examined processing speed (PS), broad attention (BA), and working memory (WM) ability of patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma over a 5-year period. Patients and Methods The study included 126 patients, ages 3 to 21 years at diagnosis, enrolled onto a collaborative protocol for medulloblastoma. Patients were treated with postsurgical risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (n = 36 high risk [HR]; n = 90 average risk) followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support. Patients completed 509 neuropsychological evaluations using the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities Third Edition (median of three observations per patient). Results Linear mixed effects models revealed that younger age at diagnosis, HR classification, and higher baseline scores were significantly associated with poorer outcomes in PS. Patients treated as HR and those with higher baseline scores are estimated to have less favorable outcomes in WM and BA over time. Parent education and marital status were significantly associated with BA and WM baseline scores but not change over time. Conclusion Of the three key domains, PS was estimated to have the lowest scores at 5 years after diagnosis. Identifying cognitive domains most vulnerable to decline should guide researchers who are aiming to develop efficacious cognitive intervention and rehabilitation programs, thereby improving the quality of survivorship for the pediatric medulloblastoma population. PMID:23980078

  2. The reciprocal relationship between work characteristics and employee burnout and engagement: a longitudinal study of firefighters.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, R P; Chambel, M J

    2015-04-01

    The paradigm of this study is positive occupational psychology, with the job demands-resources model as the research model and the Conservation of Resources theory as the general stress theory. The research design analyses the job demands-resources model's dynamic nature with normal and reversed causation effects between work characteristics and psychological well-being among Portuguese firefighters. In addition, we analyse a positive (engagement) dimension and a negative (burnout) dimension in the firefighters' well-being, because previously, studies have merely focused on the strain or stress of these professionals. The research questionnaire was distributed to a sample of 651 firefighters, and a two-wave full panel design was used. Cross-lagged panel analyses indicated that the causal direction of the relationship between organizational demands and burnout is reciprocal. Also, we found that the reciprocal model, including cross-lagged reciprocal relationships between organizational demands/supervisory support and burnout/engagement, respectively, is what fits the data best. Practical implications to develop organizational change programmes and suggestions for future research regarding the promotion of occupational health are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24124018

  3. Armodafinil for Treatment of Excessive Sleepiness Associated With Shift Work Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Walsh, James K.; Wesnes, Keith A.; Arora, Sanjay; Roth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of armodafinil, 150 mg, on the physiologic propensity for sleep and cognitive performance during usual night shift hours in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with chronic (?3 months) shift work disorder (SWD) of moderate or greater severity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This 12-week, randomized controlled study was conducted at 42 sleep research facilities in North America from April 2 through December 23, 2004, and enrolled 254 permanent or rotating night shift workers with SWD. Entry criteria included excessive sleepiness during usual night shifts for 3 months or longer (corroborated by mean sleep latency of ?6 minutes on a Multiple Sleep Latency Test), insomnia (sleep efficiency ?87.5% during daytime sleep), and SWD that was judged clinically to be of moderate or greater severity. Patients received armodafinil, 150 mg, or placebo 30 to 60 minutes before each night shift. Physiologic sleep propensity during night shift hours, clinical impression of severity, patient-reported sleepiness, and cognitive function were assessed during laboratory night shifts at weeks 4, 8, and 12. RESULTS: Armodafinil significantly improved mean (SD) sleep latency from 2.3 (1.6) minutes at baseline to 5.3 (5.0) minutes at final visit, compared with a change from 2.4 (1.6) minutes to 2.8 (2.9) minutes in the placebo group (P<.001). Clinical condition ratings improved in more patients receiving armodafinil (79%) vs placebo (59%) (P=.001). As reported by patients' diaries, armodafinil significantly reduced sleepiness during laboratory nights (P<.001), night shifts at work (P<.001), and the commute home (P=.003). Armodafinil improved performance on standardized memory (P<.001) and attention (power, P=.001; continuity, P<.001) tests compared with placebo. Armodafinil was well tolerated and did not affect daytime sleep, as measured by polysomnography. CONCLUSION: In patients with excessive sleepiness associated with chronic SWD of moderate or greater severity, armodafinil significantly improved wakefulness during scheduled night work, raising mean nighttime sleep latency above the level considered to indicate severe sleepiness during the daytime. Armodafinil also significantly improved measures of overall clinical condition, long-term memory, and attention. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00080288 PMID:19880686

  4. Broca's area, sentence comprehension, and working memory: an fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Rogalsky, Corianne; Matchin, William; Hickok, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    The role of Broca's area in sentence processing remains controversial. According to one view, Broca's area is involved in processing a subcomponent of syntactic processing. Another view holds that it contributes to sentence processing via verbal working memory. Sub-regions of Broca's area have been identified that are more active during the processing of complex (object-relative clause) sentences compared to simple (subject-relative clause) sentences. The present study aimed to determine if this complexity effect can be accounted for in terms of the articulatory rehearsal component of verbal working memory. In a behavioral experiment, subjects were asked to comprehend sentences during concurrent speech articulation which minimizes articulatory rehearsal as a resource for sentence comprehension. A finger-tapping task was used as a control concurrent task. Only the object-relative clause sentences were more difficult to comprehend during speech articulation than during the manual task, showing that articulatory rehearsal does contribute to sentence processing. A second experiment used fMRI to document the brain regions underlying this effect. Subjects judged the plausibility of sentences during speech articulation, a finger-tapping task, or without a concurrent task. In the absence of a secondary task, Broca's area (pars triangularis and pars opercularis) demonstrated an increase in activity as a function of syntactic complexity. However, during concurrent speech articulation (but not finger-tapping) this complexity effect was eliminated in the pars opercularis suggesting that this region supports sentence comprehension via its role in articulatory rehearsal. Activity in the pars triangularis was modulated by the finger-tapping task, but not the speech articulation task. PMID:18958214

  5. What do community health workers have to say about their work, and how can this inform improved programme design? A case study with CHWs within Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Martin; Geniets, Anne; Winters, Niall; Rega, Isabella; Mbae, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHWs) are used increasingly in the world to address shortages of health workers and the lack of a pervasive national health system. However, while their role is often described at a policy level, it is not clear how these ideals are instantiated in practice, how best to support this work, or how the work is interpreted by local actors. CHWs are often spoken about or spoken for, but there is little evidence of CHWs’ own characterisation of their practice, which raises questions for global health advocates regarding power and participation in CHW programmes. This paper addresses this issue. Design A case study approach was undertaken in a series of four steps. Firstly, groups of CHWs from two communities met and reported what their daily work consisted of. Secondly, individual CHWs were interviewed so that they could provide fuller, more detailed accounts of their work and experiences; in addition, community health extension workers and community health committee members were interviewed, to provide alternative perspectives. Thirdly, notes and observations were taken in community meetings and monthly meetings. The data were then analysed thematically, creating an account of how CHWs describe their own work, and the tensions and challenges that they face. Results The thematic analysis of the interview data explored the structure of CHW's work, in terms of the frequency and range of visits, activities undertaken during visits (monitoring, referral, etc.) and the wider context of their work (links to the community and health service, limited training, coordination and mutual support through action and discussion days, etc.), and provided an opportunity for CHWs to explain their motivations, concerns and how they understood their role. The importance of these findings as a contribution to the field is evidenced by the depth and detail of their descriptive power. One important aspect of this is that CHWs’ accounts of both successes and challenges involved material elements: leaky tins and dishracks evidenced successful health interventions, whilst bicycles, empty first aid kits and recruiting stretcher bearers evidenced the difficulties of resourcing and geography they are required to overcome. Conclusion The way that these CHWs described their work was as healthcare generalists, working to serve their community and to integrate it with the official health system. Their work involves referrals, monitoring, reporting and educational interactions. Whilst they face problems with resources and training, their accounts show that they respond to this in creative ways, working within established systems of community power and formal authority to achieve their goals, rather than falling into a ‘deficit’ position that requires remedial external intervention. Their work is widely appreciated, although some households do resist their interventions, and figures of authority sometimes question their manner and expertise. The material challenges that they face have both practical and community aspects, since coping with scarcity brings community members together. The implication of this is that programmes co-designed with CHWs will be easier to implement because of their relevance to their practices and experiences, whereas those that assume a deficit model or seek to use CHWs as an instrument to implement external priorities are likely to disrupt their work. PMID:26004292

  6. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian…

  7. Professional Practice as Processes of Muddling Through: A Study of Learning and Sense Making in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avby, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    Using an ethnographic approach, the aim of this study was to explore how social workers learn and make sense of experiences in their daily practices. Five events that took place during an ordinary day of child investigation work are described and serve as the basis for the analysis. The findings imply that investigation work is largely a social…

  8. A longitudinal fMRI study of working memory in severe TBI patients with diffuse axonal injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rocio Sanchez-Carrion; Davinia Fernandez-Espejo; Carme Junque; Carles Falcon; Nuria Bargallo; Teresa Roig; Montserrat Bernabeu; José M. Tormos; Pere Vendrell

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients have working memory deficits and altered patterns of brain activation during this function. The evolution of the impairment has not been examined to date. This study investigated longitudinal changes in brain activation during a working memory task. Twelve patients with severe and diffuse TBI and ten healthy matched controls were fMRI scanned twice at a

  9. Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

  10. Harassment statement regarding non-U.S. citizens who work and/or study at Virginia Tech

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Harassment statement regarding non-U.S. citizens who work and/or study at Virginia Tech Many of the non-U.S. citizens at Virginia Tech hope to live and work in the United States for the foreseeable in the Virginia Tech family. Unfortunately, given their temporary visa status, they often feel quite vulnerable

  11. A Working Bibliography on Published Materials on Black Studies Programs in the United States. Exchange Bibliography #1213.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lenwood G.

    This is a working bibliography on published materials on black studies programs in the United States. It includes books, pamphlets, articles, dissertations, general reference works, and current black periodicals. It also includes a listing of United States libraries with major black history book collections. (Author/AM)

  12. Working Memory and Individual Differences in Mathematics Achievement: A Longitudinal Study from First Grade to Second Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smedt, Bert; Janssen, Rianne; Bouwens, Kelly; Verschaffel, Lieven; Boets, Bart; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationship between working memory and individual differences in mathematics. Working memory measures, comprising the phonological loop, the visuospatial sketchpad, and the central executive, were administered at the start of first grade. Mathematics achievement was assessed 4 months later (at the middle of…

  13. Manage Work Better to Better Manage Human Resources: A Comparative Study of Two Approaches to Job Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, James P.

    1996-01-01

    The Position Classification Questionnaire (PCQ) and task inventory method (TI) were used to study the same work functions. PCQ divided functions into 16 classes for wage/salary determination. TI divided them into 28 classifications for training purposes. The two approaches were considerably different in their approach to how work should be…

  14. Comparison of two self-reported measures of physical work demands in hospital personnel: A cross-sectional study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen; Nils Fallentin; Karl B Christensen; Jette N Jensen; Finn Diderichsen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a frequent health complaint among health care personnel. Several work tasks and working postures are associated with an increased risk of LBP. The aim of this study was to compare two self-reported measures of physical demands and their association with LBP (the daily number of patient handling tasks and Hollmann's physical load index). METHODS:

  15. Working with Primary Care Practices to Improve Service Delivery for People with Learning Disabilities--A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Jenny; Stanton, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    The relatively poor health of people with learning disability reflects the failure of primary care practitioners to improve the accessibility of the service they offer. This North Essex study involved evaluation of a project to work with three primary care practices to raise staff awareness, improve their training, and adapt their working

  16. Anxiety about starting three-shift work among female workers: findings from the Female Shift Workers' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Maruyama, Takashi; Shirane, Kiyoyumi; Otomo, Hajime; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Oyama, Ichiro

    2008-03-01

    In 1999, the Japanese Law on Equal Employment Opportunity and Conditions was amended and the previous prohibition of the assignment of female workers to night work was abolished. Subsequently, the number of female shift workers has been increasing in Japan, necessitating greater attention to the health care of this population. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the relationship between anxiety expressed about starting three-shift work and background characteristics among female workers who were being assigned to three-shift work for the first time. The subjects were 38 middle-aged female workers (age range: 44 to 59 years) who were working at a chemical plant. The women completed a self-administered questionnaire before starting three-shift work. Levels of anxiety about starting three-shift work were assessed by the question 'Do you feel anxious about starting three-shift work?' The available responses were: 'Very agree', 'Considerably agree', 'Rather agree', 'Slightly agree' and 'Not agree at all', and 63% of the subjects gave one of the first two answers, which were defined as indicating anxiety. We also acquired information regarding lifestyle and occupation for each subject, including the following factors: frequency of breakfast consumption, subjective sleep insufficiency, previous experience of similar work before beginning shift work, previous experience of two-shift work, and responsibility for household duties. In the study, we found a marginally statistically significant trend association between frequent breakfast consumption and anxiety about starting three-shift work (P(trend) = 0.09). Anxiety was also high among subjects with sleep disorders, especially those suffering from subjective sleep insufficiency (P = 0.08). Due to the small study population, these results should be interpreted with caution and confirmed by future studies. PMID:18350748

  17. Is living near a coking works harmful to health? A study of industrial air pollution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R S Bhopal; P Phillimore; S Moffatt; C Foy

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether there was excess ill health in people living near a coking works, and if so whether it was related to exposure to coking works' emissions. DESIGN--Populations varying in proximity to the coking works were compared with control populations. Health data were correlated with available environmental data. METHODS--Analysis of routinely collected mortality, cancer registration, and birth statistics; community

  18. School-to-work transition: A case study of the Discovery Research model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Maureen Cuddy

    1998-01-01

    The School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 created a great deal of activity and interest in getting schools involved in work-based learning activities. School to Work is intended for all students, whether they intend to go on for a baccalaureate degree or not. Teachers and administrators need, therefore, to get involved in related activities and instruction that is integrated within current

  19. What do we know about the non-work determinants of workers' mental health? A systematic review of longitudinal studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past years, cumulative evidence has convincingly demonstrated that the work environment is a critical determinant of workers' mental health. Nevertheless, much less attention has been dedicated towards understanding the pathways through which other pivotal life environments might also concomitantly intervene, along with the work environment, to bring about mental health outcomes in the workforce. The aim of this study consisted in conducting a systematic review examining the relative contribution of non-work determinants to the prediction of workers' mental health in order to bridge that gap in knowledge. Methods We searched electronic databases and bibliographies up to 2008 for observational longitudinal studies jointly investigating work and non-work determinants of workers' mental health. A narrative synthesis (MOOSE) was performed to synthesize data and provide an assessment of study conceptual and methodological quality. Results Thirteen studies were selected for evaluation. Seven of these were of relatively high methodological quality. Assessment of study conceptual quality yielded modest analytical breadth and depth in the ways studies conceptualized the non-work domain as defined by family, network and community/society-level indicators. We found evidence of moderate strength supporting a causal association between social support from the networks and workers' mental health, but insufficient evidence of specific indicator involvement for other analytical levels considered (i.e., family, community/society). Conclusions Largely underinvestigated, non-work determinants are important to the prediction of workers' mental health. More longitudinal studies concomitantly investigating work and non-work determinants of workers' mental health are warranted to better inform healthy workplace research, intervention, and policy. PMID:21645393

  20. The Work-Study Nexus: The Challenges of Balancing Full-Time Business Degree Study with a Part-Time Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how full-time university students cope with part-time working during term time. A qualitative approach was used to examine how students simultaneously manage the two activities, and how part-time working affects their academic study. Semi-structured interviews were used to obtain data from a sample of 30 undergraduate business…

  1. Impact of working memory load on cognitive control in trait anxiety: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Qi, Senqing; Zeng, Qinghong; Luo, Yangmei; Duan, Haijun; Ding, Cody; Hu, Weiping; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Whether trait anxiety is associated with a general impairment of cognitive control is a matter of debate. This study investigated whether and how experimentally manipulated working memory (WM) load modulates the relation between trait anxiety and cognitive control. This question was investigated using a dual-task design in combination with event-related potentials. Participants were required to remember either one (low WM load) or six letters (high WM load) while performing a flanker task. Our results showed that a high WM load disrupted participants' ability to overcome distractor interference and this effect was exacerbated for the high trait-anxious (HTA) group. This exacerbation was reflected by larger interference effects (i.e., incongruent minus congruent) on reaction times (RTs) and N2 amplitudes for the HTA group than for the low trait-anxious group under high WM load. The two groups, however, did not differ in their ability to inhibit task-irrelevant distractors under low WM load, as indicated by both RTs and N2 amplitudes. These findings underscore the significance of WM-related cognitive demand in contributing to the presence (or absence) of a general cognitive control deficit in trait anxiety. Furthermore, our findings show that when limited WM resources are depleted by high WM load, HTA individuals exhibit less efficient recruitments of cognitive control required for the inhibition of distractors, therefore resulting in a greater degree of response conflict. PMID:25369121

  2. Effects of personality on overtime work: a cross-sectional pilot study among Japanese white-collar workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As detailed associations between personality and long work hours are unclear, we assessed associations between personality dimensions and overtime work among Japanese white-collar workers. Methods From records of hours worked over 12 months by 267 office workers in an organization within the service industry, average overtime work hours per month and occurrence of excessive overtime was determined for each worker. Excessive overtime was defined as >??45 overtime work hours per month for at least one month. Responses to a questionnaire assessing socio-demographic and workplace-related factors and the Big Five personality test were analyzed. Associations between personality factors and overtime work were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Low Extraversion was associated with excessive overtime work (OR 2.02, 95%CI 1.02?–?4.02, P?=??0.04). Conclusions It is suggested that workers with low Extraversion can’t share work when busy to avoid excessive overtime. Personality factors should be considered in studies evaluating work time. Moreover, strengthening communication among workers with low Extraversion may reduce excessive overtime work and associated health problems. PMID:24670102

  3. Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow…

  4. Student- Directed Projects: An International Case Study for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowa, Gina A.; Ansong, David

    2010-01-01

    Student-directed projects are increasingly becoming a common phenomenon in schools of social work across the United States. Students acquire a great learning experience from these projects, which sharpen their skills in leadership, innovation, and practice. Social work practitioners who go through such a process emerge having acquired knowledge…

  5. Reading Comprehension and Working Memory's Executive Processes: An Intervention Study in Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Madruga, Juan A.; Elosua, Maria Rosa; Gil, Laura; Gomez-Veiga, Isabel; Vila, Jose Oscar; Orjales, Isabel; Contreras, Antonio; Rodriguez, Raquel; Melero, Maria Angeles; Duque, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Reading comprehension is a highly demanding task that involves the simultaneous process of extracting and constructing meaning in which working memory's executive processes play a crucial role. In this article, a training program on working memory's executive processes to improve reading comprehension is presented and empirically tested in two…

  6. Work Role Transitions: A Study of American Expatriate Managers in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stewart Black

    1988-01-01

    Throughout the course of a career, an individual must make numerous role transitions, instigated through such events as overseas transfers, domestic transfers, promotions, company reorganizations, and inter-company job changes. This paper examines the relationships between several variables and work role transition in the case of an overseas assignment to Japan. Role ambiguity and role discretion were found to influence work

  7. Study of building virtual human body model based on SolidWorks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi Shu; Yunjing Cui; Yaoguang Qi

    2009-01-01

    Virtual human body model is important of the products for the ergonomics optimization design. In this paper, a virtual human body model was built using SolidWorks software. The function ¿configuration manager¿ in SolidWorks makes serial rebuilding of virtual human body models easy without reimporting the models with different dimensions many times. Therefore, it becomes efficient and convenient for ergonomics optimization.

  8. Compounding Confusion? When Illustrative Practical Work Falls Short of Its Purpose--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Mavis; France, Beverley; Gounder, Roshni

    2012-01-01

    Illustrative practical work is commonly used in chemistry education to enrich students' understandings of chemical phenomena. However, it is possible that such practical work may not serve to foster understanding but rather cause further confusion. This paper reports the struggles experienced by a group of senior (Year 12) secondary chemistry…

  9. Work and Leisure: An Interdisciplinary Study in Theory, Education and Planning. Human Movement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, J. T., Ed.; Smith, M. A., Ed.

    The contents of this book divide into three parts: (1) theory; (2) education; and (3) planning. The first part of the book considers a number of broad related issues in work and leisure. The term "theory" is used in a broad sense and encompasses philosophical as well as empirically based views and models of the nature of man, work, and leisure.…

  10. Factors Promoting Vocational Students' Learning at Work: Study on Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Anne; Tynjälä, Päivi; Eteläpelto, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    In order to promote effective pedagogical practices for students' work-based learning, we need to understand better how students' learning at work can be supported. This paper examines the factors explaining students' workplace learning (WPL) outcomes, addressing three aspects: (1) student-related individual factors, (2) social and…

  11. Learning in the Process of Industrial Work--A Comparative Study of Finland, Sweden and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kira, Mari

    2007-01-01

    By combining a positivistic and an interpretive approach, this research investigates the learning opportunities that contemporary industrial work processes and workplaces offer for employees individually and collectively. The research explores how employees can become trained through their work and how individual development may expand to…

  12. The Stability and Reliability of a Modified Work Components Study Questionnaire in the Educational Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil; Heller, Leonard E.

    The investigation attempted to establish the factorial validity and reliability of an industrial selection device based on Herzberg's theory of work motivation related to the school organization. The questionnaire was reworded to reflect an educational work situation; and a random sample of 197 students, 118 administrators, and 432 teachers was…

  13. Authentic Assessment in Action: Studies of Schools and Students at Work. The Series on School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; And Others

    This book examines how five schools in New York City have developed "authentic," performance-based assessments of students' learning, and how this work has interacted with and influenced the teaching and learning experiences students encounter in school. Authentic assessment attempts to take the measure of a child's real work over time and to…

  14. Group Work as a Learning Situation: A Qualitative Study in a University Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postholm, May Britt

    2008-01-01

    Problem-based learning, group work, project work and fieldwork are prescribed learning methods aimed at replacing or complementing traditional lectures in higher education in Norway (Innst. S. nr 337, 2000-2001) [Proposal to the Norwegian Parliament no. 337 (2000-2001)]. This is based on the belief that student activity can enhance learning. The…

  15. Is Working Memory Training Effective? A Study in a School Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rode, Catrin; Robson, Robby; Purviance, Andy; Geary, David C.; Mayr, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effectiveness of an intensive, on average 17-session, adaptive and computerized working-memory training program for improving performance on untrained, paper and pencil working memory tasks, standardized school achievement tasks, and teacher ratings of classroom behavior. Third-grade children received either a computerized working memory training for about 30 minutes per session (n?=?156) or participated in regular classroom activities (n?=?126). Results indicated strong gains in the training task. Further, pretest and posttest transfer measures of working memory and school achievement, as well as teacher ratings, showed substantial correlations with training task performance, suggesting that the training task captured abilities that were relevant for the transfer tasks. However, effect sizes of training-specific transfer gains were very small and not consistent across tasks. These results raise questions about the benefits of intensive working-memory training programs within a regular school context. PMID:25162637

  16. A note on path integral formulism of $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Yin

    2012-01-01

    This is a note on the derivation of path integral formulism for $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model and may be helpful for further study in related works. We are rather happy to receive any comments and other discussions are welcome.

  17. A note on path integral formulism of $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model

    E-print Network

    Yin Zhong; Hong-Gang Luo

    2012-04-21

    This is a note on the derivation of path integral formulism for $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model and may be helpful for further study in related works. We are rather happy to receive any comments and other discussions are welcome.

  18. A study of teacher thinking about working in classrooms using a multicultural perspective on science learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Kanwaljit K.

    Teaching science using a multicultural approach is not typical practice in public school systems. The purpose of the study was to gain a better understanding of the thoughts and actions of teachers who do, in fact, embrace a multicultural perspective on science teaching and learning. Specifically, the project focused on teachers' beliefs about teaching science with a multicultural perspective and how they have facilitated such an approach. This research considered what obstacles were encountered when implementing a multicultural approach. Data were gathered through interviews and classroom observations of four teachers regarding their beliefs and views about teaching science using a multicultural approach. Banks's (2002) dimensions of multicultural education and his typology of approaches to multicultural curriculum reform were used to organize and evaluate the case study descriptions of the approaches taken by the participants with respect to integrating multicultural content within the science curriculum. The case study reports portray teacher thinking and practice about multicultural approaches to science teaching and learning using six organizing themes: (1) Participants' reasons for taking a multicultural approach in science teaching, (2) Participants' beliefs that guide how to teach science using a multicultural approach, (3) Participants' views about the challenges of teaching science in a multicultural setting, (4) Participants' ideas about factors that facilitate a multicultural approach, (5) Participants' and the researcher's approaches to content integration, (6) Participants' thoughts on preparing educators to teach using a multicultural approach to science education. The participants suggested facilitation approaches for the science classroom. These included: (1) Having deep knowledge of students and their cultural backgrounds; (2) Acknowledging and including the contributions of other cultures to science teaching; (3) Using personalized strategies for science learning (e.g., cooperative learning, hands-on activities, graphic organizers); 4) Providing all science teachers with ongoing training in the areas of multicultural education and multicultural science education in particular; 5) Inviting guest speakers from a variety of ethnic/cultural backgrounds who work in the field of science/technology to share their experiences with students; 6) Hiring more ethnic-minority science and math teachers; and 7) Providing teachers with time and funding to create culturally relevant science materials.

  19. A comparative study of the working memory multicomponent model in psychosis and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Elosúa, M Rosa; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Moreno-Izco, Lucía; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2015-08-01

    Working memory deficits are considered nuclear deficits in psychotic disorders. However, research has not found a generalized impairment in all of the components of working memory. We aimed to assess the components of the Baddeley and Hitch working memory model: the temporary systems-the phonological loop, the visuospatial sketchpad and the episodic buffer (introduced later by Baddeley)-and the central executive system, which includes four executive functions: divided attention, updating, shifting and inhibition. We assessed working memory performance in a sample of 21 patients with a psychotic disorder and 21 healthy controls. Patients also underwent a clinical assessment. Both univariate and repeated measures ANOVAs were applied to analyze performance in the working memory components between groups. Patients with a psychotic disorder underperformed compared to the controls in all of the working memory tasks, but after controlling for age and premorbid IQ, we only found a difference in performance in the N-Back task. Repeated measures ANCOVAs showed that patients also underperformed compared to the controls in the Digit span test and the TMT task. Not all of the components of working memory were impaired in the patients. Specifically, patients' performance was impaired in the tasks selected to assess the phonological loop and the shifting executive function. Patients' also showed worse performance than controls in the N-Back task, representative of the updating executive function. However, we did not find higher impairment in the patients' performance respect to controls when increasing the loading of the task. PMID:26073063

  20. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE NFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-print Network

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DANE TECHNICAL NOTE NFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, June 7, 1998 Note: BM-3 BUNCH study of the bunch lengthening and microwave instability in the DANE main rings which includes distribution model and solved the Vlasov equation in order to investigate the bunch longitudinal coherent mode