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1

Infection in conflict wounded  

PubMed Central

Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

2011-01-01

2

Animal models of external traumatic wound infections  

PubMed Central

Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

2011-01-01

3

Clear Corneal Wound Infection After Phacoemulsification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Materials and Methods: The medical records of 7 pa- tients with clear corneal wound infections after phaco- emulsification were reviewed retrospectively. Data that were reviewed included patient age, sex, onset of symptoms and signs after surgery, possible risk factors for infection, concomitant ocular disease, use of perioperative prophy- lactic antibiotics and steroids, culture and antibiotic sensitivity results, treatment regimen, and

C. Banu Cosar; Elisabeth J. Cohen; Christopher J. Rapuano; Peter R. Laibson

2001-01-01

4

Microbiology of Animal Bite Wound Infections  

PubMed Central

Summary: The microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans is often polymicrobial, with a broad mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Bacteria recovered from infected bite wounds are most often reflective of the oral flora of the biting animal, which can also be influenced by the microbiome of their ingested prey and other foods. Bacteria may also originate from the victim's own skin or the physical environment at the time of injury. Our review has focused on bite wound infections in humans from dogs, cats, and a variety of other animals such as monkeys, bears, pigs, ferrets, horses, sheep, Tasmanian devils, snakes, Komodo dragons, monitor lizards, iguanas, alligators/crocodiles, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, prairie dogs, swans, and sharks. The medical literature in this area has been made up mostly of small case series or case reports. Very few studies have been systematic and are often limited to dog or cat bite injuries. Limitations of studies include a lack of established or inconsistent criteria for an infected wound and a failure to utilize optimal techniques in pathogen isolation, especially for anaerobic organisms. There is also a lack of an understanding of the pathogenic significance of all cultured organisms. Gathering information and conducting research in a more systematic and methodical fashion through an organized research network, including zoos, veterinary practices, and rural clinics and hospitals, are needed to better define the microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans. PMID:21482724

Abrahamian, Fredrick M.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

2011-01-01

5

[Bite-associated bacterial wound infections in humans].  

PubMed

Bite wounds are common injuries that are often mistakenly considered innocuous by both patients and physicians. These wounds consist of laserations, evulsions, punctures, and scratches. While many of these wounds require minimal or no therapy, a significant number results in infections, which may even be life-threatening. The bacteria associated with bite-wound infections generally originate from the oropharyngeal flora of the biting animal. The clinical presentation and appropriate treatment of infected bite wounds vary according to the causative microorganisms. This review focuses on dog, cat, small rodents, monkey, and snake bite-wound infections, risk factors, bacteriology, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the causative organisms, and recommended treatment strategies. PMID:15700676

Durmaz, Gül

2004-10-01

6

JAMA Patient Page: Wound Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... system disorders, cancer, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and malnutrition • Paralysis or other limited mobility (wheelchairs, confined to ... emergency procedures, smoking, severe obesity, altered immune function, malnutrition, low body temperature, and long operation times. TREATMENT ...

7

Surgical wound infections: an overview.  

PubMed

There have been three major avenues by which control over infection has been increased: (1) Preservation of host defenses, (2) antisepsis and (3) asepsis. Despite the major successes we have had, infection remains the major limitor of surgical horizons. Asepsis, the newest but long the mainstay of infection control, has probably been developed to nearly its greatest capacity. Its forefronts lie in laminar flow ventilation, ultraviolet radiation and operating theater design, all expensive and relatively inefficient. Cost and the problem of endogenous bacteria limit further advances. Antisepsis, including preventive antibiotics, is also reaching its zenith. Resistant organisms, toxicity and cost limit further applications. We desperately need a "social contract" among surgeons to limit, by defined rules, the choice of agent, the total dose and the indications for use. Controlled studies of the effects of "preventive antibiotics" on hospital ecology and infection are needed. A return to antiseptics is being and should be explored. Preservation and enhancement of host defenses is the oldest but the most neglected of these ideas. It appears to be the most exploitable now. Enhancement by nutrition, maintenance of tissue perfusion, oxygenation and immune stimulation appear to have contributed to reduction of infection rates. More success in this area seems distinctly possible. PMID:7211905

Hunt, T K

1981-03-01

8

Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

2014-10-15

9

Carboxymethylcellulose film for bacterial wound infection control and healing.  

PubMed

Infection control and wound healing profiles of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) films were investigated as a function of their anti-bacterial action, physical structures, polymer molecular weights and carboxymethyl substitution degrees. The films were prepared with in vitro polymer/film and in vivo microbe-colonized wound healing/systemic infection profiles examined. Adhesive high carboxymethyl substituted SCMC films aided healing via attaching to microbes and removing them from wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was removed via encapsulating in gelling low molecular weight SCMC film, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was trapped in tight folds of high molecular weight SCMC film. Incomplete microbe removal from wound did not necessary translate to inability to heal as microbe remnant at wound induced fibroblast migration and aided tissue reconstruction. Using no film nonetheless will cause systemic blood infection. SCMC films negate infection and promote wound healing via specific polymer-microbe adhesion, and removal of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa requires films of different polymer characteristics. PMID:25129756

Wong, Tin Wui; Ramli, Nor Amlizan

2014-11-01

10

The laparoscopically harvested omental flap for deep sternal wound infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To report our experience with the laparoscopically harvested omental flap in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection, and to present a modification and introduce two supportive techniques in the perioperative management. Methods: Between June 2005 and September 2007, six patients with grade IV (El Oakley–Wright classification) deep sternal wound infection following a median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass

Jan J. van Wingerden; Matijn E. H. Coret; Christianne A. van Nieuwenhoven; Eric R. Totté

2010-01-01

11

Targeted photodynamic therapy for infected wounds in mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We report on the use of a targeted polycationic photosensitizer conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6) that can penetrate the Gram (-) outer membrane together with red laser light to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting excisional wounds in mice. We used genetically engineered luminescent bacteria that allowed the infection to be imaged in mouse wounds using a sensitive CCD camera. Wounds were infected with 5x106 bacteria, followed by application of the conjugate in solution and illumination. There was a light-dose dependent loss of luminescence as measured by image analysis in the wound treated with conjugate and light, not seen in control wounds. This strain of E coli is non-invasive and the infection in untreated wounds spontaneously resolved in a few days and all wounds healed equally well showing the photodynamic treatment did not damage the host tissue. P aeruginosa is highly invasive and mice with untreated or control wounds all died while 90% of PDT treated mice survived. PDT may have a role to play in the rapid treatment of infected wounds in view of the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance.

Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Zahra, Touqir; Contag, Christopher H.; McManus, Albert T.; Hasan, Tayyaba

2002-06-01

12

Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice  

PubMed Central

HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

2010-01-01

13

Extremity trauma, dressings, and wound infection: should every acute limb wound have a silver lining?  

PubMed

The manner in which high-energy transfer limb injuries are dressed can alter the wound environment through manipulation of the bacterial burden, thus minimizing tissue degradation and influencing healing potential. Infection is the principal complication of such wounds, and antiseptic soaked gauze is accepted in early coverage of extremity wounds despite a lack of evidence to support this practice. There has been resurgence in the use of silver in acute wounds, through dressings manipulated to deliver sustained elemental silver to the wound interface. In vitro and in vivo experimentation of silver dressings are characterized however by methodological compromise, primarily through lack of similarity of models to the physiology of the healing wound. Results from in vitro studies caution against the use of silver because of evidence of cytotoxicity, but this is not reproduced in in vivo or clinical experimentation, leading to ambiguity. Review of silver dressing application in burns and chronic wound studies fails to support its use over other dressing systems. Similarly, evidence for the use of silver in acute limb wounds is lacking. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the use of silver dressings in acute wound care and highlights in particular the paucity of evidence regarding its routine use in extremity injury. PMID:23008343

Eardley, William G P; Watts, Sarah A; Clasper, Jon C

2012-09-01

14

Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.  

PubMed

Innate defense regulators (IDRs) are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP). IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018. PMID:22879874

Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias; Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Jacobsen, Frank; Mersch, Evgenija A; Stricker, Ingo; Afacan, Nicole; Jenssen, Havard; Hancock, Robert E W; Kindrachuk, Jason

2012-01-01

15

Wound infection, dressings and pain, is there a relationship in the chronic wound?  

PubMed

The focus on quality of life issues in wound care has justly taken a far greater importance. With the acceptance that pain can be a major factor to the patient, and in particular, pain at dressing change comes the opportunity for avoidance and/or reduction strategies. Whilst pain has been associated with wound infection for millennia, it is only much more recently that this has received due attention from research and clinical practice. In this study, the nature of pain, changes in pain and pain associated with infection are the focal points. A Delphi approach, now a frequently used tool in wound care research, has been used to obtain expert opinion on these aspects of management. PMID:22630139

Cutting, K F; White, R J; Mahoney, P

2013-02-01

16

Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the incidence of DSWI and effect of re-exploration for bleeding on DSWI mortality. Methods We reviewed 73,700 cases registered in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD) during the period from 2004 to 2009 and divided them into five groups: 26,597 of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) cases, 23,136 valvular surgery cases, 17,441 thoracic aortic surgery cases, 4,726 valvular surgery plus CABG cases, and 1,800 thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG cases. We calculated the overall incidence of postoperative DSWI, incidence of postoperative DSWI according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI cases according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI according to whether re-exploration for bleeding, and the intervals between the operation and deaths according to whether re-exploration for bleeding were investigated. Operative mortality is defined as in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Risk factors for DSWI were also examined. Results The overall incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8%. The incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8% after isolated CABG, 1.3% after valve surgery, 2.8% after valve surgery plus CABG, 1.9% after thoracic aortic surgery, and 3.4% after thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG. The 30-day and operative mortality in patients with DSWI was higher after more complicated operative procedures. The incidence of re-exploration for bleeding in DSWI cases was 11.1%. The overall 30-day/operative mortality after DSWI with re-exploration for bleeding was 23.0%/48.0%, and it was significantly higher than in the absence of re-exploration for bleeding (8.1%/22.0%). The difference between the intervals between the operation and death according to whether re-exploration for bleeding had been performed was not significant. Age and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors related to re-exploration for bleeding, and diabetes control was a significant risk factor related to DSWI for all surgical groups. Previous CABG was a significant risk factor related to both re-exploration for bleeding and DSWI for all surgical groups. Conclusions The incidence of DSWI after cardiac surgery according to the data entered in the JACVSD registry during the period from 2004 to 2009 was 1.8%, and more complicated procedures were followed by higher incidence and mortality. When re-exploration for bleeding was performed, mortality was significantly higher than when it was not performed. Prevention of DSWI and establishment of an effective appropriate treatment for DSWI may improve the outcome of cardiac surgery. PMID:23688324

2013-01-01

17

Wound infections on board ship--prevention, pathogens, and treatment.  

PubMed

Wounds are common in seafarers and they can easily become infected in the marine environment. Pre-sea tetanus immunization is essential. Without diagnostic facilities and only a limited range of antibiotics onboard, injury prevention and early treatment to reduce the likelihood of infection are important measures. Suturing clean cuts reduces healing time and risk of infection. Fresh, clean cuts, especially on the face or head, can be closed by adhesive tape or sutures, but if infection arises, then one or more sutures should be removed to enable drainage. Most wounds must be considered contaminated and should not be closed, just covered with sterile dressing after cleaning. Antibiotic treatment should be started immediately in seafarers with hand and puncture wounds. The primary treatment for a simple abscess is incision and drainage. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for abscesses if the infection spreads to the surrounding tissue (associated cellulitis), if there is lack of response to incision and drainage alone, or if the abscess is in an area difficult or dangerous to drain (e.g. face, palm, genitalia). Recommended therapy for cellulitis is 5-10 days of dicloxacillin, cephalexin, clindamycin, or erythromycin, but if there is no improvement after 2-3 days, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) should be suspected. Bites and burn wounds require special attention. Since wound infections can deteriorate rapidly, a telemedicine advice service (TMAS) should be consulted during the early stages, and serial digital photographs of the affected area, transmitted by e-mail to TMAS, are often useful during treatment at sea. PMID:22258845

Dahl, Eilif

2011-01-01

18

Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis  

PubMed Central

Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

2007-01-01

19

Management of human and animal bite wound infection: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal and human bite wounds can lead to serious infections. The organisms recovered generally originate from the biter’s\\u000a oral cavity and the victim’s skin flora. Anaerobes were isolated from more than two thirds of human and animal bite infections.\\u000a Streptococcus pyogenes is often recovered in human bites, Pasteurella multocida in animal bites, Eikenella corrodens in animal and human, Capnocytophaga spp,

Itzhak Brook

2009-01-01

20

Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Wound Infections  

PubMed Central

Throughout most of history, serious burns occupying a large percentage of body surface area were an almost certain death sentence because of subsequent infection. A number of factors such as disruption of the skin barrier, ready availability of bacterial nutrients in the burn milieu, destruction of the vascular supply to the burned skin, and systemic disturbances lead to immunosuppression combined together to make burns particularly susceptible to infection. In the 20th century the introduction of antibiotic and antifungal drugs, the use of topical antimicrobials that could be applied to burns, and widespread adoption of early excision and grafting all helped to dramatically increase survival. However the relentless increase in microbial resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials has led to a renewed search for alternative approaches to prevent and combat burn infections. This review will cover patented strategies that have been issued or filed with regard to new topical agents, preparations, and methods of combating burn infections. Animal models that are used in preclinical studies are discussed. Various silver preparations (nanocrystalline and slow release) are the mainstay of many approaches but antimicrobial peptides, topical photodynamic therapy, chitosan preparations, new iodine delivery formulations, phage therapy and natural products such as honey and essential oils have all been tested. This active area of research will continue to provide new topical antimicrobials for burns that will battle against growing multi-drug resistance. PMID:20429870

Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hashmi, Javad T.; Kurup, Divya B.; Hamblin, Michael R.

2010-01-01

21

Cesarean delivery wound infection in high-risk patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine whether simple inexpensive measures can reduce the frequency and severity of cesarean delivery wound infections in high-risk patients in a nonteaching hospital.Methods: The charts of 286 patients were reviewed for duration of membrane rupture, duration of labor, number of pelvic examinations, patient’s weight, and coexisting medical conditions. Office visits, at least two for each patient, after hospital

Suresh L. Persad

2000-01-01

22

Silver sulfadiazine for control of burn wound infections.  

PubMed

Silver sulfadiazine (Silvadene, U.S.; Flamazine, U.K.; Flammazine, N.; Sulplata, S.A.) is the newest topical antimicrobial agent available following worldwide clinical trials. Good control of infection is achieved without pain or other demonstrable side effects, using either dressings or the exposure technic. Many burned areas kept free of infection heal without grafting. Where necessary, early preparation for and good take of grafts has been attained by utilizing this new therapeutic agent. Markedly reduced mortality from burn wound sepsis has generally been observed. PMID:1092631

Fox, C L

1975-05-01

23

G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner.  

PubMed

This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure, and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation after Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3- to 4-month) and aged (18- to 20-month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?L per injection) or saline control (50 ?L per injection) 30 min after wound infection. Mice were killed at days 3 and 7 after wound infection, and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation, and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no effect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of postoperative wound infection or chronic nonhealing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

Brubaker, Aleah L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

2013-10-01

24

G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner  

PubMed Central

This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation following Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3–4 month) and aged (18–20 month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal, subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?l/injection) or saline control (50 ?l/injection) 30 minutes after wound infection. Mice were sacrificed at days 3 and 7 post wound infection and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no affect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of post-operative wound infection or chronic, non-healing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

Brubaker, Aleah L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

2013-01-01

25

Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

Kabon, Barbara; Akca, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

2005-01-01

26

Overview of the etiology of wound infections with particular emphasis on community-acquired illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wound cultures represent a general catchall category for a group of extremely diverse anatomic samples that range from superficial specimens of cutaneous structures (folliculitis, cellulitis) to specimens revealing invasive infections involving deep fascial planes and muscle (myonecrosis). Because of the complex nature of these infective processes, the terminology associated with such infections is often imprecise and confusing. Wounds are the

J. M. Janda; S. L. Abbott; R. A. Brenden

1997-01-01

27

An In Vivo Polymicrobial Biofilm Wound Infection Model to Study Interspecies Interactions  

PubMed Central

Chronic wound infections are typically polymicrobial; however, most in vivo studies have focused on monospecies infections. This project was designed to develop an in vivo, polymicrobial, biofilm-related, infected wound model in order to study multispecies biofilm dynamics and in relation to wound chronicity. Multispecies biofilms consisting of both Gram negative and Gram positive strains, as well as aerobes and anaerobes, were grown in vitro and then transplanted onto the wounds of mice. These in vitro-to-in vivo multi-species biofilm transplants generated polymicrobial wound infections, which remained heterogeneous with four bacterial species throughout the experiment. We observed that wounded mice given multispecies biofilm infections displayed a wound healing impairment over mice infected with a single-species of bacteria. In addition, the bacteria in the polymicrobial wound infections displayed increased antimicrobial tolerance in comparison to those in single species infections. These data suggest that synergistic interactions between different bacterial species in wounds may contribute to healing delays and/or antibiotic tolerance. PMID:22076151

Dalton, Trevor; Dowd, Scot E.; Wolcott, Randall D.; Sun, Yan; Watters, Chase; Griswold, John A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

2011-01-01

28

Efficacy of Micronized Flavonoid Fraction in Healing of Clean and Infected Wounds.  

PubMed

Purified micronized flavonoid fraction, comprising 90% diosmin and 10% hesperidin, is basically used as a phelebotonic and vasculoprotector agent. It also has anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous actions. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of micronized flavonoid fraction in clean and infectious wounds. Sixty Guinea pigs were separated into 2 main groups and 6 subgroups. The first three groups had clean wounds and the other three groups had infected wounds contaminated with S. aureus. Then these main groups were separated into 3 subgroups. The first subgroups was treated with 60 mg/kg/day micronized flavonoid fraction per oral, the second ones was treated with topical 60 mg/kg/day micronized flavonoid fraction, and the third ones had no treatment. Infected wounds were obtained by contamining the wounds with S. aureus. There were no significant differences in wound healing between the groups that have clean wounds (p > 0.05). In the groups with infected wounds, orally and topically treated guina pigs had accelerated wound healing compared to the untreated control group (p < 0.05), confirmed with surface area measurements and histopathological evaluation. Healing showed no difference between the groups treated orally and topically. This study showed that oral or topical administration of micronized flavonoid fraction in the infected wounds is beneficial, while it has no significant effect in clean wounds.

Hasanoglu, Adnan; Ara, Cengiz; Ozen, Suleyman; Kali, Kenan; Senol, Mustafa; Ertas, Ertugrul

2001-01-01

29

Postdischarge surveillance for nosocomial wound infection: Does judicious monitoring find cases?  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1988 through 1992, we conducted a prospective study of postdischarge surgical wound infection surveillance in our institution. A total of 6604 patients were seen after discharge in a centralized outpatient clinic, supervised by the infection control commission. Wounds were inspected, stitches were removed, and dressings were changed. This care was followed by referral of patients to the appropriate specialized

Edmundo Machado Ferraz; Alvaro Antonio Bandeira Ferraz; Helena Suely Torres D'Albuquerque Coelho; Valdilene Pereira Viana; Suzemires Marcia Lopes Sobral; Maria das Dores Marques Maia Vasconcelos; Tercio Souto Bacelar

1995-01-01

30

Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium Against Surgical Wounds Infected by Staphylococcus aureus in a Rat Model.  

PubMed

The wound infection is one of the frequent complications in patients undergoing surgical operations. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical wounds. Artemisia absinthium has been shown to bear strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Gram-positive pathogens. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of A. absinthium against surgical wounds infected by S. aureus in a rat model. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control rats. A circular incision was created on the dorsal inter-scapular region of each rat. After skin wounding, rats were inoculated locally with 1 × 10(4) CFU of S. aureus at sites of skin wounds. The extract was applied topically twice a day throughout the experiment. Animals of the control group were left untreated. Results have revealed that topical application of A. absinthium extract on the infected wound sites produced significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus. PMID:24293717

Moslemi, Hamid Reza; Hoseinzadeh, Hesamoddin; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Kafshdouzan, Khatereh; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

2012-12-01

31

Experimental phage therapy of burn wound infection: difficult first steps  

PubMed Central

Antibiotic resistance has become a major public health problem and the antibiotics pipeline is running dry. Bacteriophages (phages) may offer an ‘innovative’ means of infection treatment, which can be combined or alternated with antibiotic therapy and may enhance our abilities to treat bacterial infections successfully. Today, in the Queen Astrid Military Hospital, phage therapy is increasingly considered as part of a salvage therapy for patients in therapeutic dead end, particularly those with multidrug resistant infections. We describe the application of a well-defined and quality controlled phage cocktail, active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, on colonized burn wounds within a modest clinical trial (nine patients, 10 applications), which was approved by a leading Belgian Medical Ethical Committee. No adverse events, clinical abnormalities or changes in laboratory test results that could be related to the application of phages were observed. Unfortunately, this very prudent ‘clinical trial’ did not allow for an adequate evaluation of the efficacy of the phage cocktail. Nevertheless, this first ‘baby step’ revealed several pitfalls and lessons for future experimental phage therapy and helped overcome the psychological hurdles that existed to the use of viruses in the treatment of patients in our burn unit. PMID:25356373

Rose, Thomas; Verbeken, Gilbert; Vos, Daniel De; Merabishvili, Maya; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; Zizi, Martin; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

2014-01-01

32

Preventing Deep Wound Infection after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting  

PubMed Central

The consequences of deep wound infections before, during, and after coronary artery bypass grafting have prompted research to clarify risk factors and explore preventive measures to keep infection rates at an irreducible minimum. An analysis of 42 studies in which investigators used multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus and obesity are by far the chief preoperative risk factors. A 4-point preoperative scoring system based on a patient's body mass index and the presence or absence of diabetes is one practical way to determine the risk of mediastinitis, and other risk-estimate methods are being refined. Intraoperative risk factors include prolonged perfusion time, the use of one or more internal mammary arteries as grafts, blood transfusion, and mechanical circulatory assistance. The chief postoperative risk factor is reoperation, usually for bleeding. Unresolved issues include the optimal approach to Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization and the choice of a prophylactic antibiotic regimen. We recommend that cardiac surgery programs supplement their audit processes and ongoing vigilance for infections with periodic, multidisciplinary reviews of best-practice standards for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative patient care. PMID:23678210

Bryan, Charles S.; Yarbrough, William M.

2013-01-01

33

Continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgical procedures. We previously showed that elevated postoperative blood glucose levels are a predictor of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that aggressive intravenous pharmacologic control of postoperative blood glucose levels would reduce the incidence of deep sternal wound infection.Methods. In

Anthony P Furnary; Kathryn J Zerr; Gary L Grunkemeier; Albert Starr

1999-01-01

34

The use of collatamp g, local gentamicin-collagen sponge, in reducing wound infection.  

PubMed

Abstract We conducted a retrospective study to examine the role of Collatamp G in reducing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) in patients with different wound classes. Ninety-two patients (62 men and 30 women; mean age, 58 years; range, 29-88 years) who had undergone surgery between December 2009 and November 2011 in Tan Tock Seng Hospital and who had application of Collatamp G in their wound before closure were included in the study. The primary endpoint was the development of any superficial wound infection within 1 month postoperatively. Of 92 patients studied, 9 (10%) developed a superficial wound infection. Two of 43 patients with clean-contaminated wounds (5%), 2 of 19 with contaminated wounds (11%), and 5 of 30 with dirty-infected wounds (16%) developed infection. Use of the larger size Collatamp G (10 × 10 cm) also appears to have a lower incidence of SSI compared with the smaller Collatamp G (5 × 5 cm); 4% and 12%, respectively. Our data suggest that postoperative SSI was reduced in the group of patients with dirty-infected wound class. SSI appears to be decreased with use of the larger size Collatamp G. PMID:25216422

Chia, Clement L K; Shelat, Vishal G; Low, Wilson; George, Sheena; Rao, Jaideepraj

2014-01-01

35

Gram Negative Wound Infection in Hospitalised Adult Burn Patients-Systematic Review and Metanalysis-  

PubMed Central

Background Gram negative infection is a major determinant of morbidity and survival. Traditional teaching suggests that burn wound infections in different centres are caused by differing sets of causative organisms. This study established whether Gram-negative burn wound isolates associated to clinical wound infection differ between burn centres. Methods Studies investigating adult hospitalised patients (2000–2010) were critically appraised and qualified to a levels of evidence hierarchy. The contribution of bacterial pathogen type, and burn centre to the variance in standardised incidence of Gram-negative burn wound infection was analysed using two-way analysis of variance. Primary Findings Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanni, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp. and Escherichia coli emerged as the commonest Gram-negative burn wound pathogens. Individual pathogens’ incidence did not differ significantly between burn centres (F (4, 20)?=?1.1, p?=?0.3797; r2?=?9.84). Interpretation Gram-negative infections predominate in burn surgery. This study is the first to establish that burn wound infections do not differ significantly between burn centres. It is the first study to report the pathogens responsible for the majority of Gram-negative infections in these patients. Whilst burn wound infection is not exclusive to these bacteria, it is hoped that reporting the presence of this group of common Gram-negative “target organisms” facilitate clinical practice and target research towards a defined clinical demand. PMID:24751699

Azzopardi, Ernest A.; Azzopardi, Elayne; Camilleri, Liberato; Villapalos, Jorge; Boyce, Dean E.; Dziewulski, Peter; Dickson, William A.; Whitaker, Iain S.

2014-01-01

36

Efficacy of topical mupirocin against an experimental Staphylococcus aureus surgical wound infection.  

PubMed

The efficacy of topically-applied mupirocin was evaluated against an experimental surgical staphylococcal wound infection in the guinea-pig. A suture impregnated with Staphylococcus aureus was inserted into a superficial wound, and topical therapy with mupirocin ointment was started 24 h after infection. In non-treated wounds, the bacterial counts increased to greater than 10(6) organisms/wound in the majority of animals at 24 h, remaining at this level for up to seven days. Therapy with placebo ointment (polyethylene glycol base) was ineffective, whereas twice daily application of mupirocin ointment resulted in elimination of the staphylococci. Mupirocin was as effective as topically-applied fusidic acid cream in reducing the bacterial counts of infected wounds. PMID:3934130

Boon, R J; Beale, A S; Sutherland, R

1985-10-01

37

Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds.  

PubMed

After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds:FRESH, OPEN WOUNDS: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic(®)), no antibiotics, primary wound closurenearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic(®)), no antibioticsolder wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic(®)), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid)older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic(®)), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid).For each kind of bite wound, the patient's tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

2010-01-01

38

First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia  

PubMed Central

A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management. PMID:25356359

Hart, J; Mooney, L; Arthur, I; Inglis, T J J; Murray, R

2014-01-01

39

Pectoralis major muscle transposition for treatment of infected median sternotomy wounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Median sternotomy, currently the standard incision in open heart procedures, is rarely complicated by wound infection, but when present, it is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Adequate treatment can be provided by means of transposition of the pectoralis major muscle. After thorough sternal wound debridement the muscle, based on the thoraco-acromial pedicle, is transposed into the defect. From

S. J. M. Jongen; D. B. van Egmond; T. F. J. M. C. Specken; W. J. Morshuis; M. P. Carpentier Alting

1995-01-01

40

The pH of wound fluid in diabetic foot ulcers- the way forward in detecting clinical infection?  

PubMed

Infections within diabetic foot ulcers are often hard to detect and extremely difficult to treat. The normal signs and symptoms of infection including purulence, erythema, pain, tenderness, warmth and induration are frequently absent in such wounds necessitating exploration of other ways of rapidly and accurately detecting infection. This study considers diabetic wound fluid pH as a possible alternative means of monitoring infection status. CINAHL, Ovid SP and MEDLINE were searched for papers in English published between January 2004 to May 2014. Key search terms included wound fluid, exudate, wound, ulcer, diabetes, pH, healing, infection, bacteria. This paper considers the potential benefits of augmenting and supporting current clinical practice in the early determination of wound healing trajectory and infection status, by monitoring wound fluid pH. The evidence collected highlights the need for further research and suggests the potential of wound fluid analysis as a possible surrogate marker for detecting infection in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:24912533

McArdle, Carla; Lagan, Katie M; McDowell, David A

2014-05-01

41

A prospective study of wound infections after laparotomy in obstetrics and gynaecology department.  

PubMed

Postoperative wound infection is of great importance to both surgeon and patient. All surgeons know that postoperative wound infection means morbidity, anxiety, longer hospitalization, higher cost; not to forget the embarrassment to the surgeons. However, it is still a common surgical complication despite other advances in modern medicine. This study was conducted to find out the incidence of postoperative wound infection and to survey the risk factors for wound infection in obstetrics and gynaecology department of Nepal medical college teaching hospital (NMCTH). A prospective study of all the cases with infected wound after laparotomy and lower segment cesarean section done in NMCTH in obstetrics and gynaecology department was carried out in this study from Chaitra 2068 to Falgun 2069. The frequency of wound infection was 5.87%. Most of the wound infection after lower segment cesarean section occurred in emergency cases (16 out of 19). Seventy percent of patients had preoperative hospital stay range of 0-2 days whereas the range was 3-18 days for the rest 30%. The range of blood loss was 150-300 ml in nearly 75.7 % of patients. Duration of operation was 1-2 hours in 89.2% cases. Only 48.6% of wound infection was identified within 8th postoperative day. Number of infected cases getting prophylactic antibiotic was 25 (67.6%). BMI was >25 in 62.2% of patients. Type of skin incision was pfannenstiel in 94.6%. Skin was closed subcuticularly with vicryl no. 1 in 81.1%. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in swab culture in 24.3%. Resuturing was required in 18.9% of cases. PMID:24579531

Suwal, A; Shrivastava, V R; Giri, A

2012-12-01

42

Audit of major colorectal and biliary surgery to reduce rates of wound infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To reduce the rates of wound infection for major colorectal and biliary surgery. DESIGN--Prospective audit of antibiotic prophylaxis by keeping copies of typed notes of operations and annotating them at discharge and at first follow up visit and annual review of prophylactic regimen according to yearly rate of wound infection and modification if necessary. SETTING--The work of one consultant surgeon

B D Hancock

1990-01-01

43

Antibiotic prophylaxis for post-operative wound infection in clean elective breast surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antibiotic prophylaxis has been used to good effect in the prevention of post-operative wound infections in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations. We have assessed the use of a single dose of intravenous antibiotic (Augmentin 1.2 g), given with induction of anaesthesia as prophylaxis, against post-operative wound infection in women undergoing clean, elective breast surgery. Three hundred and thirty-four patients were recruited.

R. Gupta; D. Sinnett; R. Carpenter; P. E. Preece; G. T. Royle

2000-01-01

44

The significance of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and the incidence of postoperative wound infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with considerable morbidity and, in certain situations, mortality. The association between the nasal carriage of S. aureus and subsequent infection has been comprehensively established in a variety of clinical settings, in particular, patients undergoing haemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), and in patients undergoing surgery. Postoperative wound infections are associated with a high degree

R. P. Wenzel; T. M. Perl

1995-01-01

45

The Human Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 as a Potential Treatment for Polymicrobial Infected Wounds  

PubMed Central

Diabetic patients often have ulcers on their lower-limbs that are infected by multiple biofilm-forming genera of bacteria, and the elimination of the biofilm has proven highly successful in resolving such wounds in patients. To that end, antimicrobial peptides have shown potential as a new anti-biofilm approach. The single human cathelicidin peptide LL-37 has been shown to have antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity against multiple Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens, and have wound-healing effects on the host. The combination of the anti-biofilm effect and wound-healing properties of LL-37 may make it highly effective in resolving polymicrobially infected wounds when topically applied. Such a peptide or its derivatives could be a platform from which to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat biofilm-mediated infections of wounds. This review summarizes known mechanisms that regulate the endogenous levels of LL-37 and discusses the anti-biofilm, antibacterial, and immunological effects of deficient vs. excessive concentrations of LL-37 within the wound environment. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the therapeutic potential of this peptide and other clinically advanced peptides as a potential topical treatment for polymicrobial infected wounds. PMID:23840194

Duplantier, Allen J.; van Hoek, Monique L.

2013-01-01

46

Incidence, microbiological findings, and clinical presentation of sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery with and without local gentamicin prophylaxis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sternal wound infection (SWI) is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. In a previous randomized controlled trial,\\u000a the addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound before wound closure was found to significantly reduce the\\u000a incidence of postoperative wound infections compared with the routine intravenous prophylaxis of isoxazolyl-penicillin only.\\u000a The aims of the present study were to analyse the microbiological

Ö. Friberg; R. Svedjeholm; J. Källman; B. Söderquist

2007-01-01

47

Effect of surgical incision management on wound infections in a poststernotomy patient population.  

PubMed

Skin breakdown and infiltration of skin flora are key causative elements in poststernotomy wound infections. We hypothesised that surgical incision management (SIM) using negative pressure wound therapy over closed surgical incisions for 6-7?days would reduce wound infections in a comprehensive poststernotomy patient population. 'All comers' undergoing median sternotomy at our institution were analysed prospectively from 1 September to 15 October 2013 (study group, n?=?237) and retrospectively from January 2008 to December 2009 (historical control group, n?=?3508). The study group had SIM (Prevena™ Therapy) placed immediately after skin suturing and applied at -125 mmHg for 6-7?days, whereas control group received conventional sterile wound tape dressings. Primary endpoint was wound infection within 30 days. Study group had a significantly lower infection rate than control group: 1·3% (3 patients) versus 3·4% (119 patients), respectively (P?wound infection after median sternotomy. Based on these data SIM may be cost-effective in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24851729

Grauhan, Onnen; Navasardyan, Artashes; Tutkun, Baris; Hennig, Felix; Müller, Peter; Hummel, Manfred; Hetzer, Roland

2014-06-01

48

Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Uses Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A to Colonize from Wound Infection Sites  

PubMed Central

Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA), a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA). Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues. PMID:23555272

Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Kolodziejek, Izabella; Crabill, Emerson; Kaschani, Farnusch; Niessen, Sherry; Shindo, Takayuki; Kaiser, Markus; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

2013-01-01

49

Biofilms and persistent wound infections in United States military trauma patients: a case-control analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Complex traumatic injuries sustained by military personnel, particularly when involving extremities, often result in infectious complications and substantial morbidity. One factor that may further impair patient recovery is the persistence of infections. Surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, may play a role in hindering the management of infections; however, clinical data associating biofilm formation with persistent or chronic infections are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the production of bacterial biofilms as a potential risk factor for persistent infections among wounded military personnel. Methods Bacterial isolates and clinical data from military personnel with deployment-related injuries were collected through the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study. The study population consisted of patients with diagnosed skin and soft-tissue infections. Cases (wounds with bacterial isolates of the same organism collected 14 days apart) were compared to controls (wounds with non-recurrent bacterial isolates), which were matched by organism and infectious disease syndrome. Potential risk factors for persistent infections, including biofilm formation, were examined in a univariate analysis. Data are expressed as odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]). Results On a per infected wound basis, 35 cases (representing 25 patients) and 69 controls (representing 60 patients) were identified. Eight patients with multiple wounds were utilized as both cases and controls. Overall, 235 bacterial isolates were tested for biofilm formation in the case–control analysis. Biofilm formation was significantly associated with infection persistence (OR: 29.49; CI: 6.24-infinity) in a univariate analysis. Multidrug resistance (OR: 5.62; CI: 1.02-56.92), packed red blood cell transfusion requirements within the first 24 hours (OR: 1.02; CI: 1.01-1.04), operating room visits prior to and on the date of infection diagnosis (OR: 2.05; CI: 1.09-4.28), anatomical location of infected wound (OR: 5.47; CI: 1.65-23.39), and occurrence of polymicrobial infections (OR: 69.71; CI: 15.39-infinity) were also significant risk factors for persistent infections. Conclusions We found that biofilm production by clinical strains is significantly associated with the persistence of wound infections. However, the statistical power of the analysis was limited due to the small sample size, precluding a multivariate analysis. Further data are needed to confirm biofilm formation as a risk factor for persistent wound infections. PMID:24712544

2014-01-01

50

Validation of a Novel Murine Wound Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Infection  

PubMed Central

Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to testing in larger animals. PMID:24342634

Thompson, Mitchell G.; Black, Chad C.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Honnold, Cary L.; Wise, Matthew C.; Alamneh, Yonas A.; Moon, Jay K.; Kessler, Jennifer L.; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Green, Romanza K.; Hall, Eric R.; Palys, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

51

Multifocal cutaneous mucormycosis complicating polymicrobial wound infections in a tsunami survivor from Sri Lanka.  

PubMed

A man injured in the tsunami of Dec 26, 2004, returned to Sydney for management of his soft-tissue injuries. Despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical wound debridement, and vigilant wound care, his condition worsened. Muscle and fat necrosis developed in a previously debrided thigh wound, and necrotising lesions arose from previous abrasions. Histological analysis showed mucormycosis in three non-contiguous sites, and Apophysomyces elegans was isolated from excised wound tissue. Wound infections, both bacterial and fungal, will undoubtedly add to the morbidity and mortality already recorded in tsunami-affected areas. Other cases [correction] of cutaneous mucormycosis might develop in survivors, but this disease can be difficult to diagnose and even harder to treat, particularly in those remaining in affected regions. PMID:15752532

Andresen, David; Donaldson, Annabelle; Choo, Lennart; Knox, Adrian; Klaassen, Michael; Ursic, Caesar; Vonthethoff, Leon; Krilis, Steven; Konecny, Pamela

52

Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds - conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy  

PubMed Central

As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient. Bacterial counts above 105 to 106 cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated. The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness. The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects. Derived from the general principles of antiseptic wound treatment, the following working hypothesis is postulated: the most ideal constellation for treatment of wounds is the superficial destruction of microbial layers without deep tissue alteration, like it is caused by antiseptics, in order not to endanger the regenerative granulation tissue. At the same time, it is desirable to support and increase cell proliferation and granulation capacities. These two aspects might be achieved by using low temperature plasma technology. PMID:20204115

Kramer, Axel; Hubner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jurgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

2008-01-01

53

Recurrent sternal infection following treatment with negative pressure wound therapy and titanium transverse plate fixation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To provide a definition for recurrent sternal infection (RSI), analyse the risk factors and describe the management of this complication following treatment of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with horizontal titanium sternal osteosynthesis and coverage with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps. Methods: Between 2002 and 2007, 10665 patients were submitted to open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution, of whom 149

Geneviève Gaudreau; Victor Costache; Chanel Houde; Daniel Cloutier; Livia Montalin; Pierre Voisine; Richard Baillot

2010-01-01

54

Surgical wound infection surveillance in general surgery procedures at a teaching hospital in Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A surveillance system was established at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, to determine surgical wound infection (SWI) rates, trends, and risk factors; and to compare rates with those reported by the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods: Surveillance was performed from January 1997 to December 1999. Risk

Turab Pishori; Amna Rehana Siddiqui; Mushtaq Ahmed

2003-01-01

55

Association of Borderline Oxacillin-Susceptible Strains of Staphylococcus aureus with Surgical Wound Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staphylococcus aureus isolates which produce type A staphylococcal b-lactamase have been associated with wound infections complicating the use of cefazolin prophylaxis in surgery. To further evaluate this finding, 215 wound isolates from 14 cities in the United States were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility and b-lactamase type and correlated with the preoperative prophylactic regimen. Borderline-susceptible S. aureus isolates of phage group

DOUGLAS S. KERNODLE; DAVID C. CLASSEN; CHARLES W. STRATTON; ALLEN B. KAISER

1998-01-01

56

A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

2014-01-01

57

Controlling methicillin resistant Staphyloccocus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infections with a novel biomaterial.  

PubMed

Wound infections, especially those associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, offer considerable challenges for clinicians. Our laboratory has recently developed novel composite biomaterials (DRDC) for wound dressing applications, and demonstrated their in vitro bactericidal efficacy. In the present study, we assessed the proliferation of planktonic and sessile Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in porcine full-thickness wounds covered for up to 48 h with either saline- or mafenide acetate-loaded DRDC puffs and meshes. All biomaterials were applied 4 h following bacterial inoculation of the wounds with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to allow colonization of the tissues and initiation of biofilm formation. The drug-loaded biomaterials eradicated both the planktonic and biofilm bacteria in the wounds within 24 h (p <. 05), irrespective of the bacterial strain or architecture of the dressing. While the wound bioburdens increased in the ensuing 24 h, they remained approximately 2 log(10) colony-forming units (CFU) below (p <. 05) their respective baseline values. Similarly, less than 4 log(10) CFU was recovered in the drug-loaded DRDC biomaterials throughout the study. These data show that the DRDC puffs and meshes are effective in delivering certain medications, such as antimicrobial agents, to the wound bed, suggesting considerable value of this material for treating wounds, especially those with irregular shapes, contours, and depths. PMID:17710602

Martineau, Lucie; Davis, Stephen C; Peng, Henry T; Hung, Andy

2007-01-01

58

Effects of antibiotics administration on the incidence of wound infection in percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy.  

PubMed

The effect of antibiotics during the perioperative period of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) is still controversial. A total of 297 patients who underwent the PDT procedure were divided into 2 groups:those administered antibiotics perioperatively and those not administered antibiotics. Wound infections were noted in 7 cases (incidence rate, 2.36%) and no death was recorded. Of the 69 patients without antibiotics, 5 developed wound infections (incidence rate, 7.25%), while only 2 of the 228 patients with antibiotics developed wound infections (incidence rate, 0.88%) (p?0.002;risk ratio, 8.82;95% confidence interval, 1.67-46.6). Of the 7 cases of wound infection, 5 cases occurred during the early period after PDT (within 7 days). Collectively, the present results suggest that prophylactic administration of antibiotics may prevent the incidence of PDT-induced wound infection, especially in the early phase after the PDT procedures. The need for antibiotics in PDT should be reconsidered. PMID:24743781

Hagiya, Hideharu; Naito, Hiromichi; Hagioka, Shingo; Okahara, Shuji; Morimoto, Naoki; Kusano, Nobuchika; Otsuka, Fumio

2014-01-01

59

Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute Burn and Chronic Surgical Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence. PMID:25057820

Turner, Keith H.; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Whiteley, Marvin

2014-01-01

60

Evaluation of healing of infected cutaneous wounds treated with different energy densities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We aimed assess the effects of different energy densities of the association of red/IR laser light on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected Staphylococcus aureus. Background: Wound infection is the most common complication on healing wounds and cause both vascular and cellular responses on the tissue. Several therapeutics is used for improving wound healing including the use of different light sources, such as the Laser. Some energy densities present positive photobiological effects on the healing process. Material and Methods: 24 young adult male Wistar rats, under general anesthesia, had their dorsum shaven, cleaned and a 1 x 1cm cutaneous wound created with a scalpel and left without no suturing or dressings. The wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and were randomly divided in 8 subgroups of 3 animals in each: Control, Group 10J/cm2, Group 20J/cm2, and Group 30J/cm2, 7 and 14 days each group. Laser phototherapy was carried out with a diode (?680nm/790nm, P= 30mW/40mW, CW, Laser, Ø = 3mm, PD=424mW/cm2 and 566mW/cm2, t=11.8/ 8.8 sec, E=0.35J) and started immediately after surgery and repeated at every other day during 7 days. Laser light was applied on 4 points around wounded area. The animals were killed at either 8th or 15th day after contamination. Specimens were taken, routinely cut and processed to wax, stained and underwent histological analysis. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Both 20 and 30J/cm2 caused intense collagen deposition at the end of the experimental time. But, when 20 J/cm2 was used the fibers were also well organized. Conclusion: Our results indicate that irradiated subjects showed improved wound healing being the 20 J/cm2 the energy the caused better histological response.

Santos, Nicole R. S.; Cangussú, Maria C. T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

2011-03-01

61

Towards understanding Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections by profiling gene expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing severe acute and chronic nosocomial infections in immunocompromised or catheterized\\u000a patients. It is prevalent in burn wound infections and it is generally multi-drug resistant. Understanding the genetic programs\\u000a underlying infection is essential to develop highly needed new strategies for prevention and therapy. This work reviews expression\\u000a profiling efforts conducted worldwide towards gaining

Piotr Bielecki; Justyna Glik; Marek Kawecki; Vítor A. P. Martins dos Santos

2008-01-01

62

[Toxic shock syndrome in 2 girls with pharyngeal infection and wound infection].  

PubMed

In 1981, a 13 year old girl died of her shock lung. She had been admitted with the classical toxic shock syndrome then still unknown to us. Staphylococcus aureus had been cultured from a pharyngeal swab. But even in 1987, it took us 48 hours to correctly diagnose the toxic shock syndrome in a 17 year old girl. The diagnosis became evident when she was found to have a staphylococcus aureus wound infection after a surgical procedure. For pediatricians, it is crucial to know this syndrome well. Not only menstruating girls using tampons, but also quite young children can acquire this disease. Quick diagnosis and prompt institution of the correct therapy can be life saving. PMID:3352613

von Mühlendahl, K E

1988-01-01

63

Mycobacterium chelonae causing chronic wound infection and abdominal incisional hernia.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that is found all over the environment, including sewage and tap water. They are important species associated with chronic non-healing wounds. We report a case in a 41 year old female patient who underwent multiple surgeries for an ovarian cyst, tubo-ovarian abscesses with peritonitis and a repair of an abdominal incisional hernia. PMID:24943783

Verghese, Susan; Agrawal, Parag; Benjamin, Santosh

2014-01-01

64

Technical Changes in Paraspinous Muscle Flap Surgery Have Increased Salvage Rates of Infected Spinal Wounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The objective of this study is to introduce modifications in paraspinous muscle flap surgery and compare this new variation's ability to salvage infected hardware with the classic technique. Infected posterior spine wounds are a difficult problem for reconstructive surgeons. As per experience, hardware retention in infected wounds maintains spinal stability, decreases length of stay, and decreases the wound healing complication rate. Methods: An 11-year retrospective office and hospital chart review was conducted between July 1996 and August 2007. All patients who underwent paraspinous muscle flap reconstruction for postspine surgery wound infections during this time period were included. There were 51 patients in the study representing the largest reported series, to date, for this procedure. Twenty-two patients underwent treatment using the modified technique and 29 patients were treated using the classic technique. Results: There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups in demographics, medical history, or reason for initial spine surgery. The hardware salvage rate associated with the modified technique was greater than the rate associated with the classic technique (95.4% vs 75.8%; P = .03). There were fewer postreconstruction wound healing complications requiring hospital readmission in the modified technique group than the classic group (13.6% vs 44.8%; P = .04). Patients in the modified technique group demonstrated a shorter mean length of stay than the patients in the classic group (23.7 days vs 29.7; P = .25). Conclusions: The modified paraspinous muscle flap technique is an excellent option for spinal wound reconstruction, preservation of spinal hardware, and local infection control. PMID:19011678

Mericli, Alexander F.; Moore, John H.; Copit, Steven E.; Fox, James W.; Tuma, Gary A.

2008-01-01

65

Improved perioperative antibiotic use and reduced surgical wound infections through use of computer decision analysis.  

PubMed

A prospective study was performed over a two-year period to determine whether computer-generated reminders of perioperative antibiotic use could improve prescribing habits and reduce postoperative wound infections. During the first year, baseline patterns of antibiotic use and postoperative infection rates were established. During the second year, computer-generated reminders regarding perioperative antibiotic use were placed in the patient's medical record prior to surgery and patterns of antibiotic use and postoperative wound infections monitored. Hospitalized patients undergoing non-emergency surgery from June to November 1985 (3,263 patients), and from June to November 1986 (3,568) were monitored with respect to indications for perioperative antibiotic use, timing of antibiotic use and postoperative infectious complications. Perioperative antibiotic use was considered advisable for 1,621 (50%) patients in the 1985 sample and for 1,830 (51%) patients in the 1986 sample. Among these patients, antibiotics were given within two hours before the surgical incision in 638 (40%) of the 1985 sample and 1,070 (58%) of the 1986 sample (p less than 0.001). Overall, postoperative wound infections were detected in 28 (1.8%) of 1,621 patients in 1985 compared with 16 (0.9%) of 1,830 such patients in 1986 (p less than 0.03). We conclude that computer-generated reminders of perioperative antibiotic use improved prescribing habits with a concurrent decline in postoperative wound infections. PMID:2745959

Larsen, R A; Evans, R S; Burke, J P; Pestotnik, S L; Gardner, R M; Classen, D C

1989-07-01

66

Prevalence of Nosocomial Wound Infection Among Postoperative Patients and Antibiotics Patterns at Teaching Hospital in Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background: Postoperative nosocomial infections remain a major problem in health care facilities, resulting in extended length of stay, substantial morbidity and mortality, high excess of cost, and less frequent cause of death in the surgical patient. Aims: To determine the prevalence of aerobic nosocomial pathogens among patients with postoperative wound infections at Gadarif state which located in Eastern part of Sudan. Materials and Methods: 109 wound swabs were collected from patients who had developed postoperative wound infection. Conventional technique for isolation of bacteria was applied with analytical profile index (API system) for identification to confirm primary and secondary isolates. Antibiotics susceptibility was applied for all isolated bacteria. Results: Aerobic bacterial isolates were S. aureus (n=55, 55.0%), P. mirabilis (n=35, 35.0%), E. coli (n=5, 5.0%), Ps. aeruginosa (n=3, 3.0%), and Pr. vulgaris (n=2, 2.0%). The prevalence rate of hospital acquired infection were 25.23% Conclusion: The highest prevalence rate of nosocomial postoperative wound infection, in Sudan was due to poor antibiotic selection, for prophylaxis during and after surgery and increased level of contamination in most part of the hospital. PMID:22393545

Ahmed, Mohamed Issa

2012-01-01

67

Wound closure and wound management  

PubMed Central

Wound closure and infection control are the primary goal of wound management. A variety of disinfectants and antimicrobial agents are widely available today and routinely achieve infection control. On the contrary, wound closure still remains a challenging goal. Cell adhesion, migration and contraction play significant roles in creating contractile force of patent wound margins and in contributing to wound closure. Modulations of these cellular behaviors have been investigated in the context of wound contraction; however, therapeutic strategy to achieve wound closure has not been established. Recently, we have reported that a previously unknown cytoskeleton molecule, wound inducible transcript-3.0 (wit3.0) also known as fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 oncogene partner 2 (FGFR1OP2), can significantly modulate fibroblast-driven wound closure in vitro and in vivo. The dynamic role of cytoskeleton in different experimental models may provide a novel platform for designing the therapeutic target of wound management. PMID:20448469

Lin, Audrey; Hokugo, Akishige

2010-01-01

68

Prevalence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Infections in Diabetic versus Nondiabetic Wounds  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects 23.6 million people in the USA and approximately 20–25% of diabetic patients will develop foot ulceration during the course of their disease. Up to a quarter of these patients will develop infections that will necessitate amputation. Although many studies report that the rates of antibiotic resistant infections have increased dramatically in the DM population over the last decade, to our knowledge there have been no reports directly comparing the rates of antibiotic resistant infections in DM versus non-DM wounds. We performed a retrospective study comparing the wound infections of 41 DM patients to those of 74 non-DM patients to test the hypothesis that infections with multidrug resistant organisms (MDRO) were more prevalent in the DM population. We found that 63.4% of DM and 50% of non-DM patients had MDRO infections, which was not statistically different. However, 61% of the DM patients had Pseudomonas infections compared to only 18.9% of non-DM patients. Furthermore, DM patients had significantly more coinfections with both Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus aureus. Though our initial hypothesis was incorrect, we demonstrated a significant correlation between Pseudomonas and Pseudomonas/S. aureus coinfections within DM wounds. PMID:25054067

Trivedi, Urvish; Parameswaran, Shamini; Griswold, John; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

2014-01-01

69

Direction of Association between Bite Wounds and Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Badgers: Implications for Transmission  

PubMed Central

Background Badgers are involved in the transmission to cattle of bovine tuberculosis (TB), a serious problem for the UK farming industry. Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between bite wounds and TB infection in badgers which may have implications for M. bovis transmission and control, although the sequence of these two events is unclear. Transmission during aggressive encounters could potentially reduce the effectiveness of policies which increase the average range of a badger and thus its opportunities for interaction with other social groups. Methods Data were obtained on badgers captured during a long term study at Woodchester Park, UK (1998–2006). Many badgers had multiple observations. At each observation, the badger was assigned a “state” depending on presence of bite wounds and/or TB infection. Hence each badger had a “transition” from the previous state to the current state. We calculated the numbers of each type of transition and the time spent in each state. Transition rates were calculated for each transition category, dividing the number of such transitions by the total time at risk. We compared the rate of bite wound acquisition in infected badgers with that for uninfected badgers and the rate of positive M.bovis test results in bitten badgers with that in unbitten badgers. Results The rate of bite wound acquisition in infected badgers (0.291 per year) was 2.09 (95% CI: 1.41, 3.08) times that in uninfected badgers (0.139 per year). The rate of positive M.bovis test results in bitten badgers (0.097 per year) was 2.45 (95% CI: 1.29, 4.65) times that in unbitten badgers (0.040 per year). Conclusions We found strong evidence of both potential sequences of events consistent with transmission via bite wounds and distinctive behaviour in infected badgers. The complex relationship between behaviour and infection must be considered when planning TB control strategies. PMID:23029117

Jenkins, Helen E.; Cox, D. R.; Delahay, Richard J.

2012-01-01

70

Polycaprolactone-based fused deposition modeled mesh for delivery of antibacterial agents to infected wounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infections represent a significant source of site morbidity following tissue trauma. Scarring and tissue adhesion remain the challenging issues yet to be solved. Prolonged inflammation and morphology of the re-epithelisated layer are important considerations. We hypothesized that the solution lies not only in the biochemistry of biomaterial but also the micro-architecture of the scaffold used as the matrix for wound

Erin Yiling Teo; Shin-Yeu Ong; Mark Seow Khoon Chong; Zhiyong Zhang; Jia Lu; Shabbir Moochhala; Bow Ho; Swee-Hin Teoh

2011-01-01

71

Preoperative bacterial colonization and its influence on postoperative wound infections in plastic surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

During two separate periods a total of 654 patients were included in a clinical study relating preoperative bacterial colonization to occurrence of postoperative wound infection in plastic surgery. During the second period one half of the patients were randomized to receive prophylactic azithromycin. Bacteriological samples were collected from the nasal vestibulum during both periods, and additionally from the surgical field

K. Andenæs; E. Lingaas; P. F. Amland; K.-E. Giercksky; F. Åbyholm

1996-01-01

72

Burn wounds infected by contaminated water: Case reports, review of the literature and recommendations for treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

First-aid education for the management of burns advocates cool running water over burnt skin to limit soft tissue damage. However, the water used may itself constitute a risk.We report three cases of severe invasive and necrotizing infection in patients who used or immersed themselves in contaminated water in an attempt to extinguish the fire following acute major burns. Wound cultures

Noel F. F. Ribeiro; Christopher H. Heath; Jessica Kierath; Suzanne Rea; Mark Duncan-Smith; Fiona M. Wood

2010-01-01

73

Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Responses to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an In Vitro Wound Infection Model  

PubMed Central

Treatment of patients with burn wound infections may become complicated by the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Herein, we demonstrate an in vitro thermal wound infection model using human skin equivalents (HSE) and biofilm-forming methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for the testing of agents to combat such infections. Application of a liquid nitrogen-cooled metal device on HSE produced reproducible wounds characterized by keratinocyte death, detachment of the epidermal layer from the dermis, and re-epithelialization. Thermal wounding was accompanied by up-regulation of markers for keratinocyte activation, inflammation, and antimicrobial responses. Exposure of thermal wounded HSEs to MRSA resulted in significant numbers of adherent MRSA/HSE after 1 hour, and multiplication of these bacteria over 24-48 hours. Exposure to MRSA enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators such as TLR2 (but not TLR3), IL-6 and IL-8, and antimicrobial proteins human ?-defensin-2, -3 and RNAse7 by thermal wounded as compared to control HSEs. Moreover, locally applied mupirocin effectively reduced MRSA counts on (thermal wounded) HSEs by more than 99.9% within 24 hours. Together, these data indicate that this thermal wound infection model is a promising tool to study the initial phase of wound colonization and infection, and to assess local effects of candidate antimicrobial agents. PMID:24340061

Haisma, Elisabeth M.; Rietveld, Marion H.; de Breij, Anna; van Dissel, Jaap T.

2013-01-01

74

Nanohybrids of Silver Particles Immobilized on Silicate Platelet for Infected Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Silver nanoparticles supported on nanoscale silicate platelets (AgNP/NSP) possess interesting properties, including a large surface area and high biocide effectiveness. The nanohybrid of AgNP/NSP at a weight ratio 7/93 contains 5-nm Ag particles supported on the surface of platelets with dimensions of approximately 80×80×1 nm3. The nanohybrid expresses a trend of lower cytotoxicity at the concentration of 8.75 ppm Ag and low genotoxicity. Compared with conventional silver ions and the organically dispersed AgNPs, the nanohybrid promotes wound healing. We investigated overall wound healing by using acute burn and excision wound healing models. Tests on both infected wound models of mice were compared among the AgNP/NSP, polymer-dispersed AgNPs, the commercially available Aquacel, and silver sulfadiazine. The AgNP/NSP nanohybrid was superior for wound appearance, but had similar wound healing rates, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A levels and transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1 expressions to Aquacel and silver sulfadiazine. PMID:22693632

Chu, Chia-Yu; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Chiu, Ying-Fang; Lee, Hsing-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Wen; Wei, Jiun-Chiou; Lin, Jiang-Jen

2012-01-01

75

Reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and infiltration contributes to delayed resolution of cutaneous wound infection with advanced age1  

PubMed Central

Advanced age is associated with alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses, which contribute to an increased risk of infection in elderly patients. Coupled with this immune dysfunction, elderly patients demonstrate impaired wound healing with elevated rates of wound dehiscence and chronic wounds. To evaluate how advanced age alters the host immune response to cutaneous wound infection, we developed a murine model of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in young (3–4 month) and aged (18–20 month) BALB/c mice. Aged mice exhibit increased bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure over time compared to young mice. These differences were not attributed to alterations in wound neutrophil or macrophage TLR2 or Fc?RIII expression, or age-related changes in phagocytic potential and bactericidal activity. To evaluate the role of chemotaxis in our model, we first examined in vivo chemotaxis in the absence of wound injury to KC, a neutrophil chemokine. In response to a subcutaneous injection of KC, aged mice recruited fewer neutrophils at increasing doses of KC compared to young mice. This paralleled our model of wound infection, where diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment was observed in aged mice relative to young mice despite equivalent levels of KC, MIP-2 and MCP-1 chemokine levels at the wound site. This reduced leukocyte accumulation was also associated with lower levels of ICAM-1 in wounds from aged mice at early time points. These age-mediated defects in early neutrophil recruitment may alter the dynamics of the inflammatory phase of wound healing, impacting macrophage recruitment, bacterial clearance and wound closure. PMID:23319733

Brubaker, Aleah L.; Rendon, Juan L.; Ramirez, Luis; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

2012-01-01

76

Risk Factors for Complications after Reconstructive Surgery for Sternal Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Although the utility of flaps for the treatment of sternal wound infections following median sternotomy has been reported for 30 years, there have been few reports on the risk factors for complications after reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to identify factors related to complications after the reconstruction of sternal wound infections. Methods A retrospective analysis of 74 patients with reconstructive surgery after sternal wound infection over a 5-year period was performed. Clinical data including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, bacterial culture, previous cardiac surgery, wound depth, mortality rate, type of reconstructive procedure, and complication rate were collected. Results The patients' BMI ranged from 15.2 to 33.6 kg/m2 (mean, 23.1±3.74 kg/m2). Wound closure complications after reconstructive surgery were observed in 36.5% of the cases. The mortality rate was 2.7%. Diabetes mellitus significantly affected the rate of wound closure complications (P=0.041). A significant difference in the number of complications was seen between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (P=0.011). There was a correlation between harvesting of the internal thoracic artery and postoperative complications (P=0.048). The complication rates of the pectoralis major flap, rectus abdominis flap, omentum flap, a combination of pectoralis major flap and rectus abdominis flap, and direct closure were 23.3%, 33.3%, 100%, 37.5%, and 35.7%, respectively. Conclusions Diabetes mellitus, S. aureus, harvesting of the internal thoracic artery, and omentum flap were significant factors for complications after reconstruction. The omentum flap volume may be related to the complications associated with the omentum flap transfer in the present study. PMID:24883276

Takaku, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Shinji; Abe, Yoshiro; Harada, Hiroshi; Nagae, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Yusuke; Anraku, Kuniaki; Inagawa, Kiichi; Nakanishi, Hideki

2014-01-01

77

Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.  

PubMed

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (P<.001). We conclude that GSNO is easily generated from our NO-np platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa. PMID:23377518

Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

2012-12-01

78

Treatment with an oxazolidinone antibiotic inhibits toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 production in MRSA-infected burn wounds.  

PubMed

Mortality rates in burn patients increase if they experience complications of infection. Frequently, the organisms associated with such infections are Staphylococci, including antibiotic-resistant species such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Virulence factor production can further complicate treatment as a localized toxin presence may derail the healing process and allow a more invasive infection, while a toxin that becomes systemic can induce shock and cause host immune disruption. Male rats were anesthetized and subjected to full-thickness burn wounds. One day postinjury, wounds were inoculated with Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Animals were then divided into three treatment groups: vancomycin, linezolid, or positive control. For nine additional days, animals received twice-daily antibiotics and wound assessments, blood draws, and wound biopsies were performed. All animals had wound quantitative cultures that exceeded 1 × 10 colony forming units (CFU) per gram 1 day after inoculation. Linezolid treatment significantly reduced the bacterial counts in the wounds. Positive controls and vancomycin-treated animals had toxins in their wounds by day 5 and this remained throughout the study (ranging from 20-80 ng/ml). Linezolid-treated animals had significant decrease in toxin production (< 5 ng/ml), and in most cases toxins were undetectable. No animals became systemically infected with bacteria at any point during the study. Superantigen production in burn wounds has morbid consequences in terms of long-term wound healing. A S. aureus burn wound infection model was created that allowed the study of the effect of two standard-use antibiotics on local burn wound pathophysiology. Most noteworthy is that low-dose linezolid arrested toxin production in the wound. PMID:23370994

Shupp, Jeffrey W; Ortiz, Rachel T; Moffatt, Lauren T; Jo, Daniel Y; Randad, Pranay R; Njimoluh, Khadijatou L; Mauskar, Neil A; Mino, Matthew J; Amundsen, Bethany; Jordan, Marion H

2013-01-01

79

Risk factors for wound infection in health care facilities in Buea, Cameroon: aerobic bacterial pathogens and antibiogram of isolates  

PubMed Central

Introduction Wound infection is a significant clinical challenge in hospitals in developing countries where proper healthcare delivery is hampered by limited resources. This study investigated the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria causing wound infection and risk factors for infection among hospitalized patients in Buea, Cameroon, to generate findings which could drive reformation of policies on infection control. Methods Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 212 swabs collected from patients with clinically diagnosed infected wounds. Risk factors for wound infection were investigated. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was determined by disk diffusion technique. The Chi-square test was employed to determine significant differences in isolation and distribution of organisms in various specimens. Differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results Twelve bacteria species were isolated from 169 (79.7%) specimens. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the predominant isolates in all wound types exhibited a high preponderance of multidrug resistant strains. High rate of infection was attributed to lack of constant water supply and breakdown of sterilization equipment during the study period. Highest diversity of pathogens occurred in open wounds. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in isolation of pathogens with respect to age, gender and wound type. Co-existing morbidity increased risk of wound infection. Isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and resistant to oxacillin. Conclusion Wound infection with resistant bacteria constitutes a significant cause of morbidity in the study area. Findings reiterate the need to strengthen infection control and drug dispensing policies, and greater collaboration between microbiologists and medical practioners to stem the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:25360190

Kihla, Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah; Ngunde, Palle John; Evelyn, Mbianda Soupsop; Gerard, Nkwelang; Ndip, Roland Ndip

2014-01-01

80

The Role of Diminishing Appetite and Serum Nesfatin-1 Level in Patients with Burn Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Background The burn wound represents a susceptible site for opportunistic colonization by organisms of endogenous and exogenous origin. Diminishing appetite is known to occur in patients with burn infection, yet its underlying reason is not fully understood. We have examined the levels of nesfatin 1, a protein that we consider to be a potential new treatment target for the solution of appetite and nutrition problem in patients with burn infection. Objectives The aim of the present study was therefore to examine nesfatin levels in patients with burn infection. Material and Methods Laboratory values, medication and dietary records, and patient notes with diagnostic information of burn wounds patients who were admitted to the Division of Burn Treatment Center were obtained from the Erzurum Region Education and Research Hospital electronic database. Post-burn wound infection was objectively assessed by culturing wound homogenates from skin tissue. The main immediate inflammatory stress response parameters assessed were serum CRP concentrations, WBC counts, and blood nesfatin concentrations. Results Scalding was the predominant cause of burns in both categories of patients. In 19 (61.3%) burn wound infection patients, the burns were due to a scald. A significant difference was found for the nesfatin, CRP, and WBC levels between the patients and the control group (P = 0.000). A significant difference was also determined between the nesfatin, CRP, and WBC figures at the time of hospitalization and at discharge from the hospital (P = 0.000). The most predominant bacterial isolate was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 16 (51.6%) followed by Methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 7 (22.6%). Conclusions We showed that the serum nesfatin 1 level was significantly lower in the patients with burn than in the control group in our study. We considered that the central nesfatin 1 system should be taken into consideration, rather than the peripheric nesfatin 1 system, when considering the regulation of appetite in patients with burns and particularly those accompanied by infection. In other explanation of the observed negative correlation between nesfatin 1 and burn wound infection suggests that nesfatin 1 may indicate the possible contribution of nesfatin 1 to the energy homeostasis. PMID:24349725

Albayrak, Ayse; Demiryilmaz, Ismail; Albayrak, Yavuz; Aylu, Belkiz; Ozogul, Bunyami; Cerrah, Serkan; Celik, Muhammed

2013-01-01

81

[Ten-year experience with the use of ofloxacin in the treatment of wound infection].  

PubMed

The experience with ofloxacin used for 10 years from 1986 to 1995 in the complex therapy of 208 patients with wound infection complicated in 51 patients (24.5 per cent) by respiratory tract infection such as purulent tracheobronchitis or pleuropneumonia was generalized. In 28 patients (13.5 per cent) persistent bacteriuria not susceptible to the routine drugs was stated. The clinical and bacteriological efficacies of ofloxacin in the group of the patients with noncomplicated purulent wounds of the soft tissues amounted to 85-91 and 74-80 per cent respectively. In the group of the patients with wound infection complicated by respiratory or urinary tract infection the clinical and bacteriological efficacies equaled 94-100 per cent. The appetite disorder, epigastric pain or nausea were rare. Only in 3 cases the adverse reactions required the treatment discontinuation. Despite the use of ofloxacin for many years, the susceptibility of the main causative agents of surgical infections to the drug remained high: Staphylococcus epidermidis 93.3 per cent, Staph.aureus 94.5 per cent, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96.5 per cent, Escherichia coll 100 per cent, Proteus spp. 100 per cent, Enterobacter spp. 100 per cent, Acinetobacter spp. 82.3 per cent and Klebsiella spp. 88.8 per cent. The successive use of ofloxacin, at first intravenously for 3-5 days and then orally in the form of tablets for 3-5 days, in the treatment of 15 patients with wound infections of various genesis and localization subjected to osteoplastic reconstructive operations provided positive effects in all the cases and was economically advantageous. PMID:9005792

Blatun, L A; Iakovlev, V P; Svetukhin, A M; Puchkova, L S; Izotova, G N

1996-01-01

82

Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

Brook, I.

1988-07-01

83

Role of Muscle Free Flap in the Salvage of Complicated Scalp Wounds and Infected Prosthetic Dura  

PubMed Central

Background The prosthetic dura is an essential element in the protection of the cranial parenchyma and prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Although prosthetic dura are widely used in neurosurgery, they occasionally provoke infection, which can be a major concern after neurosurgical treatment. However, removal of the prosthetic dura carries a risk of brain parenchyma injury and cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The salvage of infected prosthetic dural material has not been adequately addressed in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the value of the combination of a meticulous surgical debridement of necrotic tissue and simultaneous muscle free flap for intractable postoperative epidural abscess without removal of the infected prosthetic dura. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, we reviewed the data of 11 patients with persistent infection on the prosthetic dura. The epidural infections each occurred after a neurosurgical procedure, and there was soft tissue necrosis with the disclosure of the underlying prosthetic dura and dead bone around the scalp wound. To salvage the infected prosthetic dura, meticulous debridement and a muscle free flap were performed. Results All 11 patients experienced complete recovery from the complicated wound problem without the need for further surgical intervention. No signs of prosthetic dural infection were observed during the mean follow-up period of 11 months. Conclusions The combination of a meticulous surgical debridement and coverage with a muscle free flap is an effective treatment for salvage of infected prosthetic dura. PMID:24286047

Han, Dae Hee; Park, Myong Chul; Park, Dong Ha; Song, Hyunsuk

2013-01-01

84

[Ofloxacin in the comprehensive therapy of complicated forms of wound infection].  

PubMed

A 5-year experience with the use of ofloxacin in the complex treatment of complicated wound infections showed that the drug had a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, was not toxic and well tolerated by the patients. The side effects were extremely rare. The antimicrobial activity of ofloxacin after its clinical use for 5 years did not practically change. The drug clinical and bacteriological efficacy in different groups of the patients ranged within 85-91 and 74-80 per cent respectively depending on the process severity. The failure of the therapy was as a rule associated with an insufficient surgical treatment of the purulent foci. It was more frequent in the patients with arteriosclerotic and diabetic gangrene of the lower extremities when due to various reasons the initial surgical operations were not radical. The short treatment courses (for not more than 5-7 days) or an early use of the drug tablets instead of the intravenous injections resulted from an insufficient experience with ofloxacin during the first years of its use. Such an unjustified tactics did not provide stable elimination of the pathogen. Our experience with ofloxacin in the treatment of various groups of patients with wound infections demonstrated that it should be considered as a reserve drug for the treatment of cases with complicated wound infections accompanied by infections of the respiratory and uropoietic organs requiring a long-term antibacterial therapy in hospitals and outpatient departments. PMID:8060193

Blatun, L A; Iakovlev, V P; Elagina, L V

1994-01-01

85

[Experimental aprobation of the thermo-squirt method of treatment of infected and purulent wounds of the soft tissues].  

PubMed

The influence of thermo-squirt processing on sanation of infected and purulent wounds of soft tissues was investigated in experiment. The possibility of application of the elaborated method for the wound surface disinfection and the tissues healing processes stimulation was proved. PMID:20469694

Furmanov, Iu A; Gvozdetski?, V S; Terekhov, G V; Savitskaia, I M; Ge?lenko, O A; Titarenko, S N

2010-01-01

86

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Decreases Mortality in a Murine Model of Burn-Wound Sepsis Involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection  

PubMed Central

Background The colonization of burn wounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can lead to septic shock, organ injuries, and high mortality rates. We hypothesized that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) would decrease invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound and reduce mortality. Methods Thermal injuries were induced in anesthetized mice, and P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface for 24 h. After removing the burn eschar and debridement, the animals were subjected to either NPWT or wet-to-dry (WTD) treatment protocols. The bacterial loads on the wound surface were assessed during 7 d of treatment, as were the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral blood samples. Survival was monitored daily for 14 d after burn induction. Finally, samples of wounded skin, lung, liver, and kidney were collected and subjected to histopathological examination. Results Applying P. aeruginosa to the burn wound surface led to sepsis. During early stages of treatment, NPWT reduced the mortality of the septic animals and levels of P. aeruginosa within the burn wound compared with WTD-treated animals. Circulating levels of cytokines and cytoarchitectural abnormalities were also significantly reduced via NPWT. Conclusions Our data indicate that NPWT inhibits the invasion and proliferation of P. aeruginosa in burn-wounded tissue and decreases early mortality in a murine model of burn-wound sepsis. These therapeutic benefits likely result from the ability of NPWT to decrease bacterial proliferation on the wound surface, reduce cytokine serum concentrations, and prevent damage to internal organs. PMID:24587379

Dong, Maolong; Wang, Yaojun; Li, Xiao; Hu, Dahai

2014-01-01

87

Persistent Wound Infection after Herniotomy Associated with Small-Colony Variants of Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a A small-colony variant (SCV) of Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from a patient with a persistent wound infection (abscess and fistula) 13 months after herniotomy. The strain\\u000a was nonhemolytic, nonpigmented and grew only anaerobically on Schaedler agar. As it was coagulase-negative, it was initially\\u000a misidentified as a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. In further analysis, however, the microorganism was shown to be an

M. Abele-Horn; B. Schupfner; P. Emmerling; H. Waldner; H. Göring

2000-01-01

88

Honey as an Antimicrobial Agent Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Infected Wounds  

PubMed Central

Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections. PMID:22754244

Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, PG; Bairy, Indira

2012-01-01

89

Therapy of Acute and Delayed Spinal Infections after Spinal Surgery Treated with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Adult Patients  

PubMed Central

We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland) nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43-87 years) were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30). The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:24416474

Zwolak, Pawel; Konig, Matthias Alexander; Osterhoff, Georg; Wilzeck, Verena; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Jukema, Gerrolt Nico

2013-01-01

90

Deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgery: current treatment insights. A retrospective study of 36 cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of reconstructing infected post-sternotomy wounds, with\\u000a either sternal plating and\\/or pectoralis major flap transposition or pedicled omentoplasty after previous vacuum-assisted\\u000a closure (VAC) therapy. Between January 2005 and December 2010, 36 patients, suffering from deep sternal wound infection (DSWI)\\u000a after coronary artery bypass grafting procedure, received (plastic) reconstructive surgery. All

Rutger M. Schols; Thomas M. A. S. Lauwers; Gijs G. Geskes; René R. W. J. van der Hulst

91

Does single application of topical chloramphenicol to high risk sutured wounds reduce incidence of wound infection after minor surgery? Prospective randomised placebo controlled double blind trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the effectiveness of a single application of topical chloramphenicol ointment in preventing wound infection after minor dermatological surgery.Design Prospective randomised placebo controlled double blind multicentre trial.Setting Primary care in a regional centre in Queensland, Australia.Participants 972 minor surgery patients.Interventions A single topical dose of chloramphenicol (n=488) or paraffin ointment (n=484; placebo).Main outcome measure Incidence of infection.Results The

Clare F Heal; Petra G Buettner; Robert Cruickshank; David Graham; Sheldon Browning; Jayne Pendergast; Herwig Drobetz; Robert Gluer; Carl Lisec

2009-01-01

92

Efficiency of controlled topical delivery of silver sulfadiazine in infected burn wounds.  

PubMed

The present study is designed to assess the potential benefits of controlled delivery of silver sulfadiazine from collagen scaffold (SSDM-CS) in infected deep partial thickness burn wounds in which epidermis is lost completely and the entire papillary dermis and most of the recticular layer of the dermis is lost. Infection induced by inoculating 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused significant increase in wound size (20%) till day 15, which decreased significantly from day 9 by SSDM-CS treatment, showing complete healing by day 27 (control > or = 37 days). Early subsidence of infection (<10(2) cfu, day 9) by SSDM-CS resulted in faster epidermal resurfacing and fibroplasia, whereas heavy microbial load (>10(7) cfu, day 9) in controls caused severe inflammatory cellular infiltration. Persistent infection triggered early expression of proinflammatory cytokines intereukin-6, intereukin 1-beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, lasting until day 9, whereas cytokine level decreased in SSDM-CS-treated group by day 6. Infection exacerbated expression of active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 in controls (day 15), while SSDM-CS positively modulated MMP-2 and -9 with faster decline in their levels (day 12). Inherent nature of the dressing to maintain drug level at equilibrium therapeutic concentration (51.2 microg/mL) for prolonged time (72 h), below systemic toxic limits (20 microg/dL, serum level), accelerated the magnitude and sequence of reparative events. PMID:18431769

Shanmugasundaram, N; Uma, T S; Ramyaa Lakshmi, T S; Babu, Mary

2009-05-01

93

Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia in febrile patients as early signs of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Sternal wound infection is a devastating complication of cardiothoracic surgery that carries high postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. We explored whether our current program of extensive bacteriological examination including repeat blood cultures may contribute to the early diagnosis of sternal wound infection. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients who were subjected to our bacteriological examination protocol including within 90 days after cardiothoracic surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made in order to identify risk factors for sternal infection. Results The median patient age was 75 years, and 65 patients were male. In 35 cases (31.2%) the blood cultures showed the presence of bacterial infection with the following frequencies: Staphylococcus aureus, 18 cases; Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 7 cases; other organisms, 10 cases. Eleven patients presented repeat bacteremia on at least 2 different occasions. Twenty patients (17.8%) presented sternal wound infections. There was no difference in operative mortality between the patients with and without sternal wound infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that bilateral mammary artery use (OR, 13.68, 95% CI, 1.09-167.36, p?=?0.043), positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 19.51, 95% CI, 4.46-104.33, p?wound infection. Conclusion Repeat blood cultures in febrile patients appear to be useful for the early detection of Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia, and these were associated with sternal wound infection. Bilateral internal mammary artery use was another risk factor of sternal wound infection in febrile patients. These factors may identify patients suitable for expeditious radiological examination and aggressive treatments. PMID:24885820

2014-01-01

94

Superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in the treatment of the chronic, infected wounds.  

PubMed

Background. Ozone therapy - i.e. the treatment of patients by a mixture of oxygen and ozone - has been used for many years as a method ancillary to basic treatment, especially in those cases in which traditional treatment methods do not give satisfactory results, e.g. skin loss in non-healing wounds, ulcers, pressure sores, fistulae, etc. Material and methods. In the Department of Phisiotherapy of the Medical Faculty and the Department of the Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Locomotor System at the Medical University of Warsaw in the period from January 2001 until November 2002, 23 patients with heavy,chronic, antibiotic resistants septic complications after trauma, surgical procedures and secundary skin infetions were treated with ozone. The ozone therapy was administered using an authorial technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone application. Results. In the wounds of the all experienced patients the inhibition of septic processes and wound healing was much faster than normal. Conclusions. Our data confirm the advantages wich result from the technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in combined treatment for septic complications in the soft tissue, especially in the locomotor system. These technique makes posttraumatic infections and promotes quicker healing of post-surgical and post-traumal complications - chronic septic infections. This method also lowers the cost of antibiotic therapy and is sometimes the only available auxiliary technique to support surgical procedures. PMID:17679848

Bia?oszewski, Dariusz; Kowalewski, Micha?

2003-10-30

95

Antibacterial Efficacy of Silver-Impregnated Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Immobilized on a Biological Dressing in a Murine Wound Infection Model  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the antibacterial effect of augmenting a biological dressing with polymer films containing silver nanoparticles. Background Biological dressings, such as Biobrane, are commonly used for treating partial-thickness wounds and burn injuries. Biological dressings have several advantages over traditional wound dressings. However, as many as 19% of wounds treated with Biobrane become infected, and, once infected, the Biobrane must be removed and a traditional dressing approach should be employed. Silver is a commonly used antimicrobial in wound care products, but current technology uses cytotoxic concentrations of silver in these dressings. We have developed a novel and facile technology that allows immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surfaces of soft materials, demonstrated here by augmentation of Biobrane with nanoparticulate silver. Surfaces modified with nanometer-thick polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles have been shown previously to result in in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis at loadings of silver that are noncytotoxic. Methods We demonstrated that silver-impregnated PEMs can be nondestructively immobilized onto the surface of Biobrane (Biobrane-Ag) and determined the in vitro antibacterial activity of Biobrane-Ag with Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we used an in vivo wound infection model in mice induced by topical inoculation of S aureus onto full-thickness 6-mm diameter wounds. After 72 hours, bacterial quantification was performed. Results Wounds treated with Biobrane-Ag had significantly (P < 0.001) fewer colony-forming units than wounds treated with unmodified Biobrane (more than 4 log10 difference). Conclusions The results of our study indicate that immobilizing silver-impregnated PEMs on the wound-contact surface of Biobrane significantly reduces bacterial bioburden in full-thickness murine skin wounds. Further research will investigate whether this construct can be considered for human use. PMID:22609841

Guthrie, Kathleen M.; Agarwal, Ankit; Tackes, Dana S.; Johnson, Kevin W.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.

2012-01-01

96

Impact of angiosome-oriented revascularization on clinical outcomes in critical limb ischemia patients without concurrent wound infection and diabetes.  

PubMed

Purpose : To investigate the impact of angiosome-oriented revascularization on clinical outcomes in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients excluding those with both diabetes and wound infection. Methods : Using a retrospective multicenter database, a propensity score matching analysis was performed of 539 consecutive CLI patients (375 men; mean age 71±11 years) without concurrent wound infection and diabetes who underwent balloon angioplasty of isolated infrapopliteal lesions. Propensity score matching produced 2 groups of 182 patients each who underwent angiosome-oriented direct revascularization (123 men; mean age 72±11 years) or indirect revascularization (125 men; mean age 72±11 years). The groups were compared for wound healing rate, freedom from major adverse limb events (MALE), and amputation-free survival (AFS). Results : In the overall population, indirect revascularization was performed in 36.6% (n=197). In the propensity matching analysis, the complete wound healing rate at 12 months was higher in the direct group than the indirect revascularization patients (75% vs. 64%, p=0.01), while freedom from MALE (p=0.99) and AFS (p=0.17) were not significantly different at up to 24 months. In multivariate analysis, indirect revascularization had an independent negative impact on wound healing (adjusted hazard ratio 0.7, p=0.008). Conclusion : After propensity matching analysis for CLI patients other than those with both diabetes and wound infection, the wound healing rate was higher after direct revascularization than after indirect revascularization, whereas MALE and AFS were not significantly different. PMID:25290786

Iida, Osamu; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Soga, Yoshimitsu; Yamauchi, Yasutaka; Hirano, Keisuke; Tazaki, Junichi; Yamaoka, Terutoshi; Suematsu, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Shintani, Yoshiaki; Miyashita, Yusuke; Uematsu, Masaaki

2014-10-01

97

Antibiofilm and antimicrobial efficacy of DispersinB®-KSL-W peptide-based wound gel against chronic wound infection associated bacteria.  

PubMed

The medical importance of bacterial biofilms has increased with the recognition of biofilms as one of the major contributors to the slow or non-healing chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers, and pressure ulcers. Being a protected community of microorganisms, biofilms are notoriously refractory to antibiotic treatments. As the conventional treatment modalities have proven ineffective, this study provides the in vitro evidence to support the use of a novel combination of DispersinB(®) antibiofilm enzyme that inhibits biofilm formation and disperses preformed biofilm, and thus making the biofilm bacteria more susceptible to a broad-spectrum KSL-W antimicrobial peptide. The combination of DispersinB(®) and KSL-W peptide showed synergistic antibiofilm and antimicrobial activity against chronic wound infection associated biofilm-embedded bacteria such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS), and Acinetobacter baumannii. In addition, the wound gel formulation comprising DispersinB(®), KSL-W peptide, and a gelling agent Pluronic F-127 showed a broad-spectrum and enduring antimicrobial activity against test organisms. Furthermore, as compared to commercial wound gel Silver-Sept™, DispersinB(®)-KSL-W peptide-based wound gel was significantly more effective in inhibiting the biofilm-embedded MRSA, S. epidermidis, CoNS, Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci, A. baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.05). Thus, this study provides promising evidence for the potential application of antibiofilm-antimicrobial DispersinB(®)-KSL-W wound gel in chronic wound management. PMID:24445333

Gawande, Purushottam V; Leung, Kai P; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

2014-05-01

98

Post-operative wound infection in salvage laryngectomy: does antibiotic prophylaxis have an impact?  

PubMed

Salvage laryngectomy carries a high risk of post-operative infection with reported rates of 40-61%. The purpose of this study was to analyse infections in our own patients and review the potential impact of our current antibiotic prophylaxis (AP). A retrospective analysis of infection in 26 consecutive patients between 2000 and 2010 undergoing salvage total laryngectomy (SL) following recurrent laryngeal cancer after failed radiotherapy or chemo-radiation was undertaken. The antibiotic prophylaxis was intravenous teicoplanin, cefuroxime and metronidazole at induction and for the following 24 h. Infection was defined by Tabet and Johnson's grade 5, categorized as pharyngocutaneous fistula. Fifteen patients (58%) developed a post-operative wound infection, which occurred on average at 12 days after surgery. Univariate analysis demonstrated three risk variables that had a significant correlation with infection: alcohol consumption (p = 0.01), cN stage of tumour (p < 0.01), and pre-operative albumin levels <3.2 g/L (p = 0.012). There was a trend, though not significant, for increased infection in patients with high or low BMIs. The most common organisms isolated from clinical samples from infected patients were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA (43%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (36%), Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis and Enterococcus faecalis (7% each). All these organisms are typical hospital-acquired pathogens. Pseudomonas and Serratia were not covered by the prophylactic regime we used. The current antibiotic regime following SL is inadequate as the rate of infection is high. It would therefore seem logical to trial a separate antibiotic protocol of AP for patients undergoing SL that would include an extended course of antibiotics after the standard prophylaxis. In addition, infection rates may also be reduced by improving the metabolic state of patients pre-operatively by multi-disciplinary action. Steps should also be taken to reduce cross-infection with nosocomial pathogens in these patients. Other aspects of surgical management should be also taken in consideration. PMID:22274693

Scotton, William; Cobb, Richard; Pang, Leo; Nixon, Iain; Joshi, Anil; Jeannon, Jeanne-Pierre; Oakley, Richard; French, Gary; Hemsley, Carolyn; Simo, Ricard

2012-11-01

99

RNAIII-inhibiting peptide enhances healing of wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing is a mechanism through which a bacterial population receives input from neighboring cells and elicits an appropriate response to enable survival within the host. Inhibiting quorum sensing by RNAIII-inhibiting peptide (RIP) has been demonstrated as a very effective mode of prevention and therapy for device-associated staphylococcal infections and was tested here for healing of wounds that are otherwise resistant to conventional antibiotics. Wounds, established through the panniculus carnosus of BALB/c mice, were inoculated with 5 x 10(7) CFU of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Mice were treated with Allevyn, RIP-soaked Allevyn (containing 20 microg RIP), daily intraperitoneal teicoplanin (7 mg/kg of body weight), Allevyn and teicoplanin, and RIP-soaked Allevyn and daily intraperitoneal teicoplanin. The main outcome measures were quantitative bacterial culture and histological examination with assessment of microvessel density and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tissue sections. Treatment with RIP-soaked Allevyn together with teicoplanin injection greatly reduced the bacterial load to 13 CFU/g (control untreated animals had 10(8) CFU/g bacteria). All other treatments were also significantly effective but only reduced the bacterial load to about 10(3) CFU/ml. Histological examination indicated that only treatment with RIP-soaked Allevyn with teicoplanin injection restored epithelial, granulation, and collagen scores, as well as microvessel density and VEGF expression, to the levels found with uninfected mice. In conclusion, we observed that RIP may be useful for the management of infected wounds and that it could represent an exciting and future alternative to the conventional antibiotics, at present considered the gold-standard treatments for methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:18391046

Simonetti, Oriana; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Goteri, Gaia; Scalise, Alessandro; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Riva, Alessandra; Saba, Vittorio; Madanahally, Kiran D; Offidani, Annamaria; Balaban, Naomi; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

2008-06-01

100

Fungal Wound Infection (Not Colonization) Is Independently Associated With Mortality in Burn Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective: To analyze the occurrence of fungal wound infection (FWI) after thermal injury and its relationship to mortality. Background: FWI is an uncommon but potentially lethal complication of severe thermal injury. Methods: The records of patients with thermal burns admitted to a single burn center (1991–2002) were reviewed. Analyses accounted for total burn size (TBS, percentage body surface area), full-thickness burn size (FTBS, percentage body surface area), age, inhalation injury, sex, and fungal-status category. Fungal colonization and infection were determined histopathologically. Results: Criteria for inclusion were met by 2651 patients. Each patient’s fungal-status category was defined according to the deepest level of fungal involvement observed during the hospital course: no fungus (2476 patients), fungal wound colonization (FWC, 121 patients), or fungal wound infection (FWI, 54 patients). Median TBS (9%, 47%, 64%, respectively) and mortality (5%, 27%, 76%, respectively) varied significantly among fungal-status groups. Logistic regression was used to detect significant independent associations. FWI was associated with higher TBS. Mortality was associated with TBS, FTBS, inhalation injury, FWI, and age. Unlike FWI, FWC was not independently related to mortality, the greater observed mortality in FWC being explained by other variables such as TBS. The odds ratio for FWI (8.16) suggested about the same mortality impact as augmenting TBS by 33%. A midrange TBS of 30% to 60% was required for most of the detectable association of FWI with mortality. Conclusions: FWI accompanies larger burns and is associated with mortality in burn patients, particularly in those with TBS 30% to 60%. This association is independent of burn size, inhalation injury, and age. PMID:17522525

Horvath, Edward E.; Murray, Clinton K.; Vaughan, George M.; Chung, Kevin K.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Wade, Charles E.; Holcomb, John B.; Wolf, Steven E.; Mason, Arthur D.; Cancio, Leopoldo C.

2007-01-01

101

A Prospective Audit of Complex Wound and Graft Infections in Great Britain and Ireland: the Emergence of MRSA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background a number of studies have examined the outcome of complex wound and graft infections, but most include small numbers of patients collected over a prolonged period of time. To date, there is little information on the clinical outcome of infections involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods between February 1998 and January 1999, two prospective multi-centre audits were performed in

A. R. Naylor; P. D. Hayes; S. Darke

2001-01-01

102

Antimicrobial Effect of Continuous Lidocaine Infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Wound Infection in a Mouse Model.  

PubMed

Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P = 0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections. PMID:25310128

Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

2014-11-01

103

[Further improvement of apparatuses for the hemostasis, processing and treatment of the infected wounds using high-temperature stream].  

PubMed

The bleeding stoppage and the wound sanitation constitute an important problem of modern surgery. There is information presented concerning the apparatuses elaboration for the bleeding stoppage, processing of the soft living tissues wounds, including the infected, during surgical operations conduction, using high-temperature stream of air. The data adduced about the apparatuses trial and preclinical investigations of the method, realized with their help, had confirmed a high efficacy of hemostasis and sanation effects as well as significant reduction of the wounds processing time. PMID:20825094

Khudets'ky?, I Iu; Kryvtsun, I V; Terekhov, H V; Petukhov, V O; Novhorods'ka, L O

2010-07-01

104

A Study of Post-Caesarean Section Wound Infections in a Regional Referral Hospital, Oman  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing a Caesarean section (CS) and to identify risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity. SSI significantly affect the patient’s quality of life by increasing morbidity and extending hospital stays. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Nizwa Hospital, Oman, to determine the incidence of post-Caesarean (PCS) SSI from 2001 to 2012. This was followed by a case-control study of 211 PCS cases with SSI. Controls (220) were randomly selected cases, at the same hospital in the same time period, who had undergone CS without any SSI. Data was collected on CS type, risk factors, demographic profile, type of organism, drug sensitivity and date of infection. Results: The total number of PCS wound infections was 211 (2.66%). There was a four-fold higher incidence of premature rupture of the membranes (37, 17.53%) and a three-fold higher incidence of diabetes (32, 15.16%) in the PCS cases compared with controls. The most common organisms responsible for SSI were Staphylococcus aureus (66, 31.27%) and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli group (40, 18.95%). The most sensitive antibiotics were aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. Polymicrobial infections were noted in 42 (19.90%), while 47 (22.27%) yielded no growth. A high incidence of associated risk factors like obesity, hypertension, anaemia and wound haematoma was noted. Conclusion: Measures are recommended to reduce the incidence of SSI, including the implementation of infection prevention practices and the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis with rigorous surgical techniques. PMID:24790744

Dhar, Hansa; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim; Rathi, Bhawna; Nimre, Eman A.; Sachdeva, Vibha; Hamdi, Ilham

2014-01-01

105

Effect of near-infrared diode laser and indocyanine green to treat infections on different wound models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria causes significant increase in deaths due to wound infections around the world. Nowadays, it could be impossible to find appropriate antibiotics to treat some bacterial strains, especially multidrug resistant types. The aim of this study is to use photodynamic therapy that destroys these kinds of bacteria with the interaction of Indocyanine green (ICG) and 808-nm diode laser. In this study, antibacterial Photodynamic Therapy technique that we call ICG-IR Laser PDT was applied on antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus that infected two different types of wound model (excisional and abrasion wound model) in vivo. Wistar albino rats were used to create animal wound models. Excisional or abrasion wounds were formed on the dorsal skin of the rats. They were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. 300 mW and 500 mW of 808-nm diode laser were applied on the wounds for 30 minutes and 15 minutes of exposure duration, respectively. ICG concentrations applied topically were 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 ?g/ml. Then the tissue was dissected properly and homogenized in buffer solution. From this solution, bacterial cell count was determined by serial dilution method. 1-2 log reduction in viable cell count was observed after these applications. The temperature increase in the tissue was between 6-8°C during these applications. From these findings, it was understood that this method with 808-nm and ICG is promising but it must be improved by further dosimetry studies.

Topaloglu, Nermin; Yuksel, Sahru; Gulsoy, Murat

2014-05-01

106

Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection  

PubMed Central

Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase), the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects) and host defense (antimicrobial peptides), and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection. PMID:23035888

2012-01-01

107

Synergistic interaction of Helichrysum pedunculatum leaf extracts with antibiotics against wound infection associated bacteria.  

PubMed

The effect of combinations of the crude methanolic extract of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum and eight first-line antibiotics were investigated by time kill assays against a panel of bacterial strains that have been implicated in wound infections. The plant extract showed appreciable antibacterial activities against the test bacteria with zones of inhibition ranging between 18 and 27 mm, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) varying between 0.1 and 5.0 mg/ml. The MICs of the test antibiotics range between 0.001 and 0.412 mg/ml, and combination of the plant extract and the antibiotics resulted in reduction of bacterial counts by between 0 and 6.63 Log10 cfu/ml. At V2 MIC, 56.81% synergy; 43.19% indifference and no antagonism were observed, and at MIC levels, 55.68% synergy; 44.32% indifference and no antagonism were observed when the extracts were combined with eight different antibiotics. In all, 60% of the interactions were synergistic. All combination regimes on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 yielded no synergy, neither was antagonism detected in any of the assays. We propose that extracts of the leaves of Helichrysum pedunculatum could be of relevance in combination therapy and as a source of resistance modifying principies that could be useful as treatment options for persistent wound infections. PMID:19915741

Aiyegoro, Olayinka A; Afolayan, Anthony J; Okoh, Anthony I

2009-01-01

108

Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.  

PubMed Central

A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures. PMID:7925666

Poulsen, K. B.; Bremmelgaard, A.; S?rensen, A. I.; Raahave, D.; Petersen, J. V.

1994-01-01

109

[Wound infection following appendectomy. Metronidazole vs ornidazole as single-dose prophylaxis in non-perforated appendix].  

PubMed

In an open prospective randomized study, the postoperative wound infection rate following removal of an unperforated appendix was evaluated in 187 patients who received either metronidazole (1 g suppositories) or ornidazole (500 mg iv or 500 mg suppositories) in a single dose preoperatively. The overall postoperative infection rate was 2.1%. Metronidazole and ornidazole suppositories are a cheap method of preventing postoperative infection in cases of unperforated appendix. PMID:3175579

Barth, A; Kuhn, P; Bertschmann, W

1988-10-01

110

Dual delivery of chlorhexidine and platelet-derived growth factor-BB for enhanced wound healing and infection control.  

PubMed

Wound treatment can require molecules that both enhance healing and control infection. As in many biomedical applications, the options for therapeutic molecules may include both hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules. The goal of this study was to investigate a polymer system for drug delivery that simultaneously delivers platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, a hydrophilic protein known to promote wound healing, and chlorhexidine (CHX), a hydrophobic antimicrobial agent for infection treatment. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were prepared using different polymer formulations in a double emulsion process. CHX encapsulation efficiency was 19.6±0.8% and 28.9±1.5% for PLGA 50:50 and 85:15, respectively. The presence of CHX significantly increased PDGF-BB encapsulation efficiency relative to PDGF-BB alone. Both molecules could be released for up to 50 days and exhibited bioactivity for greater than 3 (PLGA 85:15) or 8 (PLGA 50:50) weeks using in vitro bacteria and cellular assays. An infected wound model was used to evaluate the system in vivo. Wounds treated with the dual delivery system showed decreased levels of infection and increased healing. Vascular analysis of wound tissues also showed higher levels of mature vasculature with the delivery of PDGF-BB. In conclusion, we have evaluated a drug delivery system for simultaneous delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules and have shown that this system can improve healing and reduce bacteria levels in an infected wound model. This system could be applied to other therapeutic applications where sustained delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules is required. PMID:23063555

Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Gehan; Brey, Eric M

2013-02-01

111

Biobrane improves wound healing in burned children without increased risk of infection.  

PubMed

A synthetic bilaminar membrane used as a skin substitute (Biobrane) has been shown to decrease pain and hospitalization in superficial second-degree burns. Despite these benefits, it has not been utilized universally, particularly in young children, due to a perceived increase in related infections. We propose that when this synthetic membrane is applied to superficial scald burns <25% of the total body surface area (TBSA), decreased healing times are expected without increased risk of infection. Between 1994-1999, 89 children treated within 48 h after receiving superficial partial thickness scald burns covering 5-25% TBSA with no indication of infection were seen at our hospital. Forty-one were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the skin substitute Biobrane and 48 to receive conservative treatment with topical antimicrobials and dressing changes. Comparisons of treatment were made between groups for length of hospitalization, wound healing times, and infectious complications. Children treated with Biobrane or topical antimicrobials were similar in age, race, sex, %TBSA burned, and location of burn. Those receiving Biobrane had shorter hospitalizations and healing times, which was significant for both infants and toddlers and older children. Treatment groups were not different in the use of systemic antibiotics or readmissions for infectious complications. Biobrane was removed in 5.9% of cases for non-adherence. The application of Biobrane within 48 h of superficial burns provides for shorter hospitalizations and faster healing times in children of all ages without increased risk of infection. PMID:11028549

Lal, S; Barrow, R E; Wolf, S E; Chinkes, D L; Hart, D W; Heggers, J P; Herndon, D N

2000-09-01

112

Characterization of Slackia exigua Isolated from Human Wound Infections, Including Abscesses of Intestinal Origin ?  

PubMed Central

Eleven clinical strains isolated from infected wound specimens were subjected to polyphasic taxonomic analysis. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that all 11 strains were phylogenetically related to Slackia exigua. Additionally, conventional and biochemical tests of 6 of the 11 strains were performed as supplementary methods to obtain phenotypic identification by comparison with the phenotypes of the relevant type strains. S. exigua has been considered an oral bacterial species in the family Coriobacteriaceae. This organism is fastidious and grows poorly, so it may easily be overlooked. The 16S rRNA gene sequences and the biochemical characteristics of four of the S. exigua strains isolated for this study from various infections indicative of an intestinal source were almost identical to those of the validated S. exigua type strain from an oral source and two of the S. exigua strains from oral sources evaluated in this study. Thus, we show for the first time that S. exigua species can be isolated from extraoral infections as well as from oral infections. The profiles of susceptibility to selected antimicrobials of this species were also investigated for the first time. PMID:20107092

Kim, Keun-Sung; Rowlinson, Marie-Claire; Bennion, Robert; Liu, Chengxu; Talan, David; Summanen, Paula; Finegold, Sydney M.

2010-01-01

113

Preclinical advantages of intramuscularly administered peptide A3-APO over existing therapies in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections  

PubMed Central

Objectives The designer antibacterial peptide A3-APO is efficacious in mouse models of Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii systemic infections. Here we compare the efficacy of the peptide with that of imipenem and colistin in A. baumannii wound infections after burn injury. Methods CD-1 mice were inflicted with burn wounds and different inocula of A. baumannii, isolated from an injured soldier, were placed into the wound sites. The antibiotics were given intramuscularly (im) one to five times. Available free peptide in the blood and the systemic toxicity of colistin and A3-APO were studied in healthy mice. Results While toxicity of colistin was observed at 25 mg/kg bolus drug administration, the lowest toxic dose of A3-APO was 75 mg/kg. In the A. baumannii blast injury models, 5 mg/kg A3-APO improved survival and reduced bacterial counts in the blood as well as in the wounds and improved wound appearance significantly better than any other antibiotic treatment. The free peptide concentration in the blood did not reach 1 µg/mL. Conclusions Peptide A3-APO, with an intramuscular therapeutic index of 15, is more efficacious and less toxic than any existing burn injury infection therapy modality against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. A3-APO administered by the im route probably binds to a biopolymer that promotes the peptide's biodistribution. PMID:20810424

Ostorhazi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Sztodola, Andras; Harmos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Szabo, Dora; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Cassone, Marco; Wade, John D.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Otvos, Laszlo

2010-01-01

114

[Basic of wound healing in thoracic surgery].  

PubMed

Wound condition changes from moment to moment. It is important to understand what is happening on the wound to evaluate and treat it. Wound can be classified into low contaminated wound, contaminated wound, colonized wound, critical colonized wound and infected wound by status of bacteria on the wound. Moreover, it can be classified into acute wound, subacute wound, subchronic wound, and chronic wound by time course. Also, wound healing course can be classified into coagulation phase, inflammation phase, proliferation phase and remodeling phase. Moreover, wound healing can be classified into primary wound healing, secondary wound healing and tertiary wound healing according to types of surgical intervention. The TIME principles provide a systematic approach to the management of wounds. TIME leads to an optimal wound bed preparation( WBP). The objectives underpinning TIME are tissue non-viable or deficient (T), infection or inflammation (I), moisture imbalance (M) and epidermal margin;non advancing or undermined( E). PMID:22314172

Ogawa, Rei

2012-02-01

115

In Vivo Imaging of Bioluminescent Escherichia coli in a Cutaneous Wound Infection Model for Evaluation of an Antibiotic Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid, continuous method for noninvasively monitoring the effectiveness of several antibacterial agents in real time by using a model of wound infection was developed. This study was divided into three steps: (i) construction of a plasmid to transform Escherichia coli into a bioluminescent variant, (ii) study of the bioluminescent E. coli in vitro as a function of temperature and

Samir Jawhara; Serge Mordon

2004-01-01

116

Use of the Surgical Wound Infection Model To Determine the Efficacious Dosing Regimen of Retapamulin, a Novel Topical Antibiotic  

PubMed Central

The effect of topically applied retapamulin ointment was evaluated using various dosing regimens in the Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes wound infection model. Retapamulin (1%, wt/wt) was efficacious using twice-daily (b.i.d.) applications for 4 or 5 days. These data underpinned the decision to evaluate 1% retapamulin b.i.d. in clinical trials. PMID:17065626

Rittenhouse, Stephen; Singley, Christine; Hoover, Jennifer; Page, Roni; Payne, David

2006-01-01

117

Healthcare Savings Associated with Reduced Infection Rates Using Antimicrobial Suture Wound Closure for Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims\\/Methods: This is a follow-up study from a recent randomized controlled trial conducted at the Women and Children’s Hospital of Buffalo that investigated the use of antimicrobial sutures (AMS) for wound closure during cerebrospinal fluid shunting procedures. Our purpose was to determine the average cost of shunt infections at our institution and estimate the healthcare savings associated with reduced infection

Jonathan Stone; Thomas J. Gruber; Curtis J. Rozzelle

2010-01-01

118

Responses of 2 epiphytic yeasts to foliar infection by Rhizoctonia solani or mechanical wounding on the phylloplane of tall fescue.  

PubMed

A growth-chamber experiment was conducted to determine how foliar disease or wounding affects the ability of 2 phylloplane yeasts (Rhodotorula glutinis and Cryptococcus laurentii) to colonize leaves of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Yeasts were applied separately and together onto healthy leaves, leaves infected with Rhizoctonia solani (diseased), and mechanically bruised (wounded) leaves. In all 3 trials, the leaf disturbance treatment significantly affected the abundance of yeast on the phylloplane of tall fescue. Yeast abundance on the diseased or wounded leaves was significantly greater than on the nontreated, healthy leaves. In 2 of the 3 trials, the yeast species applied also had a significant affect on yeast abundance. Typically, R. glutinis was significantly more abundant than C. laurentii when applied individually, but not significantly greater than the total yeast colony-forming units of the co-inoculated treatment. When the 2 yeasts were co-inoculated onto the leaves, R. glutinis comprised 89.7%, 75.4%, and 67.6% of the recovered yeast colony-forming units on healthy, diseased, and wounded leaves, respectfully. Our data suggest that these 2 species of yeasts will differentially colonize compromised leaf tissue with disease or wounds favoring populations of R. glutinis over C. laurentii. PMID:19935888

Nix, Shannon; Burpee, Leon L; Buck, James W

2009-10-01

119

Dual-functional Polyurea Microcapsules for Chronic Wound Care Dressings: Sustained Drug Delivery and Non-leaching Infection Control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new design of dual-functional polyurea microcapsules was proposed for chronic wound dressings to provide both non-leaching infection control and sustained topical drug delivery functionalities. Quaternary ammonium functionalized polyurea microcapsules (MCQs) were synthesized under mild conditions through an interfacial crosslinking reaction between branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in a dimethylformamide/cyclohexane emulsion. An in-situ modification method was developed to endow non-leaching surface antimicrobial properties to MCQs via bonding antimicrobial surfactants to surface isocyanate residues on the polyurea shells. The resultant robust MCQs with both non-leaching antimicrobial properties and sustained drug releasing properties have potential applications in medical textiles, such as chronic wound dressings, for infection control and drug delivery.

He, Wei

120

Canibacter oris gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from an infected human wound.  

PubMed

A facultatively anaerobic, Gram-reaction-positive, catalase- and oxidase-negative, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from an infected human wound caused by a dog bite was characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain IMMIB Q2029717T was a member of the order Micrococcales of the class Actinobacteria, displaying 91.6% to 96% sequence similarity with members of the family Microbacteriaceae. Phylogentic trees generated by different algorithms indicated that the strain forms an independent phylogenetic line of descent that consistently clustered proximal to the base of the genus Leucobacter. Chemical studies revealed the presence of a cell-wall murein based on L-lysine (type B1?), major menaquinone (MK-10) and a DNA G+C content of 56.9 mol%. The distinct phylogenetic position, ribotyping and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS profiles and the significant phenotypic differences clearly separate strain IMMIB Q2029717T from its nearest phylogenetic neighbour and support its classification as a representative of a novel genus and species, with the suggested name Canibacter oris gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is IMMIB Q2029717T (=DSM 27064T=CCUG 64069T). PMID:24510975

Aravena-Román, M; Inglis, T J J; Siering, C; Schumann, P; Yassin, A F

2014-05-01

121

Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells  

PubMed Central

Background Human rhinoviruses (RV), the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling. PMID:16216126

Bossios, Apostolos; Psarras, Stelios; Gourgiotis, Dimitrios; Skevaki, Chrysanthi L; Constantopoulos, Andreas G; Saxoni-Papageorgiou, Photini; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

2005-01-01

122

Prognostic significance of wound infections following major head and neck cancer surgery: an open non-comparative prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveWe evaluated the incidence, risk factors and consequences of wound infection (WI) following major head and neck cancer surgery in an open non-comparative study.Patients and methodsThe study group, comprising 95 patients who underwent clean-contaminated procedures with opening of the upper aerodigestive tract for biopsy-proven squamous cell cancer, were studied over a 1-year period. Antibiotic prophylaxis was amoxicillin and clavulanic acid.

Nicolas Penel; Charles Fournier; Micheline Roussel-Delvallez; Danièle Lefebvre; Ahmed Kara; Yann Mallet; Jean-Charles Neu; Jean-Louis Lefebvre

2004-01-01

123

Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of wound edge protection devices in reducing surgical site infection after abdominal surgery. Design Multicentre observer blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients undergoing laparotomy at 21 UK hospitals. Interventions Standard care or the use of a wound edge protection device during surgery. Main outcome measures Surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, assessed by blinded clinicians at seven and 30 days and by patient’s self report for the intervening period. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, duration of stay in hospital, and the effect of characteristics of the patient and operation on the efficacy of the device. Results 760 patients were enrolled with 382 patients assigned to the device group and 378 to the control group. Six patients in the device group and five in the control group did not undergo laparotomy. Fourteen patients, seven in each group, were lost to follow-up. A total of 184 patients experienced surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, 91/369 (24.7%) in the device group and 93/366 (25.4%) in the control group (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.36; P=0.85). This lack of benefit was consistent across wound assessments performed by clinicians and those reported by patients and across all secondary outcomes. In the secondary analyses no subgroup could be identified in which there was evidence of clinical benefit associated with use of the device. Conclusions Wound edge protection devices do not reduce the rate of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparotomy, and therefore their routine use for this role cannot be recommended. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 40402832 PMID:23903454

2013-01-01

124

Development of immunosensors for direct detection of three wound infection biomarkers at point of care using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A method for label-free, electrochemical impedance immunosensing for the detection and quantification of three infection biomarkers in both buffer and directly in the defined model matrix of mock wound fluid is demonstrated. Triggering Receptor-1 Expressed on Myeloid cells (TREM-1) and Matrix MetalloPeptidase 9 (MMP-9) are detected via direct assay and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-l-HomoSerineLactone (HSL), relevant in bacterial quorum sensing, is detected using a competition assay. Detection is performed with gold screen-printed electrodes modified with a specific thiolated antibody. Detection is achieved in less than 1h straight from mock wound fluid without any extensive sample preparation steps. The limits of detection of 3.3 pM for TREM-1, 1.1 nM for MMP-9 and 1.4 nM for HSL are either near or below the threshold required to indicate infection. A relatively large dynamic range for sensor response is also found, consistent with interaction between neighbouring antibody-antigen complexes in the close-packed surface layer. Together, these three novel electrochemical immunosensors demonstrate viable multi-parameter sensing with the required sensitivity for rapid wound infection detection directly from a clinically relevant specimen. PMID:22137369

Ciani, Ilenia; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Henihan, Grace; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Pethig, Ronald; Ghazal, Peter; Crain, Jason; Campbell, Colin J; Bachmann, Till T; Mount, Andrew R

2012-01-15

125

A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections  

PubMed Central

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic”) and temperate (“lysogenic”) bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

2012-01-01

126

Nonviral human beta defensin-3 expression in a bioengineered human skin tissue: a therapeutic alternative for infected wounds.  

PubMed

The innate immune system differentially regulates the expression of host defense peptides to combat infection during wound healing. We enhanced the expression of a host defense peptide, human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), in keratinocytes to generate a three-dimensional biologic dressing to improve healing of infected wounds. The NIKS human keratinocyte cell line was stably transfected ex vivo with a construct containing an epidermis-specific promoter driving hBD-3 (NIKS(hBD) (-3) ) using nonviral methods. Levels of hBD-3 mRNA and protein in three-dimensional skin tissue produced from NIKS(hBD) (-3) were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Tissue architecture was characterized by hematoxylin and eosin staining and by indirect immunofluorescence using proliferation and keratinocyte differentiation markers. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using an in vitro bacterial growth assay and in vivo using a murine burn infection model. Three-dimensional full thickness skin tissues containing epidermal NIKS(hBD) (-3) or control NIKS possessed histologic features of interfollicular epidermis and exhibited normal tissue growth and differentiation. NIKS(hBD) (-3) tissue contained approximately fivefold more hBD-3 protein than tissue containing unmodified control NIKS. In vitro studies showed that NIKS(hBD) (-3) tissue produced a significant reduction in the growth of Staphylococcus aureus multiple peptide resistance factor (mprF) compared with control tissue. In an in vivo infected murine burn model, NIKS(hBD) (-3) tissue resulted in a 90% reduction in bacterial growth. These results demonstrate that sustained delivery of hBD-3 by a bioengineered skin tissue results in a therapeutically relevant reduction in growth of a S.?aureus strain in an animal model of infected third-degree burn wounds. PMID:22564233

Gibson, Angela L; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L; Centanni, John M; Schlosser, Sandy J; Johnston, Colette E; Van Winkle, Kelly F; Szilagyi, Andrea; He, Li-Ke; Shankar, Ravi; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

2012-01-01

127

Bacterial growth and wound infection following saphenous vein harvesting in cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial of the impact of microbial skin sealant.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare microbial skin sealant versus bare skin on the leg regarding intraoperative bacterial presence in the surgical wound and time to recolonization of the adjacent skin at the saphenous vein harvesting site. A second aim was to evaluate the incidence of leg wound infection 2 months after surgery. In this randomized controlled trial, 140 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) between May 2010 and October 2011 were enrolled. Bacterial samples were taken preoperatively and intraoperatively at multiple time points and locations. OF the patients, 125 (92.6 %) were followed up 2 months postoperatively regarding wound infection. Intraoperative bacterial growth did not differ between the bare skin (n?=?68) and the microbial skin sealant group (n?=?67) at any time point. At 2 months postoperatively, 7/61 patients (11.5 %) in the skin sealant versus 14/64 (21.9 %) in the bare skin group (p?=?0.120) had been treated with antibiotics for a verified or suspected surgical site infection (SSI) at the harvest site. We found almost no intraoperative bacterial presence on the skin or in the subcutaneous tissue, irrespective of microbial skin sealant use. In contrast, we observed a relatively high incidence of late wound infection, indicating that wound contamination occurred postoperatively. Further research is necessary to determine whether the use of microbial skin sealant reduces the incidence of leg wound infection at the saphenous vein harvest site. PMID:24907853

Falk-Brynhildsen, K; Söderquist, B; Friberg, O; Nilsson, U

2014-11-01

128

Protection of grapevine pruning wounds from infection by Eutypa lata using Trichoderma harzianum and Fusarium lateritium  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  \\u000a Trichoderma harzianum applied to grapevine pruning wounds in a spore suspension and in the commercial formulations of Trichoseal, Trichoseal spray\\u000a and Vinevax pruning wound dressing reduced recovery of Eutypa lata in the glasshouse and in the field. Recovery of E. lata was significantly reduced (P T. harzianum 2 or 7 days before inoculation with ascospores of the pathogen in

S. John; T. J. Wicks; J. S. Hunt; M. F. Lorimer; H. Oakey; E. S. Scott

2005-01-01

129

[Importance of modern treatment procedures for infected and colonized wounds in dermatology].  

PubMed

In the coming years increasing numbers of patients with chronic ulcers and tumor wounds are to be expected, both of which are typically multifaceted diseases requiring complex and increasingly long-term ambulatory therapy. Therefore, in recent years special medical emphasis has been placed on efficacious therapies with good tolerability and also suitability regarding feasibility for outpatient treatment. Some of these methods, such as cold plasma therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), water-filtered infrared therapy (wIRA), electrostimulation (ES) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) have a good chance of success when applied as an adjuvant method in the multimodal treatment concept for patients with recalcitrant wounds. All of these methods have at least indirect antimicrobial properties which can be advantageous in cases of microbial infiltration of wounds. As for all other methods for treating recalcitrant wounds, the promising application of the aforementioned methods requires great expertise in wound healing together with a broad and continuous interdisciplinary diagnostics and therapy (wound center). PMID:25336295

Daeschlein, G; Lutze, S; Arnold, A; von Podewils, S; Jünger, M

2014-11-01

130

Does preoperative nephrostomy increase the incidence of wound infection after nephrectomy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. To determine whether patients with nephrostomy after simple nephrectomy more often had postoperative wound complication than did matched patients without nephrostomy.Methods. The hospital records of patients who underwent retroperitoneal simple nephrectomy were evaluated, and the following data were retrieved: age, indication for nephrectomy and nephrostomy insertion, medical history, urine culture, antibiotic regimen, time elapsed from nephrostomy insertion to nephrectomy,

Alexander Greenstein; Issac Kaver; Juza Chen; Haim Matzkin

1999-01-01

131

Efflux pump regulatory genes mutations in multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wound infections in Isfahan hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background: Multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa) is a worldwide threat for public health. Hyperexpression of efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ), which is a well-known mechanisms for MDR emerging, is controlled by regulatory genes, mexR and nfxB, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate point mutations in mexR and nfxB genes in MDR- P. aeruginosa isolated from wound infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 P. aeruginosa cultures obtained from wound infections were analyzed. Among them eight isolates identified as MDR-P. aeruginosa and were subjected to determination of mutations in mexR and nfxB genes. Results: We detected eight-point mutations in mexR and 12-point mutations in nfxB. The most common mutations were common G327-A (eight isolates), G384-A (eight isolates), G411-A (eight isolates). Mutations in A371-C and A372-C were the predominant substitution which was seen in nfxB. Amino acid substitutions were also found at position 124 and 126 for NfxB and MexR, respectively. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa isolates with mutation in efflux pump regulatory genes such as mexR and nfxB could be a main factor contributed to antibiotic resistance and must be considered in antibiotic treatment. PMID:24949288

Vaez, Hamid; Faghri, Jamshid; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Yadegari, Sima; Fazeli, Hossein; Moghofeei, Mohsen; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

2014-01-01

132

Methodologies used in surveillance of surgical wound infections and bacteremia in Australian hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The prevalence of nosocomial infection in Australian hospitals is estimated to be between 5.5% and 6.3%. Since 1989, infection control professionals (ICPs) in hospitals accredited by the Australian Council on Health Care Standards (ACHS) have been encouraged to collect nosocomial infection data according to ACHS methodology. Method: In 1996, we surveyed members of the Australian Infection Control Association to

Cathryn L. Murphy; M.-L. McLaws

1999-01-01

133

In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging To Evaluate Systemic and Topical Antibiotics against Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Skin Wounds in Mice  

PubMed Central

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S.; Donegan, Niles P.; Cheung, Ambrose L.

2013-01-01

134

Human wound infections caused by Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and EF-4b  

PubMed Central

Background Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and -4b, are considered to be rare zoonotic pathogens, usually associated with dog or cat bites. The aim of the study was to phenotypicaly characterize 13 EF-4 isolates from wound infections, determine their antibiotic susceptibility and to follow the clinical outcome of the patients. Methods 13 of the EF-4 isolates were cultured on agar plates. Conventional biochemical tests and the Biolog system were used for phenotypical identification. An arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) was carried out to determine the genetic profiles. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for different antibiotics were determined. According to this, clinical data for the patients were recorded. Results 11 isolates were identified as N. animaloris and 2 as N. zoodegmatis due to the production of arginine dihydrolase. A majority of the patients had a history of dog bite. In 6 cases only grewth of N. animaloris or zoodegmatis was registered. When a patient received antibiotic treatment the most common drug of choice was penicillin V. Only 3 patients received treatment for which the isolated EF-4 bacterium was fully susceptible. Conclusion Human infections involving N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis usually present themselves as local wound infection, but severe complications can occur. Despite their pathogenic potentia, l N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are often misidentified, dismissed as skin contaminants or not recognized at all. Due to the fact that N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are significant pathogens in animal bites, physicians should keep these bacteria in mind when choosing antibiotic therapy. PMID:23919115

Heydecke, Anna; Andersson, Birgitta; Holmdahl, Torsten; Melhus, Asa

2013-01-01

135

Minor amputation and palliative wound care as a strategy to avoid major amputation in patients with foot infections and severe peripheral arterial disease.  

PubMed

Foot infections occurring in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who are not considered candidates for revascularization and limb salvage efforts are generally treated with major amputations. Herein we describe our early experiences in managing foot infections with minor amputations and palliative wound care as a strategy to avoid the functional disability often associated with major amputations. Patients with severe PAD that underwent minor amputations and subsequent palliative wound care for moderate/severe infections were paired with age-matched controls with PAD that underwent primary major amputations for foot infections. Eleven patients who underwent minor amputations and palliative wound care of 13 limbs were compared to an age-matched cohort of 12 patients undergoing 13 major amputations.The median age was 80 years in both groups. Survival at 1 and 2 years did not differ significantly between groups. All patients who were ambulatory and/or independently living remained so following palliative management; in contrast, major amputation changed ambulatory status in 75% of patients and independent living status in 50%. Palliative management did not result in ascending/systemic sepsis or progressive necrosis. The need for reoperations was uncommon in both groups. In summary, minor amputations and operative drainage with subsequent palliative wound care appears to be a safe management option in patients with severe PAD and moderate or severe foot infections that are not candidates for revascularization. Palliative management may result in less functional impairment than major amputation. PMID:25049375

Barshes, Neal R; Gold, Benjamin; Garcia, Aimee; Bechara, Carlos F; Pisimisis, George; Kougias, Panos

2014-09-01

136

Novel biodegradable sandwich-structured nanofibrous drug-eluting membranes for repair of infected wounds: an in vitro and in vivo study  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to develop novel sandwich-structured nanofibrous membranes to provide sustained-release delivery of vancomycin, gentamicin, and lidocaine for repair of infected wounds. Methods To prepare the biodegradable membranes, poly(D, L)-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA), collagen, and various pharmaceuticals, including vancomycin, gentamicin, and lidocaine, were first dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. They were electrospun into sandwich-structured membranes with PLGA/collagen as the surface layers and PLGA/drugs as the core. An elution method and a high-pressure liquid chromatography assay were used to characterize in vivo and in vitro drug release from the membranes. In addition, repair of infected wounds in rats was studied. Histological examination of epithelialization and granulation at the wound site was also performed. Results The biodegradable nanofibrous membranes released large amounts of vancomycin and gentamicin (well above the minimum inhibition concentration) and lidocaine in vivo for more than 3 weeks. A bacterial inhibition test was carried out to determine the relative activity of the antibiotics released. The bioactivity ranged from 40% to 100%. The nanofibrous membranes were functionally active in treating infected wounds, and were very effective as accelerators in early-stage wound healing. Conclusion Using the electrospinning technique, we will be able to manufacture biodegradable, biomimetic, nanofibrous, extracellular membranes for long-term delivery of various drugs. PMID:22359454

Chen, Dave Wei-Chih; Liao, Jun-Yi; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

2012-01-01

137

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the literature, although they typically are not the first line of treatment in Ontario. Modern moist interactive dressings are foams, calcium alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and films. Topical antibacterial agents—antiseptics, topical antibiotics, and newer antimicrobial dressings—are used to treat infection. The Technology Being Reviewed Negative pressure wound therapy is not a new concept in wound therapy. It is also called subatmospheric pressure therapy, vacuum sealing, vacuum pack therapy, and sealing aspirative therapy. The aim of the procedure is to use negative pressure to create suction, which drains the wound of exudate (i.e., fluid, cells, and cellular waste that has escaped from blood vessels and seeped into tissue) and influences the shape and growth of the surface tissues in a way that helps healing. During the procedure, a piece of foam is placed over the wound, and a drain tube is placed over the foam. A large piece of transparent tape is placed over the whole area, including the healthy tissue, to secure the foam and drain the wound. The tube is connected to a vacuum source, and fluid is drawn from the wound through the foam into a disposable canister. Thus, the entire wound area is subjected to negative pressure. The device can be programmed to provide varying degrees of pressure either continuously or intermittently. It has an alarm to alert the provider or patient if the pressure seal breaks or the canister is full. Negative pressure wound therapy may be used for patients with chronic and acute wounds; subacute wounds (dehisced incisions); chronic, diabetic wounds or pressure ulcers; meshed grafts (before and after); or flaps. It should not be used for patients with fistulae to organs/body cavities, necrotic tissue that has not been debrided, untreated osteomyelitis, wound malignancy, wounds that require hemostasis, or for patients who are taking anticoagulants. Review Strategy The inclusion criteria were as follows: Randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a sample size of 20 or more Human s

2006-01-01

138

Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC).

Aron F Popov; Jan D Schmitto; Theodor Tirilomis; Christian Bireta; Kasim O Coskun; Suyog A Mokashi; Alexander Emmert; Martin Friedrich; Christoph H Wiese; Friedrich A Schoendube

2010-01-01

139

Impact of deep sternal wound infection management with vacuum-assisted closure therapy followed by sternal osteosynthesis: a 15-year review of 23 499 sternotomies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study was undertaken to examine the outcome of patients with deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) now treated with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy as a bridge to sternal osteosynthesis with horizontal titanium plate fixation. Methods: From 1992 to 2007, a consecutive cohort of 23499 patients underwent open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution. The period under study was divided in

Richard Baillot; Daniel Cloutier; Livia Montalin; Louise Côté; François Lellouche; Chanel Houde; Geneviève Gaudreau; Pierre Voisine

2010-01-01

140

One year ago not business as usual: Wound management, infection and psychoemotional control during tertiary medical care following the 2004 Tsunami disaster in southeast Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Following the 2004 tsunami disaster in southeast Asia severely injured tourists were repatriated via airlift to Germany. One cohort was triaged to the Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (Germany) for further medical care. We report on the tertiary medical care provided to this cohort of patients. METHODS: This study is an observational report on complex wound management, infection and psychoemotional control

Marc Maegele; Sven Gregor; Nedim Yuecel; Christian Simanski; Thomas Paffrath; Dieter Rixen; Markus M Heiss; Claudia Rudroff; Stefan Saad; Walter Perbix; Frank Wappler; Andreas Harzheim; Rosemarie Schwarz; Bertil Bouillon

2006-01-01

141

cDNA cloning of carrot extracellular beta-fructosidase and its expression in response to wounding and bacterial infection.  

PubMed Central

We isolated a full-length cDNA for apoplastic (extracellular or cell wall-bound) beta-fructosidase (invertase), determined its nucleotide sequence, and used it as a probe to measure changes in mRNA as a result of wounding of carrot storage roots and infection of carrot plants with the bacterial pathogen Erwinia carotovora. The derived amino acid sequence of extracellular beta-fructosidase shows that it is a basic protein (pl 9.9) with a signal sequence for entry into the endoplasmic reticulum and a propeptide at the N terminus that is not present in the mature protein. Amino acid sequence comparison with yeast and bacterial invertases shows that the overall homology is only about 28%, but that there are short conserved motifs, one of which is at the active site. Maturing carrot storage roots contain barely detectable levels of mRNA for extracellular beta-fructosidase and these levels rise slowly but dramatically after wounding with maximal expression after 12 hours. Infection of roots and leaves of carrot plants with E. carotovora results in a very fast increase in the mRNA levels with maximal expression after 1 hour. These results indicate that apoplastic beta-fructosidase is probably a new and hitherto unrecognized pathogenesis-related protein [Van Loon, L.C. (1985). Plant Mol. Biol. 4, 111-116]. Suspension-cultured carrot cells contain high levels of mRNA for extracellular beta-fructosidase and these levels remain the same whether the cells are grown on sucrose, glucose, or fructose. PMID:2152110

Sturm, A; Chrispeels, M J

1990-01-01

142

Clinical outcome and microvascular blood flow in VAC® - and Sorbalgon® -treated peri-vascular infected wounds in the groin after vascular surgery - an early interim analysis.  

PubMed

Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC(®)) therapy is considered to be superior to conventional dressings in the treatment of peri-vascular groin infections after vascular surgery at our department. Therefore, we performed an early interim analysis of the clinical outcomes in these seriously ill patients at risk of amputation and death. Patients were randomised to either VAC(®) (n = 5) or Sorbalgon(®) (n = 5; best alternative treatment) therapy after surgical debridement. Non-invasive, laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) studies of the skin adjacent to the undressed wound were performed after 14 days of wound treatment. There was no difference in LDPI values in VAC(®) versus Sorbalgon(®) treated patients (P = 0·46). One patient in the VAC(®) group suffered from two re-bleeding episodes, leading to vascular resection and transfemoral amputation and in the Sorbalgon(®) group two had a complete wound healing time of more than 4 months and one had a visible interposition bypass graft in the groin after 1 month of treatment. No patient died of the groin infection. Although not statistically proven, fewer wound treatment failures were recorded in the VAC(®) group, justifying this early interim analysis. LDPI studies were feasible. PMID:22672773

Acosta, Stefan; Monsen, Christina; Dencker, Magnus

2013-08-01

143

Multiple actions of Lucilia sericata larvae in hard-to-heal wounds: larval secretions contain molecules that accelerate wound healing, reduce chronic inflammation and inhibit bacterial infection.  

PubMed

In Europe ?15,000 patients receive larval therapy for wound treatment annually. Over the past few years, clinical studies have demonstrated the success of larvae of Lucilia sericata as debridement agents. This is based on a combination of physical and biochemical actions. Laboratory investigations have advanced our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of larval secretions, including removal of dead tissue, reduction of the bacterial burden, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the microbiological, immunological, and wound healing actions of larval therapy, and the molecules involved in these beneficial effects. Future studies will focus on the isolation, identification, and (pre)clinical testing of the effective molecules of L. sericata larvae. These molecules may be candidates for the development of new agents for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory diseases, including chronic wounds. PMID:24123092

Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pritchard, David I; Nigam, Yamni; Jung, Willi; Nibbering, Peter H

2013-12-01

144

Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

2014-10-15

145

Notes from the field: rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium wound infections among medical tourists undergoing cosmetic surgeries in the Dominican Republic--multiple states, March 2013-February 2014.  

PubMed

In August 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (MDHMH) was notified of two persons with rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (RG-NTM) surgical-site infections. Both patients had undergone surgical procedures as medical tourists at the same private surgical clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic the previous month. Within 7 days of returning to the United States, both sought care for symptoms that included surgical wound abscesses, clear fluid drainage, pain, and fever. Initial antibiotic therapy was ineffective. Material collected from both patients' wounds grew Mycobacterium abscessus exhibiting a high degree of antibiotic resistance characteristic of this organism. PMID:24598597

Schnabel, David; Gaines, Joanna; Nguyen, Duc B; Esposito, Douglas H; Ridpath, Alison; Yacisin, Kari; Poy, Joe A; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Lijewski, Virginia; McElroy, Nora P; Ahmad, Nina; Harrison, Cassandra; Parinelli, Ellen J; Beaudoin, Amanda L; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Pritchard, Scott; Jensen, Bette J; Toney, Nadege C; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Nyangoma, Edith N; Barry, Anita M; Feldman, Katherine A; Blythe, David; Perz, Joseph F; Morgan, Oliver W; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Brunette, Gary W; Sotir, Mark

2014-03-01

146

Involvement of Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulatory Network in Susceptibility to Wound Infection Following Trauma  

PubMed Central

Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals. PMID:18159239

Xiao, Wenzhong; Tegos, George P.; Papisov, Michail I.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rahme, Laurence G.

2007-01-01

147

Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10?M HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at ?=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at ?=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

2010-02-01

148

Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident  

PubMed Central

A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution only. PMID:24432204

Bibashi, Evangelia; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Pavlidis, Theodoros E.; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Sakantamis, Athanasios; Walther, Grit

2012-01-01

149

Wound infection in breast augmentation: The role of prophylactic perioperative antibiotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection after augmentation mammoplasty is not common, with the reported incidence between 1% and 7%. The use of prophylactic antibiotics, however, is widespread in plastic surgery: It was documented in a 1975 survey in which 43% of responding plastic surgeons used prophylactic antibiotics. Fifteen years since this survey, surgeons have witnessed an explosion in antibiotic variety and have participated in

John LeRoy; Kenna S. Given

1991-01-01

150

Extended-spectrum Beta-lactamase Orthopedic Wound Infections in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteria are emerging and impacting significantly on the management of patients and hospital costs. Besides, they are not being routinely sought after in diagnostic laboratories thus contributing to treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from wounds of 45 patients were identified using commercial identification kits and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by the Bauer-Kirby method. Screening and phenotypic confirmation of ESBL production were done as prescribed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The conjugation experiment was performed by the mating assay in broth between the ESBL producers and E. coli ATCC 25922 as the recipient. Results: Out of 102 Gram-negative bacteria isolated, 36 were positive for ESBL mainly of the Enterobacteriaceae family (33) and the rest were oxidase-positive bacilli (3). The predominant bacteria were Klebsiella spp. and E. coli. Others were Serratia rubidae, Citrobacter freundii, Morganella morgannii, Proteus spp., Providencia stuartii, and Enterobacter spp. There was a significant association between treatment with third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs) and isolation of ESBLs (P=0.0020). The ESBL producers were multiply resistant and moderately sensitive to colistin. The conjugation experiment showed that the ESBL gene was transferred horizontally and tetracycline, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, and aztreonam resistance genes were co-transferred. No mortality was recorded but the mean length of stay in the hospital was 82 days. Conclusion: The development and spread of ESBL among Gram-negative bacteria and possible horizontal transfer calls for concern, especially in view of treatment failure, high treatment cost, and consequent discomfort to patients. PMID:21887050

Idowu, Olusolabomi J; Onipede, Anthony O; Orimolade, Ayodele E; Akinyoola, Lawrence A; Babalola, Gbolahan O

2011-01-01

151

Asymptomatic urinary tract colonisation predisposes to superficial wound infection in elective orthopaedic surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is no evidence surrounding the benefits, effects or clinical outcomes treating asymptomatic urinary tract colonisation.\\u000a A series of 558 patients undergoing elective admission for orthopaedic surgery were recruited prior to surgery and were screened\\u000a for urinary tract infection (UTI). Patients had their urine dipstick tested and positive samples were sent for culture and\\u000a microscopy. Patients with a positive urine

B. J. Ollivere; N. Ellahee; K. Logan; J. C. A. Miller-Jones; P. W. Allen

2009-01-01

152

IB-367 pre-treatment improves the in vivo efficacy of teicoplanin and daptomycin in an animal model of wounds infected with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides are known as immunomodulators and antibiotic enhancers. We report that administration of an antimicrobial peptide, IB-367, was efficacious in increasing the antimicrobial activity of daptomycin and teicoplanin in a mouse model of wound infection caused by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Mice were assigned to seven groups: an IB-367 pre-treated group with no antibiotics given after challenge, two IB-367 pre-treated groups plus daptomycin or teicoplanin given after challenge, two groups treated with daptomycin or teicoplanin only after challenge, and two control groups without infection or that did not receive any treatment. The main outcome measures were quantitative bacterial culture and analysis of natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity and leukocyte phenotype. The wound, established through the panniculus carnosus muscle of mice, was infected by MRSA. Bacterial cultures of mice receiving antibiotics alone showed a -2 log decrease, whilst those for IB-367 plus daptomycin or teicoplanin showed a -4 log decrease. IB-367 plus daptomycin showed the highest efficacy. The higher antimicrobial effect exerted by IB-367 was associated with increased levels of NK cytotoxicity but not of NK cell number. IB-367 increased the number of both CD11b and Gr-1 cells 3 days after MRSA challenge, whereas both of these leukocyte populations were reduced at 10 days after challenge. Our data suggest that a combination of IB-367 with antibiotic exerts a therapeutic effect and may be useful for the management of staphylococcal wounds. PMID:23813277

Cirioni, Oscar; Silvestri, Carmela; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Kamysz, Wojciech; Ghiselli, Roberto; Scalise, Alessandro; Brescini, Lucia; Castelli, Pamela; Orlando, Fiorenza; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Guerrieri, Mario; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

2013-10-01

153

Topical Antibiotics in War Wounds: A Re-Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Early and adequate wound debridement is the therapy of choice in treating war wounds. Topical antibiotics, used early, will reduce the incidence of wound infection when debridement is delayed. Additional studies are needed to define the complete value of ...

C. Heisterkamp, J. Vernick, R. L. Simmons, T. Motsumoto

1968-01-01

154

Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.  

PubMed

The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area <40% were simple randomised to treat with nanocrystalline silver nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. PMID:22734483

Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

2013-10-01

155

Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?  

PubMed Central

Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds. PMID:23162236

Tiwari, V. K.

2012-01-01

156

Skin tissue engineering for the infected wound site: biodegradable PLA nanofibers and a novel approach for silver ion release evaluated in a 3D coculture system of keratinocytes and staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin substitutes or wound dressings for infected wound sites. PMID:24494739

Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

2014-10-01

157

Topical and systemic medications for wounds.  

PubMed

There are a plethora of topical and systemic medications available to the veterinary practitioner today that aid the wound healing process. Some of these help to maintain a moist environment. Others increase growth factors, provide local energy sources, control infection, provide for debridement, increase wound blood flow and temperature, or reduce wound edema. Modern wound care requires that the proper products(s)be used, depending on the condition of the wound and the phase of wound healing. This article discusses various wound care products and provides guidelines on their use. PMID:16787786

Krahwinkel, D J; Boothe, Harry W

2006-07-01

158

Microbiology of equine wounds and evidence of bacterial biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Horse wounds have a high risk of becoming infected due to their environment. Infected wounds harbour diverse populations of microorganisms, however in some cases these microorganisms can be difficult to identify and fail to respond to antibiotic treatment, resulting in chronic non-healing wounds. In human wounds this has been attributed to the ability of bacteria to survive in a biofilm

S. J. Westgate; S. L. Percival; D. C. Knottenbelt; P. D. Clegg; C. A. Cochrane

2011-01-01

159

Office management of minor wounds.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

2001-01-01

160

Wound healing.  

PubMed

Wound healing is a dynamic biologic process of repairing insults to the integumentary system. It is commonly divided into three phases: inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. Each phase has unique cellular and substance constituents without which it cannot progress normally. A large variety of factors may influence any part of wound healing, including local factors such as bacteria, oxygen tension, and bleeding, and systemic factors such as the mental and physical health of the patient. There are also extrinsic factors that can be influenced by the caretakers of the wound to enhance wound healing. Areas of intervention include using antiseptic technique when one is dealing with the wound, using good surgical technique, choosing the appropriate wounding method and repair for the individual patient, and using antibiotics and special wound dressings. Modern science and technology are giving us new insights into wound healing and leading us to exciting new ways of influencing it, including the topical use of growth factors, artificial skins, cultured epithelium with and without dermal components, and electrical stimulation. The future of wound healing holds a better understanding of the complexities of the physiologic events that occur and a translation of that into a biologically active and interactive wound care. PMID:7794680

Waldorf, H; Fewkes, J

1995-01-01

161

Efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection after Whipple's procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy) with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents: protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Among surgical oncology patients, incisional surgical site infection is associated with substantially increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Moreover, while adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent have a high risk of this type of infection, and wound protectors may significantly reduce its risk, no relevant studies of wound protectors yet exist involving this patient population. This study will evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents. Methods and analysis This study will be a parallel, dual-arm, randomised controlled trial that will utilise a more explanatory than pragmatic attitude. All adults (?18?years) undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent will be considered eligible. Exclusion criteria will include patient age <18?years and those receiving long-term glucocorticoids. The trial will employ block randomisation to allocate patients to a commercial dual-ring wound protector (the Alexis Wound Protector) or no wound protector and the current standard of care. The main outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30?days of the index operation date as determined by a research assistant blinded to treatment allocation. Outcomes will be analysed by a statistician blinded to allocation status by calculating risk ratios and 95% CIs and compared using Fisher's exact test. Ethics and dissemination This will be the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results of this study are expected to be available in 2016/2017 and will be disseminated using an integrated and end-of-grant knowledge translation strategy. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01836237. PMID:25146716

Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Edwards, Janet P; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver; Ball, Chad G

2014-01-01

162

The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).  

PubMed

Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population. PMID:24126108

Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

2014-01-01

163

Comparison of clinical and economic outcomes of two antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for sternal wound infection in high-risk patients following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: a prospective randomised double-blind controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Prospective studies show a 10% incidence of sternal wound infection (SWI) after 90 days of follow-up, compared with infection rates of 5% reported by the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System after only 30 days of follow-up. This incidence increases 2–3 times in high-risk patients. Design: Prospective randomised double-blind controlled clinical trial.Setting: Cardiothoracic centre, UK.Patients: Patients were eligible if they

Kay Dhadwal; Sharif Al-Ruzzeh; Thanos Athanasiou; Marina Choudhury; Pynee Vuddamalay; Haifa Lyster; Mohamed Amrani; Shane George

2007-01-01

164

Diabetic Wound Care  

MedlinePLUS

What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that occurs in approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes and ... the foot. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, 6 percent will be hospitalized due to infection ...

165

The management of perineal wounds  

PubMed Central

Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum. PMID:23162235

Sharma, Ramesh K.; Parashar, Atul

2012-01-01

166

Evidence and Significance of Biofilms in Chronic Wounds in Horses  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Equine wounds have a high risk of becoming infected due to their environment. Infected wounds encompass diverse populations\\u000a of microorganisms that fail to respond to antibiotic treatment, resulting in chronic non-healing wounds. In human wounds this\\u000a has been attributed to the ability of bacteria to survive in a biofilm phenotypic state. Biofilms are known to delay wound\\u000a healing, principally due

Samantha J. Westgate; Steven L. Percival; Peter D. Clegg; Derek C. Knottenbelt; Christine A. Cochrane

167

Relation between topical application of platelet-rich plasma and vancomycin and severe deep sternal wound infections after a first median sternotomy.  

PubMed

Deep sternal wound infections (DSWIs) are serious complications of sternotomy, leading to increased mortality and costs of care. Topical applications of autologous platelet concentrate and vancomycin have both shown promise in preventing DSWIs. From January 1, 1998, to November 30, 2010, 1,866 patients without previous sternotomy underwent cardiac surgery at the Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, by a single surgeon who systematically adopted application of a paste containing vancomycin, calcium-thrombin, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP paste) to the edges of sternal wounds before closure in December 2005. A propensity-adjusted logistic regression model employing Firth's penalized maximum likelihood method was used to assess the association between the use of the PRP paste (intervention) and the incidence of severe DSWI. Eleven patients (0.59%) developed severe DSWIs. All were among the 1,318 patients in the control group (0.83%); no severe DSWIs developed in the 548 patients in the intervention group. Both the unadjusted and adjusted associations between the study intervention and DSWI were statistically significant (unadjusted p value=0.021; adjusted p value=0.005; adjusted odds ratio=0.05, 95% confidence interval 0.01, 0.50). In conclusion, the PRP paste appears to prevent severe DSWIs. PMID:24576548

Hamman, Baron L; Stout, Laura Y; Theologes, Theodore T; Sass, Danielle M; da Graca, Briget; Filardo, Giovanni

2014-04-15

168

Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus complex clear corneal wound infection with recurrent hypopyon and perforation after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.  

PubMed

We report a clear corneal wound infection occurring in a 74-year-old man caused by a member of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus complex, presenting as crystalline keratopathy with recurrent hypopyon. This led to perforation after phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Only after corneal biopsy of the incision was the causative organism isolated and found to be sensitive to clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin. Despite aggressive therapy, a full-thickness corneal perforation developed, requiring emergent cyanoacrylate glue to preserve ocular integrity. Both the difficulty and delays in obtaining a correct diagnosis led to severe ocular morbidity. Infectious lamellar keratitis limited to the clear cornea phacoemulsification incision is rare, but some unusual organisms such as atypical mycobacteria may be encountered. PMID:16105623

Servat, Juan Javier; Ramos-Esteban, Jerome C; Tauber, Shachar; Bia, Frank J

2005-07-01

169

supply (i.e., diabetic foot ulcers) as well as in the prevention of postsurgical wound infections (Daum, 2007). Furthermore,  

E-print Network

of these models, euthanasia is required to determine the ex vivo bacterial burden using colony counts and longitudinally monitor the bacterial burden and infection induced inflammation without the need for euthanasia

Simon, Scott I.

170

The effects of infection by Phytophthora infestans on the control of phenylpropanoid metabolism in wounded potato tissue  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the first 24 h of in vitro incubation of excised potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) discs, the appearance of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 3.4.1.5) and the accumulation of chlorogenic acid are both stimulated by infection with Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary. Whereas in control tissue the level of PAL reached a stable plateau value after 40 h, in infected

B. G. Smith; P. H. Rubery

1981-01-01

171

Delivery of Methylene Blue and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate from cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels: a potential means of photodynamic therapy of infected wounds.  

PubMed

Poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate complexes were evaluated as a potentially novel drug delivery platform suitable for in vivo use in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) of wound infections. An optimised formulation (8.0%w/w PVA, 2.0%w/w borax) was loaded with 1.0 mg ml(-1) of the photosensitisers Methylene Blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Both drugs were released to yield receiver compartment concentrations (>5.0 microg ml(-1)) found to be phototoxic to both planktonic and biofilm-grown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common cause of wound infections in hospitals. Newborn calf serum, used to simulate the conditions prevalent in an exuding wound, did not adversely affect the properties of the hydrogels and had no significant effect on the rate of TMP-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA, despite appreciably reducing the fluence rate of incident light. However, MB-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA was significantly reduced in the presence of calf serum and when the clinical isolate was grown in a biofilm. Results support the contention that delivery of MB or TMP using gel-type vehicles as part of PACT could make a contribution to the photodynamic eradication of MRSA from infected wounds. PMID:19651522

Donnelly, Ryan F; Cassidy, Corona M; Loughlin, Ryan G; Brown, Anthony; Tunney, Michael M; Jenkins, Mark G; McCarron, Paul A

2009-09-01

172

Management of gunshot wounds  

SciTech Connect

Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

1987-01-01

173

Wounded Warriors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soldiers have been killed and wounded in wars throughout history. With new medical technologies, more soldiers survive their injuries and return home. Unfortunately, those injuries often include permanent disabilities either through loss of limb(s) or brain injury or post-traumatic stress disorder, among other possibilities. Perhaps equally unfortunate is the way that soldiers with disabilities and persons with disabilities generally are

Marilyn Martone

2008-01-01

174

Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing  

PubMed Central

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

2012-01-01

175

The Cost-Effectiveness of Wound-Edge Protection Devices Compared to Standard Care in Reducing Surgical Site Infection after Laparotomy: An Economic Evaluation alongside the ROSSINI Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Wound-edge protection devices (WEPDs) have been used in surgery for more than 40 years to reduce surgical site infection (SSI). No economic evaluation of WEPDs against any comparator has ever been conducted. The aim of the paper was to assess whether WEPDs are cost-effective in reducing SSI compared to standard care alone in the United Kingdom. Methods and Findings An economic evaluation was conducted alongside the ROSSINI trial. The study perspective was that of the UK National Health Service and the time horizon was 30 days post-operatively. The study was conducted in 21 UK hospitals. 760 patients undergoing laparotomy were randomised to either WEPD or standard care and 735 were included in the primary analysis. The main economic outcome was cost-effectiveness based on incremental cost (£) per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Patients in the WEPD arm accessed health care worth £5,420 on average and gained 0.02131 QALYs, compared to £5,130 and 0.02133 QALYs gained in the standard care arm. The WEPD strategy was more costly and equally effective compared to standard care, but there was significant uncertainty around incremental costs and QALYs. The findings were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions There is no evidence to suggest that WEPDs can be considered a cost effective device to reduce SSI. Their continued use is a waste of limited health care resources. PMID:24748154

Gheorghe, Adrian; Roberts, Tracy E.; Pinkney, Thomas D.; Bartlett, David C.; Morton, Dion; Calvert, Melanie

2014-01-01

176

Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective  

PubMed Central

Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ‘TIME’ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, infection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and its clinical management components along with the principles of advanced wound care management at the present time. Management of tissue necrosis can be tailored according to the wound and local expertise. It ranges from simple to modern techniques like wet to dry dressing, enzymatic, biological and surgical debridement. Restoration of the bacterial balance is also an important element in managing chronic wounds that are critically colonized. Achieving a balance moist wound will hasten healing and correct biochemical imbalance by removing the excessive enzymes and growth factors. This can be achieved will multitude of dressing materials. The negative pressure wound therapy being one of the great breakthroughs. The progress and understanding on scientific basis of the wound bed preparation over the last two decades are discussed further in this article in the clinical perspectives. PMID:23162216

Halim, A. S.; Khoo, T. L.; Saad, A. Z. Mat

2012-01-01

177

GhWRKY40, a multiple stress-responsive cotton WRKY gene, plays an important role in the wounding response and enhances susceptibility to ralstonia solanacearum infection in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.  

PubMed

WRKY transcription factors form one of the largest transcription factor families and function as important components in the complex signaling processes that occur during plant stress responses. However, relative to the research progress in model plants, far less information is available on the function of WRKY proteins in cotton. In the present study, we identified the GhWRKY40 gene in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and determined that the GhWRKY40 protein is targeted to the nucleus and is a stress-inducible transcription factor. The GhWRKY40 transcript level was increased upon wounding and infection with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The overexpression of GhWRKY40 down-regulated most of the defense-related genes, enhanced the wounding tolerance and increased the susceptibility to R. solanacearum. Consistent with a role in multiple stress responses, we found that the GhWRKY40 transcript level was increased by the stress hormones salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethylene (ET). Moreover, GhWRKY40 interacted with the MAPK kinase GhMPK20, as shown using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation systems. Collectively, these results suggest that GhWRKY40 is regulated by SA, MeJA and ET signaling and coordinates responses to wounding and R. solanacearum attack. These findings highlight the importance of WRKYs in regulating wounding- and pathogen-induced responses. PMID:24747610

Wang, Xiuling; Yan, Yan; Li, Yuzhen; Chu, Xiaoqian; Wu, Changai; Guo, Xingqi

2014-01-01

178

Wound complications following operative fixation of calcaneal fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of our study was to find the incidence of wound complications following operative fixation of fractured calcanea and identify the risk factors contributing to them. We retrospectively reviewed the results of operative treatment of 33 calcaneal fractures in 30 patients over a 4-year period. We report an overall wound complication rate of 18.1%. Wound infection, haematoma, dehiscence and

M Al-Mudhaffar; C. V. R Prasad; A Mofidi

2000-01-01

179

Simultaneous irrigation and negative pressure wound therapy enhances wound healing and reduces wound bioburden in a porcine model.  

PubMed

Infected foot wounds are one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and amputation among persons with diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate a new wound therapy system that employs negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with simultaneous irrigation therapy. For this study, we used a porcine model with full-thickness excisional wounds, inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wounds were treated for 21 days of therapy with either NPWT, NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy using normal saline or polyhexanide biguanide (PHMB) at low or high flow rates, or control. Data show that NPWT with either irrigation condition improved wound healing rates over control-treated wounds, yet did not differ from NPWT alone. NPWT improved bioburden over control-treated wounds. NPWT with simultaneous irrigation further reduced bioburden over control and NPWT-treated wounds; however, flow rate did not affect these outcomes. Together, these data show that NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy with either normal saline or PHMB has a positive effect on bioburden in a porcine model, which may translate clinically to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:24134060

Davis, Kathryn; Bills, Jessica; Barker, Jenny; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence

2013-01-01

180

Small fragment wounds: biophysics and pathophysiology.  

PubMed

This paper considers the wounding effects of small fragments in modern warfare. Small fragment wounds may be expected to predominate on a future conventional battlefield; however, studies and models of "military" wounds have tended to focus on bullets as the wounding projectile. This paper discusses briefly the types of fragment projectile expected from modern munitions. It goes on to define a model for such projectiles, and describes the interaction with soft tissue simulants. The extent of penetration, temporary cavitation, and contamination by foreign material are all considered. This work with simulants is validated by experimental shots against animal tissue. A wound model in an experimental animal is described. This model was used to investigate the hematologic, biochemical, and histologic effects of a small fragment wound. The effects on skin and skeletal muscle are described. By sampling at various times (up to 1 week) after wounding, the natural progress of these wounds has been ascertained. The results from 28 experimental animals, with untreated fragment wounds, are reported. The most important findings are that the skin damage is very localized and that the muscle damage is limited, with little necrotic tissue in the track. Furthermore, the extent of the muscle damage, peripheral to the wound track, improves with time, healing within a few days, provided the wound remains free from infection. There was no clinical or microbiologic evidence of infection in those animals followed for up to 3 days. However, of eight animals followed to 1 week, three developed infected wounds. This work has implications for the management of soft tissue wounds caused by fragmentation munitions. The conventional military approach has been to treat penetrating war wounds by exploration, debridement, excision of dead tissue, and delayed primary closure; conservative treatment has largely been regarded as inappropriate. The work presented here shows that the potential culture medium within the wound is small and can be removed by the normal bodily responses. There is no need for surgery, provided that infection can be prevented. It may be inferred that if bacterial colonization can be prevented in the early stages by the timely use of antibiotics, surgery may be unnecessary. Further studies are planned to investigate this possibility. PMID:8606400

Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Rice, P

1996-03-01

181

Wound drains in proximal femoral fracture surgery: a randomized prospective trial of 177 patients.  

PubMed Central

We report on the effect of wound drains on wound healing following surgery for proximal femoral fractures. One hundred and seventy-seven patients undergoing AO dynamic hip screw (DHS) or hemiarthroplasty were randomized whether or not to receive wound drainage. Patients who received wound drainage showed statistically better wound healing in terms of the ASEPSIS wound scoring system and a reduced infection rate. This study conflicts with previous smaller studies which failed to show an effect of wound drainage upon wound healing. PMID:7884770

Varley, G W; Milner, S A

1995-01-01

182

The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat chronic wounds: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic wounds, defined as those wounds which fail to proceed through an or- derly process to produce anatomic and functional integrity, are a significant so- cioeconomic problem. A wound may fail to heal for a variety of reasons including the use of corticosteroids, formation of squamous cell carcinoma, persistent infection, unrelieved pressure, and underlying hypoxia within the wound bed. Hypoxia

Jennifer A. Thackham; D. L. Sean McElwain; Robert J. Long

2008-01-01

183

Skeletonized versus pedicled internal thoracic artery and risk of sternal wound infection after coronary bypass surgery: meta-analysis and meta-regression of 4817 patients  

PubMed Central

It is suggested that the internal thoracic artery (ITA) harvesting technique influences the incidence of sternal wound infection (SWI) after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). To determine if there is any real difference between skeletonized vs pedicled ITA, we performed a meta-analysis to determine if there is any real difference between these two established techniques in terms of SWI. We performed a systematic review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL/CCTR, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant articles to search for studies that compared the incidence of SWI after CABG between skeletonized vs pedicled ITA until June 2012. The principal summary measures were odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and P values (statistically significant when <0.05). The ORs were combined across studies using the weighted DerSimonian–Laird random effects model and weighted Mantel–Haenszel fixed effects. Meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis and meta-regression were completed using the software Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 2 (Biostat, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Twenty-two studies involving 4817 patients (2424 skeletonized; 2393 pedicled) met the eligibility criteria. There was no evidence for important heterogeneity of effects among the studies. The overall OR (95% CI) of SWI showed a statistically significant difference in favour of skeletonized ITA (fixed effect model: OR 0.443, 95% CI 0.323–0.608, P < 0.001; random effect model: OR 0.443, 95% CI 0.323–0.608, P < 0.001). In the sensitivity analysis, the difference in favour of skeletonized ITA was also observed in subgroups such as diabetic, bilateral ITA and diabetic with bilateral ITA; we also observed that there was a difference in the type of study, since non-randomized studies together demonstrated the benefit of skeletonized ITA in comparison with pedicled ITA, but the randomized studies together did not show this difference (although close to statistical significance and with the tendency to favour the skeletonized group). In meta-regression, we observed a statistically significant coefficient for SWI and proportion of diabetic patients (coefficient ?0.02, 95% CI ?0.03 to ?0.01, P = 0.016). In conclusion, skeletonized ITA appears to reduce the incidence of postoperative SWI in comparison with pedicled ITA after CABG, with this effect being modulated by the presence of diabetes. PMID:23446674

Sa, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; Ferraz, Paulo Ernando; Escobar, Rodrigo Renda; Vasconcelos, Frederico Pires; Ferraz, Alvaro Antonio Bandeira; Braile, Domingo Marcolino; Lima, Ricardo Carvalho

2013-01-01

184

Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen  

PubMed Central

The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

Sen, Chandan K.

2009-01-01

185

Wound care with antibacterial honey (Medihoney) in pediatric hematology–oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physiologic process of wound healing is impaired and prolonged in pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy. Due to profound immunosuppression, wound infection can easily spread and act as the source of sepsis. Referring to in vitro studies, which confirmed the antibacterial potency of special honey preparations against typical isolates of nosocomially acquired wound infections (including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-resistant enterococci)

Arne Simon; Kai Sofka; Gertrud Wiszniewsky; Gisela Blaser; Udo Bode; Gudrun Fleischhack

2006-01-01

186

Topical phytochemicals: applications for wound healing.  

PubMed

To maximize the effectiveness of any complementary therapy in treating chronic wounds, the clinician must fully appreciate the scientific basis in which this treatment modality influences wound healing. The biological changes influenced by phytochemical compounds can have a positive effect on wound healing, which often depends on extract selection and clinical application. A sound understanding of the physiological changes that are associated with phytochemical compounds will help the clinician to make an appropriate extract selection and guide treatment decisions.Tissue adhesion has long been considered a key step in determining a bacterium's pathogenicity. The process of preventing infections by decreasing bacterial-tissue adhesion has been reported in the literature, with particular focus on the antibacterial effects of ingested cranberry juice. Cranberry juice has been studied primarily as a "home remedy" in the treatment of urinary tract infection with its antiadhesion and/or antibacterial effects in a chronic wound needing further investigation. PMID:24932954

Walton, Edward W

2014-07-01

187

[Gunshot wounds, firearms and wound ballistics].  

PubMed

In the Netherlands the majority of gunshot wounds are caused by hand guns with a low firing velocity, such as pistols and revolvers, in which the severity of the injuries caused is primarily determined by whether or not vital structures are hit. With these sorts of wounds the removal of debris as equally the bullet is not usually necessary. For firearms with a high firing velocity the wounds are more severe due to the greater quantity of kinetic energy transferred to the tissues. As a result of this, cavitations and damage due to secondary projectiles can occur. The extensive removal of debris can be necessary in such cases. The severity of the wounds caused by a shotgun depends mainly on the distance from the shooter. For shotgun wounds incurred at a short distance it is necessary to ascertain whether the plastic pellet has ended up in the wound. PMID:12138671

Verleisdonk, E J M M

2002-07-01

188

[New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].  

PubMed

Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

2013-01-01

189

Hand Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... many patients require weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Deep space infections There are spaces in between the different layers of structures in ... wound. These may affect the thumb area (thenar space), the palm (deep palmar space) or even the ...

190

CCMR: Wound Dressing Tool and Wound Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of our project is to develop a Wound Dressing Tool (WDT) that in addition to extracting overabundant chemicals like the VAC system does, can also allow for variable rates of mass transfer as well as a way for clinicians to monitor the fluid chemical composition of the wound bed during the healing and treatment processes.

Men, Shannon

2005-08-17

191

Wound Healing and Care  

MedlinePLUS

... there's a risk that a wound might pull apart if it gets too wet. Avoid picking or ... Tetanus Dealing With Cuts and Wounds Dealing With Falls Sports and Exercise Safety Contact Us Print Additional ...

192

Wound care centers  

MedlinePLUS

... multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this treatment, ...

193

Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.  

PubMed

The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management of these challenging cases, especially pertaining to the safety and efficacy of pressure settings, dressings, and interposing contact layer selection. PMID:17586874

Baharestani, Mona Mylene

2007-06-01

194

Wound closure and wound monitoring in total hip arthroplasty. An overview.  

PubMed

Wound closure in primary and revision total hip arthroplasty is an essential and crucial step of the procedure. A recently published meta-analysis comparing metallic staples and sutures with stitches in hip procedures revealed that the risk of infection was four times greater when staples were used. This statement created concern among orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this overview is to address the problem of THA wound closure and wound monitoring. Further well designed, randomised, controlled trials comparing staples vs traditional stitches and eventually vs skin adhesive are necessary in order to draw conclusions in elective THA, revision surgery and hip fractures. Orthopaedic surgeons need to have more evidence in order to be able to justify their method of wound closure. Monitoring of the wound by the surgeon in the postoperative period is recommended. PMID:22983895

Mondini, Andrea; Bianchi, Luca; Zagra, Luigi

2012-01-01

195

Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... Externa) Eye Infections Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Styes Fungal Infections (Ringworm, Yeast, etc.) Diaper Rash Infections That Pets Carry Pneumocystis Pneumonia Tinea (Ringworm, Jock Itch, Athlete's Foot) Immunizations Flu Center ...

196

Assisted closure of fasciotomy wounds  

PubMed Central

Introduction Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and vessel loop assisted closure are two common methods used to assist with the closure of fasciotomy wounds. This retrospective review compares these two methods using a primary outcome measurement of skin graft requirement. Methods A retrospective search was performed to identify patients who underwent fasciotomy at our institution. Patient demographics, location of the fasciotomy, type of assisted closure, injury characteristics, need for skin graft, length of stay and evidence of infection within 90 days were recorded. Results A total of 56 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 49 underwent vessel loop closure and seven underwent NPWT assisted closure. Patients who underwent NPWT assisted closure were at higher risk for requiring skin grafting than patients who underwent vessel loop closure, with an odds ratio of 5.9 (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 31.24). There was no difference in the rate of infection or length of stay between the two groups. Demographic factors such as age, gender, fracture mechanism, location of fasciotomy and presence of open fracture were not predictive of the need for skin grafting. Conclusion This retrospective descriptive case series demonstrates an increased risk of skin grafting in patients who underwent fasciotomy and were treated with NPWT assisted wound closure. In our series, vessel loop closure was protective against the need for skin grafting. Due to the small sample size in the NPWT group, caution should be taken when generalising these results. Further research is needed to determine if NPWT assisted closure of fasciotomy wounds truly leads to an increased requirement for skin grafting, or if the vascular injury is the main risk factor. PMID:23610668

Fowler, J. R.; Kleiner, M. T.; Das, R.; Gaughan, J. P.; Rehman, S.

2012-01-01

197

The Wound Microbiome: Modern Approaches to Examining the Role of Microorganisms in Impaired Chronic Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Significance: Bacterial burden is believed to play a significant role in impaired wound healing of chronic wounds and the development of infection-related complications. The standard of care in the clinic relies upon cultivation-dependent methods to identify microorganisms. These assays are biased toward microorganisms that thrive in isolation under laboratory conditions. Recent Advances: Significant advances in genomic technologies have enabled less-biased, culture-independent approaches to characterize microbial communities, or microbiomes. The aggregate sequencing and analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes has demonstrated that cultures under-represent true microbial diversity and load. Critical Issues: Despite recent advances that enable culture-independent analyses of microbiomes, those organisms that are important in impaired healing remain ambiguous. Inconsistent findings across various studies highlight the need to characterize microbiomes of chronic wounds with homogenous etiology to determine differences in microbiomes that may be driven by the wound environment and that may affect wound outcomes. Rigorous analyses of wound microbiomes in light of the three dimensions of bioburden (microbial diversity, microbial load, and pathogenic organisms), clinical metadata, and wound outcomes will be a significant step forward in our quest to understand the role of microorganisms in impaired healing. Future Directions: Longitudinal studies employing serial sampling are needed to appreciate the role of the dynamic microbial community in chronic wound healing. The value of clinical metadata needs to be examined as potential biomarkers of problematic microbiota and wound outcomes. Lastly, better characterization and understanding of wound microbiomes will open avenues for improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the nonhealing wound. PMID:25032070

Misic, Ana M.; Gardner, Sue E.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

2014-01-01

198

The treatment of wartime brain wounds: traditional versus minimal debridement  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundSince World War II, surgeons in Western armies dealing with brain wounds have generally advocated thorough missile track debridement, and many have urged meticulous dural closure to prevent cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leakage and subsequent infection. For the last decade some reports have appeared wherein wartime brain wounds have been treated by minimal brain debridement with little or no attention

Michael E Carey

2003-01-01

199

Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.  

PubMed

Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

Topaz, Moris

2012-05-01

200

Wound contraction effects and antibacterial properties of Tualang honey on full-thickness burn wounds in rats in comparison to hydrofibre  

PubMed Central

Background Full-thickness burn wounds require excision and skin grafting. Multiple surgical procedures are inevitable in managing moderate to severe full-thickness burns. Wound bed preparations prior to surgery are necessary in order to prevent wound infection and promote wound healing. Honey can be used to treat burn wounds. However, not all the honey is the same. This study aims to evaluate the wound contraction and antibacterial properties of locally-produced Tualang honey on managing full-thickness burn wounds in vivo. Methods Thirty-six female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups. Under anaesthesia, three full-thickness burn wounds were created on the dorsum of the rats. The full-thickness burn wounds were inoculated with a specific organism (104), namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 12), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 12), or Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 12). The three burn wounds were dressed with Tualang honey, hydrofibre and hydrofibre silver respectively. Swab samples were obtained every 3 days (day 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21) for quantitative and semi-quantitative microbiological analyses. Clinical assessments, including observations concerning the appearance and wound size, were measured at the same time. Results There was a rapid 32.26% reduction in wound size by day 6 (p = 0.008) in the Tualang honey-treated wounds, and 49.27% by day 15 (p = 0.005). The wounds remained smaller by day 18 (p < 0.032). Tualang honey-treated rats demonstrated a reduction in bacterial growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated wounds (p = 0.005). However, hydrofibre silver and hydrofibre-treated wounds are superior to honey-treated wounds with Acinetobacter baumannii (p = 0.035). There was no statistical significant of antibacterial property in Klebsiella pneumonia inoculated wounds. Conclusions Tualang honey has better results with regards to its control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its wound contraction effects on full-thickness burn wound in vivo. PMID:20815896

2010-01-01

201

Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Wounding following whole-body ?-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI) increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co ?-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI) vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in ?-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in ?-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI) included continuously decreased ?-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI) included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined injury and reduce related mortality. PMID:22686656

2012-01-01

202

[Errors in wound management].  

PubMed

Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions. PMID:25326993

Filipovi?, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

2014-10-01

203

Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45?days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided) and sample size (n?=?258 per group) is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010 PMID:22587425

2012-01-01

204

Wound currents and wound healing in the newt, Notophthalmus viridescens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wounded amphibian skin heals initially by a migration of epithelial cells from the cut edge towards the center of the wound. The density of currents leaving wounds made in Notophthalmus viridescens skin was manipulated in order to determine whether electrical fields associated with these currents might have a significant role in promoting this cell migration during wound healing. Wounds were

Lynette R. Robinson Rhodes; John J. Turek; Edward J. Cragoe Jr; Joseph W. Vanable Jr

1990-01-01

205

Benefit and harm of iodine in wound care: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays many products are available to combat infections and thus to promote wound healing. Iodine is one of these products, but reports are conflicting as to the effectiveness and adverse effects of iodine in the treatment of wounds. A systematic review was performed of 27 randomised clinical trials, reporting on chronic, acute, burn wounds, pressure sores, and skin grafts. Main

H. Vermeulen; S. J. Westerbos; D. T. Ubbink

2010-01-01

206

Telemedicine for wound management  

PubMed Central

The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

Chittoria, Ravi K.

2012-01-01

207

WOUND MYIASIS CAUSED BY LUCILIA SERICATA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lucilia sericata is one of the facultative parasites which causes myiasis in animals, and rarely in humans as an ectoparasite. Infestation in humans and domestic herbivorous animals occurs in wounds, mouth, eyes, and nose. It causes itching, pain, inflammation, secondary bacterial infections, eosinophilia, and erythema. We report on a 26-year-old man from Kashan, with a 12- year history of opium

Safar-Ali Talari; Fakhrodin Sadr; Abbas Doroodgar; Mohammad-Reza Talari; Ali-Shoja Gharabagh

208

Extended negative pressure wound therapy-assisted dermatotraction for the closure of large open fasciotomy wounds in necrotizing fasciitis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapid progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue or fascia and may result in large open wounds. The surgical options to cover these wounds are often limited by the patient condition and result in suboptimal functional and cosmetic wound coverage. Dermatotraction can restore the function and appearance of the fasciotomy wound and is less invasive in patients with comorbidities. However, dermatotraction for scarred, stiff NF fasciotomy wounds is often ineffective, resulting in skin necrosis. The authors use extended negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) as an assist in dermatotraction to close open NF fasciotomy wounds. The authors present the clinical results, followed by a discussion of the clinical basis of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction. Methods A retrospective case series of eight patients with NF who underwent open fasciotomy was approved for the study. After serial wound preparation, dermatotraction was applied in a shoelace manner using elastic vessel loops. Next, the extended NPWT was applied over the wound. The sponge was three times wider than the wound width, and the transparent covering drape almost encircled the anatomical wound area. The negative pressure of the NPWT was set at a continuous 100 mmHg by suction barometer. The clinical outcome was assessed based on wound area reduction after treatment and by the achievement of direct wound closure. Results After the first set of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction procedures, the mean wound area was significantly decreased (658.12 cm2 to 29.37 cm2; p?=?0.002), as five out of eight patients achieved direct wound closure. One patient with a chest wall defect underwent latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap coverage, with primary closure of the donor site. Two Fournier’s gangrene patients underwent multiple sets of treatment and finally achieved secondary wound closure with skin grafts. The patients were followed up for 18.3 months on average and showed satisfactory results without wound recurrence. Conclusions Extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction advances scarred, stiff fasciotomy wound margins synergistically in NF and allows direct closure of the wound without complications. This method can be another good treatment option for the NF patient with large open wounds whose general condition is unsuitable for extensive reconstructive surgery. PMID:24731449

2014-01-01

209

Combined laser and photodynamic treatment in extensive purulent wounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for the treatment of festering wounds and trophic ulcers. An important advantage of PDT is its ability to affect bacterial cultures that are resistant to antibiotics. However the use of PDT alone does not usually guarantee a stable antiseptic effect and cannot prevent an external infection of wounds and burns. In this work attention is focused on the healing of the extensive soft tissues wounds with combined laser therapy (LT) and PDT treatment. At the first stage of this process festering tissues (for example spacious purulent wounds with area more than 100 cm2) were illuminated with high-energy laser beam (with power 20 W) in continues routine. The second stage involves “softer” PDT affect, which along with the completion stages of destruction pathological cells, stimulating the process of wound granulation and epithelization. Also, according to our previous results, photosensitizer (photoditazin) is introduced inside the wound with different amphiphilic polymers for increasing the PDT efficacy.

Solovieva, A. B.; Tolstih, P. I.; Melik-Nubarov, N. S.; Zhientaev, T. M.; Kuleshov, I. G.; Glagolev, N. N.; Ivanov, A. V.; Karahanov, G. I.; Tolstih, M. P.; Timashev, P. S.

2010-05-01

210

Potential implications of biofilm in chronic wounds: a case series.  

PubMed

Bacterial biofilm is increasingly suspected as being a significant barrier to wound healing. Bacteria predominantly attach to surfaces in their natural habitats and form biofilm; in this state they adapt to, and tolerate, the hostilities in their surrounding environment. The purpose of this clinical observational study was to consider chronic wound biofilm in relation to other factors that are implicated in wound recalcitrance, such as peripheral arterial disease, wound infection, osteomyelitis and moisture imbalance. Based on our clinical observations, it is possible that links exist between wound biofilm and other underlying pathophysiological factors, and that biofilm may also provide clues to the involvement of such factors. Recognising and managing these factors collectively may be important in addressing recalcitrance and facilitating wound progression. PMID:22399078

Hurlow, J; Bowler, P G

2012-03-01

211

Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds  

SciTech Connect

The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

Jaing, C

2012-03-19

212

Environmental and Developmental Regulation of the Wound-Induced Cell Wall Protein WI12 in the Halophyte Ice Plant1  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wounded gene WI12 was used as a marker to examine the interaction between biotic stress (wounding) and abiotic stress (high salt) in the facultative halophyte ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum). The deduced WI12 amino acid sequence has 68% similarity to WUN1, a known potato (Solanum tuberosum) wound-induced protein. Wounding, methyl jasmonate, and pathogen infection induced local WI12 expression. Upon wounding,

Shyi-Kae Yen; Mei-Chu Chung; Pei-Chung Chen; Hungchen E. Yen

2001-01-01

213

Understanding methods of wound debridement.  

PubMed

Autolytic debridement describes the body's natural method of wound-bed cleansing, helping it to prepare the wound bed for healing. In acute wounds, autolytic debridement occurs automatically and often does not require intervention, as during the inflammatory stage of a wound, neutrophils and macrophages digest and removes devitalised tissue, cell debris and contaminants, clearing the wound of any cellular barriers to healing. In chronic wounds, by contrast, healing is often delayed, frequently because of inadequate debridement. The autolytic process becomes overwhelmed by high levels of endotoxins released from damaged tissue (Broadus, 2013). Therefore wound debridement becomes an integral part of chronic-wound management and practitioners involved in wound care must be fully competent at wound-bed assessment and have an awareness of the options available for debridement. This article will review wound-bed assessment, highlighting variations in devitalised tissue, and explore options available for wound debridement, taking into consideration patients’ pain and quality of life. PMID:25075385

Atkin, Leanne

214

Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

2011-03-01

215

The application of new biosynthetic artificial skin for long-term temporary wound coverage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temporary dressings protect wounds from desiccation and infection. In our previous study, we used meshed acellular porcine dermis (APD) to enhance wound healing and decrease wound contraction; however, the wounds showed meshed scar [Wang HJ, Chen TM, Cheng TY. Use of a porcine dermis template to enhance widely expanded mesh autologous split-thickness skin graft growth: preliminary report. J Trauma 1997;42(2):177–82].

Hsian-Jenn Wang; Trong-Duo Chou; Tai-Li Tsou; Tim-Mo Chen; Shao-Liang Chen; Shyi-Gen Chen; Lin-Gwei Wei; Kuan-Jeh Yeh; Yao-Huang Ko; Chi-Shyran Wang; Wei-Hwa Lee

2005-01-01

216

Antibiofilm Efficacy of DispersinB® Wound Spray Used in Combination with a Silver Wound Dressing  

PubMed Central

Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. As the traditional methods of treatment have proven ineffective against chronic wounds involving biofilms, there is an unmet clinical need for developing products with an antibiofilm component that inhibits and/or disrupts biofilms and thus make the biofilm-embedded bacteria more susceptible to antimicrobial therapy. We developed a DispersinB® antibiofilm enzyme-based wound spray for treating chronic wounds in conjunction with an antimicrobial. Under in vitro conditions, the DispersinB® and Acticoat™ combination performed significantly better (P < 0.05) than Acticoat™ alone, indicating the synergy between the two compounds because of DispersinB® enhancing the antimicrobial activity of Acticoat™. Furthermore, DispersinB® wound spray enhanced the antimicrobial activity of Acticoat™ in a chronic wound mouse model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. Thus, this novel combination of DispersinB® and Acticoat™, an antimicrobial dressing, prompts clinical evaluation for potential applications in biofilm-based chronic wound management. PMID:24826078

Gawande, Purushottam V; Clinton, Allie P; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

2014-01-01

217

Silver dressings: their role in wound management.  

PubMed

Dressings have a part to play in the management of wounds; whether they are sutured or open, usually chronic wounds of many aetiologies which are healing by secondary intention. They traditionally provide a moist wound environment, but this property has been extended through simple to complex, active dressings which can handle excessive exudate, aid in debridement, and promote disorganised, stalled healing. The control of infection remains a major challenge. Inappropriate antibiotic use risks allergy, toxicity and most importantly resistance, which is much reduced by the use of topical antiseptics (such as povidone iodine and chlorhexidine). The definition of what is an antimicrobial and the recognition of infection has proven difficult. Although silver has been recognised for centuries to inhibit infection its use in wound care is relatively recent. Evidence of the efficacy of the growing number of silver dressings in clinical trials, judged by the criteria of the Cochrane Collaboration, is lacking, but there are good indications for the use of silver dressings, to remove or reduce an increasing bioburden in burns and open wounds healing by secondary intention, or to act as a barrier against cross contamination of resistant organisms such as MRSA. More laboratory, and clinical data in particular, are needed to prove the value of the many silver dressings which are now available. Some confusion persists over the measurement of toxicity and antibacterial activity but all dressings provide an antibacterial action, involving several methods of delivery. Nanocrystalline technology appears to give the highest, sustained release of silver to a wound without clear risk of toxicity. PMID:17199764

Leaper, David J

2006-12-01

218

Wound care in the geriatric client  

PubMed Central

With our aging population, chronic diseases that compromise skin integrity such as diabetes, peripheral vascular disease (venous hypertension, arterial insufficiency) are becoming increasingly common. Skin breakdown with ulcer and chronic wound formation is a frequent consequence of these diseases. Types of ulcers include pressure ulcers, vascular ulcers (arterial and venous hypertension), and neuropathic ulcers. Treatment of these ulcers involves recognizing the four stages of healing: coagulation, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Chronic wounds are frequently stalled in the inflammatory stage. Moving past the inflammation stage requires considering the bacterial burden, necrotic tissue, and moisture balance of the wound being treated. Bacterial overgrowth or infection needs to be treated with topical or systemic agents. In most cases, necrotic tissue needs to be debrided and moisture balance needs to be addressed by wetting dry tissue and drying wet tissue. Special dressings have been developed to accomplish these tasks. They include films, hydrocolloids, hydrogel dressings, foams, hydrofibers, composite and alginate dressings. PMID:19554098

Gist, Steve; Tio-Matos, Iris; Falzgraf, Sharon; Cameron, Shirley; Beebe, Michael

2009-01-01

219

The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.  

PubMed

This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care. PMID:24912830

Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

2014-06-01

220

Sirolimus impairs wound healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aims  Clinically, the immunosuppressive drug sirolimus, used in organ transplantation, appears to impair wound healing. Little is\\u000a known about the mechanisms of action. We investigated the effect of sirolimus on wound healing, and we analyzed the expression\\u000a of stimulating mediators of angiogenesis (VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor) and collagen synthesis (nitric oxide)\\u000a in wounds.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Groups of ten

Michael Schäffer; Robert Schier; Markus Napirei; Stefan Michalski; Thilo Traska; Richard Viebahn

2007-01-01

221

Nanocrystalline silver dressings in wound management: a review  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the properties of nanocrystalline silver products (Acticoat™) and their applications and examines available evidence supporting their use in wound management. Acticoat utilizes nanotechnology to release nanocrystalline silver crystals. Acticoat releases 30 times less silver cations than silversulfadiazine cream or 0.5% silver nitrate solution but more of the silver released (by Acticoat). Silver-impregnated slow-release dressings release minute concentrations of silver which are quickly bound up by the chloride in the wound exudate. While extrapolations from in vitro and animal studies are cautious, evidence from these studies suggests Acticoat is: effective against most common strains of wound pathogens; can be used as a protective covering over skin grafts; has a broader antibiotic spectrum activity; and is toxic to keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Animal studies suggest a role for nanocrystalline silver in altering wound inflammatory events and facilitation of the early phase of wound healing. Quality human clinical trials into nanocrystalline silver are few. However, evidence suggests using Acticoat in wound management is cost effective, reduces wound infection, decreases the frequency of dressing changes and pain levels, decreases matrix metalloproteinase activity, wound exudate and bioburden levels, and promotes wound healing in chronic wounds. Although there is no in vivo evidence to suggest nanocrystalline silver is toxic to human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, there is in vitro evidence to suggest so; thus these dressings should be used cautiously over epithelializing and proliferating wounds. Future clinical research, preferably randomized controlled trials into nanocrystalline silver technology, may provide clinicians a better understanding of its applications in wound management. PMID:17722278

Fong, Joy; Wood, Fiona

2006-01-01

222

Wounds and Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., ... punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. ...

223

Topical advances in wound care.  

PubMed

There are fundamental differences between acute wounds that proceed to uncomplicated healing and those that become chronic wounds. Non-healing or chronic wounds can result from a combination of overlapping factors that prevent healing, including local tissue ischemia, repetitive trauma and ischemia/reperfusion injury, presence of tissue necrosis, impaired cellular and systemic host response to stress, and critical bacterial contamination. The bacterial burden in the wound contributes to a sustained inflammatory state, which inhibits normal progression to the proliferative phase of healing, thereby preventing restoration of tissue integrity. Appropriate wound bed preparation removes local barriers to healing and optimizes the tissue environment to achieve wound healing. It is an essential element of wound management that advances endogenous healing as well as the efficacy of topical and other wound therapy. This article will summarize a systematic approach to wound bed preparation using the "TIME" principle, and will highlight important advances in topical wound care. PMID:18793796

Stojadinovic, Alexander; Carlson, Jay W; Schultz, Gregory S; Davis, Thomas A; Elster, Eric A

2008-11-01

224

The use of angiogenic-antimicrobial agents in experimental wounds in animals: problems and solutions.  

PubMed

A topical combination (silvathymosin) of natural proangiogeneic protein thymosin ?4 (T?4) and antimicrobial silver sulfadiazine was hypothesized to promote the healing of large, full-thickness, clean or infected wounds in rats. Silvathymosin showed the fastest wound healing (85%) followed by silver sulfadiazine (84%) and T?4 (72%). In the infected groups, the healing pattern was different, as T?4 and silvathymosin groups did not show similar wound healing. Wound histopathology and VEGF and KI67 immunohistochemical assessment of angiogenesis was consistent and correlated well with the tempo of healing of the acute wounds. These preliminary data demonstrate the more rapid acute wound healing properties of the combination formulation of thymosin ?4 and silver sulfadiazine as compared to these agents alone. This novel agent could prove an effective treatment modality for debilitating chronic wounds and decubitus ulcers. PMID:23050814

Suman, Paritosh; Ramachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahakian, Sossy; Gill, Kamraan Z; Horst, Basil A J; Modak, Shanta M; Hardy, Mark A

2012-10-01

225

Negative pressure wound therapy with saline instillation: 131 patient case series.  

PubMed

Negative pressure wound therapy combined with timed, cyclical instillation (NPWTi) of topical wound solutions has been recently presented as a new adjunctive modality for treating wounds with signs of infection. Normal saline, antiseptics and antimicrobials all have been proposed in scientific and clinical studies as potentially effective when used with NPWTi for treating heavily infected wounds. This is a prospective clinical study of 131 patients with 131 wounds treated with NPWTi using saline between January 2012 and December 2012 in two orthopaedic centres and one surgical wound healing centre in France. Saline was exclusively used. Results were favourable: in 98% of the cases, the wounds could be closed after debridement and following the use of NPWTi. Mean duration of NPWTi was 12·19 days. This does not preclude the need for treating the biofilm appropriately with more active antibacterial products when biofilm has been documented. PMID:24251845

Brinkert, David; Ali, Mazen; Naud, Magali; Maire, Nicolas; Trial, Chloé; Téot, Luc

2013-12-01

226

Wound Healing Disorders: Chronic Wounds and Keloids  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The normal wound healing response can be divided into (1) inflammatory, (2) proliferative, and (3) tissue remodeling (i.e.,\\u000a fibroplasia and maturation) phases that involve complex interactions between various cutaneous-derived and inflammatory cells,\\u000a cytokines, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) [1–6]. Numerous studies continue to uncover the genetic, epigenetic (i.e., microRNA),\\u000a cellular (including stem cells), molecular, and biochemical mechanisms underlying this process

Michael J. Murphy

227

Surgical Wound Case Studies With the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative pressure wound therapy consists of a wound dressing, a drainage tube inserted into the dressing, an occlusive trans- parent film, and a connection to a vacuum source that supplies the negative pressure. A new product called the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System (BlueSky Medical, La Costa, Calif) is available for negative pressure wound therapy. This article de- scribes the

Penny E. Campbell; Phyllis A. Bonham

2006-01-01

228

Evaluation of wound healing activity of ferulic acid in diabetic rats.  

PubMed

In diabetic patients, there is impairment in angiogenesis, neovascularisation and failure in matrix metalloproteineases (MMPs), keratinocyte and fibroblast functions, which affects wound healing mechanism. Hence, diabetic patients are more prone to infections and ulcers, which finally result in gangrene. Ferulic acid (FA) is a natural antioxidant found in fruits and vegetables, such as tomatoes, rice bran and sweet corn. In this study, wound healing activity of FA was evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using excision wound model. FA-treated wounds were found to epithelise faster as compared with diabetic wound control group. The hydroxyproline and hexosamine content increased significantly when compared with diabetic wound control. FA effectively inhibited the lipid peroxidation and elevated the catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and nitric oxide levels along with the increase in the serum zinc and copper levels probably aiding the wound healing process. Hence, the results indicate that FA significantly promotes wound healing in diabetic rats. PMID:23236955

Ghaisas, Mahesh M; Kshirsagar, Shashank B; Sahane, Rajkumari S

2014-10-01

229

The Impact of Psychological Stress on Wound Healing: Methods and Mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Wound healing is a critical process involved in the recovery from injury and surgical procedures. Poor healing increases the risk for wound infections or complications, lengthens hospital stays, magnifies patient discomfort, and slows return to activities of daily living. Converging evidence from different research paradigms suggests that psychological stress and other behavioral factors can affect wound healing. A meta-analytical study using diverse wound-healing models and outcomes found that across studies there was an average correlation of ?0.42 between psychological stress and wound healing.1 This result suggests that the relationship between stress and wound repair is not only statistically significant but also clinically relevant. This review presents data and methods from observational, experimental, and interventional studies corroborating the impact of stress on wound healing. Potential behavioral and physiologic mechanisms explaining the association between stress and impaired wound healing are also discussed. PMID:22548859

Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

2013-01-01

230

Surgical debridement to optimise wound conditions and healing.  

PubMed

Different treatment strategies are available for bone, joint and soft tissue infections, including use of local antibiotics; negative pressure wound therapy; one-stage, two-stage or multi-stage revisions; or open wound therapy. All methods have one principle in common: adequate surgical debridement is the prerequisite for successful treatment of bone, joint and soft tissue infections. According to the different textures of healthy, infected or necrotic tissue, special techniques are used. In this article we will describe the clinical presentation of necrotic and non-vital tissue in skin, soft tissue and bone and appropriate techniques of debridement. PMID:24251843

Diefenbeck, Michael; Haustedt, Nils; Schmidt, Hergo Gk

2013-12-01

231

New advances in instillation therapy in wounds at risk for compromised healing.  

PubMed

Combined use of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and instillation of topical wound solutions and suspensions (NPWTi) has proven to be an effective next-generation NPWT technique for wounds at risk for compromised healing. Fluid instillation has been shown to enhance exudate and debris removal, provide regular cleansing of the wound bed, and add moisture to the wound. Positive results have been demonstrated with NPWTi in assisting healing of stalled wounds and treating painful wounds as well as wounds at high risk for amputation. NPWTi has been used instead of conventional NPWT in wounds with thick exudate and slough content, acute traumatic wounds, wounds acutely debrided due to infected soft tissue, large areas of post-debrided exposed bone, and cases of critical bacterial colonization. Instilled solutions have included topical solutions such as saline, topical wound cleansers, and antiseptics. While various systems that combine instillation or irrigation with NPWT have been commercialized during the past decade, until very recently these have been relatively cumbersome to use and limited in their ability to regulate solution volume delivery. Recent advances in NPWTi technology (V.A.C. VeraFlo™ Therapy, KCI, San Antonio, TX) include automated volumetrically controlled delivery of fluids and upgraded foam dressing technology to provide better control and delivery of solutions to the wound bed. This article describes the latest NPWTi technology and provides recommendations for successful application of NPWTi in an effort to inform clinicians about product decision-making and practice. PMID:24700215

Gabriel, Allen; Kahn, Kevin M

2014-03-01

232

Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds  

PubMed Central

For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds. PMID:23710220

Kucharzewski, M.; Kubacka, S.; Urbanek, T.; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K.; Morawiec, T.

2013-01-01

233

Stan scheller: the forerunner of clinical studies on using propolis for poor and chronic nonhealing wounds.  

PubMed

For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds. PMID:23710220

Kucharzewski, M; Kubacka, S; Urbanek, T; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K; Morawiec, T

2013-01-01

234

ANGIOGENESIS IN WOUNDS TREATED BY MICRODEFORMATIONAL WOUND THERAPY  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Data Mechanical forces play an important role in tissue neovascularisation and are a constituent part of modern wound therapies. The mechanisms by which Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) modulates wound angiogenesis are still largely unknown. Objective To investigate how VAC treatment affects wound hypoxia and related profiles of angiogenic factors as well as to identify the anatomical characteristics of the resultant, newly formed vessels. Methods Wound neovascularization was evaluated by morphometric analysis of CD31- stained wound cross sections as well as by corrosion casting analysis. Wound hypoxia and mRNA expression of HIF-1? and associated angiogenic factors were evaluated by pimonidazole hydrochloride staining and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. VEGF protein levels were determined by western blot analysis. Results VAC-treated wounds were characterized by the formation of elongated vessels aligned in parallel and consistent with physiologically function, compared to occlusive dressing control wounds that showed formation of tortuous, disoriented vessels. Moreover, VAC-treated wounds displayed a well-oxygenated wound bed, with hypoxia limited to the direct proximity of the VAC-foam interface, where higher VEGF levels were found. By contrast, occlusive dressing control wounds showed generalized hypoxia, with associated accumulation of HIF-1? and related angiogenic factors. Conclusions The combination of established gradients of hypoxia and VEGF expression along with mechanical forces exerted by VAC therapy was associated with the formation of more physiological blood vessels compared to occlusive dressing control wounds. These morphological changes are likely a necessary condition for better wound healing. PMID:21217515

Erba, Paolo; Ogawa, Rei; Ackermann, Maximilian; Adini, Avner; Miele, Lino F; Dastouri, Pouya; Helm, Doug; Mentzer, Steven J; D'Amato, Robert J; Murphy, George F; Konerding, Moritz A; Orgill, Dennis P

2012-01-01

235

[Liver gunshot wounds].  

PubMed

The paper presents the 6 cases of liver shot wounds that were in supervision of the general surgery unit, County Hospital of Baia Mare, between the years 1990-1997. The patients were males, most of them being 20 to 30 years old. In 3 situations hunting rifles were involved, all followed by retention of metal foreign body. The wounds were plurivisceral in 5 of the 6 cases, the most frequently wounded was the right liver lobe. All the patients presented serious traumatic shock and haemorrhagic shock. Livertectomy was used in 40% of the cases being imposed by the dilacerant and transfixiant character of the wounds and also by the retention of foreign bodies in parenchime. We registered 2 demises, both in the first postoperatory hours. The paper proposes a few criteria that allow the application of a conservatory treatment:rapid favourable answer at deshocking therapy; hemodynamic stability; minimal hemoperitoneus (echographical and tomographical); absence of associated visceral wounds or, when they exist, of serious physiopathological consequences; access to performant means of imagistics. PMID:14768336

Botoi, G; Bl?jan, I; Neme?, S

2000-01-01

236

Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on the Growth of Keratinocytes, Fibroblasts and Vascular Endothelial Cells in Cutaneous Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Rapid and effective wound healing requires a coordinated cellular response involving fibroblasts, keratinocytes and vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Impaired wound healing can result in multiple adverse health outcomes and, although antibiotics can forestall infection, treatments that accelerate wound healing are lacking. We now report that topical application of water soluble cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nanoceria) accelerates the healing of full-thickness dermal wounds in mice by a mechanism that involves enhancement of the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts, keratinocytes and VECs. The Nanoceria penetrated into the wound tissue and reduced oxidative damage to cellular membranes and proteins, suggesting a therapeutic potential for topical treatment of wounds with antioxidant nanoparticles. PMID:23266256

Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Okun, Eitan; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; McCaffery, Michael; Seal, Sudipta; Mattson, Mark P.

2012-01-01

237

Cavity wounds management: a multicentre pilot study.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess acceptability (based on pain at removal), efficacy and tolerance of an absorbent and cohesive rope(UrgoClean Rope, Laboratoires Urgo) in the local management of deep cavity wounds. This study was a prospective, multicentre (13), non comparative clinical study. Patients presenting with an acute or chronic non-infected cavity wound were followed up for four weeks and assessed weekly with a physical examination, in addition to volumetric,planimetric and photographic evaluations. Pain at removal was the primary criterion, assessed on a Visual Analogic Scale. The percentage of the wound surface area reduction and volumetric reduction were considered as secondary efficacy criteria. Forty three patients were included in this study. After one week of treatment dressing removal was painless and continued to be so throughout the period of the trial(four weeks). Median surface area at baseline was 7.74 cm2 and was reduced by 54.5% at week 4 (relative area reduction). Median wound volumetric value was noted 12 ml at baseline and was reduced by 72.7% by the end of treatment. The cohesiveness of the new rope was considered very good by health professionals. No residue was observed on the wound bed during the dressing change with the new rope. There were no adverse events related to the tested rope, during this trial.Pain-free removal associated with good efficacy and tolerance were observed with this new cohesive rope in the healing process of deep cavity wounds and could represent a therapeutic alternative to the usual ropes used in such indications. PMID:24180023

Meaume, Sylvie; Facy, Olivier; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Ribemont, Annie-Claude; Sigal, Michele-Lea; Couffinhal, Jean-Claude; Trial, Chloe; Tacca, Olivier; Bohbot, Serge

238

Mucormycosis of a median sternotomy wound.  

PubMed

Mucormycosis is an unusual complication of cardiothoracic surgery. The fungi may infect the sternotomy wound causing a progressive gangrene or seed the implanted prosthetic valve or graft resulting in endocarditis or graft failure. There have been six previous reports of mucormycosis following cardiothoracic surgical procedures. Four cases involved prosthetic devices, the remaining two are examples of sternal wound mucormycosis acquired from the use of contaminated elasticized bandages. The first case of sternal wound mucormycosis not associated with elasticized bandages is reported here. The infection occurred in a diabetic patient who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and mitral valve replacement. The patient received corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics at the time of and after operation. The patient developed invasive sternal mucormycosis and died on day 10 after surgery, despite aggressive surgical débridement and amphotericin B therapy. No elasticized bandages were used and the source of the infection was not identified. Previous cases of mucormycosis in cardiothoracic surgery are reviewed and the specific clinical setting in which this fungal disease should be suspected defined. PMID:7953452

Abter, E I; Lutwick, S M; Chapnick, E K; Chittivelu, S; Lutwick, L I; Sabado, M; Jacobowitz, I

1994-08-01

239

Infection!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Play Infection! the game where you're the germ. And while you play, learn about the way your body fights infections.The game works best in Netscape 4 and Internet Explorer 4 or later. You will need to download Shockwave, but don't worry, you can do that right from the site.

York, Amercian M.

240

Antibiotic prophylaxis at triage for simple traumatic wounds: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Antibiotic administration at the time of wound manipulation has not been shown to decrease infection rates for simple traumatic wounds. Antibiotic administration at the time of initial emergency department (ED) presentation, however, has not been explored. Patients presenting to the ED with simple traumatic wounds received 1 g of oral flucloxacillin, or identical placebo, at triage. Wound closure was completed at the discretion of a physician blinded to study contents. Wound infection rates were determined at 1 month. Time from drug administration to wound manipulation was 64.3 min [95% confidence interval (CI) 36.6-91.9] placebo versus 75.0 min (95% CI: 51.7-98.3) flucloxacillin, P=0.657. Six of 36 patients (17%) reported wound infection in the placebo group, and four of 34 (12%) in the flucloxacillin group, P=0.736. Administration of oral flucloxacillin at triage failed to reduce the rate of wound infection for simple traumatic wounds closed in the ED. PMID:21389858

Cowell, David Lord; Harvey, Martyn; Cave, Grant

2011-10-01

241

[Dressing and wound care pain].  

PubMed

Wound care is an important step for promoting wound healing. Nevertheless it is also a major source of pain for patients with wounds. The results of a survey showed that not only burn patients but also non-burn ones suffered from wound care pain which occurred in inpatients and outpatients. One of the significant factors causing wound care pain was that the dressing adhered to the wound bed. Although some agencies claimed that particular dressings with low adhesion can result in painless removal, the actual effects needed to be verified. Results of clinical trials revealed that for relieving wound care pain of certain kinds of wound, it was recommended to use particular dressings, such as banana leaf dressing, boiled potato peel bandage, Acticoat, Mepital or Mefix. PMID:17160873

Chin, Yen-Fan

2006-12-01

242

Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing  

PubMed Central

Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing.

Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

2014-01-01

243

Applications of modern sensors and wireless technology in effective wound management.  

PubMed

The management of chronic wounds has emerged as a major health care challenge during the 21st century consuming, significant portions of health care budgets. Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, leg ulcers, and pressure sores have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. Covering wounds with suitable dressings facilitates the healing process and is common practice in wound management plans. However, standard dressings do not provide insights into the status of the wound underneath. Parameters such as moisture, pressure, temperature and pH inside the dressings are indicative of the healing rate, infection, and wound healing phase. But owing to the lack of information available from within the dressings, these are often changed to inspect the wound, disturbing the normal healing process of wounds in addition to causing pain to the patient. Sensors embedded in the dressing would provide clinicians and nurses with important information that would aid in wound care decision making, improve patient comfort, and reduce the frequency of dressing changes. The potential benefits of this enabling technology would be seen in terms of a reduction in hospitalization time and health care cost. Modern sensing technology along with wireless radio frequency communication technology is poised to make significant advances in wound management. This review discusses issues related to the design and implementation of sensor technology and telemetry systems both incorporated in wound dressings to devise an automated wound monitoring technology, and also surveys the literature available on current sensor and wireless telemetry systems. PMID:24142514

Mehmood, Nasir; Hariz, Alex; Fitridge, Robert; Voelcker, Nicolas H

2014-05-01

244

Spiral wound extraction cartridge  

DOEpatents

A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

Wisted, Eric E. (Apple Valley, MN); Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

1999-01-01

245

Spiral wound extraction cartridge  

DOEpatents

A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

1999-04-27

246

Stress and Wound Healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade it has become clear that stress can significantly slow wound healing: stressors ranging in magnitude and duration impair healing in humans and animals. For example, in humans, the chronic stress of caregiving as well as the relatively brief stress of academic examinations impedes healing. Similarly, restraint stress slows healing in mice. The interactive effects of glucocorticoids

Lisa M. Christian; Jennifer E. Graham; David A. Padgett; Ronald Glaser; Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser

2006-01-01

247

Healing Invisible Wounds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

Adams, Erica J.

2010-01-01

248

Topical Naltrexone as Treatment for Type 2 Diabetic Cutaneous Wounds  

PubMed Central

Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with impaired cutaneous wound healing and can result in ulceration, infection, and/or amputation. More than 25 million people in the United States have T2D and are vulnerable to epithelial-related complications. Current therapies are limited in their efficacy. New treatments for full-thickness cutaneous wounds that focus on underlying diabetic pathways are needed. Approach: Topical application of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in cream reverses delayed wound closure in type 1 diabetic rat by the acceleration of reepithelialization and enhancement of angiogenesis and remodeling. NTX blocks the opioid growth factor (OGF)–OGF receptor (OGFr) axis and upregulates DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. To investigate whether NTX is an effective therapy for T2D wound closure, genetically obese mice (db/db) and normal C57Bl/6J mice received full-thickness cutaneous wounds. Wounds (5?mm in diameter) were treated topically three times daily with 10?5 M NTX or sterile saline dissolved in cream and photographed every 2 days. Results: Wounds in db/db mice treated with saline were 11–92% larger than those in normal mice throughout the 2-week observation. Topical NTX therapy in T2D mice reduced the residual wound size by 13–30% between days 8 and 14 relative to diabetic mice receiving saline. Reepithelialization and DNA synthesis, as analyzed by epithelial thickness and BrdU labeling indexes, respectively, were accelerated in NTX-treated wounds. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that the OGF-OGFr axis plays a role in epithelial-related complications of T2D and that blockade of this pathway by NTX may be an effective treatment for wound repair. PMID:24940556

Immonen, Jessica A.; Zagon, Ian S.; McLaughlin, Patricia J.

2014-01-01

249

Toward a common language: surgical wound bed preparation and debridement.  

PubMed

Wound management encompasses a number of disciplines. As new concepts and innovative technologies develop within this exciting field, it is important to share them in spite of the divergence of clinical perspectives between the expert disciplines. One such divergence exists between surgeons and nonsurgical wound specialists. As a result, there is a need to develop a common language between these two groups. How can we develop a common language that unites surgical expertise within medical wound management? One route may be through the principles of wound bed preparation, which we believe have great potential for the communication of effective surgical techniques. Another is through sharing our concepts of surgical debridement as it is applied to different wounds by a variety of surgical disciplines. In this monograph, we try to bring these two themes together. We discuss how wound bed preparation has added to our understanding of the pathophysiology of the nonhealing wound and has provided us with some general clinical concepts. We discuss what role debridement, and then specifically surgical debridement, has to play within wound bed preparation, before analyzing the importance of surgical debridement in tissue preservation and the control of infection. We finally look at ongoing work that examines the cost of various surgical debridement techniques. We will also review a new hydrosurgery system (VERSAJET, Smith and Nephew, Hull, UK), which we believe has an important role to play in the surgical preparation of the wound. We also expect that this paper will remind our medical colleagues about the critical role played by surgery in wound management. PMID:16939471

Granick, Mark; Boykin, Joseph; Gamelli, Richard; Schultz, Gregory; Tenenhaus, Mayer

2006-01-01

250

Telemedicine and wound care.  

PubMed

Although wound care has been practiced for centuries, telewound care is a relatively new concept. Currently, only a few pilot programs are in existence. Telewound care has yet to achieve the popularity and recognition of its other telemedicine predecessors amongst members of the health care industry and public alike. The tremendous potential of incorporating the technology of telemedicine into wound care needs to be realized. Wound care is a representation of the care of chronic and debilitating conditions that require long-term specialized care. We have seen the positive effects of improved living conditions and advances in health care globally. The result: people are now living longer. Every day a small piece is added to the pie: the percentage of world's elderly and those with chronic medical conditions that would require medical attention is rising. With the escalating costs of health care, and the push of the industry towards outpatient care, this is a part of the health care crisis that is demanding our immediate attention. We have seen positive outcomes in the care of other chronic medial conditions using telemedicine such as home telecare programs. In addition, the effectiveness of several programs using available advances in technology such as the field of radiology has been established. Wound care can build on success created in these fields to create an effective and useful method of care. The aim of this chapter is to recognize the impact of this problem, to introduce several pilot programs in several different aspects of wound care and to build on current resources in order to achieve a novel method of wound care. The goal would be to create a technologically advanced, cost-effective and user-friendly program, and be able to bridge the gap between the sick and available specialized care. Both store-and-forward technology and televideo have a role to play in telewound care, the latter greater in the role of home telecare and teleconsultation, and the former in post-operative patients and the follow-up of chronic wounds. Either way, both have been underutilized and underdeveloped. With the advances in the field of telecommunications in connecting people across distances at a fraction of the time and costs, improved outcomes reported in other fields of telemedicine and positive legislative changes, there is an enormous potential in this field. We now have the ability, knowledge and resources to develop telewound care programs, which can provide high quality patient care in a more concise and cost-effective way. It is certainly a welcoming relief to a field that has traditionally been known to pose an emotional, physical and financial drain to all those involved. PMID:18305332

Ong, Cheri A

2008-01-01

251

Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations  

PubMed Central

While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness. PMID:24851187

Maerz, Porter W.; Falgiani, Tricia B.; Hoelle, Robyn M.

2014-01-01

252

Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

2014-01-01

253

Infection!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity from the American Museum of Natural History's family magazine series is a board game in which kids learn how germs spread and infections take hold. The online activity begins with an overview of the many ways germs can enter your body and the body's first and second lines of defense. Kids then go to a page of directions for playing the online game, where they are also asked to select a microbe playing piece. As they move through the playing board, kids gain insight into how the body fights infection.

254

Reconstructive challenges in war wounds  

PubMed Central

War wounds are devastating with extensive soft tissue and osseous destruction and heavy contamination. War casualties generally reach the reconstructive surgery centre after a delayed period due to additional injuries to the vital organs. This delay in their transfer to a tertiary care centre is responsible for progressive deterioration in wound conditions. In the prevailing circumstances, a majority of war wounds undergo delayed reconstruction, after a series of debridements. In the recent military conflicts, hydrosurgery jet debridement and negative pressure wound therapy have been successfully used in the preparation of war wounds. In war injuries, due to a heavy casualty load, a faster and reliable method of reconstruction is aimed at. Pedicle flaps in extremities provide rapid and reliable cover in extremity wounds. Large complex defects can be reconstructed using microvascular free flaps in a single stage. This article highlights the peculiarities and the challenges encountered in the reconstruction of these ghastly wounds. PMID:23162233

Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti

2012-01-01

255

Tissue engineering and regenerative repair in wound healing.  

PubMed

Wound healing is a highly evolved defense mechanism against infection and further injury. It is a complex process involving multiple cell types and biological pathways. Mammalian adult cutaneous wound healing is mediated by a fibroproliferative response leading to scar formation. In contrast, early to mid-gestational fetal cutaneous wound healing is more akin to regeneration and occurs without scar formation. This early observation has led to extensive research seeking to unlock the mechanism underlying fetal scarless regenerative repair. Building upon recent advances in biomaterials and stem cell applications, tissue engineering approaches are working towards a recapitulation of this phenomenon. In this review, we describe the elements that distinguish fetal scarless and adult scarring wound healing, and discuss current trends in tissue engineering aimed at achieving scarless tissue regeneration. PMID:24788648

Hu, Michael S; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wu, Jen-Chieh; Rennert, Robert C; Hong, Wan Xing; Lai, Tiffany S; Cheung, Alexander T M; Walmsley, Graham G; Chung, Michael T; McArdle, Adrian; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

2014-07-01

256

Cephalic Tetanus from Penetrating Orbital Wound  

PubMed Central

Tetanus is a neurologic disorder caused by tetanospasmin, a protein toxin elaborated by Clostridium tetani. Cephalic tetanus is a localized form of the disease causing trismus and dysfunction of cranial nerves. We report the case of a man who presented with facial trauma, complete ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos, areactive mydriasis, and periorbital hematoma. An orbital CT revealed air bubbles in the right orbital apex. The patient was given a tetanus toxoid booster and antibiotherapy. After extraction of a wooden foreign body, the patient developed right facial nerve palsy, disorders of swallowing, contralateral III cranial nerve palsy, and trismus. Only one case of cephalic tetanus from penetrating orbital wound has been reported in literature 20 years ago. When a patient presents with an orbital wound with ophthalmoplegia and signs of anaerobic infection, cephalic tetanus should be ruled out. PMID:19710932

Guyennet, Eloise; Guyomard, Jean-Laurent; Barnay, Emilie; Jegoux, Franck; Charlin, Jean-Francois

2009-01-01

257

Airborne Bacterial Contamination of Operative Wounds  

PubMed Central

Both the numbers and species of airborne bacteria were studied during 263 surgical procedures. The numbers of bacteria isolated were reduced by 95 percent in a horizontal laminar flow room compared with a conventional room and a further 4 percent reduction occurred when a suction-mask system was used. The species of bacteria isolated differed notably at the operative site where a slit sampler was used, as compared with the instrument table and the periphery of the room where settling plates were used. Studies done during simulated surgical operation suggested that light fixtures, pass-through doors, floor contamination and the draped patient were not important sources of airborne contamination in this horizontal laminar flow system. The exact role of airborne bacterial contamination of operative wounds in the development of clinical wound infections is still unknown. Therefore, installation of laminar flow systems must be considered unnecessary at this time. PMID:1274336

Alexakis, Peter G.; Feldon, Paul G.; Wellisch, Mark; Richter, Robert E.; Finegold, Sydney M.

1976-01-01

258

Thiolated Carboxymethyl-Hyaluronic-Acid-Based Biomaterials Enhance Wound Healing in Rats, Dogs, and Horses  

PubMed Central

The progression of wound healing is a complicated but well-known process involving many factors, yet there are few products on the market that enhance and accelerate wound healing. This is particularly problematic in veterinary medicine where multiple species must be treated and large animals heal slower, oftentimes with complicating factors such as the development of exuberant granulation tissue. In this study a crosslinked-hyaluronic-acid (HA-) based biomaterial was used to treat wounds on multiple species: rats, dogs, and horses. The base molecule, thiolated carboxymethyl HA, was first found to increase keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. Crosslinked gels and films were then both found to enhance the rate of wound healing in rats and resulted in thicker epidermis than untreated controls. Crosslinked films were used to treat wounds on forelimbs of dogs and horses. Although wounds healed slower compared to rats, the films again enhanced wound healing compared to untreated controls, both in terms of wound closure and quality of tissue. This study indicates that these crosslinked HA-based biomaterials enhance wound healing across multiple species and therefore may prove particularly useful in veterinary medicine. Reduced wound closure times and better quality of healed tissue would decrease risk of infection and pain associated with open wounds. PMID:23738117

Yang, Guanghui; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Mann, Brenda K.

2011-01-01

259

Wound Bed Preparation for Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers  

PubMed Central

The escalating incidence of diabetic mellitus has given rise to the increasing problems of chronic diabetic ulcers that confront the practice of medicine. Peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and infection contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic ulcers. Approaches to the management of diabetic ulcers should start with an assessment and optimization of the patient's general conditions, followed by considerations of the local and regional factors. This paper aims to address the management strategies for wound bed preparation in chronic diabetic foot ulcers and also emphasizes the importance of preventive measures and future directions. The “TIME” framework in wound bed preparation encompasses tissue management, inflammation and infection control, moisture balance, and epithelial (edge) advancement. Tissue management aims to remove the necrotic tissue burden via various methods of debridement. Infection and inflammation control restores bacterial balance with the reduction of bacterial biofilms. Achieving a moist wound healing environment without excessive wound moisture or dryness will result in moisture balance. Epithelial advancement is promoted via removing the physical and biochemical barriers for migration of epithelium from wound edges. These systematic and holistic approaches will potentiate the healing abilities of the chronic diabetic ulcers, including those that are recalcitrant. PMID:23476800

Mat Saad, Arman Zaharil; Khoo, Teng Lye; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

2013-01-01

260

Multimodal noninvasive monitoring of soft tissue wound healing.  

PubMed

Here we report results of non-invasive measurements of indirect markers of soft tissue healing of traumatic wounds in an observational swine study and describe the quantification of analog physiological signals. The primary purpose of the study was to measure bone healing of fractures with four different wound treatments. A second purpose was to quantify soft tissue wound healing by measuring the following indirect markers: (1) tissue oxygenation, (2) fluid content, and (3) blood flow, which were all measured by non-invasive modalities, measured with available devices. Tissue oxygenation was measured by near infrared spectroscopy; fluid content was measured by bipolar bio-impedance; and blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound. Immediately after comminuted femur fractures were produced in the right hind legs of thirty anesthetized female Yorkshire swine, one of four wound treatments was instilled into each wound. The four wound treatments were as follows: salmon fibrinogen/thrombin-n = 8; commercial bone filler matrix-n = 7; bovine collagen-n = 8; porcine fibrinogen/thrombin-n = 7. Fractures were stabilized with an external fixation device. Immediately following wound treatments, measurements were made of tissue oxygenation, fluid content and blood flow; these measurements were repeated weekly for 3 weeks after surgery. Analog signals of each modality were recorded on both the wounded (right) hind leg and the healthy (left) hind leg, for comparison purposes. Data were processed off-line. The mean values of 10-s periods were calculated for right-left leg comparison. ANOVA was applied for statistical analysis. Results of the bone healing studies are published separately (Rothwell et al. in J Spec Oper Med 13:7-18, 2013). For soft tissue wounds, healing did not differ significantly among the four wound treatments; however, regional oxygenation of wounds treated with salmon fibrinogen/thrombin showed slightly different time trends. Further studies are needed to establish standards for healthy wound healing and for detection of pathological alterations such as infection. Non-invasive measurement and quantification of indirect markers of soft tissue wound healing support the goals and principles of evidence-based medicine and show potential as easy to administer tools for clinicians and battlefield medical personnel to apply when procedures such as the PET scan are not available or affordable. The method we developed for storing analog physiological signals could be used for maintaining electronic health records, by incorporating vital signs such as ECG and EEG, etc. PMID:23832619

Bodo, Michael; Settle, Timothy; Royal, Joseph; Lombardini, Eric; Sawyer, Evelyn; Rothwell, Stephen W

2013-12-01

261

Systematic review of the use of honey as a wound dressing  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To investigate topical honey in superficial burns and wounds though a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, reference lists and databases were used to seek randomised controlled trials. Seven randomised trials involved superficial burns, partial thickness burns, moderate to severe burns that included full thickness injury, and infected postoperative wounds. REVIEW METHODS:

Owen A Moore; Lesley A Smith; Fiona Campbell; Kate Seers; Henry J McQuay; R Andrew Moore

2001-01-01

262

Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.  

PubMed

Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes. PMID:24572884

Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

2014-03-01

263

Proteases and Delayed Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Significance Proteases and their inhibitors contribute to the balance between extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and deposition, creating an equilibrium that is essential for the timely and coordinated healing of cutaneous wounds. However, when this balance is disrupted, wounds are led into a state of chronicity characterized by abundant levels of proteases and decreased levels of protease inhibitors. Recent Advances Researchers have sought to investigate the roles of proteases within both acute and chronic wounds and how the manipulation of protease activity may aid healing. Indeed, numerous wound dressings have been developed that target such proteases in an attempt to promote wound healing. Critical Issues The normal tissue response to injury involves a complex interaction between cells and cellular mediators. In particular, the inflammatory response is augmented in chronic wounds which are characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and proteases. While controlling levels of inflammation and protease expression is a critical part of normal wound healing, elevated and prolonged expression of proteases produced during the inflammatory phase of healing can lead to excessive ECM degradation associated with impaired healing. Future Directions It seems plausible that future research should aim to investigate the ways in which proteases may be targeted as an alternative therapeutic approach to wound management and to assess the benefits and draw-backs of utilizing wound fluids to assess wound progression in terms of proteolytic activity. PMID:24688830

McCarty, Sara M.; Percival, Steven L.

2013-01-01

264

Wounding, wound healing and staining of mature pear fruit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incidence of wounding in commercially-harvested `d'Anjou' and `Bosc' pear fruit, healing of wounds to decrease decay caused by Botrytis cinerea, Mucor piriformis, Penicillium expansum, and Penicillium solitum at ?1°C, 20°C, and 28°C, and formation of compounds potentially involved in resistance were determined. Use of a blue food coloring to make wounds on fruit more visible on packinghouse lines was evaluated.

Robert A Spotts; Peter G Sanderson; Cheryl L Lennox; David Sugar; Louis A Cervantes

1998-01-01

265

Healing in the irradiated wound  

SciTech Connect

Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

1990-07-01

266

Wound Healing and the Dressing*  

PubMed Central

The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

Scales, John T.

1963-01-01

267

Wound modulation after filtration surgery.  

PubMed

Filtration surgery is the standard invasive procedure for the management of intraocular pressure in advanced glaucoma. The key to a successful outcome is to modulate the normal wound healing cascade that leads to closure of the newly created aqueous outflow pathway. Antifibrotic agents such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil have been increasingly used to modulate the wound healing process and increase surgical success. Although these agents have proven efficacy, they also increase the risk of complications. Efforts have centered on the identification of novel agents and techniques that can influence wound modulation without these complications. We detail new agents and methods under investigation to control wound healing after filtration surgery. PMID:23068975

Seibold, Leonard K; Sherwood, Mark B; Kahook, Malik Y

2012-11-01

268

Studies on Wound Healing Activity of Heliotropium indicum Linn. Leaves on Rats  

PubMed Central

The petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Heliotropium indicum Linn. (Family: Boraginaceae) were separately evaluated for their wound healing activity in rats using excision (normal and infected), incision, and dead space wound models. The effects of test samples on the rate of wound healing were assessed by the rate of wound closure, period of epithelialisation, wound breaking strength, weights of the granulation tissue, determination of hydroxyproline, super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and histopathology of the granulation tissues. Nitrofurazone (0.2%?w/w) in simple ointment I. P. was used as reference standard for the activity comparison. The results revealed significant promotion of wound healing with both methanol and aqueous extracts with more promising activity with the methanol extract compared to other extracts under study. In the wound infection model (with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa), the methanol extract showed significant healing activity similar to the reference standard nitrofurazone. Significant increase in the granulation tissue weight, increased hydroxyproline content, and increased activity of SOD and catalase level with the animals treated with methanol extract in dead space wound model further augmented the wound healing potential of H. indicum. The present work substantiates its validity of the folklore use. PMID:22084720

Dash, G. K.; Murthy, P. N.

2011-01-01

269

Optimizing Prevention of Healthcare-Acquired Infections After Cardiac Surgery (HAI)_2  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Disease; Healthcare Associated Infectious Disease; Sternal Superficial Wound Infection; Deep Sternal Infection; Mediastinitis; Thoracotomy; Conduit Harvest or Cannulation Site; Sepsis; Pneumonia

2014-06-20

270

Sensor materials for the detection of human neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G activity in wound fluid.  

PubMed

Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and cathepsin G (CatG) are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory disorders. These serine proteinases are released by neutrophils and monocytes in case of infection. Wound infection is a severe complication regarding wound healing causing diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In this study we have shown the potential of HNE and CatG to be used as markers for early detection of infection. Significant differences in HNE and CatG levels in infected and non-infected wound fluids were observed. Peptide substrates for these two enzymes were successfully immobilised on different surfaces, including collagen, modified collagen, polyamide polyesters and silica gel. HNE and CatG activities were monitored directly in wound fluid via hydrolysis of the chromogenic substrates. Infected wound fluids led to significant higher substrate hydrolysis compared with non-infected ones. These different approaches could be used for the development of devices which are able to detect elevated enzyme activities before manifestation of infection directly on bandages. This would allow a timely intervention by medical doctors thus preventing severe infections. PMID:21488974

Hasmann, Andrea; Gewessler, Ulrike; Hulla, Elisabeth; Schneider, Konstantin P; Binder, Barbara; Francesko, Antonio; Tzanov, Tzanko; Schintler, Michael; Van der Palen, Job; Guebitz, Georg M; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, Eva

2011-06-01

271

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOEpatents

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01

272

Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a high-powered parallel waterjet for wound debridement.  

PubMed

Current concepts of wound healing acknowledge the essential role of wound bed preparation in achieving a wound with good healing potential. Critical to wound bed preparation is the removal of necrosis, unhealthy tissue, foreign matter, and infection. One of the accepted methods of wound bed preparation is surgery. The high-power parallel waterjet is a new surgical device, which allows the operator to remove very precisely undesirable tissue and debris with maximal preservation of viable tissue. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and economic impact of using this technique of surgical debridement. Forty patients who had waterjet debridements were compared with 22 patients with matched wounds who had conventional surgical debridement. The waterjet group had significantly fewer procedures (p<0.002) than the conventional group. Based on these outcomes, the use of the new device in appropriate patients is expected to lead to cost savings of approximately 1,900 dollars per patient. PMID:16939565

Granick, Mark S; Posnett, John; Jacoby, Michael; Noruthun, Shyam; Ganchi, Parham A; Datiashvili, Ramazi O

2006-01-01

273

Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy  

PubMed Central

Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing. PMID:24511283

Houreld, Nicolette N.

2014-01-01

274

Wounded Nucleons, Wounded Quarks, and Relativistic Ion Collisions  

E-print Network

A concept of wounded nucleons and/or wounded quarks plays an important role in parametrizing and to some extent explaining many a feature of the relativistic ion collisions. This will be illustrated in a historical perspective, up to and including the latest developpments.

Helena Bialkowska

2006-09-06

275

Wounds of the hand contaminated by human or animal saliva.  

PubMed

A prospective and retrospective evaluation of 75 patients with hand wounds contaminated by human saliva (35) or animal saliva (40) demonstrates that a program of outpatient management can be sufficient for optimal care in many patients. This series challenges the proposition that hospitalization, radiographs, and surgical debridement are necessary for most such wounds. Sixty-seven per cent did not have surgical intervention and no complications resulted. Ninety-two per cent received antibiotics. Radiographs were obtained only when bony injury or entry into a joint was suspected. Delay in seeking treatment until obvious signs of infection or pain are present is common. Literature review details the anatomic factors important in the natural history and control of these infections, and the changes with respect to modes of treatment for these potentially dangerous wounds. The injury is caused by bites with the hand extended or, in fight-bite wounds, with the metacarpal-phalangeal and interphalangeal joints flexed, allowing deeper penetration and then sealing of the wound when the first is opened. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are the organisms most frequently found in human bites, and in animal bites; Pasteurella multocida should be considered in dog and cat bites. PMID:7365851

Peeples, E; Boswick, J A; Scott, F A

1980-05-01

276

Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate16S-based molecular amplifications followed by pyrosequencing, shotgun Sanger sequencing, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were utilized to survey the major populations of bacteria that occur in the pathogenic biofilms of three types of chronic wound types: diabetic foot ulcers (D), venous leg ulcers (V), and pressure ulcers (P). Results There are specific major populations of bacteria that were evident in the biofilms of all chronic wound types, including Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia spp. Each of the wound types reveals marked differences in bacterial populations, such as pressure ulcers in which 62% of the populations were identified as obligate anaerobes. There were also populations of bacteria that were identified but not recognized as wound pathogens, such as Abiotrophia para-adiacens and Rhodopseudomonas spp. Results of molecular analyses were also compared to those obtained using traditional culture-based diagnostics. Only in one wound type did culture methods correctly identify the primary bacterial population indicating the need for improved diagnostic methods. Conclusion If clinicians can gain a better understanding of the wound's microbiota, it will give them a greater understanding of the wound's ecology and will allow them to better manage healing of the wound improving the prognosis of patients. This research highlights the necessity to begin evaluating, studying, and treating chronic wound pathogenic biofilms as multi-species entities in order to improve the outcomes of patients. This survey will also foster the pioneering and development of new molecular diagnostic tools, which can be used to identify the community compositions of chronic wound pathogenic biofilms and other medical biofilm infections. PMID:18325110

Dowd, Scot E; Sun, Yan; Secor, Patrick R; Rhoads, Daniel D; Wolcott, Benjamin M; James, Garth A; Wolcott, Randall D

2008-01-01

277

Ultraviolet Radiation in Wound Care: Sterilization and Stimulation  

PubMed Central

Significance Wound care is an important area of medicine considering the increasing age of the population who may have diverse comorbidities. Light-based technology comprises a varied set of modalities of increasing relevance to wound care. While low-level laser (or light) therapy and photodynamic therapy both have wide applications in wound care, this review will concentrate on the use of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Recent Advances UVC (200–280?nm) is highly antimicrobial and can be directly applied to acute wound infections to kill pathogens without unacceptable damage to host tissue. UVC is already widely applied for sterilization of inanimate objects. UVB (280–315?nm) has been directly applied to the wounded tissue to stimulate wound healing, and has been widely used as extracorporeal UV radiation of blood to stimulate the immune system. UVA (315–400?nm) has distinct effects on cell signaling, but has not yet been widely applied to wound care. Critical Issues Penetration of UV light into tissue is limited and optical technology may be employed to extend this limit. UVC and UVB can damage DNA in host cells and this risk must be balanced against beneficial effects. Chronic exposure to UV can be carcinogenic and this must be considered in planning treatments. Future Directions New high-technology UV sources, such as light-emitting diodes, lasers, and microwave-generated UV plasma are becoming available for biomedical applications. Further study of cellular signaling that occurs after UV exposure of tissue will allow the benefits in wound healing to be better defined. PMID:24527357

Gupta, Asheesh; Avci, Pinar; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

2013-01-01

278

Neurolaena lobata L. promotes wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats  

PubMed Central

Background: The leaves of the Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae) plant are used to control diabetes and heal wounds and infections. Aim: The ethanolic extract of N. lobata leaf was evaluated for its ability to heal inflicted wounds in rats using the excision wound model. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six each. Test group animals were treated topically with an ethanolic extract of N. lobata (1:1 with petroleum jelly, 100 mg/kg/day). Standard and control group animals were treated with mupirocin and petroleum jelly, respectively. Treatment was given for 13 days and the wound area was measured on alternate days. Parameters of healing assessed were the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization and hydroxyproline content. Antimicrobial activity of the extract was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Results: Phytochemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of saponins, tannins, alkaloids and flavanoids. Extract-treated animals exhibited 87% reduction in the wound area over 13 days when compared with the control (78%) and standard (83%) groups (P < 0.05). A significant decrease in the epithelialization period was noticed with the extract-treated test group animals compared with the controls and the standard group animals (P < 0.008). The hydroxyproline content of the extract-treated animals was higher (230.5 ± 42.1) when evaluated against the control and (79.0 ± 32.2) and the standard (115.0 ± 44.5) groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Increase in the rate of wound contraction and hydroxyproline content with decrease in epithelialization time in extract-treated animals support further evaluation of N. lobata as a pharmacotherapy for wound healing. PMID:25143886

Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Ramlogan, Surrin; Chalapathi Rao, AV; Maharaj, Sandeep

2014-01-01

279

Multimodal imaging of ischemic wounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, no method is available for noninvasive, simultaneous, and quantitative imaging of these tissue parameters. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities into a single setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Advanced algorithms were developed for accurate reconstruction of wound oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between different imaging modalities. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated by an ongoing clinical trials approved by OSU IRB. In the clinical trial, a wound of 3mm in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was serially monitored by the multimodal imaging setup. Our experiments demonstrated the clinical usability of multimodal wound imaging.

Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Liu, Peng; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

2012-12-01

280

Nanofiber Microenvironment and Diabetic Wound Healing  

Cancer.gov

Diabetic nonhealing wounds represent a major public health problem. Diabetic wounds are characterized by altered wound microenvironment, unbalanced proteolytic activity, prolonged inflammation, and insufficient neovascularization. The efficacy of conventional therapies is unsatisfactory and often results in recurrence of wounds at characteristically predisposed sites, as a direct consequence of poor wound repair. Skin substitutes based on novel biocomposite materials represent the most promising bioengineering technology today and may offer an exciting new treatment strategy in management of chronic wounds.

281

miRNA in Diabetic Wound Healing  

Cancer.gov

Impairment of dermal wound healing is a debilitating complication commonly encountered during diabetes mellitus. Dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenesis phases are key players in the impairment of diabetic wound healing. Emerging studies indicate that miRNAs play a key role in regulating several hubs that orchestrate the wound inflammation and angiogenesis processes. Our laboratory first reported dysfunction in wound macrophage efferocytosis function leading to impaired resolution of wound inflammation in diabetic wounds.

282

Fetal tendon wound size modulates wound gene expression and subsequent wound phenotype.  

PubMed

The fetal response to small tendon injury results in regenerative or scarless healing and is characterized by a markedly diminished cellular inflammatory response, lack of fibroplasia, and restoration of normal tissue architecture. We hypothesized that an increasing fetal tendon wound size would lead to increased wound inflammation and a change from regenerative to reparative healing and scar formation. We created small or large tendon wounds in early gestation fetal sheep and used histology to assess tissue architecture, immunohistochemistry to assess the cellular inflammatory response, ovine-specific gene microarrays, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to measure the gene expression in response to injury. Small tendon wounds showed a regenerative healing phenotype with orderly deposition of collagen fibers while large tendon wounds showed disorderly collagen deposition consistent with scar formation. Small tendon wounds had few inflammatory cells at 7 and 28 days after injury, whereas the large wounds showed a significant inflammatory cell infiltrate at 7 days that resolved by 28 days. At 3 days, the differential expression of genes involved in the response to injury and inflammation were seen between large and small tendon wounds. By real-time polymerase chain reaction at 7 days, large tendon wounds also had significantly increased expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, transforming growth factor-?1, and transforming growth factor-?3, compared with the small wounds. Increasing the fetal tendon wound size results in increased proinflammatory gene expression, inflammatory cell infiltration, and a change from regenerative to reparative healing. This model allows the process of regenerative healing to be examined without the confounding variable of gestational age. PMID:20840524

Herdrich, Benjamin J; Danzer, Enrico; Davey, Marcus G; Bermudez, Dustin M; Radu, Antoneta; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Zhe; Soslowsky, Louis J; Liechty, Kenneth W

2010-01-01

283

[Treatment of a patient with massive unhealed wound accompanied by wound sepsis in late stage after burn injury].  

PubMed

This article analyzed the medical records of a patient with 90% TBSA unhealed wound accompanied with wound sepsis 50 days post burn (PBD) and to discuss the ideal strategies of treatment for such patients in such condition. This was a 24-year-old male patient suffering from flame burn with 95% TBSA wound and severe inhalation injury. Meek skin grafting with autologous scalp was performed once to the thoracic and abdominal regions; intermingled skin grafting of autologous scalp microskin and large sheet of allograft was performed twice to the limbs within PBD 31. The patient was transferred to our hospital on PBD 50 with 90% TBSA wound unhealed, leaving a vast amount of necrotic tissue and allografts. Furthermore, he was complicated by sepsis, pulmonary infection, and gastric ulcer. Debridement and allogenic skin grafting were performed on the first day after hospitalization. When the condition of wounds was improved, transplantation of a large sheet of allogenic skin with inlaid small pieces of autologous skin, intermingled skin grafting of autologous and allogenic skin, and small pieces of autologous skin grafting were performed. Because of the shortage of donor area, the exposed wounds were temporarily covered with allogeneic skin. Epidermal growth factor was used to promote the healing of autologous skin donor site and deep partial-thickness burn wound. Autologous skin grafting was performed whenever source of healthy skin was available. Systemic use of effective antibiotics, nutritional support and therapy, and other comprehensive measures also contributed to the success of treatment of this patient suffering from wound sepsis. The patient was cured and discharged on PBD 145. PMID:23327916

Li, Zhi-qing; Wang, Jia-han; Wu, Qi; Yang, Lei

2012-12-01

284

Evaluation of LHP® (1% hydrogen peroxide) cream versus petrolatum and untreated controls in open wounds in healthy horses: a randomized, blinded control study  

PubMed Central

Background Treatment and protection of wounds in horses can be challenging; protecting bandages may be difficult to apply on the proximal extremities and the body. Unprotected wounds carry an increased risk of bacterial contamination and subsequent infection which can lead to delayed wound healing. Topical treatment with antimicrobials is one possibility to prevent bacterial colonization or infection, but the frequent use of antimicrobials ultimately leads to development of bacterial resistance which is an increasing concern in both human and veterinary medicine. Methods Standardized wounds were created in 10 Standardbred mares. Three wounds were made in each horse. Two wounds were randomly treated with LHP® or petrolatum and the third wound served as untreated control. All wounds were assessed daily until complete epithelization. Protocol data were recorded on day 2, 6, 11, 16, 21 and 28. Data included clinical scores for inflammation and healing, photoplanimetry for calculating wound areas and swab cytology to assess bacterial colonization and inflammation. Bacterial cultures were obtained on day 2, 6 and 16. Results Mean time to complete healing for LHP® treated wounds was 32 days (95%CI = 26.9-37.7). Mean time to complete healing for petrolatum and untreated control wounds were 41.6 days (95%CI = 36.2-47.0) and 44.0 days (95%CI = 38.6-49.4) respectively. Wound healing occurred significantly faster in LHP® wounds compared to both petrolatum (p = 0.0004) and untreated controls (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in time for healing between petrolatum and untreated controls. Total scores for bacteria and neutrophils were significantly (p < 0.0001) lower for LHP® treated wounds compared to petrolatum from day 16 and onwards. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus zooepidemicus were only found in cultures from petrolatum treated wounds and untreated controls. Conclusions Treatment with LHP® reduced bacterial colonization and was associated with earlier complete wound healing. LHP® cream appears to be safe and effective for topical wound treatment or wound protection. PMID:21718487

2011-01-01

285

Collecting And Measuring Wound Exudate Biochemical Mediators In Surgical Wounds  

PubMed Central

We describe a methodology by which we are able to collect and measure biochemical inflammatory and nociceptive mediators at the surgical wound site. Collecting site-specific biochemical markers is important to understand the relationship between levels in serum and surgical wound, determine any associations between mediator release, pain, analgesic use and other outcomes of interest, and evaluate the effect of systemic and peripheral drug administration on surgical wound biochemistry. This methodology has been applied to healthy women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. We have measured wound exudate and serum mediators at the same time intervals as patient's pain scores and analgesics consumption for up to 48 hours post-cesarean delivery. Using this methodology we have been able to detect various biochemical mediators including nerve growth factor (NGF), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2) substance P, IL-1?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, TNF?, INF?, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and MIP-1?. Studies applying this human surgical wound bioassay have found no correlations between wound and serum cytokine concentrations or their time-release profile (J Pain. 2008; 9(7):650-7).1 We also documented the utility of the technique to identify drug-mediated changes in wound cytokine content (Anesth Analg 2010; 111:1452-9).2 PMID:23117346

Carvalho, Brendan; Clark, David J; Yeomans, David; Angst, Martin S

2012-01-01

286

Scope of wounds.  

PubMed

The scope of extremity wounds in the current conflict presents surgeons with new lessons to master. Unique to this conflict is a new type of patient, one with multiple and severely injured extremities who is otherwise free of serious injury. These injuries provide challenges to the medical system in terms of the volume and complexity of care, and to the patient and surgeon trying to achieve limb salvage and rehabilitation. These patients present with a combination of high-energy injury, massive evolving tissue destruction, and widespread contamination, resulting in an evolving zone of injury that respects no tissue planes, anatomic boundaries, or normal physiologic rules. We must ensure that our skills and techniques as surgeons evolve faster than do the injuries themselves. PMID:17003214

Crabtree, Thomas G

2006-01-01

287

Wound healing in plants  

PubMed Central

Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

2008-01-01

288

Infections and bacteriological data after laparoscopic and open gallbladder surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In two hospitals 637 patients undergoing cholecystectomy between June 1989 and June 1993 were entered into a prospective audit. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative infections, especially wound infections, after open and laparoscopic biliary surgery and to assess the bacteriological data on these patients. The incidence of minor wound infection was 10·4% (66637), of

P. T. den Hoed; R. U. Boelhouwer; H. F. Veen; W. C. J. Hop; H. A. Bruining

1998-01-01

289

First Evidence of Sternal Wound Biofilm following Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Management of deep sternal wound infection (SWI), a serious complication after cardiac surgery with high morbidity and mortality incidence, requires invasive procedures such as, debridement with primary closure or myocutaneous flap reconstruction along with use of broad spectrum antibiotics. The purpose of this clinical series is to investigate the presence of biofilm in patients with deep SWI. A biofilm is a complex microbial community in which bacteria attach to a biological or non-biological surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm related infections represent a major clinical challenge due to their resistance to both host immune defenses and standard antimicrobial therapies. Candidates for this clinical series were patients scheduled for a debridement procedure of an infected sternal wound after a cardiac surgery. Six patients with SWI were recruited in the study. All cases had marked dehiscence of all layers of the wound down to the sternum with no signs of healing after receiving broad spectrum antibiotics post-surgery. After consenting patients, tissue and/or extracted stainless steel wires were collected during the debridement procedure. Debrided tissues examined by Gram stain showed large aggregations of Gram positive cocci. Immuno-fluorescent staining of the debrided tissues using a specific antibody against staphylococci demonstrated the presence of thick clumps of staphylococci colonizing the wound bed. Evaluation of tissue samples with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed three-dimensional aggregates of these cocci attached to the wound surface. More interestingly, SEM imaging of the extracted wires showed attachment of cocci aggregations to the wire metal surface. These observations along with the clinical presentation of the patients provide the first evidence that supports the presence of biofilm in such cases. Clinical introduction of the biofilm infection concept in deep SWI may advance the current management strategies from standard antimicrobial therapy to anti-biofilm strategy. PMID:23936415

Elgharably, Haytham; Mann, Ethan; Awad, Hamdy; Ganesh, Kasturi; Ghatak, Piya Das; Gordillo, Gayle; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Roy, Sashwati; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Sen, Chandan K.

2013-01-01

290

Mixed-species biofilm compromises wound healing by disrupting epidermal barrier function.  

PubMed

In chronic wounds, biofilm infects host tissue for extended periods of time. This work establishes the first chronic preclinical model of wound biofilm infection aimed at addressing the long-term host response. Although biofilm-infected wounds did not show marked differences in wound closure, the repaired skin demonstrated compromised barrier function. This observation is clinically significant, because it leads to the notion that even if a biofilm infected wound is closed, as observed visually, it may be complicated by the presence of failed skin, which is likely to be infected and/or further complicated postclosure. Study of the underlying mechanisms recognized for the first time biofilm-inducible miR-146a and miR-106b in the host skin wound-edge tissue. These miRs silenced ZO-1 and ZO-2 to compromise tight junction function, resulting in leaky skin as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Intervention strategies aimed at inhibiting biofilm-inducible miRNAs may be productive in restoring the barrier function of host skin. PMID:24771509

Roy, Sashwati; Elgharably, Haytham; Sinha, Mithun; Ganesh, Kasturi; Chaney, Sarah; Mann, Ethan; Miller, Christina; Khanna, Savita; Bergdall, Valerie K; Powell, Heather M; Cook, Charles H; Gordillo, Gayle M; Wozniak, Daniel J; Sen, Chandan K

2014-08-01

291

Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... or liquids. This can make it easier for fungi to enter your body and increase your chances ... infection such as candidemia. 1 , 2 Disease-causing fungi can enter your body through cuts, wounds, and ...

292

Forces driving epithelial wound healing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

2014-09-01

293

Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations  

PubMed Central

Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

2014-01-01

294

Use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery: clinical evidence and consensus recommendations.  

PubMed

Abstract Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors' own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

Dohmen, Pascal M; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

2014-01-01

295

Wound Coverage Technologies in Burn Care: Novel Techniques  

PubMed Central

Improvements in burn wound care have vastly decreased morbidity and mortality in severely burned patients. Development of new therapeutic approaches to increase wound repair has the potential to reduce infection, graft rejection, and hypertrophic scarring. The incorporation of tissue engineering techniques, along with the use of exogenous proteins, genes, or stem cells to enhance wound healing, heralds new treatment regimens based on the modification of already existing biological activity. Refinements to surgical techniques have enabled the creation of protocols for full facial transplantation. With new technologies and advances such as these, care of the severely burned will undergo massive changes over the next decade. This review centers on new developments that have recently shown great promise in the investigational arena. PMID:23877140

Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Branski, Ludwik K.; Dibildox, Manuel

2013-01-01

296

Transplantation of BMSCs expressing hPDGF-A\\/hBD2 promotes wound healing in rats with combined radiation-wound injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) expressing human platelet-derived growth factor A (hPDGF-A) and human beta-defensin2 (hBD2) in accelerating wound healing of combined radiation-wound injury. Recombinant adenovirus vector simultaneously expressing hPDGF-A and hBD2 was constructed and packaged into virus particles that were used to infect rat BMSCs.

L Hao; J Wang; Z Zou; G Yan; S Dong; J Deng; X Ran; Y Feng; C Luo; Y Wang; T Cheng

2009-01-01

297

Preparation of SMART wound dressings based on colloidal microgels and textile fibres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wound dressings and other types of wound healing technologies are experiencing fast-paced development and rapid growth. As the population ages, demand will continue to rise for advanced dressings used to treat chronic wounds, such as pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and diabetic ulcers. Moist wound dressings, which facilitate natural wound healing in a cost-effective manner, will be increasingly important. In commercially available hydrogel / gauze wound dressings the gel swells to adsorb wound excreta and provide an efficient non adhesive particle barrier. An alternative to hydrogels are microgels. Essentially discrete colloidal gel particles, as a result of their very high surface area to volume ratio compared to bulk gels, they have a much faster response to external stimuli such as temperature or pH. In response to either an increase or decrease in solvent quality these porous networks shrink and swell reversibly. When swollen the interstitial regions within the polymer matrix are available for further chemistry; such as the incorporation of small molecules. The reversible shrinking and swelling as a function of external stimuli provides a novel drug release system. As the environmental conditions of a wound change over its lifetime, tending to increase in pH if there is an infection combining these discrete polymeric particles with a substrate such as cotton, results in a smart wound dressing.

Cornelius, Victoria J.; Majcen, Natasa; Snowden, Martin J.; Mitchell, John C.; Voncina, Bojana

2007-01-01

298

Wounding in the plant tissue: the defense of a dangerous passage  

PubMed Central

Plants are continuously exposed to agents such as herbivores and environmental mechanical stresses that cause wounding and open the way to the invasion by microbial pathogens. Wounding provides nutrients to pathogens and facilitates their entry into the tissue and subsequent infection. Plants have evolved constitutive and induced defense mechanisms to properly respond to wounding and prevent infection. The constitutive defenses are represented by physical barriers, i.e., the presence of cuticle or lignin, or by metabolites that act as toxins or deterrents for herbivores. Plants are also able to sense the injured tissue as an altered self and induce responses similar to those activated by pathogen infection. Endogenous molecules released from wounded tissue may act as Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) that activate the plant innate immunity. Wound-induced responses are both rapid, such as the oxidative burst and the expression of defense-related genes, and late, such as the callose deposition, the accumulation of proteinase inhibitors and of hydrolytic enzymes (i.e., chitinases and gluganases). Typical examples of DAMPs involved in the response to wounding are the peptide systemin, and the oligogalacturonides, which are oligosaccharides released from the pectic component of the cell wall. Responses to wounding take place both at the site of damage (local response) and systemically (systemic response) and are mediated by hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid. PMID:25278948

Savatin, Daniel V.; Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Cervone, Felice

2014-01-01

299

Wounding in the plant tissue: the defense of a dangerous passage.  

PubMed

Plants are continuously exposed to agents such as herbivores and environmental mechanical stresses that cause wounding and open the way to the invasion by microbial pathogens. Wounding provides nutrients to pathogens and facilitates their entry into the tissue and subsequent infection. Plants have evolved constitutive and induced defense mechanisms to properly respond to wounding and prevent infection. The constitutive defenses are represented by physical barriers, i.e., the presence of cuticle or lignin, or by metabolites that act as toxins or deterrents for herbivores. Plants are also able to sense the injured tissue as an altered self and induce responses similar to those activated by pathogen infection. Endogenous molecules released from wounded tissue may act as Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) that activate the plant innate immunity. Wound-induced responses are both rapid, such as the oxidative burst and the expression of defense-related genes, and late, such as the callose deposition, the accumulation of proteinase inhibitors and of hydrolytic enzymes (i.e., chitinases and gluganases). Typical examples of DAMPs involved in the response to wounding are the peptide systemin, and the oligogalacturonides, which are oligosaccharides released from the pectic component of the cell wall. Responses to wounding take place both at the site of damage (local response) and systemically (systemic response) and are mediated by hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid. PMID:25278948

Savatin, Daniel V; Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Cervone, Felice

2014-01-01

300

Phytochemicals and Naturally Derived Substances for Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) are widely used by the general public. Natural products including plant-derived extracts (phytochemicals) and naturally derived substances, such as honey, are an important component of CAM. Here, we review the evidence for their use in wound care. The Problem Wound healing is complex and disruption of this process can lead to considerable morbidity, including chronic wounds, infection, and scarring. Natural products have a long history of use in wound care, but there are only a few rigorous studies. With the growing interest in the use of natural products and the belief that they are safer than standard therapies, it is vital to understand the current knowledge of their efficacy and side effects. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Natural products possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and cell synthesis-modulating components among many others. However, this complex composition of chemicals may increase the risk for irritant or allergic side effects. Clinical Care Relevance Natural products can be much cheaper than conventional treatments, but further study is needed to better understand their efficacy. The type of wound and the potential for side effects need to be carefully considered when choosing a treatment. Conclusion The research to date is supportive of the use of natural products in wound care. Patients need to be cautioned of potential side effects. Collaborative research between allopathic medicine and medical systems that frequently employ phytochemicals and naturally derived substances, such as Ayurveda and naturopathy, will provide a better understanding of how to integrate natural products into wound care. PMID:24527308

Sivamani, Raja K.; Ma, Brian R.; Wehrli, Lisa N.; Maverakis, Emanual

2012-01-01

301

Classification of Wounds and their Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is no standard classification for wounds. However, there are a number of different ways in which wounds can be classified which are of help in describing the wound with a view to its management and ultimate healing. The factors of greatest importance in evaluation are: the nature of the injury causing the wounds, the timing, whether acute or chronic,

Nicholas J Percival

2002-01-01

302

Contact dermatitis presenting as non-healing wound: case report.  

PubMed

Topical antiseptics are commonly used in the management of minor wounds, burns, and infected skin. These agents are widely used by health professionals and are often self-prescribed by patients as they are easily available over-the-counter. This case illustrates a 73 year old man who presented with a non-healing wound on his right forearm for 4 weeks. The wound started from an insect bite and progressively enlarged with increasing pruritus and burning sensation. Clinically an ill-defined ulcer with surrounding erythema and erosion was noted. There was a yellow crust overlying the center of the ulcer and the periphery was scaly. Further inquiry revealed history of self treatment with a yellow solution to clean his wound for 3 weeks. Patient was provisionally diagnosed to have allergic contact dermatitis secondary to acriflavine. Topical acriflavine was stopped and the ulcer resolved after treatment with non-occlusive saline dressing. Skin patch test which is the gold standard for detection and confirmation of contact dermatitis showed a positive reaction (2+) to acriflavine. Acriflavine is widely used as a topical antiseptic agent in this part of the world. Hence, primary care physicians managing a large variety of poorly healing wounds should consider the possibility of contact allergy in recalcitrant cases, not responding to conventional treatment. Patient education is an important aspect of management as this would help curb the incidence of future contact allergies. PMID:21575147

Leelavathi, M; Le, Yy; Tohid, H; Hasliza, Ah

2011-01-01

303

Epidermal Differentiation in Barrier Maintenance and Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Significance: The epidermal barrier prevents water loss and serves as the body's first line of defense against toxins, chemicals, and infectious microbes. Disruption of the barrier, either through congenital disorders of barrier formation or through wounds, puts the individual at risk for dehydration, hypersensitivity, infection, and prolonged inflammation. Epidermal barrier disorders affect millions of patients in the United States, causing loss of productivity and diminished quality of life for patients and their families, and represent a burden to the health-care system and society. Recent Advances: The genetic basis of many congenital barrier disorders has been identified in recent years, and great advances have been made in the molecular mechanisms of the formation and homeostasis of epidermal barrier, as well as acute and chronic wound healing. Progress in stem cell (SC) biology, particularly in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has opened new doors for cell-based therapy of chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barrier homeostasis in health and disease, as well as contributions of iPSCs and allogeneic MSCs to wound healing, will lead to the identification of novel targets for developing therapeutics for congenital barrier and wound healing disorders. Future Directions: Future studies should focus on better understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to disrupted homeostasis of epidermal barrier to identify potential therapeutic targets to combat its associated diseases. PMID:24669361

Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

2014-01-01

304

[Nursing management of wound care pain].  

PubMed

Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject. PMID:17554674

Chin, Yen-Fan

2007-06-01

305

Wound Healing and Cellular Microenvironment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Investigations of oxygen supply to dermal and epidermal elements in healing tissue have been made with oxygen electrodes in rabbit ear window preparations and in human subjects. Effects of mild stress and hemorrhagic and endotoxic shock on wound environme...

I. A. Silver

1971-01-01

306

Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in acute and chronic wounds  

PubMed Central

Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA), as a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and a low thermal load to the skin surface, can improve the healing of acute and chronic wounds both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA increases tissue temperature (+2.7°C at a tissue depth of 2 cm), tissue oxygen partial pressure (+32% at a tissue depth of 2 cm) and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient supply of tissue with energy and oxygen and consequently also for wound healing and infection defense. wIRA can considerably alleviate pain (without any exception during 230 irradiations) with substantially less need for analgesics (52–69% less in the groups with wIRA compared to the control groups). It also diminishes exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. The overall evaluation of the effect of irradiation as well as the wound healing and the cosmetic result (assessed on visual analogue scales) were markedly better in the group with wIRA compared to the control group. wIRA can advance wound healing (median reduction of wound size of 90% in severely burned children already after 9 days in the group with wIRA compared to 13 days in the control group; on average 18 versus 42 days until complete wound closure in chronic venous stasis ulcers) or improve an impaired wound healing (reaching wound closure and normalization of the thermographic image in otherwise recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers) both in acute and in chronic wounds including infected wounds. After major abdominal surgery there was a trend in favor of the wIRA group to a lower rate of total wound infections (7% versus 15%) including late infections following discharge from hospital (0% versus 8%) and a trend towards a shorter postoperative hospital stay (9 versus 11 days). Even the normal wound healing process can be improved. The mentioned effects have been proven in six prospective studies, with most of the effects having an evidence level of Ia/Ib. wIRA represents a valuable therapy option and can generally be recommended for use in the treatment of acute as well as of chronic wounds. PMID:20204090

Hoffmann, Gerd

2009-01-01

307

[From the history of wound care].  

PubMed

Wound care in ancient times was based on many techniques: Bandages soaked with antibiotics, Sutures continuous or in separate stitches, apply of poultices around the wounds, honey and propolis as antibiotics in the treatment of wounds, surgical drainage of pus with a piece of tin pipe etc. The oldest wound clamp is shown with the jaws of ants holding together the edges of a wound. Finally are discussed the cauterization and the principles of Antisepsis and Asepsis. PMID:10929654

Benedum, J

2000-01-01

308

Use of a new silver barrier dressing, ALLEVYN Ag in exuding chronic wounds.  

PubMed

Recognising and managing wounds at risk of infection is vital in wound management. ALLEVYN Ag dressings have been designed to manage exudate in chronic wounds that are at risk of infection; are displaying signs of local infection; or where a suspected increase in bacterial colonisation is delaying healing. They combine an absorbent silver sulfadiazine containing hydrocellular foam layer, with a perforated wound contact layer and highly breathable top film. The results presented are from a multi-centre clinical evaluation of 126 patients conducted to assess the performance of ALLEVYN Ag (Adhesive, Non Adhesive and Sacrum dressings) in a range of indications. Clinicians rated the dressings as acceptable for use in various wound types in 88% of patients. The majority of clinical signs of infection reduced between the initial and the final assessment. The condition of wound tissue and surrounding skin was observed to improve, and there was significant evidence of a reduction in the level of exudate from initial to final assessment (p < 0.001). Clinicians rated ALLEVYN Ag as satisfying or exceeding expectations in over 90% of patients. The evaluation showed the dressings to offer real benefits to patients and clinicians across multiple indications when used in conjunction with local protocols. PMID:19538192

Kotz, Paula; Fisher, Jane; McCluskey, Pat; Hartwell, Samantha D; Dharma, Hussein

2009-06-01

309

Digital photography and transparency-based methods for measuring wound surface area.  

PubMed

To compare and determine a credible method of measurement of wound surface area by linear, transparency, and photographic methods for monitoring progress of wound healing accurately and ascertaining whether these methods are significantly different. From April 2005 to December 2006, 40 patients (30 men, 5 women, 5 children) admitted to the surgical ward of Shree Sayaji General Hospital, Baroda, had clean as well as infected wound following trauma, debridement, pressure sore, venous ulcer, and incision and drainage. Wound surface areas were measured by these three methods (linear, transparency, and photographic methods) simultaneously on alternate days. The linear method is statistically and significantly different from transparency and photographic methods (P value <0.05), but there is no significant difference between transparency and photographic methods (P value >0.05). Photographic and transparency methods provided measurements of wound surface area with equivalent result and there was no statistically significant difference between these two methods. PMID:24426404

Bhedi, Amul; Saxena, Atul K; Gadani, Ravi; Patel, Ritesh

2013-04-01

310

Longitudinal shift in diabetic wound microbiota correlates with prolonged skin defense response  

PubMed Central

Diabetics frequently suffer from chronic, nonhealing wounds. Although bacterial colonization and/or infection are generally acknowledged to negatively impact wound healing, the precise relationship between the microbial community and impaired wound healing remains unclear. Because the host cutaneous defense response is proposed to play a key role in modulating microbial colonization, we longitudinally examined the diabetic wound microbiome in tandem with host tissue gene expression. By sequencing 16S ribosomal RNA genes, we show that a longitudinal selective shift in wound microbiota coincides with impaired healing in diabetic mice (Leprdb/db; db/db). We demonstrate a parallel shift in longitudinal gene expression that occurs in a cluster of genes related to the immune response. Further, we establish a correlation between relative abundance of Staphylococcus spp. and the expression of cutaneous defense response genes. Our data demonstrate that integrating two types of global datasets lends a better understanding to the dynamics governing host–microbe interactions. PMID:20668241

Grice, Elizabeth A.; Snitkin, Evan S.; Yockey, Laura J.; Bermudez, Dustin M.; Liechty, Kenneth W.; Segre, Julia A.; Mullikin, Jim; Blakesley, Robert; Young, Alice; Chu, Grace; Ramsahoye, Colleen; Lovett, Sean; Han, Joel; Legaspi, Richelle; Fuksenko, Tatyana; Reddix-Dugue, Natalie; Sison, Christina; Gregory, Michael; Montemayor, Casandra; Gestole, Marie; Hargrove, April; Johnson, Taccara; Myrick, Jerlil; Riebow, Nancy; Schmidt, Brian; Novotny, Betsy; Gupti, Jyoti; Benjamin, Betty; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Ho, Shi-ling; Schandler, Karen; Smith, Lauren; Stantripop, Mal; Maduro, Quino; Bouffard, Gerry; Dekhtyar, Mila; Guan, Xiaobin; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Park, Morgan; Jacques Thomas, Pamela

2010-01-01

311

Longitudinal shift in diabetic wound microbiota correlates with prolonged skin defense response.  

PubMed

Diabetics frequently suffer from chronic, nonhealing wounds. Although bacterial colonization and/or infection are generally acknowledged to negatively impact wound healing, the precise relationship between the microbial community and impaired wound healing remains unclear. Because the host cutaneous defense response is proposed to play a key role in modulating microbial colonization, we longitudinally examined the diabetic wound microbiome in tandem with host tissue gene expression. By sequencing 16S ribosomal RNA genes, we show that a longitudinal selective shift in wound microbiota coincides with impaired healing in diabetic mice (Lepr(db/db); db/db). We demonstrate a parallel shift in longitudinal gene expression that occurs in a cluster of genes related to the immune response. Further, we establish a correlation between relative abundance of Staphylococcus spp. and the expression of cutaneous defense response genes. Our data demonstrate that integrating two types of global datasets lends a better understanding to the dynamics governing host-microbe interactions. PMID:20668241

Grice, Elizabeth A; Snitkin, Evan S; Yockey, Laura J; Bermudez, Dustin M; Liechty, Kenneth W; Segre, Julia A

2010-08-17

312

Hydrodebridement of wounds: effectiveness in reducing wound bacterial contamination and potential for air bacterial contamination  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to assess the level of air contamination with bacteria after surgical hydrodebridement and to determine the effectiveness of hydro surgery on bacterial reduction of a simulated infected wound. Methods Four porcine samples were scored then infected with a broth culture containing a variety of organisms and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The infected samples were then debrided with the hydro surgery tool (Versajet, Smith and Nephew, Largo, Florida, USA). Samples were taken for microbiology, histology and scanning electron microscopy pre-infection, post infection and post debridement. Air bacterial contamination was evaluated before, during and after debridement by using active and passive methods; for active sampling the SAS-Super 90 air sampler was used, for passive sampling settle plates were located at set distances around the clinic room. Results There was no statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination of the porcine samples post hydrodebridement. Analysis of the passive sampling showed a significant (p < 0.001) increase in microbial counts post hydrodebridement. Levels ranging from 950 colony forming units per meter cubed (CFUs/m3) to 16780 CFUs/m3 were observed with active sampling of the air whilst using hydro surgery equipment compared with a basal count of 582 CFUs/m3. During removal of the wound dressing, a significant increase was observed relative to basal counts (p < 0.05). Microbial load of the air samples was still significantly raised 1 hour post-therapy. Conclusion The results suggest a significant increase in bacterial air contamination both by active sampling and passive sampling. We believe that action might be taken to mitigate fallout in the settings in which this technique is used. PMID:19426486

Bowling, Frank L; Stickings, Daryl S; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; Armstrong, David G; Boulton, Andrew JM

2009-01-01

313

Clinical update: gunshot wound ballistics.  

PubMed

Although firearm related injury and mortality actually may be declining, gunshot trauma remains a significant cause of morbidity and socioeconomic cost with 115,000 missile injuries annually and as many as 40,000 deaths. Wounds typically are classified as low-velocity (< 2000 feet/second) or high-velocity (> 2000 feet/second). However, these terms can be misleading. More important is the efficiency of energy transfer, which is dependent on the projectile's physical characteristics including deformation and fragmentation, kinetic energy, stability, entrance profile, path traveled through the body, and the biologic characteristics of the tissues. Therefore, the decision whether to explore the wound should not be based solely on the involvement of a high-velocity or low-velocity weapon. The majority of low-velocity gunshot wounds can be treated safely nonoperatively with local wound care and outpatient treatment. Treatment of associated fractures generally is dictated by the bony injuries, which have similar personalities to closed fractures. Because contamination is not always apparent, routine antibiotic prophylaxis still is recommended. The soft tissues assume a more crucial role in high-velocity and shotgun fractures, whereas high-energy injuries and grossly contaminated wounds mandate irrigation, appropriate debridement, and the use of open fracture protocols. However, a patient with a high-velocity wound with limited soft tissue disruption, no significant functional deficits, no evidence of bullet fragmentation, and minimal bony involvement can be a candidate for simple wound care. When exploration is indicated, decompression and excision of necrotic tissue is the rule with color, consistency, contractility, and capacity to bleed providing valuable information regarding muscle viability. PMID:12616039

Bartlett, Craig S

2003-03-01

314

Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

Brook, Itzhak

1995-01-01

315

Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

Kloth, Luther C.

2014-01-01

316

Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service  

PubMed Central

Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. PMID:23983497

Little, Sahoko H; Menawat, Sunil S; Worzniak, Michael; Fetters, Michael D

2013-01-01

317

A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ?6.5 M people and costing ?$25B/year in the US alone [1]. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies. PMID:25313558

Dhall, Sandeep; Do, Danh; Garcia, Monika; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Brandon, Angela; Kim, Jane; Sanchez, Antonio; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Gallagher, Sean; Nothnagel, Eugene A; Chalfant, Charles E; Patel, Rakesh P; Schiller, Neal; Martins-Green, Manuela

2014-01-01

318

A Novel Model of Chronic Wounds: Importance of Redox Imbalance and Biofilm-Forming Bacteria for Establishment of Chronicity  

PubMed Central

Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ?6.5 M people and costing ?$25B/year in the US alone [1]. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies. PMID:25313558

Dhall, Sandeep; Do, Danh; Garcia, Monika; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Brandon, Angela; Kim, Jane; Sanchez, Antonio; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Gallagher, Sean; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Schiller, Neal; Martins-Green, Manuela

2014-01-01

319

The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Regenerative Wound Healing Phenotype  

PubMed Central

Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key to regenerative wound healing. MSCs have spatial memory and respond to local environment. MSCs orchestrate wound repair by: (1) structural repair via cellular differentiation; (2) immune-modulation; (3) secretion of growth factors that drive neovascularization and re-epithelialization; and (4) mobilization of resident stem cells. The Problem Autologous bone-marrow-derived cells and MSCs demonstrate improved healing and tissue-integrity in animal models and clinical trials. However, the effects are variable and the mechanisms of MSC-mediated wound healing are not fully understood. The mammalian MSC niche and signaling sequences and factors affecting their homing, differentiation, viability, and safety need to be characterized to get full benefits of MSC cellular therapy. Basic/Clinical Science Advances MSCs can be isolated from bone-marrow, and less-invasive tissues such as adipose, gingiva, muscle, and umbilical cord, with similar functional effects. However, isolation, culture conditions, and markers used to identify and trace the lineage of these MSCs have not been standardized, which is crucial to determine the extent to which MSCs act as multipotent stem cells or sources of secreted factors in wounds. Clinical Care Relevance In chronic nonhealing wounds, where efficacy of conventional therapies is unsatisfactory, autotransplantation of MSCs could accelerate wound healing, promote regeneration and restoration of tissue integrity, and reduce recurrence of wounds at characteristically predisposed sites. Conclusion Regenerative medicine and novel wound therapies using autologous stem cells holds great promise for clinical management of difficult wounds. The ideal candidate stem cells can be used to repopulate the wound bed to mediate appropriate epidermal and dermal regeneration and promote efficient wound repair, while modulating the immune system to prevent infection. PMID:24527298

Balaji, Swathi; Keswani, Sundeep G.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

2012-01-01

320

Wound breakdown after middle cranial fossa craniotomy: an unusual complication after rhytidectomy.  

PubMed

Wound complications after middle cranial fossa craniotomy are rare. We describe a patient who underwent a left middle fossa craniotomy for resection of a small internal auditory canal tumor with subsequent development of wound breakdown and infection 1 week postoperatively. Prompting of the patient elicited a history of bilateral rhytidectomies. Wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, dermal regeneration template placement, and prolonged antibiotic treatment were performed. Complete secondary intention healing occurred with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Prior rhytidectomy scars must be identified and incorporated into the surgical planning prior to performing middle fossa craniotomy incisions. PMID:24150991

Moberly, Aaron C; Tweel, Benjamin C; Welling, D Bradley

2014-02-01

321

Noninfectious Wound Complications in Clean Surgery: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Association with Antibiotic Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Noninfectious wound complications are frequent and often are confused with and treated as infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We assessed the epidemiology, impact, risk factors, and associations with antibiotic use of noninfectious wound complications\\u000a in clean orthopedic and trauma surgery. We report a single-center, prospective, observational study in an orthopedic department.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Among 1,073 adult patients, 630 (59%) revealed clinically relevant postoperative noninfectious wound complications,

Ilker UckayAmerico; Americo Agostinho; Wilson Belaieff; Laurence Toutous-Trellu; Saja Scherer-Pietramaggiori; Axel Andres; Louis Bernard; Hubert Vuagnat; Pierre Hoffmeyer; Blaise Wyssa

2011-01-01

322

Comparison of delayed and primary wound closure in the treatment of open tibial fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Primary wound closure in the management of open tibial fractures has generally been discouraged. Several prior studies suggest\\u000a that infections are not caused by the initial contamination, but are instead the result of organisms acquired in the hospital.\\u000a Primary wound closure after adequate wound care and fracture stabilisation could therefore be considered a reasonable option.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  We analysed 95

E. Hohmann; K. Tetsworth; M. J. Radziejowski; T. F. Wiesniewski

2007-01-01

323

Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate16S-based molecular

Scot E Dowd; Yan Sun; Patrick R Secor; Daniel D Rhoads; Benjamin M Wolcott; Garth A James; Randall D Wolcott

2008-01-01

324

Comparison between topical honey and mafenide acetate in treatment of burn wounds  

PubMed Central

Summary Histological and clinical studies of wound healing were performed in comparable cases of fresh partial-thickness burns treated with honey dressing or mafenide acetate in two groups of 50 randomly allocated patients. Of the patients with honey-treated wounds, 84% showed satisfactory epithelialization by day 7 and 100% by day 21. In wounds treated with mafenide acetate, epithelialization occurred by day 7 in 72% of cases and in 84% by day 21. Histological evidence of reparative activity was observed in 80% of wounds treated with honey dressing by day 7 with minimal inflammation. Fifty-two per cent of the mafenide acetate treated wounds showed reparative activity with inflammatory changes by day 7. Reparative activity reached 100% by day 21 with the honey dressing and 84% with mafenide acetate. Thus, in honey-dressed wounds, early subsidence of acute inflammatory changes, better control of infection, and quicker wound healing were observed, while in mafenide acetate treated wounds a sustained inflammatory reaction was noted even on epithelialization. PMID:22396671

Maghsoudi, H.; Salehi, F.; Khosrowshahi, M.K.; Baghaei, M.; Nasirzadeh, M.; Shams, R.

2011-01-01

325

Advanced Wound Therapies in the Management of Severe Military Lower Limb Trauma: A New Perspective  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the treatment of injuries resulting from land mine explosions using a holistic approach that includes gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and encompasses wound bed preparation, exudate management, and infection control. Method: In the treatment of 3 traumatic injuries, each requiring limb amputation, we describe the application of NPWT using the Chariker-Jeter system, which uses a single layer of saline-moistened antimicrobial gauze laid directly onto the wound bed. A silicone drain is placed on the gauze and then more gauze is placed over the drain to fill the wound. This is then covered with a clear semipermeable film, cut so that there is a 2- to 3-cm border around the wound allowing it to be sealed onto healthy skin. Results: In each of the cases described, we were able to achieve wound closure prior to successful skin grafting, and the patients have recovered well despite the severity of their injuries. Conclusion: We discuss the potential advantages of the Chariker-Jeter system over polyurethane foam as a method of delivering NPWT in highly extensive and irregular-shaped wounds created by land mine explosions while stressing the importance of thorough and effective wound bed preparation. PMID:19696875

Jeffery, Lt Col S. L. A.

2009-01-01

326

A coordinated approach to cutaneous wound healing: vibrational microscopy and molecular biology.  

PubMed

The repair of cutaneous wounds in the adult body involves a complex series of spatially and temporally organized processes to prevent infection and restore homeostasis. Three characteristic phases of wound repair (inflammation, proliferation including re-epithelialization and remodelling) overlap in time and space. We have utilized a human skin wound-healing model to correlate changes in genotype and pheno-type with infrared (IR) and confocal Raman spectroscopic images during the re-epithelialization of excisional wounds. The experimental protocols validated as IR images clearly delineate the keratin-rich migrating epithelial tongue from the collagen-rich wound bed. Multivariate statistical analysis of IR datasets acquired 6 days post-wounding reveal subtle spectral differences that map to distinct spatial distributions, which are correlated with immunofluorescent staining patterns of different keratin types. Images computed within collagen-rich regions expose complementary spatial patterns and identify elastin in the wound bed. The temporal sequence of events is explored through a comparison of gene array analysis with confocal Raman microscopy. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of acquiring detailed molecular structure information from the various proteins and their subclasses involved in the wound-healing process. PMID:19145704

Andrew Chan, K L; Zhang, Guojin; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Lee, Brian; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard

2008-10-01

327

Multispectral Imaging Of Burn Wounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research program successfully developed a real-time video imaging system (the Imaging Burn Depth Indicator, or IBDI) which can discriminate areas of burn wounds expected to heal in three weeks or less from the day of injury from those areas not expected to heal in that time period. The analysis can be performed on or about the third day post-burn on debrided burn wounds. Early evaluation of burn healing probability is a crucial factor in the decision to tangentially excise the burn wound. The IBDI measures the reflectivity of the burn wound in the red, green, and near infrared wavelength bands, which data correlate with burn healing probability. The instrument uses an algorithm established in an earlier study to translate the optical data into burn healing probabilities. The IBDI produces two types of images: a true-color image of the burn and a false-color image of the burn. The false-color image consists of up to four colors, each of which indicates a distinct range of probability that the area of the burn so colored will heal within 21 days. Over 100 burn wound sites were studied. Burn sites were evaluated on day three post-burn by our instrument and by the attending physician. Of 55 sites considered to be of intermediate depth, the IBDI predicted the healing outcome accurately in 84% of the cases. By comparison, the predictions of burn surgeons supervising the care of these patients were accurate in 62% of the cases.

Afromowitz, Martin A.; Callis, James B.; Heimbach, David M.; DeSoto, Larry A.; Norton, Mary K.

1988-06-01

328

Skin Wound Healing and Scarring: Fetal Wounds and Regenerative Restitution  

PubMed Central

The adverse physiological and psychological effects of scars formation after healing of wounds are broad and a major medical problem for patients. In utero, fetal wounds heal in a regenerative manner, though the mechanisms are unknown. Differences in fetal scarless regeneration and adult repair can provide key insight into reduction of scarring therapy. Understanding the cellular and extracellular matrix alterations in excessive adult scarring in comparison to fetal scarless healing may have important implications. Herein, we propose that matrix can be controlled via cellular therapy to resemble a fetal-like matrix that will result in reduced scarring. PMID:24203921

Yates, Cecelia C.; Hebda, Patricia; Wells, Alan

2014-01-01

329

Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

Hasan, Tayyaba (Arlington, MA); Hamblin, Michael R. (Revere, MA); Trauner, Kenneth (Sacramento, CA)

2000-08-22

330

Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing  

PubMed Central

Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELM?; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting. PMID:22884902

Tymen, Stephanie D.; Rojas, Isolde G.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T.

2013-01-01

331

[Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) promotes wound healing].  

PubMed

Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with high tissue penetration and low thermal load to the skin surface which promotes the healing of acute and chronic wounds both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. Water-filtered infrared-A increases tissue temperature (+?2.7?°C at a tissue depth of 2 cm), tissue oxygen partial pressure (+?32?% at a tissue depth of 2 cm) and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient supply of tissue with energy and oxygen and consequently also for wound healing and infection defense. Water-filtered infrared-A promotes normal as well as disturbed wound healing by diminishing inflammation and exudation, by promotion of infection defense and regeneration, and by alleviation of pain. These effects have been proven in a total of seven prospective studies (of these six randomized controlled studies) with most of the effects having an evidence level of Ia or Ib. The additional cases of complicated courses of wound healing presented in this article illustrate the proven effects of wIRA. Not only in the 6 presented cases wIRA turned the complicated courses of wound healing for the better and facilitated the healing of the wounds after varying total times of irradiation (in the 6 cases 51-550 h) and after variable times of wound care and mostly after transplantation of split skin grafts. In complicated courses of wound healing wIRA does not replace consultation and, when indicated, treatment by an experienced plastic surgeon and by a surgeon specialized in septic surgery. With these limitations wIRA can be recommended as a valuable complement for the treatment of acute as well as of chronic wounds. PMID:25385134

Winkel, R; Hoffmann, G; Hoffmann, R

2014-11-01

332

A Global Perspective on Wound Care  

PubMed Central

The development of an interprofessional team approach to the care of acute and chronic wounds is a worldwide challenge. This global unmet need has recently been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and addressed by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Global Volunteers program. This article provides an overview of the escalating international wound problem. Current programs established to deal with wounds in resource-poor countries are presented as well as information on volunteering. PMID:25126476

Serena, Thomas E.

2014-01-01

333

Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care  

PubMed Central

Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

2014-01-01

334

Evaluation of a Novel Polihexanide-Preserved Wound Covering Gel on Dermal Wound Healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Daily wound assessment, including dressing changes and the removal of old ointments causes discomfort for the patient. We therefore developed a new thermoreversible and transparent gel formulation that allows for filling wounds of different shapes and depths. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a wound covering gel on wound healing and the skin’s microcirculation.

O. Goertz; A. Ring; U. Knie; C. Abels; A. Daigeler; H.-U. Steinau; L. Steinstraesser; S. Langer

2010-01-01

335

Antioxidant, antimicrobial and wound healing activities of Boesenbergia rotunda.  

PubMed

The ethanolic extract of Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf was studied for its wound-healing potential. Since wound healing is interrelated with microbial infection and reactive oxygen species (ROS), this study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of B. rotunda. The antimicrobial activity of B. rotunda was studied against six bacterial and two yeast strains using disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC). The B. rotunda extract displayed potential antimicrobial and antifungal activities by inhibiting the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), S. epidermidis, and Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), and the yeasts Candida albicans (ATCC 10231), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MIC and MMC values varied from 0.04 to 25 mg/mL and from 0.16 to 25 mg/mL, respectively. The antioxidant activity of B. rotunda was evaluated by measuring the Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power (FRAP) and DPPH free radical scavenging activity. The FRAP and DPPH values were 22.2 microM/microg and 76.3 mg/mL, respectively. In the wound-healing studies, the topical application of the B. rotunda extract indicated a significantly increased percentage of wound contraction on day 12 compared with the control group. Histological studies showed the complete epidermis and found collagen fibers and hair follicles in the dermis. The results of the present study support the continued and expanded utilization of B. rotunda in Thai folk medicine. PMID:22908579

Jitvaropas, Rungrat; Saenthaweesuk, Suphaket; Somparn, Nuntiya; Thuppia, Amornnat; Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo

2012-07-01

336

Synergistic Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in an In Vitro Wound Model.  

PubMed

In individuals with polymicrobial infections, microbes often display synergistic interactions that can enhance their colonization, virulence, or persistence. One of the most prevalent types of polymicrobial infection occurs in chronic wounds, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the two most common causes. Although they are the most commonly associated microbial species in wound infections, very little is known about their interspecies relationship. Evidence suggests that P. aeruginosa-S. aureus coinfections are more virulent than monoculture infection with either species; however, difficulties in growing these two pathogens together in vitro have hampered attempts to uncover the mechanisms involved. Here we describe a simple and clinically relevant in vitro wound model that supported concomitant growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. We observed that the ability of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus to survive antibiotic treatment increased when they were grown together in planktonic cocultures and that antibiotic tolerance was further enhanced when they were grown together in the wound model. We attributed this enhanced tolerance to both the "host-derived" and "bacterium-derived" matrix components. Taken together, our data indicate that P. aeruginosa and S. aureus may benefit each other by coinfecting wounds and that the host-derived matrix may serve as important a role as the bacterium-derived matrix in protecting bacteria from some antibiotics. PMID:25156721

DeLeon, Stephanie; Clinton, Allie; Fowler, Haley; Everett, Jake; Horswill, Alexander R; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

2014-11-01

337

Wound healing in Eisenia foetida (Oligochaeta)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both anterior wounds (first eight segments removed) and shallow body wall wounds in Eisenia foetida are definitively closed by migration of epidermal columnar cells which undergo few morphological changes in the process. Epidermal basal cells do not contribute directly to wound epithelialization, but they enter the plug of cells which acts as the substratum for the columnar cells and function

Janice M. Burke

1974-01-01

338

BURN WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF Euphorbia hirta.  

PubMed

The Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta was screened for burn wound healing activity in rats as 2% W/W cream. The study was carried out based on the assessment of percentage reduction in original wound. It showed significant burn wound healing activity. PMID:22557201

Jaiprakash, B; Chandramohan; Reddy, D Narishma

2006-01-01

339

Functionalized Silk Biomaterials for Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Silk protein-biomaterial wound dressings with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and silver sulfadiazine were studied with a cutaneous excisional mouse wound model. Three different material designs (silk films, lamellar porous silk films, electrospun silk nanofibers) and two different drug functionalization techniques (drug coatings or drug loading into the materials) were studied to compare wound healing responses. Changes in wound size and histological assessments of wound tissues over time confirmed that functionalized silk biomaterial wound dressings increased wound healing rate, including reepithelialization, dermis proliferation, collagen synthesis, epidermal differentiation into hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and reduced scar formation, when compared to air-permeable Tegaderm™ tape (3M) (? control) and a commercially sold wound dressing (Tegaderm™ Hydrocolloid dressing) (+ control). All silk biomaterials studied were effective for wound healing, while the porous features of the silk biomaterials (lamellar porous films and electrospun nanofibers) and the incorporation of EGF/silver sulfadiazine, via drug loading or coating, provided the most rapid wound healing responses. This systematic approach to evaluate functionalized silk biomaterial wound dressings demonstrates a useful strategy to select formulations for further study towards new treatment options for chronic wounds. PMID:23184644

Gil, Eun Seok; Panilaitis, Bruce; Bellas, Evangelia

2013-01-01

340

Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids  

PubMed Central

Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Here we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues on in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration, and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 d alongside adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of TGF-? and ICAM-1 were significantly lower, while TNF-? was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical brassinosteroids accelerate wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and re-epithelialization phases of the wound-repair process, in partby enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in a wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing. PMID:23937635

Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

2013-01-01

341

Heterotopic Ossification in Wartime Wounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Heterotopic ossification (HO) refers to the formation of mature lamellar bone in nonosseous tissue. In the setting of high-energy wartime extremity wounds, HO is expected to complicate up to 64% of patients, has a predilection for the residual limbs of am...

B. K. Potter, J. A. Forsberg

2010-01-01

342

Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce

G. J. S. Taylor; G. C. Bannister; J. P. Leeming

1995-01-01

343

Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.  

PubMed

The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds. PMID:24813380

Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

2014-07-01

344

Sutures versus staples for wound closure in orthopaedic surgery: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background A recently published meta-analysis comparing metallic staples to sutures in orthopaedic procedures revealed three fold increase in risk for infection in stapled wounds. The studies included in the meta-analysis are at risk of bias due to experimental design limitations. A large randomized controlled trial is proposed to direct orthopaedic surgeons in their choice of wound closure material. Methods/Design A parallel group randomized controlled trial with institutional review board approval will be conducted. Patients will be randomized intraoperatively to have skin wounds closed with sutures or staples. Dressings will be used to maintain blinding outcome assessors. The primary outcome measure will be a composite all-cause wound complication outcome measure composed of: infection, wound drainage, wound necrosis, blistering, dehiscence, suture abscess and material sensitivity reaction. An independent review board blinded to treatment assignment will adjudicate suspected complications based on clinical data. All deceased patients will also be reviewed. An interim analysis of complications will take place after half of the patients have been recruited. All data will be analyzed by a blinded statistician. Dichotomous primary and secondary outcome measures will be analyzed using the Chi-squared statistic. Continuous outcome measures will be analyzed using Student's?t-test. Subgroup analysis will compare infection rates using sutures versus staples in each anatomic area (upper extremity, pelvis/acetabulum, hip/femur, knee, ankle). A further subgroup analysis will be conducted comparing trauma patients to elective surgery patients. Non-infected revision surgery will also be compared to primary surgery. Discussion Wound closure material is an afterthought for many orthopaedic surgeons. The combined results of several comparative trials suggests that the choice of wound closure materials may have an impact on the rate of surgical site infections. However, the strength of the evidence is poor given the heterogeneity of the methods employed in previous studies. The following study protocol aims to guide surgeons in their choice of wound closure material by determining if there is a difference in complication rates in sutured and stapled wounds. Trial Registration This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under the identifier NCT01146236 (registered June 14, 2010) PMID:22672186

2012-01-01

345

[Microbial stress of skin and wounds in clinical aspects and practice. Between search and destroy and monitor and relax].  

PubMed

The antibiotic treatment of microbial pathogens of the skin and wounds could so far not fulfil the expectations of an effective and permanent elimination of pathogens so that local treatment with antiseptic agents as a flanking measure to wound cleansing and debridement has become increasingly more established. Because an antiseptic treatment does not actually represent a treatment of infections, the current antimicrobial treatment strategy for infections in skin and wound areas consists of combined antibiotic and flanking antiseptic administration following debridement. However, the combined therapy is not always successful. There is an urgent need for new forms of therapy particularly to combat multiresistant pathogens in biofilms in infections of chronic and other complicated wounds. PMID:24445943

Daeschlein, G; Lutze, S; Jünger, M

2014-01-01

346

[Chronic wounds as a public health problem].  

PubMed

Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Regarding the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within the expected period according to the wound etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones, which include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcers and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. Eighty percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the rest are mostly neuropathic ulcers. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life of patients by requiring continuous topical treatment, causing immobility and pain in a high percentage of patients. Chronic wounds affect elderly population. Chronic leg ulcers affect 0.6-3 percent of those aged over 60, increasing to over 5 percent of those aged over 80. Emergence of chronic wounds is a substantial socioeconomic problem as 1-2 percent of western population will suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to the increasing proportion of elderly population along with the diabetic and obesity epidemic. It has been proved that chronic wounds account for the large proportion of costs in the health care system, even in rich societies. Socioeconomically, the management of chronic wounds reaches a total of 2-4 percent of the health budget in western countries. Treatment costs for some other diseases are not irrelevant, nor are the method and materials used for treating these wounds. Considering etiologic factors, a chronic wound demands a multidisciplinary approach with great efforts of health care professionals to treat it more efficiently, more simply and more painlessly for the patient, as well as more inexpensively for health care funds. PMID:25326983

Situm, Mirna; Koli?, Maja; Redzepi, Gzim; Antoli?, Slavko

2014-10-01

347

THE LINEAR EXCISIONAL WOUND: AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR HUMAN EX-VIVO WOUND EPITHELIALIZATION STUDIES  

PubMed Central

Background/Purpose Wound healing is a complex process that involves multiple intercellular and intracellular processes and extracellular interactions. Explanted human skin has been used as a model for the re-epithelialization phase of human wound healing. The currently used standard technique employs a circular punch biopsy tool to make the initial wound. Despite its wide use, the geometry of round wounds makes them difficult to measure reliably. Methods Our group has designed a linear wounding tool, and compared the variability in ex vivo human linear and circular wounds. Results An F test for differences in variances demonstrated that the linear wounds provided a population of wound size measurements that was fifty percent less variable than that obtained from a group of matched circular wounds. This reduction in variability would provide substantial advantages for the linear wound technique over the circular wound punch technique, by reducing the sample sizes required for comparative studies of factors that alter healing. Conclusion This linear wounding tool thus provides method for wounding that is standardized, provides minimal error in wound gap measurements, and is easily reproducible. We demonstrate its utility in an ex vivo model for the controlled investigation of human skin wounds. PMID:21605167

Rizzo, Amilcar Ezequiel; Beckett, Laurel A.; Baier, Brian S.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

2013-01-01

348

Infection control in severely burned patients  

PubMed Central

In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood stream infections. Universal application of early excision of burned tissues has made a substantial improvement in the control of wound-related infections in burns. Additionally, the development of new technologies in wound care have helped to decrease morbidity and mortality in severe burn victims. Many examples can be given of the successful control of wound infection, such as the application of an appropriate antibiotic solution to invasive wound infection sites with simultaneous vacuum-assisted closure, optimal preservation of viable tissues with waterjet debridement systems, edema and exudate controlling dressings impregnated with Ag (Silvercel, Aquacell-Ag). The burned patient is at high risk for NI. Invasive interventions including intravenous and urinary chateterization, and entubation pose a further risk of NIs. The use of newly designed antimicrobial impregnated chateters or silicone devices may help the control of infection in these immunocomprimised patients. Strict infection control practices (physical isolation in a private room, use of gloves and gowns during patient contact) and appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy guided by laboratory surveillance culture as well as routine microbial burn wound culture are essential to help reduce the incidance of infections due to antibiotic resistant microorganisms. PMID:24701406

Coban, Yusuf Kenan

2012-01-01

349

Preparation and Evaluation of Transdermal Plasters Containing Norfloxacin: A Novel Treatment for Burn Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Objective: In an attempt for better treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds, plaster formulations containing different concentrations of norfloxacin were prepared using polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl alcohol and evaluated for physicochemical parameters, in vitro drug release, antimicrobial activity, and burn wound healing properties. The prepared formulations were compared with silver sulfadiazine cream 1%, USP. Methods: Plaster formulations containing different concentrations of norfloxacin were prepared by solvent casting method using combination of polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl alcohol. These plasters were characterized for drug content, thickness, percentage elongation, tensile strength, in vitro drug release properties, and antimicrobial activity against various strains of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. The wound healing property was evaluated by histopathological examination and by measuring the wound contraction. Results: The in vitro release and in vitro skin permeation followed the first-order kinetics followed by diffusion as dominant release mechanism. In spite of the significant antimicrobial and wound healing effects produced by plasters, the observed values were less than the values obtained with silver sulfadiazine 1% cream (P < .05). Various histopathological changes observed during the study period (days 1, 4, 8, and 12) also supported the wound healing process. Conclusion: Based on the observed in vitro performances along with antimicrobial and wound healing effects, the 5% norfloxacin transdermal plasters could be employed as an alternative to commercial silver sulfadiazine 1% cream. PMID:20596234

Dua, Kamal; Ramana, M. V.; Sara, U. V. S.; Agrawal, D. K.; Pabreja, Kavita; Chakravarthi, Srikumar

2010-01-01

350

Topical treatments in equine wound management.  

PubMed

Wound repair is a complex series of coordinated events regulated by a delicately orchestrated cascade of cytokines and growth factors that restore the structural integrity of damaged tissue. Manipulation of the growth factor profile or wound environment through topical application of therapeutic agents could positively influence the rate and quality of wound repair. Transforming growth factor-beta,platelet-rich plasma, activated macrophage supernatant, and growth hormone are sources of mediators that may facilitate wound healing. Solcoseryl, ketanserin, tripeptide- and tetrapeptide-copper complexes, maltodextrin, live yeast cell derivative, corticosteroids,aloe vera, acemannan, phenytoin, honey, sugar, and maggots may modify the wound environment and promote repair. The process of wound healing is complex, however, and it is currently unknown whether any one agent can ameliorate all issues of repair or cover all vulnerabilities of impaired wound healing. PMID:15691601

Dart, Andrew J; Dowling, Brad A; Smith, Christine L

2005-04-01

351

[Chronic wound in waiting-room].  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are wounds that in addition to standard methods of treatment do not heal within 6-8 weeks, depending on their localization and etiology. Wound healing is affected by a number of factors: physical, psychosocial, relationship to the patient's disease, the condition of the wound itself, as well as the experience and knowledge of medical personnel and financial resources of the institution. Treating chronic wounds begins taking adequate history. Holistic approach is very important in each patient. It should take into account all the situations that can lead to the prolonged healing of wounds. The psychosocial status of the patient plays an important role in the treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:25326997

Spehar, Branka; Laginja, Stanislava; Marinovi?, Marin

2014-10-01

352

Management of Traumatic Wounds and a Novel Approach to Delivering Wound Care in Children  

PubMed Central

Significance: The costs and morbidity of pediatric traumatic wounds are not well known. The literature lacks a comprehensive review of the volume, management, and outcomes of children sustaining soft tissue injury. We briefly review the existing literature for traumatic wounds such as open fractures and burns. Such injuries require dedicated wound care and we propose a novel approach for more efficient and more effective delivery of dedicated pediatric wound care. Recent Advances: New pediatric literature is emerging regarding the long-term effects of wound care pain in traumatic injuries—especially burns. A variety of wound dressings and alternative management techniques exist and are geared toward reducing wound care pain. Our institution utilizes a unique model to provide adequate sedation and pain control through a dedicated pediatric wound care unit. We believe that this model reduces the cost of wound care by decreasing emergency department and operating room visits as well as hospital length of stay. Critical Issues: First, medical costs related to pediatric traumatic wound care are not insignificant. The need for adequate pain control and sedation in children with complex wounds is traditionally managed with operating room intervention. Afterward, added costs can be from a hospital stay for ongoing acute wound management. Second, morbidities of complex traumatic wounds are shown to be related to the acute wound care received. Future Directions: Further guidelines are needed to determine the most effective and efficient care of complex traumatic soft tissue injuries in the pediatric population. PMID:24761364

Bernabe, Kathryn Q.; Desmarais, Thomas J.; Keller, Martin S.

2014-01-01

353

Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

Safer, Joshua D.

2013-01-01

354

Filament wound rocket motor chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

1976-01-01

355

The Wound-Healing Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is on the rise in the United States and the rest of the world, and its complications are even more evident in the\\u000a aging population. Among the most severe complications of diabetes are impaired circulation and wound healing. The former condition,\\u000a together with peripheral neuropathy, contributes to an insensate, poorly vascularized lower extremity that is prone to the\\u000a development

Jeffrey M. Davidson; Luisa DiPietro

356

Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, BAMC 07-18, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound  

PubMed Central

Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important infectious agent of surgical sites and combat wounds. Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are common impediments to the healing of chronic infections. Here, we report the genome sequence of a highly multidrug-resistant strain of K. pneumoniae, BAMC 07-18, isolated from a combat wound of a soldier. PMID:25428975

Van Laar, Tricia A.; Chen, Tsute; Childers, Brandon M.; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

2014-01-01

357

Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): design and rationale for a large, multicenter collaborative 2 × 3 factorial trial of irrigating pressures and solutions in patients with open fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Open fractures frequently result in serious complications for patients, including infections, wound healing problems, and failure of fracture healing, many of which necessitate subsequent operations. One of the most important steps in the initial management of open fractures is a thorough wound irrigation and debridement to remove any contaminants. There is, however, currently no consensus regarding the optimal approach

2010-01-01

358

A Plasma Membrane Wound Proteome  

PubMed Central

Cells in mechanically active tissues undergo constant plasma membrane damage that must be repaired to allow survival. To identify wound-associated proteins, a cell-impermeant, thiol-reactive biotinylation reagent was used to label and subsequently isolate intracellular proteins that become exposed on the surface of cultured cells after plasma membrane damage induced by scraping from substratum or crushing with glass beads. Scrape-damaged cells survived injury and were capable of forming viable colonies. Proteins that were exposed to the cell surface were degraded or internalized a few seconds to several minutes after damage, except for vimentin, which was detectable on the cell surface for at least an hour after injury. Seven major biotinylated protein bands were identified on SDS-PAGE gels. Mass spectrometric studies identified cytoskeletal proteins (caldesmon-1 and vimentin), endoplasmic reticulum proteins (ERp57, ERp5, and HSP47), and nuclear proteins (lamin C, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F, and nucleophosmin-1) as major proteins exposed after injury. Although caldesmon was a major wound-associated protein in calpain small subunit knock-out fibroblasts, it was rapidly degraded in wild-type cells, probably by calpains. Lamin C exposure after wounding was most likely the consequence of nuclear envelope damage. These studies document major intracellular proteins associated with the cell surface of reversibly damaged somatic cells. The studies also show that externalization of some proteins reported to have physiologic or pathologic roles on the cell surface can occur in cells undergoing plasma membrane damage and subsequent repair. PMID:20810652

Mellgren, Ronald L.

2010-01-01

359

Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.  

PubMed

This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs. PMID:24912832

King, Brenda

2014-06-01

360

Topical naltrexone accelerates full-thickness wound closure in type 1 diabetic rats by stimulating angiogenesis.  

PubMed

Delays in wound healing often result in infection, chronic ulceration, and possible amputation of extremities. Impaired wound healing is a major complication of the 23 million people in the USA with diabetes, and financial and medical burdens are demanding new treatments for wound healing. Previous studies have demonstrated that topical application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in moisturizing cream reverses delays in wound closure in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. A target of NTX's action is DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In this study, granulation tissue was evaluated to ascertain the specific cellular targets that were impaired in diabetic wounds, as well as those that were enhanced following NTX application. Mast cell number as well as the number of new blood vessels immunoreactive to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and alpha smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) antibodies were recorded at 3, 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20 days following creation of full-thickness dorsal cutaneous wounds in normal and type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetic rats displayed delays in wound closure as well as a reduction in the number of mast cells responding to the injury, and delays in the spatial and temporal expression of FGF-2, VEGF, and ?-SMA in capillaries. Topical NTX accelerated the rate of wound closure and stimulated expression of angiogenic factors within granulation tissue of diabetic rats relative to control animals receiving saline in moisturizing cream. These data support observations that a novel biological pathway is impaired under diabetic conditions and can be modulated by topical NTX to enhance proliferative events in wound healing. PMID:23788174

McLaughlin, Patricia J; Immonen, Jessica A; Zagon, Ian S

2013-07-01

361

In vitro activity of Bay 12-8039, a new 8-methoxyquinolone, compared to the activities of 11 other oral antimicrobial agents against 390 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria isolated from human and animal bite wound skin and soft tissue infections in humans.  

PubMed Central

The in vitro activity of Bay 12-8039, a new oral 8-methoxyquinolone, was compared to the activities of 11 other oral antimicrobial agents (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin, sparfloxacin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, amoxicillin clavulanate, penicillin, cefuroxime, cefpodoxime, and doxycycline) against 250 aerobic and 140 anaerobic bacteria recently isolated from animal and human bite wound infections. Bay 12-8039 was active against all aerobic isolates, both gram-positive and gram-negative isolates, at < or = 1.0 microg/ml (MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited [MIC90s < or = 0.25 microg/ml) and was active against most anaerobes at < or = 0.5 microg/ml; the exceptions were Fusobacterium nucleatum and other Fusobacterium species (MIC90s, > or = 4.0 microg/ml) and one strain of Prevotella loeschii (MICs, 2.0 microg/ml). In comparison, the other quinolones tested had similar in vitro activities against the aerobic strains but were less active against the anaerobes, including peptostreptococci, Porphyromonas species, and Prevotella species. The fusobacteria were relatively resistant to all the antimicrobial agents tested except penicillin G (one penicillinase-producing strain of F. nucleatum was found) and amoxicillin clavulanate. PMID:9210683

Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Hudspeth, M; Hunt Gerardo, S; Merriam, C V

1997-01-01

362

Can tap water be used to irrigate wounds in A&E?  

PubMed

After critiquing the seven selected articles, it seems likely that tap water can be used as an irrigant and cleansing agent for soft-tissue wounds. However, the current research on tap water has involved human and rat wound studies and tap water culture studies (Dire, 1990; Riyat and Quinton, 1997; Moscati, 1998). The research is strong, but limitations in current research remain an issue for practice (Towler, 2000). The use of tap water is a cost and practicality issue, and changing current practice is always difficult, as it would seem that the use normal saline is more of a ritualistic process rather than one based on hard evidence (Glover, 1999). Two key conclusions could be drawn from the available research: The tap water tested was generally agreed to be safe from harmful bacteria and had no contaminating bacteria; Human and rat models showed a clear benefit in using tap water to cleanse soft tissue wounds, thus concluding tap water is safe for use on wounds (Towler, 2000). The financial benefits were also stated in the studies; tap water can have huge cost-saving potential for A&E departments. In an increasingly cost-conscious NHS this could be a major driving factor for changing practice. However, there were limitations in the methodologies of the selected articles in this critique. Most of the studies measured wound infection rates, but the various researchers did not take into account other factors affecting the likelihood of infection rates and wound progress which would ultimately affect wound infection rates by killing any bacteria in vivo. PMID:11974735

O'Neill, Daniel

363

Development of fibroblast culture in three-dimensional activated carbon fiber-based scaffold for wound healing.  

PubMed

This work developed a novel bi-layer wound dressing composed of 3D activated carbon fibers that allows facilitates fibroblast cell growth and migration to a wound site for tissue reconstruction, and the gentamicin is incorporated into a poly(?-glutamic acid)/gelatin membrane to prevent bacterial infection. In an in vitro, field emission scanning electron microscopy shows that rat skin fibroblasts appeared and spread on the surface of activated carbon fibers, and penetrated the interior and exterior of the 3D activated carbon fiber construct to a depth of roughly 200 ?m. An in vivo analysis shows that fibroblast cells containing the proposed 3D scaffold had the potential of a biologically functionalized dressing to accelerate wound closure. Additionally, fibroblasts migrated to the wound site in a bi-layer wound dressing containing fibroblasts, enhancing fibronectin and type I collagen expression, resulting in faster skin regeneration than that achieved with a Tegaderm™ hydrocolloid dressing or gauze. PMID:22415364

Huang, Wen-Ying; Yeh, Chia-Lin; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Jai-Sing; Ko, Tse-Hao; Lin, Yu-Hsin

2012-06-01

364

Irradiation at 660 nm modulates different genes central to wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wound healing is a highly orchestrated process and involves a wide variety of cellular components, chemokines and growth factors. Laser irradiation has influenced gene expression and release of various growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins involved in wound healing. This study aimed to determine the expression profile of genes involved in wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded fibroblast cells in response to irradiation at a wavelength of 660 nm. Human skin fibroblast cells (WS1) were irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength 660 nm; fluence 5 J/cm2; power output 100 mW; power density 11 mW/cm2; spot size 9.1 cm2; exposure duration 7 min 35 s). Total RNA was isolated and 1 ?g reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used as a template in real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Eighty four genes involved in wound healing (extracellular matrix and cell adhesion; inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; growth factors; and signal transduction) were evaluated in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models. Forty eight hours post-irradiation, 6 genes were significantly upregulated and 8 genes were down-regulated in irradiated wounded cells, whereas 1 gene was up-regulated and 33 genes down-regulated in irradiated diabetic wounded cells. Irradiation of stressed fibroblast cells to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 modulated the expression of different genes involved in wound healing in different cell models. Modulation of these genes leads to the effects of laser irradiation seen both in vivo and in vitro, and facilitates the wound healing process.

Houreld, Nicolette N.

2014-02-01

365

Silver Sol Improves Hospital Associated Wound Care In Long Term, High Risk Hospital Patients Who Have Pressure Sores Including MRSA: A Review and Study of Wound Care Treatments in Long Stay, High Risk Hospitals. By  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silver Sol is a nutritional supplement that has anti-bacterial, antiviral and anti fungal properties (US Patent #7135195). Silver Sol has unique mechanisms of action that promote wound healing by preventing infection and promoting stem cell release and activation (Nexus, 2008). The purpose of this study is to review the results of nursing homes using Silver Sol for pressure sores infected

Gordon Pedersen

366

Maggot debridement therapy for serious horse wounds - a survey of practitioners.  

PubMed

Hoof disease and injuries are common and serious problems for equines. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) has been used to treat problematic wounds in humans, but has been used only rarely in other animals. US veterinarians who had employed MDT were surveyed to investigate their reasons for the choice of this treatment and their clinical experiences with it. Between 1997 and 2003, 13 horses were treated by eight veterinarians who used MDT to control infection or debride wounds, which could not easily be reached surgically or were not responding to conventional therapy. Seven animals were lame, and six were expected to require euthanasia. Following maggot therapy, all infections were eradicated or controlled, and only one horse had to be euthanased. No adverse events were attributed to maggot therapy for any of these cases, other than presumed discomfort during therapy. The data collected suggest that maggot therapy could be useful for treating some serious equine hoof and leg wounds. PMID:16831562

Sherman, Ronald A; Morrison, Scott; Ng, David

2007-07-01

367

Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Extremity Infections in Soldiers  

PubMed Central

War wound infection and osteomyelitis caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species have been prevalent during the 2003–2005 military operations in Iraq. Twenty-three soldiers wounded in Iraq and subsequently admitted to our facility from March 2003 to May 2004 had wound cultures positive for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. Eighteen had osteomyelitis, 2 burn infection, and 3 deep wound infection. Primary therapy for these infections was directed antimicrobial agents for an average of 6 weeks. All soldiers initially improved, regardless of the specific type of therapy. Patients were followed up to 23 months after completing therapy, and none had recurrent infection with Acinetobacter species. Despite the drug resistance that infecting organisms demonstrated in this series, a regimen of carefully selected extended antimicrobial-drug therapy appears effective for osteomyelitis caused by MDR Acinetobacter spp. PMID:16102310

Moran, Kimberly A.; McAllister, C. Kenneth; Gray, Paula J.

2005-01-01

368

Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Wound Healing Potential of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii  

PubMed Central

Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The aim of the study is to determine the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and in vivo wound healing properties of methanol leaf extracts of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii. The antimicrobial activity was investigated using agar well diffusion and microdilution methods. The free radical scavenging activity of the methanol leaf extracts was performed using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). The rate of wound contraction was determined using excision model. The test organisms used were Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 4853, Bacillus subtilis NTCC 10073, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and clinical strains of Candida albicans. The MICs of methanol leaf extract of J. flava against test organisms were E. coli (7.5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (7.5?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (7.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (5?mg/mL). The MICs of methanol leaf extract of L. welwitschii against test organisms were E. coli (5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (10?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (2.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (2.5?mg/mL). The MBC/MFC of the extract was between 10 and 50?mg/mL. The IC50 of the reference antioxidant, ?-tocopherol, was 1.5??g/mL and the methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii had IC50 of 65.3??g/mL and 81.8??g/mL, respectively. The methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii gave a significant reduction in wound size as compared to the untreated. The rates of wound closure after the application of the extracts (7.5%?w/w) were compared to the untreated wounds. On the 9th day, J. flava extract had a percentage wound closure of 99% (P < 0.01) and that of L. welwitschii exhibited wound closure of 95% (P < 0.05) on the 13th day compared to the untreated wounds. The two extracts significantly (P < 0.01) increased the tensile strength of wounds compared to the untreated wounds. The extracts treated wound tissues showed improved angiogenesis, collagenation, and reepithelialization compared to the untreated wound tissues. The preliminary phytochemical screening of J. flava and L. welwitschii leaf extracts revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, and glycosides. The above results indicate that methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii possess antimicrobial and wound healing properties which may justify the traditional uses of J. flava and L. welwitschii in the treatment of wounds and infections. PMID:24159350

Bempah, Solomon Boamah; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Ayande, Patrick George; Adarkwa-Yiadom, Martin; Mensah, Kwesi Boadu

2013-01-01

369

Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Wound Healing Potential of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii.  

PubMed

Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The aim of the study is to determine the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and in vivo wound healing properties of methanol leaf extracts of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii. The antimicrobial activity was investigated using agar well diffusion and microdilution methods. The free radical scavenging activity of the methanol leaf extracts was performed using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). The rate of wound contraction was determined using excision model. The test organisms used were Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 4853, Bacillus subtilis NTCC 10073, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and clinical strains of Candida albicans. The MICs of methanol leaf extract of J. flava against test organisms were E. coli (7.5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (7.5?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (7.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (5?mg/mL). The MICs of methanol leaf extract of L. welwitschii against test organisms were E. coli (5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (10?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (2.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (2.5?mg/mL). The MBC/MFC of the extract was between 10 and 50?mg/mL. The IC50 of the reference antioxidant, ? -tocopherol, was 1.5? ? g/mL and the methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii had IC50 of 65.3? ? g/mL and 81.8? ? g/mL, respectively. The methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii gave a significant reduction in wound size as compared to the untreated. The rates of wound closure after the application of the extracts (7.5%?w/w) were compared to the untreated wounds. On the 9th day, J. flava extract had a percentage wound closure of 99% (P < 0.01) and that of L. welwitschii exhibited wound closure of 95% (P < 0.05) on the 13th day compared to the untreated wounds. The two extracts significantly (P < 0.01) increased the tensile strength of wounds compared to the untreated wounds. The extracts treated wound tissues showed improved angiogenesis, collagenation, and reepithelialization compared to the untreated wound tissues. The preliminary phytochemical screening of J. flava and L. welwitschii leaf extracts revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, and glycosides. The above results indicate that methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii possess antimicrobial and wound healing properties which may justify the traditional uses of J. flava and L. welwitschii in the treatment of wounds and infections. PMID:24159350

Agyare, Christian; Bempah, Solomon Boamah; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Ayande, Patrick George; Adarkwa-Yiadom, Martin; Mensah, Kwesi Boadu

2013-01-01

370

Management of radiated reoperative wounds of the cervicothoracic spine: the role of the trapezius turnover flap.  

PubMed

Reoperation for malignant disease of the cervicothoracic spine can lead to compromised wound healing secondary to poor tissue quality from previous operations, heavily irradiated beds, and concomitant steroid therapy. Other complicating factors include exposed dura and spinal implants. Introducing well-vascularized soft tissue to obliterate dead space is critical to reliable wound healing. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the trapezius turnover flap in the management of these complex wounds. This study is a retrospective review of all patients undergoing trapezius muscle turnover flaps for closure of complex cervicothoracic wounds after spinal operations for metastatic or primary tumors. Six patients (3 male/3 female) were operated over an 18-month period (mean patient age, 43 years). Primary pathologies included radiation-induced peripheral nerve sheath tumor (N = 2), chondrosarcoma (N = 1), nonsmall-cell lung cancer (N = 1), paraganglioma (N = 1), and spindle cell sarcoma (N = 1). Trapezius muscle turnover flaps were unilateral and based on the transverse cervical artery in every patient. Indication for flap closure included inability to perform primary layered closure (N = 3), open wound with infection (N = 2), and exposed hardware (N = 1). All patients had previous operations of the cervicothoracic spine (mean, 5.8 months; range 2-9 months) for malignant disease and prior radiation therapy. Exposed dura was present in all patients, and 2 patients had dural repairs with bovine pericardial patches. Spinal stabilization hardware was present in 4 patients. All patients underwent perioperative treatment with systemic corticosteroids. All flaps survived, and primary wound healing was achieved in each patient. The only wound complication was a malignant pleural effusion communicating with the back wound, which was controlled with a closed suction drain. All wounds remained healed during the follow-up period. Four patients died from progression of disease within 10 months of surgery. The trapezius turnover flap has been used successfully when local tissue conditions prevent primary closure, or in the setting of open, infected wounds with exposed dura and hardware. The ease of flap elevation and minimal donor site morbidity make it a useful, single-stage reconstructive option in these difficult wounds. PMID:11601574

Disa, J J; Smith, A W; Bilsky, M H

2001-10-01

371

Wound Care Nursing: Professional Issues and Opportunities  

PubMed Central

As the field of wound care advances and seeks validity as a distinctive healthcare specialty, it becomes imperative to define practice competencies for all related professionals in the arena. As such, the myriad nurses practicing wound care in settings across the continuum should be understood for their unique contribution to the wound care team. Furthermore, the hierarchy of wound care nursing with varying levels of licensure, certification, and scope of practice can be clarified to delineate leadership and reimbursement issues to meet current health care challenges. A review of the role of nursing in wound care from a historical and evolutionary perspective helps to characterize the trend towards advanced practice nursing in the wound care specialty. PMID:24527304

Corbett, Lisa Q.

2012-01-01

372

Epidermal T Cells and Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

The murine epidermis contains resident T cells that express a canonical ?? TCR. These cells arise from fetal thymic precursors and use a TCR that is restricted to the skin in adult animals. These cells assume a dendritic morphology in normal skin and constitutively produce low levels of cytokines that contribute to epidermal homeostasis. When skin is wounded, an unknown antigen is expressed on damaged keratinocytes. Neighboring ?? T cells then round up and contribute to wound healing by local production of epithelial growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of skin ?? T cells, wound healing is impaired. Similarly, epidermal T cells from patients with healing wounds are activated and secreting growth factors. Patients with non-healing wounds have a defective epidermal T cell response. Information gained on the role of epidermal-resident T cells in the mouse may provide information for development of new therapeutic approaches to wound healing. PMID:20483798

Havran, Wendy L.; Jameson, Julie M.

2010-01-01

373

A novel microfluidic wound model for testing antimicrobial agents against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius biofilms  

PubMed Central

Background Current methods for testing treatments for veterinary surgical site infections can successfully emulate elements of a chronic wound, but these are time consuming and costly, requiring specialized laboratory equipment and considerable space to house study animals. Microfluidic devices however, can be coated with collagen and maintained at basal body temperature, providing a more cost-effective and space-saving model of a chronic wound. Our study assesses the applicability of a new microfluidic model by testing the activity of DispersinB against biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP); DispersinB has been shown to prevent biofilm growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis, another prominent wound colonizer. Results We successfully developed a microfluidic model to examine the effects of antimicrobial therapy on biofilms formed by organisms associated with wound infections in companion animals (e.g. MRSP). Although, we were unable to recapitulate previous findings that DispersinB-Gentamycin is highly effective against Staphylococcal biofilms using this model, we were able to confirm its effect in a microtitre plate. Differences in the experimental conditions likely account for this result (e.g. strains tested, flow conditions, treatment time, etc.). In the microtitre plate assay, DispersinB inhibited biofilm growth after a 24 hour period; there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of DispersinB-Gentamycin and the amount of biofilm remaining following treatment. Collagen-coated microtitre plates showed a similar result, but this did not correlate as well; collagen, the most abundant protein in the body may help to retain the biomass of treated biofilms. Conclusions Our model may be useful in examining the effect of treatment on wound infections, although we acknowledge that in this model the test organisms may be more recalcitrant to antimicrobials than in other published systems. We contend that this may in fact better represent the conditions in vivo, where organisms associated with chronic wound infections are highly resistant to antimicrobials. PMID:24411017

2014-01-01

374

Use of a biological extracellular matrix wound therapy to heal complex, chronic wounds.  

PubMed

This small case series involved four patients with vascular impairment and multiple comorbidities whose wounds had not responded to standard treatment. Use of this novel therapy help initiate wound healing and improve quality of life. PMID:19418784

Rando, T

2009-02-01

375

Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or in proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds.

Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.; Carl, James

2011-01-01

376

Growth factors and corneal epithelial wound healing  

PubMed Central

In this article, we briefly review recent findings in the effects of growth factors including the EGF family, KGF, HGF, IGF, insulin, and TGF-? on corneal epithelial wound healing. We discuss the essential role of EGFR in inter-receptor cross-talk in response to wounding in corneal epithelium and bring forward a concept of “alarmins” to the field of wound healing research. PMID:19733636

Yu, Fu-Shin X.; Yin, Jia; Xu, Keping; Huang, Jenny

2010-01-01

377

Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds  

SciTech Connect

The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

1983-10-01

378

CCMR: Developing a convection asisted wound dressing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To develop an improved bandage containing an artificial vascular structure that will effectively treat severe burn wounds. Nutrients injected into the artificial vascular system from outside the body will reach the new cells growing over the wound, and thus allow them to proliferate. With the new cells proliferating, the wound may heal, and a new vascular structure will grow inside the skin to replace the destroyed structure. Since in the bandage, convection is being used to transport nutrients, we call this bandage a convection assisted wound dressing.

Baker, Wesley

2004-08-17

379

Prevention and Management of Nonhealing Perineal Wounds  

PubMed Central

Complex perineal wounds are at risk for nonhealing. High-risk procedures include proctectomy for Crohn disease, anal cancer and radiated distal rectal cancers. A basic understanding of both patient and procedural risk factors is helpful in planning and executing operative procedures for these conditions and to minimize associated wound complications. Diabetes, obesity, and malnutrition may contribute to wound breakdown and failure to heal. Delaying operative intervention, adding nutritional supplementation, and employing intestinal diversion as well as myocutaneous flaps may help optimize conditions for wound healing. PMID:24436658

Kamrava, Allen; Mahmoud, Najjia N.

2013-01-01

380

Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings, by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could