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Sample records for work study note

  1. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes…

  2. TopSURV: Working with Photo NotesTopSURV: Working with Photo Notes Oscar R. Cantu'

    E-print Network

    Ghilani, Charles

    TopSURV: Working with Photo NotesTopSURV: Working with Photo Notes Oscar R. Cantu' March 2010 #12 the Questions section of your webinar software. · All questions and answers will be posted as a PDF alongSURV - Working with Photo Notes #12;March 2010 · For access to previously offered webinars and supporting

  3. 7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LASSEN PARK ROAD BRIDGE AT SULFUR WORKS. NOTE ROAD TRAVERSING DISTANT RIDGE BEYOND BRIDGE. SEEN FROM WEST OF HIGHWAY FROM OLD HIGHWAY LOOP. LOOKING E. - Lassen Park Road, Mineral, Tehama County, CA

  4. 5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING AQUEDUCT PRISM. NOTE INTERIOR STONE WORK OF THE PARAPET WALL AND REMAINS OF 1920 TIMBER AND CONCRETE FLOORING SYSTEM. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  5. Working note for PAV software I Presentation

    E-print Network

    . Originally done on low resolution (orca2) with NCL scripts, moving to high resolution (orca025) prevented NCL tools. It worked quite well for this resolution (about 45minutes for 30 years of data) but simply the current algorithm used in NCL scripts, we first tried to use NCO tools to compute the climatology and CDO

  6. Studying Resistance: Some Cautionary Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The question of "resistance" has oriented the field of critical ethnography for several generations now. Indeed, the reproduction-resistance binary has animated much of the most important, critical work in educational studies over the last 30 years. Yet, this reproduction-resistance binary has perhaps calcified in recent years. Such work often…

  7. These notes are from 2010 Cap and Trade Working Already

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Acid Rain These notes are from 2010 #12;Cap and Trade Working Already December 15, 2009 10:14 AM across the country decreased emissions of SO2, a precursor to acid rain, to 7.6 million tons in 2008. #12;Overview of Acid Rain Phenomenon Most common term for acidification of the environment, which can occur

  8. LAPACK Working Note #216: A novel parallel QR algorithm

    E-print Network

    Kågström, Bo

    LAPACK Working Note #216: A novel parallel QR algorithm for hybrid distributed memory HPC systems R the codes to distributed memory platforms with multithreaded nodes, such as multicore processors. Numerous early deflation, parallel algorithms, hybrid distributed memory systems. 1 Introduction Computing

  9. Asymptotic analysis: Working Note No. 2, Approximation of integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M. . Lab. d'Analyse Numerique); Kaper, H.G. )

    1993-07-01

    In this note we discuss the approximation of integrals that depend on a parameter. The basic tool is simple, namely, integration by parts. Of course, the power of the tool is evidenced in applications. The applications are many; they include Laplace integrals, generalized Laplace integrals, Fourier integrals, and Stokes' method of stationary phase for generalized Fourier integrals. These results illustrate beautifully Hardy's concept of applications of mathematics, that is, certain regions of mathematical theory in which the notation and the ideas of the (method of integration by parts] may be used systematically with a great gain in clearness and simplicity''. The notation differs slightly from Working Note No. 1, for reasons that are mainly historical. The asymptotic analysis of integrals originated in complex analysis, where the (real or complex) parameter, usually denoted by x, is usually introduced in such a way that the interesting behavior of the integrals occurs when x [yields] [infinity] in some sector of the complex plane. As there is nothing sacred about notation, and historical precedent is as good a guide as any, we follow convention and denote the parameter by x, focusing on the behavior of integrals as x [yields] [infinity] along the real axis or, if x is complex, in some sector of the complex plane. The connection with the notation of Working Note No. 1 is readily established by identifying the small parameter [epsilon] with [vert bar]x[vert bar][sup [minus]1].

  10. Minority Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East-West Gateway Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

    This report covers a work-study program in the East-West Gateway area to provide employment and training for minority and economically disadvantaged graduate and upper-division undergraduate students enrolled in planning and related curricula. The program has aided students in continuing their education who might otherwise be financially unable to…

  11. Asymptotic analysis, Working Note No. 1: Basic concepts and definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1993-07-01

    In this note we introduce the basic concepts of asymptotic analysis. After some comments of historical interest we begin by defining the order relations O, o, and O{sup {number_sign}}, which enable us to compare the asymptotic behavior of functions of a small positive parameter {epsilon} as {epsilon} {down_arrow} 0. Next, we introduce order functions, asymptotic sequences of order functions and more general gauge sets of order functions and define the concepts of an asymptotic approximation and an asymptotic expansion with respect to a given gauge set. This string of definitions culminates in the introduction of the concept of a regular asymptotic expansion, also known as a Poincare expansion, of a function f : (0, {epsilon}{sub o}) {yields} X, where X is a normed vector space of functions defined on a domain D {epsilon} R{sup N}. We conclude the note with the asymptotic analysis of an initial value problem whose solution is obtained in the form of a regular asymptotic expansion.

  12. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Go?ek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (??) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present ?? of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  13. Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

  14. A Study of Actions in Operative Notes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Burkart, Nora E.; Ryan, James O.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2012-01-01

    Operative notes contain rich information about techniques, instruments, and materials used in procedures. To assist development of effective information extraction (IE) techniques for operative notes, we investigated the sublanguage used to describe actions within the operative report ‘procedure description’ section. Deep parsing results of 362,310 operative notes with an expanded Stanford parser using the SPECIALIST Lexicon resulted in 200 verbs (92% coverage) including 147 action verbs. Nominal action predicates for each action verb were gathered from WordNet, SPECIALIST Lexicon, New Oxford American Dictionary and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary. Coverage gaps were seen in existing lexical, domain, and semantic resources (Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, SPECIALIST Lexicon, WordNet and FrameNet). Our findings demonstrate the need to construct surgical domain-specific semantic resources for IE from operative notes. PMID:23304423

  15. ROUGH NOTES NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION Mathematics and Math Education: how can they work together?1

    E-print Network

    Mond, David

    ROUGH NOTES NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION Mathematics and Math Education: how can they work together?1 or cannot do". They understood English, their working language, much better ­ hence those tests are not just foundation in basics before they can solve problems" ­ though kids solve problems with their (only) counting

  16. Some Notes on Conversational Fission. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Stuart J.

    While most previous research has implied or assumed that the conversational structure giving each speaker a turn to speak is universally normative, findings of one study suggest that in interactions with at least four participants, alternatives to this rule are possible. A phenomenon called "conversational fission" occurs when a four- (or more)…

  17. Teaching Note--Heterosexism as Experienced by LGBT Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    As social work educators, much of our practice involves helping students think critically about complex political, economic, and social issues. One of the most complex and contentious sociopolitical issues of our time has been civil rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. This teaching note considers how we, as LGBT…

  18. Noted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunberg, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

  19. Work-Study Awarding Timeline, 2015-2016 Below are the changes to the Work-Study (WS) awarding process for the 2015-2016 academic year. Please

    E-print Network

    Flann, Nicholas

    Work-Study Awarding Timeline, 2015-2016 Below are the changes to the Work-Study (WS) awarding process for the 2015-2016 academic year. Please note timelines and associated deadlines. Work Student Aid (FASFA) by May 1, 2015, to receive a work-study award for the 2015-2016 academic year. Career

  20. Electronic Nursing Notes: A Case Study on Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth V.; Teets, Janet

    2006-01-01

    In an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Computer & Information Technology (CIT) and Nursing (NSG) Departments at the Middletown and Hamilton regional campuses of Miami University (of Ohio), student team members created a Web-based application to create Electronic Nursing Notes. Students from the two departments worked together to design…

  1. Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Women's Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/swws www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Our Social Work and Women's Studies program is unique in North America. We

  2. RENEWAL OF WORK PERMITS/STUDENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR MSP Please note that copies of work permits/student authorizations must be submitted to

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    RENEWAL OF WORK PERMITS/STUDENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR MSP Please note that copies of work permits in which a Work Permit or Student Authorization expires. If they are renewed, coverage will only of the previous work permit and MSP coverage has expired, there are three possible outcomes. (i) MSP coverage

  3. Non-Traditional Learning Study: Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraine Valley Community College., Palos Hills, IL. Office of Institutional Research.

    A study was conducted at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) to determine the characteristics of individuals who had taken courses through the college's Non-Traditional Learning (NTL) sub-division. The records of students who had taken specified NTL courses during spring 1981, fall 1981 or spring 1982 were retrieved and analyzed. Study

  4. Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work and Disability Studies Social work engages with individuals, families, communities for personal and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork Social Work and Disability Studies can lead to careers in social service agencies, schools, government, graduate studies and individual, group

  5. My Obstetrician Got Me Fired: How Work Notes Can Harm Pregnant Patients and What to Do About It.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca A; Gardner, Sigrid; Torres, Leah N; Huchko, Megan J; Zlatnik, Marya G; Williams, Joan C

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal care providers are frequently asked to provide employment notes for their patients requesting medical leave or changes to work duties. Writing employment notes correctly can help patients negotiate for and obtain medically indicated workplace accommodations, allowing them to continue to work and earn an income. However, a poorly written or poorly timed note can jeopardize a patient's employment and salary. This commentary provides an overview of pregnancy-related employment laws and guidance in writing work accommodations letters that allow pregnant women to keep their jobs while maintaining a healthy pregnancy. PMID:26241411

  6. Social Work Assessment Notes: A Comprehensive Outcomes-Based Hospice Documentation System.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Angela Gregory; Martin, Ellen; Jones, Barbara L; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the development of an integrated psychosocial patient and caregiver assessment and plan of care for hospice social work documentation. A team of hospice social workers developed the Social Work Assessment Notes as a quality improvement project in collaboration with the information technology department. Using the Social Work Assessment Tool as an organizing framework, this comprehensive hospice social work documentation system is designed to integrate assessment, planning, and outcomes measurement. The system was developed to guide the assessment of patients' and caregivers' needs related to end-of-life psychosocial issues, to facilitate collaborative care plan development, and to measure patient- and family-centered outcomes. Goals established with the patient and the caregiver are documented in the plan of care and become the foundation for patient-centered, strengths-based interventions. Likert scales are used to assign numerical severity levels for identified issues and progress made toward goals and to track the outcome of social work interventions across nine psychosocial constructs. The documentation system was developed for use in an electronic health record but can be used for paper charting. Future plans include automated aggregate outcomes measurement to identify the most effective interventions and best practices in end-of-life care. PMID:26285358

  7. Appears in Working Notes of the AAAI Fall Symposium on Model-Directed Autonomous Systems Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 1997

    E-print Network

    Krebsbach, Kurt D.

    into multi-agentdomainssuch as cooperating teams of autonomous aircraft (see Fig- ure 2). D-CIRCA agentsAppears in Working Notes of the AAAI Fall Symposium on Model-Directed Autonomous Systems Cambridge and execute real-time control plans for multiple cooperating autonomous agents. In this pa- per, we

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION The utility of ITS2 in spider phylogenetics: notes on prior work and an example from Anelosimus

    E-print Network

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    SHORT COMMUNICATION The utility of ITS2 in spider phylogenetics: notes on prior work and an example nuclear DNA marker used to examine relationships among and within species in animals and plants. ITS2 of spiders. Here, I examine the potential utility of this marker for spider phylogenetics based

  9. Federal Work Study Program Information Overview of Federal Work-Study Program

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Federal Work Study Program Information Overview of Federal Work-Study Program The Federal Work by the U.S. Department of Education processing center. To be eligible for work study at UNCW, students must works over the allowed amount, the department will have to cover the overage. If a department would like

  10. Lives and Deaths: Biographical Notes on Selections from the Works of Edwin S. Shneidman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenaars, Antoon A.

    2010-01-01

    Edwin S. Shneidman (DOB: 1918-05-13; DOD: 2009-05-15) is a father of contemporary suicidology. His work reflects the intensive study of lives lived and deaths, especially suicides, and is the mirror to his mind. His contributions can be represented by five categories: psychological assessment, logic, Melville and Murray, suicide, and death. His…

  11. Vocational Education and the Work Establishment of Youth: Equity and Effectiveness Issues. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Sue E.

    A study examined data from literature and from three surveys of high school students to analyze the equity of the way in which high schools assign students to the vocational track and the effectiveness of vocational education in preparing students for work. Data revealed that while students' junior high abilities, achievement, and curricular…

  12. Social Work and Applied Social Studies

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate #12;Undergraduate Social and Policy Sciences 2, social policy, international development and social work. Many of our staff are at the forefront, in 2011 we were awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for our work on poverty and vulnerable people

  13. Learning from Lecture: Investigations of Study Strategies Involving Note Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Nicholas H.; And Others

    Two experiments were conducted with college students as subjects in an effort to determine the note taking strategy most effective for learning from lecture. In one experiment students listened to a lecture while engaging in either parallel or distributed note taking. The information density of the lecture and the lecture presentation speed were…

  14. Earn, Learn...Serve? Federal Work-Study Program Confronts Midlife Crises as It Nears 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzick, Abbey

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that although research indicates that integrating work experience with schools is a key workforce development strategy, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, which provides campuses with matching funds to support part-time jobs for financially needy students, is being threatened. Describes the FWS program, noting that a growing body of…

  15. Something Works: Evidence from Practice Effectiveness Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomlison, Ray J.

    1984-01-01

    Poses and responds to ten questions of key significance for social work practice, drawing on the results of effectiveness outcome studies in the related fields of psychotherapy, marital therapy, family therapy, and behavioral therapy. Highlights the research that is beginning to establish which methods work. (Author/LLL)

  16. Work and Sleep—A Prospective Study of Psychosocial Work Factors, Physical Work Factors, and Work Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Garefelt, Johanna; Richter, Anne; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Sverke, Magnus; Kecklund, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is limited knowledge about the prospective relationship between major work characteristics (psychosocial, physical, scheduling) and disturbed sleep. The current study sought to provide such knowledge. Design: Prospective cohort, with measurements on two occasions (T1 and T2) separated by two years. Setting: Naturalistic study, Sweden. Participants: There were 4,827 participants forming a representative sample of the working population. Measurements and Results: Questionnaire data on work factors obtained on two occasions were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Competing models were compared in order to investigate temporal relationships. A reciprocal model was found to fit the data best. Sleep disturbances at T2 were predicted by higher work demands at T1 and by lower perceived stress at T1. In addition, sleep disturbances at T1 predicted subsequent higher perception of stress, higher work demands, lower degree of control, and less social support at work at T2. A cross-sectional mediation analysis showed that (higher) perceived stress mediated the relationship between (higher) work demands and sleep disturbances; however, no such association was found longitudinally. Conclusions: Higher work demands predicted disturbed sleep, whereas physical work characteristics, shift work, and overtime did not. In addition, disturbed sleep predicted subsequent higher work demands, perceived stress, less social support, and lower degree of control. The results suggest that remedial interventions against sleep disturbances should focus on psychosocial factors, and that such remedial interventions may improve the psychosocial work situation in the long run. Citation: Åkerstedt T, Garefelt J, Richter A, Westerlund H, Magnusson LL, Sverke M, Kecklund G. Work and sleep—a prospective study of psychosocial work factors, physical work factors, and work scheduling. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1129–1136. PMID:26118559

  17. Learning to Work or Working to Learn? A University-Work Transition Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Alby, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the case of an innovative project on the transition between university and work. The project examined sustains two social dimensions of learning: education as a shared social institution in which university studies and work can be productively interconnected and alternated in order to enhance learning, and learning as identity…

  18. [Work capacity perceived by nurses: descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Tomietto, Marco; Zanini, Antonietta; Sgrazzutti, Sasha; Palese, Alvisa

    2011-01-01

    Perceived work ability is the worker perception of his/her job performances. There are many factors involved in this perception: individual characteristics (such as health status, motivation, and attitudes), job characteristics (such as technological resources, physical and mental demands) and working climate (such as job organization and leadership styles). The promotion of a good work ability could decrease the premature loss of workers and could help them in facing job demands and stress. In the health care settings the risk to perceive a low work ability could be higher due to nurses' shortage. The main aim of this pilot study was to measure the perceived work ability among nurses in order to find the work ability predictors. 78 nurses were recruited and had filled the Work Ability Index (WAI). The main work ability predictors found were: age over 45 years (OR=4,56; IC 95% 1,14 to 19,14), working years over 15 (OR=3,18; IC 95% 1,09 to 9,45) and more than 3 diseases (OR=25,00; IC95% 3,17 to 531,90). These results give useful information to health care managers in order to improve human resources management strategies and to find solutions about nurses' shortage and aging workforce. PMID:22452097

  19. Global Working Guidance Note for staff and students at London School of Hygiene & Tropical

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    Medicine working overseas The work of the School may bring us into contact with regimes who do not hold discussions with staff/students before they go to work overseas about risks and issues of concern such as how best to ensure safety, what support will be available during the time based overseas and who

  20. Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

  1. Tree-related research at Wytham Woods The following notes provide background to some of the work going on in Wytham Woods, focussed

    E-print Network

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Tree-related research at Wytham Woods The following notes provide background to some of the work ....................................................................................................................................15 FORESTPRIME: Predicting carbon release from forest soils through priming effects biomass, leaf chemistry and the impact of tree diseases in British woodlands

  2. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

  3. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, to appear. A Tool for Taking Class Notes

    E-print Network

    Ward, Nigel

    International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, to appear. A Tool for Taking Class Notes Nigel the notes of the student without passing through the mind of either". If so, learning problems explained in terms of encoding: the student's mind receives some inputs from the instructor, both verbal

  4. Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing…

  5. Qualitative Research: Studying How Things Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    This book provides invaluable guidance for thinking through and planning a qualitative study. Rather than offering recipes for specific techniques, master storyteller Robert Stake stimulates readers to discover "how things work" in organizations, programs, communities, and other systems. Topics range from identifying a research question to…

  6. Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,…

  7. Crowdsourcing Student Notes to Provide Real-Time Study Guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    What if you had access to all your students' notes, their questions, their answers to questions you posed in class and when they were confused in class. What could you do with that information to help guide your students. With the advent of in-class tools like LectureTools it is now possible to have such access to student data. This paper describes on-going research at the University of Michigan to explore how best to mine student notes and questions to provide adaptive learning opportunities to students. Student notes are parsed in real-time searching for keywords from the geosciences. These words and phrases are then linked to a variety of resources for those wishing further clarification. This presentation will demonstrate the tools that have been generated for students and report on the students' assessment of the value of such information. The presentation will use LectureTools to demonstrate the crowdsourcing. Attendees are encouraged to bring a mobile device to the session.

  8. A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Wallace K. C.; Meyer, Bruce D.; Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Achen, Alexandra C.

    2008-01-01

    Charles (2003) examines the dynamic effects of disability, finding a small decline in earnings and hours following disability onset, even for those who have positive disability reports for each of the next ten years. These outcomes also rebound quickly after the onset of disability. In recent work, Meyer and Mok (2006), find a much larger loss in…

  9. National Institute of Education: Methods for Managing Programmatic Research and Development. A Working Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Arnold; And Others

    This work has been done as part of the effort to plan the National Institute of Education (NIE). The report, one of a series, describes four different management systems used by the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA, the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Air Force in managing programmatic research and…

  10. Teaching Note--Integrating Prevention Content into Clinical Social Work Practice Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid changes in health care services and delivery suggest an upcoming paradigm shift in the field of mental health. Recent national reports, health care policy changes, and growing evidence support a shift toward prevention-focused mental health care. The social work profession is uniquely positioned to act as leaders in this shift as the…

  11. Research Note--A Pilot Cyber Counseling Course in a Graduate Social Work Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishna, Faye; Tufford, Lea; Cook, Charlene; Bogo, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Cyber counseling is a new and growing medium for offering mental health services to children and youth. However, there is a lack of identification of the core competencies required to provide effective online counseling. A school of social work, in partnership with a national service agency providing online counseling to children and youth,…

  12. Teaching Note--Incorporating Social Innovation Content into Macro Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Cosner Berzin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The practice of social innovation offers promising approaches for addressing social issues. Although many social innovation strategies are congruent with macro social work theory and practice, some of the insights and tactics that have emerged in the social innovation field have the potential to strengthen current macro practice. Based on our…

  13. ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment. ADIFOR Working Note No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Carle, A.

    1992-07-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

  14. A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.; Heerwagen, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

  15. A note on a new study of intelligence in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bakhiet, Salaheldin Farah Attallah; Lynn, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Three studies of intelligence in Egypt published between 1957 and 1989 and based on small samples gave British IQs between 77 and 83. The present paper reports the results of a recent study based on a much larger sample in order to examine how far the results of the older studies can be replicated. The Coloured Progressive Matrices was standardized in Egypt in 2011-2013 on a sample of 11,284 children aged 5.6 to 10.5 years. The sample obtained a British IQ of 84.2 and provides a satisfactory replication of the earlier studies. PMID:25386704

  16. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  17. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  18. Research Note. Student Attitudes toward Physical Education: A Multicultural Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannehill, Deborah; Zakrajsek, Dorothy

    1993-01-01

    This study examined secondary school students' attitudes toward physical education (PE) and sport from a multicultural perspective. Surveys indicated students considered PE important to their overall education. Students liked PE for fun and enjoyment. Many students had negative attitudes toward fitness. Some cultural differences surfaced, but they…

  19. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...monitor the activities of the work study coordinating committee...institutions of higher education, work placement agencies, students...program, and by making the analysis of students under the financial...Federal requirements. (f) Work placement agencies...

  20. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...monitor the activities of the work study coordinating committee...institutions of higher education, work placement agencies, students...program, and by making the analysis of students under the financial...Federal requirements. (f) Work placement agencies...

  1. Checklist for Liberal Studies Requirements PLEASE NOTE: Some programs may require specific courses within the Liberal Studies curriculum. Check

    E-print Network

    /Social Science ­ 6 Hours ­ Select from Liberal Studies list _____ History _____ Social Science IV. Humanities/Fine Arts ­ 5 Hours ­ Select from Liberal Studies list _____ Humanities or Fine Arts _____ HumanitiesChecklist for Liberal Studies Requirements PLEASE NOTE: Some programs may require specific courses

  2. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-print Network

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how climate, natural resources, and socioeconomic systems affect each other. 2 #12;3 ntroduction Climate scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon

  3. A descriptive study of work aggravated asthma

    PubMed Central

    Goe, S; Henneberger, P; Reilly, M; Rosenman, K; Schill, D; Valiante, D; Flattery, J; Harrison, R; Reinisch, F; Tumpowsky, C; Filios, M

    2004-01-01

    Background and Aims: Work related asthma (WRA) is one of the most frequently reported occupational lung diseases in a number of industrialised countries. A better understanding of work aggravated asthma (WAA), as well as work related new onset asthma (NOA), is needed to aid in prevention efforts. Methods: WAA and NOA in the United States were compared using cases reported to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) from four state Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) surveillance programmes for 1993–95. Results: A total of 210 WAA cases and 891 NOA cases were reported. WAA cases reported mineral and inorganic dusts as the most common exposure agent, as opposed to NOA cases, in which diisocyanates were reported most frequently. A similar percentage of WAA and NOA cases still experienced breathing problems at the time of the interview or had visited a hospital or emergency room for work related breathing problems. NOA cases were twice as likely to have applied for workers' compensation compared with WAA cases. However, among those who had applied for worker compensation, approximately three-fourths of both WAA and NOA cases had received awards. The services and manufacturing industrial categories together accounted for the majority of both WAA (62%) and NOA (75%) cases. The risk of WAA, measured by average annual rate, was clearly the highest in the public administration (14.2 cases/105) industrial category, while the risk of NOA was increased in both the manufacturing (3.2 cases/105) and public administration (2.9 cases/105) categories. Conclusions: WAA cases reported many of the same adverse consequences as NOA cases. Certain industries were identified as potential targets for prevention efforts based on either the number of cases or the risk of WAA and NOA. PMID:15150390

  4. Work Study Steps and Helpful Information In this document you will learn about how the Work-Study program works at Washington State University and

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    1 Work Study Steps and Helpful Information In this document you will learn about how the Work-Study program works at Washington State University and what the process for awarding student this upcoming fall semester. Students have recently received an email notice letting them know they are Work-Study eligible

  5. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work-study program. 570.37 Section 570.37 Labor Regulations... (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study program. (a) This section varies the provisions contained in... employed pursuant to a school-supervised and school-administered work-study program that meets...

  6. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  7. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study program. 570.37 Section 570.37 Labor Regulations... (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study program. (a) This section varies the provisions contained in... employed pursuant to a school-supervised and school-administered work-study program that meets...

  8. Federal Work Study Program Office of Scholarships & Financial Aid

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Federal Work Study Program Office of Scholarships & Financial Aid Warwick Center 140 Orientation: 2014-2015 #12;Topics · What is Federal Work Study (FWS)? · Payment Process · Payroll Forms · FWS Restrictions · Important Dates · Employment Search · Responsibilities · Timesheets #12;Federal Work-Study (FWS

  9. 29 CFR 570.37 - Work-study program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study program. 570.37 Section 570.37 Labor Regulations... (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.37 Work-study program. (a) This section varies the provisions contained in... employed pursuant to a school-supervised and school-administered work-study program that meets...

  10. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  11. ACCOUNT NUMBER ERN HOURS 10THS ~ WORK-STUDY

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Lee

    ACCOUNT NUMBER ERN HOURS 10THS !! !! !! !! ~ WORK-STUDY ~ HOURLY CSU STUDENT ~ HOURLY NONST WEEK 2ND WEEK DATE TIME WORKED ACCOUNT DATE TIME WORKED ACCOUNT MO DAY START STOP HOURS MIN MO DAY on this sheet must be filled I certify that this sheet accurately records the hours worked by the above employee

  12. International scoping study: accelerator working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

    2006-09-30

    During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

  13. Sex Work and Students: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ron; Bergstrom, Sandra; La Rooy, David

    2007-01-01

    Available evidence suggests that changes in the funding of higher education have led to some students entering the sex industry in order to make ends meet. The current study comprises a sample of undergraduates (N=130) in the south of England, who completed a cross-sectional survey of their financial circumstances, health, psychological…

  14. Page 1 of 5 WORK STUDY APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    are not considered dependent. $ $ Fall-Winter Credit Units:Fall Credit Units: *All communication regarding Study Program purposes you are living in a common-law relationship if (a) you and your partner have been living together in a conjugal relationship for not less than 3 years, or (b) you and your partner

  15. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work... rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  16. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work... rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  17. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 2: Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The construction portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines the requirements and selects the concepts for the crewman work system required to support the construction of large structures in space.

  18. The AFL penetrometer study: work in progress.

    PubMed

    Orchard, J

    2001-06-01

    Five hundred and seventy one matches in the Australian Football League [AFL] had ground hardness measured using a Penetrometer, over the period 1997-2000. The method used was 3 drops at each of 20 locations over the playing field on the morning before games. Anterior Cruciate Ligament [ACL] injuries were recorded using an ongoing injury surveillance system. There was a non-significant trend towards a higher risk of ACL injury when the 3-drop average of the Penetrometer was less (harder) than 4.5cm, RR 2.36 (95% CI 0.90-6.24). When the first drop average of the Penetrometer was less (harder) than 2.5cm, the relative risk was 2.60 (95% CI 0.94-7.20). There was also a nonsignificant trend towards an increased risk of ACL injury in games where the predominant grass type was couch (Bermuda) grass, as opposed to rye grass, RR 2.37 (95% CI 0.89-6.36). This study confirms previous findings from the AFL that early season matches and matches played at northern (warmer) venues have a higher risk of ACL injury. It is likely that ground-related variables are partially responsible for these observations, but to date, the relative contributions of ground hardness, grass type, shoe-surface traction and other confounding factors are not certain. There was a significant fall in the number of ACL injuries in the AFL (to approximately half the previous level of incidence) during seasons 1999 and 2000. It is possible that reaction to this study and related publicity has led to the preparation of ground conditions in the AFL that are less likely to produce ACL injuries. PMID:11548921

  19. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

  20. Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how…

  1. What Works Clearinghouse[TM] Reporting Guide for Study Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document provides guidance about how to describe studies and report their findings in a way that is clear, complete, and transparent. This document does not include information about how studies are judged against What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards. For information about What Works Clearinghouse evidence standards, please refer to…

  2. Thirty-Five Years of Studying Work and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Jeanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The author and Karen Gyllstrom began working on the study that resulted in the highly cited article entitled, "Working Men and Women: Inter-and Intra-role Conflict" (Herman & Gyllstrom, "Psychology of Women Quarterly" 1977) probably more for personal than professional reasons. The study was based on Gyllstrom's master's thesis. The focus of…

  3. ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes vol 21 no 2 March 1996 Page 39 Working Results on Software

    E-print Network

    Leite, Julio Cesar Sampaio do Prado

    of casting the recovered design. We worked with two small systems and a complex one. Our objective here], [Leite 91]. [Klajman 92], [Prado 92]. Work has been cen- tered on methods and not much has been invested and casting them in JSD. JSD views software development as a forward engineer- ing activity, but we are using

  4. Working-Class Students Need More Friends at University: A Cautionary Note for Australia's Higher Education Equity Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Denise Bradley and colleagues published their "Review of Australian Higher Education." A key point of the Bradley Review was to highlight the long-standing under-representation of working-class people at Australia's universities. Working-class people represent 25% of Australia's general population; however, they represent only 15% of…

  5. Adverse events of NOTES mediastinoscopy compared to conventional video-assisted mediastinoscopy: a randomized survival study in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, Henry; Cubas, Georgina; Boada, Marc; Rodríguez de Miguel, Cristina; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Gimferrer, Josep M.; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safety is a concern in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) mediastinoscopy. The objective of this study was to compare the safety of NOTES mediastinoscopy with video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM). Methods: Twenty-four pigs were randomly assigned to NOTES or VAM. Thirty-minute mediastinoscopies were performed with the identification of seven predetermined structures. The animals were euthanized after 7 days and necropsy was performed. Results: Mediastinoscopy was not possible in one animal in each group.?There were more intraoperative adverse events with NOTES than VAM (7 vs. 2, P?=?0.04); hemorrhage was the most frequent adverse event (4 and 1, respectively). At necropsy, pathological findings were observed in 13 animals (9 NOTES and 4 VAM; P?=?0.03). Inflammatory parameters were not different between groups and were not related to adverse events. Conclusion: Systematic NOTES mediastinoscopy is possible and comparable to VAM in terms of number of organs identified and inflammatory impact. However, the safety profile of NOTES mediastinoscopy has to be improved before it can be adopted in a clinical setting. PMID:26716115

  6. Soul Work: A Phenomenological Study of College English Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Sjon F.

    2011-01-01

    English teachers can encourage writing that opens college students to transformative learning through what John Dirkx called soul work. This soul work involves the conscious attempt to bring to the surface myths, images, and metaphors from the unconscious through imaginative writing and thinking processes. Participants in this study engaged in…

  7. Curriculum of Work-Study Program, Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darrell; And Others

    The work study curriculum guide for secondary special education students was designed for use in a classroom atmosphere simulating a work setting. Performance objectives and suggested activities are listed for 10 units (sample subunits in parentheses): purchasing habits (advertising methods, types of stores and merchandise, sales tax); budgeting…

  8. Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work

  9. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  10. A Study To Increase Computer Applications in Social Work Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucero, John A.

    The purpose of this study was to address the use of computers in social work practice and to survey the field for tools, concepts, and trends that could assist social workers in their practice. In addition to a review of the relevant literature, information was requested from the Social Work Service and Ambulatory Care Database Section at Walter…

  11. Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-01-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  12. Work schedules and fatigue: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, N; van Amelsvoort, L G P M; Kristensen, T; van den Brandt, P A; Kant, I.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: (1) To describe the prevalence of fatigue among employees in different work schedules (day work, three-shift, five-shift, and irregular shift work); (2) to investigate whether different work schedules are related to increasing fatigue over time, while taking into account job title and job characteristics; and (3) to study fatigue among shift workers changing to day work. Methods: Data from nine consecutive four-monthly self administered questionnaires from the Maastricht Cohort Study on Fatigue at work (n = 12 095) were used with 32 months of follow up. Day and shift workers were matched on job title. Results: The prevalence of fatigue was 18.1% in day workers, 28.6% in three-shift, 23.7% in five-shift, and 19.1% in irregular shift workers. For three-shift and five-shift workers substantial higher fatigue levels were observed compared to day workers at baseline measurement. In the course of fatigue over the 32 months of follow up there were only small and insignificant differences between employees in different work schedules. However, among employees fatigued at baseline, fatigue levels decreased faster over time among five-shift workers compared to fatigued day workers. Shift workers changing to day work reported substantially higher fatigue levels prior to change, compared to those remaining in shift work. Conclusions: Substantial differences in fatigue existed between day and shift workers. However, as no considerable differences in the course of fatigue were found, these differences have probably developed within a limited time span after starting in a shift work job. Further, evidence was found that fatigue could be an important reason for quitting shift work and moving to day work. Finally, in the relation between work schedules and fatigue, perceived job characteristics might play an important role. PMID:12782747

  13. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program: Prebreathe elimination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The study examined impacts of changing Orbiter cabin pressure and EMU EVA pressure to eliminate pure O2 prebreathing prior to EVA. The investigation defines circumscribing physiological boundaries and identifies changes required within Orbiter to reduce cabin pressure. The study also identifies payload impacts, payload flight assignment constraints, and impacts upon EMU resulting from raising EVA pressure. The study presents the trade-off which optimizes the choice of reduced cabin pressure and increased EVA pressure.

  14. Work-Study Earnings Monitoring Worksheet Student's Name University ID

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Work-Study Earnings Monitoring Worksheet Student's Name University ID MAY/SUMMER 2014 Work-Study Award Amount Pay Period Pay Period Dates Award Period Earnings this Pay Period Applicable Gross Total Remaining WS Award 25 5/19/2014 ­ 6/1/2014 May/Summer 26 6/2/2014 ­ 6/15/2014 May/Summer 1 6/16/2014 ­ 6/29/2014

  15. Effects of random study checks and guided notes study cards on middle school special education students' notetaking accuracy and science vocabulary quiz scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles L.

    Federal legislation mandates that all students with disabilities have meaningful access to the general education curriculum and that students with and without disabilities be held equally accountable to the same academic standards (IDEIA, 2004; NCLB, 2001). Many students with disabilities, however, perform poorly in academic content courses, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Previous research has reported increased notetaking accuracy and quiz scores over lecture content when students completed guided notes compared to taking their own notes. This study evaluated the effects of a pre-quiz review procedure and specially formatted guided notes on middle school special education students' learning of science vocabulary. This study compared the effects of three experimental conditions. (a) Own Notes (ON), (b) Own Notes+Random Study Checks (ON+RSC), and (c) Guided Notes Study Cards+Random Study Checks (GNSC+RSC) on each student's accuracy of notes, next-day quiz scores, and review quiz scores. Each session, the teacher presented 12 science vocabulary terms and definitions during a lecture and students took notes. The students were given 5 minutes to study their notes at the end of each session and were reminded to study their notes at home and in study hall period. In the ON condition students took notes on a sheet of paper with numbered lines from 1 to 12. Just before each next-day quiz in the ON+RSC condition students used write-on response cards to answer two teacher-posed questions over randomly selected vocabulary terms from the previous day's lecture. If the answer on a randomly selected student's response card was correct, that student earned a lottery ticket for inexpensive prizes and a quiz bonus point for herself and each classmate. In the GNSC+RSC condition students took notes on specially formatted guided notes that after the lecture they cut into a set of flashcards that could used for study. The students' mean notetaking accuracy was 75% during ON, 89% during ON+RSC, and 99.5% during GNSC+RSC. The class mean scores on next-day quizzes during ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 39%, 68%, and 90%, respectively. The class mean score on review quizzes following ON, ON+RSC, and GNSC+RSC was 2.1, 5.3, and 7.8 (maximum score, 10), respectively. Results for five of the seven students provide convincing evidence of functional relationships between ON+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON and between GNSC+RSC and higher quiz scores compared to ON+RSC. Students', teachers', and parents' opinions regarding the RSC and GNSC procedures were highly favorable.

  16. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

  17. Like Father, Like Son? A Note on the Intergenerational Transmission of IQ Scores. NBER Working Paper No. 14274

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2008-01-01

    More able parents tend to have more able children. While few would question the validity of this statement, there is little large-scale evidence on the intergenerational transmission of IQ scores. Using a larger and more comprehensive dataset than previous work, we are able to estimate the intergenerational correlation in IQ scores, examining not…

  18. Long working hours and cognitive function: the Whitehall II Study.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Marianna; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Ferrie, Jane E; Gimeno, David; Marmot, Michael G; Elovainio, Marko; Jokela, Markus; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2009-03-01

    This study examined the association between long working hours and cognitive function in middle age. Data were collected in 1997-1999 (baseline) and 2002-2004 (follow-up) from a prospective study of 2,214 British civil servants who were in full-time employment at baseline and had data on cognitive tests and covariates. A battery of cognitive tests (short-term memory, Alice Heim 4-I, Mill Hill vocabulary, phonemic fluency, and semantic fluency) were measured at baseline and at follow-up. Compared with working 40 hours per week at most, working more than 55 hours per week was associated with lower scores in the vocabulary test at both baseline and follow-up. Long working hours also predicted decline in performance on the reasoning test (Alice Heim 4-I). Similar results were obtained by using working hours as a continuous variable; the associations between working hours and cognitive function were robust to adjustments for several potential confounding factors including age, sex, marital status, education, occupation, income, physical diseases, psychosocial factors, sleep disturbances, and health risk behaviors. This study shows that long working hours may have a negative effect on cognitive performance in middle age. PMID:19126590

  19. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Notes on the Feeding Behavior and Caudal Luring by Juvenile Alsophis portoricensis

    E-print Network

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Notes on the Feeding Behavior and Caudal Luring for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1564695 . Accessed: 24 for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access

  20. Working in the UK during your studies Can I work while I study in the UK?

    E-print Network

    are permitted to undertake an internship during the Christmas and Easter holidays. However, only undergraduate of term-time) Term dates for Undergraduate Students are available from: www@imperial.ac.uk, Website: www.imperial.ac.uk/study/international-students Internships Some UK companies offer students

  1. On a personal note: a music therapist's reflections on working with those who are living with a terminal illness.

    PubMed

    Hartley, N A

    2001-01-01

    Music therapists are constantly called upon to justify their work through research projects and evaluation processes. Rarely do we get the opportunity to talk personally about our work, the effects it has on us as music therapists, indeed, as human beings. This paper traces my own journey as a music therapist working with the terminally ill. Using audio extracts of music improvised with patients at the end of their lives, the concept of "attention" in music is addressed and explored. The paper will investigate: a) What is the difference between the quality of attention that is available to ourselves and our patients "in" music, as opposed to other ways of being together?; b) What does musical experience, particularly when achieved through improvisation, enable us and our patients to be that we cannot achieve in other ways?; c) Can "being in music" with another person fulfill a sense of longing that is evident in people at the end of their lives? In her book Waiting For God, Simone Weil suggests, "Those who are unhappy have no need for anything else in this world other than people capable of giving them their attention..." (1). Can the improvisation of music offer a unique and uncomplicated medium for being close? PMID:11816752

  2. Commentary: The Challenge of Nonexperimental Interventions Studies in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The challenging context of social work interventions require that most intervention studies will be derived from nonexperimental research designs. Two evaluation studies in this special issue employed nonrandomized designs to examine the efficacy of two programs--a police crisis intervention team designed to enhance officers' responses to mental…

  3. How to Critically Evaluate Case Studies in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunjung; Mishna, Faye; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop guidelines to assist practitioners and researchers in evaluating and developing rigorous case studies. The main concern in evaluating a case study is to accurately assess its quality and ultimately to offer clients social work interventions informed by the best available evidence. To assess the quality of…

  4. A Study of Variance Estimation Methods. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Weng, Stanley; Salvucci, Sameena; Hu, Ming-xiu

    This working paper contains reports of five studies of variance estimation methods. The first, An Empirical Study of Poststratified Estimator, by Fan Zhang uses data from the National Household Education Survey to illustrate use of poststratified estimation. The second paper, BRR Variance Estimation Using BPLX Hadamard Procedure, by Stanley Weng…

  5. Working in the sky: a diary study on work engagement among flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulou, Despoina; Bakker, Arnold B; Heuven, Ellen; Demerouti, Evangelia; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2008-10-01

    This study aims to gain insight in the motivational process of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model by examining whether daily fluctuations in colleague support (i.e., a typical job resource) predict day-levels of job performance through self-efficacy and work engagement. Forty-four flight attendants filled in a questionnaire and a diary booklet before and after consecutive flights to three intercontinental destinations. Results of multilevel analyses revealed that colleague support had unique positive effects on self-efficacy and work engagement. Self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between support and engagement, but work engagement mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and (in-role and extra-role) performance. In addition, colleague support had an indirect effect on in-role performance through work engagement. These findings shed light on the motivational process as outlined in the JD-R model, and suggest that colleague support is an important job resource for flight attendants helping them reach their work-related goals. PMID:18837629

  6. Work Experiences of Latina Immigrants: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggerth, Donald E.; DeLaney, Sheli C.; Flynn, Michael A.; Jacobson, C. Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of the Latino immigrants working in the United States are women. However, studies concerning the work experiences of Latinas are almost absent in the literature. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study using eight focus groups (n = 53) of Latina immigrant workers. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using the grounded theory approach in which themes emerge from iterative readings of the transcripts by a group of investigators. This study identified themes related to excessive workload, familiar work/unfamiliar hazards, cultural tensions, lack of health care, pregnancy, sexual harassment, and family obligations/expectations. The responses of the Latina workers in this study clearly indicated that they live within a complex web of stressors, both as workers and as women. The increased economic opportunities that come with immigration to the United States are accompanied by many opportunities for exploitation, especially if they are undocumented. It is hoped that the findings of this study will raise awareness regarding these issues and spur further work in this area. PMID:26346566

  7. Revisiting Work-Life Issues in Canada: The 2012 National Study on Balancing Work and Caregiving in

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    1 Revisiting Work-Life Issues in Canada: The 2012 National Study on Balancing Work and Caregiving the first national study of work-life conflict in Canada to "explore how the changing relationship between family and work affects organizations, families and employers." Just over 10 years ago (2001) we

  8. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  9. Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Fiscal Year 1997 Grant Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report contains project synopses and evaluations supporting recommendations for funding 25 continuing and 7 new projects in public and nonpublic colleges and universities included in the $1.5 million appropriated for fiscal year 1997 for the Illinois Cooperative Work Study Program. Selection criteria included: strengthening cooperation among…

  10. Training and Work; A Study in Employment Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, L. R.

    Conducted at the request of the Commonwealth Advisory Committee on Advanced Education, this study inquired into the attitudes of university graduates and technical college diploma holders toward the training they had received; the relevance of training to the work expected of them; and how employers felt about the graduates whom they employed. The…

  11. A Study of Work Histories of Married Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Lucy Dorothea

    This study dealt with married women as past, present, and future members of the nursing force. Respondents were 53 married women, aged 22 to 68, in the Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Health Region who had been registered nurses. Data were gathered on personal, family, and work history, motives for entering the nursing profession, and satisfactions and…

  12. Grit and Work Engagement: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Grit, defined as perseverance of effort and consistency of interest, has attracted attention as a predictor of success in various fields beyond IQ and the Big Five personality dimension of Conscientiousness. The purpose of the current study was to examine previously uninvestigated questions regarding grit using a cross-sectional design among a large number of working adults in Japan. First, we tested geographical generalizability of associations between grit and orientations towards happiness by comparing previous studies in the U.S. and the current study in Japan. It was confirmed that orientation towards meaning rather than orientation towards engagement had a stronger positive correlation with grit in our sample of Japanese people. This result is inconsistent with previous studies in the U.S. Furthermore, the Big Five dimension of Openness to Experience was newly confirmed as having a positive association with grit. Second, we examined the association between grit and work engagement, which is considered as an outcome indicator for work performance. In this analysis, grit was a strong predictor for work performance as well as academic performance. PMID:26335001

  13. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  14. Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

  15. The Work-Study Experience of Indigenous Undergraduates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large number of universities in Taiwan and the increased availability of scholarships for disadvantaged students, the number of college students from indigenous families has been on the rise in recent years. However, many indigenous students still find it necessary to work part-time. In this study, indigenous students were interviewed…

  16. Work Satisfaction and the Black Female Professional: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.

    Black women who have gained access to higher education and higher paying positions often find themselves in less than optimal work environments, on account of racist and sexist attitudes of their colleagues. Accordingly, this study was undertaken to identify those aspects of interpersonal interaction and response among black professional women on…

  17. Work Study and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Just the Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cebula, Ray

    2004-01-01

    The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is essentially a needs-based welfare program. As a needs-based program, SSI must consider the income and resources of the individual applicant or recipient. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) discusses both income and resources at length. When considering Work Study income it is necessary to…

  18. Engineering Our work is focused on the study of Powder

    E-print Network

    goal is to develop a quantitative description of flows for a wide variety of powders using a continuous and physical properties such as density, elasticity, etc. and several flow geometries to gain meaningfulChemical Engineering Abstract Our work is focused on the study of Powder Mechanics and the ultimate

  19. At-Risk Students in Work and Family Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This manual is designed to help work and family studies teachers meet the needs of students who are at risk. It uses a systematic approach to adapting the learning environment that consists of an intervention checklist and intervention strategies. The manual is divided into two general sections: Common Skills Area and Applied Skills Areas. The…

  20. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  1. Rural Action: A Collection of Community Work Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paul, Ed.; Francis, David, Ed.

    This book contains 10 case studies of rural community development in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Catalonia, as seen from the perspective of community-work practitioners. Development projects encompassed such activities as promotion of tourism, establishment of community centers, vocational training for school dropouts, adult community…

  2. The College Work-Study Adult Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickse, Ruth S.

    In academic year 1983-84, 19 postsecondary institutions participated in adult literacy projects under the Federal College Work Study (CWS) Program as part of the National Adult Literacy Initiative. (This report presents data from the 18 projects that returned questionnaires.) Approximately 256 college students tutored in reading, writing, math,…

  3. Protest suicide among Korean students and laborers: a study of suicide notes.

    PubMed

    Ben Park, B C; Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    Suicide notes from two groups of protest suicides in South Korea during the period 1975-2003 were compared: suicide notes from students (n =16) and suicide notes from workers (n = 15). The students appeared to be acting upon abstract ideals, including the oppression of the masses by the government and the American forces in Korea, and they typically urged the reunification of Korea. The workers were acting upon more local concerns, such as the oppression of their union by the government and the companies and the policies of their specific companies. PMID:20099554

  4. Potential Danger in Pre-Populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so…

  5. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF "REAL" AUDIO DATA FOR MIR ALGORITHM EVALUATION AT THE NOTE-LEVEL A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    E-print Network

    Widmer, Gerhard

    data. This study investigates the effect of audio quality and source on the performance of two patches; a com- mercial high-quality sample library; and audio recordings made on a real (computerON THE IMPORTANCE OF "REAL" AUDIO DATA FOR MIR ALGORITHM EVALUATION AT THE NOTE

  6. 76 FR 15052 - Proposed Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request AGENCY...the actual number of hours worked by a work-study claimant. DATES: Written comments...information technology. Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program)), VA Form...

  7. Literary works as case studies for teaching human experimentation ethics.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, V R

    1996-03-01

    Case studies are widely used as a teaching strategy for a variety of topics in various disciplines. They are particularly valued as a teaching strategy in the teaching of ethics because they provide a context for understanding the complexities of situations involving ethical dilemmas. This article describes the successful use of two literary works as case studies in teaching master's students about the ethical issues in human experimentation. Pygmalion and Flowers for Algernon were selected to exemplify the ethical considerations important in the conduct of research with human subjects. Students found the assignment both personally and professionally stimulating and recommended continued use of the assignment in the course. PMID:8676212

  8. The relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported paediatric medication administration errors: a pan canadian study.

    PubMed

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs) occur frequently, with devastating consequences for children and their families. This study explored the relationship between the nursing work environment and the occurrence of reported PMAEs. In total, 127 potential and 245 actual PMAEs were reported. Workload, distraction, and ineffective communication were identified as significant contributors to the occurrence of PMAEs. Medical/surgical units reported more errors than critical care environments (p=.000) and a 2.9% increase in the frequency of reported PMAEs was noted for each additional bed on units (p=.001). This study supports the awareness that a systems reform is required to reduce PMAEs. PMID:23290866

  9. Wegener's work included studies of noctilucent clouds, auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    The 120th anniversary of the birth of Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) occurs next year and the event gives us an opportunity to commemorate his work. While the study of continental drift was a significant part of that work, Wegener's influence is also apparent in other areas of the geosciences, including solar-terrestrial physics, the physics of the upper atmosphere, and meteorology.Wegener's research in these areas was a continuation of a series of early studies by a number of scientists trying to explain atmospheric phenomena with the known laws of physics. His studies of noctilucent clouds and of auroras, for example, are significant in the context of the history of science as early experiments to explain the terrestrial atmosphere from a profoundly physical point of view. His contributions are building blocks to modern, comprehensive, physical interpretations, just as previous studies were building blocks to his. Wegener followed the same goal, namely the physical explanation of observed and recorded phenomena, and he belonged therefore to that group of researchers who contributed to the early development of geoscience and cosmoscience and whose heritage should be conserved.

  10. Note: Optimization of the numerical data analysis for conductivity percolation studies of drying moist porous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscicki, J. K.; Sokolowska, D.; Kwiatkowski, L.; Dziob, D.; Nowak, J.

    2014-02-01

    A simplified data analysis protocol, for dielectric spectroscopy use to study conductivity percolation in dehydrating granular media is discussed. To enhance visibility of the protonic conductivity contribution to the dielectric loss spectrum, detrimental effects of either low-frequency dielectric relaxation or electrode polarization are removed. Use of the directly measurable monofrequency dielectric loss factor rather than estimated DC conductivity to parameterize the percolation transition substantially reduces the analysis work and time.

  11. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

  12. Working with "rookies": A case study of science teachers mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meagher, Thomas Francis

    To gain insight into the world of mentoring new science teachers it is imperative to examine how a veteran science teacher is influenced through his or her work mentoring a new teacher. The impacts of mentoring new teachers have been extensively researched within the literature, documenting many of the factors that may enhance the teaching abilities of new teachers (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez & Tomlinson, 2008; Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004; Wang & Odell, 2002). A thorough search of the literature reveals an unbalanced representation of research focusing on the many influences mentoring may bring to a new teacher while ignoring the impact on the mentor. It is when the activity of mentoring a new teacher is examined within the theoretical frame work of social cognitive learning, it is apparent that not only are two individuals participating in working together, but also that research needs to investigate both sides of the relationship. Also, since the mentoring relationship is situated within a community of practice, it becomes important to utilize a situated learning theoretical framework in tandem with social cognitive learning to provide the clearest picture of this dynamic social relationship. This case study seeks to share the impacts experienced by mentors through their work with new teachers and provide balance to the other side of research into the social partnership of mentoring. Five science teachers mentoring new teachers online, through the University of Minnesota's Science Engineering, Math Mentoring Program (STEMMP) and Science Teacher Induction Network (TIN), participated in this study that explores their experiences through a phenomenographic lens and follows an interpretive research approach. Four main themes emerged that identified how science teacher mentors were impacted from mentoring which included: (1) impacts to their teaching practice, (2) perceptions influenced from feedback, (3) enhanced reflection, and (4) enhancement of self-efficacy. The results of this study also provide a model by which science teacher mentor characteristics can be identified. This case study has implications for improvement of science teacher mentoring programs and policies for professional support of mentor teachers and their mentees.

  13. Suicide notes.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Farmer, R; Catalan, J

    1993-07-01

    Detailed case reports of incidents of suicide and attempted suicide on the London Underground railway system between 1985 and 1989 were examined for the presence of suicide notes. The incidence of note-leaving was 15%. Notes provided little insight into the causes of suicide as subjectively perceived, or strategies for suicide prevention. PMID:8353698

  14. NOTES: Issues and Technical Details With Introduction of NOTES Into a Small General Surgery Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Brian; Horne, Walter; Moskowitz, Jesse B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a development of recent origin. In 2004, Kalloo et al first described NOTES investigation in an animal model. Since then, several investigators have pursued NOTES study in animal survival and nonsurvival models. Our objectives for this project included studying NOTES intervention in a laboratory environment using large animal (swine) models and learning to do so in a safe, controlled manner. Ultimately, we intend to introduce NOTES methodology into our surgical residency training program. The expertise of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon, fellowship-trained laparoendoscopic surgeon, and veterinarian along with a senior surgical resident was utilized to bring the input of several disciplines to this study. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM/COP) approved this study. Methods: A series of 5 laboratory sessions using mixed breed farm swine varying in weight from 37 kg to 43.1 kg was planned for the initial phase of NOTES introduction into our residency program. Animals were not kept alive in this investigation. All animals were anesthetized using a standard swine protocol and euthanized following guidelines issued by the American Veterinary Medical Association Panel on Euthanasia. Equipment included a Fujinon EVE endoscope 0.8 cm in diameter with a suction/irrigation channel and one working channel. Initially, a US Endoscopy gastric overtube, 19.5 mm OD and 50 cm in length, was used to facilitate passage of the endoscope. However, this device was found to have insufficient length. Subsequently, commercially available 5/8” diameter clear plastic tubing, 70 cm to 80 cm in length, was adapted for use as an overtube. Standard endoscopic instruments included Boston Scientific biopsy forceps, needle-knife, papillotome, endoscopic clip applier, and Valley Lab electrosurgical unit. A Karl Storz laparoscope and tower were used for laparoscopic observation of NOTES maneuvers. Necropsy was performed to determine specific details of surgical intervention. Results: NOTES intervention is feasible in an animal model. Insight into the potential of NOTES was obtained in this investigation. Conclusions: NOTES investigation in a controlled, laboratory setting using an animal model proved to have value for our program. A steep learning curve was encountered despite the availability of an investigator familiar with elementary NOTES procedures. The authors strongly suggest investigators adopt the ASGE/SAGES working group recommendations for a multidisciplinary team possessing advanced therapeutic endoscopic and advanced laparoscopic skills to study NOTES before human investigation. Animal laboratory facilities to perform research and training should be available to the multidisciplinary team for exploration of NOTES techniques and procedures. Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval must be obtained before introduction of NOTES procedures in human patients. PMID:18402737

  15. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  16. Environmental Studies Lecture Notes for Geology 361K, Environmental Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, Rolland B.

    This is one of a series of 14 instructional components of a semester-long, environmental earth science course developed for undergraduate students. The course includes lectures, discussion sessions, and individualized learning carrel lessons. Presented are the lecture notes for 10 lectures on the topics of geologic time, natural resources, and…

  17. Note: Design of a dose-controlled phototherapy system based on hyperspectral studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, M. F.; Chávarri, L.; Briz, S.

    2013-02-01

    Phototherapy consists in applying radiation on a part of the human body in order to treat an illness. A radiation dose is established for each treatment. In order to apply the correct dose a treatment time is set. However, in this work we have carried out some hyperspectral imaging studies that conclude that the radiation sources and the absorption properties of each patient can change. Therefore, the same treatment time does not ensure that the patient receive the appropriate dose. Thus, an optimized therapy system must measure the radiation emitted by the source and absorbed by the patient on real time to calculate the optimal dose at which the treatment is effective. In this work, we have developed and designed a custom system to measure the effectiveness of a radiative therapy treatment to adapt the appropriate dose for a specific patient in real time.

  18. Learning Work: A Critical Pedagogy of Work Education. Critical Studies in Education and Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Roger I.; And Others

    Through discussions of teaching practice and actual lesson suggestions, this book clarifies how the viewpoint of critical pedagogy can be used to develop a clear and principled practice of work education. The introduction provides a brief discussion of how critical pedagogy is understood and how it relates to work education. Chapter 1 situates the…

  19. 76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment...determine a claimant's eligibility for work-study benefits. DATES: Written comments...technology. Titles: a. Application for Work-Study Allowance, VA Form...

  20. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  1. ART IN TANZANIA INTERNHIP/WORK STUDY PROGRAMS

    E-print Network

    on working in the surrounding schools and areas. · Our focuses include and internships to empower our work in Tanzania. For questions on immigration as well as international documentaries. We offer various mentoring and learning

  2. Women's Personality, Work, and Retirement in the Mills Longitudinal Study

    E-print Network

    George, Linda Katherine

    2010-01-01

    college education in understanding the early personalityage 70? Personality did not predict either work or educationpersonality trait of Openness and a work-based creativity outcome measure above and beyond cognitive ability and education

  3. Faculty Work Practices in Material Environments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an extensive and well-developed body of literature on the nature of faculty work (e.g., Blackburn & Lawrence, 1996; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006) that has examined numerous aspects of faculty work and sources of influence on that work (e.g., intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, personal characteristics, disciplinary affiliation,…

  4. Tritium Related Studies Within the JET Fusion Technology Work Programme

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanvallon, S.; Bekris, N.

    2005-07-15

    The JET Fusion Technology (FT) work programme was launched in 2000, in the frame of the European Fusion Development Agreement, to address issues related to JET and ITER. In particular, there are four topics related to tritium being investigated. Based on the experience gained on the existing tokamaks, first calculations indicate that in-vessel tritium retention could represent a burden for ITER operation. Therefore erosion/deposition studies are being performed in order to better understand the layer co-deposition and tritium retention processes in tokamaks. Moreover, testing of in-situ detritiation processes, in particular laser and flash lamp treatments, should assess detritiation techniques for in-vessel components in the ITER-relevant JET configuration.To reduce the constraints on waste disposal, dedicated procedures are being developed for detritiation of metals, graphite, carbon-fibre composites, process and housekeeping waste. During the operational and decommissioning phases of a fusion reactor, many processes will produce tritiated water. Key components for an ITER relevant water detritiation facility are being studied experimentally with the aim of producing a complete design that could be implemented and tested at JET. This paper describes these topics of the FT-programme, the strategy developed and the results obtained so far.

  5. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Working Memory in Youth after Sports-Related Concussion: Is It Still Working?

    PubMed Central

    Singh Saluja, Rajeet; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory strategies to maintain cognitive performance after mTBI. This has significant implications for safe return to daily activities, including competitive sport. PMID:24070614

  6. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of working memory in youth after sports-related concussion: is it still working?

    PubMed

    Keightley, Michelle L; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory strategies to maintain cognitive performance after mTBI. This has significant implications for safe return to daily activities, including competitive sport. PMID:24070614

  7. What Is Not Working in Working Memory of Children with Literacy Disorders? Evidence from a Three-Year-Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbach, Anne; Könen, Tanja; Rietz, Chantal S.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to explore the deficits in working memory associated with literacy disorders (i.e. developmental disorders of reading and/or spelling) and the developmental trajectories of these working memory deficits. The performance of 28 children with literacy disorders was compared to a non-disabled control group with the same…

  8. Development and Evaluation of ‘Briefing Notes’ as a Novel Knowledge Translation Tool to Aid the Implementation of Sex/Gender Analysis in Systematic Reviews: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Doull, Marion; Welch, Vivian; Puil, Lorri; Runnels, Vivien; Coen, Stephanie E.; Shea, Beverley; O’Neill, Jennifer; Borkhoff, Cornelia; Tudiver, Sari; Boscoe, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition of sex/gender differences in health and the importance of identifying differential effects of interventions for men and women. Yet, to whom the research evidence does or does not apply, with regard to sex/gender, is often insufficiently answered. This is also true for systematic reviews which synthesize results of primary studies. A lack of analysis and reporting of evidence on sex/gender raises concerns about the applicability of systematic reviews. To bridge this gap, this pilot study aimed to translate knowledge about sex/gender analysis (SGA) into a user-friendly ‘briefing note’ format and evaluate its potential in aiding the implementation of SGA in systematic reviews. Methods Our Sex/Gender Methods Group used an interactive process to translate knowledge about sex/gender into briefing notes, a concise communication tool used by policy and decision makers. The briefing notes were developed in collaboration with three Cochrane Collaboration review groups (HIV/AIDS, Hypertension, and Musculoskeletal) who were also the target knowledge users of the briefing notes. Briefing note development was informed by existing systematic review checklists, literature on sex/gender, in-person and virtual meetings, and consultation with topic experts. Finally, we held a workshop for potential users to evaluate the notes. Results Each briefing note provides tailored guidance on considering sex/gender to reviewers who are planning or conducting systematic reviews and includes the rationale for considering sex/gender, with examples specific to each review group’s focus. Review authors found that the briefing notes provided welcome guidance on implementing SGA that was clear and concise, but also identified conceptual and implementation challenges. Conclusions Sex/gender briefing notes are a promising knowledge translation tool. By encouraging sex/gender analysis and equity considerations in systematic reviews, the briefing notes can assist systematic reviewers in ensuring the applicability of research evidence, with the goal of improved health outcomes for diverse populations. PMID:25372876

  9. Pattern Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Alan

    1980-01-01

    Looks at an alternative method to linear notes for organizing thoughts when preparing a talk or paper. This method displays the manner in which the relationships of a subject are organized and offers a format for displaying complex inter-dependencies in place of linear notes. (Author/MER)

  10. Project Work Plan Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform Attenuation Parameter Studies: Heterogeneous Hydrolytic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2006-06-01

    Between 1955 and 1973, an estimated 750,000 kg of carbon tetrachloride were discharged to the soil in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site as part of the plutonium production process. Of this amount, some carbon tetrachloride reached the groundwater more than 70 m below the ground surface and formed a plume of 10 km2. Recent information has shown that the carbon tetrachloride plume extends to a depth of at least 60 m below the water table. Some carbon tetrachloride has been degraded either by the original process or subsequent transformations in the subsurface to form a co-existing chloroform plume. Although current characterization efforts are improving the conceptual model of the source area, more information is needed to effectively assess the fate and transport of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform to support upcoming remediation decisions for the plume. As noted in a simulation study by Truex et al. (2001), parameters describing porosity, sorption, and abiotic degradation have the largest influence on predicted plume behavior. The work proposed herein will improve the ability to predict future plume movement by better quantifying abiotic degradation mechanisms and rates. This effort will help define how much active remediation may be needed and estimate where the plume will eventually stabilize – key factors in determining the most appropriate remedy for the plume.

  11. Guidance Notes Statement of Activity for Research Passports The Research Passport application is the application process for approval to work with NHS information or

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    Guidance Notes ­ Statement of Activity for Research Passports The Research Passport application of the research passport ­ either a letter of access or an honorary contract. The outcome is determined of clearance needed. A statement of activity is required for your research passport application in order

  12. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

  13. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

  14. Visual complexity in highway work zones: an exploratory study 

    E-print Network

    Helmuth, Jaime Leigh

    2002-01-01

    of factors that may contribute to visual complexity in a work zone and therefore cause difficulties in path-finding from a motorist's perspective. The objectives of this thesis were (1) use Critical Incident human factors techniques to identify sections...

  15. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

  16. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

  17. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...veteran, reservist, or eligible person of transportation to the place where his or her services are to be performed; (3) Motivation of the veteran, reservist, or eligible person; and (4) Compatibility of the work assignment to the veteran's,...

  18. Student Fellowship Program in Pathology Unique work-study experience

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Student Fellowship Program in Pathology Pathology 40% Non Pathology 60% Unique work presentation and publication Fellowship is tailored to the individual's interests with appropriate rotations student fellows: Crystal Magno, current: Mike Baer, Jack Abbott #12;Student Fellowship Program

  19. Student Fellowship Program in Pathology Unique work-study experience

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Student Fellowship Program in Pathology Pathology 40% Non Pathology 60% Unique work presentation and publication Fellowship is tailored to the individual's interests with appropriate rotations student fellows: Caroline Sloan, Anders Meyer, Crystal Magno #12;Student Fellowship Program in Pathology

  20. A Case study of a working memory deficit 

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Working Memory is a complex cognitive function used to perform everyday tasks. A large variety of influential theories and models have set out a number of theoretical constructs. Baddeley and Hitch (1974) first set out ...

  1. Student perception about working in rural United States/Canada after graduation: a study in an offshore Caribbean medical school

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Nandy, Atanu; Herz, Burton L; Little, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rural residents of the United States (US) and Canada face problems in accessing healthcare. International medical graduates (IMGs) play an important role in delivering rural healthcare. IMGs from Caribbean medical schools have the highest proportion of physicians in primary care.  Xavier University School of Medicines admits students from the US, Canada and other countries to the undergraduate medical (MD) course and also offers a premedical program. The present study was conducted to obtain student perception about working in rural US/Canada after graduation.   Methods: The study was conducted among premedical and preclinical undergraduate medical (MD) students during October 2014. The questionnaire used was modified from a previous study. Semester of study, gender, nationality, place of residence and occupation of parents were noted. Information about whether students plan to work in rural US/Canada after graduation, possible reasons why doctors are reluctant to work in rural areas, how the government can encourage rural practice, possible problems respondents anticipate while working in rural areas were among the topics studied. Results: Ninety nine of the 108 students (91.7%) participated. Forty respondents were in favor of working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Respondents mentioned good housing, regular electricity, water supply, telecommunication facilities, and schools for education of children as important conditions to be fulfilled. The government should provide higher salaries to rural doctors, help with loan repayment, and provide opportunities for professional growth.  Potential problems mentioned were difficulty in being accepted by the rural community, problems in convincing patients to follow medical advice, lack of exposure to rural life among the respondents, and cultural issues. Conclusions: About 40% of respondents would consider working in rural US/Canada. Conditions required to be fulfilled have been mentioned above. Graduates from Caribbean medical schools have a role in addressing rural physician shortage. Similar studies in other offshore Caribbean medical schools are required as Caribbean IMGs make an important contribution to the rural US and Canadian health workforce. PMID:25901275

  2. 76 FR 15052 - Proposed Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Proposed Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... needed to verify the actual number of hours worked by a work-study claimant. DATES: Written comments and... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program)),...

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  4. Incapacity for work in elective orthopaedic surgery: a study of occurrence and the probability of returning to work after treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Rossvoll, I; Benum, P; Bredland, T R; Solstad, K; Arntzen, E; Jørgensen, S

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The extent to which patients undergoing elective surgery for orthopaedic disorders were incapacitated for work while they were on the waiting list and whether they were able to return to work after surgery were studied. DESIGN--This was a prospective cohort study of patients admitted to hospital for elective orthopaedic surgery. Main outcome measures were occurrence of sickness certification during the waiting time, and whether those incapacitated for work at the time of surgery returned to work during the first year after treatment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for factors influencing return to work. SETTING--Orthopaedic department in charge of all elective orthopaedic surgery in a population of 197,354 persons in central Norway. SUBJECTS--All 2803 patients admitted to hospital for chronic orthopaedic disorders in the defined population between 1 September 1988 and 31 August 1990 were included in the study. MAIN RESULTS--Of the 1333 patients who were employed, 42% had been certified sick due to the orthopaedic disorder for some period of the waiting time. Sickness benefits from the national insurance scheme (paid from the 15th day of sickness certification) had been received by 33% and were received by 29% at the time of surgery. Of 380 patients incapacitated for work at the time of surgery, 53% returned to work within the first year after surgery. Using those treated within one month of being placed on the waiting list as the reference group, the adjusted odds ratios for not returning to work during the first year after surgery were 9.2 (p < 0.0001) for those who waited more than a year for surgery, 6.2 (p = 0.002) for those waiting nine to 12 months, and 4.9 (p = 0.02) for those waiting for six to nine months. CONCLUSIONS--A high proportion of these patients were incapacitated for work, 53% of those incapacitated returned to work within the first year after surgery. The probability of returning to work after surgery is strongly influenced by the length of time on the waiting list. Waiting for more than one year, compared with immediate treatment, was associated with an adjusted odds ratio of 9.2 for not returning to work. PMID:8289040

  5. Technical Work Plan for: Fracture and Lithophysal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    n

    2006-09-11

    The primary objective of the work scope described in this technical work plan (TWP) is to enhance the descriptions of fracture and lithophysal parameters for the repository host horizon (RHH) over the repository footprint utilizing a predictive model. This work is planned to address U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) additional information needs (AINs) associated with the Structural Deformation and Seismicity (SDS) Key Technical Issues (KTI) agreement SDS 3.03 (Schlueter 2000 [DIRS 166615]). The results of the planned work are expected to enhance the technical basis and confirm the results of the fracture analyses presented in ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107], Section 6.1.6). This model is not intended to provide an alternative for the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models currently used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Nor are the outputs of this model intended to address the SDS 3.03 AINs related to the unsaturated zone and saturated zone flow and transport models.

  6. A Case Study of Work in Long Island Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of the past few decades, technology has shaped the way people interact, work, learn, and retrieve and disperse information. The advent of the 21st Century includes new forms of knowledge and information, requiring tools and skills previously unseen by generations of learners. New tools are meant to be used for expansion of…

  7. Piedmont Works and PVCC Students: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, David

    This report analyzes the Piedmont Works Adult Education Program (PW) at Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) and compares PW students with regular students at the college. PW offers aid to students to attend PVCC. Those students follow the same scheduling and enrollment procedures as other PVCC students. The PW program helps fund educational…

  8. Music Training and Working Memory: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elyse M.; Coch, Donna

    2011-01-01

    While previous research has suggested that music training is associated with improvements in various cognitive and linguistic skills, the mechanisms mediating or underlying these associations are mostly unknown. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that previous music training is related to improved working memory. Using event-related potentials…

  9. APPLICATION FOR WORK STUDY OR STUDENT ASSISTANT POSITION

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Competent Expert LICENSES AND CERTIFICATES: Complete this section only if license/certificate is required Licenses and Certificate: AVAILABLE WORK HOURS Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Date Avaiblable years. Military or volunteer experrience may be included 1. EMPLOYER: Job Title and Department Average

  10. Study and Work: The Pilot Projects of the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucciarelli, Claudio

    1982-01-01

    Examines the relevance of education to the needs of high school drop-outs and graduates entering the work force. Pilot projects of the European community to improve continuing education, vocational training, career education, and guidance are discussed. Italian continuing education and vocational programs are described. (AM)

  11. Note taking, review, memory, and comprehension.

    PubMed

    Bohay, Mark; Blakely, Daniel P; Tamplin, Andrea K; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2011-01-01

    In previous work assessing memory at various levels of representation, namely the surface form, textbase, and situation model levels, participants read texts but were otherwise not actively engaged with the texts. The current study tested the influence of active engagement with the material via note taking, along with the opportunity to review such notes, and the modality of presentation (text vs. spoken). The influence of these manipulations was assessed both immediately and 1 week later. In Experiment 1 participants read a text, whereas in Experiment 2 participants watched a video recording of the material being read as a lecture. For each experiment the opportunity to take notes was manipulated within participants, and the opportunity to review these notes before the test was manipulated between participants. Note taking improved performance at the situation model level in both experiments, although there was also some suggestion of benefit for the surface form. Thus, active engagement with material, such as note taking, appears to have the greatest benefit at the deeper levels of understanding. PMID:21506451

  12. 76 FR 5787 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Programs... Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG.... The Work Colleges Program The Work Colleges September 30, Report of 2010-2011 award Program Report...

  13. UTHSCSA Federal Work-Study Student Guidelines Please read the guidelines and requirements outlined below which

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    UTHSCSA Federal Work-Study Student Guidelines Please read the guidelines and requirements outlined below which relate to employment through the UTHSCSA's Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program. Prior begin work until all hiring paperwork is processed. Students may not start work until their first class

  14. 78 FR 14776 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...EDUCATION Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational...for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental...Falls Church, VA 22042- 4548. 3. The Work Colleges Program Report of The Work...

  15. 77 FR 4547 - Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...EDUCATION Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational...for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Federal Supplemental...Falls Church, VA 22042-4548. 3. The Work Colleges Program Report of The Work...

  16. Isolated perfused working heart preparation for in vitro biomechanical studies 

    E-print Network

    Shroff, Manish Vikram

    2003-01-01

    diseased states. In this study, one of the simplest biomechanical parameters, fractional shortening of left ventricular external diameter was computed. The preliminary findings of this in vitro mode of study were then compared to data from an established...

  17. Notes on the p-spin glass studied via Hamilton-Jacobi and Smooth-Cavity techniques

    E-print Network

    Elena Agliari; Adriano Barra; Raffaella Burioni; Aldo Di Biasio

    2012-06-04

    In these notes, we continue our investigation of classical toy models of disordered statistical mechanics through various techniques recently developed and tested mainly on the paradigmatic SK spin glass. Here we consider the p-spin-glass model with Ising spins and interactions drawn from a normal distribution N[0,1]. After a general presentation of its properties (e.g. self-averaging of the free energy, existence of a suitable thermodynamic limit), we study its equilibrium behavior within the Hamilton-Jacobi framework and the smooth cavity approach. Through the former we find both the RS and the 1RSB expressions for the free energy, coupled with their self-consistent relations for the overlaps. Through the latter, we recover these results as irreducible expression, and we study the generalization of the overlap polynomial identities suitable for this model; a discussion on their deep connection with the structure of the internal energy and the entropy closes the investigation.

  18. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  19. 75 FR 29744 - Federal Pell Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, Federal Supplemental Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ...Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, Federal Supplemental Educational...Notice of revision of the Federal Need Analysis Methodology for the 2011-2012 award...Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, Federal Supplemental...

  20. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work–home balance and the European Working Time Directive: a panel study

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work–home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Design Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Setting Norway. Participants Unbalanced cohort of 1300–1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Outcome measures Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. Results From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46–47?h) and junior (45–46?h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27–35%) than junior (11–20%) doctors reported suboptimal work–home balance, defined as working more than 48?h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45?h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. Conclusions The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. PMID:25311038

  1. 76 FR 31682 - Agency Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Agency Information Collection (Time Record (Work-Study Program)) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: Time Record (Work-Study Program), VA Form 22-8690. OMB Control Number: 2900-0379. Type of... 22-8690 to report the number of work-study hours a claimant has completed. When a claimant elects...

  2. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or study release programs is awarded automatically, beginning on...

  3. 78 FR 18629 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ...Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations...collection request (ICR) titled, ``Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations...school-supervised and school-administered Work-Study Program (WSP) of the Child...

  4. Interactive Expertise: Studies in Distributed Working Intelligence. Research Bulletin 83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engestrom, Yrjo

    The four studies presented show how expertise, from the cultural-historical theory of activity, is constructed interactively in everyday problem situations. They also demonstrate that purely situational analyses of discourse are insufficient as attempts to explain expertise. The four studies are presented as individual chapters: (1) Expertise as…

  5. Ecology and Human Values: A Course of Study. (Working Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This interdisciplinary course is designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is made of the case study

  6. Transforming English Language Learners' Work Readiness: Case Studies in Explicit, Work-Specific Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrigal-Hopes, Diana L.; Villavicencio, Edna; Foote, Martha M.; Green, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of a six-step framework for work-specific vocabulary instruction in adult English language learners (ELLs). Guided by research in English as a second language (ESL) methodology and the transactional theory, the researchers sought to unveil how these processes supported the acquisition and application of…

  7. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Rigouin, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Brunet, René; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:25479968

  8. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of new structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.

  9. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-11-19

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm2. The preliminary tests show that this kind of newmore »structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs.« less

  10. Case study - fast work in Chesapeake on a wastewood boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, S.L.; Habeishi, F.G.

    1983-08-01

    The project began in April 1980 and was on an extremely tight ''fast-track'' schedule to take advantage of available funding and energy tax credits. It was completed in December 1981, 19 months after the boiler was purchased. In spite of the congested location and the need to maintain normal mill operations, the work was completed on schedule. The project included a 190,000-kg/hour (420,000-lb/hour) waste-fuel-fired boiler, auxiliaries, and a new woodyard complete with flume, slasher, barking drum, chipper, screens, and materials-handling system. The boiler is designed to burn bark, oil as an auxiliary fuel, wastewater sludge, and strong waste gases.

  11. [To begin to believe. Working notes on a mother-daughter incest case and its implications on the formation of the pre-transitional object].

    PubMed

    Haineault, D L

    1990-11-01

    Most psychoanalytic literature dealing with incest holds the premise that the act took place between a parent and a child of opposite sex. Incidentally, most of these cases involve a father-daughter incest (e.g. research by Julien Bigras). However, this is only one of four mathematically possible combinations. For instance, we tend to underestimate the occurrences and, consequently, the repercussions of mother-daughter incest relationships. The biological and psychological importance of the mother in the child's development radically influences the mother-daughter incest. In the reactualizing of transference, analysts, especially if they are female, often find themselves confronted with some of the most fundamental choices in the life of an infant, such as to live or to die, to grow or to cease to grow. It then becomes crucial to understand the most primitive components of the infant's early life. In such a case, an analyst must consult some of the most complex theoretical work covering the subject. The author, for her part, has greatly referred to the experiences of Renatta Gaddini, who insists on the importance of developing a pretransitional space during the analysis. This pretransitional space, however, is useless if the analyst is unable to follow it up by becoming a transformational object in the eyes of the patient, in the way described by Christopher Bollas: an object suggesting that the patient relive the steps leading from pre-thought to thought, from real to symbolic. Indeed, Bollas' research has allowed the author to develop a more accurate vision of what is at stake. At the same time, she was able to assess the amount of work still needed in that area of study, an area which, up to this day, offers only very little research to support the author's exploration. PMID:2094487

  12. The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

  13. What is Work-Study? Program that gives students the opportunity to

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    What is Work-Study? Program that gives students the opportunity to gain work experience and earn money, which is awarded as part of some financial aid packages A chance to work conveniently on campus You must work to access the money awarded A networking opportunity Opportunities? Benefits? Better

  14. Telepresence work station system definition study, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This study effort has shown that the development of a space robotic servicing system is totally feasible. More importantly, many of the key elements of such a system are currently available as the result of previous and ongoing technical efforts. In many cases, decisions remain to be made concerning tradeoffs between options available to satisfy system technology requirements. The primary recommendation resulting from this study is for the development of a flight test bed system that could be used to establish a performance database to assist some of the necessary technical decisions described in the study package. A properly design flight test bed system would prove tremendously useful in terms of rapidly evaluating technology in a realistic setting and would be a great benefit in the development of the operational system.

  15. A didactical note on the advantage of using two parameters in Hopf bifurcation studies

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, O.; Korvasová, K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to maximize the information that a linearized stability analysis provides, one should work with two free parameters rather than one. Moreover, it is recommended to first consider coefficients in the characteristic equation as parameters and in a second step (try to) invert the map that defines the coefficients in terms of the parameters as they occur in the original equation. Our aim is to substantiate these claims by way of a delay equation example taken from the literature. AMS Subject Classification: 34K18; 34K20; 34K60; 92C99 PMID:23327443

  16. Making Education and Training Work: Case Studies of Good Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, David. Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Includes 12 case studies of education and training in various settings and countries: AT&T, Microsoft, and IBM; Maytag; Vauxhall; St. John Ambulance; McDonald's; Bayer; Newcastle (England) City Council; corporate universities; European management program; distance learning at Leuven University (Belgium); learning organizations; and technology…

  17. Working on asymmetry in Parkinson's disease: randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Ricciardi, Diego; Lena, Francesco; Plotnik, Meir; Petracca, Martina; Barricella, Simona; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Modugno, Nicola; Bernabei, Roberto; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-08-01

    Posture, gait and balance problems are very disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). An increased stride-to-stri de variability, reduction of automaticity and asymmetry of lower limbs function characterize parkinsonian gait. These features predispose to freezing of gait (FOG), which often leads to falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the modulation of asymmetry through physiotherapy might improve gait and reduce FOG, thus preventing falls. Twenty-eight PD patients entered a double-blind pilot feasibility controlled study and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 months of a rehabilitative program (performed twice a week) by means of the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), Gait and Falls Questionnaire, Tinetti balance and gait scale, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), European Quality of Life questionnaire. Patients were randomly assigned to three treatment arms: (1) worst side improvement; (2) best side improvement; (3) standard therapy. All study arms showed a significant improvement of the Tinetti and SPPB scores. BSI led to a greater improvement than ST in terms of UPDRS-III (p = 0.01); Tinetti total score (p = 0.05) and Tinetti gait subscore (p = 0.01). Our study confirms the efficacy of physical therapy in the treatment of PD and, more importantly, suggests that specific intervention tailored on individual feature (e.g., asymmetry of motor condition) might be even more effective than standard rehabilitative programs. PMID:25677846

  18. Academic and Personal Development through Group Work: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study linked academic and personal development within a group counseling intervention. A pre-test post-test research design compared social skills, learning behaviors, and achievement with a convenience sample and control group of students from three elementary schools. For the treatment group, grade point average in Language Arts…

  19. Women's Work and Women's Studies, 1973-1974: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

    The bibliography lists almost 4,000 books, articles, pamphlets, and research papers about women and feminism. All items in this third volume were published or in progress in 1973-1974. The items are classified by the topics of abortion, arts and media, contemporary women's movement, cultural studies, education, employment, family organization,…

  20. Classics and Women's Studies. Working Paper No. 119.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Judith P.

    A consideration of classical study as an evolving profession includes discussion of classical content and methodology and an examination of the role of women both as objects of classical inquiry and as classical scholars. Material is arranged in three parts. In part A, classical content and scope are defined. The interdisciplinary and elitist…

  1. How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Consumer Affairs, Washington, DC.

    Detailing the false starts, uncertainty, and internal questioning that occur as companies organize and manage language simplification projects, the 12 case studies contained in the two sections of this book reveal how some business organizations have benefited by simplifying consumer documents. Descriptions of each case contain information on the…

  2. Study part-time whilst working Integrate learning with practice

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    qualification Sports Physiotherapy MSc, PG Diploma, Certificate, CPD Online distance education #12;Sports Physiotherapy www.bath.ac.uk/health World class MSc, PG Diploma, Certificate and CPD in Sports Physiotherapy I study around my full-time job. So far I have found that this has enabled me to put everything I learn

  3. Health status of people with work-related musculoskeletal disorders in return to work programs: a Malaysian study.

    PubMed

    Murad, Mohd Suleiman; O'Brien, Lisa; Farnworth, Louise; Chien, Chi-Wen

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the health status of injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders enrolled in the Malaysian Return to Work (RTW) program. The 102 participants were categorized into three RTW groups: Off-work (n = 30, 29.4%), Re-entry (n = 44, 43.1%), and Maintenance (n = 28, 27.5%). Overall health status, as measured by the SF-36 version 2, of the workers exhibited below average compared to the internationally established normative population, with their physical health component summary rated lower than mental health. Across the different groups, significant differences were found in role-physical, vitality, bodily pain, general health, and mental health. However, the mean values of these variables were higher in the Maintenance group and were found significant. The current health status of injured workers at Off-work and Re-entry phases was significantly low and warranted to be improved by involving other health professionals such as occupational therapists, ergonomists, and psychologists. PMID:23855610

  4. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  5. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    This collection of notes describes (1) an optoelectronic apparatus for classroom demonstrations of mechanical laws, (2) a more efficient method for demonstrated nuclear chain reactions using electrically energized "traps" and ping-pong balls, and (3) an inexpensive demonstration for qualitative analysis of temperature-dependent resistance. (CS)

  6. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  7. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  8. A Follow-Up Note on Prescriptive Statements in Nonintervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Shana M.; Walls, Stephen M.; Dacy, Breana Sylvester; Levin, Joel R.; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Robinson, Levin, Thomas, Pituch, and Vaughn (2007) examined 74 articles reporting nonintervention studies (i.e., studies with no researcher-manipulated variables) that appeared in 5 educational journals in 1994. Of these articles, 22 contained prescriptive statements (e.g., if teachers or students did X, then student outcome Y would result). In…

  9. Notes from the Ethnic Studies Home Front: Student Protests, Texting, and Subtexts of Oppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, Lydia R.; Cammarota, Julio

    2011-01-01

    The protest against Arizona House Bill 2281 designed to ban Ethnic Studies from K-12 public schools on 12 May 2010 in Tucson resulted in 15 arrests. Students walked out of their classrooms in large numbers to defend their Mexican American Studies curriculum and program. Based primarily on participant observation of the protest, the authors examine…

  10. Reactivity in rapidly collected hygiene and toilet spot check measurements: a cautionary note for longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Benjamin F; Khush, Ranjiv S; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford, John M

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. PMID:25385856

  11. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial Administration...TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in work or...

  12. Design Principles of Worked Examples: A Review of the Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Hui-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers investigated the efficacy of using worked examples in classroom instruction and provided evidence in the effectiveness of worked example instruction in mathematics, computer programming, physics, and etc. However, there are limited studies in worked example design. The purpose of this study is to generate the instructional design…

  13. Study Notes on Numerical Solutions of the Wave Equation with the Finite Difference Method

    E-print Network

    Artur B. Adib

    2000-11-19

    In this introductory work I will present the Finite Difference method for hyperbolic equations, focusing on a method which has second order precision both in time and space (the so-called staggered leapfrog method) and applying it to the case of the 1d and 2d wave equation. A brief derivation of the energy and equation of motion of a wave is done before the numerical part in order to make the transition from the continuum to the lattice clearer. To illustrate the extension of the method to more complex equations, I also add dissipative terms of the kind $-\\eta \\dot{u}$ into the equations. The von Neumann numerical stability analysis and the Courant criterion, two of the most popular in the literature, are briefly discussed. In the end I present some numerical results obtained with the leapfrog algorithm, illustrating the importance of the lattice resolution through energy plots.

  14. Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Rodrigo, José G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Agraït, Nicolás; Condensed Matter Physics Center and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales “Nicolás Cabrera,” Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid; Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid

    2014-02-15

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  15. Note on Tekman's study of preference judgments for excerpts of music.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A

    1998-12-01

    Tekman's study is a useful exploration and benefits from his consideration of published research on music; however, his interpretation of music tempo research by LeBlanc and associates cannot be supported. It would be worthwhile for Tekman to conduct a follow-up study with a larger number of participants and music excerpts from other styles of music in addition to art music ("classical" music). PMID:9923170

  16. Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

  17. A cautionary note on using secondary phenotypes in neuroimaging genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Almost all genome-wide association studies (GWASs), including Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), are based on the case-control study design, implying that the resulting case-control data are likely a biased, not random, sample of the target population. Although association analysis of the disease (e.g. Alzheimer's disease in the ADNI) can be conducted using a standard logistic regression by ignoring the biased case-control sampling, a standard linear regression analysis on a secondary phenotype (e.g. any neuroimaging phenotype in the ADNI) may in general lead to biased inference, including biased parameter estimates, inflated Type I errors and reduced power for association testing. Despite of this well known result in genetic epidemiology, to our surprise, all the published studies on secondary phenotypes with the ADNI data have ignored this potential problem. Here we aim to answer whether such a standard analysis of a secondary phenotype is valid or problematic with the ADNI data. Through both real data analyses and simulation studies, we found that, strikingly, such an analysis was generally valid (with only small biases or slightly inflated Type I errors) for the ADNI data, though cautions must be taken when analyzing other data. We also illustrate applications and possible problems of two methods specifically developed for valid analysis of secondary phenotypes. PMID:26220747

  18. Statistics: Notes and Examples. Study Guide for the Doctor of Arts in Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    This study guide presents lessons on hand calculating various statistics: Central Tendency and Dispersion; Tips on Data Presentation; Two-Tailed and One-Tailed Tests of Significance; Error Types; Standard Scores; Non-Parametric Tests such as Chi-square, Spearman Rho, Sign Test, Wilcoxon Matched Pairs, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Rank Sums;…

  19. Organizational Economics: Notes on the Use of Transaction-Cost Theory in the Study of Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews transaction-cost approaches to organizational analysis, examines their use in microeconomic theory, and identifies some important flaws in the study. Advocates transaction-cost theory as a powerful tool for organizational and strategic analysis when set within the famework of more general organizational theory. Includes 61 references. (MLH)

  20. Limiting Nonresponse in Longitudinal Research: Three Strategies for School-Based Studies. A RAND Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    Longitudinal studies conducted with children typically experience non-response problems that can make substantial inroads on sample size and introduce bias into the analysis. Three methods for limiting non-response in school-based research programs were assessed: (1) asking parents to return consent forms only if they do not want their children to…

  1. BRIEFING NOTES November 2010

    E-print Network

    Mound, Jon

    BRIEFING NOTES November 2010 Sustainable biofuels in Africa: cultivation of Jatropha curcas in Mali Background Case study 1 - Mali Case study 2 - Malawi Policy recommendations Biofuel cultivation worldwide on sustainability impacts of biofuel production? · Are sustainability issues relating to biofuels addressed

  2. Note on the applicability of the James-Stein estimator in regional hydrologic studies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landwehr, J.M.; Matalas, N.C.; Wallis, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    By means of computer simulation studies the James-Stein estimator, subject to the Lindley modification and adoption of the positive part rule suggested by Efron and Morris and conditioned on the assumption of independence, was shown to be robust in the case of the hydrologically plausible distribution considered here, namely, Weibull distributions with coefficient of skewness ranging from 0 to 10. However, in contrast to traditional methods of regionalization the effect of cross correlation is a diminishment of the relative risk advantage of the James-Stein estimator, even in the best case of normal variables: this is discussed and illustrated. -from Authors

  3. Academic Performance of College Students: Influence of Time Spent Studying and Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonis, Sarath A.; Hudson, Gail I.

    2006-01-01

    Today's college students are less prepared for college-level work than their predecessors. Once they get to college, they tend to spend fewer hours studying while spending more hours working, some even full time (D. T. Smart, C. A. Kelley, & J. S. Conant, 1999). In this study, the authors examined the effect of both time spent studying and time…

  4. Eye-Gaze Patterns as Students Study Worked-out Examples in Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Adam D.; Mestre, Jose P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores what introductory physics students actually look at when studying worked-out examples. Our classroom experiences indicate that introductory physics students neither discuss nor refer to the conceptual information contained in the text of worked-out examples. This study is an effort to determine to what extent students…

  5. Learning Geometry Problem Solving by Studying Worked Examples: Effects of Learner Guidance and Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokosmaty, Sahar; Sweller, John; Kalyuga, Slava

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that instruction that relies heavily on studying worked examples is more effective for less experienced learners compared to instruction emphasizing problem solving. However, the guidance associated with studying some worked examples may reduce the performance of more experienced learners. This study investigated…

  6. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Veda Prakash, G; Kumar, R; Patel, J; Saurabh, K; Shyam, A

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results. PMID:24387484

  7. Assessment of a manipulator device for NOTES with basic surgical skill tests: a bench study.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Seigo; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Advanced complex surgery performed with the natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery technique requires use of a multitasking platform. The aim of this study is to evaluate the basic functionality of a prototype multitasking platform "EndoSAMURAI" with the use of a biosimulation model and ex vivo porcine stomach. We compared the performance of basic surgical skill tasks between the EndoSAMURAI and standard laparoscopic instrumentation. Basic surgical tasks include cutting, dissection, and suturing and knot tying. Main outcome measurements were the time to complete each task and leak pressure to evaluate the quality of the suturing and knot tying. Although it took longer to perform all basic surgical tasks with the EndoSAMURAI than with laparoscopic instrumentation, all tasks could be performed precisely and with an accuracy comparable to that of the laparoscopic technique. Leak pressures of the gastric closure site between both techniques were also comparable. PMID:24710223

  8. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

  9. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  10. Learning through Working: A Case Study of Chinese College Students in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Minyoung; Chang, Wonsup

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to provide an understanding of the work experience of Chinese college students in South Korea. A growing number of Chinese students are coming to South Korea for college education, and their aspirations for better work materialize into work experiences in South Korean businesses. In-depth interviews were…

  11. An Assessment of Intervention Fidelity in Published Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Nicole A.; Kim, Irang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention fidelity is a critical strategy to help advance the usefulness and integrity of social work research. This study assessed the extent to which a selected sample of published social work intervention researchers reported its intervention protocols. Methods: Six core social work journals were reviewed in this analysis. The…

  12. File: 2015.05.Work_study_program_agreement APRIL 2015 Student Number

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    File: 2015.05.Work_study_program_agreement APRIL 2015 Start Date End Date Salary Hours/Week Name Department Program Name (If Applicable) Degree Or Diploma Student Is Working Toward SFU Supervisor Name SFU Supervisor Department SFU Supervisor Telephone SFU Supervisor Email #12;File: 2015.05.Work

  13. The Region of the Study [and] Outline Methodology of the Study. Patterns of Participation in Adult Education and Training. Working Paper 1 [and] Working Paper 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen; Rees, Gareth; Furlong, John; Fevre, Ralph

    These two working papers are products of a regional study in industrial South Wales of the determinants of participation and non-participation in post-compulsory education and training, with special reference to processes of change in the patterns of these determinants over time and to variations between geographical areas. The study combines…

  14. PURPOSE: This technical note describes an Engineering With Nature (EWN) project being conducted in the Atchafalaya River, LA. The current work presents a wetland classification,

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    in the Atchafalaya River, LA. The current work presents a wetland classification, vegetation survey map, preliminary ecological inventory, and soil descriptions for an island receiving strategically placed dredged sediments (i and proceeding thru 2013, 17 maintenance dredging events within this segment occurred at a return interval of 1

  15. NOTE: Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%.

  16. Technical Note: On the Use of Nudging for Aerosol-Climate Model Intercomparison Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Kooperman, G. J.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.

    2014-08-26

    Nudging is an assimilation technique widely used in the development and evaluation of climate models. Con- straining the simulated wind and temperature fields using global weather reanalysis facilitates more straightforward comparison between simulation and observation, and reduces uncertainties associated with natural variabilities of the large-scale circulation. On the other hand, the artificial forcing introduced by nudging can be strong enough to change the basic characteristics of the model climate. In the paper we show that for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, due to the systematic temperature bias in the standard model and the relatively strong sensitivity of homogeneous ice nucleation to aerosol concentration, nudging towards reanalysis results in substantial reductions in the ice cloud amount and the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on longwave cloud forcing. In order to reduce discrepancies between the nudged and unconstrained simulations and meanwhile take the advantages of nudging, two alternative experimentation methods are evaluated. The first one constrains only the horizontal winds. The second method nudges both winds and temperature, but replaces the long-term climatology of the reanalysis by that of the model. Results show that both methods lead to substantially improved agreement with the free-running model in terms of the top-of-atmosphere radiation budget and cloud ice amount. The wind-only nudging is more convenient to apply, and provides higher correlations of the wind fields, geopotential height and specific humidity between simulation and reanalysis. This suggests that nudging the horizontal winds but not temperature is a good strategy, especially for studies that involve both warm and cold clouds.

  17. Blood cell origin of circulating microRNAs: a cautionary note for cancer biomarker studies.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Colin C; Kroh, Evan; Wood, Brent; Arroyo, Jason D; Dougherty, Katy J; Miyaji, Melanie M; Tait, Jonathan F; Tewari, Muneesh

    2012-03-01

    Circulating, cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) hold great promise as a new class of cancer biomarkers due to their surprisingly high stability in plasma, association with disease states, and ease of sensitive measurement. Yet little is known about the origin of circulating miRNAs in either healthy or sick people or what factors influence levels of circulating miRNA biomarkers. Of 79 solid tumor circulating miRNA biomarkers reported in the literature, we found that 58% (46 of 79) are highly expressed in one or more blood cell type. Plasma levels of miRNA biomarkers expressed by myeloid (e.g., miR-223, miR-197, miR-574-3p, and let-7a) and lymphoid (e.g., miR-150) blood cells tightly correlated with corresponding white blood cell counts. Plasma miRNA biomarkers expressed by red blood cells (e.g., miR-486-5p, miR-451, miR-92a, and miR-16) could not be correlated to red cell counts due to limited variation in hematocrit in the cohort studied but were significantly increased in hemolyzed specimens (20- to 30-fold plasma increase; P < 0.0000001). Finally, in a patient undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation, plasma levels of myeloid- and lymphoid-expressed miRNAs (miR-223 and miR-150, respectively) tracked closely with changes in corresponding blood counts. We present evidence that blood cells are a major contributor to circulating miRNA and that perturbations in blood cell counts and hemolysis can alter plasma miRNA biomarker levels by up to 50-fold. Given that a majority of reported circulating miRNA cancer biomarkers are highly expressed in blood cells, we suggest caution in interpretation of such results as they may reflect a blood cell-based phenomenon rather than a cancer-specific origin. PMID:22158052

  18. Blood cell origin of circulating microRNAs: a cautionary note for cancer biomarker studies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brent; Arroyo, Jason D.; Dougherty, Katy J.; Miyaji, Melanie M.; Tait, Jonathan F.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2014-01-01

    Circulating, cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) hold great promise as a new class of cancer biomarkers due to their surprisingly high stability in plasma, association with disease states, and ease of sensitive measurement. Yet little is known about the origin of circulating miRNAs in either healthy or sick people, or what factors influence levels of circulating miRNA biomarkers. Of 79 solid tumor circulating miRNA biomarkers reported in the literature, we found that fifty-eight percent (47/79) are highly expressed in one or more blood cell type. Plasma levels of miRNA biomarkers expressed by myeloid (e.g., miR-223, miR-197, miR-574-3p, let-7a) and lymphoid (e.g., miR-150) blood cells tightly correlated with corresponding white blood cell counts. Plasma miRNA biomarkers expressed by red blood cells (e.g., miR-486-5p, miR-451, miR-92a, miR-16) could not be correlated to red cell counts due to limited variation in hematocrit in the cohort studied, but were significantly increased in hemolyzed specimens (20-30 fold plasma increase; p<0.0000001). Finally, in a patient undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation, plasma levels of myeloid- and lymphoid-expressed miRNAs (miR-223 and miR-150, respectively) tracked closely with changes in corresponding blood counts. We present evidence that blood cells are a major contributor to circulating miRNA, and that perturbations in blood cell counts and hemolysis can alter plasma miRNA biomarker levels by up to 50-fold. Given that a majority of reported circulating miRNA cancer biomarkers are highly expressed in blood cells, we suggest caution in interpretation of such results as they may reflect a blood cell-based phenomenon rather than a cancer-specific origin. PMID:22158052

  19. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  20. Note on numerical study of the beam energy spread in NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P.A.; Friedman, A.

    2011-01-19

    The kinetic energy spread (defined here as the standard deviation of the beam particle energies) sets the ultimate theoretical limit on the longitudinal compression that can be attained on NDCX-I and NDCX-II. Experimental measurements will inevitably include the real influences on the longitudinal phase space of the beam due to injector and accelerator field imperfections1. These induced energy variations may be the real limit to the longitudinal compression in an accelerator. We report on a numerical investigation of the energy spread evolution in NDCX-I; these studies do not include all the real imperfections, but rather are intended to confirm that there are no other intrinsic mechanisms (translaminar effects, transverse-longitudinal anisotropy instability, etc.) for significant broadening of the energy distribution. We have performed Warp simulations that use a realistic Marx voltage waveform which was derived from experimental measurements (averaged over several shots), a fully-featured model of the accelerating and focusing lattice, and new diagnostics for computing the local energy spread (and temperature) that properly account for linear correlations that arise from the discrete binning along each physical dimension (these capabilities reproduce and extend those of the earlier HIF code BPIC). The new diagnostics allow for the calculation of multi-dimensional maps of energy spread and temperature in 2-D axisymmetric or 3-D Cartesian space at selected times. The simulated beam-line was terminated at z = 3 m by a conducting plate, so as to approximately reproduce the experimental conditions at the entrance of the spectrometer that was used for mapping the longitudinal phase space. Snapshots of the beam projection and current, as well as the Marx waveform and history of beam kinetic energy collected at the end plate, are shown in Fig. 1. A two-dimensional axisymmetric map of energy spread from simulations of a typical NDCX-I configuration is shown in Fig. 2 (a). The energy spread starts at 0.1 eV at the source and rapidly rises to a few eV, then fluctuates between a fraction of an eV and tens of eV, ending near the exit in a range of a few eV at the outer edge of the beam to a few tens of eV near the axis. The higher value on-axis is associated with greater numerical noise there, due to the axisymmetric geometry of the calculation, resulting in poorer simulation-particle statistics at small radius. A scatter plot of the macroparticles kinetic energy (KE) versus radius (R) and longitudinal position (0.28 m < z < 3 m) colored by local energy spread is shown in Fig. 2 (b). As expected, there is a correlation of the kinetic energy with radius that is clearly visible at z = 2.8 m and vanishes at the metal plate at z = 3 m. More snapshots from simulations varying the time step, grid resolution and number of macroparticles are given in Appendix II. The macro-particles were collected at the exit plate and their kinetic energy history is plotted in Fig. 3 (left) and contrasted to an experimental measurement using a streak camera shown in Fig. 3. For some types of measurements, averaging over several pulses to improve signal-to-noise will contribute an additional spread that may not be present on any single beam pulse. The upper bound for the energy spread is in the range of a few 100 eV for the experiment while in the range of a few eV for the reported Warp simulations. The Marx voltage exhibits variations in the range of up to several hundreds of volts, playing a significant role in the experimentally measured energy spread, which may account for the difference between the experimental and the simulated bounds.

  1. 129A Lecture Notes Notes on Special Relativity

    E-print Network

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    129A Lecture Notes Notes on Special Relativity 1 Why Relativity? Particle Physics aims to study, special relativity is an integral part of par- ticle physics and we need to understand it thoroughly. Even though special relativity has been discussed already in 110AB, I'd like to review it in the way that I

  2. Teaching Notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    If you would like to contribute a teaching note for any of these sections please contact ped@iop.org Contents: LET'S INVESTIGATE: Bows and arrows STARTING OUT: A late start ON THE MAP: A South African school making a world of difference TECHNICAL TRIMMINGS: May the force be with you an easily constructed force sensor Modelling Ultrasound A-scanning with the Pico Technology ADC-200 Virtual Instrument PHYSICS ON A SHOESTRING: Sugar cube radioactivity models CURIOSITY: Euler's disk MY WAY: Why heavy things don't fall faster

  3. Payload specialist station study. Volume 3: Program study cost estimates. Part 1: Work breakdown structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Payload Specialist Station (PSS) is presented. The WBS is divided into two elements--PSS contractor and mission unique requirements. In accordance with the study ground rules, it is assumed that a single contractor, hereafter referred to as PSS Contractor will perform the following: (1) provide C and D hardware (MFDS and elements of MMSE), except for GFE; (2) identify software requirements; (3) provide GSE and ground test software; and (4) perform systems engineering and integration in support of the Aft Flight Deck (AFD) C and D concept. The PSS Contractor WBS element encompasses a core or standardized PSS concept. Payload peculiar C and D requirements identified by users will originate as a part of the WBS element mission unique requirements; these requirements will be provided to the PSS Contractor for implementation.

  4. Research Notes and Information References

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access andmore »data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.« less

  5. Marine Studies Initiative, Oregon State University Learning Models Working Group Report

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    Marine Studies Initiative, Oregon State University Learning Models Working Group Report January 15, 2015 Executive Summary ­ (updated on March 19, 2015) Learning models within the Marine Studies that integrates marine literacy throughout OSU academic programs while expanding innovative marine education

  6. Burnout among Turkish High School Teachers Working in Turkey and Abroad: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogan, Ismail; Dogan, Ahmet Atilla; Bayram, Nuran

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine perceived levels of burnout among Turkish high school teachers working in Turkey and abroad. Method: A total of 255 Turkish teachers working at public schools in Germany (n=78), Cyprus (n=94) and Turkey (n=83) comprised our study group. In Germany and Cyprus, the participants were selected…

  7. Job Demands and Resources as Antecedents of Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauno, Saija; Kinnunen, Ulla; Ruokolainen, Mervi

    2007-01-01

    By utilizing a 2-year longitudinal design, the present study investigated the experience of work engagement and its antecedents among Finnish health care personnel (n = 409). The data were collected by questionnaires in 2003 (Time 1) and in 2005 (Time 2). The study showed that work engagement--especially vigor and dedication--was relatively…

  8. University of Wolverhampton Case Study: Embedding Practical Work-Based Modules into a Traditionally, Theoretical Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Emma; Walsh, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aims to provide a critical evaluation of the decision by the University of Wolverhampton's School of Legal Studies to develop a number of work-based learning modules, offered as part of the undergraduate programme. It seeks to examine why the School has taken the approach of embedding work-based learning into what has…

  9. The Labor Practices of Service Mediation: A Study of the Work Practices of Food Assistance Outreach

    E-print Network

    Mazmanian, Melissa

    The Labor Practices of Service Mediation: A Study of the Work Practices of Food Assistance Outreach and use of specific technologies. Author Keywords E-Government; Food Insecurity; Service Mediation the results of a study of the work practices of food assistance outreach workers. We introduce the construct

  10. The Labor Practices of Service Mediation: A Study of the Work Practices of Food Assistance Outreach

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Gillian R.

    The Labor Practices of Service Mediation: A Study of the Work Practices of Food Assistance Outreach and use of specific technologies. Author Keywords E-Government, Food Insecurity, Service Mediation the results of a study of the work practices of food assistance outreach workers. We introduce the construct

  11. Does Social Work Education Have an Impact on Social Policy Preferences? A Three-Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Idit; Gal, John; Cnaan, Ram A.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the impact of social work education on the social policy preferences of social work students through a panel study of 3 cohorts of students at universities in 2 countries--the United States and Israel. The findings of the study indicate that though the initial policy preferences of the students at the beginning of their…

  12. 28 CFR 523.12 - Work/study release good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Work/study release good time. 523.12 Section 523.12 Judicial...AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.12 Work/study release good time. Extra good time for an inmate in...

  13. No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement after Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Fried, David E.; Hambrick, David Z.; Kane, Michael J.; Engle, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations…

  14. 34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

  15. 34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

  16. 34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

  17. 34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

  18. 34 CFR 692.80 - How does a State administer its community service work-study program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...How does a State administer its community service work-study program? 692...Does A State Administer Its Community Service Work-Study Program? § 692...does a State administer its community service work-study program?...

  19. Notes on Linguistics, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Linguistics, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1990. Articles in the four issues include: "The Indians Do Say Ugh-Ugh" (Howard W. Law); "Constraints of Relevance, A Key to Particle Typology" (Regina Blass); "Whatever Happened to Me? (An Objective Case Study)" (Aretta Loving); "Stop Me and Buy One (For $5...)"…

  20. Registration Study. Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    During spring 1977 registration, 3,255 or 45% of Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) registering students responded to a scheduling preferences and problems questionnaire covering enrollment status, curriculum load, program preference, ability to obtain courses, schedule conflicts, preferred times for class offerings, actual scheduling of…

  1. Assessing Statistical Change Indices in Selected Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Amanda D.; Huggins-Hoyt, Kimberly Y.; Pettus, Joelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined how evaluation and intervention research (IR) studies assessed statistical change to ascertain effectiveness. Methods: Studies from six core social work journals (2009-2013) were reviewed (N = 1,380). Fifty-two evaluation (n= 27) and intervention (n = 25) studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies were…

  2. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Thomas H; Castro, Victor M; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M; Kohane, Isaac S; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment--that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion--in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  3. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas H.; Castro, Victor M.; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Perlis, Roy H.

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment–that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion–in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  4. Validation Study of the Malay Version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    SANAZ, Aazami; SYAQIRAH, Akmal; KHADIJAH, Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work-family conflict has received increasing attention in recent decades in the area of workplace stressors, which can affect employees’ health. However, the dimensionality of the work–family conflict construct among the Malay-speaking population has not been clarified. In order to do so, it is crucial to use an instrument that is appropriate and valid for the Malay-speaking population. As such, the goal of this study was to validate and test the dimensionality of the Malay version of the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire. Methods: The present study conducted exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency, using Cronbach’s alpha, of the work–family conflict construct among 332 working women in Malaysia. Results: The results supported the existence of four dimensions in the Work-Family Conflict Questionnaire that distinguish between time based and strain-based work-family conflict and family-work conflict. The discriminant validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency of this construct are adequately supported. Conclusion: The findings of this study supported the existence of discriminant and convergent validity, as well as adequate reliability, for the construct. Thus, the Work–Family Conflict Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument among Malay-speaking working women. PMID:24639612

  5. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Feller, Alex; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2012-11-01

    This topical issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes is a collection of reference articles covering the GREGOR solar telescope, its science capabilities, its subsystems, and its dedicated suite of instruments for high-resolution observations of the Sun. Because ground-based telescopes have life spans of several decades, it is only natural that they continuously reinvent themselves. Literally, the GREGOR telescope builds on the foundations of the venerable Gregory-Coudé Telescope (GCT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Acknowledging the fact that new discoveries in observational solar physics are driven by larger apertures to collect more photons and to scrutinize the Sun in finer detail, the GCT was decommissioned and the building was made available to the GREGOR project.

  6. Social Consequences of Nomadic Working: A Case Study in an Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramanjit; Wood-Harper, Trevor

    This research study identified social challenges that knowledge workers in the Swedish organization TeliaSonera (Telia) face when utilizing wireless technologies to conduct work on the move. Upon collecting the relevant research data, five problem areas were identified: work and life balance, addiction, organizational involvement, nomadic work and control, and individual productivity. Each problem area was examined with the philosophical underpinning of socio-technical design principles. The results confirm that better role boundary management, self-discipline, work negotiation, and e-mail communication skills may be required for the knowledge workers to manage the demands of nomadic working. Similarly, rewarding nomadic work performance, building employee supervisor trust relations, and designing jobs that enhance work and life balance can be imperative.

  7. Working conditions and depressive symptoms: A prospective study of U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Sarah A.; Elliott, Michael R.; Zivin, Kara; House, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prior longitudinal studies of negative working conditions and depression generally have used a single exposure indicator, such as job strain, and have required consistent availability of the measure across waves and selection of only those working at all measurement points. Methods Up to four waves of the American’s Changing Lives study (1986-2001/2) and item response theory (IRT) models were used to generate wave-specific measures of negative working conditions. Random-intercept linear mixed models assessed the association between the score and depressive symptoms. Results Adjusting for covariates, negative working conditions were associated with significantly greater depressive symptoms. Conclusion A summary score of negative working conditions allowed use of all available working conditions measures and predicted depressive symptoms in a nationally-representative sample of U.S. workers followed for up to 15 years. Linear mixed models also allowed retention of intermittent workers. PMID:24013657

  8. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

  9. The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Herbert

    During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

  10. Work Time Control and Sleep Disturbances: Prospective Cohort Study of Finnish Public Sector Employees

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Paula; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Tucker, Philip; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Employee control over work times has been associated with favorable psychosocial and health-related outcomes, but the evidence regarding sleep quality remains inconclusive. We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between work time control and sleep disturbances in a large working population, taking into account total hours worked. Methods: The data were from a full-panel longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work time control and sleep disturbances in years 2000-2001, 2004-2005, 2008-2009, and 2012. The analysis of cross-sectional associations was based on 129,286 person measurements from 68,089 participants (77% women) aged 17-73 years (mean 43.1). Data from 16,503 participants were used in the longitudinal analysis. Log-binomial regression analysis with the generalized estimating equations method was used. Results: Consistently in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, less control over work time was associated with greater sleep disturbances in the total population and among those working normal 40-hour weeks. Among participants working more than 40 hours a week, work time that was both very high (cross-sectional prevalence ratio compared to intermediate work time control [PR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.65) and very low (PR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.39) was associated with sleep disturbances, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: These data suggest that having few opportunities to influence the duration and positioning of work time may increase the risk of sleep disturbances among employees. For persons working long hours, very high levels of control over working times were also associated with increased risk of sleep disturbances. Citation: Salo P, Ala-Mursula L, Rod NH, Tucker P, Pentti J, Kivimäki M, Vahtera J. Work time control and sleep disturbances: prospective cohort study of Finnish public sector employees. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1217-1225. PMID:25061250

  11. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Deirdre; Fitzpatrick, Clodagh; O’Toole, Lynn; Doran, Michele; O’Shea, Finbar

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases’ experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and working full-time. Three themes were identified: “Impact of fatigue on work performance” with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme “Disclosure at Work” participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme “work-based fatigue management strategies” included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases. PMID:26516896

  12. Referrals to an Intellectual Disability Psychotherapy Service in an Inner City Catchment Area--A Retrospective Case Notes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Geosrgina; Mukherjee, Raja A. S.; Karagianni, Efthalia; Attavar, Rajnish; Sinason, Valerie; Hollins, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aims were to identify referral characteristics and outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities referred to a psychodynamic psychotherapy service. Materials and Methods: A retrospective case notes review of anonymized data relating to 100 sequential patient episodes. Results: A total of 81 people out of 100 with a range of…

  13. Low back pain patients' experiences of work modifications; a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research indicates that work modifications can reduce sickness absence and work disability due to low back pain. However, there are few studies that have described modified work from the perspective of patients. A greater understanding of their experiences may inform future workplace management of employees with this condition. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Data was analysed thematically. Results Many participants had made their own work modifications, which were guided by the extent of control they had over their hours and duties, colleague support, and their own beliefs and attitudes about working with back pain. A minority of the participants had received advice or support with work modifications through occupational health. Access to these services was limited and usually followed lengthy sickness absence. Implementation largely rested with the manager and over-cautious approaches were common. Conclusions There was little evidence of compliance with occupational health guidance on modified work. There appears to be insufficient expertise among managers and occupational health in modifying work for employees with low back pain and little indication of joint planning. On the whole, workers make their own modifications, or arrange them informally with their manager and colleagues, but remain concerned about working with back pain. More effective and appropriate application of modifications may increase employees' confidence in their ability to work. PMID:21134248

  14. Technical note: a pilot study using a mouse mastitis model to study differences between bovine associated coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Breyne, K; De Vliegher, S; De Visscher, A; Piepers, S; Meyer, E

    2015-02-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a group of bacteria classified as either minor mastitis pathogens or commensal microbiota. Recent research suggests species- and even strain-related epidemiological and genetic differences within the large CNS group. The current pilot study investigated in 2 experiments whether a mouse mastitis model validated for bovine Staphylococcus aureus can be used to explore further differences between CNS species and strains. In a first dose titration experiment, a low inoculum dose of S. aureus Newbould 305 (positive control) was compared with increasing inoculum doses of a Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a chronic bovine intramammary infection to a sham-inoculated mammary glands (negative control). In contrast to the high bacterial growth following inoculation with S. aureus, S. chromogenes was retrieved in very low levels at 24 h postinduction (p.i.). In a second experiment, the inflammation inflicted by 3 CNS strains was studied in mice. The host immune response induced by the S. chromogenes intramammary strain was compared with the one induced by a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from cow bedding sawdust and by a S. chromogenes strain originating from a teat apex of a heifer. As expected, at 28 and 48 h p.i., low bacterial growth and local neutrophil influx in the mammary gland were induced by all CNS strains. As hypothesized, bacterial growth p.i. was the lowest for S. fleurettii compared with that induced by the 2 S. chromogenes strains, and the overall immune response established by the 3 CNS strains was less pronounced compared with the one induced by S. aureus. Proinflammatory cytokine profiling revealed that S. aureus locally induced IL-6 and IL-1? but not TNF-?, whereas, overall, CNS-inoculated glands lacked a strong cytokine host response but also induced IL-1? locally. Compared with both other CNS strains, S. chromogenes from the teat apex inflicted a more variable IL-1? response characterized by a more intense local reaction in several mice. This pilot study suggests that an intraductal mouse model can mimic bovine CNS mastitis and has potential as a complementary in vivo tool for future CNS mastitis research. Furthermore, it indicates that epidemiologically different bovine CNS species or strains induce a differential host innate immune response in the murine mammary gland. PMID:25497801

  15. An Introduction to the Work (and Play) of Writing Studies Research Methods through Micro Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Suzan; Beard, Emily J.; McClure, David R. E.; Nickoson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the benefits and challenges involved with assigning small-scale research projects in one research methods class as means of introducing new(er) researchers to the work and rewards of empirical writing research. The following discussion does not claim to offer examples of cutting-edge methodological work. That is not our goal…

  16. The Phenomenon of Studying While Working in Nigerian Universities: Preliminary Report on NCE Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duyilemi, B. O.

    1997-01-01

    In Nigeria, 340 male and 160 female certified teachers studying for bachelor's degrees while working were surveyed. Primary motives for combining work and education were improvement of academic qualifications (85%), self-actualization (76%), effective job performance (58%), and job security (53%). (SK)

  17. Outcome Studies in Social Work Journals: A Review of Publication Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCroy, Craig W.; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2013-01-01

    Social work practice emerges from research conducted with outcome studies that attempt to capture the "change" that social work services are designed to influence. However, it is unclear the extent to which social workers are prioritizing, and thereby producing, publications that investigate this change. We find that both the number and…

  18. School Culture: A Validation Study and Exploration of Its Relationship with Teachers' Work Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ping

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the relationship between school culture and teachers' work environment and further exploring the roles of school culture, teachers' efficacy, beliefs, and behaviors for character education, and teachers' work environment in the relationship between a character education intervention and…

  19. Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.…

  20. A Study of Leadership Strategies and Their Impact on Teacher Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbalm, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this study, the researcher sought to find the key strategies needed to improve school culture and working conditions. These findings were measured by the 2010 and 2012 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey (NC TWCS) data, as well as staff focus-group dialogue at three selected schools. The participant groups consisted of an…

  1. A Two-Study Examination of Work-Family Conflict, Production Deviance and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Hunter, Emily M.; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    Building on the spillover and crossover literatures of work-family conflict and the theoretical framework of Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1989) we examine the effects of conflict on production deviance. Using a two-study constructive replication and extension design, we examine how partner work-to-family conflict contributes to job…

  2. The Study of Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Its Design, Efficiency, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work paradigm is proposed. Recently, multitouch technology has become widely available for human-computer interaction. We found it has great potential to facilitate more awareness of human-to-human interaction than personal computers (PCs) in colocated collaborative work. However, other…

  3. The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

  4. The Effect of Job Resources on Work Engagement: A Study on Academicians in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunel, Mustafa C.; Kocak, Omer Erdem; Cankir, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Conducting research and publishing these research papers in academic journals is an accepted norm in the academic world. Previous studies prove that work engagement is a significant predictor of performance. Herein, the relationship between work engagement, which is assumed as a substitute for performance, and job resources is examined. At least…

  5. An Exploratory Study into Work/Family Balance within the Australian Higher Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; Kluvers, Ron; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Vranic, Vedran

    2013-01-01

    The higher education landscape is undergoing major transformation, with a significant impact on the work and family practices of academics and professional staff. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the extent to which (1) time-related, (2) strain-related and (3) demographical variables impact on the work/family balance of academic…

  6. Staff Perceptions of the Work Environment in Juvenile Group Home Settings: A Study of Social Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Kevin I.; Wells, James B.; Jones, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This study used the Prison Social Climate Survey to measure perceptions of the work environment among staff employed in all group homes administered by a state department of juvenile justice. Work environment perceptions were favorable along six dimensions and in the moderate range on a seventh. The variables that most consistently predicted staff…

  7. A Study of Spanish II High School Students Discourse during Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Group work offers a viable alternative to the teacher-centered, direct instructional model. However, many teachers have been reluctant to incorporate extensive group work into their teaching repertoire, citing concerns about the amount of English used and off-task behavior. This study reports the results of an analysis of five conversations of…

  8. The Federal Work-Study Program: Impacts on Academic Outcomes and Employment. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Student employment subsidies are one of the largest types of employment subsidies and one of the oldest forms of student aid. The Federal Work-Study program (FWS) is the largest student employment subsidy program; since 1964, it has provided about $1 billion per year to cover 75 percent of wages for student employees, who typically work on campus…

  9. Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life conflict leads to poor health satisfaction. Methods The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing seven waves of data collection. The sample includes 1261 persons, with 636 men and 625 women. Data was analysed by multi-level mixed models and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results In the overall sample, there was no linear increase or decrease of work-life conflict detected, in either its time-based or strain-based form. People with higher education were more often found to have a strong work-life conflict (time- and strain-based), and more men demonstrated a strong time-based work-life conflict than women (12.2% vs. 5%). A negative relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction over time was found. People reporting strong work-life conflict at every wave reported lower health satisfaction than people with consistently weak work-life conflict. However, the health satisfaction of those with a continuously strong work-life conflict did not decrease during the study period. Conclusions Both time-based and strain-based work-life conflict are strongly correlated to health satisfaction. However, no evidence was found for a persistent work-life conflict leading to poor health satisfaction. PMID:21529345

  10. SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours-45 credits of classroom work and 18 credits of

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours- 45 credits of classroom work and 18 credits of supervised practicum. The program is planned for completion in 4 are on campus two days a week. In addition to classroom work, students engage in two field practica

  11. Self-rostering and psychosocial work factors - a mixed methods intervention study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Albertsen, Karen; Hogh, Annie; Lund, Henrik; Hvid, Helge; Garde, Anne Helene

    2015-03-01

    This study aims at 1) examining the effect of self-rostering on emotional demands, quantitative demands, work pace, influence, social community at work, social support from leaders and colleagues, job satisfaction, and negative acts, 2) examining whether this effect was mediated through increased influence on the scheduling of working hours, and interpreting the results in light of the different implementation processes that emerged in the study and by including qualitative data. We conducted a 12 months follow-up, quasi-experimental study of self-rostering among 28 workplaces out of which 14 served as reference workplaces. We also interviewed 26 employees and 14 managers about their expectations of introducing self-rostering. In the present study implementation of self-rostering had a positive effect on job demands and the social environment of the workplace, especially if the intervention does not comprise drastic changes of the organisation of the employees' work and private life. PMID:25479989

  12. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, Doug

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment is to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport.

  13. THE WORKING MEMORY BENEFITS OF PROPRIOCEPTIVELY DEMANDING TRAINING: A PILOT STUDY (.).

    PubMed

    Alloway, Ross G; Alloway, Tracy Packiam

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of proprioception on working memory. It was also of interest whether an acute and highly intensive period of exercise would yield working memory gains. The training group completed a series of proprioceptively demanding exercises. There were also control classroom and yoga groups. Working memory was measured using a backward digit recall test. The data indicated that active, healthy adults who undertook acute, proprioceptively demanding training improved working memory scores compared to the classroom and yoga groups. One possible reason that the training yielded significant working memory gains could be that the training was proprioceptively dynamic, requiring proprioception and at least one other factor-such as locomotion or navigation-at the same time, which may have contributed to the improvements in working memory performance. PMID:26029969

  14. International Students' Experience of Studying and Working at a Northeastern Public University in the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwadzo, Moses

    2014-01-01

    This study explores international students' experiences with studying and working at a North Eastern public university. Through phenomenological research approach that utilized face-to-face interview and photo-elicitation techniques, the personal experiences of twenty international students were captured. The findings of this study indicated that…

  15. [Analysis of the usefulness of different methods of the evaluation of heart rate during work in work load studies].

    PubMed

    Makowiec-Dabrowska, T; Radwan-W?odarczyk, Z; Koszada-W?odarczyk, W

    1980-01-01

    The load of the circulatory system during work is usually evaluated basing on the heart beats above the heart rate at rest (i.e. the difference between the heart rate during work and at rest). To differentiate this evaluation according to the subjects' age, the percentage of heart rate reserve (the difference between the maximum heart rate and that at rest), constituted by the heart beats above the heart rate during work and at rest). To differentiate this evaluation according to the subjects' age, the percentage of heart rate reserve (the difference between the kers as well as at the model exercise on cycle ergometer in the group of students and female whitecollar workers has demonstrated that the heart rate before work is often higher than at breaks during the working day, whereas the heart rate during work depends on the output level when work results in a slight tachycardia. It was also found that incusion of the maximum heart rate results in much greater changes in evaluating individual groups--when it is calculated what percentage of this value constitutes heart rate at work, then when calculating the heart rate reserve percentage constituted by the difference between the maximum heart rate and that at rest. Therefore the calculation of the percentage of the maximum heart rate is promoted for evaluating the load of the circulatory system during work. PMID:7421570

  16. Some Working Parameters and Energy Use in a Pistachio Nut Processing Plant: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Refik; Erol Ak, Bekir; Acar, Izzet

    This study was performed with the objective to investigate the work process, work capacity, work effectiveness, energy consumption and labor force requirements of basic units such as washing, dehulling, sorting, separating, roasting and packing in a pistachio processing plant which has been mechanized in the last years. As a result of this study, the work capacity in washing, sorting, breaking, drying, separating units was found to be 1.5, 1.5, 2, 1, 1.6 t h-1, respectively. The work effectiveness in sorting and breaking units was found to be 95% and that of separating unit was 99%. The total energy consumption of the units was found to be 20.42 kW h-1 and the total labor force requirement was found to be five workers.

  17. Methods for recruiting white, black, and hispanic working-class women and men to a study of physical and social hazards at work: the United for Health study.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Hartman, Cathy; Quinn, Margaret M; Stoddard, Anne M; Krieger, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Despite research on work and health having a long-standing concern about unjust exposures and inequitable burdens of disease, there are few studies that document the joint distribution and health effects of physical and psychosocial hazards (e.g., noise, dusts, fumes, and job strain) and social hazards (e.g., racial discrimination and gender harassment) encountered at work. Also, there is a paucity of data on how these exposures, singly and combined, are distributed in relation to sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, and nativity. This article presents a conceptual model for redressing these knowledge gaps and describes recruitment strategies and the characteristics of study participants in the United for Health study. Working with labor unions, the authors recruited 14 (67%) of 21 worksites from manufacturing, meat processing, retail, and transportation, and 1,282 workers (72% response rate), of whom 62 percent were men, 36 percent were women, 39 percent were black, 23 percent were Hispanic, 25 percent were white, 31% earned less than a living wage, 40 percent were below the poverty level, and 23 percent had less than a high school education. PMID:17436989

  18. Is working in culturally diverse working environment associated with physicians' work-related well-being? A cross-sectional survey study among Finnish physicians.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Heponiemi, Tarja; Väänänen, Ari; Bergbom, Barbara; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko

    2014-08-01

    International mobility of health care professionals is increasing, though little is known about how working in a culturally diverse team affects the native physicians' psychosocial work environment. We examined Finnish physicians' perceptions of work-related wellbeing according to whether they had foreign-born colleagues (FBCs) in their work unit. We also examined whether work-related resources moderate the potential association between work-related wellbeing and working alongside FBCs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted for a random sample of physicians in Finland in 2010 (3826 respondents, response rate 55%). Analyses were restricted to native Finnish physicians working in public health care. The results were analyzed by ANCOVA. In unadjusted analyses, having FBCs was related to poor team climate (p<0.001) and poor job satisfaction (p=0.001). Those physicians who reported high procedural justice and high job control perceived also higher job satisfaction even if they had many FBCs in the work unit (p=0.007 for interaction between FBCs and procedural justice and p<0.001 for interaction between FBCs and job control). These associations were robust to adjustments for age, sex, health care sector, specialization, on-call duty, employment contract, full-time employment and leadership position. The results indicate that culturally diverse work units face challenges related to team climate and job satisfaction. The results also show that leadership plays an important role in culturally diverse work units. The potential challenges of culturally diverse teams for native physicians may be reduced by fair decision-making and by increasing physicians' job control. PMID:24602375

  19. No evidence of intelligence improvement after working memory training: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Redick, Thomas S; Shipstead, Zach; Harrison, Tyler L; Hicks, Kenny L; Fried, David E; Hambrick, David Z; Kane, Michael J; Engle, Randall W

    2013-05-01

    Numerous recent studies seem to provide evidence for the general intellectual benefits of working memory training. In reviews of the training literature, Shipstead, Redick, and Engle (2010, 2012) argued that the field should treat recent results with a critical eye. Many published working memory training studies suffer from design limitations (no-contact control groups, single measures of cognitive constructs), mixed results (transfer of training gains to some tasks but not others, inconsistent transfer to the same tasks across studies), and lack of theoretical grounding (identifying the mechanisms responsible for observed transfer). The current study compared young adults who received 20 sessions of practice on an adaptive dual n-back program (working memory training group) or an adaptive visual search program (active placebo-control group) with a no-contact control group that received no practice. In addition, all subjects completed pretest, midtest, and posttest sessions comprising multiple measures of fluid intelligence, multitasking, working memory capacity, crystallized intelligence, and perceptual speed. Despite improvements on both the dual n-back and visual search tasks with practice, and despite a high level of statistical power, there was no positive transfer to any of the cognitive ability tests. We discuss these results in the context of previous working memory training research and address issues for future working memory training studies. PMID:22708717

  20. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; de Vroome, Ernest M M

    2014-08-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on specific populations, such as nurses. We used data on night work collected in the Dutch Labor Force Surveys of 1996 until 2009, and individually linked these with National registers on hospital admission. Among 285,723 women without breast cancer at baseline, 2,531 had a hospital admission for breast cancer during an average of 7 years of follow up in the registers. Occasional and regular night work were not associated with the risk of hospital admission for breast cancer (adjusted hazard ratios 1.04; 95 % confidence interval 0.85-1.27, and 0.87; 0.72-1.05, respectively). Working more hours per week, or more years in a job entailing night work did not show increased breast cancer risks. Hazard ratios neither differed between nurses and women with other occupations. Our results show no association of night work with incident breast cancer, and suggest that night work generally does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women in the Dutch working population. PMID:25012051

  1. Finding a Balance: Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-Time Work and Advanced Level Study. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ann, Ed.; Spours, Ken, Ed.

    This document presents and discusses case studies that examined the relationship between part-time employment and advanced level study at 15 schools in Essex, England. "Foreword" (David Jones) provides a brief overview of the project. "Finding a Balance--Fifteen Institutional Case Studies on the Relationship between Part-time Work and Advanced…

  2. Climate change impacts on working people (the HOTHAPS initiative): findings of the South African pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mathee, Angela; Oba, Joy; Rose, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Background It is now widely accepted that climate change is occurring as a result of the accumulation of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere. With the prospect of a warmer world, increased attention is being devoted to the implications for worker well-being and work performance. Objectives The ‘high occupational temperature health and productivity suppression’ (HOTHAPS) programme is a multi-centre health research and prevention programme aimed at characterising and quantifying the extent to which working people are affected by, or adapt to, heat exposure while working. The main aim of the current South African pilot study was to look at the perceptions of outdoor workers regarding their work environment in hot weather and how this affected their health and productivity levels. Design A qualitative study utilising focus group discussions was employed in two sites, Johannesburg (which has a temperate climate) and Upington (located in the hottest part of South Africa). Results In summary, the pilot study demonstrated that especially in Upington, where daily maximum temperatures may reach +40°C, workers reported a wide range of heat-related effects, including sunburn, sleeplessness, irritability, and exhaustion leading to difficulty in maintaining work levels and output during very hot weather. Few, if any, measures were being undertaken by employers to protect health or improve worker comfort. Conclusion This pilot study has demonstrated that people working in sun-exposed conditions in hot parts of South Africa currently experience heat-related health effects, with implications for their well-being and ability to work and that further research is warranted. In this regard, the pilot study has proved valuable in informing the design, site, sample selection, and logistical planning for a proposed main study on the health and performance aspects of work in hot weather in South Africa. PMID:21139703

  3. Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Reste, Jelena; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Martinsone, Zanna; Martinsone, Inese; Seile, Anita; Vanadzins, Ivars

    2015-01-01

    Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad). The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C), while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C) in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia. PMID:26262633

  4. Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Reste, Jelena; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Martinsone, Zanna; Martinsone, Inese; Seile, Anita; Vanadzins, Ivars

    2015-01-01

    Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad). The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C), while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C) in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia. PMID:26262633

  5. Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59) and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38), and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99). In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over one’s job is likely to help prevent early retirement due to disability. PMID:22537302

  6. Fulfillment of Work–Life Balance From the Organizational Perspective: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Context: Researchers studying work–life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. Objective: To investigate what factors influence work–life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Results: Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work–life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. Conclusions: The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work–life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance. PMID:24067152

  7. 1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology Meeting Notes MEETING DATE: 7's work in developing a prototype to allow the lock shop to know in advance when Omni lock batteries need

  8. Which Type of Work-Study Experience Is More Beneficial?: Perceptions of Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng Cheng; Ho, Hsuan-Fu; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase of tuition and the reduced financial support from government and families have forced many more students to take part-time jobs, however, different jobs might bear different benefits. The main purposes of this study were to identify the major benefits of part-time jobs or work-study experiences performed by college students, and…

  9. The Relationship between Working Memory for Serial Order and Numerical Development: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attout, Lucie; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Majerus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the link between verbal working memory (WM) and calculation abilities remains poorly understood. The present longitudinal study focuses specifically on the role of serial order retention capacities, based on recent findings suggesting a link between ordinal processing in verbal WM and numerical processing tasks. Children…

  10. Engagement in Work: Case Study of Four Schools in Suffolk County, New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sean Bayles

    2013-01-01

    The study was a qualitative case study on engagement in work in four schools in Suffolk County, New York. The purpose of this researcher was to investigate how school systems and educators engage students and adults in 21st Century education. The levels of engagement were examined using patterns of instruction, organization, governance, and…

  11. The Federal Work-Study Program: Impacts on Academic Outcomes and Employment. CAPSEE Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers may be interested in the extent to which Federal Work-Study programs (FWS) increase students' access to productive employment, and how they impact students' academic and career success. This brief summarizes findings from a recent study using national data and a propensity score matching approach to examine the overall effects of FWS…

  12. The Role of the Directorate of Studies in the Legislative Work of the Hellenic Parliament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassilouni, Stavroula

    This paper discusses the role of the Directorate of Studies in the legislative work of the Hellenic Parliament (Greece). The first section describes the establishment and organization of the Directorate of Studies, which consists of three departments: the department for the elaboration of bills and law proposals, the department for parliamentary…

  13. The Nature and Requirements of Work in University-Based Telehealth Units: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth units are one of many university administrative units created to foster innovation in universities over the last 40 years. Despite the proliferation of such units, few organizational studies have examined the work undertaken inside of these units. This qualitative study used a sequential two-part research design to understand the…

  14. Community-Based Participatory Study Abroad: A Proposed Model for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Colleen M.; Grettenberger, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad experiences offer important benefits for social work students and faculty, including global awareness, practice skill development, and enhanced multicultural competence. Short-term study abroad programs are most feasible but typically lack depth of engagement with host communities and may perpetuate existing systems of power and…

  15. Liberal Studies in Hong Kong: A New Perspective on Critical Thinking through Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Dennis; Howe, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article reports research that is contextualised within reforms of secondary education in Hong Kong and the reintroduction of Liberal Studies, which jointly emphasise the need for a learning environment that facilitates the practice of group work and the development of critical thinking. A study is described that explores the relevance of…

  16. Development of Working Memory and Performance in Arithmetic: A Longitudinal Study with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study has aimed to investigate the relationship between the development of working memory and performance on arithmetic activities. Method: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study of a sample of 90 children, that was followed during the first, second and third year of primary school. All children were tested on measures of WM…

  17. Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal Behaviourists

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Working Party on Certification of Clinical Animal), and the Companion Animal Behaviour Therapy Study Group, which is an affiliated group of the British Small Animal behaviour counsellor", or "companion animal behaviour therapist", and similar titles, first appeared

  18. The Work of Community College Faculty: A Study through In-Depth Interviews. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Earl; And Others

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to explore the nature and meaning of the work of community college faculty through a process of in-depth phenomenological interviewing of 76 faculty and staff and 24 students from community colleges in Massachusetts, New York, and California. Section 1 provides an overview of the study,…

  19. The relationship between transformational leadership and work engagement in governmental hospitals nurses: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Hayati, Davood; Charkhabi, Morteza; Naami, Abdolzahra

    2014-01-14

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of transformational leadership and its components on work engagement among hospital nurses. There are a few set of researches that have focused on the effects of transformational leadership on work engagement in nurses. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. In this study, 240 nurses have been chosen by stratified random sampling method which filled related self-reported scales include multifactor leadership questionnaire (MLQ) and work engagement scale. Data analysis has been exerted according to the statistical method of simple and multiple correlation coefficients. Findings indicated that the effect of this type of leadership on work engagement and its facets is positive and significant. In addition, the research illustrates that transformational leaders transfer their enthusiasm and high power to their subordinates by the way of modeling. This manner can increase the power as a component of work engagement in workers. Idealized influence among these leaders can result in forming a specific belief among employees toward those leaders and leaders can easily transmit their inspirational motivation to them. Consequently, it leads to make a positive vision by which, and by setting high standards, challenges the employees and establishes zeal along with optimism for attaining success in works. regarding to the results we will expand leadership and work engagement literature in hospital nurses. Also, we conclude with theoretical and practical implications and propose a clear horizon for future researches. PMID:24455469

  20. Long Working Hours and Subsequent Use of Psychotropic Medicine: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental ill health is the most frequent cause of long-term sickness absence and disability retirement in Denmark. Some instances of mental ill health might be due to long working hours. A recent large cross-sectional study of a general working population in Norway found that not only “very much overtime”, but also “moderate overtime” (41-48 work hours/week) was significantly associated with increased levels of both anxiety and depression. These findings have not been sufficiently confirmed in longitudinal studies. Objective The objective of the study is to give a detailed plan for a research project aimed at investigating the possibility of a prospective association between weekly working hours and use of psychotropic medicine in the general working population of Denmark. Methods People from the general working population of Denmark have been surveyed, at various occasions in the time period 1995-2010, and interviewed about their work environment. The present study will link interview data from these surveys to national registers covering all inhabitants of Denmark. The participants will be followed for the first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. Poisson regression will be used to analyze incidence rates as a function of weekly working hours (32-40; 41-48; > 48 hours/week). The analyses will be controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. According to our feasibility studies, the statistical power is sufficient and the exposure is stable enough to make the study worth the while. Results The publication of the present study protocol ends the design phase of the project. In the next phase, the questionnaire data will be forwarded to Statistics Denmark where they will be linked to data on deaths, migrations, socioeconomic status, and redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medication. We expect the analysis to be completed by the end of 2014 and the results to be published mid 2015. Conclusions The proposed project will be free from hindsight bias, since all hypotheses and statistical models are completely defined, peer-reviewed, and published before we link the exposure data to the outcome data. The results of the project will indicate to what extent and in what direction the national burden of mental ill health in Denmark has been influenced by long working hours. PMID:25239125

  1. Korean working mothers' parenting style in Korea and in the United STates: a qualitative comparative study.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyesang; Kim, Eunjung; Sung, Kyungsuk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences of cultural influences on the parenting styles of Korean working mothers who live in South Korea versus Korean American working mothers living in the U.S. Four major themes were identified: (a) expression of affection for children, (b) parental control, (c) feelings for children, and (d) feelings for themselves. The findings indicate that acculturation to the American culture affected the Korean American working mothers to grant higher self-regulation to their children and to have more positive feelings for their children and themselves. PMID:24855813

  2. Working Memory Training for Children With Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7–15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated using parent report and measures of children’s performance on the training exercises. Efficacy measures of working memory and sentence repetition were obtained prior to training, immediately after training, and 1 month and 6 months after training. Results Children’s performance improved on most training exercises, and parents reported no problems with children’s hearing or understanding of the exercises. After completion of working memory training, children demonstrated significant improvement on measures of verbal and nonverbal working memory, parent-reported working memory behavior, and sentence-repetition skills. The magnitude of improvement in working memory decreased slightly at the 1-month follow-up and more substantially at 6-month follow-up. However, sentence repetition continued to show marked improvement at 6-month follow-up. Conclusions Working memory training may produce benefit for some memory and language skills for children with CIs, supporting the importance of conducting a large-scale, randomized clinical trial with this population. PMID:21173394

  3. Work demands, family demands, and BMI in dual-earners families: A 16-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Amit; Chung, Wonjoon

    2015-09-01

    Many scholars assert that work and family demands are negatively related to individuals' long-term physical health, but few studies have explicitly examined this relationship. Among these exceptions, most have employed a cross-sectional design that is limited in its ability to establish causality. We use body mass index (BMI) that generally increases during one's lifetime as an indicator of physical health, and seek to explore the amount of control individuals may have on this seemingly inevitable progression. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we propose that an increase in demands-both in the work realm (e.g., the number of work hours) and in the family realm (e.g., the number of spouse work hours)-is likely to speed up the increase of BMI. Using a nationally representative sample of 4,264 individuals who were part of a dual-earner family between 1994 and 2010, we find that a within-person increase in weekly work hours, an increase in spouse weekly work hours, and an increase in the number of children are all related to a small within-person increase of the BMI growth trajectory. Within-person increase in work responsibility demands is related to a small within-person decrease in the BMI growth trajectory. We discuss implications of the relationships between work and family demands and long-term physical health. PMID:25602120

  4. More Students Seek Campus Jobs as Work-Study Positions Dwindle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    As more college students are relying on part- or full-time work to help pay for their education, federally financed work-study jobs are becoming harder to find. The percentage of freshmen who planned to hold full-time jobs while in college jumped to 4.7 percent this year, from 2.7 percent in 2000. But as more students are seeking jobs, federal…

  5. A Study on the Transition from School to the World of Work in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wonsup

    The school-to-work transition in Korea was examined in a comprehensive study that included an overview of the realities of the school-to-work transition in Korea and a survey of 694 Koreans aged 15-29 years who had completed high school. The sample included 366 respondents who were in enrolled in a two-year college or higher level of postsecondary…

  6. Drug Use and Sex Work Among At-risk Women: A Qualitative Study of Initial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Roshanfekr, Payam; Noori, Roya; Dejman, Masoumeh; Fathi Geshnigani, Zahra; Rafiey, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in performing research on drug use and sex work among at-risk women. Although there is a well-documented literature of the initial reasons associated with drug use and sex work among women, there is, however, a paucity of information in this area in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to explore the initial reasons associated with drug use and sex work in a group of female treatment seekers, who presented health-related risk behaviors, in Tehran, Iran. Patients and Methods: This qualitative study enrolled a total of 65 at-risk women, from five women-specific drug clinics, who participated in the study in 2011. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted. Focus group interviews were conducted with 10 key informants. All interviews were audio-taped and thematically written. The recorded data were analyzed using ATLASti qualitative research software version 10. Results: The median age of the sample was 34 years. In addition, 44.6% of subjects were opiate users, and 55.4% were users of opiates and methamphetamine. Sex work was the main source of income for almost half of the sample. The most frequently reported reasons, associated with initial drug use, were extrinsic motivations, including the drug-using family, friends or social networks. Intrinsic motivations, including curiosity and individual willingness to use drugs, were other initial reasons. The most frequently reported reasons, associated with initial sex work, included the need to purchase drugs and financial problems. Conclusions: The study findings demonstrated a number of reasons associated with initial drug use and sex work. The role of sex work in providing drugs necessitates education and prevention. Special treatment programs should be implemented to prevent sex work among at-risk women in Iran. PMID:26288649

  7. The importance of a medical chaperone: a quality improvement study exploring the use of a note stamp in a tertiary breast surgery unit

    PubMed Central

    Rose, K; Eshelby, S; Thiruchelvam, P; Khoo, A; Hogben, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The project aim was to determine current use and documentation of medical chaperones within a major breast service unit. It explored ways of improving adherence to professional guidelines concerning chaperones. Setting The single centre quality improvement project was completed in a tertiary breast service unit in North West London. It was a three-stage project with initial audit in October 2013, 1st postintervention cycle in November 2013 and 2nd postintervention cycle in October 2014. Participants In each study cycle, data were collected from entries in clinic notes until at least 155 encounters with documented clinical examination were analysed. All notes were of female patients. Interventions (1) Intervention 1st cycle: presentation and discussion of chaperone guidelines alongside reminder posters and introduction of note stamp. (2) Intervention 2nd cycle: note stamp alone. Primary and secondary outcome measures Documentation of chaperone offer, documentation of patient preference regarding chaperone, identifier (name or signature) of chaperone present and gender of examining clinician. Results In the 1st postintervention cycle, 69.95% documentation of chaperone offer was recorded, p<0.001, CI (59.04% to 80.76%). This result was replicated in the 2nd postintervention cycle a year later with 74.86% documentation of chaperone offer recorded, p<0.001, CI (66.41% to 83.31%). The 4.91% difference was insignificant; p=0.294, CI (14.03% to 4.21%). Conclusions The authors suggest that a proforma approach to medical chaperones is an effective means of ensuring adherence to best practice guidelines. A stamp, or similar, that can be embedded into documentation structure is an effective example of such an approach. Improved documentation allows any problems with adherence to guidelines to be more easily identified, helping to ensure the safeguarding of patients and staff involved in intimate examinations. PMID:26179645

  8. Environmental effects of dredging: Synopsis of Hamlet City Lake, North Carolina, and San Francisco Bay Area, California, sediment leaching studies. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.E.; Brannon, J.M.; Engler, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    This note summarizes results from six laboratory leaching studies conducted on contaminated sediments. Laboratory batch and column leach tests were conducted on sediments from Hamlet City Lake, Hamlet, North Carolina; Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, Oakland, California; Santa Fe Channel (Richmond Harbor), Oakland; and West Richmond and Pinole Shoal reaches of the J. F. Baldwin Channel, Oakland. These studies were conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer Districts, Wilmington and San Francisco. Implications of the results for development of predictive techniques for leachate quality in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) are discussed.

  9. Work plan addendum for the remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Salmon Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document is intended as an addendum to the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the Salmon Site (SS) (formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site) Lamar County, Mississippi. The original work plan - Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Tatum Dome Test Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (herein after called the Work Plan) was approved by the state of Mississippi in 1992 and was intended as the operative document for investigative activities at the Tatum Dome Test Site. Subsequent to the approval of the document a series of activities were undertaken under the auspices of the work plan. This document is organized in the same manner as the original work plan: (1) Introduction; (2) Site Background and History; (3) Initial Evaluation; (4) Data Quality Objectives; (5) RI/FS Tasks; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Management; and (8) Reference. This addendum will identify changes to the original work plan that are necessary because of additional information acquired at the SS. This document is not intended to replace the work plan, rather, it is intended to focus the remaining work in the context of additional site knowledge gained since the development of the original work plan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a focused and phased site characterization as a part, of the RI/FS. The RI/FS is the methodology under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) for evaluating hazardous waste sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The SS is not listed on the NPL, but DOE has voluntarily elected to conduct the evaluation of the SS in accordance with CERCLA.

  10. A nested case-control study of fatal work related injuries among Brazilian steel workers.

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, S M; Swerdlow, A J; Smith, P G; Higgins, C D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the relative risk of death from work related injury in a steelworks, associated with exposure to various occupational hazards, sociodemographic factors, and medical history. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a nested case-control design. It was based on a cohort of men employed in the steel plant of USIMINAS, Brazil between January 1977 and August 1990, who were followed up to November 1992. The cases were defined as all workers in the cohort who died from injury in the study period and whose death had been notified to the Brazilian Ministry of Labour as being related to work. Four controls per case, matched to cases on year of birth, were randomly selected from among workers employed in the plant at the time of death of the matching case. Data on potential risk factors for occupational injury were extracted from company records; for the controls these data were abstracted for the period preceding the death of the matching case. RESULTS: There were 37 deaths related to work injuries during the study period. Four surviving workers were selected as controls for each case, but for eight the personnel records were incomplete, leaving 140 controls in all. Significantly increased risk of fatal injury related to work was associated with exposure to noise, heat, dust and fumes, gases and vapours, rotating shift work, being a manual worker, and working in the steel mill, coke ovens, blast furnaces, and energy and water supply areas. Risk of fatal injury related to work increased with intensity of exposure to noise (P (trend) = 0.004) and heat (P < 0.001), and increased greatly with a hazard score that combined information on noise, heat, dust, and gas exposure (P < 0.001). Number of years of schooling (P = 0.03) and salary level (P = 0.03) were both negatively associated with risk. In a multivariate analysis including all these significant factors, only hazard score and area of work remained associated with death from injury related to work. The highest risks were for men exposed to all four environmental hazards (odds ratio (OR) 19.4; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 352.1) and those working in the energy supply area (OR 18.0; 1.6 to 198.1). CONCLUSIONS: The study identified parts of the steelworks and types of hazard associated with greatly increased risk of fatal accident. Research and measures to prevent accidents need to concentrate on these areas and the people working in them. The use of a hazard score was successful in identifying high risk, and similar scoring might prove useful in other industrial situations. PMID:9326164

  11. For graduate students in MFT, Social Work, Child & Family Studies, Women's & Gender Studies, Counseling and related programs

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    the relationship between gender transition and life satisfaction, family relationships, social support, and mental relationships and other social systems. The self-of-therapist will be examined in relation to sexual and genderFor graduate students in MFT, Social Work, Child & Family Studies, Women's & Gender Studies

  12. Anticipated significant work limitation in primary care consulters with osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Ross; Phillipson, Chris; Hay, Elaine M; Pransky, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of expected work limitations (EWL) prior to future retirement age in osteoarthritis consulters, and the associated health, sociodemographic and workplace factors. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting General practices in Staffordshire, England. Participants 297 working adults aged 50–65, who had consulted primary care for osteoarthritis. Outcome EWL was defined using a single question, “Do you think joint pain will limit your ability to work before you reach 69?years old?” Results 51 (17.2%) indicated that joint pain would not limit their ability to work until 69, 79 (26.6%) indicated EWL and 167 (56.2%) did not know if joint pain would limit work before 69. In bivariate analysis, physical function (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.91 to 0.96), depression (4.51; 1.81 to 11.3), cognitive symptom (3.84; 1.81 to 8.18), current smoker (2.75; 1.02 to 7.38), age (0.69; 0.58 to 0.82), physically demanding job (3.18; 1.50 to 6.72), no opportunities to retrain (3.01; 1.29 to 7.05) and work dissatisfaction (3.69; 1.43 to 9.49) were associated with EWL. The final multivariate model included physical function and age. Conclusions Only one in five osteoarthritis consulters expected that joint pain would not limit their work participation before 69?years of age. Given the expectation for people to work until they are older, the results highlight the increasing need for clinicians to include work participation in their consultation and implement strategies to address work loss/limitation. Targeting pain-related functional limitation and effective communication with employers to manage workplace issues could reduce EWL. PMID:25190616

  13. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles describe a method of introducing the study of simple harmonic motion, and suggest models that are analogues for impedence matching, electrical transformers, and birefringent crystals. (AL)

  14. Project Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

  15. Working Atmosphere and Job Satisfaction of Health Care Staff in Kenya: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Marx, Michael; Marx, Irmgard; Brodowski, Marc; Nafula, Maureen; Prytherch, Helen; Omogi Awour, Irene K. E.; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Job satisfaction and working atmosphere are important for optimal health care delivery. The study aimed to document working atmosphere and job satisfaction of health care professionals in Kenya and to explore associations between job satisfaction, staff characteristics, and working atmosphere. Methods. Data from the integrated quality management system (IQMS) for the health sector in Kenya were used. Job satisfaction was measured with 10 items and with additional 5 items adapted to job situation in Kenya. Working atmosphere was measured with 13 item questionnaire. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with overall job satisfaction and working atmosphere, aspects of job satisfaction, and individual characteristics. Results. Out of 832 questionnaires handed out, 435 questionnaires were completed (response rate: 52.3%). Health care staff indicated high commitment to provide quality services and low levels regarding the adequacy and functionality of equipment at their work station. The aspect “support of the ministry of health” (? = 0.577) showed the highest score of explained variance (32.9%) regarding overall job satisfaction. Conclusions. IQMS which also evaluates job satisfaction and working atmosphere of health care staff provides a good opportunity for strengthening the recruitment and retention of health care staff as well as improving the provision of good quality of care. PMID:26504793

  16. Ethnographic study of ICT-supported collaborative work routines in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health informatics research has traditionally been dominated by experimental and quasi-experimental designs. An emerging area of study in organisational sociology is routinisation (how collaborative work practices become business-as-usual). There is growing interest in the use of ethnography and other in-depth qualitative approaches to explore how collaborative work routines are enacted and develop over time, and how electronic patient records (EPRs) are used to support collaborative work practices within organisations. Methods/design Following Feldman and Pentland, we will use 'the organisational routine' as our unit of analysis. In a sample of four UK general practices, we will collect narratives, ethnographic observations, multi-modal (video and screen capture) data, documents and other artefacts, and analyse these to map and compare the different understandings and enactments of three common routines (repeat prescribing, coding and summarising, and chronic disease surveillance) which span clinical and administrative spaces and which, though 'mundane', have an important bearing on quality and safety of care. In a detailed qualitative analysis informed by sociological theory, we aim to generate insights about how complex collaborative work is achieved through the process of routinisation in healthcare organisations. Discussion Our study offers the potential not only to identify potential quality failures (poor performance, errors, failures of coordination) in collaborative work routines but also to reveal the hidden work and workarounds by front-line staff which bridge the model-reality gap in EPR technologies and via which "automated" safety features have an impact in practice. PMID:21190583

  17. Logistical and ergonomic transportation capacity for refuse collection workers: a work physiology field study.

    PubMed

    Luttmann, A; Laurig, W; Jäger, M

    1992-09-01

    In a work physiology field study, the work flow and the electrocardiogram were recorded throughout whole shifts for six male refuse (garbage) collection workers who transported and emptied 1.1 m3 refuse containers. The work rate (WR), indicated by the number of 1.1 m3 containers emptied per unit of time, and the work pulse rate (WPR) were determined in the data evaluation. The work pulse rate increases with the work rate. The functional relationship can be approximated by a linear regression function (WPR = 20.9 + 35.8.WR). The work pulse rate reaches such high values that it must be assumed that the work cannot be performed continuously throughout the whole working day. Consequently, regular breaks should be provided. When determining the necessary duration of the breaks, it was assumed that an equilibrium between fatigue and recovery should be maintained during the working day. The recovery breaks should be at least long enough for the heart rate to return to the resting level. The necessary duration of the breaks was determined on the basis of the present field study and the laboratory investigations described in the literature. A minimum duration of 10 min per working hour results from the calculations. The breaks should be taken regularly at about hourly intervals. A transportation-capacity model is provided for the planning of the deployment of refuse workers. It permits calculation of the number of 1.1 m3 containers a three-man crew, comprising the refuse collection truck driver and two loaders, can empty during one shift. Both the logistical and ergonomic transportation capacities can be determined using the model. The logistical transportation capacity (TCL) indicates the number of containers which can be emptied per shift by a crew when only criteria such as the optimal utilization of the working time are considered. The ergonomic transportation capacity (TCE) is understood as the number of containers which can be emptied per shift taking into consideration the workers' strain and the recovery breaks they require. TCE amounts to between about 140 and 160 containers per shift depending on the type of city district. TCL is higher by between 20 and 30 containers per shift. In order to meet the demand of protecting workers' health, the number of containers to be emptied per shift by a three-man crew should not exceed the ergonomic transportation capacity. PMID:1505505

  18. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  19. A Modified Delphi Study to Identify the Significant Works Pertaining to the Understanding of Reading Comprehension and Content Analysis of the Identified Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunker, Norma D.

    2009-01-01

    The first part of this study explored the significant works pertaining to the understanding of reading comprehension using a Modified Delphi Method. A panel of reading comprehension experts in the field of reading identified 20 works they considered to be significant to the understanding of reading comprehension. The panel of experts additionally…

  20. Editor's Notes

    E-print Network

    by contemporary studies in human consciousness. Speakers in­ clude: Gregory Bateson, David Böhm, Norman Cousins, Hubert Dreyfus, Jacob Needleman, Michael Scriven, Huston Smith, Richard Taylor and Paul Wienpahl. Contact: Reminding, 505 Tamalpais Ave., Mill...

  1. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes 20 teaching activities and experiments appropriate for use with various secondary school science classes. Instructional activities include the study of catalase, raising bees, a game about equilibrium, spectrometers, lead iodide, resonance, graphing, and electromagnetic waves. (TW)

  2. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Describes three pieces of scientific apparatus and their demonstrational use: a high temperature apparatus for positron annihilation studies, a digitally synthesized classroom variable star, and a demonstration of plasma laser-beam focusing using paint stripper flames. (GA)

  3. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkney, J. N.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes eleven laboratory experiments, including the catalytic effect of copper in zinc-acid reaction; a study of the rate of polymerization of some aldehydes; and a demonstration automatic potentiometric titrator. (MLH)

  4. Prevalence of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Physicians, Surgeons and Dentists: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rambabu, T; Suneetha, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the common occupational hazards among health care providers. Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate MSDs in terms of perception of pain experienced by physicians, surgeons and dental surgeons during professional work. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted with 100 physicians practicing either modern or alternative medicine, 100 surgeons of various specialties and 100 dental surgeons. Self-reporting work related questionnaire on MSDs were distributed, including information on the location of MSD symptoms in the past 12 months and the pain experienced. Results: Musculoskeletal pain was most prevalent among dentists 61% (61/100), followed by surgeons 37% (37/100) and physicians 20% (20/100). Nearly 15% of physicians (3/20), 40% (15/37) of Surgeons and 60% (35/61) of Dentists had MSD problems in more than one site. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there is a higher prevalence of MSDs experienced by dental surgeons than physicians and surgeons. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems with dental surgeons and other specialty doctors with an emphasis on a larger sample sizes and correlating other factors such as age and sex of the doctor, duration of practice, working hours per week, physical activity and working environment. PMID:25221708

  5. Working through the Problems of Study Abroad Using the Methodologies of Religious Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    After illustrating the joys of teaching religious studies abroad with an anecdote from my trip to China, I warn of some of its inherent pedagogical and ethical challenges. I argue that teaching some of the "new directions" in religious studies scholarship might address these challenges. These include a turning away from the abstract…

  6. A Study on the Perfectionist Personality Traits and Empathic Tendencies of Working and Non-Working Adolescents across Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koksal Akyol, Aysel; Sali, Günes

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with the goal of examining the perfectionist personality traits and empathic tendencies of adolescents between the ages of 15 and 17. The study group consisted of 531 children attending a vocational education center and two general high schools located in the city center of Kayseri, Turkey. Data for this study were…

  7. Teacher and Paraprofessional Work Productivity. A Public School Cost Effectiveness Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conant, Eaton H.

    A consequence of the trend for paraprofessional employment in the schools is that the traditional teaching division of labor in schools in being substantially changed to provide teachers with work assistance and opportunities to specialize more effectively in instructional tasks. The two central questions posed in this study ask if the new…

  8. A Descriptive Study of Working Memory, Phonological Awareness and Literacy Performance of People Who Use AAC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibo, Maria Luisa Gomez; Iglesias, Pilar Vieiro; Mendez, Maria Sotillo; del Salvador, Maria Gonzalez Raposo

    2009-01-01

    Ten cerebral palsied adolescents and young adults with complex communicative needs who use augmentative and alternative communication were studied. They were classified according to their high versus low working memory capacity and according to their high versus low phonological skills into two groups of participants. These groups were compared on…

  9. Study of an interconnected flashing warning light system for work zone lane closures 

    E-print Network

    Finley, Melisa Dayle

    1999-01-01

    effectiveness in encouraging earlier lane-changing upstream of a lane closure compared to a standard lane closure. The studies simulated a work zone with a left lane closure. The following treatments in conjunction with an arrow panel were examined at two...

  10. Comparability work and the management of difference in research synthesis studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Barroso, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The new imperative to be more methodologically inclusive has generated a burgeoning interest in synthesizing the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies, or mixed research synthesis. Yet, the very diversity seen to define the mixed research synthesis enterprise is also considered to defy it as it intensifies the problem of comparing the seemingly incomparable to enable the combination of the seemingly uncombinable. We propose here that the research synthesis enterprise, in general, and the mixed research synthesis enterprise, in particular, entail comparability work whereby reviewers impose similarity and difference on the studies to be reviewed. The very study diversity requiring management does not exist a priori but rather is itself an outcome of comparability work already done whereby judgments have been made about what constitutes methodological and topical diversity and uniformity. Conceiving the research synthesis process as defined by comparability work moves the backstage interpretive work of systematic review to center stage and, thereby, sets a new stage for addressing the methodological issues involved. These issues are explored by reference to the synthesis of empirical studies of antiretroviral adherence in HIV-positive women in the US. PMID:17029691

  11. The Working Postures among Schoolchildren--Controlled Intervention Study on the Effects of Newly Designed Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Lea; Nygrd, Clas-H kan; Rimpel, Arja; Nummi, Tapio; Kaukiainen, Anneli

    2007-01-01

    Background: School workstations are often inappropriate in not offering an optimal sitting posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of individually adjustable saddle-type chairs with wheels and desks with comfort curve and arm support on schoolchildren's working postures compared to conventional workstations. Methods:…

  12. Case Study of Characteristics of Effective Leadership in Graduate Student Collaborative Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duemer, Lee S.; Christopher, Mary; Hardin, Fred; Olibas, Lezlie; Rodgers, Terry; Spiller, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effective leadership characteristics of graduate students working in a collaborative setting. A secondary goal was to develop recommendations that will help faculty better utilize group collaboration as a learning experience for graduate students. Data consisted of interviews of graduate students who…

  13. Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

  14. Validation Study of a Gatekeeping Attitude Index for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Dora M. Y.; Coleman, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to validate the Gatekeeping Attitude Index, a 14-item Likert scaling index. The authors collected data from a convenience sample of social work field instructors (N = 188) with a response rate of 74.0%. Construct validation by exploratory factor analysis identified a 2-factor solution on the index after…

  15. CDC Work-Study Program Position Title: IT Budget/Project Management

    E-print Network

    CDC Work-Study Program Position Title: IT Budget/Project Management Division/CIO: Office of Chief Operating Officer (OCOO) / Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) / Enterprise IT Portfolio Office within the office. Student will provide user support to the CDC project managers concerning IT systems

  16. CDC Work-Study Program Position Title: Health Communications/ Adolescent Health

    E-print Network

    CDC Work-Study Program Position Title: Health Communications/ Adolescent Health Division/CIO: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP) / Division of Adolescent of Adolescent and School Health's Health Communications Team with a number of entry-level and potentially

  17. Review of Study Programme Renewal in Lithuania: Planning Students' Independent Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zibeniene, Gintaute

    2013-01-01

    The article introduces external quality assessment results of first cycle and second cycle study programmes renewed under the Human Resources Development Action Programme 2007-2013 priority direction 2 "Lifelong Learning" (hereinafter the "Programme") through the aspect of planning students' independent work. Problems…

  18. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  19. A Study of Korean Working Mothers with Infants: Implications for Research and Social Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, So-Jung

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a broad range of variables that predict maternal self-efficacy with a sample of 92 Korean working mothers whose infants are cared for at non-maternal child care settings. In addition, differences between mothers of infants on welfare roll and their socioeconomic status (SES) counterparts (not on welfare)…

  20. The Willingness-to-Pay for Work/Family Policies: A Study of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago, Robert; Costanza, David; Caplan, Robert; Brubaker, Tanya; Cloud, Darnell; Harris, Naomi; Kashian, Russell; Riggs, T. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A contingent valuation study of 343 elementary teachers identified circumstances in which they would be willing to provide, through payroll deductions, certain work-family policies/programs. Even those with little or no likelihood of using the programs exhibited willingness to pay for some of them. (SK)

  1. State-Space Analysis of Working Memory in Schizophrenia: An FBIRN Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janoos, Firdaus; Brown, Gregory; Morocz, Istvan A.; Wells, William M., III

    2013-01-01

    The neural correlates of "working memory" (WM) in schizophrenia (SZ) have been extensively studied using the multisite fMRI data acquired by the Functional Biomedical Informatics Research Network (fBIRN) consortium. Although univariate and multivariate analysis methods have been variously employed to localize brain responses under differing task…

  2. High Performance Work System, HRD Climate and Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muduli, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to study the relationship between high-performance work system (HPWS) and organizational performance and to examine the role of human resource development (HRD) Climate in mediating the relationship between HPWS and the organizational performance in the context of the power sector of India. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  3. Work, Productivity, and Human Performance: Practical Case Studies in Ergonomics, Human Factors and Human Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, T. M.; Pityn, P. J.

    This book contains 12 case histories, each based on a real-life problem, that show how a manager can use common sense, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to solve problems in human performance at work. Each case study describes a worker's problem and provides background information and an assignment; solutions are suggested. The following cases…

  4. Principal Documents Issued by the Ministry of Education and Relevant Departments Concerning Study-Abroad Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In the past twenty-five years, the Ministry of Education of the Republic of China and relevant departments have formulated a total of more than 400 documents with regard to the selection and sending of personnel for studies abroad, management abroad, work after returning to China, serving the country, convenience in entering and exiting China's…

  5. To contextualise your work, could you begin with an overview of the Arctic Studies Centre

    E-print Network

    Miller, Scott

    and inaccessible environments? Arctic peoples have experienced climate and environmental changes for thousands Arctic peoples have responded to climate, environmental and social or political changes in the pastTo contextualise your work, could you begin with an overview of the Arctic Studies Centre (ASC

  6. Studies in Public Welfare. Paper Number 13. How Income Supplements Can Affect Work Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Irwin; And Others

    To what extent, if any, will workers in families receiving Government cash benefits reduce their hours of work? The papers by Irwin Garfinkel and by Glen Cain and Harold Watts review large numbers of studies on this question. These authors caution us against having great confidence in the detailed estimates of how workers will respond because…

  7. Work Experiences of People with Mental Illness in Malaysia: A Preliminary Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, Su-Lyn; Loong, Jaymee; Ng, Wai-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary qualitative study, using a basic interpretive approach, to investigate the work experiences of people with mental illness in Malaysia. Six females and four males (aged 30-70) from a residential home for the mentally ill participated in semi-structured interviews. Three inter-relating themes emerged, namely the experience of…

  8. Public Service Professionalism among State Administrators: A Multiple State Study. A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Bruce J.; And Others

    This working paper, part of an ongoing national study, presents preliminary analysis of public service professionalism among state public administrators in many states on the basis of data already produced by a continuing survey research project. Information about the data source and sample profiles are provided. Additionally, the research…

  9. Public Welfare and Work Incentives: Theory and Practice. Studies in Public Welfare. Paper No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Vee; Townsend, Alair A.

    This chart book summarizes two volumes in the subcommittee's series, "Studies in Public Welfare." Paper No. 4 (Dec. 22, 1972) explored work incentive and disincentive features in existing and proposed public welfare programs (cash welfare, unemployment insurance, social security, veterans' benefits, food stamps, public housing, and medicaid).…

  10. Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades…

  11. 1 Philosophy From reading the works of Plato and Aristotle to studying

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Philosophy PHILOSOPHY From reading the works of Plato and Aristotle to studying logic and phenomenology, students in the philosophy program are provided a broad-based learning experience. One examines the intersection of philosophy with other subjects, including law, biomedicine, science

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) a microcomputer demonstration of autocatalysis; (2) a safe alternative to ethanol and methanol; (3) a simple condenser for test-tube reactions; (4) a new procedure for studying the magnetic properties of transition metal compounds; (5) plasticization of the polymer PVC; and (6) some thoughts on polybasic acids and their salts. (JN)

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Included is information regarding: sucrose dehydration by sulphuric acid; an example of school-industry link in studying zinc oxide production; viscous flow in inorganic silicate glass; construction of a peristaltic pump; electrolysis; carbon dioxide preparation; electrophoresis; safety in using hydrogen and sulphuric acid; and approaches to…

  14. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the determination of the activation energy of the thiosulphate-acid reaction, an experiment on hydrolysis of similar metal salt solutions, the preparation and electrolytic properties of iodine monochloride and iodine trochloride, and instructions for apparatus enabling laboratory study of the thermal cracking of ethylbenzene. (AL)

  15. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH note55.tex SL/Note 9555 (AP)

    E-print Network

    Keil, Eberhard

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH note55.tex SL/Note 95­55 (AP) Various Reasons for Non­Closure of Electrostatic Separator Bumps Eberhard Keil Abstract In this note three reasons are studied for the leakage by errors on the high voltage generators is discussed. Section 5 contains my conclusions. 2 Effect of Energy

  16. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties.

  17. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-07

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties.

  18. A prospective study of night shift work, sleep duration, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglei; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2006-04-15

    The authors prospectively investigated whether working rotating night shifts was associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease among 84,794 female nurses who reported years of night shift work in 1988 (the US Nurses' Health Study). After 975,912 person-years of follow-up (1988-2000), 181 incident Parkinson's disease cases were documented. Compared with nurses who never worked rotating night shifts, those with 15 years or more of night shift work had a 50% lower risk of Parkinson's disease after adjustment for age and smoking (95% confidence interval: 0.26, 0.97; p(trend) = 0.01). Sleep duration was positively associated with Parkinson's disease risk: The relative risk was 1.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.99, 3.42) when comparing nurses who reported 9 or more hours of sleep per day with those who slept 6 hours or less (p(trend) = 0.005). These data suggest that working night shifts may be protective against Parkinson's disease or that low tolerance for night shift work is an early marker of Parkinson's disease. Conversely, habitual longer sleep duration may be an earlier marker of Parkinson's disease. Because of the novelty and the exploratory nature of these findings, confirmation is needed. PMID:16495472

  19. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties. PMID:26049515

  20. Spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into nonwork: A daily diary study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Corts, Inés; Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B; Boz, Marina

    2015-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 20(3) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2015-15847-001). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read "High Daily Resilience".] This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work-task and relationship conflict-spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n = 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work-life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25602278

  1. A longitudinal study of the relationship between work engagement and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik

    2012-02-01

    This longitudinal study examined the dynamic relationship between work engagement (vigour and dedication) and symptoms of anxiety and depression. A sample of 3475 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers, church ministers, bus drivers, people working in advertising and people working in information technology) in Norway supplied data at two points in time with a 2-year time interval. The advantages of longitudinal design were utilized, including testing of reversed causation and controlling for unmeasured third variables. In general, the results showed that the hypothesized normal causal relationship was superior to a reversed causation model. In other words, this study supported the assumption that work engagement is more likely to be the antecedent for symptoms of depression and anxiety than the outcome. In particular, the vigour facet of work engagement provides lower levels of depression and anxiety 2 years later. However, additional analyses modelling unmeasured third variables indicate that unknown third variables may have created some spurious effects on the pattern of the observed relationship. Implications of the findings are discussed in the paper. PMID:22259153

  2. Psychosocial work conditions, social capital, and daily smoking: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations between psychosocial conditions at work, social capital/social participation, and daily smoking. Design/setting/participants/measurements: The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5180 persons aged 18–64 years that belonged to the work force and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work/unemployment, social participation, and daily smoking. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demand–control/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and jobstrain categories. The multivariate analyses included age, country of origin, education and economic stress. Results: 17.2% proportion of all men and 21.9% of all women were daily smokers. The jobstrain (high demands/low control) and unemployed categories had significantly higher odds ratios of daily smoking among both men and women compared to the relaxed (low demands/high control) reference category. The passive (low demands/low control), jobstrain, and unemployed categories were also significantly associated with low social participation. Low social participation was significantly and positively associated with daily smoking within each of the psychosocial work conditions and unemployed categories. Conclusions: The positive association between low social capital/low social participation and daily smoking is well known. However, both social participation and daily smoking are associated with psychosocial work conditions and unemployment. Psychosocial work conditions and unemployment may affect daily smoking both directly and through a pathway including social participation. PMID:15333886

  3. Editors' note.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Ellen R; Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The Fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) contains original research that evaluates the role of teletherapy and online language exercises in the treatment of chronic aphasia; investigates whether improvements are maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and studies the use of in-home telerehabilitation for proximal humerus fractures. Within the context of two case studies, authors evaluated three service delivery models (direct, hybrid, and telepractice) for stuttering intervention. The results of a preliminary qualitative investigation are presented for telepractice in rural schools in Australia. And, schemas are offered for privacy and security analyses for store and forward applications in physical and occupational therapy. The Fall 2014 issue also contains a book review, and announcements from the American Telemedicine Association and the Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center. PMID:25945224

  4. Technical Note: The impact of spatial scale in bias correction of climate model output for hydrologic impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, E. P.; Ficklin, D. L.; Wang, W.

    2015-10-01

    Statistical downscaling is a commonly used technique for translating large-scale climate model output to a scale appropriate for assessing impacts. To ensure downscaled meteorology can be used in climate impact studies, downscaling must correct biases in the large-scale signal. A simple and generally effective method for accommodating systematic biases in large-scale model output is quantile mapping, which has been applied to many variables and shown to reduce biases on average, even in the presence of non-stationarity. Quantile mapping bias correction has been applied at spatial scales ranging from areas of hundreds of kilometers to individual points, such as weather station locations. Since water resources and other models used to simulate climate impacts are sensitive to biases in input meteorology, there is a motivation to apply bias correction at a scale fine enough that the downscaled data closely resembles historically observed data, though past work has identified undesirable consequences to applying quantile mapping at too fine a scale. This study explores the role of the spatial scale at which the quantile-mapping bias correction is applied, in the context of estimating high and low daily streamflows across the Western United States. We vary the spatial scale at which quantile mapping bias correction is performed from 2° (∼ 200 km) to 1/8° (∼ 12 km) within a statistical downscaling procedure, and use the downscaled daily precipitation and temperature to drive a hydrology model. We find that little additional benefit is obtained, and some skill is degraded, when using quantile mapping at scales finer than approximately 0.5° (∼ 50 km). This can provide guidance to those applying the quantile mapping bias correction method for hydrologic impacts analysis.

  5. An Evaluation Study of Youth Participation in Youth Work: A Case Study in Southern Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morciano, Daniele; Scardigno, Anna Fausta; Manuti, Amelia; Pastore, Serafina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an evaluation study of a public programme financing a regional network of 157 youth centres in the South of Italy is presented. A theory-based evaluation model was adopted to explore the causal links between different types of participation experience. Evaluation questions focused on three main issues are: the perception of…

  6. Return to work following unintentional injury: a prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hepp, Urs; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hepp-Beg, Sofia; Friedrich-Perez, Josefina; Stulz, Niklaus; Moergeli, Hanspeter

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to predict time off work following unintentional injuries due to accidents leading to hospital admission. Design Prospective 6-month follow-up study. Setting Department of Trauma Surgery of a University Hospital. Participants Consecutively recruited victims of unintentional injuries (n=221) hospitalised for a minimum of 32?h including two consecutive nights. All the participants were aged 18–65?years and were able to participate in an assessment within 30?days of the accident. Main outcome measures Interview-assessed number of days off work during the 6?months immediately following the accident. Results The patients’ subjective appraisals of (1) accident severity and (2) their ability to cope with the resulting injury and its job-related consequences predicted time off work following the accident beyond the impact of the objective severity of their injury and the type of accident involved. Conclusions The patients’ subjective appraisals of the accident severity and of their ability to cope with its consequences are highly relevant for return to work after accidents. Extending the findings from previous studies on severely injured and otherwise preselected accident victims, this seems to apply to the whole spectrum of patients hospitalised with unintentional injuries. PMID:24327361

  7. A Fifteen Year Follow Up Study of the North Kansas City Public Schools Work Study Graduates. 1966-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonley, Pat; And Others

    Data were collected at a 15 year class reunion of 100 graduates of a work study program for educable mentally retarded students in the North Kansas City Public Schools. Ss were interviewed personally by one of their former teachers or the vocational adjustment coordinator. Among findings were the following: 64% had their own automobile; 56% lived…

  8. NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica

    E-print Network

    Kitajima, Kaoru

    NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica accumulation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) under transport Si, through transpiration, from soils to shoots, while others actively transport silica manipulated transpiration rates by changing humidity and air movements around pot-grown plants receiving

  9. Linux Notes Fall 2015 Linux Notes

    E-print Network

    Gousie, Michael B.

    Linux Notes Fall 2015 Linux Notes Linux is a free operating system that runs on PCs and laptops Linux much easier to use than in the past; in fact, the casual user can use Linux just like Windows or Mac OS. However, for computer scientists, Linux offers much more (direct) access to operating system

  10. Publishers' Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EPL Management Team

    2008-12-01

    We would like to thank all our contributors, subscribers, reviewers, and readers for their interest in EPL during 2008. You each play an invaluable role in the promotion, prestige, development and success of the journal and therefore your continued support is greatly appreciated. The Directors' vision for EPL to become a leading home for global physics letters, to offer rapid publication of ground-breaking physics results from the international community, and to provide the broadest coverage of physics research, is beginning to take shape as increased submissions, reduced acceptance rates, raised scientific quality, rapid publication, and greater visibility amongst the community are achieved. The latest published articles will continue to be freely available for 30 days from their on-line publication. Those articles highlighted by the Co-Editors in 2008 will remain free-to-all for the entire of 2009. We invite you to visit the website regularly (http://www.epljournal.org) to stay up-to-date with the journal's latest developments and to read the most recent articles. Our most recent opportunity publicized on the EPL website and in the CERN SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics) messages is below: Open Access Opportunity for Authors of Experimental and Theoretical HEP Articles EPL is delighted to offer open access free of charge to all authors submitting experimental and theoretical letters in PACS codes 10 and 20. This offer will remain open until the SCOAP3 agreement at CERN takes effect. Authors submitting any article to EPL will continue to be offered the opportunity to make their published letter open access for a one-off payment. However, with effect from 1 November 2008, any author who submits work related to subject areas within PACS 10 and 20 will benefit from open access at no charge, meaning their published article will be available free to all readers, forever. ``Physics of Elementary Particles and Fields'' and ``Nuclear Physics'' are two research areas focusing on the HEP community, that the EPLA Directors recognize as significant to the broadband development of EPL, and they endeavour to increase the number of high-quality research letters published in these fields, to engage more closely with the High Energy Physics community, and to strengthen and promote the journal. All submitted articles will still be subject to rigorous peer review to maintain the high standard of articles published in EPL, and will benefit from expert leadership within the Editorial Board and rapid publication in addition to open access. You are invited to submit your paper now on https://www.epletters.net to take advantage of this fantastic offer. If you have comments or questions about changes taking place in 2009, please e-mail us at info@epljournal.org or editorial.office@epletters.net. With our best wishes for 2009!

  11. Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in office work: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tânia M; Coelho, Denis A

    2011-01-01

    Twelve recently built office work stations, where jobs imply continued use of information and communication technologies, were analyzed for ergonomic risk factors. Based on a literature review of ergonomic recommendations for computer and general office work, a checklist was devised for assistance in identifying inadequate ergonomic situations, a process that was informed by pain complaints information. RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment) was selected to estimate the risk of MSDs, considering the criteria of applicability and appropriateness to the case studied. This method was applied by an occupational health and safety technician to the most critical job observed in the workplace. Criticality was estimated through observations aided by the systematic use of a checklist tailored to the specific office scenario. Recommendations for change were provided for implementation in all workplaces in the office, in order to improve work conditions, and guide the setup of a MSD prevention training program. PMID:21811030

  12. A prospective study of work related factors and physical exercise as predictors of shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, H; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R; Takala, E; Riihimaki, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the effects of work related and individual factors as well as physical activity and sports on the incidence and persistence of shoulder pain among forestry workers.?METHODS—Workers in a large Finnish forestry company replied to a questionnaire (a modified version of the Nordic questionnaire) on musculoskeletal pain and its possible risk factors for 4 consecutive years 1992-5. This 1 year follow up study covers the time 1994-5. Year 1994 was chosen as baseline because in that year the questionnaire contained for the first time more detailed questions about different sports. The response rate in 1995 was 90%. The effects of the predictors on 1 year incidence and persistence of shoulder pain were studied with multivariate logistic regression modelling.?RESULTS—At baseline, 2094 subjects had been free of shoulder pain during the preceding 12 months. After 1 year, 14% (n=285) reported having mild or severe shoulder pain. Higher age, obesity, and mental stress as well as physically strenuous work and working with trunk forward flexed or with a hand above shoulder level increased the risk of incident shoulder pain. Of the different sports activities, dancing increased the risk of incident pain whereas jogging decreased the risk significantly. Of those 419 workers who had severe shoulder pain at baseline, 55% (n=230) still had severe pain 1 year later. Higher age, overload at work, and working with a hand above shoulder level increased the risk of persistent severe shoulder pain whereas cross country skiing and general sports activity decreased the risk.?CONCLUSION—Our results support the current view that shoulder pain is the result of many factors, including occupational and individual factors. In this longitudinal study, physical work with a heavy load, awkward work postures, mental stress, and obesity were the risk factors at which preventive measures could be aimed. As a new finding, physical exercise had more protective than impairing effects on the shoulders.???Keywords: mental stress; physical work load; sports PMID:11452048

  13. Psychosocial work environment and sickness absence among British civil servants: the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed Central

    North, F M; Syme, S L; Feeney, A; Shipley, M; Marmot, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study sought to examine the association between the psychosocial work environment and subsequent rates of sickness absence. METHODS. The analyses were based on a cohort of male and female British civil servants (n=9072). Rates of short spells (7 days) of sickness absence were calculated for different aspects of the psychosocial work environment, as measured by self-reports and personnel managers' ratings (external assessments). RESULTS. Low levels of work demands, control, and support were associated with higher rates of short and long spells of absence in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. The differences were similar for the self-reports and external assessments. After adjustment for grade of employment, the differences were diminished but generally remained significant for short spells. The combination of high demands and low control was only associated with higher rates of short spells in the lower grades. CONCLUSIONS. The psychosocial work environment predicts rates of sickness absence. Increased levels of control and support at work could have beneficial effects in terms of both improving the health and well-being of employees and increasing productivity. PMID:8604757

  14. Applying the Theory of Work Adjustment to Latino Immigrant Workers: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggerth, Donald E.; Flynn, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Blustein mapped career decision making onto Maslow’s model of motivation and personality and concluded that most models of career development assume opportunities and decision-making latitude that do not exist for many individuals from low income or otherwise disadvantaged backgrounds. Consequently, Blustein argued that these models may be of limited utility for such individuals. Blustein challenged researchers to reevaluate current career development approaches, particularly those assuming a static world of work, from a perspective allowing for changing circumstances and recognizing career choice can be limited by access to opportunities, personal obligations, and social barriers. This article represents an exploratory effort to determine if the theory of work adjustment (TWA) might meaningfully be used to describe the work experiences of Latino immigrant workers, a group living with severe constraints and having very limited employment opportunities. It is argued that there is significant conceptual convergence between Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and the work reinforcers of TWA. The results of an exploratory, qualitative study with a sample of 10 Latino immigrants are also presented. These immigrants participated in key informant interviews concerning their work experiences both in the United States and in their home countries. The findings support Blustein’s contention that such workers will be most focused on basic survival needs and suggest that TWA reinforcers are descriptive of important aspects of how Latino immigrant workers conceptualize their jobs. PMID:26345693

  15. Multidimensional work sampling to study the activities of decentralized clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Ried, L D; West, T E; Martin, P; Force, W

    1991-06-01

    Self-reported multidimensional work sampling (MDWS) was used to study the activities of decentralized clinical pharmacists at six hospitals in Portland, Oregon, and Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in March through June 1989. A community hospital, a university hospital, and a hospital associated with a health maintenance association were selected in each city, and pharmacists at each site who provided clinical services were recruited. Each pharmacist wore a random reminder device and recorded the activity during which the device sounded by writing on a card numbers assigned to describe work activity, contact, location, and function. Of 6609 classifiable observations, 34.5% (2280) were of clinical activities and 35.8% distributive activities. Pharmacists spent 28.6% of their clinical time reviewing and assessing patients' charts, 17.1% on clinical rounds, 15.9% on activities related to therapeutic drug monitoring, 10.2% providing drug information, 11.6% attending or giving formal education, 6.1% doing research, and 2.6% attending meetings. The average pharmacist spent less than 10 minutes each day with patients but spent a substantial portion of time providing clinical services to other health professionals. Self-reported, multidimensional work sampling appears to be a valuable method for describing and monitoring decentralized pharmacists' work activities at multiple sites and work settings. PMID:1858799

  16. Shame! Self-stigmatisation as an obstacle to sick doctors returning to work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Max; Brooks, Samantha K; del Busso, Lilliana; Chalder, Trudie; Harvey, Samuel B; Hotopf, Matthew; Madan, Ira; Hatch, Stephani

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the views of sick doctors on the obstacles preventing them returning to work. Design Qualitative study. Setting Single participating centre recruiting doctors from all over the UK. Participants Doctors who had been away from work for at least 6?months with physical or mental health problems, drug or alcohol problems, General Medical Council involvement or any combination of these, were eligible. Eligible doctors were recruited in conjunction with the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund, the General Medical Council and the Practitioner Health Programme. These organisations approached 77 doctors; 19 participated. Each doctor completed an in-depth semistructured interview. We used a constant comparison method to identify and agree on the coding of the data and the identification of a number of central themes. Results The doctors described that being away from work left them isolated and sad. Many experienced negative reactions from their family and some deliberately concealed their problems. Doctors described a lack of support from colleagues and feared a negative response when returning to work. Self-stigmatisation was central to the participants’ accounts; several described themselves as failures and appeared to have internalised the negative views of others. Conclusions Self-stigmatising views, which possibly emerge from the belief that ‘doctors are invincible’, represent a major obstacle to doctors returning to work. From medical school onwards cultural change is necessary to allow doctors to recognise their vulnerabilities so they can more easily generate strategies to manage if they become unwell. PMID:23069770

  17. The Impact of Sex Work on Women’s Personal Romantic Relationships and the Mental Separation of Their Work and Personal Lives: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Bellhouse, Clare; Crebbin, Susan; Fairley, Christopher K.; Bilardi, Jade E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Very limited research has been undertaken on sex workers’ personal romantic relationships and the impact the nature of their work has on their relationships. This exploratory study aimed to explore the impact sex work has on women’s personal romantic relationships and the use of mental separation as a coping mechanism to balance the two aspects of their lives. Methods Fifty-five women working in the indoor sex industry in Melbourne, Australia, were recruited to complete a self-report questionnaire about various aspects of their work, including the impact of sex work on their personal relationships. Questionnaires were completed anonymously and included both closed and open-ended questions. A further six women were interviewed to ‘member check’ the accuracy of the questionnaire findings. Results Most women (78%) reported that, overall, sex work affected their personal romantic relationships in predominantly negative ways, mainly relating to issues stemming from lying, trust, guilt and jealousy. A small number of women reported positive impacts from sex work including improved sexual self-esteem and confidence. Just under half of women were in a relationship at the time of the study and, of these, 51% reported their partner was aware of the nature of their work. Seventy-seven percent of single women chose to remain single due to the nature of their work. Many women used mental separation as a coping mechanism to manage the tensions between sex work and their personal relationships. Member checking validated the accuracy of the questionnaire data. Conclusion This exploratory study identified a number of ways in which sex work impacts negatively on women’s personal romantic relationships. The findings of this study support the need for further studies to be undertaken to determine if the findings are reflected in a larger, more representative sample of Australian sex workers and should be considered in the context of any future intervention and support programs aimed at addressing the tensions sex workers experience between their work and personal relationships. Greater public awareness and education programs aimed at addressing the negative stigma associated with the sex industry may go some way towards easing the issues faced by women in their personal relationships. PMID:26516765

  18. Psychological factors at work and musculoskeletal disorders: a one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Zo?nierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; J?dryka-Góral, Anna; Gasik, Robert; Hildt-Ciupi?ska, Katarzyna; Mali?ska, Marzena; Bedy?ska, Sylwia

    2013-12-01

    The etiology of musculoskeletal disorders is complex, with physical and psychosocial working conditions playing an important role. This study aimed to determine the relationship between psychosocial work conditions, such as psychological job demands, decision latitude, social support and job insecurity and musculoskeletal complains (MSCs) and (repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) in a 1-year prospective study. The job content questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and provocation tests were used to study 725 employees aged 20-70 years. Pain in the lower back (58 % of subjects), neck (57 %), wrists/hands (47 %) and upper back (44 %) was most frequent. The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (33.6 %), rotator cuff tendinitis (15.4 %), Guyon's canal syndrome (13.4 %), lateral epicondylitis (7.6 %), medial epicondylitis (5.3 %), tendinitis of forearm-wrist extensors (7.8 %) and tendinitis of forearm-wrist flexors (7.3 %) were the most frequent RSIs. Logistic analysis showed that increased psychological job demands statistically significantly increased the probability of lateral and medial epicondylitis, and increased control (decision latitude) statistically significantly decreased the risk of CTS. There was no relationship between job insecurity, social support and the studied RSIs. Psychosocial factors at work predict prevalence of MSCs and RSIs, irrespectively of demographic factors, e.g., age or gender, and organizational and physical factors. PMID:23934521

  19. Psychological and Social Work Factors as Predictors of Mental Distress: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Finne, Live Bakke; Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2014-01-01

    Studies exploring psychological and social work factors in relation to mental health problems (anxiety and depression) have mainly focused on a limited set of exposures. The current study investigated prospectively a broad set of specific psychological and social work factors as predictors of potentially clinically relevant mental distress (anxiety and depression), i.e. “caseness” level of distress. Employees were recruited from 48 Norwegian organizations, representing a wide variety of job types. A total of 3644 employees responded at both baseline and at follow-up two years later. Respondents were distributed across 832 departments within the 48 organizations. Nineteen work factors were measured. Two prospective designs were tested: (i) with baseline predictors and (ii) with average exposure over time ([T1+T2]/2) as predictors. Random intercept logistic regressions were conducted to account for clustering of the data. Baseline “cases” were excluded (n?=?432). Age, sex, skill level, and mental distress as a continuous variable at T1 were adjusted for. Fourteen of 19 factors showed some prospective association with mental distress. The most consistent risk factor was role conflict (highest odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 99% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45–3.00). The most consistent protective factors were support from immediate superior (lowest OR 0.56, 99% CI: 0.43–0.72), fair leadership (lowest OR 0.52, 99% CI: 0.40–0.68), and positive challenge (lowest OR 0.60, 99% CI: 0.41–0.86). The present study demonstrated that a broad set of psychological and social work factors predicted mental distress of potential clinical relevance. Some of the most consistent predictors were different from those traditionally studied. This highlights the importance of expanding the range of factors beyond commonly studied concepts like the demand-control model and the effort-reward imbalance model. PMID:25048033

  20. Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

  1. Study on the Influence of the Work Hardening Models Constitutive Parameters Identification in the Springback Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.; Chaparro, B. M.; Menezes, L. F.

    2005-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to determine the influence of the work hardening model in the numerical prediction of springback. This study will be performed according with the specifications of the first phase of the "Benchmark 3" of the Numisheet'2005 Conference: the "Channel Draw". Several work hardening constitutive models are used in order to allow a better description of the different material mechanical behavior. Two are classical pure isotropic hardening models described by a power law (Swift) or a Voce type saturation equation. Those two models were also combined with a non-linear (Lemaître and Chaboche) kinematic hardening rule. The final one is the Teodosiu microstructural hardening model. The study is performed for two commonly used steels of the automotive industry: mild (DC06) and dual phase (DP600) steels. The mechanical characterization, as well as the constitutive parameters identification of each work hardening models, was performed by LPMTM, based on an appropriate set of experimental data such as uniaxial tensile tests, monotonic and Bauschinger simple shear tests and orthogonal strain path tests, all at various orientations with respect to the rolling direction. All the simulations were carried out with the CEMUC's home code DD3IMP (contraction of `Deep Drawing 3-D IMPlicit code').

  2. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

  3. Quickies : intelligent sticky notes

    E-print Network

    Mistry, Pranav (Pranav K.)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis introduces 'Quickies', an attempt to bring one of the most useful inventions of the 20th century into the digital age: the ubiquitous sticky notes. Sticky notes help us manage our to-do lists, tag our objects ...

  4. Social Studies: A Multi-media Study Project in the Educational Section of West Germany's South-west Broadcasting Company. German Studies Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebel, Karlheinz

    This study of multimedia political education in West Germany deals specifically with a South-West German Broadcasting Company's educational television project in the social studies. The dual purpose of the study was to assess the rationale behind the TV series and to present an overview of the structure and function of units which have been…

  5. An exploratory study of associations of physical activity with mental health and work engagement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) to be associated with a decreased risk of mental disorders. Although the focus in the field of psychology has shifted towards human strengths and optimal functioning, studies examining associations between MVPA and mental health in general (MH) and between MVPA and well-being are scarce. An indicator of work-related well-being is work engagement (WE). The aim of this study was to explore the associations between MVPA and MH, and between MVPA and WE. Methods In this study, a total of 257 employees from two research institutes, self-reported their MVPA, MH and level of WE. In addition, a randomly chosen subgroup (n=100) wore an Actigraph accelerometer for a 1-week period to measure their MVPA objectively. Crude and adjusted associations between MVPA and both WE and MH were analyzed using linear regression analyses. Results There was no statistically significant association between self-reported MVPA and mental health, resulting from both the crude (b=0.058, 95% CI -0.118 - 0.235) and adjusted analyses (b=0.026; 95% CI -0.158- 0.210), nor between objectively measured MVPA and mental health for both crude and adjusted analyses (b=-0.144; 95% CI -1.315- 1.027; b=-0.199; 95% CI 1.417- 1.018 respectively). There was also no significant association between self-reported MVPA and work engagement (crude: b=0.005; 95% CI -0.005-0.016, adjusted: b= 0.002; 95% CI -0.010- 0.013), nor between objectively measured MVPA and work engagement (crude: b= 0.012; 95% CI -0.084- 0.060, adjusted: b=0.007; 95% CI -0.083-0.069). Conclusions Although the beneficial effects of MVPA on the negative side of MH (i.e. mental disorders) have been established in previous studies, this study found no evidence for the beneficial effects of MVPA on positive side of MH (i.e. well-being). The possible difference in how the physical activity-mental health relationship works for negative and positive sides of MH should be considered in future studies. PMID:23758966

  6. Accidents at Work and Costs Analysis: A Field Study in a Large Italian Company

    PubMed Central

    BATTAGLIA, Massimo; FREY, Marco; PASSETTI, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Accidents at work are still a heavy burden in social and economic terms, and action to improve health and safety standards at work offers great potential gains not only to employers, but also to individuals and society as a whole. However, companies often are not interested to measure the costs of accidents even if cost information may facilitate preventive occupational health and safety management initiatives. The field study, carried out in a large Italian company, illustrates technical and organisational aspects associated with the implementation of an accident costs analysis tool. The results indicate that the implementation (and the use) of the tool requires a considerable commitment by the company, that accident costs analysis should serve to reinforce the importance of health and safety prevention and that the economic dimension of accidents is substantial. The study also suggests practical ways to facilitate the implementation and the moral acceptance of the accounting technology. PMID:24869894

  7. Statement of Work for Studies in BlueGene/L Scalability and Reconfigurability

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, A; McKee, S A

    2005-09-13

    As referenced in the subcontract, the work included three major goals: (1) study the performance of an ASCI application, (2) study tradeoffs in using the second CPU in coprocessor mode to optimize use of the L3 scratchpad memory for performing vector-like gather/scatter and streamlining operations, and (3) perform simulator studies of hardware phase detection and identification. We made some modifications to the work contract. Work involving the integration of a cache-conscious data placement algorithm to improve cache utilization on BlueGene/L has been added and work involving the L3 scratchpad memory has been eliminated. This was explained in the previous milestones. In this milestone, we continue to focus on the last goal by modifying a cycle-accurate simulator, sim-alpha [4]. As premise to hardware phase detection and identification, we need to have an infrastructure for testing various cache-conscious data placement methods. For this milestone, we discuss the completed framework that handles cache-conscious placement optimizations, which includes profiling data accesses and handling remapped addresses. We will also introduce an algorithm (ccdp profiling tool) that we implemented for assigning remapped addresses for a given code. Our performance results show that by using our ccdp profiling tool, we achieve reduced miss rates and an improved overall simulation performance. For our test cases, we use four applications from the SPEC CPU 2000 suite [2]. In our past milestones, we studied research that involves implementing cache-conscious data placement techniques. By becoming more familiar with previous research, we can make better decisions on designing our cache-conscious profiling tool. It is important to have a firm understanding of the existing techniques that have proven to be efficient at improving memory performance, since our tool will produce trace files as input to our enhanced simulator framework.

  8. Experimental reconstruction of work distribution and study of fluctuation relations in a closed quantum system.

    PubMed

    Batalhão, Tiago B; Souza, Alexandre M; Mazzola, Laura; Auccaise, Ruben; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Goold, John; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro; Serra, Roberto M

    2014-10-01

    We report the experimental reconstruction of the nonequilibrium work probability distribution in a closed quantum system, and the study of the corresponding quantum fluctuation relations. The experiment uses a liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance platform that offers full control on the preparation and dynamics of the system. Our endeavors enable the characterization of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a quantum spin from a finite-time thermodynamics viewpoint. PMID:25325627

  9. The work of commissioning: a multisite case study of healthcare commissioning in England's NHS

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sara E; Smith, Judith A; Porter, Alison; Rosen, Rebecca; Mays, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the work of commissioning care for people with long-term conditions and the factors inhibiting or facilitating commissioners making service change. Design Multisite mixed methods case study research, combining qualitative analysis of interviews, documents and observation of meetings. Participants Primary care trust managers and clinicians, general practice-based commissioners, National Health Service trust and foundation trust senior managers and clinicians, voluntary sector and local government representatives. Setting Three ‘commissioning communities’ (areas covered by a primary care trust) in England, 2010–2012. Results Commissioning services for people with long-term conditions was a long drawn-out process involving a range of activities and partners. Only some of the activities undertaken by commissioners, such as assessment of local health needs, coordination of healthcare planning and service specification, appeared in the official ‘commissioning cycle’ promoted by the Department of Health. Commissioners undertook a significant range of additional activities focused on reviewing and redesigning services and providing support for implementation of new services. These activities often involved partnership working with providers and other stakeholders and appeared to be largely divorced from contracting and financial negotiations. At least for long-term condition services, the time and effort involved in such work appeared to be disproportionate to the anticipated or likely service gains. Commissioners adopting an incremental approach to service change in defined and manageable areas of work appeared to be more successful in terms of delivering planned changes in service delivery than those attempting to bring about wide-scale change across complex systems. Conclusions Commissioning for long-term condition services challenges the conventional distinction between commissioners and providers with a significant amount of work focused on redesigning services in partnership with providers. Such work is labour-intensive and potentially unsustainable at a time of reduced finances. New clinical commissioning groups will need to determine how best to balance the relational and transactional elements of commissioning. PMID:24014483

  10. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures. PMID:24804914

  11. A Case Study of American Bicycle Culture: How Cycling to Work Works in a Small Town in Kansas

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carolina

    2011-08-31

    and explore their attitudes as to what would make them attempt the behavior in the future. Other studies investigate the behaviors, choices, and decisions made by active transportation commuters using solely the survey method (Sallis, et al., 2004). One... on the number of people riding their bikes to the Lewis and Clark Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Conveniently, this also happens to be where my family and I live. Through my observations, I learned that, although few in number, more people rode...

  12. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR?=?1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR?=?1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR?=?2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR?=?1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR?=?1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR?=?1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. PMID:24884707

  13. Goals of telephone nursing work - the managers’ perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish healthcare direct

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD. Methods The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis. Results The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: ‘create feelings of trust’, ‘achieve patient safety’, ‘assess, refer and give advice’, and ‘teach the caller’. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given. Conclusions The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers’ expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems. PMID:24762193

  14. Suicide Notes in Hong Kong in 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Yeung, April W. M.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Yip, Paul S. F.; Tang, Arthur K. H.

    2009-01-01

    Suicide notes have been regarded as one of the most informative data sources to understand the reasons why people commit suicide. However, there is a paucity of suicide note studies, leaving researchers with an assumption that this phenomenon remains static over time. This study examines this assumption by comparing the characteristics of…

  15. Woodworking injuries: a comparative study of work-related and hobby-related accidents.

    PubMed

    Loisel, F; Bonin, S; Jeunet, L; Pauchot, J; Tropet, Y; Obert, L

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the injury characteristics and demographics of patients injured during woodworking activities, upon their arrival to the emergency department in a regional of France where this industry is prevalent. The secondary objective was to compare patient and injury characteristics for work-related and hobby-related accidents. A cohort of 87 patients who had suffered a woodworking accident over a two-year period was evaluated; 79 were available for follow-up. The context and circumstances of the accident, nature and location of the injuries and patient demographics were recorded. Hobby-related accidents accounted for two-thirds of the accidents (51/79). Most of the injured workers were either loggers (35%) or carpenters (46%). The hand was injured in 53 cases (67%). Work-related accidents resulted in significantly more serious consequences in terms of hospital stay, work stoppage, resumption of work or retraining than hobby-related accidents. For the workplace accidents, 86% occurred on new machines; more than 25% of the machines involved in accidents at home were over 15 years. Sixty-eight per cent of workers were wearing their safety gear, while only 31% of those injured during recreational woodworking wore the appropriate gear. Several elements of prevention should be improved: information about the need to maintain the equipment, protect the worker with suitable clothing, and learn which maneuvers are considered hazardous. Safety gear should be regularly inspected in the workplace. PMID:25043313

  16. Correlation between work concentration level and background music: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2009-01-01

    It is a common phenomenon for office workers {to listen to music} while executing daily routines at their desks. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between work concentration level and background music. This research would first follow examples in previous researches, and then explore the influence of background music on participants' scores on attention tests. We hope to gain a preliminary understanding of the possible influence of background music on people's focus and concentration when doing work. Thirty-two college students were separated into three controlled groups; all were given the attention test. Group [a] listened to background music while being tested for 10 minutes; group [b] had no background music at all; and group [c] listened to the music for 10 minutes prior to the attention test. The test was conducted in a "noise free" environment. The means and error rates for each group were then calculated. The findings showed that, in comparison with "no music at all", those who listened to music prior to testing obtained higher scores in attentiveness (most probably a supplemental effect of the music), whereas those who listened to music during attention test showed extremely high level of variation in attention test scoring. Background music does affect people's job-site behavior. In fact, all three test conditions - no background music at all, background music before the work shift, and background music during work - have affected worker performance on different levels. PMID:19759431

  17. Linnaeus' study of Swedish swidden cultivation: Pioneering ethnographic work on the 'economy of nature'.

    PubMed

    Dove, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Carl Linnaeus' work on the 'economy of nature' was a major early development in what became the modern field of ecology. This analysis suggests that a key subject of this work that has been ignored or misunderstood for 250 years is the rural livelihoods, especially swidden (or slash-and-burn) agriculture, which Linnaeus studied during his expeditions through rural Sweden. Rereading his reports in the light of modern work on swiddens, political ecology, and the history of science affords a new appreciation of Linnaeus' insights into traditional systems of resource exploitation. The logic of nutrient cycling in swidden agriculture and its utilization of natural dynamics to serve human ends exemplify the principles of the 'economy of nature', and gave Linnaeus a philosophical basis for understanding and defending this system of agriculture as well as other rural resource use systems in Sweden. This analysis sheds new light on Linnaeus' ethnographic work, his view of folk environmental knowledge, and his often derided identification with Sweden's ethnic peoples. PMID:25155194

  18. Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Bergsten, Eva L.; Mathiassen, S. E.; Vingård, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Swedish flight baggage handlers. Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire) and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ) was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports. Results. Low back (LBP) and shoulder pain (SP) were reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW) by 30% (low back) and 18% (shoulders), and intense pain (PINT) occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67–7.99) and 2.68 (1.09–6.61)) while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIW LBP (HR 2.18 (1.06–4.49)) and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05–3.65) and 2.11 (1.08–4.12)). Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation. PMID:26558282

  19. Health Care Costs and the Socioeconomic Consequences of Work Injuries in Brazil: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, Vilma Sousa; FERNANDES DE SOUZA, Luis Eugênio Portela; PINTO, Isabela Cardoso de Matos

    2013-01-01

    Work injuries are a worldwide public health problem but little is known about their socioeconomic impact. This prospective longitudinal study estimates the direct health care costs and socioeconomic consequences of work injuries for 406 workers identified in the emergency departments of the two largest public hospitals in Salvador, Brazil, from June through September 2005. After hospital discharge workers were followed up monthly until their return to work. Most insured workers were unaware of their rights or of how to obtain insurance benefits (81.6%). Approximately half the cases suffered loss of earnings, and women were more frequently dismissed than men. The most frequently reported family consequences were: need for a family member to act as a caregiver and difficulties with daily expenses. Total costs were US$40,077.00 but individual costs varied widely, according to injury severity. Out-of-pocket costs accounted for the highest proportion of total costs (50.5%) and increased with severity (57.6%). Most out-of-pocket costs were related to transport and purchasing medicines and other wound care products. The second largest contribution (40.6%) came from the public National Health System ? SUS. Employer participation was negligible. Health care funding must be discussed to alleviate the economic burden of work injuries on workers. PMID:23803496

  20. Eye-gaze patterns as students study worked-out examples in mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam D.; Mestre, Jose P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2010-07-01

    This study explores what introductory physics students actually look at when studying worked-out examples. Our classroom experiences indicate that introductory physics students neither discuss nor refer to the conceptual information contained in the text of worked-out examples. This study is an effort to determine to what extent students incorporate the textual information into the way they study. Student eye-gaze patterns were recorded as they studied the examples to aid them in solving a target problem. Contrary to our expectations from classroom interactions, students spent 40±3% of their gaze time reading the textual information. Their gaze patterns were also characterized by numerous jumps between corresponding mathematical and textual information, implying that they were combining information from both sources. Despite this large fraction of time spent reading the text, student recall of the conceptual information contained therein remained very poor. We also found that having a particular problem in mind had no significant effects on the gaze-patterns or conceptual information retention.

  1. Work and Risk: Perceptions of Nuclear-Power Personnel. a Study in Grounded Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Claire Dewitt

    1992-01-01

    The utility industry has devoted time and money to assure personnel within nuclear power plants are informed about occupational risks. Radiation-protection training programs are designed to present information to employees about occupational radiation and protective procedures. Work -related concerns are known to create stress, affect the morale of the workforce, influence collective bargaining, and increase compensation claims. This study was designed to determine perceptions of risk among employees of nuclear power plants and identify variables that influence these perceptions. Four power plants were included in the study, one in Canada and three in the United States. Data were generated through participant observations and interviews of 350 participants during a period of 3 weeks at each plant. Data were gathered and analyzed following procedures advanced by Grounded Theory, a naturalistic methodology used in this study. Training content, information, and communication materials were additional sources of data. Findings indicated employees believed health and safety risks existed within the work environment. Perceptions of risk were influenced by training quality, the work environment, nuclear myths and images of the general public, and fears of family members. Among the three groups of workers, administration personnel, security personnel, and radiation workers, the latter identified a larger number of risks. Workers perceived radiation risks, shift work, and steam pipe ruptures as high-level concerns. Experiencing stress, making mistakes, and fear of sabotage were concerns shared among all employee groups at various levels of concern. Strategies developed by employees were used to control risk. Strategies included teamwork, humor, monitoring, avoidance, reframing, and activism. When risks were perceived as uncontrollable, the employee left the plant. A coping strategy of transferring concerns about radiological risks to nonradiological risks were uncovered in the data. Implications and recommendations include (a) the development of interactive training sessions concerning perceptions and facts of radiological exposures, (b) informational training for nonradiological employees, and (c) educational material development for family members and friends of employees.

  2. Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

  3. Work resumption or not after rehabilitation? A descriptive study from six social insurance offices.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Asa; Bergroth, Alf; Ekholm, Jan

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe measures and outcomes of vocational rehabilitation at six local national insurance offices in the same county in Sweden. Data were collected from mainframe registers and other records at each office. There were great differences in sickness allowance, incapacity rate, selected rehabilitation measures and resuming work. The percentage of sick-listed people who received any rehabilitation measure differed from 1.2 to 8.7%. The gender distribution for the study population was 36% men and 64% women and the predominant diagnosis was musculoskeletal pain conditions, which was followed by psychiatric disorders. Outcomes varied from office B, which reported 58% fully fit after completed planned rehabilitation, to office C, which reported only 24% fully fit. The clear differences in outcome between the offices indicate that various rehabilitation measures differ in effectiveness. The rehabilitation measure 'investigation of working ability' was not linked to any great proportion of people resuming work, but showed a greater correspondence to full disability pension. There were also large differences in social and demographic factors in the different municipalities. The effect of these on the rehabilitation process requires further investigation. PMID:15319686

  4. Working memory deficits in multiple sclerosis: a controlled study with auditory P600 correlates

    PubMed Central

    Sfagos, C; Papageorgiou, C; Kosma, K; Kodopadelis, E; Uzunoglu, N; Vassilopoulos, D; Rabavilas, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Recently, the P600 component of event related potentials, a waveform that is conceived to be generated and/or modulated by basal ganglia and cingulate area has been considered an index of the completion of any synchronised operation after target detection, having much in common with working memory operation. Moreover, dysfunction of these brain structures as well as working memory deficits have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of P600 elicited during a working memory test in multiple sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls. Methods: Twenty two definite, chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patients, with recent exacerbation of their illness, and 20 normal subjects matched for age, sex, and educational level, were studied with a computerised version of the digit span test of Wechsler batteries. Auditory P600 were measured during the anticipatory period of this test. Results: The patient group, as compared with healthy controls, showed significantly reduced latencies of P600 at left frontal areas and reduced P600 amplitudes at left temporoparietal region. Moreover, memory performance of patients was significantly more impaired when compared with healthy controls. Conclusions: These findings may indicate that multiple sclerosis is associated with abnormal features of the completion of synchronised operation after target detection, as they are reflected by P600 amplitudes and latencies. Dysfunction of this mechanism may contribute to the identification of basic cognitive processes that could account for the cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis. PMID:12933924

  5. An ecological study of regional variation in work injuries among young workers

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, F Curtis; Smith, Peter; Dunn, James R

    2007-01-01

    Background The investigation of geographic variation in occupational injuries has received little attention. Young workers 15 to 24 years are of particular concern because they consistently show elevated occupational injury rates compared to older workers. The present study sought to: (a) to describe the geographic variation of work injuries; (b) to determine whether geographic variation remained after controlling for relevant demographic and job characteristics; (c) to identify the region-level factors that correlate with the geographic variation. Methods Using workers compensation claims and census data, we estimated claim rates per 100 full-time equivalents for 15 to 24 year olds in 46 regions in Ontario. A total of 21 region-level indicators were derived primarily from Census and Labour Force Survey data to reflect social and material deprivation of the region as well as demographic and employment characteristics of youth living in those areas. Results Descriptive findings showed substantial geographic variation in young worker injury rates, even after controlling for several job and demographic variables. Region-level characteristics such as greater residential stability were associated with low work injury rates. Also, regions with the lowest claim rates tended to have proportionally fewer cuts and burns than high-claim-rate regions. Conclusion The finding of substantial geographic variation in youth claim rates even after controlling for demographic and job factors can aid in targeting prevention resource. The association between region-level indicators such as residential stability and youth work injury suggests that work injury prevention strategies can be integrated with other local economic development measures. The findings partially support the notion that work safety measures may be unevenly distributed with respect to regional socio-economic factors. PMID:17521448

  6. International variation in absence from work attributed to musculoskeletal illness: findings from the CUPID study

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, José Miguel; Serra, Consol; Benavides, Fernando G; Palmer, Keith T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the variation in rates of absence due to musculoskeletal pain across 47 occupational groups (mostly nurses and office workers) from 18 countries, and to explore personal and group-level risk factors that might explain observed differences. Methods A standardised questionnaire was used to obtain information about musculoskeletal pain, sickness absence and possible risk factors in a cross-sectional survey of 12?416 workers (92–1017 per occupational group). Additionally, group-level data on socioeconomic variables, such as sick pay and unemployment rates, were assembled by members of the study team in each country. Associations of sickness absence with risk factors were examined by Poisson regression. Results Overall, there were more than 30-fold differences between occupational groups in the 12-month prevalence of prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence, and even among office workers carrying out similar occupational tasks, the variation was more than tenfold. Personal risk factors included older age, lower educational level, tendency to somatise, physical loading at work and prolonged absence for non-musculoskeletal illness. However, these explained little of the variation between occupational groups. After adjustment for individual characteristics, prolonged musculoskeletal sickness absence was more frequent in groups with greater time pressure at work, lower job control and more adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness of musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusions Musculoskeletal sickness absence might be reduced by eliminating excessive time pressures in work, maximising employees’ responsibility and control and providing flexibility of duties for those with disabling symptoms. Care should be taken not to overstate work as a cause of musculoskeletal injury. PMID:23695413

  7. Speech Perception and Working Memory in Children with Residual Speech Errors: A Case Study Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cabbage, Kathryn L; Farquharson, Kelly; Hogan, Tiffany P

    2015-11-01

    Some children with residual deficits in speech production also display characteristics of dyslexia; however, the causes of these disorders--in isolation or comorbidly--remain unknown. Presently, the role of phonological representations is an important construct for considering how the underlying system of phonology functions. In particular, two related skills--speech perception and phonological working memory--may provide insight into the nature of phonological representations. This study provides an exploratory investigation into the profiles of three 9-year-old children: one with residual speech errors, one with residual speech errors and dyslexia, and one who demonstrated typical, age-appropriate speech sound production and reading skills. We provide an in-depth examination of their relative abilities in the areas of speech perception, phonological working memory, vocabulary, and word reading. Based on these preliminary explorations, we suggest implications for the assessment and treatment of children with residual speech errors and/or dyslexia. PMID:26458199

  8. The Use of Decision Support Systems in Social Work: A Scoping Study Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Liedgren, Pernilla; Elvhage, Gudrun; Ehrenberg, Anna; Kullberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems are known to be helpful for professionals in many medical professions. In social work, decision support systems have had modest use, accompanied by strong criticism from the profession but often by praise from political management. In this study the aim of the authors was to collect and report on the published evidence on decision support systems in social work. The conclusion of the authors is that a decision support system gives support to social workers in conducting a thorough investigation, but at the same time gives them the freedom to make autonomous decisions that might be the most helpful for and used by social workers. Their results also indicate that decision support systems focusing on atypical rather than typical cases are perceived as the most useful among experienced staff. PMID:26061124

  9. Metal working fluid-associated hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an outbreak investigation and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fox, J; Anderson, H; Moen, T; Gruetzmacher, G; Hanrahan, L; Fink, J

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to bacterial or fungal antigens has been associated with hypersensivity pneumonitis (HP), an immunologically-mediated pulmonary disease. Between August 1995 and April 1996, 34 employees working in machining and assembly areas of an engine manufacturing plant were clinically diagnosed with HP. Of these, 20 employees met an epidemiologic case definition. In a case-control study, no exposure variables, including duration and intensity of metal working fluid (MWF) exposure, were statistically associated with an increased risk of disease. Neither cases nor controls demonstrated precipitin reactivity against unused samples of the seven MWF and two biocides used in the plant. HP cases had a significantly higher prevalence of positive precipitin reactions to used oil soluble and synthetic MWFs. Reactivity to used but not unused MWF suggests a biocontaminant, probably bacteria or fungi, is the causative antigen in the development of HP in this setting. PMID:9884746

  10. Farmers’ Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) Study: Study Design, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics of Enrolled Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hannae; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background The ongoing Farmers’ Cohort for Agricultural Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) study was developed to evaluate health status and related factors in farmers. Methods Farmers in Kangwon Province, South Korea, were recruited. Baseline characteristics were determined using questionnaires about sociodemographic and health characteristics and agricultural work-related factors. In addition, laboratory examinations (lumbar spinal radiography and serologic testing) were conducted. Results The FARM study covers eight rural areas and recruited 1013 subjects (534 women; mean [standard deviation {SD}] age, 57.2 [7.5] years). Musculoskeletal pain in multiple areas was reported by 925 subjects (91.3%), and low back pain (63.8%) was the most frequent site of pain. Farmer’s Stress Inventory (mean [SD], 77.7 [10.2]; range, 28–112] and subjective stress index (mean [SD], 5.3 [2.4]; range, 0–10) were above median scale values, reflecting a stressful condition, while the EuroQol-5D-3L index and the EuroQol-Visual Analog Scale scores were high (mean [SD], 0.9 [0.1]; range ?0.171–1 and mean [SD], 67.7 [18.7]; range 0–100, respectively), reflecting good life quality. In total, 53% of participants had worked in farming for more than 30 years, and workers involved in dry-field farming comprised the largest subgroup (41.5%). Most participants (94.3%) had no more than a high school education, and families with annual income below 20 million won constituted the largest subgroup (36.3%). Conclusions The FARM study may provide data on the current health status and related sociodemographic and agricultural work-related risk factors in Korean farmers, with the goal of providing a scientific basis for developing coping interventions and preventive strategies. PMID:26235456

  11. GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David

    2002-01-01

    Status, progress and plans will be given for current GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System Study) WG2 (Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems) projects, including: (a) the Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project, (b) the Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project (Phase 2), and (c) the developing Hurricane Nora extended outflow model case study project. Past results will be summarized and plans for the upcoming year described. Issues and strategies will be discussed. Prospects for developing improved cloud parameterizations derived from results of GCSS WG2 projects will be assessed. Plans for NASA's CRYSTAL-FACE (Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment) potential opportunities for use of those data for WG2 model simulations (future projects) will be briefly described.

  12. In situ nanoindentation study on plasticity and work hardening in aluminium with incoherent twin boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bufford, D; Liu, Y; Wang, J; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2014-01-01

    Nanotwinned metals have been the focus of intense research recently, as twin boundaries may greatly enhance mechanical strength, while maintaining good ductility, electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Most prior studies have focused on low stacking-fault energy nanotwinned metals with coherent twin boundaries. In contrast, the plasticity of twinned high stacking-fault energy metals, such as aluminium with incoherent twin boundaries, has not been investigated. Here we report high work hardening capacity and plasticity in highly twinned aluminium containing abundant ?3{112} incoherent twin boundaries based on in situ nanoindentation studies in a transmission electron microscope and corresponding molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations also reveal drastic differences in deformation mechanisms between nanotwinned copper and twinned aluminium ascribed to stacking-fault energy controlled dislocation-incoherent twin boundary interactions. This study provides new insight into incoherent twin boundary-dominated plasticity in high stacking-fault energy twinned metals. PMID:25204688

  13. Professional Competence Development of the Social Work Specialists in the Period of Study in the System of Additional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davletkaliev, Denis Kuanyshevich; Zueva, Natalia Konstantinovna; Lebedeva, Natalya Vasilevna; Mkrtumova, Irina Vladimirovna; Timofeeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is the study of psychological-pedagogical approaches to the understanding of the idea of professional competence of social work specialists as well as the role of study in the system of additional educations in professional-personal development of the listeners. In the process of study of this problem we define main…

  14. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  15. WWC Review of the Report "Does Working Memory Moderate the Effects of Fraction Intervention? An Aptitude-Treatment Interaction." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 study, "Does Working Memory Moderate the Effects of Fraction Intervention? An Aptitude-Treatment Interaction," examined the impacts of the fluency and conceptual versions of "Fraction Face-Off!," a math instruction program designed to improve knowledge of fractions and decimals in fourth-graders at risk for low…

  16. A Descriptive Study of Perceived Impact of Gender on Employment Status, Type of Work, Industry Relationships, Working Environment & Job Satisfaction in Livestock Industry Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A two-part study examined the employment status, distribution, job satisfaction, and promotion opportunities of women working for livestock industry magazines. Livestock publications were chosen for this research because they are typical of industry-related magazines and are traditionally dominated by males. The mastheads of 59 magazines were…

  17. New PIC/Postsecondary Alliances. How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work. Six Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Work and Learning, Washington, DC.

    Case studies are provided of the six sites involved in a demonstration project to encourage partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs). These programs represent instances of collaborations between colleges/universities and the Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and…

  18. Work Stress and Metabolic Syndrome in Police Officers. A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Garbarino, Sergio; Magnavita, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the association between occupational stress and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a rapid response police unit. Method Work-related stress was continuously monitored during the 5-year period with both the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) and the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) models. Blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured at baseline in January 2009, and in January 2014. 234 out of 290 police officers (81%) completed the follow-up. Results The majority of police officers had high stress levels. At follow-up, police officers in the highest quartile of stress had significantly higher mean levels of triglycerides, and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol than their colleagues in the lowest quartile. Police officers with high stress had an increased adjusted risk of developing MetS (aOR = 2.68; CI95% = 1.08–6.70), and hypertriglyceridemia (aOR = 7.86; CI95 = 1.29–48.04). Demand and Effort were significant predictors of MetS. Conclusion Our study supports the hypothesis that work-related stress induces MetS, particularly through its effects on blood lipids. Future longitudinal studies with continuous monitoring of stress levels will definitively confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26641879

  19. Work environment issues and intention-to-leave in Portuguese nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Bruyneel, Luk; Anderson, Janet E; Murrells, Trevor; Dussault, Gilles; Henriques de Jesus, Élvio; Sermeus, Walter; Aiken, Linda; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    This study extends the Registered Nurses Forecasting (RN4CAST) study evidence base with newly collected data from Portuguese nurses working in acute care hospitals, in which the measurement of the quality of work environment, workload and its association with intention-to-leave emerge as of key importance. Data included surveys of 2235 nurses in 144 nursing units in 31 hospitals via stratified random sampling. Multilevel multivariate regression analysis shows that intention-to-leave is higher among nurses with a specialty degree, nurses aged 35-39, and in nursing units where nurses are less satisfied with opportunities for career advancement, staffing levels and participation in hospital affairs. Analysis with moderation effects showed the observed effect of age and of having a specialty degree on intention-to-leave during the regression analysis is reduced in nursing units where nurses are more satisfied with opportunities for career advancement. The most important finding from the study suggests that promoting retention strategies that increase satisfaction with opportunities for career advancement among Portuguese nurses has the potential to override individual characteristics associated with increased turnover intentions. PMID:26474746

  20. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The report describes the work breakdown structure (WBS) and its associated WBS dictionary for task area 1 of contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies (ATSS). This WBS format is consistent with the preliminary design level of detail employed by both task area 1 and task area 4 in the ATSS study and is intended to provide an estimating structure for parametric cost estimates.

  1. Extravehicular Crewman Work System (ECWS) study program. Volume 3: Satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The satellite service portion of the Extravehicular Crewman Work System Study defines requirements and service equipment concepts for performing satellite service from the space shuttle orbiter. Both normal and contingency orbital satellite service is required. Service oriented satellite design practices are required to provide on orbit satellite service capability for the wide variety of satellites at the subsystem level. Development of additional satellite service equipment is required. The existing space transportation system provides a limited capability for performing satellite service tasks in the shuttle payload bay area.

  2. Performance Study on ST/JT Hybrid Cryocoolers Working at Liquid Helium Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongli, Liu; Xuan, Tao; Xiao, Sun; Zhihua, Gan

    The ST/JT hybridcryocooler consists of a Stirling-typecryocooler and a J-T loop. The common process of steady-state operation is given. Pressure-Enthalpy map analysis and thermodynamic calculation showhow the precooling temperature, high pressure and recuperator effectiveness affect thecooling powerat liquid helium temperature. Applying the current performance level of the Stirling cooler,the overall COP of the hybrid cryocooleris roughly optimized. This performance study shows that the hybrid cryocooler can develop its performance potential with improved J-T compressors with larger pressure ratio and aprecooler working at lower temperature.

  3. Psychotic Experiences, Working Memory, and the Developing Brain: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Study.

    PubMed

    Fonville, Leon; Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Drakesmith, Mark; Dutt, Anirban; Zammit, Stanley; Mollon, Josephine; Reichenberg, Abraham; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Derek K; David, Anthony S

    2015-12-01

    Psychotic experiences (PEs) occur in the general population, especially in children and adolescents, and are associated with poor psychosocial outcomes, impaired cognition, and increased risk of transition to psychosis. It is unknown how the presence and persistence of PEs during early adulthood affects cognition and brain function. The current study assessed working memory as well as brain function and structure in 149 individuals, with and without PEs, drawn from a population cohort. Observer-rated PEs were classified as persistent or transient on the basis of longitudinal assessments. Working memory was assessed using the n-back task during fMRI. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was used to characterize frontoparietal network configuration and voxel-based morphometry was utilized to examine gray matter. Those with persistent, but not transient, PEs performed worse on the n-back task, compared with controls, yet showed no significant differences in regional brain activation or brain structure. DCM analyses revealed greater emphasis on frontal connectivity within a frontoparietal network in those with PEs compared with controls. We propose that these findings portray an altered configuration of working memory function in the brain, potentially indicative of an adaptive response to atypical development associated with the manifestation of PEs. PMID:26286920

  4. Immigration experience of Latin American working women in Alicante, Spain: an ethnographic study 1

    PubMed Central

    González-Juárez, Liliana; Noreña-Peña, Ana Lucía

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to describe the experience of Latin American working women regarding immigration, taking into account the expectations and conditions in which this process takes place. METHOD: ethnographic qualitative study. Data collection was performed by means of semi-structured interviews with 24 Latin American immigrant women in Spain. The information collected was triangulated through two focal groups. RESULTS: the expectations of migrant women focus on improving family living conditions. Social support is essential for their settling and to perform daily life activities. They declare they have adapted to the settlement country, although they live with stress. They perceive they have greater sexual freedom and power with their partners but keep greater responsibility in childcare, combining that with the role of working woman. CONCLUSIONS: migrant women play a key role in the survival of households, they build and create new meanings about being a woman, their understanding of life, their social and couple relationships. Such importance is shaped by their expectations and the conditions in which the migration process takes place, as well as their work integration. PMID:25493683

  5. Psychotic Experiences, Working Memory, and the Developing Brain: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Fonville, Leon; Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Drakesmith, Mark; Dutt, Anirban; Zammit, Stanley; Mollon, Josephine; Reichenberg, Abraham; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Derek K.; David, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Psychotic experiences (PEs) occur in the general population, especially in children and adolescents, and are associated with poor psychosocial outcomes, impaired cognition, and increased risk of transition to psychosis. It is unknown how the presence and persistence of PEs during early adulthood affects cognition and brain function. The current study assessed working memory as well as brain function and structure in 149 individuals, with and without PEs, drawn from a population cohort. Observer-rated PEs were classified as persistent or transient on the basis of longitudinal assessments. Working memory was assessed using the n-back task during fMRI. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was used to characterize frontoparietal network configuration and voxel-based morphometry was utilized to examine gray matter. Those with persistent, but not transient, PEs performed worse on the n-back task, compared with controls, yet showed no significant differences in regional brain activation or brain structure. DCM analyses revealed greater emphasis on frontal connectivity within a frontoparietal network in those with PEs compared with controls. We propose that these findings portray an altered configuration of working memory function in the brain, potentially indicative of an adaptive response to atypical development associated with the manifestation of PEs. PMID:26286920

  6. Schooling, Local Knowledge and Working Memory: A Study among Three Contemporary Hunter-Gatherer Societies.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Victoria; Pyhälä, Aili; Díaz-Reviriego, Isabel; Duda, Romain; Fernández-Llamazares, Álvaro; Gallois, Sandrine; Guèze, Maximilien; Napitupulu, Lucentezza

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have analysed whether school and local knowledge complement or substitute each other, but have paid less attention to whether those two learning models use different cognitive strategies. In this study, we use data collected among three contemporary hunter-gatherer societies with relatively low levels of exposure to schooling yet with high levels of local ecological knowledge to test the association between i) schooling and ii) local ecological knowledge and verbal working memory. Participants include 94 people (24 Baka, 25 Punan, and 45 Tsimane') from whom we collected information on 1) schooling and school related skills (i.e., literacy and numeracy), 2) local knowledge and skills related to hunting and medicinal plants, and 3) working memory. To assess working memory, we applied a multi-trial free recall using words relevant to each cultural setting. People with and without schooling have similar levels of accurate and inaccurate recall, although they differ in their strategies to organize recall: people with schooling have higher results for serial clustering, suggesting better learning with repetition, whereas people without schooling have higher results for semantic clustering, suggesting they organize recall around semantically meaningful categories. Individual levels of local ecological knowledge are not related to accurate recall or organization recall, arguably due to overall high levels of local ecological knowledge. While schooling seems to favour some organization strategies this might come at the expense of some other organization strategies. PMID:26735297

  7. Work and headache: a prospective study of psychological, social, and mechanical predictors of headache severity.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jan Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2012-10-01

    Headache is a common health complaint responsible for substantial suffering and disability. Although musculoskeletal complaints such as back and neck pain have frequently been associated with occupational psychological and social factors, headache has received less attention as a possible outcome of such exposures. The aim of the present study was to identify occupational psychological, social, and mechanical factors that predicted headache severity. Furthermore, using a full panel design, cross-lagged and synchronous structural equation models were employed to test reverse causality. Data were obtained by work environment surveys in a wide variety of organizations in Norway, with a two-year follow-up period. At baseline 6421 employees responded and 3574 employees also responded at follow-up. Ordinal logistic regression models revealed that 7 of 16 psychological/social/mechanical factors were prospectively related to headache severity. Most consistently, higher quantitative demands and role conflict, and lower decision control, control over work intensity, and job satisfaction were related to more severe headache at follow-up. Cross-lagged models indicated an impact across a 2-year period of decision control, control over work intensity, and job satisfaction on headache severity. Reverse effects from headache severity to quantitative demands were indicated. For role conflict, no cross-lagged effects were observed. However, synchronous models supported the notion of an effect of each of these factors on headache severity over a time span shorter than 2 years. PMID:22906887

  8. Studying Knowledge Work It has been mentioned earlier in this thesis, but it is worth to repeat that the

    E-print Network

    Broberg, Anders

    6 Studying Knowledge Work It has been mentioned earlier in this thesis, but it is worth to repeat that the part of the population that has information as a major working object will continue to grow in both. The process to answer that question involves both theoretical work, like that in the first part of this thesis

  9. Domain-Specific Treatment Effects in Children with Language and/or Working Memory Impairments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wener, Sarah E; Archibald, Lisa MD

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study with an n-of-1 design examined whether children with a specific language impairment without working memory impairment (SLI), a specific working memory impairment without language impairment (SWMI), or mixed language and working memory impairments (L&WMI) may respond differently to treatment targeting verbal or visuospatial…

  10. [An occupational physiology study at the Asarel Mining and Milling Works. The evaluation of the work load in the basic jobs in an open-pit mine].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, L; Khadzhiolova, I; Deianov, Kh

    1995-01-01

    This occupational physiology study was undertaken within a wider applied-research framework designed to evaluate the occupational environment and its impact on workers at "Asarel" Mining and Milling Works. Analysis of activities showed physical effort (dynamic and static) to be the major problem at the open pit, though varying in extent between jobs (most prominent for blasters and bulldozerists). Nervous/emotional strain, while not leading, was sustained mostly by diggers and blasters, followed by drivers. Organization of work (shift regimen, no regulated breaks, stepwise schedule of days off work) was hardly appropriate and did not allow for recovery. Interviewed workers qualified working conditions as extremely unfavorable; they disapproved with the physical factors of the occupational environment, the workplace, the state of machines and devices, and remuneration for work performed. Exertion from work, assessed by pulse rate and energy expended, was moderate for most activities of diggers, drivers, and drillers. The burden of physical effort was great for blasters at the open pit and for diggers and drillers performing extra repair operations (pulse rate, 100-110 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.2-5.5 Kcal/min). Hardest and least attractive was the work of blasters at stores for explosive materials (pulse rate, 120-141 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.5-6.5 Kcal/min). These adverse factors of labor activities might produce a negative impact on worker health and performance, leading to occupational impairment of their musculoskeletal system, to labor-related disorders of their cardiovascular and nervous systems, etc. Preventive measures are thus necessary to limit physical exertion, optimize the work-and-rest regimen; also, there is a need for conducting pertinent preventive medical examinations, providing social measures (conditions for transportation, rest, nutrition, sports), etc. PMID:8524750

  11. Work with prolonged arm elevation as a risk factor for shoulder pain: a longitudinal study among young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanvold, Therese Nordberg; Wærsted, Morten; Mengshoel, Anne Marit; Bjertness, Espen; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2015-03-01

    This prospective study aimed at examining if work with prolonged arm elevation predicts shoulder pain among 41 young adults in their first years of working life. Fifteen hairdressers, 15 electricians, 5 students and 6 with various work were followed over a 2.5-year period (2006/7-2009). Arm elevation was measured with inclinometers during a full working day at baseline. Shoulder pain was reported at baseline and twice in the follow-up period. Data were analyzed by generalized estimating equations (GEE-analysis), stratified by gender and adjusted for time, mechanical workload, work demand, physical activity, tobacco use and prior shoulder pain. Work with prolonged arm elevation with angles >60° and >90° were associated with shoulder pain among women. Even though the shoulder pain levels are low the study suggests work with arms elevated as an early work-related risk factor among women, and indicates the importance of early prevention strategies. PMID:25479973

  12. Prevalence of work related upper limb disorders in hairdressers: a cross sectional study on the influence of working conditions and psychological, ergonomic and physical factors.

    PubMed

    De Smet, E; Germeys, F; De Smet, L

    2009-01-01

    A cross sectional study where 145 hairdressers were interviewed for the occurrence of work related upper limb disorders (WRULD). The interview features for engagement, burnout and workaholism, as well as asks for general health and working conditions. The BMI, the hand size and gripping force of each worker was obtained. WRULD was present in 41%. It was significantly correlated with burnout and workaholism. Surprisingly it was not altered by engagement or by the use of ergonomic equipment. Morphological features (BMI), hand size and gripping force, were not related to the occurrence of WRULD. PMID:20037247

  13. Notes 16. Analysis of tilting pad bearings 

    E-print Network

    San Andres, Luis

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info Notes 16 Analysis Tilt Pad bearings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 56514 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Notes 16 Analysis Tilt Pad bearings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset...=ISO-8859-1 NOTES 16. STATIC AND DYNAMIC FORCED PERFORMANCE OF TILTING PAD BEARINGS: ANALYSIS INCLUDING PIVOT STIFFNESS Dr. Luis San Andr?s Mast-Childs Professor August 2010 SUMMARY Work in progress ? still a lot of be done...

  14. Technical Notes Compressive Sensing and Reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Huang, Xun

    Technical Notes Compressive Sensing and Reconstruction in Measurements with an Aerospace. Introduction COMPRESSIVE sensing is a newly emerging signal-processing method [1,2] in information technologies. In this note, we introduce the fundamentals of compressive sensing and demonstrate its usage by studying

  15. Potential Danger in Pre-populating Exam Note Sheets with Formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaskey, Timothy L.

    2015-09-01

    In previous work, I allowed students in my introductory physics course to write note sheets to prepare for exams, and I analyzed the contents as a way of determining what students saw as important in my course. In the present study, I tried a new note sheet approach where I supplied some equations for their notes in advance, thinking that doing so would focus students on other important conceptual aspects of the course. In all cases, I gave a brief survey to get student perspectives on their exam preparation. In addition, I introduced an online pre-exam forum asking students to respond to two short questions about how they might prepare their notes for the exam.

  16. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices--one located in Denmark and one in Australia--negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers. PMID:25442013

  17. Vertical and Horizontal Trust at Work as Predictors of Retirement Intentions: The Finnish Public Sector Study

    PubMed Central

    Muurinen, Charlotte; Laine, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Oksanen, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust) and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust) with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000–12 (Finnish Public Sector Study). Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers) and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53–0.67) and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55–0.70) at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement. PMID:25191745

  18. Gifts on a High Note: A Case Study of Major Donors to Music Programs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barascout, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This study is an examination of the giving decision-making process, as well as the factors, characteristics, and motivators of major donors to music programs in higher education. The college and the conservatory of music selected for this study are part of large, public, doctoral, research universities in metropolitan areas with at least three…

  19. Exploring Multiple Spaces and Practices: A Note on the Use of Ethnography in Research in Library and Information Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Hanna; Hanell, Fredrik; Lindh, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, there has been a growing interest in ethnographic research within the field of library and Information studies. Although ethnography has been used by information researchers for studying a wide variety of phenomena, discussions concerning methodological developments and directions, as well as ethnography's wider…

  20. Lean production and work-related musculoskeletal disorders: overviews of international and Swedish studies.

    PubMed

    Brännmark, Mikael; Håkansson, Malin

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed at summarizing the knowledge of the relationship between Lean and work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), and WMSD risk factors, in manufacturing companies. Literature search processes identified 23 publications studying this, in scientific journals. Eight included measurements of WMSD; three were mostly negative, two showed mixed results, one showed no results and two were mostly positive. Eighteen publications included measurements of WMSD risk factors; seven showed mostly negative results, eight showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one was inconclusive. Three literature reviews were identified, which studied this question; two were mostly negative, while the third was inconclusive. Also, 12 publications of grey literature studying Lean and WMSD risk factors in Swedish organizations were identified; nine showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one showed mostly negative results. Due to the varying quality and study design of the publications, together with the few identified studies, it is difficult to compare them. The context and the implementation also likely affect the results. The general conclusion was that a Lean implementation may increase the risk of WMSD and risk factors for WMSD, if it is not accompanied with an ergonomic intervention. PMID:22317062

  1. Shift Work and Obesity among Canadian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study Using a Novel Exposure Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Natalie; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Harris, M. Anne; Nadalin, Victoria; Kreiger, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives It has been suggested that the association between shift work and chronic disease is mediated by an increase in obesity. However, investigations of the relationship between shift work and obesity reveal mixed findings. Using a recently developed exposure assessment tool, this study examined the association between shift work and obesity among Canadian women from two studies: a cohort of university alumni, and a population-based study. Methods Self-administered questionnaire data were used from healthy, currently employed females in a population-based study, the Ontario Women’s Diet and Health case-control study (n = 1611 controls), and from a subset of a of university alumni from the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle, and Health (n = 1097) cohort study. Overweight was defined as BMI?25 to <30, and obesity as BMI?30. Reported occupation was converted to occupational codes and linked to a probability of shift work value derived from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics data. Regular evenings, nights, or rotating work comprised shift work. Polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between probability of shift work, categorized as near nil, low, medium, and high probability of shift work, on overweight and obesity, controlling for detected confounders. Results In the population-based sample, high probability of shift work was associated with obesity (reference = near nil probability of shift work, OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.01–3.51, p = 0.047). In the alumni cohort, no significant association was detected between shift work and overweight or obesity. Conclusions As these analyses found a positive association between high probability of shift work exposure and obesity in a population-based sample, but not in an alumni cohort, it is suggested that the relationship between shift work and obesity is complex, and may be particularly susceptible to occupational and education-related factors within a given population. PMID:26376050

  2. 1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 ACIT Meeting Notes Advisory Committee for Information Technology Meeting Notes MEETING DATE: 4 is starting analysis on benefit information and position data, which is where the UCOP PMO thought there would on the conversion work stream meeting its deliverables (Interfaces, ODS/DWH, Testing, Business Process). 2) Work

  3. A note on path integral formulism of $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Yin

    2012-01-01

    This is a note on the derivation of path integral formulism for $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model and may be helpful for further study in related works. We are rather happy to receive any comments and other discussions are welcome.

  4. A note on path integral formulism of $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model

    E-print Network

    Yin Zhong; Hong-Gang Luo

    2012-04-21

    This is a note on the derivation of path integral formulism for $Z_{2}$ slave-spin representation of Hubbard model and may be helpful for further study in related works. We are rather happy to receive any comments and other discussions are welcome.

  5. Clinical Utility of the N-back Task in Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Willard, Victoria W.; Ashford, Jason M.; Ogg, Robert J.; Scoggins, Matthew A.; Jones, Melissa M.; Wu, Shengjie; Conklin, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction N-back tasks are commonly used in functional neuroimaging studies to identify the neural mechanisms supporting working memory (WM). Despite widespread use, the clinical utility of these tasks is not well specified. This study compared N-back performance during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with task data acquired outside of the scanner as a measure of reliability across environment. N-back task validity was examined in relation to performance and rater-based measures used clinically to assess working memory. Method Forty-three healthy adults completed Verbal and Object N-back tasks during fMRI scanning and outside the scanner. Task difficulty was varied parametrically (0, 1, and 2-back conditions). Order of N-back task completion was stratified by modality (Verbal/Object) and environment. Participants completed the Digit Span [DS] and provided self-ratings using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function [BRIEF-WM]). Results Mean Verbal and Object N-back accuracy was above 95% across load conditions; task difficulty was effectively manipulated across load conditions. Performance accuracy did not significantly differ by environment. N-back reaction time was slower during fMRI (F =6.52, p=.01, ?p2=.13); participants were faster when initially completing tasks outside the scanner (?p2=.10–.15). Verbal 2-back accuracy was significantly related to DS performance (r = .36, p = .02). N-back performance was not related to BRIEF-WM. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for reliability of N-back accuracy during fMRI scanning; however, reliability of reaction time data is affected by order of task presentation. Data regarding construct validity are inconsistent and emphasize the need to consider clinical utility of behavioral measures in the design and interpretation of functional neuroimaging studies. PMID:25252868

  6. Exploitation of satellite optical and SAR data for public work studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, Charalabos; Soile, Sofia; Stamos, Athanassios; Vassilaki, Dimitra; Maltezos, Evangelos; Verykokou, Styliani

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the use of high resolution satellite optical and SAR images for 1:5,000 mapping production, which is essential for public work and environmental impact assessment studies. The images were used for the extraction of DEMs and their "fit for purpose" use was investigated, through the examination of parameters like accuracy, reliability and performance of morphological features. Orthoimages from satellite optical images using the produced DEMs with or without breaklines were produced. An application was developed on Antiparos island, a Greek island with irregular terrain. The data includes: (a) a triplet of Pleiades (1A, tri-stereo) satellite images, with a resolution of 0.5m, (b) a TanDEM-X Intermediate DEM, a preliminary version of the forthcoming TanDEM-X global DEM, and (c) an accurate DEM produced from the Greek National Cadastre & Mapping Agency S.A. was used as the reference DEM. The georeferencing of the optical images was computed using GCPs which were measured with GNSS. DEMs were extracted using all the possible combinations of the images triplet using automated image matching without any filtering or editing and were evaluated using the reference DEM. The combination of images which yielded the best DEM was then used to manually editing 3D points and collecting breaklines in order to produce a better DEM, which was also evaluated using various statistical measures and geo-morphological features. Orthoimages were created and evaluated using DEMs from optical and SAR data. A discussion about the use of the computed mapping products for the various stages of the public work studies is included.

  7. Outcomes from Combining Work and Tertiary Study. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polidano, Cain; Zakirova, Rezida

    2011-01-01

    Working in some capacity is almost considered de rigueur for tertiary students. The reasons for working and the impact this has on both an individual's ability to complete their studies and on their post-study labour market outcomes are only recently receiving attention. Using the 1995 and 1998 cohorts of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian…

  8. Is There a Global Common Core to Social Work?: A Cross-National Comparative Study of BSW Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Idit

    2005-01-01

    This article reports findings from a cross-national comparative study that examined the commonalities and differences in professional ideology among social work graduates in 10 countries by studying their attitudes toward poverty and the goals of social work. The major finding is the substantial similarity in the students' professional ideology…

  9. Magnetoencephalography---theory, instrumentation, and applications to noninvasive studies of the working human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, M.; Hari, R.; Ilmoniemi, R.J.; Knuutila, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V. )

    1993-04-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive technique for investigating neuronal activity in the living human brain. The time resolution of the method is better than 1 ms and the spatial discrimination is, under favorable circumstances, 2--3 mm for sources in the cerebral cortex. In MEG studies, the weak 10 fT--1 pT magnetic fields produced by electric currents flowing in neurons are measured with multichannel SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) gradiometers. The sites in the cerebral cortex that are activated by a stimulus can be found from the detected magnetic-field distribution, provided that appropriate assumptions about the source render the solution of the inverse problem unique. Many interesting properties of the working human brain can be studied, including spontaneous activity and signal processing following external stimuli. For clinical purposes, determination of the locations of epileptic foci is of interest. The authors begin with a general introduction and a short discussion of the neural basis of MEG. The mathematical theory of the method is then explained in detail, followed by a thorough description of MEG instrumentation, data analysis, and practical construction of multi-SQUID devices. Finally, several MEG experiments performed in the authors' laboratory are described, covering studies of evoked responses and of spontaneous activity in both healthy and diseased brains. Many MEG studies by other groups are discussed briefly as well.

  10. A study of potential sources of linguistic ambiguity in written work instructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the results of a small experimental study that investigated potential sources of ambiguity in written work instructions (WIs). The English language can be highly ambiguous because words with different meanings can share the same spelling. Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous WIs can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. To study possible sources of ambiguity in WIs, we determined which of the recommended action verbs in the DOE and BWXT writer's manuals have numerous meanings to their intended audience, making them potentially ambiguous. We used cognitive psychology techniques to conduct a survey in which technicians who use WIs in their jobs indicated the first meaning that came to mind for each of the words. Although the findings of this study are limited by the small number of respondents, we identified words that had many different meanings even within this limited sample. WI writers should pay particular attention to these words and to their most frequent meanings so that they can avoid ambiguity in their writing.

  11. Notes on the history of the radiological study of Egyptian mummies: from X-rays to new imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Cosmacini, P; Piacentini, P

    2008-08-01

    A few centuries after the practice of mummification was finally abolished in the seventh century A.D., mummies began to capture the collective imagination, exerting a mysterious fascination that continues to this day. From the beginning, the radiological study of Egyptian mummies permitted the collection not only of medical data but also of anthropological and archaeological evidence. The first radiological study of an Egyptian mummy was performed by Flinders Petrie shortly after the discovery of X-rays in 1895, and since then, radiology has never stopped investigating these special patients. By the end of the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) scanning permitted more in-depth studies to be carried out without requiring the mummies to be removed from their cartonnage. CT images can be used to obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of the mummy that provides important new information, in part thanks to the virtual endoscopy technique known as "fly through". Moreover, starting from CT data and using sophisticated graphics software, one can reconstruct an image of the face of the mummified individual at the time of his or her death. The history of imaging, from its origins until now, from the simplest to the most sophisticated technique, allows us to appreciate why these studies have been, and still are, fundamental in the study of Egyptian mummies. PMID:18523844

  12. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Coecke, Bob

    2006-01-04

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns 'doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement. For a survey on the 'what', the 'why' and the 'hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  13. The malleability of working memory and visuospatial skills: a randomized controlled study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Stepankova, Hana; Lukavsky, Jiri; Buschkuehl, Martin; Kopecek, Miloslav; Ripova, Daniela; Jaeggi, Susanne M

    2014-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that training on working memory (WM) generalizes to other nontrained domains, and there are reports of transfer effects extending as far as to measures of fluid intelligence. Although there have been several demonstrations of such transfer effects in young adults and children, they have been difficult to demonstrate in older adults. In this study, we investigated the generalizing effects of an adaptive WM intervention on nontrained measures of WM and visuospatial skills. We randomly assigned healthy older adults to train on a verbal n-back task over the course of a month for either 10 or 20 sessions. Their performance change was compared with that of a control group. Our results revealed reliable group effects in nontrained standard clinical measures of WM and visuospatial skills in that both training groups outperformed the control group. We also observed a dose-response effect, that is, a positive relationship between training frequency and the gain in visuospatial skills; this finding was further confirmed by a positive correlation between training improvement and transfer. The improvements in visuospatial skills emerged even though the intervention was restricted to the verbal domain. Our work has important implications in that our data provide further evidence for plasticity of cognitive functions in old age. PMID:24219314

  14. Ocular disease in working horses in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, C E; Aklilu, N; Reed, K; Knottenbelt, D C; Gebreab, F; Pinchbeck, G L

    2013-01-26

    Ocular disease is a frequent finding in working horses. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and types of ocular pathology, and explore risk factors potentially associated with disease within a population of working horses in Ethiopia. In total, 1049 horses were selected from horses attending clinics run by the Society for Protection of Animals Abroad (SPANA). Each had an ophthalmic examination conducted under field conditions using a pen-torch. All owners completed a short questionnaire. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities was 23.5 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 18.0 per cent to 30.1 per cent) and the percentage of horses with an abnormality in at least one eye was 43 per cent (95 per cent CI 28.7 per cent to 58.4 per cent), although this varied between towns. Mild eye pathology and end-stage disease with irreversible pathology were most common. There were significantly more eye abnormalities in the right eye compared with the left, and older horses were more likely to have ocular pathology. Only 55.1 per cent of owners had noticed there was an ocular abnormality present, and only 2.2 per cent had received any previous treatment for eye disease. Only 1.9 per cent presented to the clinic because of an eye problem. There appears to be either a lack of owner awareness, or a low perception of the importance of eye disease among owners. PMID:23155077

  15. Fighting female infanticide by working with midwives: an Indian case study.

    PubMed

    Murthy, R K

    1996-06-01

    In many cultures throughout history, parents have preferred to conceive and bear sons rather than daughters. In May 1995, Adithi, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) working in parts of Bihar with resource-poor women, and Bal Mahila Kalyan (BMK), an NGO working with poor people in general, organized a workshop with traditional midwives on the issue of female infanticide. A prior study found that traditional midwives are often called upon to kill female infants. These women mainly belong to the dalit community, are mostly illiterate, typically live in poverty, and have little power in the community. The workshop goals were to explore gender discrimination in different caste and religious groups; to understand the history and extent of female infanticide in the area, and to examine whether the incidence varies with caste, class, religion, and birth order; and to identify strategies to combat female infanticide. 28 traditional midwives participated. This paper describes the proceedings of the workshop and examines strategies for combatting female infanticide. PMID:12291312

  16. Skylab task and work performance /Experiment M-151 - Time and motion study/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubis, J. F.; Mclaughlin, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The primary objective of Experiment M151 was to study the inflight adaptation of Skylab crewmen to a variety of task situations involving different types of activity. A parallel objective was to examine astronaut inflight performance for any behavioral stress effects associated with the working and living conditions of the Skylab environment. Training data provided the basis for comparison of preflight and inflight performance. Efficiency was evaluated through the adaptation function, namely, the relation of performance time over task trials. The results indicate that the initial changeover from preflight to inflight was accompanied by a substantial increase in performance time for most work and task activities. Equally important was the finding that crewmen adjusted rapidly to the weightless environment and became proficient in developing techniques with which to optimize task performance. By the end of the second inflight trial, most of the activities were performed almost as efficiently as on the last preflight trial. The analysis demonstrated the sensitivity of the adaptation function to differences in task and hardware configurations. The function was found to be more regular and less variable inflight than preflight. Translation and control of masses were accomplished easily and efficiently through the rapid development of the arms and legs as subtle guidance and restraint systems.

  17. A study on the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test and the beryllium levels in working environment.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Shima, S; Nagaoka, K; Taniwaki, H; Wada, A; Kurita, H; Morita, K

    1997-07-01

    The relationship between airborne concentration of beryllium in the working environment and workers' beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (Be-LTT) values was examined based on data obtained from a four-year survey (1992-1995) conducted at beryllium-copper alloy manufacturing factories. This study showed that the T cells of workers continuously exposed to beryllium of more than 0.01 microgram/m3 could be activated and that the cell-mediated immune response of workers could be promoted. On the other hand, the Be-LTT of workers exposed to beryllium levels of less than 0.01 microgram/m3 was shown to be unaffected by beryllium. These findings suggest that beryllium sensitization is not manifested when level of beryllium in working environment are less than 0.01 microgram/m3. Therefore, in such cases workers do not develop Chronic beryllium disease (CBD). We concluded that the Be-LTT can be applied as a medical indicator to detect the development of CBD. PMID:9248221

  18. Continuing Professional Development for Volunteers Working in Palliative Care in a Tertiary Care Cancer Institute in India: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study of Educational Needs

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, Jayita Kedar; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Context: Training programs for volunteers prior to their working in palliative care are well-established in India. However, few studies report on continuing professional development programs for this group. Aims: To conduct a preliminary assessment of educational needs of volunteers working in palliative care for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program for this group. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study conducted in the Department of Palliative Medicine of a tertiary care cancer institute in India. Materials and Methods: Participant volunteers completed a questionnaire, noting previous training, years of experience, and a comprehensive list of topics for inclusion in this program, rated in order of importance according to them. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics for overall data and Chi-square tests for categorical variables for group comparisons were applied using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 18. Results: Fourteen out of 17 volunteers completed the questionnaire, seven having 5–10-years experience in working in palliative care. A need for continuing professional development program was felt by all participants. Communication skills, more for children and elderly specific issues were given highest priority. Spiritual-existential aspects and self-care were rated lower in importance than psychological, physical, and social aspects in palliative care. More experienced volunteers (>5 years of experience) felt the need for self-care as a topic in the program than those with less (<5-years experience) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Understanding palliative care volunteers’ educational needs is essential for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program and should include self-care as a significant component. PMID:26009668

  19. Preliminary work for SiC-based piezoelectric energy harvester with mathematical modelling and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. N. Fakhzan M., K.; Nasrul F. M., N.; Raman, S.; Muthalif, Asan G. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary work to explore the feasibility of cubic silicon carbide on silicon wafers with integrated proof mass as horizontal cantilever with vertical displacement. The reason of harvesting ambient vibration energy is to convert mechanical energy produces by piezoelectric into useful electrical energy. The collectable energy is useful for powering the low-power devices. Theoretically, the resonant phenomena are a special characteristic in order to optimize the generated output power. The natural frequency of the cantilever can to be tuned with difference proof masses. Another parameter considered in this paper is the damping ratio. Throughout analytical study, small damping ratio will enhance the output power of the piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH). This paper will present a mathematical modelling approach and the simulation validation.

  20. GPACC program cost work breakdown structure-dictionary. General purpose aft cargo carrier study, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The results of detailed cost estimates and economic analysis performed on the updated Model 101 configuration of the general purpose Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) are given. The objective of this economic analysis is to provide the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with information on the economics of using the ACC on the Space Transportation System (STS). The detailed cost estimates for the ACC are presented by a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure that all elements of cost are considered in the economic analysis and related subsystem trades. Costs reported by WBS provide NASA with a basis for comparing competing designs and provide detailed cost information that can be used to forecast phase C/D planning for new projects or programs derived from preliminary conceptual design studies. The scope covers all STS and STS/ACC launch vehicle cost impacts for delivering payloads to a 160 NM low Earth orbit (LEO).

  1. Description of coupled general circulation models of the atmosphere and oceans used for carbon dioxide studies. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, W.M.; VerPlank, L.

    1986-08-01

    The report describes three coupled atmosphere/ocean models that are being used at NCAR for studies of climate sensitivity to increased CO/sub 2/ concentrations. The atmospheric model was adapted from the original version of the NCAR Community Climate Model which was based on the Austrialian spectral model. The model has been modified by adding a substantially revised radiation/cloudiness scheme and then run with perpetual January and July simulations. To make the model suitable for CO/sub 2/ studies, it was modified to include an optional seasonal cycle, with predictions of soil moisture, snow cover, and sea ice. Also, three different types of ocean models were made optional features.

  2. Note on fault-slip motion inferred from a study of micro-cataclastic particles from an underground shear rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortlepp, W. D.

    1992-09-01

    Mining of a highly-stressed remnant in a deep South African gold mine was accompanied by considerable seismic activity and some significant rockbursts. The larger seismic events were registered some 60 km away at a WSSN station and several shear ruptures corresponding to these events were encountered during mining operations. A careful study based on detailed exploration of two of these ruptures proved them to be the source of two of the larger rockbursts. Certain striking features revealed by a scanning electron microscopic study of some of the fresh cataclastic ‘rock-flour’ forming part of the comminuted filling of these ruptures provide strong evidence of violent ’shock rebound’ phenomena in the faulting process. This interpretation could provide useful insight into earthquake source mechanisms and also has practical significance in the understanding of mine rockbursts.

  3. Work-related heat stress concerns in automotive industries: a case study from Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Ayyappan, Ramalingam; Sankar, Sambandam; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Balakrishnan, Kalpana

    2009-01-01

    Background Work-related heat stress assessments, the quantification of thermal loads and their physiological consequences have mostly been performed in non-tropical developed country settings. In many developing countries (many of which are also tropical), limited attempts have been made to create detailed job-exposure profiles for various sectors. We present here a case study from Chennai in southern India that illustrates the prevalence of work-related heat stress in multiple processes of automotive industries and the efficacy of relatively simple controls in reducing prevalence of the risk through longitudinal assessments. Methods We conducted workplace heat stress assessments in automotive and automotive parts manufacturing units according to the protocols recommended by NIOSH, USA. Sites for measurements included indoor locations with process-generated heat exposure, indoor locations without direct process-generated heat exposure and outdoor locations. Nearly 400 measurements of heat stress were made over a four-year period at more than 100 locations within eight units involved with automotive or automotive parts manufacturing in greater Chennai metropolitan area. In addition, cross-sectional measurements were made in select processes of glass manufacturing and textiles to estimate relative prevalence of heat stress. Results Results indicate that many processes even in organised large-scale industries have yet to control heat stress-related hazards adequately. Upwards of 28% of workers employed in multiple processes were at risk of heat stress-related health impairment in the sectors assessed. Implications of longitudinal baseline data for assessing efficacy of interventions as well as modelling potential future impacts from climate change (through contributions from worker health and productivity impairments consequent to increases in ambient temperature) are described. Conclusions The study re-emphasises the need for recognising heat stress as an important occupational health risk in both formal and informal sectors in India. Making available good baseline data is critical for estimating future impacts. PMID:20052426

  4. Youth Supervision While Mothers Work: A Daily Diary Study of Maternal Worry

    PubMed Central

    Blocklin, Michelle K.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a daily diary study of hourly hotel employees in the U.S. and their children, this study examined links between youth supervision arrangements and maternal worry while at work, examining both differences between individuals and day-to-day variation within individuals. Multilevel model analyses revealed both between- and within-person effects linking youth supervision to maternal worry. Mothers' partner status functioned as moderator, and maternal knowledge also emerged as a protective factor when youth were in self-care, highlighting a potential target for future work-family interventions, particularly those for hourly employees with limited access to family-friendly workplace policies. En utilisant les données d'une étude de journal quotidien des employés horaires de l'hôtel aux États-Unis et leurs enfants, cette étude a examiné les liens entre les modalités de supervision des jeunes et l'inquiétude maternelle pendant le travail, en examinant à la fois les différences inter individus et la variation intra individus au jour le jour. Analyses multi-niveaux ont révélé à la fois des effets inter et intra reliant la supervision des jeunes à l'inquiétude maternelle. Statut de partenaire des mères a fonctionné en tant que modérateur, et la connaissance maternelle est également apparue comme un facteur de protection lorsque les jeunes ont pris soins d'eux-mêmes, soulignant une cible potentielle pour des interventions de conciliation travail-famille, en particulier ceux conçus pour des employés horaires avec un accès limité à des politiques favorables à la famille. PMID:23109814

  5. Youth Supervision While Mothers Work: A Daily Diary Study of Maternal Worry.

    PubMed

    Blocklin, Michelle K; Crouter, Ann C; McHale, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a daily diary study of hourly hotel employees in the U.S. and their children, this study examined links between youth supervision arrangements and maternal worry while at work, examining both differences between individuals and day-to-day variation within individuals. Multilevel model analyses revealed both between- and within-person effects linking youth supervision to maternal worry. Mothers' partner status functioned as moderator, and maternal knowledge also emerged as a protective factor when youth were in self-care, highlighting a potential target for future work-family interventions, particularly those for hourly employees with limited access to family-friendly workplace policies.En utilisant les données d'une étude de journal quotidien des employés horaires de l'hôtel aux États-Unis et leurs enfants, cette étude a examiné les liens entre les modalités de supervision des jeunes et l'inquiétude maternelle pendant le travail, en examinant à la fois les différences inter individus et la variation intra individus au jour le jour. Analyses multi-niveaux ont révélé à la fois des effets inter et intra reliant la supervision des jeunes à l'inquiétude maternelle. Statut de partenaire des mères a fonctionné en tant que modérateur, et la connaissance maternelle est également apparue comme un facteur de protection lorsque les jeunes ont pris soins d'eux-mêmes, soulignant une cible potentielle pour des interventions de conciliation travail-famille, en particulier ceux conçus pour des employés horaires avec un accès limité à des politiques favorables à la famille. PMID:23109814

  6. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA.

  7. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  8. CONSERVATION NOTES WILD CHICKENS

    E-print Network

    ^-^ CONSERVATION NOTES AMERICA'S WILD CHICKENS Most natural environments in the United States once had at least one kind of Nature's wild chickens, the upland game birds. Just as there are many kinds NOTES ^^ AMERICA'S WILD CHICKENS ^UUOS HOl£, Most natural environments in the United States once had

  9. Pre-ordering lunch at work. Results of the what to eat for lunch study.

    PubMed

    Stites, Shana D; Singletary, S Brook; Menasha, Adeena; Cooblall, Clarissa; Hantula, Donald; Axelrod, Saul; Figueredo, Vincent M; Phipps, Etienne J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an intervention that combined mindful eating and online pre-ordering to promote healthier lunch purchases at work. The study took place at an urban hospital with 26 employees who were overweight or obese. The design included a contemporaneous comparison with delayed-treatment control and a three-phase prospective study. A minimum 4-week baseline period preceded a 4-week full-intervention, in which participants received mindful eating training, pre-ordered their lunches, and received price discounts toward lunch purchases. In a 4-week reduced intervention phase, participants pre-ordered lunches without price discounts. Participant lunch purchases were tracked electronically at the point of purchase. The primary outcome measures were the amounts of kilocalories and fat grams in purchased lunches. In contemporaneous comparisons, the treatment group purchased lunches with an average of 144.6 fewer kilocalories (p?=?0.01) and 8.9 fewer grams of fat (p?=?0.005) compared to controls. In multivariable longitudinal analyses, participants decreased the average number of calories in their meals by 114.6?kcal per lunch and the average grams of fat by 5.4 per lunch during the partial-intervention compared to the baseline (p?study, a moderate increase was observed in participants' overall mindful eating behaviors as compared to the beginning of the study (p?

  10. Negative emotion modulates prefrontal cortex activity during a working memory task: a NIRS study

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Sachiyo; Matsuda, Goh; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the neural processing underlying the cognitive control of emotions induced by the presentation of task-irrelevant emotional pictures before a working memory task. Previous studies have suggested that the cognitive control of emotion involves the prefrontal regions. Therefore, we measured the hemodynamic responses that occurred in the prefrontal region with a 16-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. In our experiment, participants observed two negative or two neutral pictures in succession immediately before a 1-back or 3-back task. Pictures were selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). We measured the changes in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) during picture presentation and during the n-back task. The emotional valence of the picture affected the oxyHb changes in anterior parts of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) (located in the left and right superior frontal gyrus) and left inferior frontal gyrus during the n-back task; the oxyHb changes during the task were significantly greater following negative rather than neutral stimulation. As indicated in a number of previous studies, and the time courses of the oxyHb changes in our study, activation in these locations is possibly led by cognitive control of emotion, though we cannot deny it may simply be emotional responses. There were no effects of emotion on oxyHb changes during picture presentation or on n-back task performance. Although further studies are necessary to confirm this interpretation, our findings suggest that NIRS can be used to investigate neural processing during emotional control. PMID:24574991

  11. Prognostic Factors of Returning to Work after Sick Leave due to Work-Related Common Mental Disorders: A One- and Three-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Borritz, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) after one and three years among people on sick leave due to occupational stress. Methods. The study population comprised 223 completers on sick leave, who participated in a stress treatment program. Self-reported psychosocial work environment, life events during the past year, severity of the condition, occupational position, employment sector, marital status, and medication were assessed at baseline. RTW was assessed with data from a national compensation database (DREAM). Results. Self-reported high demands, low decision authority, low reward, low support from leaders and colleagues, bullying, high global symptom index, length of sick leave at baseline, and stressful negative life events during the year before baseline were associated with no RTW after one year. Low work ability and full-time sick leave at inclusion were predictors after three years too. Being single was associated with no RTW after three years. The type of treatment, occupational position, gender, age, and degree of depression were not associated with RTW after one or three years. Conclusion. The impact of the psychosocial work environment as predictor for RTW disappeared over time and only the severity of the condition was a predictor for RTW in the long run. PMID:26557678

  12. Prognostic Factors of Returning to Work after Sick Leave due to Work-Related Common Mental Disorders: A One- and Three-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Borritz, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) after one and three years among people on sick leave due to occupational stress. Methods. The study population comprised 223 completers on sick leave, who participated in a stress treatment program. Self-reported psychosocial work environment, life events during the past year, severity of the condition, occupational position, employment sector, marital status, and medication were assessed at baseline. RTW was assessed with data from a national compensation database (DREAM). Results. Self-reported high demands, low decision authority, low reward, low support from leaders and colleagues, bullying, high global symptom index, length of sick leave at baseline, and stressful negative life events during the year before baseline were associated with no RTW after one year. Low work ability and full-time sick leave at inclusion were predictors after three years too. Being single was associated with no RTW after three years. The type of treatment, occupational position, gender, age, and degree of depression were not associated with RTW after one or three years. Conclusion. The impact of the psychosocial work environment as predictor for RTW disappeared over time and only the severity of the condition was a predictor for RTW in the long run. PMID:26557678

  13. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-?l/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  14. Respondent-driven sampling in a study of drug users in New York City: notes from the field.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe exchange in Lower Manhattan to serve as the initial study participants. Upon completion of the interview that lasted approximately 1 h and a blood draw, each seed was given three coupons to recruit three drug users into the study. Each of the subsequent eligible participants was also given three coupons to recruit three of their drug-using acquaintances. Eligible participants had to have: injected, smoked or snorted an illicit drug in the last 6 months (other than marijuana), aged 18 or older, adequate English language knowledge to permit informed consent and complete questionnaire. From April to July 2004, 618 drug users were interviewed, including 263 (43%) current injectors, 119 (19%) former injectors, and 236 (38%) never injectors. Four hundred sixty nine (76%) participants were men, 147 (24%) were women, and two (<1%) were transgender. By race/ethnicity, 285 (46%) were black, 218 (35%) Hispanic, 88 (14%) white, 23 (4%) mixed/not specified, and four (<1%) native American. Interviews were initially done on a drop-in basis but this system changed to appointments 1 month into the study due to the large volume of subjects coming in for interviews. Data collection was originally proposed to last for 1 year with a target recruitment of 500 drug users. Utilizing RDS, we were able to recruit and interview 118 more drug users than originally proposed in one quarter of the time. RDS was efficient with respect to time and economics (we did not have to hire an outreach worker) and effective in recruiting a diverse sample of drug users. PMID:16977493

  15. Work-family conflicts and subsequent sleep medication among women and men: a longitudinal registry linkage study.

    PubMed

    Lallukka, T; Arber, S; Laaksonen, M; Lahelma, E; Partonen, T; Rahkonen, O

    2013-02-01

    Work and family are two key domains of life among working populations. Conflicts between paid work and family life can be detrimental to sleep and other health-related outcomes. This study examined longitudinally the influence of work-family conflicts on subsequent sleep medication. Questionnaire data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study mail surveys in 2001-2002 (2929 women, 793 men) of employees aged 40-60 years. Data concerning sleep medication were derived from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution's registers covering all prescribed medication from 1995 to 2007. Four items measured whether job responsibilities interfered with family life (work to family conflicts), and four items measured whether family responsibilities interfered with work (family to work conflicts). Cox proportional hazard models were fitted, adjusting for age, sleep medication five years before baseline, as well as various family- and work-related covariates. During a five-year follow-up, 17% of women and 10% of men had at least one purchase of prescribed sleep medication. Among women, family to work conflicts were associated with sleep medication over the following 5 years after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association remained largely unaffected after adjusting for family-related and work-related covariates. Work to family conflicts were also associated with subsequent sleep medication after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association attenuated after adjustment for work-related factors. No associations could be confirmed among men. Thus reasons for men's sleep medication likely emerge outside their work and family lives. Concerning individual items, strain-based ones showed stronger associations with sleep medication than more concrete time-based items. In conclusion, in particular family to work conflicts, but also work to family conflicts, are clear determinants of women's sleep medication. PMID:22721964

  16. Work hours, weight status, and weight-related behaviors: a study of metro transit workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Associations between hours worked per week and Body Mass Index (BMI), food intake, physical activity, and perceptions of eating healthy at work were examined in a sample of transit workers. Methods Survey data were collected from 1086 transit workers. Participants reported hours worked per week, food choices, leisure-time physical activity and perceptions of the work environment with regard to healthy eating. Height and weight were measured for each participant. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations between work hours and behavioral variables. Associations were examined in the full sample and stratified by gender. Results Transit workers working in the highest work hour categories had higher BMI and poorer dietary habits, with results differing by gender. Working 50 or more hours per week was associated with higher BMI among men but not women. Additionally, working 50 or more hours per week was significantly associated with higher frequency of accessing cold beverage, cold food, and snack vending machines among men. Working 40 or more hours per week was associated with higher frequency of accessing cold food vending machines among women. Reported frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was highest among women working 50 or more hours per week. Intake of sweets, sugar sweetened beverages, and fast food did not vary with work hours in men or women. Physical activity and perception of ease of eating healthy at work were not associated with work hours in men or women. Conclusions Long work hours were associated with more frequent use of garage vending machines and higher BMI in transit workers, with associations found primarily among men. Long work hours may increase dependence upon food availability at the worksite, which highlights the importance of availability of healthy food choices. PMID:21172014

  17. STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom setting to help students develop skills related to decision-making. Students will read about the engine cut-off sensor anomaly which created challenges during the STS-114 mission and have the opportunity to make decisions as lead NASA engineers and Mission Management Team members. Included within this document are three case study presentation options - class discussion, group activity, and open-ended research. Please read the full case prior to in-class presentation to allow ample time for students' analysis and reflection, as well as to prepare additional questions. activities or exercises, material selection, etc. Depending upon the setting of your presentation and the number of participants, please choose at least one presentation format beforehand and plan accordingly. You may expect the following learning objectives by using the proposed formats. Learning Objectives: To enable students to experience the responsibilities of NASA management, engineers, and analysis; to discover possible procedures for investigating system anomalies; to become familiar with the liquid hydrogen low level engine cut-off sensor, including its function, connecting components, and location within the Space Shuttle; and to encourage critical analysis and stimulating discussion of Space Shuttle mission challenges.

  18. A BRIEF NOTE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANXIETY AND PERFORMANCE IN SCUBA DIVING IN ADOLESCENTS: A FIELD STUDY.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Fabian; Doppelmayr, Michael

    2015-06-01

    This study explored the relationship between anxiety and scuba diving performance of young individuals (N = 44; 16.9 yr., SD = 1.2) participating in an introductory scuba diving activity. The question was whether the well-known negative correlation between anxiety and scuba diving performance found for experienced and middle-aged scuba divers will be observed in young participants in their first dive experience. Diving instructors rated standardized scuba diving skills that were correlated with individual state and trait anxiety. There was no relationship between anxiety and scuba diving performance, neither for state nor for trait anxiety. This non-significant correlation between anxiety and performance was in contrast to recent findings observed for experienced divers or those who participated at a scuba diving training program. Considering the differences in methodological design between this study and recent investigations, further research is needed to reveal possible relations between anxiety, scuba diving performance, and panic behavior in beginner-level youth or adults. PMID:26029967

  19. Off-Farm Work among Rural Households: A Case Study in the Brazilian Amazon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWey, Leah; Vithayathil, Trina

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes off-farm work among subsistence-level farmers in the Santarem region of the Brazilian Amazon. We build on the literature on rural livelihoods in the Global South by exploring how the opportunity to work off the farm is embedded in social relationships. We additionally differentiate our analysis by type of off-farm work, and…

  20. Work and Family Plans among At-Risk Israeli Adolescents: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative methods were used to investigate attributions of importance to work and family roles and anticipated work--family conflict and facilitation among 353 at-risk Israeli male and female adolescents. Qualitative interviews conducted with 26 of the at-risk youth explored future work and family perceptions. Findings indicated that both sexes…