Sample records for wound infection

  1. Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kohlberg, W I; Tellis, V A; Bhat, D J; Driscoll, B; Veith, F J

    1980-05-01

    Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy were analyzed retrospectively. When prophylactic antibiotics were not used, 20% of the closed nephrectomy wounds became infected. Eighty-one percent of the infections were due to staphylococcal organisms. Wounds containing a preexisting focus of infection or those reoperated on more than once within a month prior to nephrectomy are at such high risk for infection that these wounds should be left open for secondary healing. With the use of prophylactic cefazolin sodium, in the immediate preoperative and postoperative period, no wound infections have occurred in 18 closed transplant nephrectomy wounds. PMID:6990895

  2. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  3. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  4. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the General Surgery Department in Khartoum Teaching Hospital– Sudan. All Adult patients (age ?18 years) admitted during March 1st to 31st October 2010 were recruited. Multivariable logistic analysis was done to identify wound infection risk factors. Prescriptions were audited against predetermined criteria. Results: A total of 540 patients were recruited; (females73.7% of total ). The performed surgical procedures were 547. The rate of wound infection was 10.9%. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that; ASA score ? 3; (p= <0.001), wound class (p= 0.001), and laparoscopic surgical technique; (p= 0.002) were significantly associated with prevalence of wound infection. Surgical prophylaxis was unnecessarily given to 311 (97.5%) of 319 patients for whom it was not recommended. Prophylaxis was recommended for 221 patients; of them 218 (98.6 %) were given preoperative dose in the operating rooms. Evaluation of prescriptions for those patients showed that; spectrum of antibiotic was adequate for 160 (73.4%) patients, 143 (65.6%) were given accurate doses, only 4 (1.8%) had the first preoperative dose/s in proper time window, and for 186 (85.3%) of them prophylaxis was extended post-operatively. Only 36 (6.7%) prescriptions were found to be complying with the stated criteria. Conclusion: The rate of wound infection was high and prophylactic antibiotics were irrationally used. Multiple interventions are needed to correct the situation. PMID:24551629

  5. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  6. Topical antimicrobial toolkit for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Alam, Tarik; Marin, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Increased bacterial burden and formation of biofilm has been recognized as one of the key factors contributing to delayed wound healing. There is a toolbox of topical antimicrobial wound dressings that incorporate silver, iodine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, methylene blue/gentian violet, and honey. This article reviews a diverse range of evidence to discuss the advantages and disadvantage of topical antimicrobial dressings. Discussion will provide guidance on when and how to use topical antimicrobial dressings to achieve optimal outcomes and cost-effective wound care. Chronic wounds do not follow a predictable and expected healing trajectory, and they may persist for months or years due to underlying disease processes, recurrent injury, and comorbidities.1 With an aging population and increased prevalence of chronic diseases, the majority of wounds are refractory to healing, placing a significant burden on the health system and individual patients. Bacterial burden and biofilm have been recognized as key factors contributing to persistent inflammation, tissue destruction, delayed wound healing, and other serious complications (especially in individuals who are frail and immune-compromised).2 It has been demonstrated that when bacterial growth reaches a critical threshold of 105 bacteria per gram of tissue, bacterial toxins can cause tissue damage in the superficial wound compartment, delaying healing.2 In the literature, this phenomenon is referred to as critical colonization, increased bacterial burden, superficial infection, or localized infection. According to a recent review, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized infection.3. PMID:25433174

  7. Microbiology of animal bite wound infections.

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Fredrick M; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2011-04-01

    The microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans is often polymicrobial, with a broad mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Bacteria recovered from infected bite wounds are most often reflective of the oral flora of the biting animal, which can also be influenced by the microbiome of their ingested prey and other foods. Bacteria may also originate from the victim's own skin or the physical environment at the time of injury. Our review has focused on bite wound infections in humans from dogs, cats, and a variety of other animals such as monkeys, bears, pigs, ferrets, horses, sheep, Tasmanian devils, snakes, Komodo dragons, monitor lizards, iguanas, alligators/crocodiles, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, prairie dogs, swans, and sharks. The medical literature in this area has been made up mostly of small case series or case reports. Very few studies have been systematic and are often limited to dog or cat bite injuries. Limitations of studies include a lack of established or inconsistent criteria for an infected wound and a failure to utilize optimal techniques in pathogen isolation, especially for anaerobic organisms. There is also a lack of an understanding of the pathogenic significance of all cultured organisms. Gathering information and conducting research in a more systematic and methodical fashion through an organized research network, including zoos, veterinary practices, and rural clinics and hospitals, are needed to better define the microbiology of animal bite wound infections in humans. PMID:21482724

  8. Enhanced susceptibility to infections in a diabetic wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Tobias; Spielmann, Malte; Zuhaili, Baraa; Koehler, Till; Fossum, Magdalena; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Yao, Feng; Steinstraesser, Lars; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Eriksson, Elof

    2008-01-01

    Background Wound infection is a common complication in diabetic patients. The progressive spread of infections and development of drug-resistant strains underline the need for further insights into bacterial behavior in the host in order to develop new therapeutic strategies. The aim of our study was to develop a large animal model suitable for monitoring the development and effect of bacterial infections in diabetic wounds. Methods Fourteen excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of diabetic and non-diabetic Yorkshire pigs and sealed with polyurethane chambers. Wounds were either inoculated with 2 × 108 Colony-Forming Units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus or injected with 0.9% sterile saline. Blood glucose was monitored daily, and wound fluid was collected for bacterial quantification and measurement of glucose concentration. Tissue biopsies for microbiological and histological analysis were performed at days 4, 8, and 12. Wounds were assessed for reepithelialization and wound contraction. Results Diabetic wounds showed a sustained significant infection (>105 CFU/g tissue) compared to non-diabetic wounds (p < 0.05) over the whole time course of the experiment. S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed tissue infection with up to 8 × 107 CFU/g wound tissue. Non-diabetic wounds showed high bacterial counts at day 4 followed by a decrease and no apparent infection at day 12. Epidermal healing in S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed a significant delay compared with non-inoculated diabetic wounds (59% versus 84%; p < 0.05) and were highly significant compared with healing in non-diabetic wounds (97%; p < 0.001). Conclusion Diabetic wounds developed significantly more sustained infection than non-diabetic wounds. S. aureus inoculation leads to invasive infection and significant wound healing delay and promotes invasive co-infection with endogenous bacteria. This novel wound healing model provides the opportunity to closely assess infections during diabetic wound healing and to monitor the effect of therapeutical agents in vivo. PMID:18312623

  9. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  10. JAMA Patient Page: Wound Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infection to the bloodstream, involving other organs • Septic shock , a critical illness involving the whole body, which ... antibiotics. In the case of sepsis or septic shock, intensive care and life support may be needed. ...

  11. Cobra bite wound infection caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Po-Yu; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Wu, Zong-Yen; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Jin-An; Mao, Yan-Chiao; Tung, Kwong-Chung

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella wound infections after snake bites are rare. We report the case of a Shewanella algae wound infection associated with a cobra bite in a 27-year-old woman. The isolate was confirmed by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. This case expands the reported spectrum of infection caused by S. algae and raises the possibility that S. algae could be a causative pathogen in wound infections resulting from snake bites. PMID:24602312

  12. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  13. Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

  14. Successful treatment of an infected wound in infants by a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and arginine supplementation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kouji Masumoto; Kouji Nagata; Yoichiro Oka; Hiroki Kai; Sadako Yamaguchi; Mika Wada; Tsuyoshi Kusuda; Toshiro Hara; Shin-ichi Hirose; Akinori Iwasaki; Tomoaki Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveWound dehiscence caused by surgical site infection (SSI) presents a complicated problem. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was developed to treat wound dehiscence. Nutritional treatment using arginine has also been recently shown to be effective for the treatment of pressure ulcers. Therefore, wound complications due to SSI were treated using NPWT combined with nutritional therapy with an arginine-rich supplement (ARS).

  15. Platelet-rich plasma inside the sternotomy wound reduces the incidence of sternal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Serraino, Giuseppe F; Dominijanni, Andrea; Jiritano, Federica; Rossi, Michele; Cuda, Aldo; Caroleo, Santo; Brescia, Adalgisa; Renzulli, Attilio

    2015-06-01

    Despite the large choice of wide-spectrum antibiotic therapy, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) following cardiac surgery is a life-threatening complication worldwide. This study evaluated that the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applied inside the sternotomy wound would reduce the effect of sternal wound infections, both superficial and deep. Between January 2007 and January 2012, 1093 consecutive patients underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. Patients were divided into two groups. Group B, the study group, included those who received the PRP applied inside the sternotomy wound before closure. Group A, the control group, included patients who received a median sternotomy but without the application of PRP. Antibiotic prophylaxis remained unchanged across the study and between the two groups. Occurrence of DSWI was significantly higher in group A than in group B [10 of 671 (1·5%) versus 1 of 422 (0·20%), P = 0·043]. Also, superficial sternal wound infections (SSWIs) were significantly higher in group A than in group B [19 of 671 (2·8%) versus 2 of 422 (0·5%), P = 0·006]. The use of PRP can significantly reduce the occurrence of DSWI and SSWI in cardiac surgery. PMID:23692143

  16. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the incidence of DSWI and effect of re-exploration for bleeding on DSWI mortality. Methods We reviewed 73,700 cases registered in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD) during the period from 2004 to 2009 and divided them into five groups: 26,597 of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) cases, 23,136 valvular surgery cases, 17,441 thoracic aortic surgery cases, 4,726 valvular surgery plus CABG cases, and 1,800 thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG cases. We calculated the overall incidence of postoperative DSWI, incidence of postoperative DSWI according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI cases according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI according to whether re-exploration for bleeding, and the intervals between the operation and deaths according to whether re-exploration for bleeding were investigated. Operative mortality is defined as in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Risk factors for DSWI were also examined. Results The overall incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8%. The incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8% after isolated CABG, 1.3% after valve surgery, 2.8% after valve surgery plus CABG, 1.9% after thoracic aortic surgery, and 3.4% after thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG. The 30-day and operative mortality in patients with DSWI was higher after more complicated operative procedures. The incidence of re-exploration for bleeding in DSWI cases was 11.1%. The overall 30-day/operative mortality after DSWI with re-exploration for bleeding was 23.0%/48.0%, and it was significantly higher than in the absence of re-exploration for bleeding (8.1%/22.0%). The difference between the intervals between the operation and death according to whether re-exploration for bleeding had been performed was not significant. Age and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors related to re-exploration for bleeding, and diabetes control was a significant risk factor related to DSWI for all surgical groups. Previous CABG was a significant risk factor related to both re-exploration for bleeding and DSWI for all surgical groups. Conclusions The incidence of DSWI after cardiac surgery according to the data entered in the JACVSD registry during the period from 2004 to 2009 was 1.8%, and more complicated procedures were followed by higher incidence and mortality. When re-exploration for bleeding was performed, mortality was significantly higher than when it was not performed. Prevention of DSWI and establishment of an effective appropriate treatment for DSWI may improve the outcome of cardiac surgery. PMID:23688324

  17. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Laparoscopic Omentoplasty for Deep Sternal Wound Infections after Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Brabandere, Kristof; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Delvaux, Georges; Wellens, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection remains one of the most serious complications in patients who undergo median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass surgery. We describe our experience in treating 6 consecutive patients with our treatment protocol that combines aggressive débridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative-pressure wound therapy, omentoplasty with laparoscopically harvested omentum, and the use of bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flaps. The number of débridements needed in order to attain clinically clean wounds and negative cultures varied between 1 and 10, with a median of 5. The length of stay after omentoplasty and bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flap placement varied between 11 and 22 days. One of the 6 patients developed a small wound dehiscence that was treated conservatively. No bleeding related to vacuum-assisted closure therapy was identified. Three patients had pneumonia. Two of the 3 patients had an episode of acute renal failure. The 30-day mortality rate was zero, although 1 patient died in the hospital 43 days after the reconstructive surgery, of multiple-organ failure due to pneumonia that was induced by end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. No patient died between hospital discharge and the most recent follow-up date (4–12 mo). Late local follow-up results, both functional and aesthetic, were good. We conclude that negative-pressure wound therapy—in combination with omentoplasty using laparoscopically harvested omentum and with the use of bilateral pectoral advancement flaps—is a valuable technique in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection because it produces good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:22719146

  18. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  19. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. PMID:25972413

  20. Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hashmi, Javad T.; Kurup, Divya B.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout most of history, serious burns occupying a large percentage of body surface area were an almost certain death sentence because of subsequent infection. A number of factors such as disruption of the skin barrier, ready availability of bacterial nutrients in the burn milieu, destruction of the vascular supply to the burned skin, and systemic disturbances lead to immunosuppression combined together to make burns particularly susceptible to infection. In the 20th century the introduction of antibiotic and antifungal drugs, the use of topical antimicrobials that could be applied to burns, and widespread adoption of early excision and grafting all helped to dramatically increase survival. However the relentless increase in microbial resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials has led to a renewed search for alternative approaches to prevent and combat burn infections. This review will cover patented strategies that have been issued or filed with regard to new topical agents, preparations, and methods of combating burn infections. Animal models that are used in preclinical studies are discussed. Various silver preparations (nanocrystalline and slow release) are the mainstay of many approaches but antimicrobial peptides, topical photodynamic therapy, chitosan preparations, new iodine delivery formulations, phage therapy and natural products such as honey and essential oils have all been tested. This active area of research will continue to provide new topical antimicrobials for burns that will battle against growing multi-drug resistance. PMID:20429870

  1. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Aleah L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation following Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3–4 month) and aged (18–20 month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal, subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?l/injection) or saline control (50 ?l/injection) 30 minutes after wound infection. Mice were sacrificed at days 3 and 7 post wound infection and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no affect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of post-operative wound infection or chronic, non-healing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  2. A clinical trial using co-trimoxazole in an attempt to reduce wound infection rates in dog bite wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Jones; T. N. Stanbridge

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients were entered into a randomized, prospective double-blind, placebo controlled trial to assess the use of co-trimoxazole in reducing wound infections after dog bites. Although there was a reduction in the wound infection rate from 13.8% in the placebo group to 5.5% in the treatment group this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.135). If

  3. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome due to burn wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Farroha, A.; Frew, Q.; Jabir, S.; Dziewulski, P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction. The staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is an acute exfoliation of the skin caused by exfoliative toxins A and B. Although Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of burn wound infection, SSSS following burn wound infection is rare. Method. A retrospective review of all SSSS cases admitted to a regional burns service between January 2008 and January 2012 was undertaken. Results. Two cases of SSSS were reported during this time period as occurring following burns injury. The first case was a 17-month-old boy who had been hospitalized for a conservative treatment of 6% total body surface area (TBSA) mixed depth scald burns. On day four he developed exfoliation of 85% TBSA. The second case was a ten-month-old boy who sustained a 1% TBSA scald burn and was managed conservatively in the community by his general practitioner. On day five, he developed exfoliation of 80% TBSA. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the burn wounds in both cases. Conclusion: These two cases show that it is vital for burns surgeons and intensive care specialists to be aware of the possibility of SSSS occurring in patients with burn injuries with its potential devastating effects. PMID:23467312

  4. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 ?mol/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections. PMID:21923951

  5. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of the fistula and PP mesh replacement followed by reinstitution of NPWT and flap closure. In addition to appropriate systemic antibiotics and nutritional optimisation, the adjunctive use of NPWT resulted in successful closure of 86% of infected abdominal wounds with exposed prosthetic mesh. Patient hospital LOS (except those with PG mesh), operative procedures and readmissions were decreased during NPWT compared with treatment prior to NPWT. Future multi-site prospective, controlled studies would provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions could be made in the management of these challenging and costly cases. PMID:21176107

  6. Investigation of lysine acrylate containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels as wound dressings in normal and infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Larson, Jeffery C; Drapala, Pawel W; Pérez-Luna, Víctor H; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J; Brey, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    The design of materials for cutaneous wound dressings has advanced from passive wound covers to bioactive materials that promote skin regeneration and prevent infection. Crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogels have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications. While these materials can be used for drug delivery, limited cell interactions restrict their biological activity. In this article, acryoyl-lysine (A-Lys) was incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) crosslinked PNIPAAm to enhance biological activity. A-Lys could be incorporated into the hydrogels to improve cellular interaction in vitro, while maintaining swelling properties and thermoresponsive behavior. Polyhexamethylene biguanide, an antimicrobial agent, could be encapsulated and released from the hydrogels and resulted in decreased bacteria counts within 2 hours. Two in vivo animal wound models were used to evaluate the hydrogel wound dressing. First, application of the hydrogels to a rodent cutaneous wound healing model resulted in significant increase in healing rate when compared with controls. Moreover, the hydrogels were also able to decrease bacteria levels in an infected wound model. These results suggest that PNIPAAm hydrogels containing A-Lys are promising wound dressings due to their ability to promote healing and deliver active antimicrobial drugs to inhibit infection. PMID:22121043

  7. An In Vivo Polymicrobial Biofilm Wound Infection Model to Study Interspecies Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Trevor; Dowd, Scot E.; Wolcott, Randall D.; Sun, Yan; Watters, Chase; Griswold, John A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wound infections are typically polymicrobial; however, most in vivo studies have focused on monospecies infections. This project was designed to develop an in vivo, polymicrobial, biofilm-related, infected wound model in order to study multispecies biofilm dynamics and in relation to wound chronicity. Multispecies biofilms consisting of both Gram negative and Gram positive strains, as well as aerobes and anaerobes, were grown in vitro and then transplanted onto the wounds of mice. These in vitro-to-in vivo multi-species biofilm transplants generated polymicrobial wound infections, which remained heterogeneous with four bacterial species throughout the experiment. We observed that wounded mice given multispecies biofilm infections displayed a wound healing impairment over mice infected with a single-species of bacteria. In addition, the bacteria in the polymicrobial wound infections displayed increased antimicrobial tolerance in comparison to those in single species infections. These data suggest that synergistic interactions between different bacterial species in wounds may contribute to healing delays and/or antibiotic tolerance. PMID:22076151

  8. Incidence and risk factors for caesarean wound infection in Lagos Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver C Ezechi; Asuquo Edet; Hakim Akinlade; Chidinma V Gab-Okafor; Ebiere Herbertson

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post caesarean wound infection is not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. In order to control and prevent post caesarean wound infection in our environment there is the need to access the relative contribution of each aetiologic factor. Though some studies in our

  9. Continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony P Furnary; Kathryn J Zerr; Gary L Grunkemeier; Albert Starr

    1999-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgical procedures. We previously showed that elevated postoperative blood glucose levels are a predictor of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that aggressive intravenous pharmacologic control of postoperative blood glucose levels would reduce the incidence of deep sternal wound infection.Methods. In

  10. Preventing Deep Wound Infection after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Charles S.; Yarbrough, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of deep wound infections before, during, and after coronary artery bypass grafting have prompted research to clarify risk factors and explore preventive measures to keep infection rates at an irreducible minimum. An analysis of 42 studies in which investigators used multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus and obesity are by far the chief preoperative risk factors. A 4-point preoperative scoring system based on a patient's body mass index and the presence or absence of diabetes is one practical way to determine the risk of mediastinitis, and other risk-estimate methods are being refined. Intraoperative risk factors include prolonged perfusion time, the use of one or more internal mammary arteries as grafts, blood transfusion, and mechanical circulatory assistance. The chief postoperative risk factor is reoperation, usually for bleeding. Unresolved issues include the optimal approach to Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization and the choice of a prophylactic antibiotic regimen. We recommend that cardiac surgery programs supplement their audit processes and ongoing vigilance for infections with periodic, multidisciplinary reviews of best-practice standards for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative patient care. PMID:23678210

  11. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate) decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases. PMID:21955731

  12. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Calum, H; Moser, C; Jensen, P Ø; Christophersen, L; Maling, D S; van Gennip, M; Bjarnsholt, T; Hougen, H P; Givskov, M; Jacobsen, G K; Høiby, N

    2009-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6% third-degree burn injury was induced in mice with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. The mice were allocated into five groups: control, shave, burn, infection and burn infection group. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed a more polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs)-dominated inflammation in the group of mice with infected burn wound compared with the with burn wound group. In contrast, a higher degree of inflammation was observed in the burn wound group compared with the group of mice with infected burn wound. Furthermore, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capacity of the PMNs were reduced in the group of mice with burn wound. Using this novel mouse model of thermal injury a decline of peripheral leucocytes was observed, whereas the increased local inflammatory response at the site of infection showed reduced capacity to contain and eliminate the infection. PMID:19210518

  13. Parkin-mediated responses against infection and wound involve TSPO-VDAC complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong Hyang; Chung, Chang Geon; Shim, Hyun-Jung; Jeon, Keun Hye; Yu, Seong-Woon; Lee, Sung Bae

    2015-07-17

    Parkin, an E3 ubuquitin ligase associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), has recently been implicated in mediating innate immunity. However, molecular details regarding parkin-mediated immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we identified mitochondrial TSPO-VDAC complex to genetically interact with parkin in mediating responses against infection and wound in Drosophila. The loss-of-function mutation in parkin results in defective immune response against bacterial infection. Additionally, parkin mutant larvae showed hypersensitivity against wound regardless of bacterial infection. Interestingly, the combinatorial trans-heterozygotic mutations in parkin and TSPO, or parkin and VDAC showed similar lethal tendency with parkin homozygous mutants. Furthermore, knockdown of TSPO alone also resulted in defective responses to infection and wound analogously to parkin mutants. Taken together, we propose that parkin cooperates with TSPO-VDAC complex to mediate responses against infection and wound. PMID:25979357

  14. Novel technique for avoidance of pressure competition between a negative pressure wound therapy device and chest drains in the management of deep sternal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Davis, James S; Kourliouros, Antonios; Deshpande, Ranjit; Cavale, Naveen

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) devices has changed the way sternal wound infections are being managed. It is not uncommon for deep sternal wound infections to occur together with mediastinal or even pleural collections requiring underwater seal drainage. In these patients in whom there is a communication between the pleural and mediastinal cavities, the concomitant use of an NPWT device negates the pressure gradient within the pleural and mediastinal drains, allowing suppurative fluid to stagnate. We present a novel technique to address this limitation of NPWT devices in patients with sternal wound infections that communicate with a pleural collection. PMID:25415315

  15. Characterization of SaccharolyticBacteroidesandPrevotella Isolates from Infected Dog and Cat Bite Wounds in Humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CAROLYN J. ALEXANDER; DIANE M. CITRON; SHARON HUNT GERARDO; MARINA C. CLAROS; DAVID TALAN; ANDELLIE J. C. GOLDSTEIN

    Saccharolytic, nonpigmented, anaerobic gram-negative rods isolated from infected dog and cat bite wounds in humans have been poorly characterized, and most are not included in the databases of kits used for anaerobic identification; thus, they are problematic for clinical laboratories to identify. Fifty strains isolated from such wounds were characterized with commercial kits for preformed-enzyme detection, carbohydrate fermentation, and other

  16. The Healing Effect of Scrophularia Striata on Experimental Burn Wounds Infected to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rokni-Hosseini, Mohammad Hossein; Hossienzadeh, Masood; Mehrabani, Davood; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Koohi-Hossienabadi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of death in burn patients after 48 hours of hospitalization has been reported to be bacterial infections. Recently, due to the compounds accelerating the healing process and the intense reduction of treatment side effects, medicinal plants are used to cure burn wound infections. This study aims to investigate the medicinal effect of the ethanolic extract of Scrophularia striata on burn wound infection in in-vivo and in-vitro in comparison with silver sulfadiazine (SSD). METHODS One hundred and fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 equal groups. A hot plate of 1×1cm was used to create second degree burn wounds. The ethanolic extract of S. striata was provided through percolation method. Group 1 was treated with SSD, group 2 with S. striata, and group 3 was considered as control group. All animals were infected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On days 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after burn wound injury, the animals were euthanized and were evaluated histologically. The MIC and MBC were determined using the micro dilution method. RESULTS The rate of wound healing was significantly greater in S. striata group in comparison to SSD and control groups. CONCLUSION S. striata contains was shown to have anti-bacterial and wound healing effects while this effect was significantly more than SSD denoting to its use when needed for burn wounds infected to P. aeruginosa. PMID:25606472

  17. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  18. Bacterial Profile of Blood and Burn Wound Infections in Burn Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herjinder Kaur; Jyothi Bhat; Anup R. Anvikar; Savinder Rao; Vijay Gadge

    Infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Three fourth of deaths in burn patients occur due to infections. The objective behind this work was to find out the bacteriological profile of post burn infections in blood and wound in first week along with the evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the organisms isolated. Fifty

  19. Patient Factors as a Major Determinant of Wound Outcome and Infection After Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. W. Hopf

    \\u000a Despite major advances in the management of patients undergoing surgery-including aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics,\\u000a and advances in surgical approaches such as laparoscopic surgery-surgical wound infection remains among the most common complications\\u000a of surgery [1]. Wound complications are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased resource consumption. More than 300,000\\u000a surgical site infections occur each year in the United States at an

  20. Novel peptidoglycan-based diagnostic devices for detection of wound infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Hasmann; Eva Wehrschuetz-Sigl; Gertraud Kanzler; Ulrike Gewessler; Elisabeth Hulla; Konstantin P. Schneider; Barbara Binder; Michael Schintler; Georg M. Guebitz

    2011-01-01

    Detection of wound infection is based on evaluation of the well-known signs of inflammation like rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling), and dolor (pain) by medical doctors and\\/or time-consuming procedures requiring special machinery. There is currently no rapid diagnostic device available for the indication of wound infection, which would especially be helpful in home care of chronic ulcer patients. In

  1. Postoperative wound dealing and superficial surgical site infection in open radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Fukashi; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Mauso; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soishi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-09-01

    The number of open radical prostatectomy (RP) surgeries has been decreasing owing to the spread of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, which has implications for postoperative wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the current status of postoperative wound healing and superficial surgical site infection (SSI) in open RPs. One hundred and seventy-five antegrade RPs with the same or similar kinds of prophylactic antibiotic administration were divided into two groups: (i) 'no intervention' (wound covering group) and (ii) 'washing', using a washing solution from the second postoperative day to the day of skin staple removal (wound washing group). We compared these groups for the occurrence of superficial SSI. The wound covering group had three (3·03%) cases of superficial SSI, with one case caused by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). The wound washing group had nine (11·8%) cases of superficial SSI, with three cases caused by MSSA, two cases caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and one by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The wound covering group showed a significantly lower ratio of superficial SSI (P?=?0·0472). In conclusion, the postoperative wound status data in this study suggests that no wound intervention after RP resulted in a comparatively lower ratio of superficial SSI than in the wound washing group. PMID:25186077

  2. CD4+ T cells and CXC chemokines modulate the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus wound infections.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Rachel M; Solinga, Robert M; Rich, Jeremy; Zaleski, Kathleen J; Cocchiaro, Jordan L; Risley, Allison; Tzianabos, Arthur O; Lee, Jean C

    2006-07-01

    T cells are critical for the formation of intraabdominal abscesses by Staphylococcus aureus. We hypothesized that T cells modulate the development of experimental staphylococcal infections by controlling polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) trafficking. In models of staphylococcal s.c. abscess formation, hindpaw infection, and surgical wound infection, S. aureus multiplied in the tissues of WT C57BL/6J mice and elicited a marked inflammatory response. CD4(+) alphabeta T cells homed to the surgical wound infection site of WT animals. In contrast, significantly fewer S. aureus were recovered from the tissues of mice deficient in alphabeta T cells, and the inflammatory response was considerably diminished compared with that of WT animals. Alphabeta T cell receptor (-/-) mice had significantly lower concentrations of PMN-specific CXC chemokines in wound tissue than did WT mice. The severity of the wound infection was enhanced by administration of a CXC chemokine and abrogated by antibodies that blocked the CXC receptor. An acapsular mutant was less virulent than the parental S. aureus strain in both the s.c. abscess and the surgical wound infection models in WT mice. These data reveal an important and underappreciated role for CD4(+) alphabeta T cells in S. aureus infections in controlling local CXC chemokine production, neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection, and subsequent bacterial replication. PMID:16801559

  3. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Uses Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A to Colonize from Wound Infection Sites

    PubMed Central

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Kolodziejek, Izabella; Crabill, Emerson; Kaschani, Farnusch; Niessen, Sherry; Shindo, Takayuki; Kaiser, Markus; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA), a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA). Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues. PMID:23555272

  4. Biofilms and persistent wound infections in United States military trauma patients: a case–control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex traumatic injuries sustained by military personnel, particularly when involving extremities, often result in infectious complications and substantial morbidity. One factor that may further impair patient recovery is the persistence of infections. Surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, may play a role in hindering the management of infections; however, clinical data associating biofilm formation with persistent or chronic infections are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the production of bacterial biofilms as a potential risk factor for persistent infections among wounded military personnel. Methods Bacterial isolates and clinical data from military personnel with deployment-related injuries were collected through the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study. The study population consisted of patients with diagnosed skin and soft-tissue infections. Cases (wounds with bacterial isolates of the same organism collected 14 days apart) were compared to controls (wounds with non-recurrent bacterial isolates), which were matched by organism and infectious disease syndrome. Potential risk factors for persistent infections, including biofilm formation, were examined in a univariate analysis. Data are expressed as odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]). Results On a per infected wound basis, 35 cases (representing 25 patients) and 69 controls (representing 60 patients) were identified. Eight patients with multiple wounds were utilized as both cases and controls. Overall, 235 bacterial isolates were tested for biofilm formation in the case–control analysis. Biofilm formation was significantly associated with infection persistence (OR: 29.49; CI: 6.24-infinity) in a univariate analysis. Multidrug resistance (OR: 5.62; CI: 1.02-56.92), packed red blood cell transfusion requirements within the first 24 hours (OR: 1.02; CI: 1.01-1.04), operating room visits prior to and on the date of infection diagnosis (OR: 2.05; CI: 1.09-4.28), anatomical location of infected wound (OR: 5.47; CI: 1.65-23.39), and occurrence of polymicrobial infections (OR: 69.71; CI: 15.39-infinity) were also significant risk factors for persistent infections. Conclusions We found that biofilm production by clinical strains is significantly associated with the persistence of wound infections. However, the statistical power of the analysis was limited due to the small sample size, precluding a multivariate analysis. Further data are needed to confirm biofilm formation as a risk factor for persistent wound infections. PMID:24712544

  5. Validation of a Novel Murine Wound Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mitchell G.; Black, Chad C.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Honnold, Cary L.; Wise, Matthew C.; Alamneh, Yonas A.; Moon, Jay K.; Kessler, Jennifer L.; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Green, Romanza K.; Hall, Eric R.; Palys, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to testing in larger animals. PMID:24342634

  6. Pathology case of the month. Swamp-related wound infection. Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Donthamsetty, Supriya; Figueroa, Julio; Barbeau, James; McGoey, Robin

    2013-01-01

    A 38 year-old woman with no significant past medical history was brought to the emergency department following a motor vehicle rollover and submersion into swampy waters alongside a Louisiana interstate. In addition to multiple blunt force injuries, she suffered a laceration injury over the right lower extremity, which initially required irrigation and sterile dressing. On hospital day two, the wound became grossly infected. The wound was swabbed for culture and Gram stain, and the patient was empirically started on intravenous Piperacillin/tazobactam. Results from the Gram stain showed few white blood cells and numerous Gram negative rods. The following day, the wound continued to drain purulent material but with a stable zone of erythema. The wound was drained and debrided. On hospital day four, the blood agar plate, previously inoculated with the wound culture, grew the colonies shown in the below photograph. PMID:25073265

  7. Recurrent sternal infection following treatment with negative pressure wound therapy and titanium transverse plate fixation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geneviève Gaudreau; Victor Costache; Chanel Houde; Daniel Cloutier; Livia Montalin; Pierre Voisine; Richard Baillot

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a definition for recurrent sternal infection (RSI), analyse the risk factors and describe the management of this complication following treatment of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with horizontal titanium sternal osteosynthesis and coverage with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps. Methods: Between 2002 and 2007, 10665 patients were submitted to open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution, of whom 149

  8. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds – conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-01-01

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient. Bacterial counts above 105 to 106 cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated. The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness. The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects. Derived from the general principles of antiseptic wound treatment, the following working hypothesis is postulated: the most ideal constellation for treatment of wounds is the superficial destruction of microbial layers without deep tissue alteration, like it is caused by antiseptics, in order not to endanger the regenerative granulation tissue. At the same time, it is desirable to support and increase cell proliferation and granulation capacities. These two aspects might be achieved by using low temperature plasma technology. PMID:20204115

  9. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  10. Quality of the surveillance of surgical wound infections: a 10-year prospective study of 12,364 wounds.

    PubMed

    Ibsen Sørensen, Allan; Sandberg Sørensen, Torben; Bremmelgaard, Annie

    2003-04-01

    We did a survey of postoperative wound infection rates in our department over a 10-year period. It was based on the results of forms completed by surgeons in the department after each operation and when an infection was diagnosed (primary registration). These forms were sent to the electronic data processing department for registration of data in a database. Every third month, detailed reports of the data were discussed with the surgeons. The quality of this routine survey was evaluated as follows: 1) Every year, the year's data in the surveys database were compared with those in the National Patient Register and, in case of discrepancies, the patient's records were checked and missing information about the operation and infections were recorded in the surveys database (secondary registration). 2) In case of a primary registered infection, the patient's record was carefully examined. Infections not fulfilling the criteria for an infection were called registration failures. The primary registration of operations reached an acceptable level (about 95%) after 5 years of the survey, but the recording of infections was unreliable throughout the study due to an unacceptably low registration rate (about 60%) and to a high rate of registration failures. PMID:12807325

  11. Intracardiac Abscess with Cutaneous Fistula Secondary to Ventricular Septal Defect Repair Simulating Sternal Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Miranda, Cyndee Cruz; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Pettersson, Gosta Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous fistula as a clinical presentation of intracardiac abscess of the right side is such an unusual occurrence that it has not until now been reported in the English-language medical literature. We present a rare case of right-sided infective endocarditis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in which recurrent infection presented as sternal wound discharge. The infection was found to have an intracardiac origin and was successfully managed by radical débridement on cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:24955054

  12. Suction-irrigation drainage: an underestimated therapeutic option for surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Deschka, Heinz; Erler, Stefan; El-Ayoubi, Lemir; Vogel, Cordula; Vöhringer, Luise; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Deep sternal wound infections are significant and severe complications following cardiac surgery and substantially influence perioperative morbidity and mortality. We present the experience of our department using two different surgical treatments over a three-year period. METHODS Between January 2009 and December 2011, a total of 3274 cardiac procedures with complete median sternotomy were performed in our department. In 94 patients (3%), a deep sternal wound infection occurred, including sternal instability with consecutive surgical treatment. The patients either received wound debridement with sternum refixation and suction-irrigation drainage (SID; n = 72) or sternum refixation only (RF; n = 22) if there was sternal instability with limited signs of infection. SID was routinely installed for 7 days: the irrigation solution contained neomycin. In all cases, swabs were taken and analysed. The different methods were evaluated in respect of their clinical outcomes. RESULTS The success rate—defined as single, uncomplicated procedure—of the SID treatment was 74%, compared with 59% of the isolated sternum refixation. Complications included continuous infection, recurrence of sternal instability and wound necrosis. Eighty-eight percent of the swabs in the SID group were positive, compared with 32% in the sternal refixation only group. The dominating pathogenic germs were coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Mortality was 10% for the SID group and 5% for the RF group. CONCLUSIONS Contrary to accepted opinion, the suction-irrigation drainage is an appropriate therapy for deep sternal wound infections. Nevertheless, deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery remain severe complications and are related to increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:23529753

  13. Mycobacterium chelonae causing chronic wound infection and abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Susan; Agrawal, Parag; Benjamin, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that is found all over the environment, including sewage and tap water. They are important species associated with chronic non-healing wounds. We report a case in a 41 year old female patient who underwent multiple surgeries for an ovarian cyst, tubo-ovarian abscesses with peritonitis and a repair of an abdominal incisional hernia. PMID:24943783

  14. Prevena™, negative pressure wound therapy applied to closed Pfannenstiel incisions at time of caesarean section in patients deemed at high risk for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Anglim, B; O'Connor, H; Daly, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our retrospective study is to report on our experience using the Prevena™ wound system in obese patients undergoing caesarean section delivery. A total of 26 cases were identified from July 2012 to October 2013. The median BMI of these women was 45.3 kg/m(2). Elective caesarean sections were performed in 20 women (77%). There were four cases (15%) of superficial dehiscence. Factors associated with wound breakdown were wound infection (p = 0.03), increasing BMI (p < 0.001) and emergency LSCS (p = 0.04). In a logistic regression model the presence of infection was the only factor which remained associated with wound breakdown. Wound disruption is a major cause of morbidity following caesarean section in morbidly obese patients. The wound complication rate in our experience was low with the Prevena™ dressing with no cases of sheath dehiscence, and no patient required a second operation. The presence of infection is the most important factor in wound breakdown and should be the focus for management protocols. PMID:25383909

  15. Burn wounds infected by contaminated water: Case reports, review of the literature and recommendations for treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noel F. F. Ribeiro; Christopher H. Heath; Jessica Kierath; Suzanne Rea; Mark Duncan-Smith; Fiona M. Wood

    2010-01-01

    First-aid education for the management of burns advocates cool running water over burnt skin to limit soft tissue damage. However, the water used may itself constitute a risk.We report three cases of severe invasive and necrotizing infection in patients who used or immersed themselves in contaminated water in an attempt to extinguish the fire following acute major burns. Wound cultures

  16. Combination of photodynamic and ultrasonic therapy for treatment of infected wounds in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2006-02-01

    One of the important problems of modern medicine is treatment of infected wounds. There are many diversified expedients of treatment, but none of them obey the modern physician completely. The aim of this study is to develop and test a new combined method of photodynamic ultrasonic therapy (PDUST) for treatment of infected wounds with focus on experimental trials. PDUST is based on a combination of two methods: photodynamic (PD) therapy (PDT) with photosensitizer and low frequency ultrasonic (US) therapy with antibiotic as tools for treatment of wounds and effectively killing bacteria. The main parameters are: US frequency - 26.5 kHz; US tip elongation - 40+/-20 ?m wavelength of light emitting diodes (LED) array - 660+/-10 nm; light intensity on biotissue surface - 1-2 mW/cm2; photosensitizer - an aluminum disulfonated phtalocyanine dissolved in a physiological solution in concentration 10 mg/l. The experiments were carried out with 70 male chinchilla rabbits divided into 7 groups, thus the dynamics of wounds healing were studied in different modes of PDUST. The PD and US methods supplement each other and in conjunction provide additive and especially synergetic effects. The experimental data demonstrated advantages of new technology in comparison with conventional methods in cases of treatment of extended suppurative inflammatory and profound wounds. The more detailed study of PDUST method's mechanism, which is based on low intensity of LED light, PD therapy and US influence is required.

  17. Risk factors for wound infection in health care facilities in Buea, Cameroon: aerobic bacterial pathogens and antibiogram of isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kihla, Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah; Ngunde, Palle John; Evelyn, Mbianda Soupsop; Gerard, Nkwelang; Ndip, Roland Ndip

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wound infection is a significant clinical challenge in hospitals in developing countries where proper healthcare delivery is hampered by limited resources. This study investigated the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria causing wound infection and risk factors for infection among hospitalized patients in Buea, Cameroon, to generate findings which could drive reformation of policies on infection control. Methods Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 212 swabs collected from patients with clinically diagnosed infected wounds. Risk factors for wound infection were investigated. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was determined by disk diffusion technique. The Chi-square test was employed to determine significant differences in isolation and distribution of organisms in various specimens. Differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results Twelve bacteria species were isolated from 169 (79.7%) specimens. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the predominant isolates in all wound types exhibited a high preponderance of multidrug resistant strains. High rate of infection was attributed to lack of constant water supply and breakdown of sterilization equipment during the study period. Highest diversity of pathogens occurred in open wounds. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in isolation of pathogens with respect to age, gender and wound type. Co-existing morbidity increased risk of wound infection. Isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and resistant to oxacillin. Conclusion Wound infection with resistant bacteria constitutes a significant cause of morbidity in the study area. Findings reiterate the need to strengthen infection control and drug dispensing policies, and greater collaboration between microbiologists and medical practioners to stem the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:25360190

  18. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

  19. Efficacy of Topically Delivered Moxifloxacin against Wound Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, F.; Fisahn, C.; Sorkin, M.; Thiele, I.; Hirsch, T.; Stricker, I.; Klaassen, T.; Roemer, A.; Fugmann, B.; Steinstraesser, L.

    2011-01-01

    Wound infection is a common risk for patients with chronic nonhealing wounds, causing high morbidity and mortality. Currently, systemic antibiotic treatment is the therapy of choice, despite often leading to several side effects and the risk of an insufficient tissue penetration due to impaired blood supply. If systemically delivered, moxifloxacin penetrates well into inflammatory blister fluid, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissues and might therefore be a possible option for the topical treatment of skin and infected skin wounds. In this study, topical application of moxifloxacin was investigated in comparison to mupirocin, linezolid, and gentamicin using a porcine wound infection and a rat burn infection model. Both animal models were performed either by an inoculation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wound fluid, tissue, and blood samples were taken, and bacterial counts as well as the moxifloxacin concentration were determined for a 14-day follow-up. A histological comparison of the rat burn wound tissues was performed. Both strains were susceptible to moxifloxacin and gentamicin, whereas mupirocin and linezolid were effective only against MRSA. All antibiotics showed efficient reduction of bacterial counts, and except with MRSA, infected burn wounds reached bacterial counts below 105 CFU/g tissue. Additionally, moxifloxacin was observed to promote wound healing as determined by histologic analysis, while no induction of bacterial resistance was observed during the treatment period. The use of topical antibiotics for the treatment of infected wounds confers many benefits. Moxifloxacin is therefore an ideal candidate, due to its broad antibacterial spectrum, its high efficiency, and its potential to promote wound healing. PMID:21343458

  20. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; Ahmadi, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B received 10% licorice extract and Group C was considered as control group and received gel base as the base of medication. Group D did not receive any medication and just underwent burn injury. A standard 3rd degree burn wound was produced by a hot plate with similar size about 20% of total body surface area (TBSA) and at identical temperature. After 24 h of burn production, 108 colony forming units (CFU) of toxigenic strains of P. aeruginosa (PA 103) were inoculated subcutaneously into the burnt area. After 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of therapy, the animals were sacrificed and burn areas were macroscopically examined and histologically evaluated. RESULTS Decrease in size of the burn wounds, in inflammation and re-epithelialization were poor in groups B-D. Infection to P. aeruginosa was still visible in groups B-D but was absent in Group A. The mean histological score, tensile strength, maximum stress, yield strength and stiffness in groups B-D were lower compared with Group A. CONCLUSION Licorice extract in 10% concentration was shown not to be effective in healing of P. aeruginosa infected burn wounds. PMID:25489532

  1. Phage Therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Mouse Burn Wound Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine S. McVay; Marisela Velasquez; Joe A. Fralick

    2007-01-01

    Mice compromised by a burn wound injury and subjected to a fatal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa were administered a single dose of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage cocktail consisting of three different P. aeruginosa phages by three different routes: the intramuscular (i.m.), subcutaneous (s.c.), or intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. The results of these studies indicated that a single dose of the P.

  2. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-01-01

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata. PMID:23109419

  3. A new method to prevent wound infection: a controlled clinical trial in patients with combined liver and bile duct resection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Hiramatsu; M. Nagino; J. Kamiya; S. Kondo; M. Kanai; M. Miyachi; K. Uesaka; S. Mizuno; Y. Nimura

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Despite advances in antibiotic prophylaxis, postoperative wound infection remains a major source of morbidity after digestive\\u000a surgery. Its prevention is a challenging problem, especially in high-risk patients. The authors introduced a new method to\\u000a prevent surgical wound infections and evaluated its efficacy in a prospective, randomized trial in markedly high-risk patients.\\u000a Methods: Patients with biliary tract carcinoma who were

  4. Honey as an Antimicrobial Agent Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, PG; Bairy, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections. PMID:22754244

  5. Soft Tissue and Wound Infections Due to Enterococcus spp. Among Hospitalized Trauma Patients in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Mathur, Purva; Misra, Mahesh Chandra

    2014-10-01

    Soft tissue and wound infections due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with current need to understand the epidemiology of the Enterococcal infections of wounds. Hence, we have looked into the distribution of Enterococcus spp. responsible for causing wound and soft tissue infections among trauma patients, its antibiotic resistance pattern and how it affects the length of hospital stay and mortality. A laboratory cum clinical-based study was performed over a period of 3 years at a level I trauma center in New Delhi, India. Patients with Enterococcal wound and soft tissue infections were identified using the hospital data base, their incidence of soft tissue/wound infections calculated, drug resistance pattern and their possible risk factors as well as outcomes analyzed. A total of 86 non-repetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which E. faecium were maximally isolated 48 (56%). High level of resistance was seen to gentamicin HLAR in all the species of Enterococcus causing infections whereas a low level resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin was observed among the isolates. Longer hospital stay, repeated surgical procedure, prior antibiotic therapy and ICU stay were observed to associate with increased morbidity (P < 0.05) and hence, more chances of infections with VRE among the trauma patients. The overall rate of wound and soft tissue infections with Enterococcus sp. was 8.6 per 1,000 admissions during the study period. Enterococcal wound infection is much prevalent in trauma care facilities especially in the ICUs. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel, help in empirical therapeutic decisions and also in preventing such infections. PMID:25538459

  6. Aeromonas jandaei and Aeromonas veronii dual infection of a human wound following aquatic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S W; Carnahan, A M; Brayton, P R; Fanning, G R; Almazan, R; Drabick, C; Trudo, E W; Colwell, R R

    1991-01-01

    Exudate removed from an infection that developed below the left eye of a 10-year-old male following a previously inflicted wound after aquatic exposure was cultured and revealed two different Aeromonas spp. Further characterization showed that one strain was phenotypically identical to Aeromonas veronii, while the other strain was confirmed by DNA hybridization analysis to be Aeromonas jandaei sp. nov. This is the first report of these more recently described aeromonads, thus far rarely reported from clinical disease, occurring simultaneously in a human infection. PMID:2037674

  7. Does a gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge reduce sternal wound infections in high-risk cardiac surgery patients?

    PubMed Central

    Birgand, Gabriel; Radu, Costin; Alkhoder, Soleiman; Al Attar, Nawwar; Raffoul, Richard; Dilly, Marie-Pierre; Nataf, Patrick; Lucet, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Sternal wound infections occurring after cardiac surgery have a critical impact on morbidity, mortality and hospital costs. This study evaluated the efficacy of a gentamicin–collagen sponge in decreasing deep sternal-wound infections in high-risk cardiac surgery patients. METHODS We conducted a quasi-experimental single-centre prospective cohort study in diabetic and/or overweight patients undergoing coronary-artery bypass surgery with bilateral internal mammary artery grafts. The end-point was the rate of reoperation for deep sternal wound infection. The period from January 2006 to October 2008, before the introduction of the gentamicin sponge, was compared with the period from November 2008 to December 2010. RESULTS Of 552 patients (median body mass index, 31.5; 37.7% with diabetes requiring insulin), 68 (12.3%) had deep sternal wound infections. Reoperation for deep sternal wound infections occurred in 40/289 (13.8%) preintervention patients and 22/175 (12.6%) patients managed with the sponge. Independent risk factors were female sex and longer time on mechanical ventilation, but not use of the sponge (adjusted odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.52–1.73; P = 0.88). The group managed with the sponge had a higher proportion of gentamicin-resistant micro-organisms (21/27, 77.8%) compared with the other patients (23/56, 41.1%; P < 0.01). The median time to reoperation for wound infection was higher with the sponge (21 vs 17 days, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS A gentamicin–collagen sponge was not effective in preventing deep sternal wound infections in high-risk patients. Our results suggest that a substantial proportion of wound contaminations occur after bypass surgery with bilateral internal mammary artery grafts. PMID:23115102

  8. Preparation and characterization of silver nanoparticle loaded amorphous hydrogel of carboxymethylcellulose for infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Das, Anup; Kumar, Ajay; Patil, Niranjan B; Viswanathan, Chandra; Ghosh, Deepa

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing demand for an appropriate and safe antimicrobial dressing to treat infected deep wounds. An amorphous gel formulation (SNP-CMC), containing silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), was prepared in one step by the reduction of silver nitrate in situ. Spectrophotometric and microscopic analysis revealed that the SNPs were 7-21nm in diameter. In simulated wound experiments, SNP-CMC gel was found to absorb 80.48±4.69% w/w of saline and donate 17.43±0.76% w/w of moisture within 24h indicating its dual fluid affinity. Cytocompatibility of the gel was assessed by proliferation studies with primary human skin cells. The antimicrobial activity studies showed that SNP-CMC containing 50ppm of SNPs was effective against the growth of both Gram negative and Gram positive strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These results indicate that SNP-CMC could be ideal for the treatment of deep infected wounds. PMID:26076624

  9. The Novel Application of a Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging System to Determine Signature Spectral Differences Between Infected and Non-Infected Burn Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu T.A.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ortiz, Rachel T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complications of infection can increase burn-related morbidity and mortality. Early detection of burn wound infection could lead to more precise and effective treatment, reducing systemic complications and the need for long term, broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Quantitative cultures from biopsies are the gold standard to determine infection. However, this methodology can take days to yield results and is invasive. This investigation focuses on the use of non-invasive imaging to determine the infection status of burn wounds in a controlled in-vivo model. Methods Full-thickness burn wounds were created on the dorsum of adult male rats (n=6). Twenty-four hours after burn wound creation, wounds in the “Infected” group were inoculated with a vehicle containing 1 × 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus. “Control” group animals received vehicle alone. Subsequently, the wounds were imaged daily for a total of 10 days and the differences of skin optical properties were assessed using a Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) at 16 different wavelengths from 500 nm to 700 nm. Regions of interest on the resulting images were selected and averaged at each time point. Results Statistically significant differences in average absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (?a and ?s’) at 620 and 700 nm were observed between the two groups (p<0.05). Differential optical properties were most evident by day 4 and persisted throughout the time course. Conclusions Differential signature changes in optical properties are evident in infected burn wounds. This novel application of SFDI may prove to be a valuable adjunct to burn wound assessment. Further work will be aimed at determining dose-response relationships and prokaryotic species differences. PMID:23292572

  10. A Prospective Audit of Complex Wound and Graft Infections in Great Britain and Ireland: the Emergence of MRSA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Naylor; P. D. Hayes; S. Darke

    2001-01-01

    Background a number of studies have examined the outcome of complex wound and graft infections, but most include small numbers of patients collected over a prolonged period of time. To date, there is little information on the clinical outcome of infections involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods between February 1998 and January 1999, two prospective multi-centre audits were performed in

  11. RNAIII-Inhibiting Peptide Enhances Healing of Wounds Infected with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Oriana; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Goteri, Gaia; Scalise, Alessandro; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Riva, Alessandra; Saba, Vittorio; Madanahally, Kiran D.; Offidani, Annamaria; Balaban, Naomi; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism through which a bacterial population receives input from neighboring cells and elicits an appropriate response to enable survival within the host. Inhibiting quorum sensing by RNAIII-inhibiting peptide (RIP) has been demonstrated as a very effective mode of prevention and therapy for device-associated staphylococcal infections and was tested here for healing of wounds that are otherwise resistant to conventional antibiotics. Wounds, established through the panniculus carnosus of BALB/c mice, were inoculated with 5 × 107 CFU of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Mice were treated with Allevyn, RIP-soaked Allevyn (containing 20 ?g RIP), daily intraperitoneal teicoplanin (7 mg/kg of body weight), Allevyn and teicoplanin, and RIP-soaked Allevyn and daily intraperitoneal teicoplanin. The main outcome measures were quantitative bacterial culture and histological examination with assessment of microvessel density and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tissue sections. Treatment with RIP-soaked Allevyn together with teicoplanin injection greatly reduced the bacterial load to 13 CFU/g (control untreated animals had 108 CFU/g bacteria). All other treatments were also significantly effective but only reduced the bacterial load to about 103 CFU/ml. Histological examination indicated that only treatment with RIP-soaked Allevyn with teicoplanin injection restored epithelial, granulation, and collagen scores, as well as microvessel density and VEGF expression, to the levels found with uninfected mice. In conclusion, we observed that RIP may be useful for the management of infected wounds and that it could represent an exciting and future alternative to the conventional antibiotics, at present considered the gold-standard treatments for methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:18391046

  12. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant designer host defence peptide P-novispirin G10 in infected full-thickness wounds of porcine skin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Jacobsen; A. Mohammadi-Tabrisi; T. Hirsch; D. Mittler; P. H. Mygind; C. P. Sonksen; D. Raventos; H. H. Kristensen; S. Gatermann; M. Lehnhardt; A. Daigeler; H. U. Steinau; L. Steinstraesser

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The growing number of patients with impaired wound healing and the development of multidrug-resistant bacteria demand the investigation of alternatives in wound care. The antimicrobial activity of naturally occurring host defence peptides and their derivatives could be one alternative to the existing therapy options for topical treatment of wound infection. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate

  13. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections. PMID:25310128

  14. Antimicrobial effects of coprisin on wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jingoo; Han, Seon-Young; Ji, Ae-Ri; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hong, Il-Hwa; Ki, Mi-Ran; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Dong Gun; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are naturally produced antibiotics that play important roles in host defense mechanisms. These proteins are found in variety of animal and plant species. The antibiotic effects of AMPs are gaining attention for use in human medicine. In this study, the antimicrobial effects of coprisin, a novel AMP isolated from the dung beetle (Copris tripartitus), were evaluated. The peptide was used to treat rats with wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Coprisin accelerated wound closure both grossly and microscopically compared with the untreated group. Additionally, treatment with this peptide decreased phosphorylated-Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3) levels, a downstream factor of the transforming growth factor-? signaling pathway which is believed to inhibit reepithelization, in the nucleus and cytoplasm of regenerating cells. Moreover, increased cell populations and angiogenesis were observed in lesions treated with coprisin, suggesting that this peptide promotes wound healing via its antimicrobial activity against S.?aureus. Our results demonstrated that coprisin is a potential therapeutic agent that can possibly replace traditional antibiotics and overcome microbial resistance. PMID:24134388

  15. The effect of a honey based gel and silver sulphadiazine on bacterial infections of in vitro burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Boekema, B K H L; Pool, L; Ulrich, M M W

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial contamination remains a constant threat in burn wound care. Topical treatments to combat contaminations have good bactericidal effects but can have detrimental effects for the healing process. Treatments with for example silver can increase healing times. Honey based products can be a good alternative as it is antibacterial and patient-friendly. We evaluated the bactericidal and cytotoxic effects of a honey based gel and silver sulphadiazine in a human burn wound model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After adding 10(5)colony forming units of P. aeruginosa, topical treatments were applied on the burn wound models. After 2, 12, 24, 28 and 70 h, bacteria were dislodged and counted by plating dilutions. Cytotoxic effects were evaluated histologically in samples of burn wound models treated topically for 3 weeks, without bacteria. L-Mesitran Soft significantly reduced the bacterial load (5-log reduction) up to 24h but did not completely eliminate bacteria from the burn wounds. After Flammazine(®) treatment, only a few colony forming units were observed at all time points. In contrast, re-epithelialization was significantly reduced after application of Flammazine(®) compared to L-Mesitran Soft or control. This in vitro model of burn wound infection can be used to evaluate topical treatments. L-Mesitran Soft is a good alternative for treating burn wounds but the slightly lower bactericidal activity in the burn wound model warrants a higher frequency of application. PMID:23036845

  16. A Study of Post-Caesarean Section Wound Infections in a Regional Referral Hospital, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Hansa; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim; Rathi, Bhawna; Nimre, Eman A.; Sachdeva, Vibha; Hamdi, Ilham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing a Caesarean section (CS) and to identify risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity. SSI significantly affect the patient’s quality of life by increasing morbidity and extending hospital stays. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Nizwa Hospital, Oman, to determine the incidence of post-Caesarean (PCS) SSI from 2001 to 2012. This was followed by a case-control study of 211 PCS cases with SSI. Controls (220) were randomly selected cases, at the same hospital in the same time period, who had undergone CS without any SSI. Data was collected on CS type, risk factors, demographic profile, type of organism, drug sensitivity and date of infection. Results: The total number of PCS wound infections was 211 (2.66%). There was a four-fold higher incidence of premature rupture of the membranes (37, 17.53%) and a three-fold higher incidence of diabetes (32, 15.16%) in the PCS cases compared with controls. The most common organisms responsible for SSI were Staphylococcus aureus (66, 31.27%) and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli group (40, 18.95%). The most sensitive antibiotics were aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. Polymicrobial infections were noted in 42 (19.90%), while 47 (22.27%) yielded no growth. A high incidence of associated risk factors like obesity, hypertension, anaemia and wound haematoma was noted. Conclusion: Measures are recommended to reduce the incidence of SSI, including the implementation of infection prevention practices and the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis with rigorous surgical techniques. PMID:24790744

  17. Bacteria Isolated from Conspecific Bite Wounds in Norway and Black Rats: Implications for Rat Bite–Associated Infections In People

    PubMed Central

    Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L.; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound–related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species. PMID:24528094

  18. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species. PMID:24528094

  19. Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, K. B.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Sørensen, A. I.; Raahave, D.; Petersen, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures. PMID:7925666

  20. A comparative study of the effect of different topical agents on burn wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Katara; Shobha, Chamania; Sheetal, Chitnis; Nanda, Hemvani; Vikrant, Chitnis; Chitnis, Dhananjay Sadashiv

    2012-01-01

    Background: Topical agents are used to treat burn wound infections. Aims and Objective: The present work was aimed to find out the in vitro efficacy of different topical agents against burn wound pathogens. Settings and Design: Randomly selected gram-positive (29) and gram-negative bacterial (119) isolates from burn wound cases admitted in burn unit of Choithram Hospital and Research Centre, Indore, were included in the in vitro activity testing for silver nitrate, silver sulphadiazine (SSD), chlorhexidine, cetrimide, nitrofuran, soframycin, betadine, benzalkonium chloride and honey by growth inhibition on agar medium. Materials and Methods: Multidrug-resistant isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria were checked for different topical agents. 1% topical agent was mixed with Mueller-Hinton agar. Two microlitres of bacterial suspension adjusted to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard was spread over the topical agent containing plates. The plates without the topical agent were used as control plates. The plates were incubated for 48 h at 37°C. Results: SSD (148/148), silver nitrate (148/148) and chlorhexidine (148/148) showed excellent activity against all the pathogens. Neosporin had poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, (4/44) Proteus spp. (2/4) and group D streptococci (1/4). Betadine did not show activity against the bacterial isolates in the presence of organic matter. Honey did not exert any antimicrobial activity under the study conditions. Conclusion: SSD, silver nitrate and chlorhexidine have excellent activity against all the bacterial pathogens and could be used empirically, while identification of the infective agent is required for selecting the alternative topical agents such as nitrofuran, soframycin, and benzalkonium chloride. PMID:23162237

  1. Anaerobic Wound Infections in Cancer Patients: Comparative Trial of Clindamycin, Tinidazole, and Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Klastersky, J.; Husson, M.; Weerts-Ruhl, D.; Daneau, D.

    1977-01-01

    Clindamycin, tinidazole (a parent compound to metronidazole), and doxycycline were compared in vitro against 376 anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens. Bacteriostatic tests indicated that clindamycin was the most active drug, on a weight basis, against these strains except for Clostridium species. The three drugs were compared as therapies for anaerobic wound infections in cancer patients. In a randomized double-blind study, no statistically significant differences between clindamycin and tinidazole could be documented. Doxycycline was less active presumably because of the lack of clinical response in three out of four patients infected with doxycycline-resistant strains. No major untoward effects were observed. The bactericidal dilution of the serum was predictive of the clinical outcome. PMID:921254

  2. Role of Arginine and Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Wound Healing and Infection.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J Wesley; Supp, Dorothy M

    2014-11-01

    Significance: Only a few decades ago, the primary focus of nutritional supplementation was to prevent deficiencies of essential nutrients. It is now recognized that, at higher than essential levels, selected nutrients can have a pharmacologic effect to prevent or treat disease. Recent Advances: Two of the most important pharmaconutrients, arginine, and the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil, have been shown to have profound effects on wound healing and infections. Critical Issues: Both arginine and fish oils have independent benefits, but the combination appears to be much more effective. This combination has been shown to affect outcomes involving wound healing and infections, as reviewed here, and can also affect incidence and outcomes in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and other inflammatory conditions. These possibilities have not yet progressed to widespread clinical application. Future Directions: The optimal combinations of immunonutrients, timing of administration, and the doses needed for best results need to be determined in preclinical and clinical studies. Also, the mechanisms involved in the administration of pharmaconutrients need to be established. PMID:25371851

  3. HIV Shedding from Male Circumcision Wounds in HIV-Infected Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Kigozi, Godfrey; Manucci, Jordyn; Grabowski, Mary K.; Serwadda, David; Musoke, Richard; Redd, Andrew D.; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J.; Kighoma, Nehemiah; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Lessler, Justin; Gray, Ronald H.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Wawer, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A randomized trial of voluntary medical male circumcision (MC) of HIV—infected men reported increased HIV transmission to female partners among men who resumed sexual intercourse prior to wound healing. We conducted a prospective observational study to assess penile HIV shedding after MC. Methods and Findings HIV shedding was evaluated among 223 HIV—infected men (183 self—reported not receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART], 11 self—reported receiving ART and had a detectable plasma viral load [VL], and 29 self—reported receiving ART and had an undetectable plasma VL [<400 copies/ml]) in Rakai, Uganda, between June 2009 and April 2012. Preoperative and weekly penile lavages collected for 6 wk and then at 12 wk were tested for HIV shedding and VL using a real—time quantitative PCR assay. Unadjusted prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) and adjusted PRRs (adjPRRs) of HIV shedding were estimated using modified Poisson regression with robust variance. HIV shedding was detected in 9.3% (17/183) of men not on ART prior to surgery and 39.3% (72/183) of these men during the entire study. Relative to baseline, the proportion shedding was significantly increased after MC at 1 wk (PRR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.12–3.14, p = 0.012), 2 wk (PRR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.94–5.13, p < 0.001), and 3 wk (PRR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.19–3.28, p = 0.008) after MC. However, compared to baseline, HIV shedding was decreased by 6 wk after MC (PRR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.09–0.83, p = 0.023) and remained suppressed at 12 wk after MC (PRR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06–0.64, p = 0.008). Detectable HIV shedding from MC wounds occurred in more study visits among men with an HIV plasma VL > 50,000 copies/ml than among those with an HIV plasma VL < 400 copies/ml (adjPRR = 10.3, 95% CI = 4.25–24.90, p < 0.001). Detectable HIV shedding was less common in visits from men with healed MC wounds compared to visits from men without healed wounds (adjPRR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.07–0.23, p < 0.001) and in visits from men on ART with undetectable plasma VL compared to men not on ART (PRR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.05–0.43, p = 0.001). Among men with detectable penile HIV shedding, the median log10 HIV copies/milliliter of lavage fluid was significantly lower in men with ART—induced undetectable plasma VL (1.93, interquartile range [IQR] = 1.83–2.14) than in men not on ART (2.63, IQR = 2.28–3.22, p < 0.001). Limitations of this observational study include significant differences in baseline covariates, lack of confirmed receipt of ART for individuals who reported ART use, and lack of information on potential ART initiation during follow—up for those who were not on ART at enrollment. Conclusion Penile HIV shedding is significantly reduced after healing of MC wounds. Lower plasma VL is associated with decreased frequency and quantity of HIV shedding from MC wounds. Starting ART prior to MC should be considered to reduce male-to-female HIV transmission risk. Research is needed to assess the time on ART required to decrease shedding, and the acceptability and feasibility of initiating ART at the time of MC. PMID:25919012

  4. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series. PMID:25451209

  5. First experiences with negative pressure wound therapy and instillation in the treatment of infected orthopaedic implants: a clinical observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burkhard Lehner; Wim Fleischmann; Rolf Becker; Gerrolt N. Jukema

    Purpose  Infections associated with orthopaedic implants remain a serious complication. The main objective in acute infection control\\u000a is component retention, whereas this option is usually not considered for chronic infections.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This multi-centre prospective, non-randomised observational study investigated one possible treatment option for implant retention\\u000a in combination with negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi). Thirty-two patients with an infected orthopaedic\\u000a implant

  6. [Chronic fistulating wound infection after Lichtenstein repair of inguinal hernia, caused by a small colony variant of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Göring, H; Waldner, H; Emmerling, P; Abele-Horn, M

    2001-04-01

    We report a case of chronic wound infection (abscess, fistula) after a Lichtenstein repair of inguinal hernia. After surgical treatment (mesh explantation), a small-colony variant (SCV) of Staphylococcus aureus was cultured microbiologically. SCV represent subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus which are associated with chronic infections and which respond poorly to usual treatment regimes. In this case surgery and specific antibiotic treatment with flucloxacillin and rifampicin were successful. PMID:11357538

  7. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  8. Efficacy and safety profile of the novel antimicrobial peptide PXL150 in a mouse model of infected burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Björn, Camilla; Noppa, Laila; Näslund Salomonsson, Emelie; Johansson, Anna-Lena; Nilsson, Elin; Mahlapuu, Margit; Håkansson, Joakim

    2015-05-01

    The urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial therapies has stimulated interest in antimicrobial peptides as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-infectious effect of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide PXL150, formulated in hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) gel, on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in an in vivo mouse model of infected burn wounds as well as to assess the in vivo safety profile of PXL150 in rats and rabbits. Minimal microbicidal concentration analysis showed prominent efficacy of PXL150 against P. aeruginosa in vitro, which was further enhanced in formulating the peptide in HPC gel. Application of 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20mg/g PXL150 in HPC gel twice daily for four consecutive days significantly reduced bacterial counts in the burn wounds compared with non-treated or placebo-treated controls. Continuous bioluminescence measurements of the bacteria revealed a pronounced anti-infective effect already at the first day post infection by PXL150 in concentrations of ?2.5mg/g. In the non-clinical safety studies, PXL150 showed a favourable safety profile following repeated administration systemically and locally in rats and rabbits, respectively. In conclusion, these data support that PXL150 has the potential to be an effective and safe drug candidate for the treatment of infected burn wounds. The findings encourage the progression of PXL150 as a novel topical treatment of microbial infections. PMID:25649371

  9. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects.

  10. Real-Time Monitoring of Bacterial Infection In Vivo: Development of Bioluminescent Staphylococcal Foreign-Body and Deep-Thigh-Wound Mouse Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuklin, Nelly A.; Pancari, Gregory D.; Tobery, Timothy W.; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P.; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs. PMID:12936968

  11. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gastrointestinal system, or respiratory system — fluids and other contaminants could get into the wound and cause infection. ... sure there are no remaining bacteria or other contaminants, they will stitch or close the wound. Sometimes, ...

  12. Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors according to clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Lemaignen, A; Birgand, G; Ghodhbane, W; Alkhoder, S; Lolom, I; Belorgey, S; Lescure, F-X; Armand-Lefevre, L; Raffoul, R; Dilly, M-P; Nataf, P; Lucet, J C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery depends on the definition used. A distinction is generally made between mediastinitis, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and superficial SSI. Our objective was to decipher these entities in terms of presentation and risk factors. We performed a 7-year single centre analysis of prospective surveillance of patients with cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. SSI was defined as the need for reoperation due to infection. Among 7170 patients, 292 (4.1%) developed SSI, including 145 CDC-defined mediastinitis (CDC-positive SSI, 2.0%) and 147 superficial SSI without associated bloodstream infection (CDC-negative SSI, 2.1%). Median time to reoperation for CDC-negative SSI was 18 days (interquartile range, 14-26) and 16 (interquartile range, 11-24) for CDC-positive SSI (p 0.02). Microorganisms associated with CDC-negative SSI were mainly skin commensals (62/147, 41%) or originated in the digestive tract (62/147, 42%); only six were due to Staphylococcus aureus (4%), while CDC-positive SSI were mostly due to S. aureus (52/145, 36%) and germs from the digestive tract (52/145, 36%). Risk factors for SSI were older age, obesity, chronic obstructive bronchopneumonia, diabetes mellitus, critical preoperative state, postoperative vasopressive support, transfusion or prolonged ventilation and coronary artery bypass grafting, especially if using both internal thoracic arteries in female patients. The number of internal thoracic arteries used and factors affecting wound healing were primarily associated with CDC-negative SSI, whereas comorbidities and perioperative complications were mainly associated with CDC-positive SSI. These 2 entities differed in time to revision surgery, bacteriology and risk factors, suggesting a differing pathophysiology. PMID:25882356

  13. Clinical Trial on the Incidence of Wound Infection and Patient Satisfaction After Stoma Closure: Comparison of Two Skin Closure Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Il; Bae, Sun Mi; Park, Dong Guk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most common complications that can occur after stoma closure. Reports have described differences in the incidence of wound infection depending on the skin closure technique, but there is no consensus on the ideal closure technique for a stoma wound. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of SSI and the patient satisfaction between a circumferential purse-string approximation (CPA) and a primary linear closure (PC) of a stoma wound. Methods This prospective nonrandomized trial enrolled 48 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2010 to October 2013. Patients were divided into two groups according to the stoma closing technique: the CPA group (n = 34) and the PC group (n = 14). The incidences of SSI for the two groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction with the stoma closure was determined by using a questionnaire. Results SSI occurred in 3 of 48 patients (6.3%) and was more frequent in the PC group than in the CPA group (3/14 [21.4%] vs. 0/34 [0%], P = 0.021). Time to complete healing after stoma closure in the CPA group was 32 days (range, 14-61 days). Patients in the CPA group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, CPA was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to PC. However, with the CPA technique, the time to heal is longer than it is with PC. PMID:25745624

  14. Microbial Profiling of Combat Wound Infection through Detection Microarray and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jonathan E.; Brown, Trevor S.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Chromy, Brett A.; Luciw, Paul A.; Elster, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Combat wound healing and resolution are highly affected by the resident microbial flora. We therefore sought to achieve comprehensive detection of microbial populations in wounds using novel genomic technologies and bioinformatics analyses. We employed a microarray capable of detecting all sequenced pathogens for interrogation of 124 wound samples from extremity injuries in combat-injured U.S. service members. A subset of samples was also processed via next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Array analysis detected microbial targets in 51% of all wound samples, with Acinetobacter baumannii being the most frequently detected species. Multiple Pseudomonas species were also detected in tissue biopsy specimens. Detection of the Acinetobacter plasmid pRAY correlated significantly with wound failure, while detection of enteric-associated bacteria was associated significantly with successful healing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed broad microbial biodiversity between samples. The total wound bioburden did not associate significantly with wound outcome, although temporal shifts were observed over the course of treatment. Given that standard microbiological methods do not detect the full range of microbes in each wound, these data emphasize the importance of supplementation with molecular techniques for thorough characterization of wound-associated microbes. Future application of genomic protocols for assessing microbial content could allow application of specialized care through early and rapid identification and management of critical patterns in wound bioburden. PMID:24829242

  15. Topical “Soft Candle” Applications for Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Harnarayan, Patrick; Islam, Shariful; Nahmorah J., Bobb; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Ramdass, Michael J.; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: There is a cultural barrier to early medical intervention for diabetic foot infections in Trinidad & Tobago, stemming from the strong cultural belief in “soft candle” as effective treatment. We carried out a case-control study to evaluate the outcomes of “soft candle” to treat diabetic foot infections. Methods: All consecutive patients admitted with diabetic foot infections were interviewed to collect data on: demographics, medical history, unhealthy lifestyle markers (exposure to risk factors for chronic diseases), chosen treatment and details of “soft candle” use. The hospital records were accessed on discharge to records the main outcome measures: HbA1c readings, duration of hospitalization, amputation and in-hospital mortality. Two groups were defined: The control group included patients who sought medical attention after detecting a foot infection. The study group included patients who recognized their infection but voluntarily chose to utilize “soft candle” regimens. We excluded patients who voluntarily chose to use other forms of non-traditional treatment or sought no treatment at all. Outcomes were compared using SPSS ver 19. A two-tailed P value was calculated for variables of interest in each group using Fisher’s exact test. The duration of hospitalization between the groups was compared using paired T-Test. A P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There were 442 patients who met inclusion criteria: There were 60 patients in the study group at an average age of 55.2 years (SD ± 11.4; range 43-88): 63% had HBA1c readings >7.0% at presentation and 95% had unhealthy lifestyle habits. There were 382 patients in the control group at an average age of 59.1 years (SD ± 12.6, Range 37-89): 74% with HBA1c readings >7.0% at presentation and 48% with unhealthy lifestyle habits. Patients who used “soft candle” had significantly longer duration of hospitalization (15.5 ± 10.2 vs 9.2 ± 3.9 days; P<0.001) and major amputations (13.3% vs 5.6%; P=0.048) that was considered clinically significant. There was no difference in minor amputations (31.7% vs 34.3%; P=0.770) or in-hospital mortality (1.7% vs 0.52%; P=0.355) between the groups. Conclusion: In its current form, the traditional practice of topical “soft candle” application to diabetic foot wounds may be potentially harmful. Persons with diabetes should be warned about these effects. We have identified the target population for educational campaigns. PMID:25018679

  16. Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Site-Specific Cefazolin Delivery Using Biodegradable Implants in the Prevention of Post-operative Wound Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saleh Allababidi; Jaymin C. Shah

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. The study objective was to evaluate the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of cefazolin delivered locally as a glyceryl monostearate (GMS) based biocompatible implant for prevention of post-operative wound infection in Sprague Dawley rats subcutaneously inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of wound edge protection devices in reducing surgical site infection after abdominal surgery. Design Multicentre observer blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients undergoing laparotomy at 21 UK hospitals. Interventions Standard care or the use of a wound edge protection device during surgery. Main outcome measures Surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, assessed by blinded clinicians at seven and 30 days and by patient’s self report for the intervening period. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, duration of stay in hospital, and the effect of characteristics of the patient and operation on the efficacy of the device. Results 760 patients were enrolled with 382 patients assigned to the device group and 378 to the control group. Six patients in the device group and five in the control group did not undergo laparotomy. Fourteen patients, seven in each group, were lost to follow-up. A total of 184 patients experienced surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, 91/369 (24.7%) in the device group and 93/366 (25.4%) in the control group (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.36; P=0.85). This lack of benefit was consistent across wound assessments performed by clinicians and those reported by patients and across all secondary outcomes. In the secondary analyses no subgroup could be identified in which there was evidence of clinical benefit associated with use of the device. Conclusions Wound edge protection devices do not reduce the rate of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparotomy, and therefore their routine use for this role cannot be recommended. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 40402832 PMID:23903454

  18. Combat trauma-associated invasive fungal wound infections: epidemiology and clinical classification.

    PubMed

    Weintrob, A C; Weisbrod, A B; Dunne, J R; Rodriguez, C J; Malone, D; Lloyd, B A; Warkentien, T E; Wells, J; Murray, C K; Bradley, W; Shaikh, F; Shah, J; Aggarwal, D; Carson, M L; Tribble, D R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) in combat casualties led to development of a combat trauma-specific IFI case definition and classification. Prospective data were collected from 1133 US military personnel injured in Afghanistan (June 2009-August 2011). The IFI rates ranged from 0·2% to 11·7% among ward and intensive care unit admissions, respectively (6·8% overall). Seventy-seven IFI cases were classified as proven/probable (n = 54) and possible/unclassifiable (n = 23) and compared in a case-case analysis. There was no difference in clinical characteristics between the proven/probable and possible/unclassifiable cases. Possible IFI cases had shorter time to diagnosis (P = 0·02) and initiation of antifungal therapy (P = 0·05) and fewer operative visits (P = 0·002) compared to proven/probable cases, but clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. Although the trauma-related IFI classification scheme did not provide prognostic information, it is an effective tool for clinical and epidemiological surveillance and research. PMID:24642013

  19. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic”) and temperate (“lysogenic”) bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  20. The use of dilute Dakin's solution for the treatment of angioinvasive fungal infection in the combat wounded: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Louis; Purcell, Richard; Fleming, Mark; Gordon, Wade T

    2013-04-01

    Disseminated fungal infections are normally opportunistic infections in the immunocompromised population. Current literature has documented a high mortality rate with these infections in civilian trauma or as complications of severe burns. There is only one published case of fungal infection in a combat-injured individual to date, which resulted in mortality despite aggressive debridement and appropriate antifungal agents. We present here three patients in whom aggressive debridement, antifungals, and the addition of dilute Dakin's solution with negative pressure wound therapy was used to treat angioinvasive mold. Angioinvasive fungal infection continue to be one of the most aggressive and devastating infections that our combat-injured patients face. With the addition of dilute Dakin's solution, we successfully managed three critically ill patients. Previous literature had shown close to 30% mortality associated with cutaneous mucormycosis and the mortality rate approaches 100% with disseminated angioinvasive fungal infections. These results provide hope not only for the combat-injured patients being treated for both local and disseminated angioinvasive fungal infections, but also for the civilian trauma and immunocompromised patients. PMID:23707840

  1. Off-label drug use in WOC nursing: issues related to use of mafenide acetate to treat infected chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Breton, D W

    2001-09-01

    It is not unusual for practitioners to prescribe off-label drugs for their patients--that is, drugs that have not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat the patient's particular condition. The decision to use off-label drugs should be based on a clear understanding of the risks and benefits to the patient. This issue is pertinent to WOC nurses because they may work with physicians who prescribe off-label drugs for their wound care patients. In addition, WOC nurses who are also nurse practitioners and have prescribing privileges may be intimately involved in the decision to prescribe off-label drugs. A review of the literature related to off-label drug use and mafenide acetate was conducted. This article presents the issues related to off-label use of mafenide acetate (Sulfamylon) and possible implications for patients with chronic infected wounds. PMID:11557929

  2. The Role of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Prevention of Wound Infection After Lichtenstein Open Mesh Repair of Primary Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aufenacker, Theo J.; van Geldere, Dirk; van Mesdag, Taco; Bossers, Astrid N.; Dekker, Benno; Scheijde, Edo; van Nieuwenhuizen, Roos; Hiemstra, Esther; Maduro, John H.; Juttmann, Jan-Willem; Hofstede, Diederik; van Der Linden, Cunera T. M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Simons, Maarten P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the use of prophylactic antibiotics is effective in the prevention of postoperative wound infection after Lichtenstein open mesh inguinal hernia repair. Summary Background Data: A recent Cochrane meta-analysis (2003) concluded that “antibiotic prophylaxis for elective inguinal hernia repair cannot be firmly recommended or discarded.” Methods: Patients with a primary inguinal hernia scheduled for Lichtenstein repair were randomized to a preoperative single dose of 1.5 g intravenous cephalosporin or a placebo. Patients with recurrent hernias, immunosuppressive diseases, or allergies for the given antibiotic were excluded. Infection was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Results: We included 1040 patients in the study between November 1998 and May 2003. According to the intention-to-treat principle, 1008 patients were analyzed. There were 8 infections (1.6%) in the antibiotic prophylaxis group and 9 (1.8%) in the placebo group (P = 0.82). There was 1 deep infection in the antibiotic prophylaxis group and 2 in the placebo group (P = 0.57). Statistical analysis showed an absolute risk reduction of 0.19% (95% confidence interval, ?1.78%–1.40%) and a number needed to treat of 520 for the total number of infections. For deep infection, the absolute risk reduction is 0.20% (95% confidence interval, ?0.87%–0.48%) with a number needed to treat of 508. Conclusions: A low percentage (1.7%) of wound infection after Lichtenstein open mesh inguinal (primary) hernia repair was found, and there was no difference between the antibiotic prophylaxis or placebo group. The results show that, in Lichtenstein inguinal primary hernia repair, antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated in low-risk patients. PMID:15570201

  3. Chryseobacterium in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Kienzle, N; Muller, M; Pegg, S

    2001-03-01

    Chryseobacteria are gram negative organisms, formerly known as Flavobacteria, which rarely cause infections of burn wounds. This article documents three cases of Chryseobacterium infection in burn wounds and adds to the other two cases that have been reported in English literature. Two patients died, with one of the deaths linked to a Chryseobacteria bacteraemia. In two patients, there was an associated history of first aid treatment with untreated water. Patients whose burn wounds are suspected to be infected with Chryseobacterium require wound excision and coverage in combination with antibiotic therapy such as ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and rifampicin. PMID:11226658

  4. Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sommerstein, R.; Kohler, P.; Wilhelm, M.J.; Kuster, S.P.; Sax, H.

    2015-01-01

    Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case–control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9–9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9–71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2–97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  5. Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sommerstein, R; Kohler, P; Wilhelm, M J; Kuster, S P; Sax, H

    2015-07-01

    Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case-control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9-71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2-97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26042188

  6. Microbial biofilms: impact on the pathogenesis of periodontitis, cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds and medical device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Mara Madalina; Holban, Alina Maria; Giurcaneanu, Calin; Popa, Liliana Gabriela; Oanea, Raluca Mihaela; Lazar, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Popa, Marcela; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The majority of chronic infections are associated with mono- or polymicrobial biofilms, having a significant impact on the patients' quality of life and survival rates. Although the use of medical devices revolutionized health care services and significantly improved patient outcomes, it also led to complications associated with biofilms and to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Immunocompromised patients, institutionalized or hospitalized individuals, elderly people are at greater risk due to life-threatening septic complications, but immunocompetent individuals with predisposing genetic or acquired diseases can also be affected, almost any body part being able to shelter persistent biofilms. Moreover, chronic biofilm-related infections can lead to the occurrence of systemic diseases, as in the case of chronic periodontitis, linked to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The more researchers discover, new unknown issues add up to the complexity of biofilm infections, in which microbial species establish relationships of cooperation and competition, and elaborate phenotypic differentiation into functional, adapted communities. Their interaction with the host's immune system or with therapeutic agents contributes to the complex puzzle that still misses a lot of pieces. In this comprehensive review we aimed to highlight the microbial composition, developmental stages, architecture and properties of medical biofilms, as well as the diagnostic tools used in the management of biofilm related infections. Also, we present recently acquired knowledge on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of four chronic diseases associated with biofilm development in tissues (chronic periodontitis, chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds) and artificial substrata (medical devices-related infections). PMID:25877092

  7. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  8. Biofilm in wound care.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial. PMID:25757387

  9. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC). PMID:20691034

  10. Impact of deep sternal wound infection management with vacuum-assisted closure therapy followed by sternal osteosynthesis: a 15-year review of 23 499 sternotomies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Baillot; Daniel Cloutier; Livia Montalin; Louise Côté; François Lellouche; Chanel Houde; Geneviève Gaudreau; Pierre Voisine

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was undertaken to examine the outcome of patients with deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) now treated with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy as a bridge to sternal osteosynthesis with horizontal titanium plate fixation. Methods: From 1992 to 2007, a consecutive cohort of 23499 patients underwent open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution. The period under study was divided in

  11. The protective effect of topical rifamycin treatment against sternal wound infection in diabetic patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aygun, Fatih; Kuzgun, Ahmet; Ulucan, Seref; Keser, Ahmet; Akpek, Mahmut; Kaya, Mehmet G

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of topical rifamycin SV treatment against sternal wound infection (SWI) in diabetic patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods One hundred and fifty-nine diabetic patients who were scheduled to undergo isolated on-pump CABG surgery were included. Eight were excluded for various reasons. Of the 151 patients, 51 were on insulin therapy and 100 were on oral anti-diabetics. The risk of mediastinitis was assessed using the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2004 guideline update for CABG surgery. According to the risk scores, patients were divided into two comparable groups: the rifamycin group (n = 78) received topical rifamycin treatment after on-pump CABG surgery, and the control group (n = 73) received no topical treatment. Results Deep sternal wound infection (mediastinitis) was not observed in either group (0/78 vs 0/73, p = 1.0). No superficial sternal wound infection was observed in the rifamycin group, however, it did occur in one patient in the control group (0/78 vs 1/73, p = 0.303). Wound culture was performed and coagulase-negative staphylococci were observed. The infection regressed on initiation of antibiotic therapy against isolated bacteria and the patient was discharged after a full recovery. Conclusion Although the difference in rate of superficial sternal wound infection (SSWI) in the rifamycin and control groups was not statistically significant, locally applied rifamycin SV during closure of the sternum in the CABG operation may have had a protective affect against SWI. PMID:24687038

  12. Notes from the field: rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium wound infections among medical tourists undergoing cosmetic surgeries in the Dominican Republic--multiple states, March 2013-February 2014.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, David; Gaines, Joanna; Nguyen, Duc B; Esposito, Douglas H; Ridpath, Alison; Yacisin, Kari; Poy, Joe A; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Lijewski, Virginia; McElroy, Nora P; Ahmad, Nina; Harrison, Cassandra; Parinelli, Ellen J; Beaudoin, Amanda L; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Pritchard, Scott; Jensen, Bette J; Toney, Nadege C; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Nyangoma, Edith N; Barry, Anita M; Feldman, Katherine A; Blythe, David; Perz, Joseph F; Morgan, Oliver W; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Brunette, Gary W; Sotir, Mark

    2014-03-01

    In August 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (MDHMH) was notified of two persons with rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (RG-NTM) surgical-site infections. Both patients had undergone surgical procedures as medical tourists at the same private surgical clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic the previous month. Within 7 days of returning to the United States, both sought care for symptoms that included surgical wound abscesses, clear fluid drainage, pain, and fever. Initial antibiotic therapy was ineffective. Material collected from both patients' wounds grew Mycobacterium abscessus exhibiting a high degree of antibiotic resistance characteristic of this organism. PMID:24598597

  13. The vacuum-assisted closure system for the treatment of deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatjana M Fleck; Michael Fleck; Reinhard Moidl; Martin Czerny; Rupert Koller; Pietro Giovanoli; Michael J Hiesmayer; Daniel Zimpfer; Ernst Wolner; Martin Grabenwoger

    2002-01-01

    BackgroundThe VAC system (vacuum-assisted wound closure) is a noninvasive active therapy to promote healing in difficult wounds that fail to respond to established treatment modalities. The system is based on the application of negative pressure by controlled suction to the wound surface. The method was introduced into clinical practice in 1996. Since then, numerous studies proved the effectiveness of the

  14. Surgical Soft Tissue Closure of Severe Diabetic Foot Infections: A Combination of Biologics, Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Skin Grafting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crystal L. Ramanujam; Thomas Zgonis

    Creative surgical strategies are often warranted for long term closure of diabetic foot wounds. This article provides a case report demonstrating the successive use of negative pressure wound therapy, advanced biologics, and split thickness skin grafting for healing of an extensive surgical wound. While the success of these therapies is enticing, their utilization should be based on careful patient selection

  15. An experimental model to determine the effects of adjuvant therapy on the incidence of postoperative wound infection: II. Evaluating preoperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ariyan, S; Kraft, R L; Goldberg, N H

    1980-03-01

    A study was performed in 110 rats to investigate the effect of an LD50 dose of MTX, rescued with leucovorin treatment in 24 hours, on the ability of surgical wounds to tolerate bacterial contamination. The results of this study would indicate that the optimal time to ensure normal wound healing would be an interval of 10 to 14 days following the administration of large doses of this drug. This information would suggest that the use of methotrexate as a preoperative adjuvant, and radiation therapy following the surgical removal of the tumor, might be a reasonable approach to the adjuvant treatment of head and neck cancer without increasing the risk of wound infections. PMID:6766559

  16. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  17. Differential deposition of suberin phenolic and aliphatic domains and their roles in resistance to infection during potato tuber ( Solanum tuberosumL.) wound-healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. C Lulai; D. L Corsini

    1998-01-01

    Rapid suberization of wounded potato tubers is critical in avoiding infection byErwinia carotovorasubsp.carotovora(a causal organism of bacterial soft rot) andFusarium sambucinum(a causal organism of fungal dry rot) in cut seed and stored potatoes. However, until now the reason for the differential development of resistance to bacterial and then fungal penetration during suberization has not been shown to be related to

  18. Brassica napus possesses an expanded set of polygalacturonase inhibitor protein genes that are differentially regulated in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection, wounding and defense hormone treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dwayne D. Hegedus; Rugang Li; Lone Buchwaldt; Isobel Parkin; Steve Whitwill; Cathy Coutu; Diana Bekkaoui; S. Roger Rimmer

    2008-01-01

    Most plants encode a limited set of polygalacturonase inhibitor (PGIP) genes that may be involved in aspects of plant development,\\u000a but more importantly in the inactivation of polygalacturonases (PG) secreted by pathogens. Previously, we characterized two\\u000a Brassica napus PGIP genes, BnPgip1 and BnPgip2, which were differentially expressed in response to pathogen infection and wounding. Here we report that the B.

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy for post-sternotomy mediastinitis reduces mortality rate and sternal re-infection rate compared to conventional treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rainer Petzina; Julia Hoffmann; Artashes Navasardyan; Malin Malmsjö; Christof Stamm; Axel Unbehaun; Roland Hetzer

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a recently introduced treatment modality for post-sternotomy mediastinitis. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality rate, the sternal re-infection rate and the length of hospital stay in patients with post-sternotomy mediastinitis after NPWT and conventional treatment. Methods: We retrospectively analysed 118 patients with post-sternotomy mediastinitis after cardiac surgery. One group

  20. Brassica napus possesses an expanded set of polygalacturonase inhibitor protein genes that are differentially regulated in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection, wounding and defense hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Dwayne D; Li, Rugang; Buchwaldt, Lone; Parkin, Isobel; Whitwill, Steve; Coutu, Cathy; Bekkaoui, Diana; Rimmer, S Roger

    2008-07-01

    Most plants encode a limited set of polygalacturonase inhibitor (PGIP) genes that may be involved in aspects of plant development, but more importantly in the inactivation of polygalacturonases (PG) secreted by pathogens. Previously, we characterized two Brassica napus PGIP genes, BnPgip1 and BnPgip2, which were differentially expressed in response to pathogen infection and wounding. Here we report that the B. napus genome encodes a set of at least 16 PGIP genes that are similar to BnPgip1 or BnPgip2. This is the largest Pgip gene family reported to date. Comparison of the BnPGIPs revealed several sites within the xxLxLxx region of leucine rich repeats that form beta-sheets along the interacting face of the PGIP that are hypervariable and represent good candidates for generating PGIP diversity. Characterization of the regulatory regions and RT-PCR studies with gene-specific primers revealed that individual genes were differentially responsive to pathogen infection, mechanical wounding and signaling molecules. Many of the BnPgip genes responded to infection by the necrotic pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum; however, these genes were also induced either by jasmonic acid, wounding and salicylic acid or some combination thereof. The large number of PGIPs and the differential manner in which they are regulated likely ensures that B. napus can respond to attack from a broad spectrum of pathogens and pests. PMID:18431596

  1. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  2. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy of peptide A3-APO in mouse models of multidrug-resistant wound and lung infections cannot be explained by in vitro activity against the pathogens involved.

    PubMed

    Ostorhazi, Eszter; Holub, Marianna Csilla; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Harmos, Ferenc; Cassone, Marco; Wade, John D; Otvos, Laszlo

    2011-05-01

    Although the designer proline-rich antimicrobial peptide A3-APO has only modest activity against Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii in vitro, in mouse models of systemic and wound infections it shows superior efficacy compared with conventional antibiotics. In this study, the efficacy of A3-APO in several additional mouse models was investigated, including Staphylococcus aureus wound infection, mixed Klebsiella pneumoniae-A. baumannii-Proteus mirabilis wound infection and K. pneumoniae lung infection, mimicking blast wound infections, foot ulcers and ventilator-induced nosocomial infections, respectively. Whilst the peptide practically did not kill the strains in vitro, when administered intramuscularly or as an aerosol it significantly improved mouse survival and reduced bacterial counts at the infection site and in blood. In the lung infection study, the blood bacterial counts following A3-APO treatment were as low as after treatment with colistin and were lower than after treatment with imipenem or amikacin. The wounds of treated animals, unlike their untreated counterparts, lacked pus and signs of inflammation. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, A3-APO upregulated the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 by four- to six-fold. One of the mechanisms mediating the in vivo protective effects might be the prevention of inflammation around bacterial infiltration. PMID:21353493

  3. Effects of inoculum density and wounding on stem infection of three Eastern U.S. forest species by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedlings of three Eastern US forest species (red maple, northern red oak, and chestnut oak) were inoculated by applying Phytophthora ramorum sporangia to stems at different inoculum densities with and without wounding. Disease occurred in all treatments involving wounds, and no disease was observe...

  4. Use of biological mesh versus standard wound care in infected incisional ventral hernias, the SIMBIOSE study: a study protocol for a randomized multicenter controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In infected incisional ventral hernias (IVHs), the use of a synthetic non-absorbable mesh is not recommended and biological meshes hold promise. However, the level of evidence for their safety and efficacy remains low. Methods The SIMBIOSE trial is a multicenter, phase III, randomized, controlled trial comparing the use of a biological mesh versus traditional wound care in patients with an IVH. The primary end point is 6-month infectious and/or wound morbidity. Secondary end points are wound infection and recurrent hernia rates, post-operative pain, quality of life, time to heal, reoperation need, impact of the cross-linked mesh structure, and a medico-economic evaluation. One hundred patients need to be included. Results The main results expected with biological mesh use are a significant decrease of post-operative morbidity, hernia recurrence, time to heal, and costs with an improved quality of life. Conclusions For the first time, the impact of biological meshes in the treatment of IVHs will be evaluated in an academic, randomized, phase III trial to provide scientific evidence ( NCT01594450). Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov, NCT01594450 PMID:23782773

  5. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area <40% were simple randomised to treat with nanocrystalline silver nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. PMID:22734483

  6. Wound bed preparation: ultrasonic-assisted debridement.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Gillian; Pinnuck, Loreto

    Wound bed preparation is essential for the healing of wounds. The TIME framework (tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, edge of wound) for wound bed preparation shows the importance of debridement in the treatment of chronic wounds. Debridement involves the removal of devitalised tissue from the wound bed. It also facilitates the removal of biofilms-complex microbial communities that are known to contribute to delayed wound healing and chronicity of wounds. Ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement (UAWD) is a lesser known debridement method that uses low-frequency ultrasound waves. There is evidence to show that the three clinical effects of atraumatic selective tissue debridement, wound stimulatory effects and antibacterial activity facilitate early healing of wounds, reducing the cost to the healthcare system and improving the patient's quality of life. PMID:23587975

  7. Skin tissue engineering for the infected wound site: biodegradable PLA nanofibers and a novel approach for silver ion release evaluated in a 3D coculture system of keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-10-01

    Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin substitutes or wound dressings for infected wound sites. PMID:24494739

  8. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds. PMID:23162236

  9. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : VI. BACTERIOLOGICAL ASEPSIS OF A WOUND.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A

    1917-07-01

    Of twenty infected cases treated with Dakin's solution or chloramine paste, seven were bacteriologically sterile. This proves that, in general, 35 per cent of the cases thus treated become bacteriologically aseptic. This degree of asepsis is not necessary in order to suture the wound, the absence of bacteria in films being sufficient. Complete sterilization of wounds, can, therefore, now be accomplished. PMID:19868138

  10. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... elevated whenever possible. Take care of your whole self: body, mind and spirit. Eat well and drink plenty of water to strengthen your body’s own natural healing abilities. Check your residual limb regularly for signs ...

  11. Efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection after Whipple's procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy) with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Edwards, Janet P; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver; Ball, Chad G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among surgical oncology patients, incisional surgical site infection is associated with substantially increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Moreover, while adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent have a high risk of this type of infection, and wound protectors may significantly reduce its risk, no relevant studies of wound protectors yet exist involving this patient population. This study will evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents. Methods and analysis This study will be a parallel, dual-arm, randomised controlled trial that will utilise a more explanatory than pragmatic attitude. All adults (?18?years) undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent will be considered eligible. Exclusion criteria will include patient age <18?years and those receiving long-term glucocorticoids. The trial will employ block randomisation to allocate patients to a commercial dual-ring wound protector (the Alexis Wound Protector) or no wound protector and the current standard of care. The main outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30?days of the index operation date as determined by a research assistant blinded to treatment allocation. Outcomes will be analysed by a statistician blinded to allocation status by calculating risk ratios and 95% CIs and compared using Fisher's exact test. Ethics and dissemination This will be the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results of this study are expected to be available in 2016/2017 and will be disseminated using an integrated and end-of-grant knowledge translation strategy. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01836237. PMID:25146716

  12. Polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in wound management.

    PubMed

    Fumarola, Sian

    This article describes wound management using polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in two patients experiencing multiple comorbidities. Wound bed debridement and bioburden management were important factors in achieving positive results in terms of promoting wound healing and reducing infection and malodour. PMID:21894678

  13. Genotype-dependent expression of specific members of potato protease inhibitor gene families in different tissues and in response to wounding and nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; Bellin, Diana; Lorito, Matteo; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-05-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are small ubiquitous proteins with a variety of biological functions in plants, including protein stabilization, modulation of apoptosis and defense against pathogens. Kunitz-like inhibitors (PKPIs) and proteinase inhibitors 1 (PI-1) are abundant in storage organs of potato plants and are up-regulated in other tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little information is available on genotype-dependent regulation of individual PKPI group- and PI-1 genes. We isolated, sequenced and characterized four novel full-length PI-1 cDNAs (PPI3A2, PPI3A4, PPI2C4 and PPI2C1A) from Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée. Specific primers were developed for PI-1 genes PPI3A2, PPI3B2 and PPI2C4 and the three PKPI homology groups A, B and C. Their expression profiles were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with transcripts of the PI-1, Pin2 and PR1 gene families in various tissues, after wounding and Globodera rostochiensis infection of nematode-resistant genotypes P40 and LB7/4/c-I-7, and susceptible cv. Desirée. Individual PI-1 genes and PKPI homology groups were expressed in a tissue- and genotype-dependent manner after wounding and nematode infection. The differences in PI expression patterns were related to the intensity, type of inhibitors produced, and the kinetics of induction. Therefore, different genotype-environment combinations produce different sets of PI transcripts. Potato plants reacted to G. rostochiensis infection by modulating PKPI, PI-1 and Pin2, but not PR1 gene expression, suggesting that the jasmonic acid but not the salicylic acid defense signaling pathway is activated. PI expression profiles were not correlated with the resistance status of the potato genotype infected with G. rostochiensis. PMID:19095329

  14. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard-to-heal leg ulcers such as large, deep, infected and long-lasting venous ulcers, sharp debridement and skin grafting may favour and shorten ulcer healing. PMID:23482540

  15. A clinical algorithm for wound biofilm identification.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, D G; Bowler, P G; Hurlow, J

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of the existence of biofilm in chronic wounds is increasing among wound care practitioners, and a growing body of evidence indicates that biofilm contributes significantly to wound recalcitrance. While clinical guidelines regarding the involvement of biofilm in human bacterial infections have been proposed, there remains uncertainty and lack of guidance towards biofilm presence in wounds. The intention of this report is to collate knowledge and evidence of the visual and indirect clinical indicators of wound biofilm, and propose an algorithm designed to facilitate clinical recognition of biofilm and subsequent wound management practices. PMID:24633059

  16. Quantitative bacterial analysis of comparative wound irrigations.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, M L; Robson, M C; Krizek, T J; Southwick, W O

    1975-01-01

    It is a biologic fact that all open wounds contain bacteria and remain contaminated with varying levels of bacteria until successful wound closure has been accomplished. The sine qua non in the management of the contaminated wound has been and remains adequate sharp debridement. In a standardized experimental model, three methods of irrigation were compared employing quantitative bacteriology of tissue to evaluate their effectiveness at decreasing bacterial levels and reducing wound infection. The pulsating jet lavate was found to be significantly better than gravity flow irrigation or wound irrigation with a bulb syringe. These data on tissue biopsies support previous reports using surface and wound exudate cultures. PMID:1094969

  17. Wound construction.

    PubMed

    Trichonas, George; Kaiser, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Wound construction is critical in microincision vitrectomy surgery. The three main steps in constructing a proper wound include displacing the conjunctiva away from the sclera, flattening the sclera on insertion, and angling the incision. Each one of these steps helps create wounds that will not leak. Misaligning the conjunctiva from the scleral hole prevents a vitreous wick from extending external to the conjunctiva. Flattening the sclera on trocar insertion provides a longer wound cord length, which is less likely to leak, and angling the incision has been proven to seal better in both anterior and posterior segment incisions. When you make an angled incision, you initially insert the blade at a 30° angle (at least). This will make the wound more stable because it is less likely to cause internal disruption of the wound edges. These three basic steps are simple, but very important to follow when constructing a microincision wound in order to limit postoperative complications including wound leakage, gas leak, hypotony, and endophthalmitis. PMID:25196754

  18. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for deep sternal wound infections: the impact of learning curve on survival and predictors for late mortality.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Johan; Mokhtari, Arash; Gustafsson, Ronny; Malmsjö, Malin; Nilsson, Johan; Ingemansson, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible learning curve effects on survival during the introduction of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in patients with deep sternal wound infection (DSWI). Furthermore, predictors of late mortality were analysed and causes of late death were examined. Fifty-three patients (early Group, n = 26, January 1999 to July 2001 versus late group, n = 27, August 2001 to March 2003) were all treated with VAC for DSWI. A follow-up was carried out in September 2006. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the predictors of late mortality. The 90-day mortality was 0% in both groups. The survival rates at 5 years were 69.2 +/- 9.1% (early group) versus 58.5 +/- 11.7% (late group), P = ns (non significant). The time interval from cardiac surgery to diagnosis of DSWI and prolonged VAC therapy were identified as independent predictors of late mortality. Our concept for VAC therapy in DSWI seems to be readily introduced in clinical practice. There was no difference in survival between our initial cases and later cases. Late diagnosis and prolonged wound therapy were identified as predictors for late mortality. PMID:18494627

  19. Survival, germination, and growth of Epichloe typhina and significance of leaf wounds and insects in infection of orchardgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epichloë typhina, [choke] is an important stroma-producing endophytic ascomycete that is responsible for significant yield loss in orchardgrass seed production fields. Although infections are presumed to occur through leaves and stems, details of the infection process and conditions that favor leaf ...

  20. Low level laser therapy (AlGaInP) applied at 5J/cm2 reduces the proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in infected wounds and intact skin of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela Conceição Gomes Gonçalves e; Plapler, Helio; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Silva, Silvio Romero Gonçalves e; de Sá, Maria da Conceição Aquino; Silva, Benedito Sávio Lima e

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laser therapy is a low cost, non-invasive procedure with good healing results. Doubts exist as to whether laser therapy action on microorganisms can justify research aimed at investigating its possible effects on bacteria-infected wounds. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of low intensity laser on the rate of bacterial contamination in infected wounds in the skin of rats. METHODS An experimental study using 56 male Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into eight groups of seven each. Those in the "infected" groups were infected by Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in the dorsal region. Red laser diode (AlGaInP) 658nm, 5J/cm2 was used to treat the animals in the "treated" groups in scan for 3 consecutive days. Samples were drawn before inoculating bacteria and following laser treatment. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Wilcoxon (paired data) method with a significance level of p <0.05. RESULTS The statistical analysis of median values showed that the groups submitted to laser treatment had low bacterial proliferation. CONCLUSION The laser (AlGaInP), with a dose of 5J/cm2 in both intact skin and in wounds of rats infected with Staphylococcus aureus MRSA, is shown to reduce bacterial proliferation. PMID:23539003

  1. Chronic wound bed preparation using a cleansing solution.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin Tapiwa; Hughes, Maria; Hilston, Keith; Sparke, Ann; Jandrisits, Johanna M

    2015-06-24

    Chronic wound management remains challenging in clinical practice, especially in the presence of bacterial bioburden and slough. To resolve these clinical challenges, it is essential clinicians implement the TIME framework (tissue, inflammation/infection, moisture, edge of wound) as a model of effective wound bed preparation. As a result of advances in technology and wound care therapies, on the market today are products that can help reduce the wound bed clinical challenges recommended by the TIME framework. This article looks at a wound cleansing solution that reduces the wound bed bioburden by breaking down biofilms and debriding slough. PMID:26110987

  2. Detection of Highly Ciprofloxacin Resistance Acinetobacter Baumannii Isolated from Patients with Burn Wound Infections in Presence and Absence of Efflux Pump Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    MALEKI, Mohammad-Hossein; JALILIAN, Farid Azizi; KHAYAT, Hatef; MOHAMMADI, Maryam; POURAHMAD, Fazel; ASADOLLAHI, Khairollah; PAKZAD, Iraj; SADEGHIFARD, Nourkhoda; SOROUSH, Setareh; EMANEINI, Mohammad; TAHERIKALANI, Morovat

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance among A. baumannii isolates is now of particular concern. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of resistance to ciprofloxacin among 50 Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wound infections of Tehran were evaluated by E-test and broth microdilution in presence and absence of efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine- arginine ?-naphthylamide (PA?N) and PCR-sequencing methods. All isolates were then typed by REP-PCR fingerprinting to find the clonal relationship between resistant isolates. Our results indicated that resistance to ciprofloxacin among A. baumannii isolated from burn infections in Tehran are high with resistance rate of 100% and ciprofloxacin resistant isolates have a mutation of Serine 83 ?Leucine in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA). 38% of the isolates showed MIC ranges of 64 to ?512?g/ml and were considered as highly resistant. We could not detect Par C mutations and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance A (qnrA) among ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. When we used the efflux pump inhibitor PAbN, MIC of ciprofloxacin was reduced two-to four folds. REP-type A (25/50; 50%), B (20/50; 30%) and C (10/50; 20%) were the most common REP-types among A. baumannii isolates. It seems that mutation in GyrA is the main mechanism of resistant to ciprofloxacin among A. baumannii isolates from burn infections and presence of efflux pumps is just secondary target for ciprofloxacin resistant among A. baumannii in Iran. Regarding with limitation of REP-types detected in this study, we found good correlation between resistance to ciprofloxacin and REP-types A-C. PMID:25705272

  3. Design and production of gentamicin/dextrans microparticles by supercritical assisted atomisation for the treatment of wound bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Rita P; Auriemma, Giulia; Mencherini, Teresa; Russo, Paola; Porta, Amalia; Adami, Renata; Liparoti, Sara; Della Porta, Giovanna; Reverchon, Ernesto; Del Gaudio, Pasquale

    2013-01-20

    In this work, the supercritical assisted atomisation (SAA) is proposed, for the first time, for the production of topical carrier microsystems based on alginate-pectin blend. Gentamicin sulphate (GS) was loaded as high soluble and hygroscopic antibiotic model with poor flowability. Particularly, different water solutions of GS/alginate/pectin were processed by SAA to produce spherical microparticles (GAP) of narrow size (about 2 ?m). GS loading was varied between 20% and 33% (w/w) with an encapsulation efficiency reaching about 100%. The micronised powders also showed high flow properties, good stability and constant water content after 90 days in accelerated storage conditions. The release profiles of the encapsulated drug were monitored using vertical diffusion Franz cells to evaluate the application of GAP microsystems as self-consistent powder formulation or in specific fibres or gels for wound dressing. All formulations showed an initial burst effect in the first 6h of application (40-65% of GS loaded), and in particular GAP4 produced with a GS/alginate/pectin ratio of 1:3:1, exhibited the ability to release GS continuously over 6 days. Antimicrobial tests against Staphylococcus aureus indicated that GS antibiotic activity was preserved at 6 days and higher than pure GS at 12 and 24 days for all SAA formulations, especially for GAP1. PMID:22917746

  4. [Pneumonia in wounded].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Kharitonov, M A; Sadykov, R R; Shelukhin, V A; Ga?duk, S V; Bogomolov, A B; Ivanov, V V; Dobrovol'skaia, L M

    2015-02-01

    Pneumonia is one of the common complications of wounds of any localization. Therapists are involved into the treatment of lung lesions in wounded in the ICU, in the surgical and if the patient arrives "on follow-up care,"--in the medical ward. The article analyzes the main statistical indicators reflecting the prevalence and clinical and pathogenetic characteristics of lung pathology in wounded during the Great Patriotic War, during the fighting Soviet troops in the Republic of Afghanistan, the 1st and 2nd Chechen campaign. Pneumonia as a manifestation of traumatic disease can occur in two ways. Primary pneumonia is in close connection with the pathogenetic traumatic injury. Secondary lung lesions complicate the injury at a later date and are due to the introduction of a nosocomial infection process flora. We describe the clinical picture of pneumonia in the affected, the basic pathogenesis, principles of therapy. Successful treatment of lung pathology in wounded depends on the performance of a complex of activities involving a wide range of doctors of various specialties. PMID:25920173

  5. Negative pressure wound therapy in acute, contaminated wounds: documenting its safety and efficacy to support current global practice.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Gallagher, Kathy E

    2013-02-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is in widespread use and its role in wound care is expanding worldwide. It is estimated that 300 million acute wounds are treated globally each year. Currently, sporadic data exist to support NPWT in acutely contaminated wounds. Despite lack of data, use of negative pressure wound therapy in such cases is increasing across the globe. We retrospectively reviewed 86 consecutive patients, totalling 97 contaminated wounds. All wounds were Class IV based on US Center for Disease Control criteria. Sepsis criteria were present in 78/86 (91%) of patients. All patients were managed with NPWT. Wound type, degree of tissue destruction, presence of infection, wound dimension, timing of initial NPWT, type and timing of wound closure and patient comorbidities were recorded. Outcome endpoints included durability of wound closure and death. Wound location was 41/97 (42%) in the torso; 56/97 (58%) at the extremities. Tissue necrosis was present in 84/97 (87%) of wounds. Infection was present in 86/97 (89%) of wounds. Average wound size was 619 cm(2) when square surface area measured; 786 cm(3) when volume measurements taken. Mean time to wound closure was 17 days, median 10 days and mode 6 days. Durability of wound closure 73/79 (92%). Deaths were noted in 6/86 (7%) of patients. No deaths appeared related to NPWT. Contemporary NPWT related acute wound care is expanding empirically, in quantity and scope across the globe. However, several areas of concern are known regarding this contemporary use of NPWT in acute wounds. Thus, it is important to assess the safety and efficacy of such expanded empiric NPWT practice. Based on our findings with NPWT in the largest known patient cohort of this type, NPWT appears safe and effective in managing acute, contaminated wounds including patients meeting sepsis criteria. These findings provide evidence-based support for current worldwide empiric NPWT-related acute wound care. PMID:22420782

  6. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  7. The Cost-Effectiveness of Wound-Edge Protection Devices Compared to Standard Care in Reducing Surgical Site Infection after Laparotomy: An Economic Evaluation alongside the ROSSINI Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Adrian; Roberts, Tracy E.; Pinkney, Thomas D.; Bartlett, David C.; Morton, Dion; Calvert, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound-edge protection devices (WEPDs) have been used in surgery for more than 40 years to reduce surgical site infection (SSI). No economic evaluation of WEPDs against any comparator has ever been conducted. The aim of the paper was to assess whether WEPDs are cost-effective in reducing SSI compared to standard care alone in the United Kingdom. Methods and Findings An economic evaluation was conducted alongside the ROSSINI trial. The study perspective was that of the UK National Health Service and the time horizon was 30 days post-operatively. The study was conducted in 21 UK hospitals. 760 patients undergoing laparotomy were randomised to either WEPD or standard care and 735 were included in the primary analysis. The main economic outcome was cost-effectiveness based on incremental cost (£) per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Patients in the WEPD arm accessed health care worth £5,420 on average and gained 0.02131 QALYs, compared to £5,130 and 0.02133 QALYs gained in the standard care arm. The WEPD strategy was more costly and equally effective compared to standard care, but there was significant uncertainty around incremental costs and QALYs. The findings were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions There is no evidence to suggest that WEPDs can be considered a cost effective device to reduce SSI. Their continued use is a waste of limited health care resources. PMID:24748154

  8. Combination of Silver Nanoparticles and Drosera binata Extract as a Possible Alternative for Antibiotic Treatment of Burn Wound Infections Caused by Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Krychowiak, Marta; Grinholc, Mariusz; Banasiuk, Rafal; Krauze-Baranowska, Miroslawa; G?ód, Daniel; Kawiak, Anna; Królicka, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common infectious agent involved in the development of skin infections that are associated with antibiotic resistance, such as burn wounds. As drug resistance is a growing problem it is essential to establish novel antimicrobials. Currently, antibiotic resistance in bacteria is successfully controlled by multi-drug therapies. Here we demonstrate that secondary metabolites present in the extract obtained from Drosera binata in vitro cultures are effective antibacterial agents against S. aureus grown in planktonic culture and in biofilm. Moreover, this is the first report demonstrating the synergistic interaction between the D. binata extract and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which results in the spectacular enhancement of the observed bactericidal activity, while having no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes. Simultaneous use of these two agents in significantly reduced quantities produces the same effect, i.e. by killing 99.9% of bacteria in inoculum or eradicating the staphylococcal biofilm, as higher amounts of the agents used individually. Our data indicates that combining AgNPs with either the D. binata extract or with its pure compound (3-chloroplumbagin) may provide a safe and highly effective alternative to commonly used antibiotics, which are ineffective towards the antibiotic-resistant S. aureus. PMID:25551660

  9. Simultaneous irrigation and negative pressure wound therapy enhances wound healing and reduces wound bioburden in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathryn; Bills, Jessica; Barker, Jenny; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Infected foot wounds are one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and amputation among persons with diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate a new wound therapy system that employs negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with simultaneous irrigation therapy. For this study, we used a porcine model with full-thickness excisional wounds, inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wounds were treated for 21 days of therapy with either NPWT, NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy using normal saline or polyhexanide biguanide (PHMB) at low or high flow rates, or control. Data show that NPWT with either irrigation condition improved wound healing rates over control-treated wounds, yet did not differ from NPWT alone. NPWT improved bioburden over control-treated wounds. NPWT with simultaneous irrigation further reduced bioburden over control and NPWT-treated wounds; however, flow rate did not affect these outcomes. Together, these data show that NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy with either normal saline or PHMB has a positive effect on bioburden in a porcine model, which may translate clinically to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:24134060

  10. Small fragment wounds: biophysics and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Rice, P

    1996-03-01

    This paper considers the wounding effects of small fragments in modern warfare. Small fragment wounds may be expected to predominate on a future conventional battlefield; however, studies and models of "military" wounds have tended to focus on bullets as the wounding projectile. This paper discusses briefly the types of fragment projectile expected from modern munitions. It goes on to define a model for such projectiles, and describes the interaction with soft tissue simulants. The extent of penetration, temporary cavitation, and contamination by foreign material are all considered. This work with simulants is validated by experimental shots against animal tissue. A wound model in an experimental animal is described. This model was used to investigate the hematologic, biochemical, and histologic effects of a small fragment wound. The effects on skin and skeletal muscle are described. By sampling at various times (up to 1 week) after wounding, the natural progress of these wounds has been ascertained. The results from 28 experimental animals, with untreated fragment wounds, are reported. The most important findings are that the skin damage is very localized and that the muscle damage is limited, with little necrotic tissue in the track. Furthermore, the extent of the muscle damage, peripheral to the wound track, improves with time, healing within a few days, provided the wound remains free from infection. There was no clinical or microbiologic evidence of infection in those animals followed for up to 3 days. However, of eight animals followed to 1 week, three developed infected wounds. This work has implications for the management of soft tissue wounds caused by fragmentation munitions. The conventional military approach has been to treat penetrating war wounds by exploration, debridement, excision of dead tissue, and delayed primary closure; conservative treatment has largely been regarded as inappropriate. The work presented here shows that the potential culture medium within the wound is small and can be removed by the normal bodily responses. There is no need for surgery, provided that infection can be prevented. It may be inferred that if bacterial colonization can be prevented in the early stages by the timely use of antibiotics, surgery may be unnecessary. Further studies are planned to investigate this possibility. PMID:8606400

  11. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  12. Surgical wound care - closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wound. Do not use soaps, lotions, powders, cosmetics, or any other skin care products on your ... around the incision: More redness More pain Swelling Bleeding The wound is larger or deeper The wound ...

  13. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat chronic wounds: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer A. Thackham; D. L. Sean McElwain; Robert J. Long

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds, defined as those wounds which fail to proceed through an or- derly process to produce anatomic and functional integrity, are a significant so- cioeconomic problem. A wound may fail to heal for a variety of reasons including the use of corticosteroids, formation of squamous cell carcinoma, persistent infection, unrelieved pressure, and underlying hypoxia within the wound bed. Hypoxia

  14. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  15. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  16. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    Preclinical Research The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds. Drug Dev Res 73 : 157-165, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25959289

  17. Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic (db/db) Mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Challenge – A Model for the Study of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C.; Usui, Marcia L.; Underwood, Robert A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by application of bacterial biofilm. Six millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms two days post-wounding, and covered with semi-occlusive dressings for two weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days post-wounding. In contrast, none of biofilm challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds- all indicators of an inflammatory non-healing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality and demonstrated delayed wound healing following biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing. PMID:20731798

  18. Biofilms and Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Usui, Marcia L.; Lippman, Soyeon I.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Significance The incidence, cost, morbidity, and mortality associated with non-healing of chronic skin wounds are dramatic. With the increasing numbers of people with obesity, chronic medical conditions, and an increasing life expectancy, the healthcare cost of non-healing ulcers has recently been estimated at $25 billion annually in the United States. The role played by bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds has been emphasized in recent years, particularly in the context of the prolongation of the inflammatory phase of repair. Recent Advances Rapid high-throughput genomic approaches have revolutionized the ability to identify and quantify microbial organisms from wounds. Defining bacterial genomes and using genetic approaches to knock out specific bacterial functions, then studying bacterial survival on cutaneous wounds is a promising strategy for understanding which genes are essential for pathogenicity. Critical Issues When an animal sustains a cutaneous wound, understanding mechanisms involved in adaptations by bacteria and adaptations by the host in the struggle for survival is central to development of interventions that favor the host. Future Directions Characterization of microbiomes of clinically well characterized chronic human wounds is now under way. The use of in vivo models of biofilm-infected cutaneous wounds will permit the study of the mechanisms needed for biofilm formation, persistence, and potential synergistic interactions among bacteria. A more complete understanding of bacterial survival mechanisms and how microbes influence host repair mechanisms are likely to provide targets for chronic wound therapy. PMID:24527355

  19. Biofilms and Wounds: An Overview of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; McCarty, Sara M.; Lipsky, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Microorganisms can exist both in the planktonic and biofilm state. Each phenotypic state has a role to play in delaying healing and causing infections of both acute and chronic wounds. However, the virulent biofilm state is the fundamental reason that chronic wounds do not heal in a timely manner. We hypothesize that because microorganisms attach to any surface, biofilms can be found in all chronic wounds. However, it is not the biofilm per se that represents the greatest obstacle to the healing of a chronic wound, but its virulence and pathogenicity. Recent Advances: Numerous studies with animals and humans have identified biofilms in wounds. In particular, these studies have highlighted how biofilms impede host fibroblast development, inflammatory responses, and the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy. Despite this, the role biofilms play in affecting the healing of wounds is still vigorously debated. Critical Issues: Clinicians must understand the role that pathogenic biofilms play in impairing the healing of chronic wounds and in increasing the risk for wound infection, with its potentially catastrophic outcomes. The composition of the biofilm, its physiochemical properties, the climaxed indigenous microbiota and their virulence/pathogenicity, microbial numbers and the host's pathophysiology, and immunological fitness will govern the sustainability of a pathogenic biofilm in a wound and its resistance to interventions. Future Directions: Establishing which specific pathogenic biofilms delay wound healing should help guide better wound care practices. PMID:26155379

  20. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  1. Dog-bite lacerations: a controlled trial of primary wound closure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Maimaris; D N Quinton

    1988-01-01

    Dog-bite wounds are often left open because of their reputation for infection if primarily closed. A prospective randomized trial comparing primary closure with leaving the wound open was performed to assess infection and cosmesis. Ninety-six patients with 169 lacerations had thorough surgical debridement and irrigation of their wounds. Ninety-two wounds were sutured and 77 left open. No prophylactic antibiotics were

  2. Wound healing potential of methanol extract of Spathodea campanulata stem bark formulated into a topical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Kwakye, Kwabena; Kwapong, Awo Afi; Bayor, Marcel Tunkumgnen

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing potential of Spathodea campanulata stem bark in Sprague Dawley rats using the excision wound model. The methanol extract contained glycosides, flavonoids and tannins, and was relatively stable when stored at the room temperature for six (6) months. Solvent-free, semi-solid extract of S. campanulata was incorporated into an aqueous cream and applied (10 % w/w and 20 % w/w) on excision wounds of thirty two (32) rats. Cicatrin(®) cream was used as a standard wound healing agent. Prior to the remedial cream application, done later on twice daily, sixteen (16) rats had their wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus, while in the remaining sixteen the wounds were kept clean. The surface area of the excision wounds was monitored planimetrically every four (4) days until a complete wound closure or healing took place. Excision wounds treated with 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream showed a rapid and comparable decrease (p > 0.05) in wound size. In uninfected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream application resulted in ? 95 %-wound closure seen on Day 20, and a complete closure seen on Day 24. In infected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream administration led to ? 91 %-wound closure on Day 24 and a complete wound contraction on Day 28. The results of this study justify the folkloric use of S. campanulata stem bark to the effect of wound treatment. PMID:22468000

  3. Factors influencing wound complications: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Bucknall, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Burst abdomen, incisional herniation, sinus formation and post-operative wound infection continue to bedevil the surgeon. A prospective study of 1129 laparotomy wounds defined the extent of the problem; 1.7% incidence of dehiscence, 7.4% herniation and 6.7% sinus formation, all significantly associated with wound infection. Mass closure reduced the dehiscence rate from 3.8% to 0.76%. Infection reduced wound strength in a rat laparotomy model due to a decrease in fibroblast concentration and activity. A monofilament non-absorbable suture was shown experimentally to be the most suitable suture for closing infected abdominal wounds. Electron microscopy demonstrated bacteria in the interstices of infected multifilament sutures. A randomised clinical trial comparing polyglycolic acid and monofilament nylon in the closure of abdominal wounds confirmed the experimental findings; polyglycolic acid resulted in a significantly higher wound failure rate with no decrease in sinus formation. A mass closure technique using monofilament nylon is recommended for laparatomy closure and efforts should continue to reduce wound sepsis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:6299161

  4. Silk sericin ameliorates wound healing and its clinical efficacy in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Palapinyo, Sirinoot; Srichana, Teerapol; Chottanapund, Suthat; Muangman, Pornprom

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silk sericin, a protein from silkworm cocoon, on scratch wound healing in vitro. For applicable result in clinical use, we also study the efficacy of sericin added to a standard antimicrobial cream, silver zinc sulfadiazine, for open wound care in the treatment of second-degree burn wounds. In vitro scratch assays show that sericin at concentration 100 ?g/mL can promote the migration of fibroblast L929 cells similar to epidermal growth factor (positive control) at 100 ?g/mL. After 1 day of treatment, the length of scratch in wounds treated with sericin was significantly shorter than the length of negative control wounds (culture medium without sericin). For clinical study, a total of 29 patients with 65 burn wounds which covered no less than 15 % of total body surface area were randomly assigned to either control (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine cream) or treatment (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream) group in this randomized, double-blind, standard-controlled study. The results showed that the average time to reach 70 % re-epithelialization of the burned surface and complete healing in the treatment group was significantly shorter, approximately 5-7 days, than in the control group. Regarding time for complete healing, control wounds took approximately 29.28 ± 9.27 days, while wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream took approximately 22.42 ± 6.33 days, (p = 0.001). No infection or severe reaction was found in any wounds. This is the first clinical study to show that silk sericin is safe and beneficial for burn wound treatment when it is added to silver sulfadiazine cream. PMID:23748948

  5. Induction and accumulation of caffeine in young, actively growing leaves of cocoa ( Theobroma cacao L.) by wounding or infection with Crinipellis perniciosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhu Aneja; Thomas Gianfagna

    2001-01-01

    Crinipellis perniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease, attacks young actively growing shoots, flowers and developing fruits of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). Infected shoots become fasciated and a profusion of hypertrophic shoots with small leaves develop from the lateral buds. This is followed by desiccation and death of the infected stem and leaves. Infected stem tissue contains significant amounts

  6. Wound care centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this treatment, ...

  7. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  8. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or a brace, specialized castings, or use a wheelchair or crutches. These devices will reduce the pressure ... location, pressure on the wound from walking or standing, swelling, circulation, blood glucose levels, wound care, and ...

  9. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. Presentation of case We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. Discussion A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. Conclusion VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. PMID:25942750

  10. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL KIRBY

    2010-01-01

    D iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kirby

    2007-01-01

    iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although its

  12. Curcumin as a wound healing agent.

    PubMed

    Akbik, Dania; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-22

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anti-coagulant and anti-infective effects. Curcumin has also been shown to have significant wound healing properties. It acts on various stages of the natural wound healing process to hasten healing. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the effects of curcumin on skin wound healing. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to reduce the body's natural response to cutaneous wounds such as inflammation and oxidation. The recent literature on the wound healing properties of curcumin also provides evidence for its ability to enhance granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, tissue remodeling and wound contraction. It has become evident that optimizing the topical application of curcumin through altering its formulation is essential to ensure the maximum therapeutical effects of curcumin on skin wounds. PMID:25200875

  13. Gene Expression Associated with Tuber Wound-Healing/Suberization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding of potatoes during harvest and handling operations results in tuber shrinkage, market quality defects and infection. Suberization and other wound-healing processes that mitigate these losses are of great agricultural importance. Previously, we determined that suberin poly(phenolics) and s...

  14. Prevention of post-operative infections in spine surgery by wound irrigation with a solution of povidone–iodine and hydrogen peroxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Ulivieri; Stefano Toninelli; Carlo Petrini; Antonio Giorgio; Giuseppe Oliveri

    Introduction  Starting from January 2009, we systematically irrigated the surgical wounds of patients undergoing spine surgery with a solution\\u000a of povidone–iodine (PVP–I) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  We prospectively recorded the clinical data of patients who underwent spine surgery during 2009 and we compared the results\\u000a with retrospectively reviewed clinical records of patients operated during 2008. Patients were analyzed for preoperative risk

  15. [Principles of wound treatment].

    PubMed

    Bruhin, A; Metzger, J

    2007-09-01

    New techniques and devices have revolutionized the treatment of wounds during the last years. For the treatment of wounds we have nowadays a great variety of new gadgets, tools and methods. Complex wounds require specific skills, given the fact that a great number of different promising methods are on the market to enable an optimal wound management. Well educated "wound experts" are required to overcome the problems of very complicated and chronic wound problems. The importance of an interdisciplinary team increases while facing the problems of special wound disorders such as a diabetic food, food ulcers or the problems of open abdomen in case of severe peritonitis. In this overview the main principles of modern wound treatment are outlined. The aim of this article is to present a good summary of wound judgement and treatment for the practioner. Increasingly important is it to point out the situation of complexe wounds which should be judgded and treated with the help of a "wound expert". PMID:18075140

  16. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45?days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided) and sample size (n?=?258 per group) is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010 PMID:22587425

  17. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and causes the wound typical for the double-edged dagger. The fact was verified. The wound typical for dagger can be found if the knife is used only according to the scheme. The forensic expert can say that a one cutting edge knife was used if the one edge of wound is squared and the other one is sharp. If the both of them are sharp, forensic expert must be very careful in his decision.Key words: stab wounds - knife - dagger - forensic expertise. PMID:25671417

  18. 3M: Monocots, Mechanical wounding, and Mass spectrometry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical wounding, one of the first steps in both pathogen infection and herbivore attack, activates signal transduction pathways dedicated to defense and recovery. The signaling pathways include reversible protein phosphorylation, changes in intracellular calcium levels, alarmone production, and...

  19. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  20. Managing infection: a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Tayeb, Khaled Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    All wound infection presents risks for the patient, but the risks are multiplied in the presence of a comorbidity such as diabetes, when they can potentially be fatal. Where diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) infection is concerned, early recognition is crucial. Prompt treatment, comprising wound cleansing, debridement of devitalised tissue and use of antimicrobial dressings, can stop locally infected ulcers from deteriorating further. PMID:26079164

  1. Incisional negative pressure wound therapy for high-risk wounds.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E

    2015-04-01

    With an ageing population and a growing number of people with obesity and/or undergoing advanced cancer therapies, there is an increasing risk of surgical site complications including surgical site infections (SSIs). Postoperative shifting of large mobilised tissue flaps, such as in abdominoplasties, remains a dreaded complication, particularly following massive weight loss. Besides negative implications for the patient, surgical site complications result in an economic burden due to prolonged and repeated wound treatments. Preventative tools to reduce SSIs are needed. In selected patients at high risk of SSI and/or wound breakdown, use of incisional NPWT has been shown to actively manage clean, closed surgical incisions. This article contains a review of scientific and clinical research relevant to incisional NPWT use over surgical incisions, with particular emphasis on the common problem of wound breakdown and SSI following body-contouring surgery in post-bariatric patients. Although there are a growing number of studies describing use of incisional NPWT in a variety of applications, including vascular, cardiac and orthopaedic, a literature search revealed few studies regarding incisional NPWT use post body-contouring surgery. In a clinical study of seroma formation, less seroma and haematoma formation was reported in post-bariatric patients who received incisional NPWT, versus the control, following body-contouring surgery. In another study of widely applied external NPWT wound dressings over the ventral and lateral trunk following post-bariatric abdominal dermolipectomy, results showed a significant reduction in exudate formation, earlier drain removal, and decreased length of hospitalisation, compared with conventional treatment. Additional controlled studies are needed to validate the clinical impact of incisional NPWT following body-contouring surgery, and to determine proper recommendations for its use. PMID:25853645

  2. Comparative Study of Antibacterial Effects and Bacterial Retentivity of Wound Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Hosokawa, Ko; Kubo, Tateki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We are often confused on selecting a suitable wound dressing for the treatment of infected wounds from huge number of available wound dressings. Then, to help clinicians easily select a wound dressing, we compared the antibacterial effects and bacterial retentivity (ie, potency of keeping absorbed bacteria inside wound dressings and preventing them from leaking out) of wound dressings. Methods: Five wound dressings with antibacterial constituents were compared to research antibacterial effects against nonpathogenic Escherichia coli using an in vitro model. The 5 other wound dressings with no antibacterial constituent were compared to research bacterial retentivity. The relative amount of E coli was determined using cell proliferation reagent WST-1 (11644807001, Roche Applied Science, United States) with time. Results: The results have shown that the antibacterial effects and bacterial retentivity differed among various wound dressings. Silver ions quickly exerted a very strong antibacterial effect, and hydrofibers had a high potency of bacterial retentivity by gelling the absorbed bacteria in wound dressings. Conclusions: The present study indicated the differences of antibacterial strength, time of onset and duration of the antibacterial effect, and bacterial retentivity between each wound dressing. Clinicians should use appropriate wound dressings according the wound condition in consideration of the different characteristics of wound dressings. The present results are helpful for clinicians to select appropriate wound dressing. PMID:23372860

  3. Failure to Heal of Thyroidectomy Wound Due to Gossypiboma and Stitch Sinus: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Adewale A.; Banjo, Adekunbi; Agboola, Oladeji; Osinupebi, Olubunmi

    2012-01-01

    This case series presents two females, 53 and 33 years old, with thyroidectomy wounds that failed to heal, 16 and 18 weeks, respectively, following the operation. The wounds were explored with removal of gauze and catgut suture. The patients made remarkable improvement and the wounds healed satisfactorily within seven days. Surgical materials forgotten intraoperatively, wrong use of and / or infected surgical materials should be considered when surgical wounds fail to heal. PMID:23066459

  4. Failure to heal of thyroidectomy wound due to gossypiboma and stitch sinus: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Musa, Adewale A; Banjo, Adekunbi; Agboola, Oladeji; Osinupebi, Olubunmi

    2012-01-01

    This case series presents two females, 53 and 33 years old, with thyroidectomy wounds that failed to heal, 16 and 18 weeks, respectively, following the operation. The wounds were explored with removal of gauze and catgut suture. The patients made remarkable improvement and the wounds healed satisfactorily within seven days. Surgical materials forgotten intraoperatively, wrong use of and / or infected surgical materials should be considered when surgical wounds fail to heal. PMID:23066459

  5. [Treatment of purulent wounds by using of negative pressure].

    PubMed

    Riabov, A L; Skalozub, O I; Lapin, R V

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of wounds treatment complicated by surgical infection. An apparatus for creating negative pressure VivanoTec/S042 was used for this in 74 patients. Types of surgical interventions depended on phase of inflammatory process and severity of clinical manifestations. It was done 153 operations. Surgical management of infected wounds, necrectomy were performed. As the relief of inflammatory process repeated surgical management with plasty by using of local tissue was done. Short-term good anatomical results were achieved in 97% of patients. Good functional result was marked in all patients. Wound healing occurred at the optimum time. PMID:25042193

  6. PHMB: an effective antimicrobial in wound bioburden management.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Martyn

    The effective management of bacterial bioburden is an essential element of wound care. Recent years have seen the increased use of topical antimicrobial dressings to control colonisation and infection, yet there is concern that some may inhibit wound healing and may have systemic sequelae (World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS), 2008). This article focuses on the safety and effectiveness of PHMB, an antimicrobial compound that is relatively underused in the UK, and argues that it is an effective option for the management of bacterial colonisation and infection. PMID:22875372

  7. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  8. Telemedicine for wound management

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

  9. Angiogenesis in Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcia G. Tonnesen; Xiaodong Feng; Richard A. F. Clark

    2000-01-01

    During wound healing, angiogenic capillary sprouts invade the fibrin\\/fibronectin-rich wound clot and within a few days organize into a microvascular network throughout the granulation tissue. As collagen accumulates in the granulation tissue to produce scar, the density of blood vessels diminishes. A dynamic interaction occurs among endothelial cells, angiogenic cytokines, such as FGF, VEGF, TGF-?, angiopoietin, and mast cell tryptase,

  10. Wound-Periderm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Idit Ginzberg

    Herbivores, and particularly chewing insects, cause substantial damage to the plant. In addition to lost tissue, there are great concerns of pathogen invasion and water loss at the site of the attack. One of the plant’s defense strategies is the formation of wound periderm at the boundaries of the invaded or damaged region to isolate it from non-wounded healthy tissue.

  11. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care. PMID:24912830

  12. Facilitating positive outcomes in older adults with wounds.

    PubMed

    Stotts, Nancy A; Hopf, Harriet W

    2005-06-01

    Older people with wounds are not the same as younger people with wounds. Older people experience biologic differences in wound healing that result in delayed healing, increased wound infection, and a greater incidence of dehiscence. Clinicians need to assess the risk of dehiscence in the older population, looking for serous drainage from the incision line and the absence of a palpable healing ridge. It is critical to recognize that older persons' presentation of wound infection is atypical. More subtle signs such as alteration in cognitive status and changes in function may indicate the presence of infection. The clinician who cares for older persons must be an exquisite detective when such changes occur to identify the source of the problem. As part of the normal trajectory of aging, older persons experience sensory loss and so may require accommodation when explanations are given to them about their wound and their wound care choices. Health care providers must consider hearing and vision changes that occur in older adults and tailor their explanations and teaching so that the message reaches the older adult and is successfully processed. Older persons have a higher incidence of cognitive changes and functional decline than do their younger counterparts, and these changes need to be assessed before a plan of care is developed to care for the older person with a wound. Limited data are available to help the clinician know the cognitive and functional level that is critical for older persons to understand their wound care choices, perform their own wound care, and to make choices about who will provide the care if they are unable to perform self-care. These seemingly basic issues raise questions for clinicians as we strive to provide evidence-based care to this ever-increasing population of older Americans. PMID:15924894

  13. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  14. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-?1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-?1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  15. Nanocrystalline silver dressings in wound management: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Joy; Wood, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the properties of nanocrystalline silver products (Acticoat™) and their applications and examines available evidence supporting their use in wound management. Acticoat utilizes nanotechnology to release nanocrystalline silver crystals. Acticoat releases 30 times less silver cations than silversulfadiazine cream or 0.5% silver nitrate solution but more of the silver released (by Acticoat). Silver-impregnated slow-release dressings release minute concentrations of silver which are quickly bound up by the chloride in the wound exudate. While extrapolations from in vitro and animal studies are cautious, evidence from these studies suggests Acticoat is: effective against most common strains of wound pathogens; can be used as a protective covering over skin grafts; has a broader antibiotic spectrum activity; and is toxic to keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Animal studies suggest a role for nanocrystalline silver in altering wound inflammatory events and facilitation of the early phase of wound healing. Quality human clinical trials into nanocrystalline silver are few. However, evidence suggests using Acticoat in wound management is cost effective, reduces wound infection, decreases the frequency of dressing changes and pain levels, decreases matrix metalloproteinase activity, wound exudate and bioburden levels, and promotes wound healing in chronic wounds. Although there is no in vivo evidence to suggest nanocrystalline silver is toxic to human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, there is in vitro evidence to suggest so; thus these dressings should be used cautiously over epithelializing and proliferating wounds. Future clinical research, preferably randomized controlled trials into nanocrystalline silver technology, may provide clinicians a better understanding of its applications in wound management. PMID:17722278

  16. Accelerated healing of complex open pilonidal wounds using MatriStem extracellular matrix xenograft: nine cases

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Kent C.; Brandt, Jared; Lim, Dionne C.; Ackerman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Complex open pilonidal wounds represent a challenging wound healing problem. Nine cases of complex open pilonidal wounds are described. Each of them was treated at the time of primary wide excision with placement of xenograft extracellular matrix material derived from urinary bladder (MatriStem, ACell Corporation). The patients left the xenograft material and dressings intact and returned to our clinic at weekly intervals for inspection of the wounds. All of the cases of complex open pilonidal wounds healed without infection and without requiring re-operation. The average time to healing in this series was 7 weeks. Treatment of complex open pilonidal wounds with MatriStem extracellular matrix derived from urinary bladder in this fashion results in favorable wound healing of complex open pilonidal wounds. PMID:24964433

  17. [Wound closure after irrigation with Octenisept® without possibility for drainage].

    PubMed

    Högele, A M; Neu, J

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old patient suffered a stab wound of the right thenar prominence after an accident with a screwdriver. In the first hospital the deep wound was irrigated with octenidine dihydrochloride/2-phenoxyethanol and closed by suture. During the further course pressure pain and numbness of the right thenar and swelling of the right hand occurred. Three weeks after the accident an operative revision of the wound in a second hospital was performed. The intraoperative findings showed inflammation and necrosis of the right m. abductor pollicis brevis, but no infection with pus.The patient accused the first hospital of irrigating the tissue of his right hand with Octenisept®. The expert option of the Arbitration Board identified improper care in the first hospital with insufficient excision of the wound and incorrect use of the Octenisept® solution. Against the explicit advice of the manufacturing company the wound had been sutured without the possibility of drainage for the Octenisept® solution. PMID:21229225

  18. Vitamin E and wound healing: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Rachel

    2014-08-14

    Vitamin E has been demonstrated to modulate cellular signalling, gene expression and affect wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), thus influencing wound healing. This evidence-based review aimed to identify and evaluate current research assessing the properties of vitamin E in relation to wound healing, through its role as an antioxidant and its influence on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), MRSA and gene transcription. Literature dated from 1996 to 2012, published in English, involving either animals or adult humans with an acute or chronic wound were included. The databases that contained relevant articles were narrowed down to four, and a total of 33 identified studies were included. The literature review revealed that there is a significant dearth of robust studies establishing the effects of vitamin E on wound healing, and further research is clearly warranted. PMID:25124164

  19. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-03-01

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  20. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-01-16

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  1. New advances in instillation therapy in wounds at risk for compromised healing.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Kahn, Kevin M

    2014-03-01

    Combined use of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and instillation of topical wound solutions and suspensions (NPWTi) has proven to be an effective next-generation NPWT technique for wounds at risk for compromised healing. Fluid instillation has been shown to enhance exudate and debris removal, provide regular cleansing of the wound bed, and add moisture to the wound. Positive results have been demonstrated with NPWTi in assisting healing of stalled wounds and treating painful wounds as well as wounds at high risk for amputation. NPWTi has been used instead of conventional NPWT in wounds with thick exudate and slough content, acute traumatic wounds, wounds acutely debrided due to infected soft tissue, large areas of post-debrided exposed bone, and cases of critical bacterial colonization. Instilled solutions have included topical solutions such as saline, topical wound cleansers, and antiseptics. While various systems that combine instillation or irrigation with NPWT have been commercialized during the past decade, until very recently these have been relatively cumbersome to use and limited in their ability to regulate solution volume delivery. Recent advances in NPWTi technology (V.A.C. VeraFlo™ Therapy, KCI, San Antonio, TX) include automated volumetrically controlled delivery of fluids and upgraded foam dressing technology to provide better control and delivery of solutions to the wound bed. This article describes the latest NPWTi technology and provides recommendations for successful application of NPWTi in an effort to inform clinicians about product decision-making and practice. PMID:24700215

  2. Closing fasciotomy wounds using plastic bands: an alternative simple and cheap method.

    PubMed

    Suliman, M Taifour; Aizaz, S

    2008-09-01

    Fasciotomy incisions are essential to relieve pressure on the neurovascular structures in the limbs. However, closing such wounds often becomes a challenge to the surgeon. The aim of this study is to describe a simple and cheap method of closing these wounds. Plastic bands were used to gradually close fasciotomy wounds in five patients. All fasciotomy wounds in the five patients closed successfully within 4-12 days. Only two patients developed minimal complications in the form of minor wound infection and a hypertrophic scar. We conclude that the plastic band method used here is cheaper and simpler in comparison to similar techniques using the same device. PMID:18761225

  3. Surgical Wound Case Studies With the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penny E. Campbell; Phyllis A. Bonham

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy consists of a wound dressing, a drainage tube inserted into the dressing, an occlusive trans- parent film, and a connection to a vacuum source that supplies the negative pressure. A new product called the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System (BlueSky Medical, La Costa, Calif) is available for negative pressure wound therapy. This article de- scribes the

  4. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  5. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    PubMed Central

    Builders, P. F.; Kabele-Toge, B.; Builders, M.; Chindo, B. A.; Anwunobi, Patricia A.; Isimi, Yetunde C.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5) as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05) and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin. PMID:23901160

  6. Wound Care Management: Proper Protocol Differs From Athletic Trainers' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    As research techniques in wound care management improve, treatment protocols for the care of wounds must also change to ensure safe and optimal healing. In this study, I surveyed current practices of athletic trainers regarding the care of athletic wounds and compared the findings to current literature. I contacted 501 athletic trainers, including all NATA curricular undergraduate directors. Overall response rate was 58%; 78% of the athletic trainers from the curricular schools responded. Wet-to-dry, irrigation, and soaks were the three most common methods used to debride and cleanse a wound. Povidone-iodine (Betadine) and hydrogen peroxide were the two most popular cleansing agents. Conventional gauze was the primary dressing used by 67% of the athletic trainers, while 20% of those surveyed used occlusive dressings. Although povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide are commonly used, both are toxic to cells involved in the wound-healing process and delay healing. Research indicates that the best method of cleansing and debriding a wound is to irrigate it with saline. Occlusive dressings have a lower infection rate, are viral barriers, and are associated with faster wound healing and less pain than gauze dressings. Athletic trainers need to assess their wound care protocols so that they give the best possible care to their athletes. PMID:16558365

  7. Multispecies biofilm in an artificial wound bed--A novel model for in vitro assessment of solid antimicrobial dressings.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Sojka, M; Pavlik, V; Szuszkiewicz, K; Velebny, V; Klein, P

    2014-08-01

    Wound infections represent a major problem, particularly in patients with chronic wounds. Bacteria in the wound exist mainly in the form of biofilms and are thus resistant to most antibiotics and antimicrobials. A simple and cost-effective in vitro model of chronic wound biofilms applied for testing treatments and solid devices, especially wound dressings, is presented in this work. The method is based on the well-established Lubbock chronic wound biofilm transferred onto an artificial agar wound bed. The biofilm formed by four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was stable for up to 48h post-transplant. The applicability of the model was evaluated by testing two common iodine wound treatments. These observations indicate that this method enables assessing the effects of treatments on established resilient wound biofilms and is clinically highly relevant. PMID:24880129

  8. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery. PMID:24525612

  9. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate for wound closure in cervical and lumbar spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brückel, Anja; Stein, Marco; Oertel, Matthias F.; Christophis, Petros; Böker, Dieter-Karsten

    2010-01-01

    It is claimed that wound closure with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate has the advantages that band-aids are not needed in the postoperative period, that the wound can get in contact with water and that removal of stitches is not required. This would substantially enhance patient comfort, especially in times of reduced in-hospital stays. Postoperative wound infection is a well-known complication in spinal surgery. The reported infection rates range between 0% and 12.7%. The question arises if the advantages of wound closure with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in spinal surgery are not surpassed by an increase in infection rate. This study has been conducted to identify the infection rate of spinal surgery if wound closure was done with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. A total of 235 patients with one- or two-level surgery at the cervical or lumbar spine were included in this prospective study. Their pre- and postoperative course was evaluated. Analysis included age, sex, body mass index, duration and level of operation, blood examinations, 6-week follow-up and analysis of preoperative risk factors. The data were compared to infection rates of similar surgeries found in a literature research and to a historical group of 503 patients who underwent wound closure with standard skin sutures after spine surgery. With the use of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate, only one patient suffered from postoperative wound infection which accounts for a total infection rate of 0.43%. In the literature addressing infection rate after spine surgery, an average rate of 3.2% is reported. Infection rate was 2.2% in the historical control group. No risk factor could be identified which limited the usage of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate provides sufficient wound closure in spinal surgery and is associated with a low risk of postoperative wound infection. PMID:20440558

  10. Therapeutic utility of antibacterial peptides in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Ostorhazi, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides were first thought to fight infection in animal models by disintegrating bacterial peptides and later by inhibiting bacteria-specific intracellular processes. However, ever increasing evidences indicate that cationic peptides accumulate around and modulate the immune system both systemically and in cutaneous and mucosal surfaces where injuries and infections occur. Native and designer antibacterial peptides as well as cationic peptides, never considered as antibiotics, promote wound healing at every step of cutaneous tissue regeneration. This article provides an introductory list of examples of how cationic peptides are involved in immunostimulation and epithelial tissue repair, eliminating wound infections and promoting wound healing in potential therapeutic utility in sight. Although a few antimicrobial peptides reached the Phase II clinical trial stage, toxicity concerns limit the potential administration routes. Resistance induction to both microbiology actions and the integrity of the innate immune system has to be carefully monitored. PMID:25835521

  11. Wound problems in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vince, Kelly G; Abdeen, Ayesha

    2006-11-01

    Wound problems can often be prevented with careful planning. When transverse incisions are used for knee surgery many years prior to any anticipated knee arthroplasty, no major problems are typically encountered with a conventional, anterior longitudinal incision. We recommend lateral incisions (eg, after a previous lateral tibial plateau fracture) be reused for TKA. When confronted with multiple previous incisions, surgeons would best use the most recently healed or the most lateral. We prefer soft tissue reconstruction with expanders or a gastrocnemius flap if there are multiple incisions, if the skin and scar tissue are adherent to underlying tissue, or if wound healing seems questionable. Deep infection must be determined by aspiration. When present, we believe treatment must include irrigation, débridement, polyethylene exchange if acute, and resection arthroplasty if chronic. Poor wound healing is a potentially devastating complication that may result in multiple reconstructive procedures and even amputation. Early recognition followed by expeditious débridement and soft tissue reconstruction should be used for managing wound complications after TKA. PMID:17079990

  12. Lasers and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, A J

    1993-10-01

    The advances in laser surgery over the past decade have been remarkable and have significantly altered the management of a host of dermatologic disorders. This article focuses on the CO2 laser as a cutting and vaporization tool and reviews the features that distinguish CO2 laser-induced wounds from those created by a scalpel. Tissue welding, wound management after skin treatment with the visible light lasers based on the principle of selective photothermolysis, as well as the controversial field of low-energy laser therapy (biostimulation) are also addressed. PMID:8222362

  13. Biofilms and Wounds: An Identification Algorithm and Potential Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The presence of a “pathogenic” or “highly virulent” biofilm is a fundamental risk factor that prevents a chronic wound from healing and increases the risk of the wound becoming clinically infected. There is presently no unequivocal gold standard method available for clinicians to confirm the presence of biofilms in a wound. Thus, to help support clinician practice, we devised an algorithm intended to demonstrate evidence of the presence of a biofilm in a wound to assist with wound management. Recent Advances: A variety of histological and microscopic methods applied to tissue biopsies are currently the most informative techniques available for demonstrating the presence of generic (not classified as pathogenic or commensal) biofilms and the effect they are having in promoting inflammation and downregulating cellular functions. Critical Issues: Even as we rely on microscopic techniques to visualize biofilms, they are entities which are patchy and dispersed rather than confluent, particularly on biotic surfaces. Consequently, detection of biofilms by microscopic techniques alone can lead to frequent false-negative results. Furthermore, visual identification using the naked eye of a pathogenic biofilm on a macroscopic level on the wound will not be possible, unlike with biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Future Direction: Lacking specific biomarkers to demonstrate microscopic, nonconfluent, virulent biofilms in wounds, the present focus on biofilm research should be placed on changing clinical practice. This is best done by utilizing an anti-biofilm toolbox approach, rather than speculating on unscientific approaches to identifying biofilms, with or without staining, in wounds with the naked eye. The approach to controlling biofilm should include initial wound cleansing, periodic debridement, followed by the application of appropriate antimicrobial wound dressings. This approach appears to be effective in removing pathogenic biofilms. PMID:26155381

  14. Effects of steroids on wound healing: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goforth, P; Gudas, C J

    1980-01-01

    Since some podiatric surgeons are using glucocorticosteroids to minimize postoperative edema and pain associated with traumatic procedures, the effects on wound healing should be understood as much as possible so that maximum results can be achieved with minimal risk to the patient. Considerable animal and human research has been done on the potential wound-healing effects of glucocorticosteroids. Current studies indicate a detrimental wound-healing effect with the use of glucocorticosteroids. Increased infection will also be discussed. PMID:7016965

  15. Macrophage phagocytosis of wound neutrophils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana J. Meszaros; Jonathan S. Reichner; Jorge E. Albina

    Abstract: Resolution of acute inflammation is thought to require the recognition and phagocyto- sis of apoptotic neutrophils (PMN) through receptor- ligand interactions with macrophages,(Mf). This hypothesis was tested in rat wounds by quantifying apoptosis in freshly harvested and aged-in-culture PMN taken from wounds 1?3 days after injury and by using these wound PMN as phagocytic targets for wound, immune-activated peritoneal,

  16. [Useful wound management at home].

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Taguchi, Akemi; Sato, Mikako; Shindo, Kazuko

    2014-12-01

    In wound care, close observation of the quantity and nature of exudate from a wound, and selection of appropriate dressing and/or medication are crucial. Care should be taken to prevent wounds with excessive exudate from becoming too moist. Furthermore, wound care at home must be easy, which is achievable through the use of readily available materials and medications. 1 ) A wound with little to moderate exudate should be treated using wrap therapy with perforated polyethylene sheets. This therapy can be used to treat pressure ulcers, wounds, wounds with slough, and burns. 2 ) An 18-gauge needle can be used to perforate wounds with little exudate, such as mild pressure ulcers or wounds with slough, and polyurethane film can then be applied. 3 ) Polyurethane film should be applied to blisters, pressure ulcers, or similar skin injuries with little exudate. 4 ) A hydrocolloid dressing should be used on wounds with light exudate. 5 ) An ointment containing steroids should be applied to critically colonized wounds. 6 ) Melolin dressings, Moiskin Pads, or a disposable diaper should be used to manage wounds with heavy exudate. PMID:25595088

  17. Outcome of primary closure of abdominal wounds following typhoid perforation in children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. E. Usang; O. A. Sowande; A. O. Ademuyiwa; T. I. B. Bakare; O. Adejuyigbe

    2009-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wounds following surgery for typhoid perforation are classifi ed as dirty, with an infection rate of over 40%. To date, the optimal method for closure of these wounds remains controversial. Delayed primary closure which was conventionally recommended as standard practice, is now considered to be of no value in preventing surgical site infection (SSI). This study evaluates the

  18. Wound Repair and Regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Reinke; H. Sorg

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the biggest organ of the human being and has many functions. Therefore, the healing of a skin wound displays an extraordinary mechanism of cascading cellular functions which is unique in nature. As healing and regeneration processes take place in all parts of the human body, this review focuses on the healing processes of the skin and highlights

  19. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  20. Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Porter W.; Falgiani, Tricia B.; Hoelle, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness. PMID:24851187

  1. Swatting flies: modelling wound healing and inflammation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, William; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant wound healing can lead to a variety of human pathologies, from non-healing chronic wounds that can become dangerously infected, to exuberant fibrotic healing in which repair is accompanied by excessive inflammation. To guide therapeutic intervention, we need a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms driving tissue repair; this will require complementary wound-healing studies in several model organisms. Drosophila has been used to model genetic aspects of numerous human pathologies, and is being used increasingly to gain insight into the molecular and genetic aspects of tissue repair and inflammation, which have classically been modelled in mice or cultured cells. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of Drosophila as a wound-healing model, as well as some exciting new research opportunities that will be enabled by its use. PMID:21810906

  2. Retained glass foreign bodies in wounds: Predictive value of wound characteristics, patient perception, and wound exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark T Steele; Luan V Tran; William A Watson; Robert L Muelleman

    1998-01-01

    A convenience sample of 164 adult patients with 185 glass-caused wounds who presented to an emergency department (ED) and consented to a radiograph was prospectively studied. The purpose was to determine the characteristics of wounds at high risk for foreign body (FB) and the predictive value of patient FB sensation and probing wound exploration for FB retention. Retained glass was

  3. Clinical Biofilms: A Challenging Frontier in Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Hurlow, Jennifer; Couch, Kara; Laforet, Karen; Bolton, Laura; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Biofilms have been implicated in a variety of wound complications. Recent Advances: Research has confirmed that biofilms form in wounds of patients experiencing delayed healing and may be a precursor to infection. Critical Issues: Research into the strength of this association is still in its infancy. Is biofilm formation a cause of these complications, a step toward them, or a signal that unresolved factors injuring tissue or delaying healing are setting the stage for biofilm formation, infection, and healing delay? To qualify biofilms for use in informing clinical practice decisions, biofilm characteristics supporting those decisions need standardized definitions and valid evidence that they predict or diagnose healing or infection outcomes. Literature searches of relevant terms reviewed biofilm definitions and validation of their role in predicting and diagnosing delayed wound healing or infection. Future Directions: Further research is needed to provide a rapid accurate technique to identify and characterize biofilms in ways that optimize their validity in diagnosing or screening patient risk of infection or delayed healing and to inform clinical decisions. This research will help validate biofilm's capacity to support wound care clinical practice decisions and establish their importance in guiding clinical practice. PMID:26005595

  4. Clinical Use of Polihexanide on Acute and Chronic Wounds for Antisepsis and Decontamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Eberlein; O. Assadian

    2010-01-01

    Polihexanide is an antimicrobial compound suitable for clinical use in critically colonized or infected acute and chronic wounds. Its beneficial characteristic is attributable particularly to its broad antimicrobial spectrum, good cell and tissue tolerability, ability to bind to the organic matrix, low risk of contact sensitization, and wound healing promoting effect. In addition, no development of microorganism resistance during polihexanide

  5. Maggot debridement therapy for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Church, J C T; Courtenay, M

    2002-06-01

    This article presents a general overview of maggot debridement therapy, as used in the management of chronic infected wounds. Much has been written about this treatment method, both historically and in the past decade. Current clinical practice is discussed and clinical and laboratory research are reviewed, with attention to the inherent challenges of such research. The nature of microbial and fungal bio-film formation in chronic wounds is considered, although little is yet known of the extent and characterization of this phenomenon. The prospects for the future are addressed. These include the need for globally acceptable criteria for clinical outcomes and guidelines for "best practice," together with the pressing need for appropriately structured randomized controlled studies. PMID:15871963

  6. Optimizing Prevention of Healthcare-Acquired Infections After Cardiac Surgery (HAI)_2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular Disease; Healthcare Associated Infectious Disease; Sternal Superficial Wound Infection; Deep Sternal Infection; Mediastinitis; Thoracotomy; Conduit Harvest or Cannulation Site; Sepsis; Pneumonia

  7. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome. PMID:14653765

  8. Burn wound infections. - PubMed - NCBI

    Science.gov Websites

    Manual NCBI News PubMed PubMed Central (PMC) PubMed Clinical Queries PubMed Health All Literature Resources... Proteins BioSystems BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)...

  9. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers. PMID:23848943

  10. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  11. Our Wounded Braves 

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, E. [author

    2012-03-05

    returned to pasture. Dehiscence occurred in one or both ulnar incisions of all foals from 2 to 5 days after surgery. All wounds healed within 2 weeks with stall rest, daily cleansing, and systemic antibiotics (procaine penicillin G, 22, 000 U/kg BID... of the distal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the best results (70% sound), and olecranon fractures affecting the proximal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the poorest results (0% sound). Reasons for euthanasia were 1 musculoskeletal...

  12. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Houreld, Nicolette N.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing. PMID:24511283

  13. Use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam for lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Andrew N

    2008-01-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) has been a valuable adjunct in the treatment of complex lower-extremity injuries. The use of NPWT/ROCF for lower extremity traumatic wounds is based on mechanical effects on the surrounding tissues, biological effects at the cellular level, and simplification of wound care for nursing personnel. For patients with compartment syndrome, risk of secondary infection and need for skin grafting to achieve soft-tissue coverage may theoretically be reduced. For traumatic wounds, dressing care may be simplified and healing encouraged. For surgical incisions, risk of secondary wound dehiscence and infection may be lowered. PMID:19034161

  14. It's not just a wound...

    PubMed

    Russell, Barbara J

    2005-04-01

    An ongoing challenge in wound management is a belief that wounds are temporary, routine, and merely physical. However, wounds can be very complex ethically which, in turn, necessitates careful and sensitive attention by practitioners. Five clinical cases are analyzed in terms of their ethical and legal implications. More specifically, concepts such as informed consent, surrogate decision-making, compliance, intimacy, embodiment, stigma, and bodily memory are examined. Following the conceptual analyses are recommendations for responsive clinical practice. PMID:16089062

  15. Formylpeptide Receptors Mediate Rapid Neutrophil Mobilization to Accelerate Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Le, Yingying; Gao, Ji-Liang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Ji Ming; Wang, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a multi-phased pathophysiological process requiring chemoattractant receptor-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the lesion. Two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptors Fpr1 and Fpr2 mediate rapid neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice by sensing pathogen-derived chemotactic ligands. These receptors also recognize host-derived chemotactic peptides in inflammation and injury. Here we report the capacity of Fprs to promote the healing of sterile skin wound in mice by initiating neutrophil infiltration. We found that in normal miceneutrophils rapidly infiltrated the dermis in the wound before the production of neutrophil-specific chemokines by the injured tissue. In contrast, rapid neutrophil infiltration was markedly reduced with delayed wound closure in mice deficient in both Fprs. In addition, we detected Fpr ligand activity that chemoattracted neutrophils into the wound tissue. Our study thus demonstrates that Fprs are critical for normal healing of the sterile skin wound by mediating the first wave of neutrophil infiltration. PMID:24603667

  16. Penetrating chest wound: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, L. L.; McKenzie, F. N.; Heimbecker, R. O.

    1977-01-01

    An unusual penetrating chest injury was caused by a ball-point pen. Because of apparent penetration of the heart, preparations were made for an emergency open-heart procedure before emergency thoracotomy was undertaken, with the pen still in situ. The pen had bruised the epicardium but had not penetrated the pericardial sac. After removal of the pen, the wound was closed and a chest tube left in place. Recovery, apart from minor degrees of basal atelectasis, pleural effusion and wound infection, was uneventful. The outcome was consistent with that associated with current aggressive management of penetrating chest injuries. Management is based on three approaches. The primary one is intercostal thoracostomy tube drainage and fluid and blood replacement. In cases of massive hemorrhage or air leak, thoracotomy is necessary. The third approach is to prevent post-traumatic pulmonary insufficiency by using fine, high-efficiency filters during blood transfusion, avoiding excessive administration of intravenous fluids, performing tracheostomy after prolonged endotracheal intubation, and using a volume respirator with positive end-expiratory pressure. The average mortality for penetrating wounds of the heart is 25%. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:856432

  17. Wounds of the hand contaminated by human or animal saliva.

    PubMed

    Peeples, E; Boswick, J A; Scott, F A

    1980-05-01

    A prospective and retrospective evaluation of 75 patients with hand wounds contaminated by human saliva (35) or animal saliva (40) demonstrates that a program of outpatient management can be sufficient for optimal care in many patients. This series challenges the proposition that hospitalization, radiographs, and surgical debridement are necessary for most such wounds. Sixty-seven per cent did not have surgical intervention and no complications resulted. Ninety-two per cent received antibiotics. Radiographs were obtained only when bony injury or entry into a joint was suspected. Delay in seeking treatment until obvious signs of infection or pain are present is common. Literature review details the anatomic factors important in the natural history and control of these infections, and the changes with respect to modes of treatment for these potentially dangerous wounds. The injury is caused by bites with the hand extended or, in fight-bite wounds, with the metacarpal-phalangeal and interphalangeal joints flexed, allowing deeper penetration and then sealing of the wound when the first is opened. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are the organisms most frequently found in human bites, and in animal bites; Pasteurella multocida should be considered in dog and cat bites. PMID:7365851

  18. Human platelet gel supernatant inactivates opportunistic wound pathogens on skin.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Donate, Amy L; Hargrave, Barbara Y; Heller, Loree C

    2015-01-01

    Activation of human platelets produces a gel-like substance referred to as platelet rich plasma or platelet gel. Platelet gel is used clinically to promote wound healing; it also exhibits antimicrobial properties that may aid in the healing of infected wounds. The purpose of this study was to quantify the efficacy of human platelet gel against the opportunistic bacterial wound pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus on skin. These opportunistic pathogens may exhibit extensive antibiotic resistance, necessitating the development of alternative treatment options. The antimicrobial efficacy of platelet gel supernatants was quantified using an in vitro broth dilution assay, an ex vivo inoculated skin assay, and in an in vivo skin decontamination assay. Human platelet gel supernatants were highly bactericidal against A. baumannii and moderately but significantly bactericidal against S. aureus in vitro and in the ex vivo skin model. P. aeruginosa was not inactivated in vitro; a low but significant inactivation level was observed ex vivo. These supernatants were quite effective at inactivating a model organism on skin in vivo. These results suggest application of platelet gel has potential clinical applicability, not only in the acceleration of wound healing, but also against relevant bacteria causing wound infections. PMID:24433255

  19. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them. PMID:26061489

  20. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  1. Next Science Wound Gel Technology, a Novel Agent That Inhibits Biofilm Development by Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Wound Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle G.; Tran, Phat L.; Haley, Cecily L.; Kruzek, Cassandra; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.; Myntti, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Loss of the skin barrier facilitates the colonization of underlying tissues with various bacteria, where they form biofilms that protect them from antibiotics and host responses. Such wounds then become chronically infected. Topical antimicrobials are a major component of chronic wound therapy, yet currently available topical antimicrobials vary in their effectiveness on biofilm-forming pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of Next Science wound gel technology (NxtSc), a novel topical agent designed to kill planktonic bacteria, penetrate biofilms, and kill the bacteria within. In vitro quantitative analysis, using strains isolated from wounds, showed that NxtSc inhibited biofilm development by Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae by inhibiting bacterial growth. The gel formulation NxtSc-G5, when applied to biofilms preformed by these pathogens, reduced the numbers of bacteria present by 7 to 8 log10 CFU/disc or CFU/g. In vivo, NxtSc-G5 prevented biofilm formation for 72 h when applied at the time of wounding and infection and eliminated biofilm infection when applied 24 h after wounding and infection. Storage of NxtSc-G5 at room temperature for 9 months did not diminish its efficacy. These results establish that NxtSc is efficacious in vitro and in vivo in preventing infection and biofilm development by different wound pathogens when applied immediately and in eliminating biofilm infection already established by these pathogens. This novel antimicrobial agent, which is nontoxic and has a usefully long shelf life, shows promise as an effective agent for the prevention and treatment of biofilm-related infections. PMID:24637684

  2. Ultraviolet Radiation in Wound Care: Sterilization and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Asheesh; Avci, Pinar; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound care is an important area of medicine considering the increasing age of the population who may have diverse comorbidities. Light-based technology comprises a varied set of modalities of increasing relevance to wound care. While low-level laser (or light) therapy and photodynamic therapy both have wide applications in wound care, this review will concentrate on the use of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Recent Advances UVC (200–280?nm) is highly antimicrobial and can be directly applied to acute wound infections to kill pathogens without unacceptable damage to host tissue. UVC is already widely applied for sterilization of inanimate objects. UVB (280–315?nm) has been directly applied to the wounded tissue to stimulate wound healing, and has been widely used as extracorporeal UV radiation of blood to stimulate the immune system. UVA (315–400?nm) has distinct effects on cell signaling, but has not yet been widely applied to wound care. Critical Issues Penetration of UV light into tissue is limited and optical technology may be employed to extend this limit. UVC and UVB can damage DNA in host cells and this risk must be balanced against beneficial effects. Chronic exposure to UV can be carcinogenic and this must be considered in planning treatments. Future Directions New high-technology UV sources, such as light-emitting diodes, lasers, and microwave-generated UV plasma are becoming available for biomedical applications. Further study of cellular signaling that occurs after UV exposure of tissue will allow the benefits in wound healing to be better defined. PMID:24527357

  3. Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant

    PubMed Central

    Gbedema, Stephen Y.; Emelia, Kisseih; Francis, Adu; Kofi, Annan; Eric, Woode

    2010-01-01

    As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae). Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor–time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2’-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) ranging between 64 and 512 ?g/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC50 value of 103.2 ?g/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control) to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm2 (control) to 25.2 mm2. Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana. PMID:21808542

  4. Maxillofacial gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; de Régloix, Stanislas; Dubourdieu, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Boizat, Stéphane; Houze, Benoit; Culoma, Jennifer; Burlaton, Guillaume; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The majority of maxillofacial gunshot wounds are caused by suicide attempts. Young men are affected most often. When the lower one-third of the face is involved, airway patency (1.6% of the cases) and hemorrhage control (1.9% of the cases) are the two most urgent complications to monitor and prevent. Spinal fractures are observed with 10% of maxillary injuries and in 20% of orbital injuries. Actions to treat the facial gunshot victim need to be performed, keeping in mind spine immobilization until radiographic imaging is complete and any required spinal stabilization accomplished. Patients should be transported to a trauma center equipped to deal with maxillofacial and neurosurgery because 40% require emergency surgery. The mortality rate of maxillofacial injuries shortly after arrival at a hospital varies from 2.8% to 11.0%. Complications such as hemiparesis or cranial nerve paralysis occur in 20% of survivors. This case has been reported on a victim of four gunshot injuries. One of the gunshots was to the left mandibular ramus and became lodged in the C4 vertebral bone. Maurin O , de Régloix S , Dubourdieu S , Lefort H , Boizat S , Houze B , Culoma J , Burlaton G , Tourtier JP . Maxillofacial gunshot wounds. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2015;30(3):1 4. PMID:25868553

  5. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Everett, Newton B.; Tyler, Ruth

    1970-01-01

    Healing skin wounds were studied in a series of parabiotic rats. The femurs of one parabiont of each pair were shielded whilst both animals were given 800 r from a Co60 source. The animals were wounded 3 days after irradiation. Each animal with partially shielded marrow was then given tritiated thymidine intraperitoneally daily while the cross-circulation was arrested by clamping. After the thymidine-3H had cleared the blood, the clamp was released. Animals were sacrificed, and wounds were prepared for radioautography 1, 2, and 6 days after wounding. In the wounds of the shielded animals thymidine-3H was observed in epidermis, endothelium, leukocytes, fibroblasts, and mast cells. Only neutrophilic leukocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes were labeled, as determined by light and electron microscope radioautography, in the wounds of each nonshielded parabiont. None of the many fibroblasts present were found to contain label in the wounds of the nonshielded parabionts through the 6 day period. These observations provide further evidence that wound fibroblasts do not arise from hematogenous precursors and, therefore, must arise from adjacent connective tissue cells. PMID:5415241

  6. Skin Substitutes and Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Auger; D. Lacroix; L. Germain

    2009-01-01

    Medical science has vastly improved on the means and methods available for the treatment of wounds in the clinic. The production and use of various types of skin substitutes has led to dramatic improvements in the odds of survival for severely burned patients, but they have also shown promise for many other applications, including cases involving chronic wounds that are

  7. First Evidence of Sternal Wound Biofilm following Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Mann, Ethan; Awad, Hamdy; Ganesh, Kasturi; Ghatak, Piya Das; Gordillo, Gayle; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Roy, Sashwati; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Management of deep sternal wound infection (SWI), a serious complication after cardiac surgery with high morbidity and mortality incidence, requires invasive procedures such as, debridement with primary closure or myocutaneous flap reconstruction along with use of broad spectrum antibiotics. The purpose of this clinical series is to investigate the presence of biofilm in patients with deep SWI. A biofilm is a complex microbial community in which bacteria attach to a biological or non-biological surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm related infections represent a major clinical challenge due to their resistance to both host immune defenses and standard antimicrobial therapies. Candidates for this clinical series were patients scheduled for a debridement procedure of an infected sternal wound after a cardiac surgery. Six patients with SWI were recruited in the study. All cases had marked dehiscence of all layers of the wound down to the sternum with no signs of healing after receiving broad spectrum antibiotics post-surgery. After consenting patients, tissue and/or extracted stainless steel wires were collected during the debridement procedure. Debrided tissues examined by Gram stain showed large aggregations of Gram positive cocci. Immuno-fluorescent staining of the debrided tissues using a specific antibody against staphylococci demonstrated the presence of thick clumps of staphylococci colonizing the wound bed. Evaluation of tissue samples with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed three-dimensional aggregates of these cocci attached to the wound surface. More interestingly, SEM imaging of the extracted wires showed attachment of cocci aggregations to the wire metal surface. These observations along with the clinical presentation of the patients provide the first evidence that supports the presence of biofilm in such cases. Clinical introduction of the biofilm infection concept in deep SWI may advance the current management strategies from standard antimicrobial therapy to anti-biofilm strategy. PMID:23936415

  8. Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  9. Use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery: clinical evidence and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors' own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  10. Wound Repair By Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard F.; Glassberg, Edward; Saperia, David; White, Rodney A.; Lask, Gary; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    In this study, we have developed a concept of wound closure by laser welding and studied the wound healing process. In the first set of experiments, six-millimeter long, full-thickness incisions were made in the skin on the back of hairless mice. Control wounds were closed with interrupted 5-0 prolene suture. The experimental wounds were approximated and closed by laser welding using a Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m) laser. Selected wounds were excised for histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, tensile strength determination and assay of type I collagen specific messenger-RNA. The laser welded wounds demonstrated rapid healing with good cosmetic results. The tensile strength was identical both for laser welded and sutured wounds at 7, 16, and 21 days. A significant increase of type I collagen specific mRNA was noted in both specimens at 4, 10 and 16 days, but a higher level was recorded in the sutured specimens at day 16 (2652 vs. 911 U/pg total RNA). We further initiated a comparative study to identify the laser which would be most suitable for skin welding. For this purpose argon, Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m and 1.32 ?m) and CO2 lasers were used to weld skin. Wound healing, tensile strength and collagen analyses were performed. The results indicated that both argon and Nd:YAG (1.32 ?m) lasers achieved the most effective closure. These results suggest that laser welding provides an efficient method for closing skin wounds. The laser welding has clear advantages over conventional suturing techniques, being sterile, non-tactile, not requiring introduction of foreign materials into the wound, and providing improved cosmetic results.

  11. Nosocomial infections in intensive care wards: A multicenter prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. D. Daschner; P. Frey; G. Wolff; P. C. Baumann; P. Suter

    1982-01-01

    In a three-year prospective investigation, a total of 6,952 patients were investigated prospectively in nine intensive care wards and their rate of nosocomial infections was analysed. The frequency of the nosocomial infections varied between 3% and 27%. The most frequent nosocomial infections were urinary tract infections, sepsis, infections of the skin and of the subcutaneous tissue, pneumonia and wound infections.

  12. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of the Althaea officinalis L. leaf extract and its wound healing potency in the rat model of excision wound creation

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Dadgar, Zeynab; Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Pakzad, Iraj; Davodian, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Wound is defined simply as the disruption of the biochemical, cellular, and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Plants and their extracts known as phytomedicine have immense potential for the management and treatment of wounds. Materials and Methods: Due to the undesirable side effects, in the control and treatment of the wound infections, it is recommended to use natural materials such as phytochemicals instead of chemically synthesized drugs. Thus, the aim of this research was to study the anti-microbial and wound healing potential of Althaea officinalis L. hydroalchoholic extract in comparison with ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and penicillin antibiotics on clinical strains as well as pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes under in vitro conditions using micro broth dilution and disc diffusion methods. Moreover, MIC and MBC of its hydroalchoholic extract was also evaluated. Results: The results showed that although Althaea officinalis L. extract was not effective on gram-negative bacteria but it was efficacious on gram-positive bacteria. The extract was also tested in the form of topical administration on excision wound model in rats. In the extract-treated wounds, the wound healing percent was significantly increased in comparison with controls. Conclusions: Based on this research, herbal extract of officinalis L. can be a great candidate for the treatment of gram-positive infections and merits further studies. PMID:25949951

  13. Localized elasticity measured in epithelial cells migrating at a wound edge using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Ajay A; Roan, Esra; Chapman, Kenneth E; Desai, Leena P; Rendon, David A; Eckstein, Eugene C; Waters, Christopher M

    2008-07-01

    Restoration of lung homeostasis following injury requires efficient wound healing by the epithelium. The mechanisms of lung epithelial wound healing include cell spreading and migration into the wounded area and later cell proliferation. We hypothesized that mechanical properties of cells vary near the wound edge, and this may provide cues to direct cell migration. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured variations in the stiffness of migrating human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells) approximately 2 h after applying a scratch wound. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) in contact mode to measure the cell stiffness in 1.5-microm square regions at different locations relative to the wound edge. In regions far from the wound edge (>2.75 mm), there was substantial variation in the elastic modulus in specific cellular regions, but the median values measured from multiple fields were consistently lower than 5 kPa. At the wound edge, cell stiffness was significantly lower within the first 5 microm but increased significantly between 10 and 15 microm before decreasing again below the median values away from the wound edge. When cells were infected with an adenovirus expressing a dominant negative form of RhoA, cell stiffness was significantly decreased compared with cells infected with a control adenovirus. In addition, expression of dominant negative RhoA abrogated the peak increase in stiffness near the wound edge. These results suggest that cells near the wound edge undergo localized changes in cellular stiffness that may provide signals for cell spreading and migration. PMID:18487359

  14. [Infection and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Senneville, E

    2008-09-01

    The large number of factors that influence the outcome of patients with diabetic foot infections calls for a multidisciplinary management of such patients. Infection is always the consequence of a preexisting foot wound whose chronicity is facilitated by the diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas peripheral vascular disease is a factor of poor outcome, especially regarding the risk for leg amputation. Primary and secondary prevention of IPD depends both on the efficacy of wound off-loading. Antibiotic treatment should only be considered for clinically infected foot wounds for which diagnostic criteria have recently been proposed by international consensus. The choice of the antibiotic regimen should take into account the risk for selecting bacterial resistance, and as a consequence, agents with a narrow spectrum of activity should be preferred. Respect of the measures for preventing the spread of bacterial resistance in diabetic foot centers is particularly important. PMID:18822250

  15. Facilitating residual wound closure after partial graft loss with vacuum assisted closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Poulakidas, Stathis; Kowal-Vern, Areta

    2008-01-01

    Third degree burns require skin grafting. In most instances, if the graft becomes infected, it requires debridement of the site and re-grafting. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the successful healing of a skin graft using negative pressure wound therapy with silver impregnated foam and soft silicone wound contact layer in a 4% total body surface area burn of a lower extremity skin graft infected with Pseudomonas aerugenosa without regrafting. A 27-year-old Hispanic male sustained a gasoline flame burn and presented 72 hours postincident with right lower extremity cellulitis. After intravenous antibiotics, the area was grafted with a partial thickness sheet graft. At 9 days postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection, with an eventual 40% graft loss and was started on a course of antibiotics. With continued graft loss, on the 22nd postoperative day, negative pressure wound therapy V.A.C. (Vacuum Assisted Closure-KCI, San Antonio, TX) with silver impregnated foam and soft silicone wound contact layer (Mepitel, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) were applied. The wound was completely re-epithelialized by 9 days. In combination with antibiotics, it was possible to treat a residual open wound and prevent the need for regrafting. PMID:18535475

  16. Wounding in the plant tissue: the defense of a dangerous passage.

    PubMed

    Savatin, Daniel V; Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Cervone, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Plants are continuously exposed to agents such as herbivores and environmental mechanical stresses that cause wounding and open the way to the invasion by microbial pathogens. Wounding provides nutrients to pathogens and facilitates their entry into the tissue and subsequent infection. Plants have evolved constitutive and induced defense mechanisms to properly respond to wounding and prevent infection. The constitutive defenses are represented by physical barriers, i.e., the presence of cuticle or lignin, or by metabolites that act as toxins or deterrents for herbivores. Plants are also able to sense the injured tissue as an altered self and induce responses similar to those activated by pathogen infection. Endogenous molecules released from wounded tissue may act as Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) that activate the plant innate immunity. Wound-induced responses are both rapid, such as the oxidative burst and the expression of defense-related genes, and late, such as the callose deposition, the accumulation of proteinase inhibitors and of hydrolytic enzymes (i.e., chitinases and gluganases). Typical examples of DAMPs involved in the response to wounding are the peptide systemin, and the oligogalacturonides, which are oligosaccharides released from the pectic component of the cell wall. Responses to wounding take place both at the site of damage (local response) and systemically (systemic response) and are mediated by hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid. PMID:25278948

  17. Comparison of a sealed, polymer foam biodegradable temporizing matrix against Integra® dermal regeneration template in a porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John Edward; Dearman, Bronwyn Louise

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and optimize the first stage of a proposed two-stage skin graft replacement strategy. This entails creation of a material that can be applied immediately after burn excision to "temporize" the wound bed, become integrated as a "neodermis," resist contraction and infection, and provide the grounding for the second stage (an autologous, cultured composite skin). Four 8 × 8 cm wounds were generated in six pigs to assess and compare wound contraction using Integra® dermal regeneration template, a biodegradable temporizing polymer matrix (sealed and unsealed), and a secondary intention wound. All dressings were contiguous. Infection resulted in early spontaneous delamination of the Integra® marring the long-term comparison. The wounds treated with the sealed polymer thus contracted significantly less than the wounds treated with Integra® over the 28 days. Histologically, a thick layer of scar developed superficial to the Integra®, unsealed polymer, and in the secondary intention wounds when compared with the sealed polymer, where such a scar layer was characteristically minimal. No clinical signs of infection were observed for any polymer-treated wound. Once the Integra® silicone layer delaminated, wound contraction was aggressive. Optimization of the biodegradable sealing membrane is imminent, and the second stage of composite skin development is under way. PMID:22002205

  18. Reduced antimicrobial peptide expression in human burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Milner, S M; Ortega, M R

    1999-08-01

    Severely burned skin ceases to perform its natural protective role and surrenders itself as a nidus and portal for bacterial invasion. Antimicrobial peptides are part of a non-specific chemical defence system, separate from cellular and humoral immunity. Two of these peptides, human beta-defensins 1 and 2 have been recently found in skin and are produced by keratinocytes. Beta defensins have potent bactericidal activity against a wide spectrum of bacterial and fungal organisms commonly responsible for burn wound infections. To date, expression of beta defensins has not been examined in the human burn wound. Our findings demonstrate that expression of hBD-2 is greatly decreased in the burn wound whereas hBD-1 appears to be preserved. These results may have important implications in the pathogenesis and treatment of invasive burn sepsis. PMID:10439149

  19. Burn wound healing and treatment: review and advancements.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew P; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Elster, Eric A; Burmeister, David M; Rose, Lloyd F; Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Chan, Rodney K; Christy, Robert J; Chung, Kevin K

    2015-01-01

    Burns are a prevalent and burdensome critical care problem. The priorities of specialized facilities focus on stabilizing the patient, preventing infection, and optimizing functional recovery. Research on burns has generated sustained interest over the past few decades, and several important advancements have resulted in more effective patient stabilization and decreased mortality, especially among young patients and those with burns of intermediate extent. However, for the intensivist, challenges often exist that complicate patient support and stabilization. Furthermore, burn wounds are complex and can present unique difficulties that require late intervention or life-long rehabilitation. In addition to improvements in patient stabilization and care, research in burn wound care has yielded advancements that will continue to improve functional recovery. This article reviews recent advancements in the care of burn patients with a focus on the pathophysiology and treatment of burn wounds. PMID:26067660

  20. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  1. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  2. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  3. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : IX. INFLUENCE ON THE HEALING OF WOUNDS OF VARIATIONS IN THE OSMOTIC TENSION OF THE DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A; Du Noüy, P L; Carrel, A

    1917-08-01

    In the study of the action of non-antiseptic substances on the rate of cicatrization, the chief obstacle encountered is the facility with which wounds become reinfected under an aseptic dressing. At the beginning of Experiment 1 the wound was sterile. It was subjected to flushing with distilled water for 2 hours, then to flushing with 30 per cent sodium chloride solution for another 2 hours. During that time no special precaution was taken to sterilize the wound and the dressing was left intact until the following morning. It was then found that the wound contained from 30 to 50 bacteria per field. The following day, after the wound had been subjected to the same treatment, the number of bacteria had increased to 50 and 100 per field, and as an immediate consequence the surface of the wound increased from 12 to 12.6 sq. cm. in 2 days. The wound was then dressed antiseptically and was found to be sterile 3 days later. Reinfection again took place the following day in spite of antiseptic dressing with chloramine paste 4 parts per 1,000, which was applied for 20 hours. In Experiment 2 similar results were observed. After 2 days of flushing with distilled water, the number of bacteria had increased to 50 per field. The wound was thereupon sterilized, but new reinfection ensued a few days later. Another wound on the same patient became reinfected under the same conditions after 1 day of sterile dressing. In none of the patients could the wounds be kept in a sterile condition throughout the whole experiment. It was impossible to maintain the sterility of a wound under aseptic dressing. Dakin's solution was therefore injected every 4 hours, or less often, according to the degree of infection, or chloramine paste was applied during the night. If there were 3 or 4 bacteria per field, the experiment was discontinued in order that the wound might be sterilized again. The cicatrization and bacteriological curves of Experiment 4 show that by the application of chloramine paste a wound may be maintained in an appropriately bacteriological condition for carrying out an experiment. Nevertheless, in spite of the antiseptic precautions taken, it was necessary to interrupt this experiment on two occasions, on December 13 to 15 and on December 18 to 22, in order that a complete sterilization of the wound might be effected. When the sterilization was performed as soon as the bacteria were discovered, little retardation occurred in the process of cicatrization. Moreover, the reinfection from the skin was often due to fine bacilli which have but mild retarding action on the rate of healing. The use of at least six flushings in 2 hours with Dakin's solution or of 12 hours' dressing with chloramine paste 10 parts per 1,000, was necessary to keep the wound in a condition of surgical asepsis. The action of distilled water was studied in Experiments 1, 2, and 3. In Experiment 1 the wound was subjected to flushing with distilled water first for 2 hours, then 4 hours, and later for 8 hours per day. The wound was maintained in a condition of mild infection. No marked modification, either acceleration or retardation, was noted in the rate of repair during the period that the treatment was applied. From November 21 to 25 the wound was almost clean and the observed curve remained parallel to the calculated curve, showing that distilled water did not retard the rate of healing. In Experiment 2 the wound was subjected to uninterrupted flushing with distilled water, first for 2 and 8 hours, then for 24 hours. It was continued from November 24 to 30; viz., for 112 hours out of 120, without the occurrence of any marked modification of the course of healing. The bacteriological curve showed that from November 22 to 27 inclusive the wound was kept aseptic. The slight retardation which occurred afterwards was probably brought about by the infection. In Experiment 3 the wound was subjected to flushing with distilled water, first for 2, then for 4, 6, and 8 hours, a total of 20 hours in 4 days. From November 21 to 24 the wound remained surgically aseptic. No modif

  4. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in acute and chronic wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA), as a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and a low thermal load to the skin surface, can improve the healing of acute and chronic wounds both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA increases tissue temperature (+2.7°C at a tissue depth of 2 cm), tissue oxygen partial pressure (+32% at a tissue depth of 2 cm) and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient supply of tissue with energy and oxygen and consequently also for wound healing and infection defense. wIRA can considerably alleviate pain (without any exception during 230 irradiations) with substantially less need for analgesics (52–69% less in the groups with wIRA compared to the control groups). It also diminishes exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. The overall evaluation of the effect of irradiation as well as the wound healing and the cosmetic result (assessed on visual analogue scales) were markedly better in the group with wIRA compared to the control group. wIRA can advance wound healing (median reduction of wound size of 90% in severely burned children already after 9 days in the group with wIRA compared to 13 days in the control group; on average 18 versus 42 days until complete wound closure in chronic venous stasis ulcers) or improve an impaired wound healing (reaching wound closure and normalization of the thermographic image in otherwise recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers) both in acute and in chronic wounds including infected wounds. After major abdominal surgery there was a trend in favor of the wIRA group to a lower rate of total wound infections (7% versus 15%) including late infections following discharge from hospital (0% versus 8%) and a trend towards a shorter postoperative hospital stay (9 versus 11 days). Even the normal wound healing process can be improved. The mentioned effects have been proven in six prospective studies, with most of the effects having an evidence level of Ia/Ib. wIRA represents a valuable therapy option and can generally be recommended for use in the treatment of acute as well as of chronic wounds. PMID:20204090

  5. Antitumor and Wound Healing Properties of Rubus ellipticus Smith.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal; Parimelazhagan, Thangaraj; Kumar, Yamini T; Sajeesh, Thankarajan

    2015-06-01

    The present investigation has been undertaken to study the antioxidant, antitumor, and wound healing properties of Rubus ellipticus. The R. ellipticus leaves were extracted using organic solvents in Soxhlet and were subjected to in vitro antioxidant assays. R. ellipticus leaf methanol (RELM) extract, which showed higher in vitro antioxidant activity, was taken for the evaluation of in vivo antioxidant, antitumor, and wound healing properties. Acute oral and dermal toxicity studies showed the safety of RELM up to a dose of 2 g/kg. A significant wound healing property was observed in incision, excision, and Staphylococcus aureus-induced infected wound models in the treatment groups compared to the control group. A complete epithelialization period was noticed during the 13(th) day and the 19(th) day. A 250-mg/kg treatment was found to prolong the life span of mice with Ehrlich ascite carcinoma (EAC; 46.76%) and to reduce the volume of Dalton's lymphoma ascite (DLA) solid tumors (2.56 cm(3)). The present study suggests that R. ellipticus is a valuable natural antioxidant and that it is immensely effective for treating skin diseases, wounds, and tumors. PMID:26100067

  6. Epidermal Differentiation in Barrier Maintenance and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The epidermal barrier prevents water loss and serves as the body's first line of defense against toxins, chemicals, and infectious microbes. Disruption of the barrier, either through congenital disorders of barrier formation or through wounds, puts the individual at risk for dehydration, hypersensitivity, infection, and prolonged inflammation. Epidermal barrier disorders affect millions of patients in the United States, causing loss of productivity and diminished quality of life for patients and their families, and represent a burden to the health-care system and society. Recent Advances: The genetic basis of many congenital barrier disorders has been identified in recent years, and great advances have been made in the molecular mechanisms of the formation and homeostasis of epidermal barrier, as well as acute and chronic wound healing. Progress in stem cell (SC) biology, particularly in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has opened new doors for cell-based therapy of chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barrier homeostasis in health and disease, as well as contributions of iPSCs and allogeneic MSCs to wound healing, will lead to the identification of novel targets for developing therapeutics for congenital barrier and wound healing disorders. Future Directions: Future studies should focus on better understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to disrupted homeostasis of epidermal barrier to identify potential therapeutic targets to combat its associated diseases. PMID:24669361

  7. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance. PMID:25027646

  8. The holistic management of chronic wound pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Acton

    Pain is a frequent symptom of patients with chronic wounds and contributes to suffering and reduced quality of life. Wound care professionals need to understand the potential causes and mechanisms of pain that are experienced by a patient with a chronic wound and provide the most appropriate interventions. A previous article published in Wounds UK considered the deleterious effect on

  9. Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Wounds: A Review of Recent Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan T. Excell

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is used extensively in the acute and chronic wound care arena of health care. It has become a standard of care for many types of wounds from non-healing diabetic foot ulcers and burns to traumatic and surgical wounds. Recently attention has been paid to using this system for the treatment of catastrophic abdominal wounds.

  10. Longitudinal shift in diabetic wound microbiota correlates with prolonged skin defense response.

    PubMed

    Grice, Elizabeth A; Snitkin, Evan S; Yockey, Laura J; Bermudez, Dustin M; Liechty, Kenneth W; Segre, Julia A

    2010-08-17

    Diabetics frequently suffer from chronic, nonhealing wounds. Although bacterial colonization and/or infection are generally acknowledged to negatively impact wound healing, the precise relationship between the microbial community and impaired wound healing remains unclear. Because the host cutaneous defense response is proposed to play a key role in modulating microbial colonization, we longitudinally examined the diabetic wound microbiome in tandem with host tissue gene expression. By sequencing 16S ribosomal RNA genes, we show that a longitudinal selective shift in wound microbiota coincides with impaired healing in diabetic mice (Lepr(db/db); db/db). We demonstrate a parallel shift in longitudinal gene expression that occurs in a cluster of genes related to the immune response. Further, we establish a correlation between relative abundance of Staphylococcus spp. and the expression of cutaneous defense response genes. Our data demonstrate that integrating two types of global datasets lends a better understanding to the dynamics governing host-microbe interactions. PMID:20668241

  11. Antimicrobial and wound healing properties of nitric oxide-releasing xerogels and silica nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan M. Hetrick

    2008-01-01

    Indwelling medical devices continue to be plagued by the body's response to foreign materials and the ever-present threat of microbial infection. Endogenously-produced nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play beneficial roles in both wound healing and the body's defense against infection. To exploit NO's favorable properties for biomaterials applications, previous studies have detailed the synthesis of xerogel polymers and

  12. Wound dressings and topical agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, K R; Ashry, H R

    1995-01-01

    Topical treatment of wounds is an important aspect of wound care, although secondary to surgical and systemic care. Dressing materials come in many forms to suit wound types and preferences. No hard evidence exists to place any one approach above another. All wounds deserve individualized attention and care plans. Likewise, a plethora of solutions exist to augment dressing materials in cleansing, antibiosis, and débridement. Traditional agents, including hydrogen peroxide, Dakin's solution, and povidone-iodine, are more tissue toxic than their common usage would indicate. We prefer frequent dressing changes with natural fiber gauze and nontoxic solutions such as saline. The scalpel, curette, and rongeur are, in our experience, much preferred to enzymatic agents when débridement is needed. We encourage scrutiny of commercial products based on clinical merit and effectiveness as documented in the medical literature. Platelet derived growth factors are an effective adjunct to wound healing and are primarily indicated when the condition of patients and their wounds has otherwise been optimized. PMID:7720031

  13. Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G J; Bannister, G C; Leeming, J P

    1995-06-01

    Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce 100 or 300 microW cm-2 s-1 irradiation; and filtered vertical laminar flow air with staff wearing cuffed cotton/polyester clothing. When used, the UVC was activated 10 min after starting an operation to assess the effect of UVC clothing alone, and of UVC radiation on bacteria already present in the wound. Compared with conventional theatres, UVC clothing reduced air counts by 38%, UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 by 81%, at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 by 91%, and laminar flow by 92%. Wounds counts fell correspondingly by 66% with UVC clothing, 87% with UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 and 92% both with UVC at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 and laminar flow. In conventional and laminar flow theatres air and wound counts correlated closely but in UVC theatres wound counts were lower than levels expected from prevailing air counts suggesting that UVC kills bacteria in wounds as well as in air. PMID:7673693

  14. A Novel Model of Chronic Wounds: Importance of Redox Imbalance and Biofilm-Forming Bacteria for Establishment of Chronicity

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Sandeep; Do, Danh; Garcia, Monika; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Brandon, Angela; Kim, Jane; Sanchez, Antonio; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Gallagher, Sean; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Schiller, Neal; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ?6.5 M people and costing ?$25B/year in the US alone [1]. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies. PMID:25313558

  15. Comparative in vitro activities of topical wound care products against community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. Bearden; George P. Allen; J. Mark Christensen

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for an increasing number of skin infections. Over-the-counter topical wound care products may play a role in the prevention of these infections, but limited data are available regarding their activity. The current study utilized a modified time-kill design to evaluate the activity of three over-the-counter topical wound care products (benzethonium chloride\\/essential oils, neomycin\\/polymyxin

  16. Early soft tissue coverage and negative pressure wound therapy optimises patient outcomes in lower limb trauma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Shi Hao Liu; Foti Sofiadellis; Mark Ashton; Kirstie MacGill; Angela Webb

    BackgroundThe timing of soft tissue reconstruction for severe open lower limb trauma is critical to its successful outcome, particularly in the setting of exposed metalware and pre-existing wound infection. The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may allow a delay in soft tissue coverage without adverse effects. This study evaluated the impact of delayed free-flap reconstruction, prolonged metalware exposure,

  17. Gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy: a valid method to manage pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Salomone, Marco; Fava, Paolo; Zingarelli, Enrico M; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Bernengo, Maria G; Bruschi, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon ulcerative, non-infective chronic inflammatory skin disorder of unknown aetiology. Systemic therapies are necessary to control the associated medical diseases, and, due to the inflammatory nature of PG, topical or systemic immunosuppressant agents are effective, but wound healing is usually slow. Negative wound pressure therapy (NPWT) has become an important tool for the management of complex skin ulcers, and usage in PG has been recently described in the literature: we present four cases of classic PG in which NPWT in association with systemic therapy achieved wound healing and a drastic pain reduction. PMID:22891652

  18. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Wound Healing Properties of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Beneth. and Strophanthus hispidus DC.

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Christian; Dwobeng, Anita Serwaa; Agyepong, Nicholas; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Mensah, Kwesi Boadu; Ayande, Patrick George; Adarkwa-Yiadom, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The study was to investigate antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of methanol leaf and stem bark extracts of Kigelia africana and methanol leaf and root extracts of Strophanthus hispidus and also to determine wound healing properties of the extracts. The antimicrobial activities of the methanol extracts were determined against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria and a fungus using agar diffusion and micro-dilution methods. The antioxidant activity was determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl–hydrazyl (DPPH) method. The influence of the extracts on rate of wound closure was investigated using the excision wound model and histopathological investigation of treated and untreated wound tissues performed. The MICs of leaf extract of K. africana against test organisms were 2.5–7.5?mg/mL and stem bark extract were 2.25–7.5?mg/mL. The leaf extract of S. hispidus had MIC range of 2.5–7.5?mg/mL and 2.5–10?mg/mL for root extract. The IC50 of leaf and stem bark extracts of K. africana were 56.9 and 13.7??g/mL, respectively and leaf and root of S. hispidus were 49.8 and 45.1??g/mL, respectively. K. africana extracts (7.5% w/w) showed significant (P < 0.05) wound contraction at day 7 with 72% of wound closure whiles significant (P < 0.05) wound contractions were observed on day 11 for stem bark of K. africana, leaf and root extracts of S. hispidus. Wound tissues treated with the extracts showed improved collagenation, re-epitheliazition and rapid granulation formation compared with untreated wound tissues. The extracts were found to contain alkaloids, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, carbohydrates, and sapogenetic glycosides. The HPLC finger-printing of the extracts were developed. The leaf, stem bark and root extracts of K. africana and S. hispidus exhibited antimicrobial, antioxidant, and enhanced wound healing properties and these may justify the medicinal uses of the plants for treatment of microbial infections and wounds. PMID:23662099

  19. Pasteurella multocida infection in man; a review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Henderson

    1963-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida has been isolated from infected lesions of nearly all regions of the body. Cat and dog bite wounds are frequently infected by this organism. The severity of the lesion varies from trivial sepsis to a severe wound abscess with sloughing and septicaemia. Bone involvement is frequent. Despite the apparent sensitivity of the organism to a wide range of

  20. Mycobacterium goodii Infections Associated with Surgical Implants at Colorado Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Ken; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew J.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2004-01-01

    From February to October 2003, Mycobacterium goodii wound infections were identified among three patients who received surgical implants at a Colorado hospital. This report summarizes the investigation of the first reported nosocomial outbreak of M. goodii. Increased awareness is needed about the potential for nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause postoperative wound infections. PMID:15504281

  1. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  2. A brief history of wound care.

    PubMed

    Broughton, George; Janis, Jeffrey E; Attinger, Christopher E

    2006-06-01

    Since the caveman, man has been tending to his wounds. Wound care evolved from magical incantations, potions, and ointments, to a systematic text of wound care and surgery from Hippocrates and Celsus. These advances were lost after the fall of the Roman Empire. In Europe, the Middle Ages were a regression of wound care back to potions and charms. It was'nt until the time of large armies using muskets and cannons that surgical wound care emerged again. This article will briefly highlight major milestones in wound care. PMID:16799371

  3. [Dehiscence of laparotomy after hysterectomy - wound management].

    PubMed

    Karasová, D; Haško, M; Ziaková, K; Zúbor, P; Mikolaj?ík, A

    2012-12-01

    Authors of the paper present prospective case report about nursing process and healing of extensive dehiscence of middle lower laparotomy wound in patient after surgical procedure for endometrial carcinoma. The aim of the paper is to describe, analyse and evaluate the process of complicated postoperative wound healing using negative pressure and moist therapy. They emphasize importance of cooperation between particular departments in complicated postoperative wound therapy management. They point out using new and easily available techniques and methods, risk factors elimination and maintenance of the factors that have a positive influence on wound healing.Key words: postoperative wound dehiscence, negative pressure wound therapy, moist therapy, case report. PMID:23521188

  4. Efficacy of papain-based wound cleanser in promoting wound regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ajlia, S A S H; Majid, F A A; Suvik, A; Effendy, M A W; Nouri, H Serati

    2010-06-15

    A new invention, papain-based wound cleanser is formulated by incorporating papain, a proteolytic enzyme extracted from Carica papaya into the formulation. This cleanser is invented to simplify the methods in wound management by combining wound cleansing and wound debridement using a single formulation. This study describes the preparation and preclinical study of papain-based wound cleanser in accelerating wound healing. In this study, papain-based wound cleanser was used to treat wound incision on Sprague-Dawley rats while distilled water and Betadine were used as negative and positive control. Twenty-seven clinically healthy white rats were randomly divided into three groups and treated accordingly until the 21st day post-incision. Wound reduction rates and histological analysis were obtained to asses the healing pattern. Rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser showed a progressive wound healing based on the wound reduction rates and histological analysis when compared with rats treated with distilled water and Betadine. Better collagen deposition and presence of skin organelles in rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser demonstrated its efficacy in promoting wound healing. In addition to its wound healing effect, papain-based wound cleanser is also integrated with antibacterial properties which make it a complete package for wound management. However, further studies should be carried out to ensure its safety for human usage. PMID:21061910

  5. Wound ballistics: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Ordog, G J; Wasserberger, J; Balasubramanium, S

    1984-12-01

    Ballistics is the study of the natural laws governing projectile missiles and their predictable performances, and wound ballistics is the study of a missile's effect on living tissue. A knowledge of these topics is essential to determine the extent and type of injury from a missile. The type of missile can often be determined by radiography. The caliber can be measured directly if the bullet is close to the x-ray plate and the x-ray tube is at least six feet from the film. Changing these distances can result in a maximum magnification of the bullet image of 20%, and the exact amount can be calculated using a formula provided. Definitions of ballistic and wound ballistic terms are provided, as are examples of wound ballistics in application. PMID:6507972

  6. Synergistic Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in an In Vitro Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Stephanie; Clinton, Allie; Fowler, Haley; Everett, Jake; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    In individuals with polymicrobial infections, microbes often display synergistic interactions that can enhance their colonization, virulence, or persistence. One of the most prevalent types of polymicrobial infection occurs in chronic wounds, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the two most common causes. Although they are the most commonly associated microbial species in wound infections, very little is known about their interspecies relationship. Evidence suggests that P. aeruginosa–S. aureus coinfections are more virulent than monoculture infection with either species; however, difficulties in growing these two pathogens together in vitro have hampered attempts to uncover the mechanisms involved. Here we describe a simple and clinically relevant in vitro wound model that supported concomitant growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. We observed that the ability of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus to survive antibiotic treatment increased when they were grown together in planktonic cocultures and that antibiotic tolerance was further enhanced when they were grown together in the wound model. We attributed this enhanced tolerance to both the “host-derived” and “bacterium-derived” matrix components. Taken together, our data indicate that P. aeruginosa and S. aureus may benefit each other by coinfecting wounds and that the host-derived matrix may serve as important a role as the bacterium-derived matrix in protecting bacteria from some antibiotics. PMID:25156721

  7. Sutures versus staples for wound closure in orthopaedic surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the spectrum of surgical decision-making, wound closure material is often an afterthought. However, the findings of a recent meta-analysis suggest that the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) is increased by using staples to close surgical wounds. Less clear is the effect of closure material on the incidence of non-infectious wound complications. The aim of this study was to compare sutures and staples in terms of: incidence of wound complications to determine the sample size for a definitive trial comparing wound closure methods. Methods Eligible adult orthopaedic patients were randomized to have wounds closed with sutures or staples. Time for skin closure was recorded. Wounds were assessed for complications for six weeks. The incidence of complications was compared using Fisher’s exact test. Time to close and pain with removal of closure material were compared using a Student’s t-test. Results The total number of patients reporting a wound complication was 59 of 148 patients completing six-week followup (41%), with no differennce between sutures and staples (RR = 0.77, CI = 0.52–1.14). The time to close wounds was shorter in the staple group (mean=4.8 min, CI = 2.6–7.1) than the suture group (mean=12 min, CI = 7.9–16). Patients in the staple group (mean=3.7, CI =2.8–4.6) reported more pain with removal than suture group (mean=2.5, CI =1.6–3.4). Conclusions This study suggests that 42% of patients report a wound complication with no difference between sutures and staples. It was demonstrated that suturing skin requires more time and staples are more painful to remove. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01146236 (registered June 14, 2010) PMID:23394586

  8. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  9. TU Delft researchers have invented a wound

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    and efficiency of wound diagnostics. A portable device using this method is capable of defining all important wound characterisaton device is very versatile, as it can be used in case of (multiple) skin (single or multi- layered) wound characteristics simultaneously and in real time outside a diagnostic

  10. Epithelial stem cells, wound healing and cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther N. Arwert; Esther Hoste; Fiona M. Watt

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that tissue repair depends on stem cells and that chronic wounds predispose to tumour formation. However, the association between stem cells, wound healing and cancer is poorly understood. Lineage tracing has now shown how stem cells are mobilized to repair skin wounds and how they contribute to skin tumour development. The signalling pathways, including WNT and

  11. Repithel®: Removing the Barriers to Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mueller; P. M. Vogt; H.-U. Steinau; B. Bosse; M. Hopp; W. Fleischer; K. Reimer

    2006-01-01

    Background: Various standardized and\\/or validated models exist to test wound healing products. This article discusses their usefulness in clinical practice. Objectives: Major barriers to wound healing have been identified after intense interaction of research and practitioners. Although extensively tested, wound healing products are still associated with trial and error due to the high variability and complexity associated with the treatment

  12. Jasmonates as Signals in the Wound Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregg A. Howe

    2004-01-01

    Plant responses to wounding and herbivore attack are orchestrated by complex signaling pathways that link the production of chemical and physical signals at the wound site to activation of gene expression and other cellular processes. The systemic nature of many wound-induced responses provides an attractive opportunity to study intercellular signaling pathways that operate over long distances within the plant. Genetic

  13. The evolution of negative pressure wound therapy: negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    PubMed

    Wolvos, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Complex wounds pose a considerable burden to patients and the health-care system. The development of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionised the treatment of these wounds. NPWT helps create a favourable wound healing environment by removing infectious material, decreasing oedema and promoting perfusion and granulation tissue formation. Additionally, NPWT has been reported to help reduce time to wound closure and length of hospital stay. Modifications of this foundation of wound care have added intermittent instillation with a dwell time to NPWT (NPWTi-d). This new system offers more comprehensive wound care through automated wound irrigation, allowing more control over the wound environment and the opportunity to deliver topical wound solutions directly to the affected tissues. A comparison between the two therapies, NPWT and NPWTi-d, is described, and two real-world applications of NPWTi-d are presented. PMID:25853644

  14. Management of chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia with life-threatening complications under negative pressure wound therapy and isolation of Helcococcus kunzii.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Katrin M; Albert, Frauke; Kneser, Ulrich; Bogdan, Christian; Horch, Raymund E

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of an 86-year-old man with severe wound infection originating from a chronic crural ulcer of the lower limb, which under negative pressure wound therapy led to excessive tissue necrosis and perforation of the anterior tibial artery. A swab taken 10 and 7 days preoperatively was positive for Helcococcus kunzii. H. kunzii has been described as a potentially pathogenic organism. The questions whether the negative pressure wound therapy itself caused the bleeding or the negative pressure wound therapy, which generates an anaerobic atmosphere, has triggered the growth and invasion of the facultative anaerobic bacterium H. kunzii and owing to the infection the artery perforated or whether the bacteria has no influence at all remain currently unanswered. After surgical debridement the signs of infection were completely eliminated, and a free musculocutaneous flap led to rapid healing of the wound. Following which H. kunzii was no longer detectable. PMID:23855685

  15. Topical application of Katupila (Securinega leucopyrus) in Dushta Vrana (chronic wound) showing excellent healing effect: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Ajmeer, Ahamed Shahan; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2014-01-01

    Securinega leucopyrus (Willd.) Muell. is known as Humari in India, Katupila in Sri Lanka and Spinous fluggea in English. It is a desert climatic plant used topically in paste form for healing of chronic and non-healing wounds. Application of Katupila Kalka (paste) is used commonly in the management of acute as well as chronic wounds in Sri Lanka as a folklore medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of herbal paste of Katupila in the treatment of Dushta Vrana (chronic wound). It is a single observational innovative case study. A female aged 40 years presented with a non-healing infected wound on her right buttock with a history of 2 months. On examination, there was a rounded wound having black color necrosed tissue and slough with foul smelling, measuring about 3 inch × 3 inch × 1 inch in diameter caused by pyogenic local infection. The routine laboratory investigations were within normal limit except hemoglobin and the swab culture test of the wound bed was reported infection of Staphylococcus aureus. This case study showed effective wound healing by topical application of Katupila paste and sesame oil. PMID:25558163

  16. Hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Elgharably, Haytham; Melvin, James; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Allen, David W.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Litorja, Maritoni; Shirley, Eric; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity in wound assessment. However, clinical acceptance of many optical imaging devices is hampered by poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and lack of biological interpretation. We developed an in vivo model of ischemic flap for non-contact assessment of wound tissue functional parameters and spectral characteristics. The model was created by elevating the bipedicle skin flaps of a domestic pig from the underlying vascular bed and inhibiting graft bed reperfusion by a silastic sheet. Hyperspectral imaging was carried out on the ischemic flap model and compared with transcutaneous oxygen tension and perfusion measurements at different positions of the wound. Hyperspectral images have also been captured continuously during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) procedure. Tissue spectral characteristics obtained by hyperspectral imaging correlated well with cutaneous tissue oxygen tension, blood perfusion, and microscopic changes of tissue morphology. Our experiments not only demonstrated the technical feasibility for quantitative assessment of chronic wound but also provided a potential digital phantom platform for quantitative characterization and calibration of medical optical devices.

  17. Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. S. Taylor; G. C. Bannister; J. P. Leeming

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce

  18. Autofluorescence imaging device for real-time detection and tracking of pathogenic bacteria in a mouse skin wound model: preclinical feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yichao Charlie; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J.; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Xu, Lizhen; Chen, Yonghong; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection significantly impedes wound healing. Clinical diagnosis of wound infections is subjective and suboptimal, in part because bacteria are invisible to the naked eye during clinical examination. Moreover, bacterial infection can be present in asymptomatic patients, leading to missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment. We developed a prototype handheld autofluorescence (AF) imaging device (Portable Real-time Optical Detection, Identification and Guidance for Intervention-PRODIGI) to noninvasively visualize and measure bacterial load in wounds in real time. We conducted preclinical pilot studies in an established nude mouse skin wound model inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal AF imaging for in vivo visualization of bacterial load in skin wounds, validated by bioluminescence imaging. We showed that bacteria (S. aureus), occult to standard examination, can be visualized in wounds using PRODIGI. We also detected quantitative changes in wound bacterial load over time based on the antibiotic treatment and the correlation of bacterial AF intensity with bacterial load. AF imaging of wounds offers a safe, noninvasive method for visualizing the presence, location, and extent of bacteria as well as measuring relative changes in bacterial load in wounds in real time.

  19. Control of burn wound sepsis in rats by methylene blue-mediated photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Control of wound sepsis is an important challenge in traumatology. However, increase in the drug-resistant bacteria makes this challenge considerably difficult in recent years. In this study, we attempted to control burn wound sepsis in rats by photodynamic treatment, which has been reported to be effective against some drug-resistant bacteria. A 20% TBSA (total body surface area) full-thickness burn was made in rat dorsal skin, and five days after injury, a suspension of P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface. At 30 min after infection, a methylene blue (MB) solution was applied to the wound surface; 5 min afterwards, the wound was illuminated with a 665-nm light emitting diode (LED) array for 10 min. This treatment (application of MB and illumination) was repeated 3 times successively. The averaged light intensity on the wound surface was 3.3 mW/cm2, the corresponding total light dose being 5.9 J/cm2. One week after injury, the numbers of bacteria in the blood and liver were counted by colony forming assay. In the liver, the number of bacteria of the treated group was significantly lower than that of the sham control group without photodynamic treatment. In the blood, no bacteria were detected in the treated group, while a certain amount of bacteria was detected in the control group. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MB-mediated PDT with a red LED array to control burn wound sepsis.

  20. Quantitative wound healing measurement and monitoring system based on an innovative 3D imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Yang, Arthur; Yin, Gongjie; Wen, James

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel three-dimensional (3D) wound imaging system (hardware and software) under development at Technest Inc. System design is aimed to perform accurate 3D measurement and modeling of a wound and track its healing status over time. Accurate measurement and tracking of wound healing enables physicians to assess, document, improve, and individualize the treatment plan given to each wound patient. In current wound care practices, physicians often visually inspect or roughly measure the wound to evaluate the healing status. This is not an optimal practice since human vision lacks precision and consistency. In addition, quantifying slow or subtle changes through perception is very difficult. As a result, an instrument that quantifies both skin color and geometric shape variations would be particularly useful in helping clinicians to assess healing status and judge the effect of hyperemia, hematoma, local inflammation, secondary infection, and tissue necrosis. Once fully developed, our 3D imaging system will have several unique advantages over traditional methods for monitoring wound care: (a) Non-contact measurement; (b) Fast and easy to use; (c) up to 50 micron measurement accuracy; (d) 2D/3D Quantitative measurements;(e) A handheld device; and (f) Reasonable cost (< $1,000).

  1. Recent Developments in Topical Wound Therapy: Impact of Antimicrobiological Changes and Rebalancing the Wound Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Erfurt-Berge, Cornelia; Renner, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Wound therapy improves every year by developing new wound treatment options or by advancing already existing wound materials, for example, adding self-releasing analgesic drugs or growth factors to wound dressings, or by binding and inactivating excessive proteases. Also new dressing materials based on silk fibers and enhanced methods to reduce bacterial burden, for example, cold argon plasma, might help to fasten wound healing. PMID:24829919

  2. Treatment of diabetic wounds with fetal murine mesenchymal stromal cells enhances wound closure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea T. Badillo; Robert A. Redden; Liping Zhang; Edward J. Doolin; Kenneth W. Liechty

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes impairs multiple aspects of the wound-healing response. Delayed wound healing continues to be a significant healthcare\\u000a problem for which effective therapies are lacking. We have hypothesized that local delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)\\u000a at a wound might correct many of the wound-healing impairments seen in diabetic lesions. We treated excisional wounds of genetically\\u000a diabetic (Db-\\/Db-) mice and heterozygous

  3. Solutions to intraoperative wound classification miscoding in a subset of American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program patients.

    PubMed

    Turrentine, Florence E; Giballa, Sarah B; Shah, Puja M; Jones, David R; Hedrick, Traci L; Friel, Charles M

    2015-02-01

    Intraoperative wound classification is a predictor of postoperative infection. Therefore, accurately assigning the correct classification to a surgical wound is of particular importance. Our institution participates in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP), a national outcomes database that collects wound classification for all qualifying operative procedures, and we noted discrepancies when comparing ACS NSQIP wound classification coding with perioperative coding in our electronic medical record. We tested the effectiveness of an intervention that included staff educational sessions, informational posters, and postoperative debriefings on improving the accuracy of documented intraoperative wound classification. The ?(2) test was used to compare proportions of wound classification miscodings before and after educational sessions and debriefings commenced. Baseline data revealed misclassification of wounds occurred 21 per cent (30 of 141) of the time in predominately colorectal procedures performed by two surgeons from April through August 2012. Errors decreased to 9 per cent (13 of 147) from August to December 2012, after our intervention of education sessions with operating room staff and the surgeons incorporating a statement confirming the wound classification at the end of the case debriefing. The ?(2) statistic was 8.7589. The P value was significant at 0.003. Ensuring concordance of classification between the surgeon and nurse during a postprocedure debriefing as well as education of perioperative nursing staff through posters and seminars significantly improved the accuracy of intraoperative wound classification coding. PMID:25642884

  4. [Chronic wounds as a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Koli?, Maja; Redzepi, Gzim; Antoli?, Slavko

    2014-10-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Regarding the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within the expected period according to the wound etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones, which include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcers and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. Eighty percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the rest are mostly neuropathic ulcers. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life of patients by requiring continuous topical treatment, causing immobility and pain in a high percentage of patients. Chronic wounds affect elderly population. Chronic leg ulcers affect 0.6-3 percent of those aged over 60, increasing to over 5 percent of those aged over 80. Emergence of chronic wounds is a substantial socioeconomic problem as 1-2 percent of western population will suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to the increasing proportion of elderly population along with the diabetic and obesity epidemic. It has been proved that chronic wounds account for the large proportion of costs in the health care system, even in rich societies. Socioeconomically, the management of chronic wounds reaches a total of 2-4 percent of the health budget in western countries. Treatment costs for some other diseases are not irrelevant, nor are the method and materials used for treating these wounds. Considering etiologic factors, a chronic wound demands a multidisciplinary approach with great efforts of health care professionals to treat it more efficiently, more simply and more painlessly for the patient, as well as more inexpensively for health care funds. PMID:25326983

  5. THE LINEAR EXCISIONAL WOUND: AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR HUMAN EX-VIVO WOUND EPITHELIALIZATION STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Amilcar Ezequiel; Beckett, Laurel A.; Baier, Brian S.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Wound healing is a complex process that involves multiple intercellular and intracellular processes and extracellular interactions. Explanted human skin has been used as a model for the re-epithelialization phase of human wound healing. The currently used standard technique employs a circular punch biopsy tool to make the initial wound. Despite its wide use, the geometry of round wounds makes them difficult to measure reliably. Methods Our group has designed a linear wounding tool, and compared the variability in ex vivo human linear and circular wounds. Results An F test for differences in variances demonstrated that the linear wounds provided a population of wound size measurements that was fifty percent less variable than that obtained from a group of matched circular wounds. This reduction in variability would provide substantial advantages for the linear wound technique over the circular wound punch technique, by reducing the sample sizes required for comparative studies of factors that alter healing. Conclusion This linear wounding tool thus provides method for wounding that is standardized, provides minimal error in wound gap measurements, and is easily reproducible. We demonstrate its utility in an ex vivo model for the controlled investigation of human skin wounds. PMID:21605167

  6. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol. PMID:25089285

  7. Therapy of chronic wounds with water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA)

    PubMed Central

    von Felbert, Verena; Schumann, Hauke; Mercer, James B.; Strasser, Wolfgang; Daeschlein, Georg; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    The central portion of chronic wounds is often hypoxic and relatively hypothermic, representing a deficient energy supply of the tissue, which impedes wound healing or even makes it impossible. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and a low thermal load to the skin surface. wIRA produces a therapeutically usable field of heat and increases temperature, oxygen partial pressure and perfusion of the tissue. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient tissue supply with energy and oxygen and consequently as well for wound healing, especially in chronic wounds, and infection defense. wIRA acts both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA can advance wound healing or improve an impaired wound healing process and can especially enable wound healing in non-healing chronic wounds. wIRA can considerably alleviate the pain and diminish wound exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study of 40 patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs irradiation with wIRA and visible light (VIS) accelerated the wound healing process (on average 18 vs. 42 days until complete wound closure, residual ulcer area after 42 days 0.4 cm² vs. 2.8 cm²) and led to a reduction of the required dose of pain medication in comparison to the control group of patients treated with the same standard care (wound cleansing, wound dressing with antibacterial gauze, and compression garment therapy) without the concomitant irradiation. Another prospective study of 10 patients with non-healing chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs included extensive thermographic investigation. Therapy with wIRA(+VIS) resulted in a complete or almost complete wound healing in 7 patients and a marked reduction of the ulcer size in another 2 of the 10 patients, a clear reduction of pain and required dose of pain medication, and a normalization of the thermographic image. In a current prospective, randomized, controlled, blinded study patients with non-healing chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs are treated with compression garment therapy, wound cleansing, wound dressings and 30 minutes irradiation five times per week over 9 weeks. A preliminary analysis of the first 23 patients of this study has shown in the group with wIRA(+VIS) compared to a control group with VIS an advanced wound healing, an improved granulation and in the later phase of treatment a decrease of the bacterial burden. Some case reports have demonstrated that wIRA can also be used for mixed arterial-venous ulcers or arterial ulcers, if irradiation intensity is chosen appropriately low and if irradiation is monitored carefully. wIRA can be used concerning decubital ulcers both in a preventive and in a therapeutic indication. wIRA can improve the resorption of topically applied substances also on wounds. An irradiation with VIS and wIRA presumably acts with endogenous protoporphyrin IX (or protoporphyrin IX of bacteria) virtually similar as a mild photodynamic therapy (endogenous PDT-like effect). This could lead to improved cell regeneration and wound healing and to antibacterial effects. In conclusion, these results indicate that wIRA generally should be considered for the treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:20204086

  8. 5th Annual David R. Boyd, MD Lecture: Revolutionary advances in wound repair in emergency medicine during the last three decades. A view toward the new millennium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard F Edlich; Vikram R Reddy

    2001-01-01

    This lecture provides an overview of advances in wound repair devised by our multidisciplinary team of physicians, scientists, and students. Our collective efforts have devised products, drugs, and concepts that are facilitating wound repair without infection and with the least possible scar. Some of the beneficial products and drugs developed or identified by our laboratory include nitrile examination and surgical

  9. Outbreak of wound botulism in injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, M; Alpers, K; Van Treeck, U; Frank, C; Rosenkoetter, N; Schaumann, R

    2009-11-01

    Between October and December 2005, 16 cases of wound botulism were notified to the health authorities of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. All patients were injecting drug users (IDU) and the epidemiological investigations suggested contaminated injection drugs as the most probable source of infection. Clostridium botulinum was cultivated from clinical samples of six patients and molecular typing revealed that the different isolates were clonally identical. Two samples of heroin, one of them provided by a patient, were examined but C. botulinum could not be isolated. This outbreak demonstrates that IDU are at risk for acquiring wound botulism by injecting contaminated drugs. A greater awareness of this disease is needed by physicians and a close cooperation between public health authorities, street workers, operators of sheltered injecting facilities, and medical centres focusing on IDU is essential to prevent and manage outbreaks in IDU in a timely manner. PMID:19351433

  10. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    E-print Network

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  11. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  12. Prospective Nationwide Study of Aeromonas Infections in France?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Brigitte; Kodjo, Angeli; Laurent, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    We report a systematic prospective multicenter nationwide study of clinical Aeromonas infections in France. During 6 months (May to October 2006), 78 cases of aeromonosis were reviewed for risk factors and clinical, microbiological, and antimicrobial susceptibility data. They included wound infections (44%), bacteremia (26%), enteritis (19%), respiratory tract infections (6%), and miscellaneous (5%) infections. PMID:19244464

  13. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kasukurthi, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently, the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our custom NPWT “mitten” technique for use with skin grafts on the pediatric hand. PMID:19562417

  14. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahul Kasukurthi; Gregory H. Borschel

    2010-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of\\u000a negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently,\\u000a the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our\\u000a custom NPWT “mitten”

  15. Silver Sol Improves Hospital Associated Wound Care In Long Term, High Risk Hospital Patients Who Have Pressure Sores Including MRSA: A Review and Study of Wound Care Treatments in Long Stay, High Risk Hospitals. By

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gordon Pedersen

    Silver Sol is a nutritional supplement that has anti-bacterial, antiviral and anti fungal properties (US Patent #7135195). Silver Sol has unique mechanisms of action that promote wound healing by preventing infection and promoting stem cell release and activation (Nexus, 2008). The purpose of this study is to review the results of nursing homes using Silver Sol for pressure sores infected

  16. Integrin Regulation of Epidermal Functions in Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Longmate, Whitney M.; DiPersio, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Integrins are bidirectional signaling receptors for extracellular matrix that regulate both inside-out signaling that controls keratinocyte-mediated changes to the wound microenvironment and outside-in signaling that controls keratinocyte responses to microenvironmental changes. As such, integrins represent attractive therapeutic targets for treatment of chronic wounds or general promotion of wound healing. Advances in wound management are particularly important as the elderly and diabetic populations within the United States continue to grow. Recent Advances: Although integrins are best known for mediating cell adhesion and migration, integrins in wound epidermis also control cell survival, proliferation, matrix remodeling, and paracrine crosstalk to other cellular compartments of the wound. Importantly, the concept of targeting integrins in the clinic has been established for treatment of certain cancers and other diseases, laying the groundwork for similar exploitation of integrins as targets to treat chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Despite their attractiveness as therapeutic targets, integrins have complex roles in wound healing that are impacted by both their own expression and a highly dynamic wound microenvironment that determines ligand availability. Therefore, identifying relevant integrin ligands in the wound and understanding both distinct and overlapping functions that different integrins play in the epidermis will be critical to determine their precise roles in wound healing. Future Directions: Future research should focus on gaining a thorough understanding of the highly coordinated functions of different integrins in wound epidermis, and on determining which of these functions go awry in pathological wounds. This focus should facilitate development of integrin-targeting therapeutics for treating chronic wounds. PMID:24669359

  17. Polymeric Multilayers that Localize the Release of Chlorhexidine from Biologic Wound Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankit; Nelson, Tyler B.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    Biologic wound dressings contain animal-derived components and are susceptible to high infection rates. To address this issue, we report an approach that permits incorporation of non-toxic levels of the small-molecule antiseptic ‘chlorhexidine’ into biologic dressings. The approach relies on the fabrication of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMs) films containing poly(allylaminehydrochloride) (PAH), poly(acrylicacid) (PAA), and chlorhexidine acetate (CX) on elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheets. The PEMs (20-100 nm thick) are subsequently stamped onto the wound-contact surface of a synthetic biologic dressing, Biobrane, which contains collagen peptides. Chlorhexidine loading in the PEMs was tailored by tuning the number of (CX/PAA) bilayers deposited, providing burst release of up to 0.98±0.06 ?g/cm2 of CX over 24 h, followed by zero order release of 0.35±0.04 ?g/cm2/day for another week. Although the CX concentrations released were below the reported in vitro cytotoxicity limit (5 ?g/mL over 24 h) for human dermal fibroblasts, they killed 4 log10 counts of pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in solution. The CX/PEMs could be stamped onto Biobrane with high efficiency to provide CX release kinetics and in-vitro antibacterial activity similar to that on PDMS stamps. In a full-thickness ‘splinted’ dermal wound-model in normal wild-type mice, the CX-functionalized Biobrane showed no decrease in either its adherence to the wound-bed or wound-closure rate over 14 days. The murine wounds topically inoculated with ~105 CFU/cm2 of S. aureus and treated with CX-functionalized Biobrane demonstrated a 3 log10 decrease in the wound's bacterial burden within 3 days, compared to persistent bacterial colonization found in wounds treated with unmodified Biobrane (n=10 mice, p<0.005). Overall, this study presents a promising approach to prevent bacterial colonization in wounds under biologic dressings. PMID:22784602

  18. Recommendations on negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and antimicrobial solutions - when, where and how to use: what does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Back, David A; Scheuermann-Poley, Catharina; Willy, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Infections of contaminated or colonised acute or chronic wounds remain a grave risk for patients even today. Despite modern surgical debridement concepts and antibiotics, a great need exists for new therapies in wound management. Since the late 1990s, advantageous effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) have been combined with local antiseptic wound cleansing in the development of NPWT with instillation (NPWTi). This article summarises the current scientific knowledge on this topic. MEDLINE literature searches were performed on the subject of negative pressure wound and instillation therapy covering publications from the years 1990 to 2013 (36 peer-reviewed citations) and regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) covering wound care with bone involvement (27 publications) or soft-tissue wounds without bone participation (11 publications) from 2005 to 2012. The use of NPWTi in the therapy of infected wounds appears to be not yet widespread, and literature is poor and inhomogeneous. However, some reports indicate an outstanding benefit of NPWTi for patients, using antiseptics such as polyhexanide (concentration 0·005-0·04%) and acetic acid (concentration 0·25-1%) in acute and chronic infected wounds and povidone-iodine (10% solution) as prophylaxis in contaminated wounds with potential viral infection. Soaking times are recommended to be 20?minutes each, using cycle frequencies of four to eight cycles per day. Additionally, the prophylactic use of NPWTi with these substances can be recommended in contaminated wounds that cannot be closed primarily with surgical means. Although first recommendations may be given currently, there is a great need for RCTs and multicentre studies to define evidence-based guidelines for an easier approach to reach the decision on how to use NPWTi. PMID:24251842

  19. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs. PMID:24912832

  20. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  1. The Evolution of Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Kelman Cohen

    Man’s struggle to heal wounds is as old as history itself. As life forms evolved from single cell life to amphibian and finally\\u000a mammal, the pristine ability to heal by regeneration was lost and thus repairs by inflammation and subsequent deposition of\\u000a matrix protein (scar) evolved as the method of mammalian healing. This evolutionary change leading to scar (the deposition

  2. Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Wound Healing Potential of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii

    PubMed Central

    Bempah, Solomon Boamah; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Ayande, Patrick George; Adarkwa-Yiadom, Martin; Mensah, Kwesi Boadu

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The aim of the study is to determine the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and in vivo wound healing properties of methanol leaf extracts of Justicia flava and Lannea welwitschii. The antimicrobial activity was investigated using agar well diffusion and microdilution methods. The free radical scavenging activity of the methanol leaf extracts was performed using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). The rate of wound contraction was determined using excision model. The test organisms used were Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 4853, Bacillus subtilis NTCC 10073, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and clinical strains of Candida albicans. The MICs of methanol leaf extract of J. flava against test organisms were E. coli (7.5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (7.5?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (7.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (5?mg/mL). The MICs of methanol leaf extract of L. welwitschii against test organisms were E. coli (5?mg/mL); P. aeruginosa (10?mg/mL); S. aureus (5?mg/mL); B. subtilis (2.5?mg/mL); and C. albicans (2.5?mg/mL). The MBC/MFC of the extract was between 10 and 50?mg/mL. The IC50 of the reference antioxidant, ?-tocopherol, was 1.5??g/mL and the methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii had IC50 of 65.3??g/mL and 81.8??g/mL, respectively. The methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii gave a significant reduction in wound size as compared to the untreated. The rates of wound closure after the application of the extracts (7.5%?w/w) were compared to the untreated wounds. On the 9th day, J. flava extract had a percentage wound closure of 99% (P < 0.01) and that of L. welwitschii exhibited wound closure of 95% (P < 0.05) on the 13th day compared to the untreated wounds. The two extracts significantly (P < 0.01) increased the tensile strength of wounds compared to the untreated wounds. The extracts treated wound tissues showed improved angiogenesis, collagenation, and reepithelialization compared to the untreated wound tissues. The preliminary phytochemical screening of J. flava and L. welwitschii leaf extracts revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, and glycosides. The above results indicate that methanol leaf extracts of J. flava and L. welwitschii possess antimicrobial and wound healing properties which may justify the traditional uses of J. flava and L. welwitschii in the treatment of wounds and infections. PMID:24159350

  3. [Wound signal transduction pathways in plants].

    PubMed

    Szczegielniak, Jadwiga

    2007-01-01

    A significant advancement in our knowledge and understanding of wound-signaling pathways in plants has been made recently. Essential role in the explanation of these processes came from the genetic screens and analysis of mutants which are defective in either jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, JA perception or systemin function. Plants equally react to wound in the tissues directly damaged (local response) as well as in the non-wounded areas (systemic response). Jasmonides and in particular the most studied JA, produced by the octadecanoid pathway, are responsible for the systemic response. Jasmonides functioning as long-distance signal particles transmit the information about wound to distant, non-wounded tissues where defense response is invoked. Peptyd - systemin, identified in some Solanaceous species, acts locally to the wounded area to elicit the production of JA. Jasmonic acid-dependent and -independent wound signal transduction pathways have been identified and partially characterized. JA-dependent wound signaling pathways are responsible for the activation of systemic responses, whereas JA-independent wound signaling pathways, activated close to wound side, have a role in reparation of damaged tissue and in defense against pathogens. PMID:17969872

  4. Impaired Laparotomy Wound Healing in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Liyu; Culbertson, Eric J.; Wen, Yuan; Robson, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity increases the risk of laparotomy dehiscence and incisional hernia. The aim of this study was to measure the biological effect of obesity on laparotomy wound healing and the formation of incisional hernias. Methods Normal-weight Sprague–Dawley (SD) and obese Zucker rats were used in an established laparotomy wound healing and incisional ventral hernia model. Mechanical testing was performed on abdominal wall strips collected from laparotomy wounds. Hernia size was measured by digital imaging. Picrosirius staining for collagen isoforms was observed with polarized microscopy. Abdominal wall fibroblasts were cultured to measure collagen matrix remodeling and proliferation. Results Laparotomy wound healing was significantly impaired in obese rats. Mechanical strength was lower than in normal-weight rats. Yield load was reduced in the obese group at all time points. Picrosirius red staining showed increased immature type III collagen content and disorganized type I collagen fibers within laparotomy wounds of obese rats. Wound size was significantly larger in the obese group. Collagen matrix remodeling was impaired with fibroblasts from obese rats, but there was no difference in fibroblast proliferation between the obese and normal-weight groups. Conclusions We observed for the first time that laparotomy wound healing is impaired in obese rats. The recovery of laparotomy wound strength is delayed due to abnormal collagen maturation and remodeling, possibly due to a defect in fibroblast function. Strategies to improve outcomes for laparotomy wound healing in obese patients should include correcting the wound healing defect, possibly with growth factor or cell therapy. PMID:21347822

  5. Experimental missile wound to the brain.

    PubMed

    Carey, M E; Sarna, G S; Farrell, J B; Happel, L T

    1989-11-01

    Among civilians in the United States, 33,000 gunshot wound deaths occur each year; probably half of these involve the head. In combat, head wounds account for approximately half of the immediate mortality when death can be attributed to a single wound. No significant reduction in the neurosurgical mortality associated with these wounds has occurred between World War II and the Vietnam conflict, and very little research into missile wounds of the brain has been undertaken. An experimental model has been developed in the anesthetized cat whereby a ballistic injury to the brain may be painlessly reproduced in order that the pathophysiological effects of brain wounding may be studied and better treatments may be designed to lower the mortality and morbidity rates associated with gunshot wounds. Prominent among physiological effects observed in this model was respiratory arrest even though the missile did not injure the brain stem directly. The incidence of prolonged respiratory arrest increased with increasing missile energy, but arrest was often reversible provided respiratory support was given. It is possible that humans who receive a brain wound die from missile-induced apnea instead of brain damage per se. The mortality rate in humans with brain wounding might be reduced by prompt respiratory support. Brain wounding was associated with persistently increased intracranial pressure and reduced cerebral perfusion pressure not entirely attributable to intracranial bleeding. The magnitude of these derangements appeared to be missile energy-dependent and approached dangerous levels in higher-energy wounds. All wounded cats exhibited postwounding increases in blood glucose concentrations consistent with a generalized stress reaction. A transient rise in hematocrit also occurred immediately after wounding. Both of these phenomena could prove deleterious to optimal brain function after injury. PMID:2509646

  6. Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species that cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the different populat...

  7. On the use of the photoplasmodynamic method for treatment of suppurative wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Pedder; V. K. Kosenok; D. V. Belik; G. Z. Rot; I. V. Surgutskova; Yu. V. Shkuro; A. V. Pedder; M. V. Naboka; V. N. Mironenko; A. V. Shudina

    2008-01-01

    Pyoinflammatory infections are an important prob? lem of modern medicine. There is a trend toward an increase in the number of patients with acute suppurative diseases of soft tissues and suppurative surgical wounds [22, 23]. Military conflicts, ecological disasters, techno? genic accidents, and terroristic acts increase the rate of injuries and mutilations. There is an increase in the num? ber

  8. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Use of biological mesh versus standard wound

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    [1]. Their repair with a synthetic non-absorbable mesh to reinforce the abdominal wall leads. In those patients, synthetic non-absorbable meshes are not recommended because of the high rates of meshSTUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Use of biological mesh versus standard wound care in infected incisional

  9. Necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a group of highly lethal infections that typically occur after trauma or surgery. Many individual infectious entities have been described, but they all have similar pathophysiologies, clinical features, and treatment approaches. The essentials of successful treatment include early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics, and supportive intensive treatment unit care. The two commonest pitfalls in management are failure of early diagnosis and inadequate surgical debridement. These life-threatening infections are often mistaken for cellulitis or innocent wound infections, and this is responsible for diagnostic delay. Tissue gas is not a universal finding in necrotizing soft tissue infections. This misconception also contributes to diagnostic errors. Incision and drainage is an inappropriate surgical strategy for necrotizing soft tissue infections; excisional debridement is needed. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful, but it is not as important as aggressive surgical therapy. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive treatment unit medicine, the mortality of necrotizing soft tissue infections is still high. This article emphasizes common treatment principles for all of these infections, and reviews some of the more important individual necrotizing soft tissue infectious entities.???Keywords: fasciitis; gas gangrene; clostridium infections; streptococcal infections; necrosis; debridement; surgical infections; soft tissue infections PMID:10621873

  10. A double-edged sword: the role of VEGF in wound repair and chemoattraction of opportunist pathogens.

    PubMed

    Birkenhauer, Eric; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process essential to repairing damaged tissues and preventing infection. Skin is the first line of defense, a chief physical barrier to microbe entry. Wound healing is a physical rebuilding process, but at the same time it is an inflammatory event. In turn, molecules for wound repair are secreted by fibroblasts and others present at the wound site. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a critical cytokine that exhibits chemoattractant properties, recruiting other immune cells to the site. Although generally beneficial, VEGF may also act as a chemoattractant for invading microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is problematic during wound infection due to its propensity to form biofilms and exhibit heightened antimicrobial resistance. Here, we explored the influence of VEGF gradients (in a microfluidic device wound model) on the motility and chemotactic properties of P. aeruginosa. At lower concentrations, VEGF had little effect on motility, but as the maximal concentration within the gradient increased, P. aeruginosa cells exhibited directed movement along the gradient. Our data provide evidence that while beneficial, VEGF, in excess, may aid colonization by P. aeruginosa. This highlights the necessity for the efficient resolution of inflammation. Understanding the dynamics of wound colonization may lead to new/enhanced therapeutics to hasten recovery. PMID:25830483

  11. Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Wound Healing Potentials of Ethanol Extract of Wedelia biflora Linn D.C. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Biswas, D; Yoganandam, G P; Dey, A; Deb, L

    2013-03-01

    To rationalize scientifically the traditional claim on use of Wedelia biflora (Linn.) D. C. for the treatment of wounds and infections, the present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial and wound healing activity of ethanol extract of leaves of W. biflora. In in vitro assays the test extract was subjected to antimicrobial activity by agar well-diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration method in different microbial strains. Wound healing activity of the test extract was studied by excision wound model and incision wound model in Wistar albino rats. In excision wound model, 97.90% wound healing was recorded in 10% w/w extract treated group on 16(th) days of postsurgery, whereas only 58.50% was observed in control group. In incision model, higher breaking strength, high hydroxyl proline content and histopathological study in extract treated groups revealed higher collagen redeposition than the control group. The agar well-diffusion evaluation and minimum inhibitory concentration established antimicrobial efficacy of ethanol extracts of W. biflora. These observations established the traditional claim and therapeutic activity of W. biflora and it could be a potent wound healing candidate for use in future. PMID:24019563

  12. Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K.; Geringer, Matthew R.; Hong, Seok J.; Leung, Kai P.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The recent literature suggests that chronic wound biofilms often consist of multiple bacterial species. However, without appropriate in vivo, polybacterial biofilm models, our understanding of these complex infections remains limited. We evaluate and compare the effect of single- and mixed-species biofilm infections on host wound healing dynamics using a quantitative, in vivo, rabbit ear model. Methods Six-mm dermal punch wounds in New Zealand rabbit ears were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus strain UAMS-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, or both, totaling 10?6 colony-forming units/wound. Bacterial proliferation and maintenance in vivo were done using procedures from our previously published model. Wounds were harvested for histological measurement of wound healing, viable bacterial counts using selective media, or inflammatory cytokine (IL-1?, TNF-?) expression via quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Biofilm structure was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison, biofilm deficient mutant UAMS-929 replaced strain UAMS-1 in some mixed-species infections. Results Bacterial counts verified the presence of both strains UAMS-1 and PAO1 in polybacterial wounds. Over time, strain PAO1 became predominant (p<0.001). SEM showed colocalization of both species within an extracellular matrix at multiple time-points. Compared to each monospecies infection, polybacterial biofilms impaired all wound healing parameters (p<0.01), and increased expression of IL-1? and TNF-? (p<0.05). In contrast, mixed-species infections using biofilm-deficient mutant UAMS-929 instead of wild-type strain UAMS-1 showed less wound impairment (p<0.01) with decreased host cytokine expression (p<0.01), despite a bacterial burden and distribution comparable to that of mixed-wild-type wounds. Conclusions This study reveals that mixed-species biofilms have a greater impact on wound healing dynamics than their monospecies counterparts. The increased virulence of polybacterial biofilm appears dependent on the combined pathogenicity of each species, verified using a mutant strain. These data suggest that individual bacterial species can interact synergistically within a single biofilm structure. PMID:22905182

  13. Use of a biological extracellular matrix wound therapy to heal complex, chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Rando, T

    2009-02-01

    This small case series involved four patients with vascular impairment and multiple comorbidities whose wounds had not responded to standard treatment. Use of this novel therapy help initiate wound healing and improve quality of life. PMID:19418784

  14. Advances in Wound Healing: A Review of Current Wound Healing Products

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick S.; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Successful wound care involves optimizing patient local and systemic conditions in conjunction with an ideal wound healing environment. Many different products have been developed to influence this wound environment to provide a pathogen-free, protected, and moist area for healing to occur. Newer products are currently being used to replace or augment various substrates in the wound healing cascade. This review of the current state of the art in wound-healing products looks at the latest applications of silver in microbial prophylaxis and treatment, including issues involving resistance and side effects, the latest uses of negative pressure wound devices, advanced dressings and skin substitutes, biologic wound products including growth factor applications, and hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct in wound healing. With the abundance of available products, the goal is to find the most appropriate modality or combination of modalities to optimize healing. PMID:22567251

  15. A Wireless Electroceutical Dressing Lowers Cost of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Piya Das; Schlanger, Richard; Ganesh, Kasturi; Lambert, Lynn; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Martinsek, Patsy; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the use of a wireless electroceutical dressing (WED) (Procellera®) in conjunction with a 5-day negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce the number of dressing changes required per week with this therapy. Approach: At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, chronic wound patients (n=30) undergoing NPWT were randomized into two arms following consent as approved by the institutional review board. The control arm received standard of care NPWT, where the dressing change was performed thrice a week. The test arm received the same care except that the WED was added as an interface layer and dressing change was limited to twice a week. Results: A reduced cost of care was achieved using the WED in conjunction with NPWT. Despite fewer dressing changes in wounds dressed with the WED, closure outcomes were comparable with no overt signs of any wound complication, including infection. The cost of NPWT care during the week was significantly lower (from $2918 to $2346) in the WED-treated group compared with patients in the control arm. Innovation: This work introduces a novel technology platform involving a WED, which may be used in conjunction with NPWT. If used as such, NPWT is effective in decreasing the frequency of dressing change and lowering the cost of care. Conclusion: This work points toward the benefit of using the WED combined with NPWT. A larger clinical trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of WED in wound care is warranted. PMID:26005596

  16. Corals Use Similar Immune Cells and Wound-Healing Processes as Those of Higher Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Caroline V.; Traylor-Knowles, Nikki G.; Willis, Bette L.; Bythell, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Sessile animals, like corals, frequently suffer physical injury from a variety of sources, thus wound-healing mechanisms that restore tissue integrity and prevent infection are vitally important for defence. Despite the ecological importance of reef-building corals, little is known about the cells and processes involved in wound healing in this group or in phylogenetically basal metazoans in general. A histological investigation into wound healing of the scleractinian coral Porites cylindrica at 0 h, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h after injury revealed differences in cellular components between injured and healthy tissues. Cell counts of the obligate endosymbiont, Symbiodinium, and melanin volume fraction analysis revealed rapid declines in both Symbiodinium abundance and tissue cross-sectional area occupied by melanin-containing granular cells after injury. Four phases of wound healing were identified, which are similar to phases described for both vertebrates and invertebrates. The four phases included (i) plug formation via the degranulation of melanin-containing granular cells; (ii) immune cell infiltration (inflammation); (iii) granular tissue formation (proliferation); and (iv) maturation. This study provides detailed documentation of the processes involved in scleractinian wound healing for the first time and further elucidates the roles of previously-described immune cells, such as fibroblasts. These results demonstrate the conservation of wound healing processes from anthozoans to humans. PMID:21887359

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing: A Review of Technologies and Tools for Wound Microbiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Brendan P.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The colonization of wounds by specific microbes or communities of microbes may delay healing and/or lead to infection-related complication. Studies of wound-associated microbial communities (microbiomes) to date have primarily relied upon culture-based methods, which are known to have extreme biases and are not reliable for the characterization of microbiomes. Biofilms are very resistant to culture and are therefore especially difficult to study with techniques that remain standard in clinical settings. Recent Advances: Culture-independent approaches employing next-generation DNA sequencing have provided researchers and clinicians a window into wound-associated microbiomes that could not be achieved before and has begun to transform our view of wound-associated biodiversity. Within the past decade, many platforms have arisen for performing this type of sequencing, with various types of applications for microbiome research being possible on each. Critical Issues: Wound care incorporating knowledge of microbiomes gained from next-generation sequencing could guide clinical management and treatments. The purpose of this review is to outline the current platforms, their applications, and the steps necessary to undertake microbiome studies using next-generation sequencing. Future Directions: As DNA sequencing technology progresses, platforms will continue to produce longer reads and more reads per run at lower costs. A major future challenge is to implement these technologies in clinical settings for more precise and rapid identification of wound bioburden. PMID:25566414

  18. A study on the ability of quaternary ammonium groups attached to a polyurethane foam wound dressing to inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Hamood, Abdul N; de Souza, Anselm; Schultz, Gregory; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Mehta, Dilip; Reid, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection of acute and chronic wounds impedes wound healing significantly. Part of this impediment is the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in wound dressings. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a polyurethane (PU) foam wound dressings coated with poly diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC-PU) to inhibit the growth and biofilm development by three main wound pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, within the wound dressing. pDADMAC-PU inhibited the growth of all three pathogens. Time-kill curves were conducted both with and without serum to determine the killing kinetic of pDADMAC-PU. pDADMAC-PU killed S.?aureus, A.?baumannii, and P.?aeruginosa. The effect of pDADMAC-PU on biofilm development was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative analysis, colony-forming unit assay, revealed that pDADMAC-PU dressing produced more than eight log reduction in biofilm formation by each pathogen. Visualization of the biofilms by either confocal laser scanning microscopy or scanning electron microscopy confirmed these findings. In addition, it was found that the pDADMAC-PU-treated foam totally inhibited migration of bacteria through the foam for all three bacterial strains. These results suggest that pDADMAC-PU is an effective wound dressing that inhibits the growth of wound pathogens both within the wound and in the wound dressing. PMID:25469865

  19. Prospective, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of an Octenidine-based hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft wounds in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    W, Eisenbeiß; F, Siemers; G, Amtsberg; P, Hinz; B, Hartmann; T, Kohlmann; A, Ekkernkamp; U, Albrecht; O, Assadian; A, Kramer

    2012-01-01

    Background: Moist wound treatment improves healing of skin graft donor site wounds. Microbial colonised wounds represent an increased risk of wound infection; while antimicrobially active, topical antiseptics may impair epithelialization. Objectives: The aim of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial was to examine the influence of an Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft donor sites. Methods: The study was designed as a randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Skin graft donor sites from a total of 61 patients were covered either with 0.05% OCT (n=31) or an OCT-free placebo wound hydrogel (n=30). Potential interaction with wound healing was assessed by measuring the time until 100% re-epithelialization. In addition, microbial wound colonisation was quantitatively determined in all skin graft donor sites. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the time for complete epithelialization of skin graft donor sites in the OCT and the placebo group (7.3±0.2 vs. 6.9±0.2 days; p=0.236). Microbial wound colonisation was significantly lower in the OCT group than in the placebo group (p=0.014). Conclusions: The OCT-based hydrogel showed no delay in wound epithelialization and demonstrated a significantly lower bacterial colonisation of skin graft donor site wounds. PMID:23071904

  20. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  1. Ultrashort peptide nanofibrous hydrogels for the acceleration of healing of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong-Chiat; Cai, Elijah Z; Ang, Chuan-Han; Raju, Ashvin; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Koh, Alvin G; Zhou, Hui J; Lim, Thiam-Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2014-06-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for wound dressings to treat partial thickness burns that damage the epidermis and dermis. An ideal dressing needs to prevent infection, maintain skin hydration to facilitate debridement of the necrotic tissue, and provide cues to enhance tissue regeneration. We developed a class of 'smart' peptide hydrogels, which fulfill these criteria. Our ultrashort aliphatic peptides have an innate tendency to self-assemble into helical fibers, forming biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds which are non-immunogenic and non-cytotoxic. These nanofibrous hydrogels accelerated wound closure in a rat model for partial thickness burns. Two peptide hydrogel candidates demonstrate earlier onset and completion of autolytic debridement, compared to Mepitel(®), a silicone-coated polyamide net used as standard-of-care. They also promote epithelial and dermal regeneration in the absence of exogenous growth factors, achieving 86.2% and 92.9% wound closure respectively, after 14 days. In comparison, only 62.8% of the burnt area is healed for wounds dressed with Mepitel(®). Since the rate of wound closure is inversely correlated with hypertrophic scar formation and infection risks, our peptide hydrogel technology fills a niche neglected by current treatment options. The regenerative properties can be further enhanced by incorporation of bioactive moieties such as growth factors and cytokines. PMID:24636214

  2. Procrastination of Wound Drainage and Malnutrition Affect the Outcome of Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi, Fereidoon M.; Parvizi, Javad; Haytmanek, C. Thomas; Joshi, Ashish

    2008-01-01

    The association between wound drainage and subsequent periprosthetic infection is well known. However, the most appropriate treatment of wound drainage is not well understood. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10,325 patients (11,785 procedures), among whom 300 patients (2.9%) developed persistent (greater than 48 hours postoperatively) wound drainage. Wound drainage stopped spontaneously between 2 and 4 days in 217 patients treated with local wound care and oral antibiotics. The remaining 83 patients (28%) underwent further surgery. A single débridement resulted in cessation of drainage without subsequent infection in 63 of 83 patients (76%), whereas 20 (24%) patients continued to drain and underwent additional treatment (repeat débridement, resection arthroplasty, or long-term antibiotics). Timing of surgery and the presence of malnutrition predicted failure of the first débridement. There were no differences between the success and failure groups with regard to all other examined parameters, including demographic or surgical factors. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18404297

  3. Electric Current Wound Healing David Cukjati

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    , diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and other vascular diseases, metabolic and ageing problems that affect of patients with peripheral vascular disease, ulcers in geriatric patients, and wounds after limb amputations

  4. Wound healing in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Ryan, T J

    1993-10-01

    Most would recognize that nonhealing is due to malnutrition, infection, or failure of blood supply, but in practice in a world in which there is now much understanding of how to manage nonhealing, the real issue is how to direct this knowledge so that it becomes available to all. There is a failure of delivery of care. When considering quality of life issues, people's preferences, priorities, and motivation have to be taken into account, but this can be applied also to the deliveries of care. Caretakers must want to relieve odor and pain and help the mobility of their patients, encouraging them to be well groomed, allowing them to maintain adequate hygiene by bathing and, above all, making them welcome so that they can be embraced, can marry, and can be employed. To achieve these goals, complete healing is necessary with normal color, contour, and function. Management of wounds in the third world requires missionary zeal for some basic objectives. Nothing can be taken for granted. There must be food and drink for the patient, protection from flies, antisepsis, good surgical technique, a temperate environment, and a knowledge of the requirements for achieving one's potential in each and every community. PMID:8222363

  5. Hyperspectral imaging in diabetic foot wound care.

    PubMed

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers could inform the diabetes caregiver about the severity of the wound and help assess the need for amputation. This article reviews how hyperspectral imaging between 450 and 700 nm can be used to assess the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development and to predict the likelihood of healing noninvasively. Two methods are described to analyze the in vivo hyperspectral measurements. The first method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law and produces a map of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the dermis of the foot. The second is based on a two-layer optical model of skin and can retrieve not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations but also epidermal thickness and melanin concentration along with skin scattering properties. It can detect changes in the diabetic foot and help predict and understand ulceration mechanisms. PMID:20920429

  6. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    PubMed

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered. PMID:24823337

  7. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers could inform the diabetes caregiver about the severity of the wound and help assess the need for amputation. This article reviews how hyperspectral imaging between 450 and 700 nm can be used to assess the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development and to predict the likelihood of healing noninvasively. Two methods are described to analyze the in vivo hyperspectral measurements. The first method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law and produces a map of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the dermis of the foot. The second is based on a two-layer optical model of skin and can retrieve not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations but also epidermal thickness and melanin concentration along with skin scattering properties. It can detect changes in the diabetic foot and help predict and understand ulceration mechanisms. PMID:20920429

  9. Emergency treatment on facial laceration of dog bite wounds with immediate primary closure: a prospective randomized trial study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the emergency treatment on facial laceration of dog bite wounds and identify whether immediate primary closure is feasible. Methods Six hundred cases with facial laceration attacked by dog were divided into two groups randomly and evenly. After thorough debridement, the facial lacerations of group A were left open, while the lacerations of group B were undertaken immediate primary closure. Antibiotics use was administrated only after wound infected, not prophylactically given. The infection rate, infection time and healing time were analyzed. Results The infection rate of group A and B was 8.3% and 6.3% respectively (P>0.05); the infection time was 26.3±11.6h and 24.9±13.8h respectively (P>0.05), the healing time was 9.12±1.30d and 6.57±0.49d respectively (P<0.05) in taintless cases, 14.24±2.63d and 10.65±1.69d respectively (P<0.05) in infected cases. Compared with group A, there was no evident tendency in increasing infection rate (8.3% in group A and 6.3% in group B respectively) and infection period (26.3±11.6h in group A and 24.9±13.8h in group B respectively) in group B. Meanwhile, in group B, the wound healing time was shorter than group A statistically in both taintless cases (9.12±1.30d in group A and 6.57±0.49d in group B respectively) and infected cases (14.24±2.63d in group A and 10.65±1.69d in group B respectively). Conclusion The facial laceration of dog bite wounds should be primary closed immediately after formal and thoroughly debridement. And the primary closure would shorten the healing time of the dog bite wounds without increasing the rate and period of infection. There is no potentiality of increasing infection incidence and infection speed, compared immediate primary closure with the wounds left open. On the contrary, primary closure the wounds can promote its primary healing. Prophylactic antibiotics administration was not recommended. and the important facial organ or tissue injuries should be secondary reconditioned. PMID:23902527

  10. Smoke Extract Impairs Adenosine Wound Healing. Implications of Smoke-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Zhang, Hui; Castellanos, Glenda; O’Malley, Jennifer K.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Horacio; Kharbanda, Kusum; Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine concentrations are elevated in the lungs of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where it balances between tissue repair and excessive airway remodeling. We previously demonstrated that the activation of the adenosine A2A receptor promotes epithelial wound closure. However, the mechanism by which adenosine-mediated wound healing occurs after cigarette smoke exposure has not been investigated. The present study investigates whether cigarette smoke exposure alters adenosine-mediated reparative properties via its ability to induce a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Using an in vitro wounding model, bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract, were wounded, and were then stimulated with either 10 ?M adenosine or the specific A2A receptor agonist, 5?-(N-cyclopropyl)–carboxamido–adenosine (CPCA; 10 ?M), and assessed for wound closure. In a subset of experiments, bronchial epithelial cells were infected with adenovirus vectors encoding human superoxide dismutase and/or catalase or control vector. In the presence of 5% smoke extract, significant delay was evident in both adenosine-mediated and CPCA-mediated wound closure. However, cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a nonspecific antioxidant, reversed smoke extract–mediated inhibition. We found that cells overexpressing mitochondrial catalase repealed the smoke extract inhibition of CPCA-stimulated wound closure, whereas superoxide dismutase overexpression exerted no effect. Kinase experiments revealed that smoke extract significantly reduced the A2A-mediated activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate–dependent protein kinase. However, pretreatment with NAC reversed this effect. In conclusion, our data suggest that cigarette smoke exposure impairs A2A-stimulated wound repair via a reactive oxygen species–dependent mechanism, thereby providing a better understanding of adenosine signaling that may direct the development of pharmacological tools for the treatment of chronic inflammatory lung disorders. PMID:23371060

  11. Is Post-Sternotomy Mediastinitis Still Devastating after the Advent of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, Marisa; Corte, Alessandro Della; Vicchio, Mariano; Pirozzi, Francesco; Nappi, Gianantonio; Cotrufo, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we reviewed a 15-year experience with the treatment of a severe sequela of cardiac surgery: post-sternotomy mediastinitis. We compared the outcomes of conventional treatment with those of negative-pressure wound therapy, focusing on mortality rate, sternal reinfection, and length of hospital stay. We reviewed data on 157 consecutive patients who were treated at our institution from 1995 through 2010 for post-sternotomy mediastinitis after cardiac surgery. Of these patients, 74 had undergone extensive wound débridement followed by negative-pressure wound therapy, and 83 had undergone conventional treatment, including primary wound reopening, débridement, closed-chest irrigation without rewiring, topical application of granulated sugar for recurrent cases, and final plastic reconstruction with pectoral muscle flap in most cases. The 2 study groups were homogeneous in terms of preoperative data and operative variables (the primary cardiac surgery was predominantly coronary artery bypass grafting). Negative-pressure wound therapy was associated with lower early mortality rates (1.4% vs 3.6%; P = 0.35) and significantly lower reinfection rates (1.4% vs 16.9%; P = 0.001). Significantly shorter hospital stays were also observed with negative pressure in comparison with conventional treatment (mean durations, 27.3 ± 9 vs 30.5 ± 3 d; P = 0.02), consequent to the accelerated process of wound healing with negative-pressure therapy. Lower mortality and reinfection rates and shorter hospital stays can result from using negative pressure rather than conventional treatment. Therefore, negative-pressure wound therapy is advisable as first-choice therapy for deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery. PMID:21841864

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam-adjunctive treatment in the management of traumatic wounds of the leg: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schlatterer, Daniel; Hirshorn, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, the application of and indications for negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) have grown tremendously. This is particularly true in orthopaedic trauma in the management of injuries to the leg, ankle, and foot. This article reviews the evidence-based medicine in terms of NPWT/ROCF, as a method of reducing bacterial counts in wounds, as a bridge until definitive bony coverage, for treating infections, and as an adjunct to wound bed preparation and for bolstering split-thickness skin grafts, dermal replacement grafts, and over muscle flaps. NPWT/ROCF has been shown to be an adjunct to the mainstays of wound management. No significant complications have been noted in the categories of NPWT/ROCF discussed in this review. In addition, evidence supports a decrease in complex soft tissue procedures in grade IIIB open fractures when NPWT/ROCF is employed. Although more research needs to be done, NPWT/ROCF appears to provide clinical benefit for the treatment of these complex lower extremity wounds. PMID:19034163

  13. High-Voltage Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation in Wound Treatment.

    PubMed

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub

    2014-02-01

    Significance: A range of studies point to the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) in wound treatment, but the methodology of its application has not been determined to date. This article provides a critical review of the results of clinical trials published by researchers using high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) to treat chronic wounds. In describing the methodology of the trials, the article gives special attention to electric stimulus parameters, the frequency of procedures and total treatment duration. Recent Advances: HVPC is a monophasic pulsed electric current that consists of double-peaked impulses (5-200??s), at very high peak-current amplitude (2-2.5?A), and high voltage (up to 500?V), at a frequency of 1-125?pulses per second. HVPC can activate "skin battery" and cellular galvanotaxis, and improves blood flow and capillary density. Critical Issues: HVPC efficacy was evaluated in conservatively treated patients with diabetic foot, venous leg and pressure ulcers (PUs), and in some patients with surgically treated venous insufficiency. Future Directions: The efficacy of HVPC as one of several biophysical energies promoting venous leg ulcer (VLU) and PU healing has been confirmed. Additional studies are needed to investigate its effect on the healing of other types of soft tissue defects. Other areas that require more research include the identification of the therapeutic effect of HVPC on infected wounds, the determination of the efficacy of cathodal versus anodal stimulation, and the minimal daily/weekly duration of HVPC required to ensure optimal promotion of wound healing. PMID:24761351

  14. Studies in fetal wound healing. IV. Hyaluronic acid-stimulating activity distinguishes fetal wound fluid from adult wound fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Longaker, M T; Chiu, E S; Harrison, M R; Crombleholme, T M; Langer, J C; Duncan, B W; Adzick, N S; Verrier, E D; Stern, R

    1989-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the fetus responds to injury in a fashion fundamentally different from that of the adult. Our initial experience with human open fetal surgery reinforces experimental observations that the fetal wounds heal without the scarring, inflammation, and contraction that often accompany adult wounds. In this study we examine fetal wound fluid in an attempt to elucidate the control mechanisms that endow the fetus with unique healing properties. The extracellular matrix of fetal wounds is rich in hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan found in high concentrations whenever there is tissue proliferation, regeneration, and repair. We establish that wound fluid from the fetus contains high levels of hyaluronic acid-stimulating activity that may underlie the elevated deposition of hyaluronic acid in the fetal wound matrix. In contrast there was no hyaluronic acid-stimulating activity present in adult wound fluid. Hyaluronic acid, in turn, fosters an extracellular environment permissive for cell motility and proliferation that may account for the unique properties observed in fetal wound healing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2818035

  15. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Electrical signals control wound healing through

    E-print Network

    Devreotes, Peter

    wound healing in vivo. Electric stimulation triggers acti- vation of Src and inositol confirmed consistent and sustained outward electric currents at wounds in human skin and in rodent cornea© 2006 Nature Publishing Group Electrical signals control wound healing through

  16. [On the use of photoplasmodynamic method in treatment of suppurative wounds].

    PubMed

    Pedder, V V; Kosenok, V K; Belik, D V; Rot, G Z; Surgutskova, I V; Shkuro, Iu V; Pedder, A V; Naboka, M V; Mironenko, V N; Shudina, A V

    2008-01-01

    A new photoplasmodynamic method and Elektroton-Pulsar hardware system for its implementation are described. The method provides treatment of suppurative wounds by exposure of the infection focus to a gas mixture containing highly active components: O*, O2*, 1O2, O(, O3 traces + UV, etc. The exposure is performed using high-voltage electric discharges interacting with the initial ozone-containing gas mixture. The photoplasmodynamic method and the Elektroton-Pulsar hardware system are used in clinical practice for treatment of suppurative wounds and cavities of various etiology. PMID:18683579

  17. Involvement of Notch Signaling in Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Srinivasulu Chigurupati; Thiruma V. Arumugam; Tae Gen Son; Justin D. Lathia; Shafaq Jameel; Mohamed R. Mughal; Sung-Chun Tang; Dong-Gyu Jo; Simonetta Camandola; Marialuisa Giunta; Irina Rakova; Nazli McDonnell; Lucio Miele; Mark P. Mattson; Suresh Poosala; Neil Hotchin

    2007-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critically involved in cell fate decisions during development of many tissues and organs. In the present study we employed in vivo and cell culture models to elucidate the role of Notch signaling in wound healing. The healing of full-thickness dermal wounds was significantly delayed in Notch antisense transgenic mice and in normal mice treated with

  18. Cosmeceuticals and natural products: wound healing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen C; Perez, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Despite several technologic and strategic advances in the field, wound care has returned to the roots of medicine and embraced some of the remedies used millennia ago. Some of the many potentially beneficial natural products include the beta-glucans, honey, aloe, cocoa, and oak bark extracts. There has recently been a surge of interest for their possible roles in wound healing. PMID:19695483

  19. Leptin Promotes Wound Healing in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Susumu; Ide, Shinji; Tokuyama, Reiko; Umeki, Hirochika; Tatehara, Seiko; Kataoka, Shiki; Satomura, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Leptin, a 16 kDa anti-obesity hormone, exhibits various physiological properties. Interestingly, skin wound healing was proven to delay in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of this phenomenon. In this study, we attempted to elucidate a role of leptin in wound healing of skin. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to confirm the expression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R) in human and mouse skin. Leptin was topically administered to chemical wounds created in mouse back skin along with sustained-release absorbable hydrogel. The process of wound repair was histologically observed and the area of ulceration was measured over time. The effect of leptin on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of human epidermal keratinocytes was investigated. Results Ob-R was expressed in epidermal cells of human and mouse skin. Topical administration of leptin significantly promoted wound healing. Histological analysis showed more blood vessels in the dermal connective tissues in the leptin-treated group. The proliferation, differentiation/function and migration of human epidermal keratinocytes were enhanced by exogenous leptin. Conclusion Topically administered leptin was proven to promote wound healing in the skin by accelerating proliferation, differentiation/function and migration of epidermal keratinocytes and enhancing angiogenesis around the wounded area. These results strongly suggest that topical administration of leptin may be useful as a treatment to promote wound healing in the skin. PMID:25799398

  20. Mechanisms of wound repair in crayfish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X Vafopoulou

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the complexity of events involved with repair to integumentary wounds and their regulation using the crayfish as a model system. Injuries to integument precipitate a cascade of cellular events that lead to rapid healing of the wound, regeneration of damaged tissues and repair of the integument. The first step in this cascade is hemolymph clotting and subsequent

  1. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical setting. These may be helpful in guiding a clinician's options in treating very difficult-to-heal ulcers. PMID:25853647

  2. Beneficial effect of Aloe on wound healing in an excisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Heggers, J P; Kucukcelebi, A; Listengarten, D; Stabenau, J; Ko, F; Broemeling, L D; Robson, M C; Winters, W D

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments suggests that topical antimicrobials may be toxic to fibroblasts and keratinocytes and retard wound healing. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Aloe, a potential wound-healing agent, on wound contraction in excisional wounds treated with topical antimicrobials. Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with four 1.5 cm2 dorsal defects through the skin and panniculus. The animals were divided into five groups (n = 10 per group): (1) Aloe, (2) NaOCl solution (0.025%), (3) mafenide acetate, (4) mafenide acetate + Aloe, and (5) control. Wounds were treated topically for 14 days 3 times a day. Serial standard photographs and serial wound planimetry were performed weekly. Following healing, the breaking strength of each resultant scar was determined using an Instron tensiometer. Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA, and multiple comparison methods were used for data analysis. Aloe and NaOCl solution significantly accelerated wound contraction (p < 0.05). In the mafenide acetate + Aloe group, contraction was similar to the control, whereas the mafenide acetate alone retarded wound healing. The addition of Aloe in combination and alone in wounds increased the breaking energy when compared to controls (p < 0.05). Aloe appears to expedite wound contraction and neutralize the wound retardant effect seen with the topical mafenide acetate alone. This effect appears to be due to an increased collagen activity, which is enhanced by a lectin, consequently improving the collagen matrix and enhancing the breaking strength. PMID:9395659

  3. An investigation of misoprostol in the promotion of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vandervoort, J M; Nieves, M A; Fales-Williams, A; Evans, R; Mason, D R

    2006-01-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 that is known to attenuate the inflammatory process and promote collagen formation by inhibiting IL-1 and TNF. The objective of this study was to determine if the application of misoprostol wound powder to open wounds in dogs would modulate inflammation and decrease wound healing time. This prospective randomized study included 20 dogs with 281 surgically created 8 mm open wounds over the dorsum. The wounds were assigned to one of three treatments: control (no treatment), treatment (misoprostol powder with 'avicel'), or vehicle ('avicel' alone). Open wounds were digitally photographed on days zero, one, three, seven, 10, and 15 to measure wound size. All wounds were harvested at day 15 and evaluated histologically for evidence of edema, inflammation, necrosis, and collagen characteristics. Amount of epithelialization of open wounds was not significantly different among the groups at days three, seven, 10, and 15. The vehicle treated wounds were found to have a significantly higher degree of necrosis in comparison to control and treatment wounds. The control wounds had significantly lower scores for deep inflammation. All of the other parameters evaluated including location of wound, oedema, and characteristics of collagen fibres in the wound showed no significance among groups. However, the total wound score for the misoprostol was statistically higher than that for the control wounds. Therefore the value of using misoprostol wound powder with 'avicel' as the vehicle to enhance wound healing cannot be substantiated by the results of this study. PMID:17143390

  4. Treatment of war wounds: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Manring, M M; Hawk, Alan; Calhoun, Jason H; Andersen, Romney C

    2009-08-01

    The treatment of war wounds is an ancient art, constantly refined to reflect improvements in weapons technology, transportation, antiseptic practices, and surgical techniques. Throughout most of the history of warfare, more soldiers died from disease than combat wounds, and misconceptions regarding the best timing and mode of treatment for injuries often resulted in more harm than good. Since the 19th century, mortality from war wounds steadily decreased as surgeons on all sides of conflicts developed systems for rapidly moving the wounded from the battlefield to frontline hospitals where surgical care is delivered. We review the most important trends in US and Western military trauma management over two centuries, including the shift from primary to delayed closure in wound management, refinement of amputation techniques, advances in evacuation philosophy and technology, the development of antiseptic practices, and the use of antibiotics. We also discuss how the lessons of history are reflected in contemporary US practices in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:19219516

  5. Staples for wound closure: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gatt, D; Quick, C R; Owen-Smith, M S

    1985-09-01

    Skin staples were compared with two conventional suture methods for speed, convenience, effectiveness and cost. One hundred and ninety-five patients having linear abdominal incisions were randomly allocated to one of three methods of interrupted skin closure--polypropylene sutures, polyglactin sutures or stainless steel staples and the wounds were assessed over 30 days. The mean rate of wound closure using sutures was 4.2 cm per minute while staples were faster at 22.5 cm per minute and saved an average of three minutes per wound. The time saved was considerably greater with long incisions. Staples cost 50p more per 15 cm wound than either suture. In other respects the three methods were comparable except that polyglactin caused the least wound pain. We believe the advantages of speed and convenience of skin staples outweigh the extra cost, provided the disposable instruments are reused until empty. PMID:3901864

  6. ANALYSES OF WOUND EXUDATES FOR CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Howard E.; Pritchard, William L.; Brinkley, Floyd B.; Mendelson, Janice A.

    1964-01-01

    Noyes, Howard E. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), William L. Pritchard, Floyd B. Brinkley, and Janice A. Mendelson. Analyses of wound exudates for clostridial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:623–629. 1964.—Earlier studies indicated that death of goats with traumatic wounds of the hindquarter could be related to the number of clostridia in the wounds, and that toxicity of wound exudates for mice and guinea pigs could be partially neutralized by commercial trivalent gas gangrene antitoxin. This report describes in vitro and in vivo analyses of wound exudates for known clostridial toxins. Wounds were produced by detonation of high-explosive pellets. Wound exudates were obtained by cold saline extraction of both necrotic tissues and gauze sponges used to cover the wounds. Exudates were sterilized by Seitz filtration in the cold. In vitro tests were used to measure alpha-, theta-, and mu-toxins of Clostridium perfringens and the epsilon-toxin of C. novyi. Mouse protection tests, employing commercial typing antisera, were used to analyze exudates for other clostridial toxins. Lethality of wound exudates for mice could be related to (i) the numbers of clostridia present in the wound, (ii) survival time of the goats, and (iii) positive lecithovitellin (LV) tests of the exudates. However, the LV tests could not be neutralized by antitoxin specific for C. perfringens alpha-toxin. Mice were not protected by typing antisera specific for types A, C, or D C. perfringens or C. septicum but were protected by antisera specific for type B C. perfringens and types A and B C. novyi. PMID:14127581

  7. Mechanical properties and in vivo healing evaluation of a novel Centella asiatica-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Dong Wuk; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Young Hun; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-07-25

    To develop a novel sodium alginate based Centella asiatica (CA)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD) providing excellent mechanical properties and improved wound healing, numerous CA-loaded HCDs were prepared with various ingredients using the hot melting method. The effect of sodium alginate, styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and petroleum hydrocarbon resin (PHR) on the mechanical properties of CA-loaded HCDs was investigated. The effect of disintegrants on swelling and drug release was assessed. Moreover, the in vivo wound healing potentials of the selected CA-loaded HCD in various wound models such as abrasion, excision and infection were evaluated in comparison with the commercial product. Polyisobutylene and SIS hardly affected the mechanical properties, but PHR improved the tensile strength and elongation at break. Disintegrants such as croscarmellose sodium, sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone improved the swelling ratio of the CA-loaded HCD. Furthermore, the CA-loaded HCD without croscarmellose sodium poorly released the drug, but that with 2% croscarmellose sodium showed about 27% drug release in 24h. In particular, the CA-loaded HCD composed of CA/polyisobutylene/SIS/PHR/liquid paraffin/sodium alginate/croscarmellose sodium at the weight ratio of 1/8/25/25/12/27/2 furnished excellent mechanical properties and drug release. As compared with the commercial product, it offered improved healing effects in excision, infection and abrasion type wounds in rats. Thus, this novel CA-loaded HCD could be a potential candidate for the treatment of various wounds. PMID:26024819

  8. Teleconsultation by using the mobile camera phone for remote management of the extremity wound: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hong; Pong, Ya-Ping; Liang, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Pao-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2004-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of remote management of extremity wound by using a mobile camera phone to transfer clinical images and online communication, teleconsultations were carried out on 60 patients between January and August 2003 for 82 extremity wounds presented to the emergency room between residents and consultant plastic surgeons. A questionnaire about wound descriptors (gangrene, necrosis, erythema, and cellulitis/infection), as well as clinical opinions regarding treatment with antibiotics or debridement, was filled out. In this study, 3 surgeons were able to make 80%, 76%, 66%, and 74% agreement, respectively, in the remote diagnosis regarding presence of gangrene, necrosis, erythema, and cellulitis/infection. Recognition of gangrene had the highest agreement percent (80%), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (93%). There were 68% to 90% of image sets that could be made with equivalent diagnoses of wound descriptors and 83% of wounds managed as per the remote treatment recommendation regarding whether to use antibiotics or to perform debridement. The preliminary results showed that the camera phone is valuable and bears potential for remote management of the extremity wound. PMID:15602257

  9. Immune cells in the healing skin wound: influential players at each stage of repair.

    PubMed

    Wilgus, Traci A

    2008-08-01

    Immune cells are involved in virtually every aspect of the wound repair process, from the initial stages where they participate in hemostasis and work to prevent infection to later stages where they drive scar formation. Traditional views maintain that a strong immune response is advantageous for wound healing, but newer data have questioned the validity of this idea. As a result, opinions about how cells of the immune system contribute to the repair process have changed considerably over the past few years. Here, current studies investigating how different immune cell lineages function in the various stages of repair will be reviewed and their impact on the wound healing field will be discussed. PMID:18723091

  10. Use of wireless microcurrent stimulation for the treatment of diabetes-related wounds: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Ramadhinara, Adisaputra; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Wireless microcurrent stimulation (WMCS) is a new method in wound healing that may have advantages compared with conventional electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Although ES has been widely known as an effective method to promote the wound-healing process in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to the authors' knowledge, there are still no data about the ability of WMCS to match the desired effect. In this article, the authors report the results of 2 cases of diabetes-related wounds (1 acute and 1 chronic) that have been treated successfully using WMCS. Neither patient reported discomfort during treatment, and the risk of infection was minimized because there was no direct contact from the device during the treatment course. PMID:23263389

  11. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  12. A bilayer composite composed of TiO2-incorporated electrospun chitosan membrane and human extracellular matrix sheet as a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Chang Hee; Choi, Young Chan; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2015-09-01

    We designed bilayer composites composed of an upper layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2)-incorporated chitosan membrane and a sub-layer of human adipose-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) sheet as a wound dressing for full-thickness wound healing. The dense and fibrous top layer, which aims to protect the wound from bacterial infection, was prepared by electrospinning of chitosan solution followed by immersion in TiO2 solution. The sponge-like sub-layer, which aims to promote new tissue regeneration, was prepared with acellular ECM derived from human adipose tissue. Using a modified drop plate method, there was a 33.9 and 69.6% reduction in viable Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus on the bilayer composite, respectively. In an in vivo experiment using rats, the bilayer composites exhibited good biocompatibility and provided proper physicochemical and compositional cues at the wound site. Changes in wound size and histological examination of full-thickness wounds showed that the bilayer composites induced faster regeneration of granulation tissue and epidermis with less scar formation, than control wounds. Overall results suggest that the TiO2-incorporated chitosan/ECM bilayer composite can be a suitable candidate as a wound dressing, with an excellent inhibition of bacterial penetration and wound healing acceleration effects. PMID:26096447

  13. Wounds That Will Not Heal

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jung S.; Gardner, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    There has been an explosion of articles on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and other modes of cellular reprogramming that influence the tumor microenvironment. Many controversies exist and remain to be resolved. The interest of the pathologists in the molecular and functional parallels between wound healing and the developing tumor stroma has its earliest origin in the writings of Rudolph Virchow in the 19th century. Since then, most of the focus has been primarily on the dynamics of the extracellular matrix; however, new interest has been redirected toward deciphering and understanding the enigmatic, yet elegant, plasticity of the cellular components of the proliferating epithelia and stroma and how they are reciprocally influenced. Citing several examples from breast cancer research, we will trace how these perspectives have unfolded in the pages of The American Journal of Pathology and other investigative journals during the past century, their impact, and where the field is headed. PMID:23438473

  14. Wound edge microvascular blood flow: effects of negative pressure wound therapy using gauze or polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Malmsjö, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard; Martin, Robin; Huddleston, Elizabeth

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on wound edge microvascular blood flow, comparing different wound fillers. Wounds were created on the backs of 7 pigs. NPWT was applied, using either foam or gauze, at -50,-75, -100, -125, -150, or -175 mm Hg. Microvascular blood flow was measured in muscle tissue, subcutaneous tissue, and in the wound bed, at 0.5, 1, and 2.5 cm from the wound edge, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Similar patterns of blood flow response were observed when using foam or gauze. At 2.5 cm from the wound edge there was an increase in microvascular blood flow, while blood flow was decreased closer (0.5 cm) to the wound edge. The blood flow effects were similar at the different levels of negative pressure in muscle tissue, subcutaneous tissue, and in the wound bed. Altered microvascular blood flow to the wound edge may be one of the mechanisms by which NPWT facilitates healing. PMID:19887926

  15. Wound healing ability of Xenopus laevis embryos. I. Rapid wound closure achieved by bisectional half embryos.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yasuko; Noda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Ihara, Setsunosuke

    2005-10-01

    We examined wound closure in 'half embryos' produced by the transverse bisection of Xenopus laevis embryos at the primary eye vesicle stage. Both the anterior- and posterior-half embryos survived for more than 6 days, and grew into 'half tadpoles'. Histology and videomicroscopy revealed that the open wound in the half embryo was rapidly closed by an epithelial sheet movement in the wound marginal zone. The time-course of wound closure showed a downward convex curve: the wound area decreased to one-fifth of the original area within 30 min, and the wound continued to contract slowly thereafter. The rapidity of closure of the epidermis as well as the absence of inflammatory cells are typical features of an embryonic type of wound healing. There was a dorso-ventral polarity in the motility of the epidermis: the wound was predominantly closed by the ventral and lateral epidermis. The change in the contour of the wound edge with time suggested a complex mechanism involved in the wound closure that could not be explained only by the purse-string theory. The present experimental system would be a unique and useful model for analyses of cellular movements in the embryonic epithelia. PMID:16287486

  16. Field application of the Numobag as a portable disposable isolation unit and for treating chemical, radiological or biologically induced wounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith A.; Felton, Robert; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Numotech Inc. has developed the Numobag{trademark}, a disposable, lightweight, wound healing device which produces Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT). The Numobag{trademark} is cost effective and has been clinically validated to heal large skin lesions rapidly and has proven to arrest wound advancement from several insidious forms of biological attack including dermal anthrax, small pox, necrotizing fasciitis etc. The Numobag{trademark} can treat mass casualties wounded by chemical/radiological burns or damaging biological exposures. The Numobag{trademark} can be a frontline tool as an isolation unit, reducing cross-contamination and infection of medical personnel. The heightened oxygen content kills organisms on the skin and in the wound, avoids expensive hospital trash disposal procedures, and helps the flesh heal. The Numobag{trademark} requires high purity oxygen. Numotech Inc. is teaming with Sandia National Laboratories and Spektr Conversion in Russia to develop a cost effective, portable, low power oxygen generator.

  17. Use of vacuum-assisted closure negative pressure wound therapy in combat-related injuries--literature review.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Daniel; Franke, Axel; Gatzka, Friedrich

    2010-03-01

    Despite surgical and technological advances, managing combat-related injuries remains challenging both within and outside of the war theater. Unique characteristics of a war theater such as environmental contamination, varying evacuation procedures, and differing levels of medical care, add to the complexity. The advent of body armor has increased blast survival rates and soldiers are surviving with increasingly mangled limbs that require lengthy, multifaceted care. An inherent high risk of infection contraindicates immediate closure for these wounds. There is growing reported use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open-cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy (KCI Licensing Inc., San Antonio, TX) as an adjunctive therapy in these open soft-tissue combat wounds. This review evaluates the efficacy of NPWT/ROCF for adjunctive treatment of wartime wounds. Following a literature review, data are summarized and presented. PMID:20358706

  18. Evaluation of Wound Healing Effect of Topical Phenytoin on Excisional Wound in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasamnis, AA; Mohanty, BK; Muralikrishna; Patil, S

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Wound healing is a significant healthcare problem in today’s medical practice. Despite extensive treatment modalities that are supposed to hasten the wound healing process, the outcomes of existing methods are far from optimal. One such agent that has been tried previously and found controversial in wound healing is phenytoin. In this study, the wound-healing efficacy of phenytoin was investigated in albino rats. Materials and Methods: 20 male Wistar albino rats were subjected to excisional wounds measuring 500 mm2 on the back and then randomized to two groups (n = 10): Control group (A) and treatment group (B). The control group received no drug treatment till the end of the study. 1% Phenytoin cream was applied to the wounds of rats in the group B and continued till the 16th day of the study. The areas of wounds were measured on the Days 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the experiment. The percentages of the healing wounds were calculated by Walker formula after measurement of the wound area. The total number of days required for complete epithelization of wounds was noted in each group. Results: Statistically significant reduction (P < 0.05) in average wound area was seen in Group B (P value=0.0017, 0.0001, 0.0001, 0.0001), respectively, on Days 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the experiment in comparison to Group A. The average number of days required for complete epithelization of wound area was less in Group B as compared to Group A (P=0.0120). The difference was statically significant Conclusion: In the present study, topical phenytoin accelerated healing of excisional wound in albino rats. PMID:21331193

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Dhruti; Amling, June; Brandoli, Cinzia; Tosi, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a comprehensive review of the literature on the use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) in pediatric patients. A review of the literature revealed 20 articles that discussed the use of NPWT/ROCF in exclusively pediatric patients. Nine articles were retrospective reviews, and 11 were case studies. This review discusses the insights from these articles. This review discusses the versatility of NPWT/ROCF for use with pediatric patients with infected wounds; full-thickness burns; open fractures; large soft tissue wounds; surgical wounds of the chest, abdomen, and spine; pilonidal disease; and pressure ulcers. NPWT/ROCF has been used in children as young as a few weeks of age, and in children with comorbidities such as congenital heart disease, immunosuppression, and spina bifida. Wound healing in children can be delayed by impaired perfusion, infection, edema, and poor nutrition. Clinical considerations for using NPWT/ROCF in children can include differences in healing due to higher granulation rates requiring more frequent dressing changes, poor nutritional status, small size, and low weight. With pediatric patients, there is no consensus on foam (white or black) selection, optimum amount of negative pressure, frequency of NPWT/ROCF dressing changes, and interposing contact layer selection. Randomized prospective studies are needed to make recommendations for safe and efficacious clinical practice. Research regarding the effects of dressing types, adjunctive treatment, and wound healing in neonates and children is needed. PMID:19034165

  20. Thrombomodulin Promotes Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Hsun; I, Ching-Chang; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Hsu, Yun-Yan; Lee, Fang-Tzu; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of thrombomodulin (TM) in corneal epithelial wound healing, and to investigate whether recombinant TM epidermal growth factor-like domain plus serine/threonine-rich domain (rTMD23) has therapeutic potential in corneal epithelial wound healing. Methods TM localization and expression in the murine cornea were examined by immunofluorescence staining. TM expression after injury was also studied. The effect of rTMD23 on corneal wound healing was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo assays. Results TM was expressed in the cornea in normal adult mice. TM expression increased in the early phase of wound healing and decreased after wound recovery. In the in vitro study, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) induced TM expression in murine corneal epithelial cells by mediating E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (Ets-1) via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The administration of rTMD23 increased the rate of corneal epithelial wound healing. Conclusions TM expression in corneal epithelium was modulated during the corneal wound healing process, and may be regulated by PDGF-BB. In addition, rTMD23 has therapeutic potential in corneal injury. PMID:25816372

  1. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  2. Marital behavior, oxytocin, vasopressin, and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Carter, C Sue; Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Hossein; Glaser, Ronald; Malarkey, William B; Loving, Timothy J; Stowell, Jeffrey; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2010-08-01

    Animal studies have implicated oxytocin and vasopressin in social bonding, physiological stress responses, and wound healing. In humans, endogenous oxytocin and vasopressin levels covary with perceptions of relationship quality, marital behaviors, and physiological stress responses. To investigate relationships among marital behavior, oxytocin, vasopressin, and wound healing, and to determine the characteristics of individuals with the highest neuropeptide levels, 37 couples were admitted for a 24-h visit in a hospital research unit. After small blister wounds were created on their forearm, couples participated in a structured social support interaction task. Blister sites were monitored daily following discharge to assess wound repair speed. Blood samples were collected for oxytocin, vasopressin, and cytokine analyses. Higher oxytocin levels were associated with more positive communication behaviors during the structured interaction task. Furthermore, individuals in the upper oxytocin quartile healed blister wounds faster than participants in lower oxytocin quartiles. Higher vasopressin levels were related to fewer negative communication behaviors and greater tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. Moreover, women in the upper vasopressin quartile healed the experimental wounds faster than the remainder of the sample. These data confirm and extend prior evidence implicating oxytocin and vasopressin in couples' positive and negative communication behaviors, and also provide further evidence of their role in an important health outcome, wound healing. PMID:20144509

  3. Nanospray technology for an in situ gelling nanoparticulate powder as a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, Felicetta; Porta, Amalia; Sansone, Francesca; Aquino, Rita P; Del Gaudio, Pasquale

    2014-10-01

    In the current study the feasibility of the novel nano spray drying technique for the production of stable nanoparticulate dry powder, able to gel when administered locally on a wound, is explored. Gentamicin sulphate (GS) was loaded into alginate/pectin nanoparticles as highly soluble (hygroscopic) model drug with wide range antibacterial agent for wound dressing. The influence of process variables, mainly spray mesh size and feed concentration, on particle size and morphology, powder wound fluid uptake ability and gelling rate, as well as hydrogel water vapour transmission at wound site were studied. Particles morphology was spherical with few exceptions as slightly corrugated particles when the larger nozzle was used. Production of spherical nanoparticles (d50 ? 350 nm) in good yield (82-92%) required 4 ?m spray mesh whereas 7 ?m mesh produced larger wrinkled particles. Nano spray-dried particles showed high encapsulation efficiency (? 80%), good flowability, high fluid uptake, fast gel formation (15 min) and proper adhesiveness to fill the wound site and to remove easily the formulation after use. Moreover, moisture transmission of the in situ formed hydrogel was between 95 and 90 g/m(2)/h, an optimum range to avoid wound dehydration or occlusion phenomena. Release of the encapsulated GS, monitored as permeation rate using Franz cells in simulated wound fluid (SWF) was related to particle size and gelling rate. Sustained permeation profiles were obtained achieving total permeation of the drug between 3 and 6 days. However, all nano spray-dried formulations presented a burst effect, suitable to prevent infection spreading at the beginning of the therapy. Antimicrobial tests against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed stronger and prolonged antimicrobial effect of the nanoparticles compared to pure GS both shortly after administration and over time (till 12 days). PMID:24979533

  4. [Issues of infection related to diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fleka?, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Foot wounds are common problem in people with diabetes and now constitute the most frequent diabetes-related cause of hospitalization. Diabetic foot infections cause substantial morbidity and at least one in five results in a lower extremity amputation. They are are now the predominant proximate trigger for lower extremity amputations worldwide. One in five diabetic wounds present clinical signs of infection at primomanifestation. About 80 % of limb non-threating wounds can be succesfully healed using appropriate and comprehensive approach, including antimicrobial therapy, revascularisation and off-loading. PMID:25894263

  5. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Salti, Haytham I

    2014-01-01

    We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction) and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation). Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients. PMID:24790402

  6. V.A.C. Therapy in the management of paediatric wounds: clinical review and experience.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona; Amjad, Ibrahim; Bookout, Kim; Fleck, Tatjana; Gabriel, Allen; Kaufman, David; McCord, Shannon Stone; Moores, Donald C; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Salazar, Jorge D; Song, David H; Teich, Steven; Gupta, Subhas

    2009-08-01

    Usage of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of acute and chronic wounds has grown exponentially in the past decade. Hundreds of studies have been published regarding outcomes and methods of therapy used for adult wounds. This treatment is increasingly being used to manage difficult-to-treat paediatric wounds arising from congenital defects, trauma, infection, tumour, burns, pressure ulceration and postsurgical complications in children, although relatively few studies have been aimed at this population. Given the anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children, a multidisciplinary expert advisory panel was convened to determine appropriate use of NPWT with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C. Therapy, KCI Licensing, Inc., San Antonio, TX) for the treatment of paediatric wounds. The primary objectives of the expert advisory panel were to exchange state-of-practice information on paediatric wound care, review the published data regarding the use of NPWT/ROCF in paediatric wounds, evaluate the strength of the existing data and establish guidelines on best practices with NPWT/ROCF for the paediatric population. The proposed paediatrics-specific clinical practice guidelines are meant to provide practitioners an evidence base from which decisions could be made regarding the safe and efficacious selection of pressure settings, foam type, dressing change frequency and use of interposing contact layer selections. The guidelines reflect the state of knowledge on effective and appropriate wound care at the time of publication. They are the result of consensus reached by expert advisory panel members based on their individual clinical and published experiences related to the use of NPWT/ROCF in treating paediatric wounds. Best practices are described herein for novice and advanced users of NPWT/ROCF. Recommendations by the expert panel may not be appropriate for use in all circumstances. Decisions to adopt any particular recommendation must be made by the collaborating medical team, including the surgeon and wound care specialist based on available resources, individual patient circumstances and experience with the V.A.C. Therapy System. PMID:19614789

  7. Laser thermal preconditioning enhances dermal wound repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Carter, Terry; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2008-02-01

    Preconditioning tissues with an initial mild thermal stress, thereby eliciting a stress response, can serve to protect tissue from subsequent stresses. Patients at risk for impaired healing, such as diabetics, can benefit from therapeutic methods which enhance wound repair. We present a laser thermal preconditioning protocol that accelerates cutaneous wound repair in a murine model. A pulsed diode laser (? = 1.86 ?m, ? p = 2 ms, 50 Hz, H = 7.64 mJ/cm2) was used to precondition mouse skin before incisional wounds were made. The preconditioning protocol was optimized in vitro and in vivo using hsp70 expression, cell viability, and temperature measurements as benchmarks. Hsp70 expression was non-invasively monitored using a transgenic mouse strain with the hsp70 promoter driving luciferase expression. Tissue temperature recordings were acquired in real time using an infrared camera. Wound repair was assessed by measuring hsp70 expression, biomechanical properties, and wound histology for up to 24 d. Bioluminescence (BLI) was monitored with the IVIS 200 System (Xenogen) and tensile properties with a tensiometer (BTC-2000). The in vivo BLI studies indicated that the optimized laser preconditioning protocol increased hsp70 expression by 15-fold. The tensiometer data revealed that laser preconditioned wounds are ~40% stronger than control wounds at 10 days post surgery. Similar experiments in a diabetic mouse model also enhanced wound repair strength. These results indicate that 1) noninvasive imaging methods can aid in the optimization of novel laser preconditioning methods; 2) that optimized preconditioning with a 1.86 ?m diode laser enhances early wound repair.

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients in inland northeastern Brazil: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections by Staphylococcus spp. are often associated with wounds, especially in hospitalized patients. Wounds may be the source of bacteria causing cross-contamination, and are a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp., especially S. aureus and MRSA, in hospitalized patients, and to identify the factors associated with such colonization. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled patients with wounds who were hospitalized in a remote and underdeveloped inland region of northeastern Brazil with extreme poverty. Samples were collected using sterile swabs with 0.85% saline solution, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., S. aureus, and MRSA were identified using standard laboratory procedures. Data regarding the sociodemographic characteristics, antibiotic use, and comorbidities of the patients were collected using the medical records and a questionnaire. Results A total of 125 wounds were analyzed. The patients had a mean age of 63.88 years and a mean 3.84 years of school education. Eighty-one wounds (64.80%) were colonized by Staphylococcus spp. Twenty-five wounds (20%) were colonized by S. aureus, 32% of which were colonized by MRSA. Wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. was associated with pneumonia or other respiratory disease (p = 0.03). Wound colonization by S. aureus was associated with nasal colonization by S. aureus (p < 0.001), fewer days of prior antibiotic use (p = 0.04), admission to a medical ward (p = 0.02), and age >65 years (p = 0.05). Among patients with wound colonization by MRSA, 37.50% had a history of prior antibiotic use, 75% had two or more comorbidities, 25% had cancer or diabetes, 50% had cardiovascular disease, and 50% died. Conclusions Wounds can be the source of Staphylococcus spp. infection, and high proportions of wounds are colonized by S. aureus and MRSA. Nasal colonization by S. aureus may be a source for wound colonization by S. aureus, illustrating the importance of preventing cross-contamination in hospital environments, especially among elderly patients. Wounds should be carefully managed to prevent microbial spread, thereby assisting patient recovery and reducing healthcare costs. PMID:24925025

  9. A therapeutic approach for diabetic wound healing using biotinylated GHK incorporated collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Arul, Vadivel; Kartha, Reena; Jayakumar, Rajadas

    2007-01-01

    Chronically elevated blood glucose levels result in reduced leukocyte function and cell malnutrition, which contribute to a high rate of wound infection and associated healing problems in diabetic patients. In the present study, the role of biotinylated GHK peptide (BioGHK) incorporated collagen biomaterial was tested for wound healing in diabetic rats. The rate of wound contraction and the levels of collagen, uronic acid, protein and DNA in the granulation tissue were determined. Further, the concentration of nitric oxide and other skin antioxidants was also monitored during the study. In diabetic rats treated with BioGHK incorporated collagen (Peptide Incorporated Collagen--PIC), the healing process was hastened with an increased rate of wound contraction. Glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid levels in the skin of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were higher in the PIC group as compared to control (Untreated) and collagen (Collagen Film--CF) treated groups. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity was altered in all the groups. In vitro fibroblast cell culture studies suggest that PIC promotes fibroblast growth. Histological evaluation by haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome method revealed epithelialization, increased synthesis of collagen and activation of fibroblasts and mast cells in the PIC group. This study provides a rationale for the topical application of BioGHK incorporated collagen as a feasible and productive approach to support diabetic wound healing. PMID:17049946

  10. [Wound-healing effect of carbopol hydrogels in rats with alloxan diabetes model].

    PubMed

    Zinov'ev, E V; Ivakhniuk, G K; Dadaian, K A; Lagvilava, T O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 0.5% hydrogels of acrylic polymers (carbopol), antibiotic ointment based on polyethylene oxides (levomekol), silver-containing creams (dermazin and argosulfan), silver sulfadiazine ointment with epidermal growth factor (ebermin), and wound-covering fabric of antibacterial cellulose with poviargol and zero-valent silver (aquacell-Ag) on skin repair processes have been evaluated in comparative experiments on rats. The wound-healing effects were characterized by the time of cleansing and epithelization, rate of suppuration, index of healing, and skin impedance under conditions of necrotic skin lesions on the background of diabetes. It is established that local application of carbopol hydrogels modified by electric (frequency-modulated) signal with antiseptics (poviargol) and nanostructural components (natural fullerene complex) shortens the period of wound cleansing from detritus on the background of decompensated diabetes by 3.6 days (p > 0.05), accelerates healing by 8.4 days (p < 0.05), reduces the frequency of suppuration by 23.3% (p < 0.05), exhibits strong bactericidal effect against wound infections by pathogens, and restores tissue impedance. Thus, hydrogels based on low-crosslinked acrylic polymers are a promising basis of wound-healing formulations for the treatment of necrotic lesions on the background of diabetic foot syndrome. PMID:24649598

  11. Antimicrobial electrospun nanofibers of cellulose acetate and polyester urethane composite for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Lin, Tong; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Zhiguang; Huang, Chen; Yao, Gang; Jiang, Linlin; Tang, Yanwei; Wang, Xungai

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a series of nanofibrous membranes were prepared from cellulose acetate (CA) and polyester urethane (PEU) using coelectrospinning or blend-electrospinning. The drug release, in vitro antimicrobial activity and in vivo wound healing performance of the nanofiber membranes were evaluated for use as wound dressings. To prevent common clinical infections, an antimicrobial agent, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) was incorporated into the electrospun fibers. The presence of CA in the nanofiber membrane improved its hydrophilicity and permeability to air and moisture. CA fibers became slightly swollen upon contacting with liquid phase. CA not only increased the liquid uptake but also created a moist environment for the wound, which accelerated wound recovery. PHMB release dynamics of the membranes was controlled by the structure and component ratios of the membranes. The lower ratio of CA: PEU helped to preserve the physical and thermal properties of the membranes, and also reduced the burst release effectively and slowed down diffusion of PHMB during in vitro tests. The controlled-diffusion membranes exerted long-term antimicrobial effect for wound healing. PMID:22692845

  12. Interaction between a regenerative matrix and wound bed in nonhealing ulcers: results with 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Motolese, Alberico; Vignati, Francesca; Brambilla, Roberto; Cerati, Michele; Passi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A chronic wound is a wound that is delayed in one of the wound-healing stages and cannot progress any further. A chronic wound leaves the patient at risk of infection and hospitalization. In these case series, 16 patients affected by venous ulcers underwent Hyalomatrix PA grafting for reconstructive surgery. Hyalomatrix PA is a bilayered, sterile, flexible, and conformable three-dimensional matrix made of fibers of HYAFF, a benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid, and a semipermeable silicone membrane. Hyalomatrix PA acts as a substitutive and regenerative permanent matrix able to replace the dermis providing a three-dimensional matrix for cellular invasion and capillary growth. The silicon layer controls water vapor loss avoiding an excessive loss of fluids and acts as a semipermeable barrier to the external agents. In the presented cases, the average area grafted per procedure was 153 cm(2). The length of followup ranged from 0.5 to 1 year. The final results were considered to be good in 12 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in one case. This study suggests that the combination of wound bed preparation with application of the hyaluronic regenerative matrix can be a valid approach for treatment of partial thickness ulcers. PMID:23971047

  13. Interaction between a Regenerative Matrix and Wound Bed in Nonhealing Ulcers: Results with 16 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Motolese, Alberico; Brambilla, Roberto; Cerati, Michele; Passi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A chronic wound is a wound that is delayed in one of the wound-healing stages and cannot progress any further. A chronic wound leaves the patient at risk of infection and hospitalization. In these case series, 16 patients affected by venous ulcers underwent Hyalomatrix PA grafting for reconstructive surgery. Hyalomatrix PA is a bilayered, sterile, flexible, and conformable three-dimensional matrix made of fibers of HYAFF, a benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid, and a semipermeable silicone membrane. Hyalomatrix PA acts as a substitutive and regenerative permanent matrix able to replace the dermis providing a three-dimensional matrix for cellular invasion and capillary growth. The silicon layer controls water vapor loss avoiding an excessive loss of fluids and acts as a semipermeable barrier to the external agents. In the presented cases, the average area grafted per procedure was 153?cm2. The length of followup ranged from 0.5 to 1 year. The final results were considered to be good in 12 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in one case. This study suggests that the combination of wound bed preparation with application of the hyaluronic regenerative matrix can be a valid approach for treatment of partial thickness ulcers. PMID:23971047

  14. The Electrical Response to Injury: Molecular Mechanisms and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2014-02-01

    Significance: Natural, endogenous electric fields (EFs) and currents arise spontaneously after wounding of many tissues, especially epithelia, and are necessary for normal healing. This wound electrical activity is a long-lasting and regulated response. Enhancing or inhibiting this electrical activity increases or decreases wound healing, respectively. Cells that are responsible for wound closure such as corneal epithelial cells or skin keratinocytes migrate directionally in EFs of physiological magnitude. However, the mechanisms of how the wound electrical response is initiated and regulated remain unclear. Recent Advances: Wound EFs and currents appear to arise by ion channel up-regulation and redistribution, which are perhaps triggered by an intracellular calcium wave or cell depolarization. We discuss the possibility of stimulation of wound healing via pharmacological enhancement of the wound electric signal by stimulation of ion pumping. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are a major problem in the elderly and diabetic patient. Any strategy to stimulate wound healing in these patients is desirable. Applying electrical stimulation directly is problematic, but pharmacological enhancement of the wound signal may be a promising strategy. Future Directions: Understanding the molecular regulation of wound electric signals may reveal some fundamental mechanisms in wound healing. Manipulating fluxes of ions and electric currents at wounds might offer new approaches to achieve better wound healing and to heal chronic wounds. PMID:24761358

  15. Electroacupuncture: applications in the treatment of chronic nonhealing wounds.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward W

    2013-11-01

    Maximizing the effectiveness of any wound treatment requires that normal wound-healing dynamics are appreciated. In considering adjuvant wound therapies, the clinical evidence supporting a therapy must be fully understood. The biological changes associated with electroacupuncture can have a positive effect on wound healing, although limited clinical data are available. PMID:24149663

  16. Wound Healing & Management Node Taxonomy 30th September 2011

    E-print Network

    Wound Healing & Management Node Taxonomy ­ 30th September 2011 JBI/AWMA Wound Healing and Management Node Taxonomy Topics for Evidence Summaries and Recommended Practice Category Topic 1. Wound & Management Node Taxonomy ­ 30th September 2011 10. Antiseptic Dressings Cadexomer iodine (IodosorbTM) Wound

  17. [Abdominal gunshot wounds. Ballistic data and practical management].

    PubMed

    Vicq, P; Jourdan, P; Chapuis, O; Baranger, B

    1996-01-01

    The mortality from abdominal gunshot wounds remains high, either in civilian or military cases. The severity factors of these wounds include bullet calibre and energy transfer of the missile. This paper studies some of the ballistics features of abdominal gunshot wounds. Practical guidelines are inferred concerning diagnosis and treatment of these wounds. PMID:9033829

  18. Chitosan/polyurethane blended fiber sheets containing silver sulfadiazine for use as an antimicrobial wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Park, Ha Na; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Bae, Min Soo; Lee, Jung Bok; Park, Se Woong; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Chang Hoon; Jung, Bock-Young; Kwon, Il Keun

    2014-10-01

    Electrospun chitosan (CTS) nanofibers have been well known for use as a wound dressing in the biomedical field. Nevertheless, fatal bacterial infections are still a serious problem when CTS nanofibers are used for wound treatment. In this study, we designed a novel wound dressing based on blending the chitosan with polyurethane (CTS/PU) containing silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) in order to enhance both antibacterial activity and mechanical strength. This fiber sheet was produced using the electrospinning (ELSP) technique. The CTS/PU containing AgSD fiber sheet was characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The physicochemical properties of the CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets were also characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrospun fibers were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For an in vitro evaluation, the CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets were tested for their antibacterial activity against gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets have strong antimicrobial activity as displayed by inhibition of bacterial growth and prevention of infection during the healing process. These results indicate that this material would be good for use as a wound dressing material. PMID:25942814

  19. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat a chronic skin wound in a dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Raduan; Plapler, Hélio; Bitar, Renata A.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising therapeutic modality for treatment of a wide variety of malignant and nononcologic tumors, as well as in the treatment of infected skin ulcers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the PDT to treat a chronic skin wound that had been already subjected to several clinical and surgical type treatments in a dog. The animal with an infected chronic skin wound with 8 cm diameter in the left leg received an injection of an aqueous solution of 1% methylene blue (MB) with 2% lidocaine into the lesion. After MB injection the wound was irradiated using a LED (LED-VET MMOptics(r)) with a wavelength between 600 and 700 nm, 2 cm diameter circular light beam, of 150 mW of power, light dose of 50 J/cm2. After 3 and 6 weeks PDT was repeated and the wound was re-evaluated. Complete healing was achieved 10 weeks after the first procedure.

  20. Evaluation of wound healing potential of Calotropis gigantea latex studied on excision wounds in experimental rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Saratha; S. Subramanian; S. Sivakumar

    2010-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the wound healing potential of Calotropis gigantea latex on excision wound induced in rats. Topical application of Calotropis gigantea latex extract ointment (10% w\\/w in petroleum gel) for 14 days significantly improved wound contraction when compared with\\u000a control group of rats. The levels of hydroxyproline (collagen), hexosamine, uronic acid, DNA, RNA, and protein in

  1. Novel Use of Insulin in Continuous-Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy as “Wound Chemotherapy”

    PubMed Central

    Scimeca, Christy L.; Bharara, Manish; Fisher, Timothy K.; Kimbriel, Heather; Mills, Joseph L.; Armstrong, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is frequently employed in the treatment of complex wounds. A variety of wound chemotherapeutic agents such as insulin, which acts as a growth factor, may prove helpful in treatment as well. We present a case report in which insulin was used as a chemotherapeutic agent in continuous-instillation NPWT. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing this method of delivery. PMID:20663443

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy: Evidence-based treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer J. Suess; Paul J. Kim; John S. Steinberg

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure therapy is a novel technology used for the promotion of wound healing and has emerged as the standard care\\u000a in the management of problem wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy has been met with rapid clinical success and widespread\\u000a acceptance. The literature is replete with case series, small trials, and noncomparative studies; however, there are few prospective,\\u000a randomized, human

  3. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD. PMID:17106898

  4. Computerized plutonium wound-analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Brake, R.J.; Vasilik, D.G.; Erkkila, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    A new plutonium wound monitor has been developed at Los Alamos to upgrade a system which has been in use for about five years. The instrument, called a Computerized Wound Screening System, is designed around a readily available personal computer. It includes a full-function 256-channel pulse height analyzer and software necessary to calculate plutonium and americium activity from a spectrum. This new system provides medical and health physics personnel with considerable flexability in recognizing and recording situations where a wound incurred in a plutonium processing facility might be contaminated. This flexibility includes fast, accurate determination of contaminants in a wound, hard copy printout of results, and full patient logging capabilities via flexible disk storage. Use of a low cost computer greatly simplifies hardware and software design, and makes duplication of the instrument very simple and inexpensive.

  5. Scarless wound healing: chasing the holy grail.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Graham G; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Duscher, Dominik; Hu, Michael S; Zielins, Elizabeth R; Wearda, Taylor; Muhonen, Ethan; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Atashroo, David A; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Lorenz, H Peter; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Over 100 million patients acquire scars in the industrialized world each year, primarily as a result of elective operations. Although undefined, the global incidence of scarring is even larger, extending to significant numbers of burn and other trauma-related wounds. Scars have the potential to exert a profound psychological and physical impact on the individual. Beyond aesthetic considerations and potential disfigurement, scarring can result in restriction of movement and reduced quality of life. The formation of a scar following skin injury is a consequence of wound healing occurring through reparative rather than regenerative mechanisms. In this article, the authors review the basic stages of wound healing; differences between adult and fetal wound healing; various mechanical, genetic, and pharmacologic strategies to reduce scarring; and the biology of skin stem/progenitor cells that may hold the key to scarless regeneration. PMID:25719706

  6. Biophysical Technologies for Management of Wound Bioburden

    PubMed Central

    Korzendorfer, Holly; Hettrick, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds commonly have high levels of bioburden and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. This review article focuses on findings from current literature related to four biophysical technologies (ultrasound, electrical stimulation, phototherapy, and negative pressure wound therapy) believed to be beneficial for managing wound bioburden and support healing. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: Recent advances for each modality are provided as a basic synopsis of the technology followed by brief overviews of the most recent literature addressing its effectiveness for managing wound bioburden, and critical issues for each modality are provided as conclusions. Future Directions: This review highlights the need for further clinically relevant studies examining bacterial levels in addition to healing progression for each technology. PMID:25493207

  7. The palliative management of fungating malignant wounds.

    PubMed

    Grocott, P

    2000-01-01

    This study focused on the palliative management of fungating malignant wounds and individual experiences of living with such a wound. Dressings were evaluated for the ability to contain these wounds and reduce their impact on daily life. The project extended to collaboration with industry for the development and evaluation of dressings designed to meet patient needs. A longitudinal multiple case study design was adopted. The methodology evolved through three principal phases: quasi-experimental design; emergent collaborative design; and emergent theory-driven evaluation. The radical departure from the initial approach was in response to the methodological problems encountered in a study of individuals with uncontrolled disease. A non-probability sampling plan was adopted, mainly because of the lack of homogeneity in the patient population; 45 participants were included. The length of time patients remained in the study depended on how long they lived. This ranged from a few days to more than two years. A sampling plan was, however, adopted for the data collection. The study had a dual focus: methodology, and the generation of explanations for dressing performance and the management of fungating wounds. The methodological aspect included development of the Teler system as a method of measuring dressing performance against goals of optimal practice in fungating wound management. The second component was a system of reasoning developed as an analytical strategy for abstracting general issues from individual case study data in order to construct explanations. Theory was used to generalize beyond the individual cases. Two forms of explanation for fungating wound management were constructed. These included explanations of individual experiences of living with such a wound and knowledge of the elements of fungating wound management. The impact on the individual was explained in terms of the stigma attached to public disability and a revulsion in society for uncontrolled body fluids. A pivotal relationship emerged between exudate and other wound management problems, including psychosocial aspects. A final critical explanation was developed for the qualification of the theory of moist wound healing to explain the phenomenon of exudate management in fungating and, possibly, other exuding chronic wounds. PMID:10827661

  8. Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

  9. Treatment of War Wounds: A Historical Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Manring; Alan Hawk; Jason H. Calhoun; Romney C. Andersen

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of war wounds is an ancient art, constantly refined to reflect improvements in weapons technology, transportation,\\u000a antiseptic practices, and surgical techniques. Throughout most of the history of warfare, more soldiers died from disease\\u000a than combat wounds, and misconceptions regarding the best timing and mode of treatment for injuries often resulted in more\\u000a harm than good. Since the 19th

  10. Amorphous metal alloys wound cores test procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Boglietti; P. Ferraris; M. Lazzari; F. Profumo

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of several samples of amorphous tape-wound magnetic cores excited under sine-wave voltage conditions at 50 Hz is investigated. Measurements of the induced-voltage and the excitation-current waveforms are used to obtain the dynamic (AC) core characteristic loop consisting of the flux density versus ampere-turns and to obtain the core losses. The possibility of using wound core transformers with either

  11. Postoperative wound dehiscence: Predictors and associations.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Fernandez, Stephen J; Evans, Karen Kim; McNish, Sean; Banerjee, Anirban N; Couch, Kara S; Mete, Mihriye; Shara, Nawar

    2015-03-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicators (PSI) were developed as a metric of hospital complication rates. PSI-14 measures postoperative wound dehiscence and specifically how often a surgical wound in the abdominal or pelvic area fails to heal after abdominopelvic surgery. Wound dehiscence is estimated to occur in 0.5-3.4% of abdominopelvic surgeries, and carries a mortality of up to 40%. Postoperative wound dehiscence has been adopted as a surrogate safety outcome measure as it impacts morbidity, length of stay, healthcare costs and readmission rates. Postoperative wound dehiscence cases from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample demonstrate 9.6% excess mortality, 9.4 days of excess hospitalization and $40,323 in excess hospital charges relative to matched controls. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the associations between PSI-14 and measurable medical and surgical comorbidities using the Explorys technology platform to query electronic health record data from a large hospital system serving a diverse patient population in the Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD metropolitan areas. The study population included 25,636 eligible patients who had undergone abdominopelvic surgery between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Of these cases, 786 (2.97%) had postoperative wound dehiscence. Patient-associated comorbidities were strongly associated with PSI-14, suggesting that this indicator may not solely be an indicator of hospital safety. There was a strong association between PSI-14 and opioid use after surgery and this finding merits further investigation. PMID:25683272

  12. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  13. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  14. Situating wound management: technoscience, dressings and 'other' skins.

    PubMed

    Rudge, T

    1999-09-01

    This paper addresses the notion of wound care as a technology of skin and other skins imbued with the combined power of technology and science. It presents the discourses of wound care evident in the accounts of patients and nurses concerning this care, and discussions about wounds in wound care interest groups, journals, and advertising material about wound care products. The discussion focuses on wounds and wound dressings as effects immanent in the power relations of discourses of wound care. These effects colour and influence nurses' responses to wounds and wound care products. Moreover, the discourses that portray these practices are evidence of the complex articulation between technoscience and gender. Nurses and patients are fascinated by wound technoscience and lured towards it by its potential for mastery and control over wounds. Such seductions are evident in the texts of nurses, patients, and pharmaceutical advertisements for wound care products. Finally, the ways that these representations are used to talk about and market wound care products are shown as exemplifying the finer points of wound management as a nursing technoscience. PMID:10795270

  15. Wound Healing Activities of Rafflesia Hasseltii Extract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Ahmed, Khaled A.; Ali, Hapipah M.; Noor, Suzita M.; Ismail, Salmah

    2009-01-01

    The effects of topical application of Rafflesia hasseltii buds and flowers extract on the rate of wound healing and histology of healed wound were assessed. Four groups of adult male Sprague Dawley rats were experimentally wounded in the posterior neck area. A thin layer of blank placebo was applied topically to wounds of Group 1 rats. Wounds of experimental animals (Group 2 and 3) were treated with placebo containing 5% and 10% R. hasseltii buds extract, respectively. A thin layer of Intrasite gel was applied topically to wounds of Group 4 animals as reference. Macroscopically, wounds treated with placebo containing 5% and 10% R. hasseltii buds extract or Intrasite gel have been significantly accelerated the rate of wound healing compared to placebo-treated wounds. Histological analysis of healed wounds has confirmed this effect. Wounds treated with placebo containing 5%, 10% R. hasseltii buds extract or Intrasite gel showed markedly less scar width at wound enclosure and granulating tissue contained markedly more collagen and proliferating fibroblasts, but with the absence of inflammatory cells compared to wounds treated with blank placebo. In conclusion, the findings of increased rate of wound closure and contraction together with the histological findingssuggest that Rafflesia hasseltii buds extract is very effective in accelerating the wound healing process. PMID:19902020

  16. Monitoring the healing of combat wounds using Raman spectroscopic mapping.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nicole J; Brown, Trevor S; Evans, Korboi N; Hawksworth, Jason S; Hussey, Sean; Tadaki, Doug K; Elster, Eric A

    2010-01-01

    Soldiers wounded in modern warfare present with extensive and complicated acute wounds, confounded by an overwhelming inflammatory response. The pathophysiology of acute wounds is unknown and timing of wound closure remains subjective. Collagen gene expression profiles are presented for 24 patients. Impaired healing wounds showed a twofold decrease in the up-regulation of COL1A1 and COL3A1 genes in the beginning of the wound healing process, compared with normal healing wounds. By the final debridement, however, collagen gene expression profiles for normal and impaired healing wounds were similar for COL1A1 and COL3A1. In addition, Raman spectroscopic maps were collected of biopsy tissue sections, from the first and last debridements of 10 wounds collected from nine patients. Tissue components obtained for the debridement biopsies were compared to elucidate whether or not a wound healed normally. Raman spectroscopy showed a loss of collagen in five patients, indicated by a negative percent difference in the 1,665/1,445 cm(-1) band area ratios. Four healed patients showed an increased or unchanged collagen content. Here, we demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopic analysis of wound biopsies for classification of wounds as normal or impaired healing. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to noninvasively monitor collagen deposition in the wound bed, during surgical wound debridements, to help determine the optimal time for wound closure. PMID:20546554

  17. Concept of Gunshot Wound Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2013-01-01

    Gunshot wound (GSW) to the spine which was earlier common in the military population is now being increasingly noted in civilians due to easy availability of firearms of low velocity either licensed or illegal combined with an increased rate of violence in the society. Contributing to 13% to 17% of all spinal injuries, the management of complex injury to the spine produced by a GSW remains controversial. Surgery for spinal cord injuries resulting from low velocity GSWs is reserved for patients with progressive neurologic deterioration, persistent cerebrospinal fluid fistulae, and sometimes for incomplete spinal cord injuries. Surgery may also be indicated to relieve active neural compression from a bullet, bone, intervertebral disk, or a hematoma within the spinal canal. Spinal instability rarely results from a civilian GSW. Cauda equina injuries from low velocity GSWs have a better overall outcome after surgery. In general, the decision to perform surgery should be made on consideration of multiple patient factors that can vary over a period of time. Although there have been plenty of individual case reports regarding GSW to the spine, a thorough review of unique mechanical and biological factors that affect the final outcome has been lacking. We review the key concepts of pathogenesis and management of GSW to the spine and propose an algorithm to guide decision making in such cases. PMID:24353856

  18. Multidrug-resistant Organisms in Military Wounds from Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Clinton K.; Manring, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Mortality from battlefield wounds has historically declined, thanks to better surgical management, faster transport of casualties, and improved antibiotics. Today, one of the major challenges facing U.S. military caregivers is the presence of multidrug-resistant organisms in orthopaedic extremity wounds. The most frequently identified resistant strains of bacteria are Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics may be an important factor in building resistant strains. Acinetobacter infections appear to hospital-acquired and not from an initial colonization of the injury. More research is required to give military physicians the tools they require to reduce the infection rate and defeat multidrug-resistant organisms. PMID:18347888

  19. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) after poststernotomy mediastinitis – a single center experience with 54 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ina C Ennker; Anita Malkoc; Detlef Pietrowski; Peter M Vogt; Juergen Ennker; Alexander Albert

    2009-01-01

    Deep sternal infections, also known as poststernotomy mediastinitis, are a rare but often fatal complication in cardiac surgery. They are a cause of increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic aspect concerning the health system. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) followed by muscular pectoralis plasty is a quite new technique for the treatment of mediastinitis after sternotomy. Although

  20. Assessment and documentation of non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient health care facilities in the Czech Republic: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Andrea; Leaper, David

    2015-04-01

    The foundation of health care management of patients with non-healing, chronic wounds needs accurate evaluation followed by the selection of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. Assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in clinical practice in the Czech Republic is not standardised. The aim of this study was to analyse the methods being used to assess non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient facilities in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out at 77 inpatient medical facilities (8 university/faculty hospitals, 63 hospitals and 6 long- term hospitals) across all regions of the Czech Republic. A mixed model was used for the research (participatory observation including creation of field notes and content analysis of documents for documentation and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data). The results of this research have corroborated the suspicion of inconsistencies in procedures used by general nurses for assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds. However, the situation was found to be more positive with regard to evaluation of basic/fundamental parameters of a wound (e.g. size, depth and location of a wound) compared with the evaluation of more specific parameters (e.g. exudate or signs of infection). This included not only the number of observed variables, but also the action taken. Both were significantly improved when a consultant for wound healing was present (P?=?0·047). The same applied to facilities possessing a certificate of quality issued by the Czech Wound Management Association (P?=?0·010). In conclusion, an effective strategy for wound management depends on the method and scope of the assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in place in clinical practice in observed facilities; improvement may be expected following the general introduction of a 'non-healing, chronic wound assessment' algorithm. PMID:25224308

  1. Comparison of vacuum-assisted closure device and conservative treatment for fasciotomy wound healing in ischaemia-reperfusion syndrome: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Saziye, Karaca; Mustafa, Cikirikcioglu; Ilker, Uckay; Afksendyios, Kalangos

    2011-06-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion syndrome (IRS) is a condition that may require early fasciotomy. In the past, fasciotomies ultimately required prolonged hospitalisation. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy system is an innovative method which promotes wound healing by reducing wound oedema, increasing microcirculation, and stimulation of granulation tissue. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the VAC treatment with the conservative treatment of the fasciotomy wound until definitive surgical closure. The researchers retrospectively identified 15 patients, 3 females and 12 males, with a mean age of 69 years, who underwent a fasciotomy between January 2003 and December 2009 at the University Hospital of Geneva. All of the fasciotomies performed on the patients were on account of IRS. Seven patients were subjected to wound treatment using the VAC-system device and eight patients underwent treatment through the usual conservative method. The data were analysed by comparing the operative wound size, length of time for wound closure and duration of hospital stay in both groups. The number of days after fasciotomy until surgical wound closure in the VAC-system group (n = 7) ranged from 8 to 13 days with a mean of 11 days. The wound size at the day of closure was decreased in length by a mean of 58% (range 29-67%) and in diameter by a mean of 56% (range 33-75%). The duration of hospital stay for this group ranged from 12 to 18 days with a mean of 14 days. No signs of infections were observed and no re-operation was required after first closure. In the conservative group (n = 8), the time to wound closure ranged between 12 and 20 days with a mean of 15 days. The wound size was decreased in length by a mean of 40% (range 32-53%) and in diameter by a mean 46% (range 30-70%). The mean duration of hospital stay was 18·5 days. Three of the patients in the conservative treatment group manifested wound infection during the course of the treatment. VAC device could be a new standard for treatment of fasciotomy wound. VAC therapy is a recent innovation and becoming more and more a necessary complementary therapy to hasten wound healing. In our preliminary study, the VAC-system device showed significantly reduction of the wound size, decreased tissue oedema, duration of hospital days and improvement of granulation tissue. PMID:21401883

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy for left ventricular assist device-related mediastinitis: two case reports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitsuhiro KawataTakashi; Takashi Nishimura; Yasuhiro Hoshino; Osamu Kinoshita; Motoyuki Hisagi; Masahiko Ando; Tetsuro Morota; Noboru Motomura; Shunei Kyo; Minoru Ono

    2011-01-01

    We report two cases of successful use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to control of left ventricular assist device\\u000a (LVAD)-related mediastinitis. It is difficult to treat mediastinitis in patients who have undergone LVAD implantation, because\\u000a it is impossible to remove the infected artificial materials from the mediastinal space. This report indicates that NPWT might\\u000a become the preferred therapeutic option

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide in the wound bed microcirculatory change during negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hitomi; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the mechanism of blood flow increase in the wound bed during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). We developed an improved experimental model that allowed visualisation of the wound bed microcirculation under NPWT. Wounds were created on the mouse ear, taking care to preserve the subdermal vascular plexus, because the wound bed microcirculation was visualised using an intravital microscope system. We investigated whether application of a NO synthase inhibitor (N(G) -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester: L-NAME) might diminish the effect of the NPWT in increasing the wound blood flow. The experimental animals were divided into a negative pressure group (negative pressure of -125 mmHg applied to the wound for 5 minutes; n = 8), and a negative pressure plus L-NAME group (administration of L-NAME prior to application of the negative pressure; n = 8). In the negative pressure group, significant increase of blood flow was observed at 1 minute after the negative pressure application, which was sustained until 5 minutes. On the contrary, in the negative pressure plus L-NAME group, no significant changes were observed throughout the period of observation. These findings suggest that NO synthesis is involved in the wound bed microcirculatory change induced by NPWT. PMID:23834415

  4. Staphylococcus aureus and wounds: a review of tea tree oil as a promising antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Halcón, Linda; Milkus, Kelly

    2004-11-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to be a major health concern worldwide. In particular, Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive, are of concern in their ability to cause difficult skin and underlying tissue infections. Melaleuca alternifolia oil (tea tree oil), an essential oil, has demonstrated promising efficacy in treating these infections. Tea tree oil has been used for centuries as a botanical medicine, and has only in recent decades surfaced in the scientific literature as a promising adjunctive wound treatment. Tea tree oil is antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and has demonstrated ability to activate monocytes. There are few apparent side effects to using tea tree oil topically in low concentrations, with contact dermatitis being the most common. Tea tree oil has been effective as an adjunctive therapy in treating osteomyelitis and infected chronic wounds in case studies and small clinical trials. There is a need for larger clinical trials to further examine efficacy of tea tree oil as an adjunctive wound therapy, as well as improved guidelines for developing plant-based medicines. PMID:15525915

  5. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based guidelines for the Netherlands using the AGREE-II and GRADE instruments. A working group, consisting of 17 representatives from all professional societies involved in wound care, tackled five controversial issues in acute-wound care, as provided by any caregiver throughout the whole chain of care. Critical Issues: The guidelines contain 38 recommendations, based on best available evidence, additional expert considerations, and patient experiences. In summary, primarily closed wounds need no cleansing; acute open wounds are best cleansed with lukewarm (drinkable) water; apply the WHO pain ladder to choose analgesics against continuous wound pain; use lidocaine or prilocaine infiltration anesthesia for wound manipulations or closure; primarily closed wounds may not require coverage with a dressing; use simple dressings for open wounds; and give your patient clear instructions about how to handle the wound. Future Directions: These evidence-based guidelines on acute wound care may help achieve a more uniform policy to treat acute wounds in all settings and an improved effectiveness and quality of wound care. PMID:26005594

  6. Evaluation of Tectona grandis leaves for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mrityunjoy; Nayeem, Naira; Kamath, Jagadish V; Asad, Mohammed

    2007-04-01

    The frontal leaves of Tectona grandis (Verabinaceae) are widely used in the folklore for the treatment of various kinds of wounds, especially burn wound. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of hydrochloric extract of Tectona grandis on experimentally induced wounds in rats and compare the effects observed with a known wound healing agent, Aloe vera. The models selected were excision wound, incision wound, burn wound and dead space wound. A suitable gel formulation was selected for the application using cellophane membrane penetration. In the excision wound and burn wound models, animals treated with Tectona grandis leaf extract showed significant reduction in period of epithelisation and wound contraction 50%. In the incision wound model, a significant increase in the breaking strength was observed. Tectona grandis leaf extract treatment orally produced a significant increase in the breaking strength, dry weight and hydroxyproline content of the granulation tissue in dead space wound. It was concluded that Tectona grandis leaf extract applied topically (5% and 10% gel formulation) or administered orally (250 mg and 500 mg/kg body weight) possesses wound healing activity. PMID:17416566

  7. [Pathophysiological aspects of wound healing in normal and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, N V; Lyundup, A V; Lubimov, R O; Melnichenko, G A; Nikolenko, V N

    2014-01-01

    The main cause of long-term healing of ulcers in patients with diabetic foot is considered to be direct mechanical damage when walking due to reduced sensitivity to due to neuropathy, hyperglycemia, infection and peripheral artery disease. These factors determine the standard approaches to the treatment of diabeticfoot, which include: offloading, glycemic control, debridement of ulcers, antibiotic therapy and revascularization. Recently, however, disturbances in the healing process of the skin in diabetes recognized an additional factor affecting the timing of healing patients with diabetic foot. Improved understanding and correction of cellular, molecular and biochemical abnormalities in chronic wound in combination with standard of care for affords new ground for solving the problem of ulcer healing in diabetes. PMID:25971136

  8. The Potential Benefit of 5% Sulfamylon Solution in the Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii–contaminated Traumatic War Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kucan, John O.; Heggers, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The recent report of high numbers of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections among service members injured in Iraq and Afghanistan during the period January 2002 through August 2004 has prompted an investigation into their etiology. A review of the current guidelines for open combat casualty wounds as part of this broad investigation was not mentioned in the report. Objective: The objective of this study was 2-fold: to ascertain the susceptibility of A baumannii to currently available topical antibacterial agents and (2) to propose an alternative, effective treatment protocol for contaminated combat-related wounds so as to reduce or eliminate the likelihood of the wound serving as the source of A baumannii infection or septicemia. Methods: A standardized antimicrobial susceptibility study of 43 strains of A baumannii collected from a tertiary care burn center was conducted using 2 commonly used topical antibacterial agents, 1% silver sulfadiazine cream (Silvadene) and 5% mafenide acetate solution (5% Sulfamylon Solution). Results: Both were effective, but 5% Sulfamylon Solution demonstrated significantly greater antibacterial activity. Conclusion: Five percent Sulfamylon Solution, initially developed for wartime use, and currently limited by the Food and Drug Administration to soaks following meshed split-thickness autografts following excision of second-degree and third-degree burns, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity and extensive off-label applicability. It is an ideal agent for use in the treatment of war wounds, and should be considered as a superior replacement for normal saline in the current guidelines for open combat casualty wounds PMID:16921408

  9. Effect of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joon Chul; Choi, Rak-Jun; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include use of the safest and least invasive methods with a goal of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced technology in wound healing has triggered the use of cells and/or biological dermis to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing efficacy.Ten nude mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness 6-mm punch wounds were created on the dorsal surface of each mouse (total, 40 wounds). The wounds were randomly assigned to one of the following 4 treatments: topical application of Dulbecco phosphate-buffered saline (control), human fibroblasts (FB), artificial dermis (AD), and human fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis (AD with FB). On the 14th day after treatment, wound healing rate and wound contraction, which are the 2 main factors determining wound healing efficacy, were evaluated using a stereoimage optical topometer system, histomorphological analysis, and immunohistochemistry.The results of the stereoimage optical topometer system demonstrated that the FB group did not have significant influence on wound healing rate and wound contraction. The AD group showed reduced wound contraction, but wound healing was delayed. The AD with FB group showed decreased wound contraction without significantly delayed wound healing. Histomorphological analysis exhibited that more normal skin structure was regenerated in the AD with FB group. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the AD group and the AD with FB group produced less ?-smooth muscle actin than the control group, but this was not shown in the FB group.Fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis may minimize wound contraction without significantly delaying wound healing in the treatment of skin and soft tissue defects. PMID:24051453

  10. Downregulation of PTEN at Corneal Wound Sites Accelerates Wound Healing through Increased Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lin; Graue-Hernandez, Enrique O.; Tran, Vu; Reid, Brian; Pu, Jin; Mannis, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The PI3K/Akt pathway is required for cell polarization and migration, whereas the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has inhibitory effects on the PI3K/Akt pathway. The authors therefore hypothesized that wounding would downregulate PTEN and that this downregulation would enhance wound healing. Methods. In human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell monolayer and rat cornea scratch wound models, the authors investigated PTEN and Akt expression using Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. The effects of PTEN and PI3K inhibitors dipotassium bisperoxo (picolinato) oxovanadate (bpv(pic)) and LY294002 on cell migration and wound closure were investigated using time-lapse imaging. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of PTEN inhibition on wound healing in whole rat eyes. Results. In HCE cell monolayer and rat cornea, PTEN was downregulated at the wound edges within 30 minutes of wounding. The downregulation of PTEN was causal in a simultaneous increase in Akt activation, which was responsible for a significant increase in individual cell migration rate from 8.8 ?m/h to 17.3 ?m/h. An increased migration rate was maintained for 20 hours. PTEN inhibition significantly enhanced the wound healing rate in the HCE cell monolayer from 10 minutes onward after treatment and reduced the healing time in eye organ culture from 30 to 20 hours. Conclusions. Injury to the corneal epithelium downregulates the expression of PTEN at wound edges, allowing increased PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby contributing to a significant enhancement of cell migration and wound healing. These results suggest that PTEN inhibition may be an effective treatment for corneal injury. PMID:21212174

  11. Heparanase accelerates wound angiogenesis and wound healing in mouse and rat models.

    PubMed

    Zcharia, Eyal; Zilka, Rachel; Yaar, Alon; Yacoby-Zeevi, Oron; Zetser, Anna; Metzger, Shula; Sarid, Ronit; Naggi, Annamaria; Casu, Benito; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2005-02-01

    Orchestration of the rapid formation and reorganization of new tissue observed in wound healing involves not only cells and polypeptides but also the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment. The ability of heparan sulfate (HS) to interact with major components of the ECM suggests a key role for HS in maintaining the structural integrity of the ECM. Heparanase, an endoglycosidase-degrading HS in the ECM and cell surface, is involved in the enzymatic machinery that enables cellular invasion and release of HS-bound polypeptides residing in the ECM. Bioavailabilty and activation of multitude mediators capable of promoting cell migration, proliferation, and neovascularization are of particular importance in the complex setting of wound healing. We provide evidence that heparanase is normally expressed in skin and in the wound granulation tissue. Heparanase stimulated keratinocyte cell migration and wound closure in vitro. Topical application of recombinant heparanase significantly accelerated wound healing in a flap/punch model and markedly improved flap survival. These heparanase effects were associated with enhanced wound epithelialization and blood vessel maturation. Similarly, a marked elevation in wound angiogenesis, evaluated by MRI analysis and histological analyses, was observed in heparanase-overexpressing transgenic mice. This effect was blocked by a novel, newly developed, heparanase-inhibiting glycol-split fragment of heparin. These results clearly indicate that elevation of heparanase levels in healing wounds markedly accelerates tissue repair and skin survival that are mediated primarily by an enhanced angiogenic response.-Zcharia, E., Zilka, R., Yaar, A., Yacoby-Zeevi, O., Zetser, A., Metzger, S., Sarid, R., Naggi, A., Casu, B., Ilan, N., Vlodavsky, I., Abramovitch, R. Heparanase accelerates wound angiogenesis and wound healing in mouse and rat models. PMID:15677344

  12. Angiotensin II inhibitor facilitates epidermal wound regeneration in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Maria; Papalazarou, Vasileios; Rouni, Georgia; Papageorgopoulou, Evagelia; Papalois, Apostolos; Kostourou, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration and wound healing are severely impaired in diabetes and are associated with poor circulation and dysfunctional blood vessels. Angiotensin II inhibitors are anti-hypertensive drugs used in clinical practice to regulate blood pressure and could affect tissue remodeling. We hypothesize that blocking angiotensin II, using Losartan, could facilitate tissue regeneration in diabetic mice. To this end, we established an experimental model of wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Our data demonstrated that Losartan accelerates wound repair and normalizes wound stromal responses, having a beneficial role in wounds of diabetic individuals. Our findings highlight a potential therapeutic use of Losartan in improving wound repair in diabetic conditions.

  13. Leading wound care technology: The ARANZ medical silhouette.

    PubMed

    Kieser, David Christopher; Hammond, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Despite major advances in medical technology and wound care, wound assessment and documentation still rely mainly on rudimentary measures. Many practitioners continue to estimate wound size using maximal length, width, and depth measurements with rulers and probes. Others use acetate tracings or equivalent measures to outline the wound onto a grid to estimate surface area and document wound border changes. Even fewer practitioners seem to routinely photograph wounds with an included scale for more visual records. This article presents a recently developed device that is changing clinical documentation, assessment, auditing, and interservice communication-the ARANZ Medical Silhouette (ARANZ Medical Limited, Christchurch, New Zealand). PMID:21242735

  14. Role of tomato lipoxygenase D in wound-induced jasmonate biosynthesis and plant immunity to insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liuhua; Zhai, Qingzhe; Wei, Jianing; Li, Shuyu; Wang, Bao; Huang, Tingting; Du, Minmin; Sun, Jiaqiang; Kang, Le; Li, Chang-Bao; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-01-01

    In response to insect attack and mechanical wounding, plants activate the expression of genes involved in various defense-related processes. A fascinating feature of these inducible defenses is their occurrence both locally at the wounding site and systemically in undamaged leaves throughout the plant. Wound-inducible proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) provide an attractive model to understand the signal transduction events leading from localized injury to the systemic expression of defense-related genes. Among the identified intercellular molecules in regulating systemic wound response of tomato are the peptide signal systemin and the oxylipin signal jasmonic acid (JA). The systemin/JA signaling pathway provides a unique opportunity to investigate, in a single experimental system, the mechanism by which peptide and oxylipin signals interact to coordinate plant systemic immunity. Here we describe the characterization of the tomato suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses8 (spr8) mutant, which was isolated as a suppressor of (pro)systemin-mediated signaling. spr8 plants exhibit a series of JA-dependent immune deficiencies, including the inability to express wound-responsive genes, abnormal development of glandular trichomes, and severely compromised resistance to cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and Botrytis cinerea. Map-based cloning studies demonstrate that the spr8 mutant phenotype results from a point mutation in the catalytic domain of TomLoxD, a chloroplast-localized lipoxygenase involved in JA biosynthesis. We present evidence that overexpression of TomLoxD leads to elevated wound-induced JA biosynthesis, increased expression of wound-responsive genes and, therefore, enhanced resistance to insect herbivory attack and necrotrophic pathogen infection. These results indicate that TomLoxD is involved in wound-induced JA biosynthesis and highlight the application potential of this gene for crop protection against insects and pathogens. PMID:24348260

  15. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Angela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014. PMID:25220821

  16. The distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in naturally infected badgers.

    PubMed

    Corner, Leigh A L; O'Meara, D; Costello, E; Lesellier, S; Gormley, E

    2012-11-01

    Populations of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) are a significant reservoir of infection for cattle in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In this study the distribution of infection, histological lesions and gross lesions was determined in a sample of 132 culled badgers from naturally-infected wild populations. Badgers were culled when an epidemiological investigation following a tuberculosis breakdown in a cattle herd implicated badgers as the probable source of infection. The definition of tuberculosis infection was based on the isolation of M. bovis from tissues or clinical samples. An accurate diagnosis of infection was achieved by culturing a wide range of lymph nodes (LN) and organ tissues (mean 32.1) and clinical samples (faeces and urine) from each badger. Infection was detected in 57/132 badgers (43.2%). Histological lesions consistent with tuberculosis were seen in 39/57 (68.4%) culture-positive and 7/75 (9.3%) culture-negative animals. Gross lesions were seen in only 30/57 (52.6%) infected badgers, leaving a high proportion (47.4%) of infected animals with latent infection (no grossly visible lesions). The most frequently infected tissues were the lungs and axillary LN, followed by the deep cervical LN, parotid LN and tracheobronchial LN. The data support the hypotheses that in badgers there are only two significant routes of infection, namely, the lower respiratory tract and bite wounds, and that badgers are very susceptible to infection but resistant to the development and progression of the disease. At all levels of disease severity, infection was found in widely dispersed anatomical locations suggesting that there is early dissemination of infection in the period preceding the development of active immunity. PMID:22542391

  17. Wounded Embryonic Corneas Exhibit Nonfibrotic Regeneration and Complete Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Spurlin, James W.; Lwigale, Peter Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Wound healing in adult corneas is characterized by activation of keratocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis that results in fibrotic scar formation and loss of transparency. Since most fetal wounds heal without scaring, we investigated the regenerative potential of wounded embryonic corneas. Methods. On embryonic day (E) 7 chick corneas were wounded by making a linear incision traversing the epithelium and anterior stroma. Wounded corneas were collected between E7 and E18, and analyzed for apoptosis, cell proliferation, staining of ECM components, and corneal innervation. Results. Substantial wound retraction was observed within 16-hours postwounding (hpw) and partial re-epithelialized by 5-days postwounding (dpw). Corneal wounds were fully re-epithelialized by 11 dpw with no visible scars. There was no difference in the number of cells undergoing apoptosis between wounded and control corneas. Cell proliferation was reduced in the wounded corneas, albeit mitotic cells in the regenerating epithelium. Staining for alpha–smooth muscle actin (?-SMA), tenascin, and fibronectin was vivid but transient at the wound site. Staining for procollagen I, perlecan, and keratan sulfate proteoglycan was reduced at the wound site. Wounded corneas were fully regenerated by 11 dpw and showed similar patterns of staining for ECM components, albeit an increase in perlecan staining. Corneal innervation was inhibited during wound healing, but regenerated corneas were innervated similar to controls. Conclusions. These data show that minimal keratocyte activation, rapid ECM reconstruction, and proper innervation occur during nonfibrotic regeneration of the embryonic cornea. PMID:24003085

  18. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Alisina; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a calamitous complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The reported incidence is low but it is probably underestimated due to the difficulty in diagnosis. PJI has challenged the orthopaedic community for several years and despite all the advances in this field, it is still a real concern with immense impact on patients, and the healthcare system. Eradication of infection can be very difficult. Therefore, prevention remains the ultimate goal. The medical community has executed many practices with the intention to prevent infection and treat it effectively when it encounters. Numerous factors can predispose patients to PJI. Identifying the host risk factors, patients’ health modification, proper wound care, and optimizing operative room environment remain some of the core fundamental steps that can help minimizing the overall incidence of infection. In this review we have summarized the effective prevention strategies along with the recommendations of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection. PMID:26110171

  19. FOXO1, TGF-? Regulation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Liu, Jian; Batres, Angelika; Graves, Gabrielle S.; Graves, Dana T.

    2014-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is a complex process that involves migration and proliferation of keratinocytes, in addition to the production of cytokines and growth factors that affect other cells. The induction of transcription factors during these processes is crucial for successful wound healing. The transcription factor forkhead boxO-1 (FOXO1) has recently been found to be an important regulator of wound healing. In particular, FOXO1 has significant effects through regulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?) expression and protecting keratinocytes from oxidative stress. In the absence of FOXO1, there is increased oxidative damage, reduced TGF-?1 expression, reduced migration and proliferation of keratinocytes and increased keratinocytes apoptosis leading to impaired re-epithelialization of wounds. PMID:25226535

  20. Epilepsy after missile wounds of the head

    PubMed Central

    Adeloye, Adelola; Odeku, E. Latunde

    1971-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-seven Nigerians with missile head injury were treated at the University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan, between July 1964 and January 1970. Among the 165 of these patients who have been followed up for over a year, the incidence of epilepsy has been 11·4%, 18·75%, and 33·3% in a follow-up period ranging between one to two years, two to three years, and three to five years respectively. Wounds in the parietal region, especially those at the vertex, were followed by epilepsy more frequently than injuries elsewhere on the head. Of these wounds, tangential skull injuries and through-and-through brain injuries were more epileptogenic than others. Fits which occurred within a fortnight of wounding have been designated as `early' fits, and they appeared to differ in their aetiology from `late' fits. PMID:4994609

  1. Developing a wound and skin care program.

    PubMed

    Ahroni, Jessie H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the process used in a large Veterans Affairs facility to unite a group of diverse wound care specialists together into a coordinated program. Program development is an iterative, interactive process requiring continued recycling of efforts until projects are completed. The Program Development Cycle is presented as an example of intentional planning that has been divided into 4 phases: (1) identifying the agency culture, (2) engaging in targeted project development, (3) developing operational strategies, and (4) conducting follow-up analysis. Specific examples of developing a mission, program goals, and wound care champions are discussed. Discussion also incorporates suggestions for changing organizational culture, developing policies and procedures, using best practices and guidelines, creating a wound fair, and incorporating a skin bundle and the challenges of outcome assessment. PMID:25377104

  2. Systemic signaling in the wound response.

    PubMed

    Schilmiller, Anthony L; Howe, Gregg A

    2005-08-01

    In many plants, localized tissue damage elicits an array of systemic defense responses against herbivore attack. Progress in our understanding of the long-distance signaling events that control these responses has been aided by the identification of mutants that fail to mount systemic defenses in response to wounding. Grafting experiments conducted with various mutants of tomato indicate that systemic signaling requires both the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid at the site of wounding and the ability to perceive a jasmonate signal in remote tissues. These and other studies support the hypothesis that jasmonic acid regulates the production of, or acts as, a mobile wound signal. Following its synthesis in peroxisomes, further metabolism of jasmonic acid might enhance its stability, transport, or action in remote tissues. Recent studies in tomato suggest that the peptide signal systemin promotes long-distance defense responses by amplifying jasmonate production in vascular tissues. PMID:15939667

  3. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vinklárková, Lenka; Vetchý, David; Bernatonien?, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT). To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5?mg/cm2 and 1.0?mg/cm2 of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds. PMID:26090454

  4. Preclinical Models of Wound Healing: Is Man the Model? Proceedings of the Wound Healing Society Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Gayle M.; Bernatchez, Stephanie F.; Diegelmann, Robert; Di Pietro, Luisa A.; Eriksson, Elof; Hinz, Boris; Hopf, Harriet W.; Kirsner, Robert; Liu, Paul; Parnell, Laura K.S.; Sandusky, George E.; Sen, Chandan K.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Volk, Susan W.; Baird, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance A review of therapeutic effects in preclinical and clinical studies suggests that concordance between large animal (pig=78%), small laboratory animal (53%) and in vitro (57%) results with those observed in humans is only partial. Pig models of wound healing provide major advantages over other animal models. Since the vast majority of wound-healing research is done in rodents and in vitro, the low concordance rate is a significant impediment to research that will have any clinical impact. Critical Issues To generate clinically relevant experimental data, hypothesis generation should begin, or at least involve human wound tissue samples. Such tissue could be used to test a predetermined hypothesis generated based on, say, murine data. Alternatively, such tissue could be analyzed using high-throughput cell biology techniques (e.g., genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics) to identify novel mechanisms involved in human wounds. Once the hypothesis has been formulated and confirmed using human samples, identification of these same mechanisms in animals represents a valid approach that could be used for more in-depth investigations and experimental manipulations not feasible with humans. Future Directions This consensus statement issued by the Wound Healing Society symposium strongly encourages all wound researchers to involve human wound tissue validation studies to make their animal and cell biology studies more translationally and clinically significant. PMID:24527316

  5. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain.

    PubMed

    Vinklárková, Lenka; Masteiková, Ruta; Vetchý, David; Doležel, Petr; Bernatonien?, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT). To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5?mg/cm(2) and 1.0?mg/cm(2) of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds. PMID:26090454

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy accelerates rats diabetic wound by promoting agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Xiaolong; Dong, Maolong; Wang, Hongtao; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) has become widely adopted to several wound treatment over the last 15 years, including diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Much of the existing evidence supports that NPWT increase in blood flow, reduce in edema, decrease bacterial proliferation and accelerate granulation-tissue formation. However, the accurate mechanism is not clear till now. The aim of the present study was to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on angiogenesis of diabetic wound model. As result, our data showed: 1) NPWT promoted the wound healing and blood perfusion on both diabetic and normal wound compared with control, 2) The NPWT increased wound vessel density, and the wound treated with NPWT showed well developed and more functional vessels at day 7 post operation compared with control 3) NPWT up regulated the expression of VEGF at day 3 and Ang1 at day 7 on RNA and protein level. 4) Ang2 was up regulated in diabetic rats but NPWT attenuated this affection. Our data indicated that NPWT increased vessel density and promoted the maturation of neovascular over the potential mechanism of up regulated VEGF and Ang1 and down regulated of Ang2.

  7. LL-37-Derived Peptides Eradicate Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Thermally Wounded Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24841266

  8. Human Wound-Healing Research: Issues and Perspectives for Studies Using Wide-Scale Analytic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Nuutila, Kristo; Katayama, Shintaro; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Revealing the basic mechanisms in the healing process and then regulating these processes for faster healing or to avoid negative outcomes such as infection or scarring are fundamental to wound research. The normal healing process is basically known, but to thoroughly understand the very complex aspects involved, it is necessary to characterize the course of events at a higher resolution with the latest molecular techniques and methodologies. Recent Advances: Various animal models are used in wound-healing research. Rodent and pig models are the ones most often used, probably because of pre-existing sophisticated research methodologies and as the proper care and ethical use of these species are highly developed and organized to serve science throughout the world. Critical Issues: Since several animal models are used, their anatomical and physiological differences varyingly affect the translation of results on healing mechanisms. Hence, to avoid species-specific misinformation, more ways to study wound healing directly in humans are needed. Future Directions: Fortunately, novel techniques have enabled high-end molecular-level research even from small samples of tissue. Since these methods require only a small amount of patient skin, they make it possible to study wound healing directly in humans. PMID:24761360

  9. Designing Hydrogel Adhesives for Corneal Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Today, corneal wounds are repaired using nylon sutures. Yet there are a number of complications associated with suturing the cornea, and thus there is interest in an adhesive to replace or supplement sutures in the repair of corneal wounds. We are designing and evaluating corneal adhesives prepared from dendrimers – single molecular weight, highly branched polymers. We have explored two strategies to form these ocular adhesives. The first involves a photocrosslinking reaction and the second uses a peptide ligation reactions to couple the individual dendrimers together to from the adhesive. These adhesives were successfully used to repair corneal perforations, close the flap produced in a LASIK procedure, and secure a corneal transplant. PMID:17889330

  10. Tomato BRI1 and systemin wound signalling.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nicholas; Harrison, Kate; Yokota, Takao; Bishop, Gerard J

    2008-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are perceived by Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1 (BRI1), that encodes a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Tomato BRI1 has previously been implicated in both systemin and BR signalling. The role of tomato BRI1 in BR signalling was confirmed, however it was found not to be essential for systemin/wound signalling. Tomato roots were shown to respond to systemin but this response varied according to the species and growth conditions. Overall the data indicates that mutants defective in tomato BRI1 are not defective in systemin-induced wound signalling and that systemin perception can occur via a non-BRI1 mechanism. PMID:19704770

  11. Of blood, inflammation and gunshot wounds: the history of the control of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Thurston, A J

    2000-12-01

    Galen (AD 129-199) propounded the notion that all wounds healed by second intention and the concept of laudable pus became unshakeable for almost 15 centuries. But William of Saliceto (AD ca 1210-1280) held quite firmly that pus formation was bad for both wound and patient and proclaimed that wounds should heal by first intention. The first rational theory of the nature of infection was by Fracastoro (1478-1553), a physician of Verona who regarded infection as being due to the passage of minute bodies from one person to another. But it was not until the work of Pasteur (1822-1895) that bacteriology took a significant leap forward. The association between bacteria and infection was slow to be accepted. The work of Semmelweis (1818-1865) is notable for his association between bacterial infection and puerperal fever. Lister (1827-1912) began the modern movement to control infection with his pioneering work in antiseptic surgery. Other contributions came from von Bergman (1836-1907; steam sterilization of instruments) and Halstead (1852-1922; rubber gloves for surgeons). The aseptic system has changed very little since then except for the innovations of Sir John Charnley (1911-1982; the laminar flow enclosure). The development of safe antibacterial drugs has been confined to the 20th century. This was led by Domagk (1895-1964; sulfonamides) and was followed by Sir Alexander Fleming (1881-1955), Sir Howard Walter Florey (1898-1968) and Sir Ernest Boris Chain (1906-1979; penicillin) and Selman Waksman (1888-1973; actinomycin). PMID:11167573

  12. Mepitel One: a wound contact layer with Safetac technology.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Simon

    This article examines the use of Mepitel One, a wound contact layer that promotes wound healing by using the clinical benefits of Safetac technology. A wide range of clinical evidence shows that dressings with Safetac prevent trauma, minimise wound pain and associated psychological stress, while facilitating undisturbed wound healing. Mepitel One has been developed as a highly transparent wound contact layer with Safetac on the wound contact surface alone; this makes it easy to apply without sticking to gloves, and allows it to be used with a choice of secondary dressings. The dressing can stay in place for up to 14 days and allows examination of the wound without removal. The clinical evidence reviewed here shows that Mepitel One is a versatile option for use on a wide range of wound types to promote undisturbed healing and minimise pain at dressing changes. PMID:23469510

  13. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-29

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  14. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  15. Polysaccharides and Cellulose in the Design of Wound Healing Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic Wound Dressings that Sequester Harmful Proteases: Traditionally the use of carbohydrate-based wound dressings including cotton, xerogels, charcoal cloth, alginates, chitosan and hydrogels, have afforded properties such as absorbency, ease of application and removal, bacterial protection, flu...

  16. Optimized polymeric film-based nitric oxide delivery inhibits bacterial growth in a mouse burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Bayliss, Jill; Wu, Jianfeng; Major, Terry C; Xi, Chuanwu; Wang, Stewart C; Bartlett, Robert H; Handa, Hitesh; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many biological roles (e.g. antimicrobial agent, promoter of angiogenesis, prevention of platelet activation) that make NO releasing materials desirable for a variety of biomedical applications. Localized NO release can be achieved from biomedical grade polymers doped with diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2O2) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). In this study, the optimization of this chemistry to create film/patches that can be used to decrease microbial infection at wound sites is examined. Two polyurethanes with different water uptakes (Tecoflex SG-80A (6.2±0.7wt.%) and Tecophilic SP-60D-20 (22.5±1.1wt.%)) were doped with 25wt.% DBHD/N2O2 and 10wt.% of PLGA with various hydrolysis rates. Films prepared with the polymer that has the higher water uptake (SP-60D-20) were found to have higher NO release and for a longer duration than the polyurethane with the lower water uptake (SG-80A). The more hydrophilic polymer enhances the hydrolysis rate of the PLGA additive, thereby providing a more acidic environment that increases the rate of NO release from the NO donor. The optimal NO releasing and control SG-80A patches were then applied to scald burn wounds that were infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. The NO released from these patches applied to the wounds is shown to significantly reduce the A. baumannii infection after 24h (?4 log reduction). The NO release patches are also able to reduce the level of transforming growth factor-? in comparison to controls, which can enhance re-epithelialization, decrease scarring and reduce migration of bacteria. The combined DBHD/N2O2 and PLGA-doped polymer patches, which could be replaced periodically throughout the wound healing process, demonstrate the potential to reduce risk of bacterial infection and promote the overall wound healing process. PMID:24980058

  17. HoxD3 accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott L.; Myers, Connie A.; Charboneau, Aubri; Young, David M.; and Boudreau, Nancy

    2003-12-01

    Poorly healing diabetic wounds are characterized by diminished collagen production and impaired angiogenesis. HoxD3, a homeobox transcription factor that promotes angiogenesis and collagen synthesis, is up-regulated during normal wound repair whereas its expression is diminished in poorly healing wounds of the genetically diabetic (db/db) mouse. To determine whether restoring expression of HoxD3 would accelerate diabetic wound healing, we devised a novel method of gene transfer, which incorporates HoxD3 plasmid DNA into a methylcellulose film that is placed on wounds created on db/db mice. The HoxD3 transgene was expressed in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes of the wounds for up to 10 days. More importantly, a single application of HoxD3 to db/db mice resulted in a statistically significant acceleration of wound closure compared to control-treated wounds. Furthermore, we also observed that the HoxD3-mediated improvement in diabetic wound repair was accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the HoxD3 target genes, Col1A1 and beta 3-integrin leading to enhanced angiogenesis and collagen deposition in the wounds. Although HoxD3-treated wounds also show improved re-epithelialization as compared to control db/db wounds, this effect was not due to direct stimulation of keratinocyte migration by HoxD3. Finally, we show that despite the dramatic increase in collagen synthesis and deposition in HoxD3-treated wounds, these wounds showed normal remodeling and we found no evidence of abnormal wound healing. These results indicate that HoxD3 may provide a means to directly improve collagen deposition, angiogenesis and closure in poorly healing diabetic wounds.

  18. A potential wound-healing-promoting peptide from salamander skin.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Liu, Han; Shen, Chuanbin; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Lai, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Although it is well known that wound healing proceeds incredibly quickly in urodele amphibians, such as newts and salamanders, little is known about skin-wound healing, and no bioactive/effector substance that contributes to wound healing has been identified from these animals. As a step toward understanding salamander wound healing and skin regeneration, a potential wound-healing-promoting peptide (tylotoin; KCVRQNNKRVCK) was identified from salamander skin of Tylototriton verrucosus. It shows comparable wound-healing-promoting ability (EC50=11.14 ?g/ml) with epidermal growth factor (EGF; NSDSECPLSHDGYCLHDGVCMYIEALDKYACNCVVGYIGERCQYRDLKWWELR) in a murine model of full-thickness dermal wound. Tylotoin directly enhances the motility and proliferation of keratinocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, resulting in accelerated reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation in the wound site. Tylotoin also promotes the release of transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), which are essential in the wound healing response. Gene-encoded tylotoin secreted in salamander skin is possibly an effector molecule for skin wound healing. This study may facilitate understanding of the cellular and molecular events that underlie quick wound healing in salamanders.-Mu, L., Tang, J., Liu, H., Shen, C., Rong, M., Zhang, Z., Lai, R. A potential wound-healing-promoting peptide from salamander skin. PMID:24868009

  19. Topical therapy for control of bacteria in the burn wound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Moncrief

    1978-01-01

    The concept of burn wound sepsis and the demonstration of the avascular nature of the burn wound paved the way for the development of effective antibacterial therapy of the burn wound. Many agents have been tried, but the most effective are those with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, lack of developing resistance, low toxicity, and active penetration of the

  20. THE MORBIDITY OF PROLONGED WOUND DRAINAGE AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. KIBERD; R. PANEK; C. M. CLASE; A. S. MacDONALD; V. McALISTER; P. BELITSKY; J. LAWEN

    1999-01-01

    PurposeThe consequences of prolonged wound drainage, defined as extravasation of more than 50 ml. fluid daily for more than 1 week through a drain or wound after renal transplantation, have not been well described in the literature. We examine the association of prolonged wound drainage with other clinical events, and its impact on hospitalization, and patient and graft survival.

  1. Wound Teleconsultation in Patients with Chronic Leg Ulcers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Salmhofer; Rainer Hofmann-Wellenhof; Gerald Gabler; Karin Rieger-Engelbogen; Dieter Gunegger; Barbara Binder; Thomas Kern; Helmut Kerl; H. Peter Soyer

    2005-01-01

    Background: The treatment of chronic leg ulcers requires frequent assessments of local wound status and adjustment of therapy. The availability of reasonably priced photographic equipment and quick electronic transfer of high-quality digital images should make it possible that the assessment of wound status can be made by remote experts. Objective: This study examines the feasibility of using teledermatology for wound

  2. Proper Wound Care: How to Minimize a Scar

    MedlinePLUS

    ... debris. To help the injured skin heal, use petroleum jelly to keep the wound moist. Petroleum jelly prevents the wound from drying out and ... bacterial ointments. After cleaning the wound and applying petroleum jelly or a similar ointment, cover the skin ...

  3. MONITORING TRANSVERSE BEAM PROFILE WITH NONUNIFORMLY-WOUND TOROIDAL COILS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Hagmann

    Others have shown that the voltages induced on one uniformly-wound toroidal coil and two sinusoidally- wound toroidal coils may be used to determine the current in a single filament and its coordinates. We have extended this technique to show that the voltages measured on a group of sinusoidally-wound toroidal coils may be used to approximate the transverse distribution of the

  4. Development and characterization of a novel, antimicrobial, sterile hydrogel dressing for burn wounds: single-step production with gamma irradiation creates silver nanoparticles and radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Barber, Philip M; Rengpipat, Sirirat; Supaphol, Pitt; Kempf, Margit; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Cuttle, Leila

    2014-10-01

    Patients with burn wounds are susceptible to wound infection and sepsis. This research introduces a novel burn wound dressing that contains silver nanoparticles (SNPs) to treat infection in a 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt (AMPS-Na(+) ) hydrogel. Silver nitrate was dissolved in AMPS-Na(+) solution and then exposed to gamma irradiation to form SNP-infused hydrogels. The gamma irradiation results in a cross-linked polymeric network of sterile hydrogel dressing and a reduction of silver ions to form SNPs infused in the hydrogel in a one-step process. About 80% of the total silver was released from the hydrogels after 72 h immersion in simulated body fluid solution; therefore, they could be used on wounds for up to 3 days. All the hydrogels were found to be nontoxic to normal human dermal fibroblast cells. The silver-loaded hydrogels had good inhibitory action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Results from a pilot study on a porcine burn model showed that the 5-mM silver hydrogel was efficient at preventing bacterial colonization of wounds, and the results were comparable to the commercially available silver dressings (Acticoat(TM) , PolyMem Silver(®) ). These results support its use as a potential burn wound dressing. PMID:25079080

  5. Inflammation: John Hunter's "A treatise on the blood, inflammation and gun-shot wounds".

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    John Hunter's A Treatise on the Blood, Inflammation and Gunshot Wounds was published in 1794. Throughout the nineteenth century this was considered the most important study of inflammation and has been widely quoted since. After a section on the nature of blood and the circulatory system, in which he describes the vascular supply in detail, he passes on to an extensive survey of inflammation. This is based mainly on his wide clinical experience, including that as a military surgeon. He, however, supplements this with a number of experiments, some of which are classic. He bases his observations on the four cardinal signs of Celsus (redness, heat, swelling and pain). Inflammation is then divided into three main groups: adhesive, suppurative and ulcerative. He discusses the nature of pus and the formation and treatment of abscesses. He describes his experiments on the transplantation of tissues under the general heading of adhesive inflammation. This, he states, underlies the union of wounds and thus the union of tissues after transplantation. Although unaware of the role of infecting organisms as a cause of inflammation, he makes observations on inflammation in smallpox, venereal infections and tuberculosis. He relates these to his observations on inflammatory aspects of wound healing. Lister was particularly influenced by Hunter's observations in the development of antisepsis. As well as the local effect of inflammation, Hunter was concerned with the constitutional effects such as fever. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7734328

  6. In situ forming antibacterial dextran blend hydrogel for wound dressing: SAA technology vs. spray drying.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, Felicetta; Reverchon, Ernesto; Adami, Renata; Auriemma, Giulia; Russo, Paola; Calabrese, Elena C; Porta, Amalia; Aquino, Rita P; Del Gaudio, Pasquale

    2014-01-30

    This study focuses on designing microparticulate carriers based on high-mannuronic alginate and amidated pectin blend loaded with gentamicin sulphate able to move rapidly from dry to soft hydrogel. Supercritical assisted atomization was used to produce microparticles in form of dry powder and characteristics were compared with those obtained by spray-drying. Particles with very high encapsulation efficiency (approximately 100%) and small diameter (less than 2 ?m) showed good flowability and high fluid uptake enabling wound site filling and limiting bacterial proliferation. Moisture transmission of the in situ formed hydrogel was about 95 g/m(2)h, ideal to avoid wound dehydration or occlusion phenomena. All formulations presented a burst effect, suitable to prevent infection spreading at the beginning of the therapy, followed by prolonged release (4-10 days) related to drug/polymers ratio. Antimicrobial tests showed stronger effect than pure GS over time (up-to 24 days) and the ability to degrade preformed biofilms, essential to properly treat infected wounds. PMID:24299894

  7. Wound production by ricocheted and destabilized bullets.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lucien C

    2007-03-01

    Bullets destabilized by ricochet or as the result of an impact with some intervening object experience a yawing to tumbling motion in flight. As a result, they often produce atypical entry wounds, but, as will be demonstrated in this article, this is not a certainty and such bullets can produce normal-appearing entry wounds. It is these wounds that are more difficult to recognize as the consequence of a ricocheted or deflected bullet at the time of autopsy. With few exceptions, ricocheted or deflected bullets also acquire characteristic damage and trace evidence inclusions that often survive the wound production process. A careful inspection of such bullets at the time of recovery will usually reveal such ricochet damage. Moreover, the instability of ricocheted bullets alters their soft-tissue penetration behavior in 2 possible ways. Destabilized full-metal-jacketed bullets will typically penetrate less than direct strikes by the same bullet. Destabilized jacketed hollow-point bullets will often fail to expand and subsequently penetrate more deeply than direct shots with the same bullet. PMID:17325456

  8. [Wound repair in plant tissues (Review)].

    PubMed

    Vasiukova, N I; Chalenko, G I; Gerasimova, N G; Ozeretskovskaia, O L

    2011-01-01

    Signaling systems responsible for repair processes in plants and manifestation of defensive effects in plant tissues were analyzed. Special attention was given to jasmonic acid, a mobile systemic repair signal, as well as to jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transport to the areas where protective responses of plants are induced. The main defense responses of potato tubers induced by wounding were considered. PMID:21790022

  9. A Plutonium-Contaminated Wound, 1985, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Eugene H. Carbaugh, CHP, Staff Scientist, Internal Dosimetry Manager, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2012-02-02

    A hand injury occurred at a U.S. facility in 1985 involving a pointed shaft (similar to a meat thermometer) that a worker was using to remove scrap solid plutonium from a plastic bottle. The worker punctured his right index finger on the palm side at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint. The wound was not through-and- through, although it was deep. The puncture wound resulted in deposition of ~48 kBq of alpha activity from the weapons-grade plutonium mixture with a nominal 12 to 1 Pu-alpha to {sup 241}Am-alpha ratio. This case clearly showed that DTPA was very effective for decorporation of plutonium and americium. The case is a model for management of wounds contaminated with transuranics: (1) a team approach for dealing with all of the issues surrounding the incident, including the psychological, (2) early surgical intervention for foreign-body removal, (3) wound irrigation with DTPA solution, and (4) early and prolonged DTPA administration based upon bioassay and in vivo dosimetry.

  10. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  11. SRM filament wound case resin characterization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The amine cured epoxy wet winding resin used in fabrication of the SRM filament wound case is analyzed. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPSC) is utilized extensively to study lot-to-lot variation in both resin and curing agent. The validity of quantitative hplc methodology currently under development in-process resin/catalyst assay is assessed.

  12. Spontaneous wound dehiscence after penetrating keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Alireza; Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Behrouz, Mahmoud Jabbarvand; Zarei, Reza; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous wound separation may be developed even months after suture removal especially in the context of long-term corticosteroid therapy. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our cornea clinic with spontaneous wound dehiscence after her third penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) which was performed three years ago. An Ahmed glaucoma valve (New World Medical, Ranchos Cucamonga, CA) was inserted ten months after the third PKP, which successfully controlled intraocular pressure (IOP). At the examination, the last sutures were removed eight months ago and she was using flourometholone 0.1 % (Sina Darou, Tehran, Iran) with a dose of once a day. There was one quadrant of wound dehiscence from 8 to 11 òclock associated with anterior wound gape and severe corneal edema. Resuturing was performed for the patient. At the one month examination, the corneal edema was resolved and best corrected visual acuity was 20/200 mainly due to previous glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Caution about the prolonged use of corticosteroids is necessary. Topical immunosuppressives could be a promising choice in this field. PMID:25349814

  13. Demonstration of a Microcurrent-Generating Wound Care Device for Wound Healing Within a Rehabilitation Center Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Emily; Monroe, Nina; Hope-Higman, Jennifer; Campbell, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Wound care in a rehabilitation environment is a costly and difficult problem. The goal of this retrospective study is to evaluate differences in wound closure outcomes in acute and chronic wounds when treated with a microcurrent-generating wound care device as compared to standard wound care methods. Methods Data files of 38 patients who received either standard wound treatment (SOC; n = 20), or were treated with a microcurrent-generating wound device (MCD, n = 18), were retrospectively reviewed. Wounds were assessed until deemed clinically to have closed or healed with up to 100% epithelialization. All patients (18–99 years) with single wounds were included. The number of days to wound closure and the rate of wound volume reduction were compared across groups. Persistent reduction of wound size improvement was also examined. Results The wounds in the SOC group closed on average at 36.25 days (SD = 28.89), while the MCD group closed significantly faster in 19.78 days (SD = 14.45), p = 0.036. The rate of volume reduction per day was ?3.83% for SOC vs. ?9.82% volume reduction per day (p = 0.013) for the MCD group. The SOC group had 50% of its wounds close monotonically vs. 83.3% in the MCD group (p = 0.018). Conclusion This two-center retrospective study demonstrated a 45.4% faster, and more robust healing of wounds with the use of the MCD, when compared to SOC in a rehabilitation center environment. This translates into improved patient care, and potentially significant cost savings. Economic benefits for the use of MCD compared to other wound care methods are planned for future research. PMID:24527381

  14. A novel poly(?-glutamic acid)/silk-sericin hydrogel for wound dressing: Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Li; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Liu, Hui; Luo, Ying

    2015-03-01

    A novel multifunctional poly(?-glutamic acid)/silk sericin (?-PGA/SS) hydrogel has been developed and used as wound dressing. The physical and chemical properties of the ?-PGA/SS gels were systemically investigated. Furthermore, these ?-PGA/SS gels have been found to promote the L929 fibroblast cells proliferate, and in the in vivo study, significant stimulatory effects were also observed on granulation and capillary formation on day 9 in H-2-treated wounds, indicating that this new complex hydrogel could maintain a moist healing environment, protect the wound from bacterial infection, absorb excess exudates, and promote cell proliferation to reconstruct damaged tissue. Considering the simple preparation process and excellent biological property, this ?-PGA/SS hydrogel might have a wide range of applications in biomedical and clinical areas. PMID:25579954

  15. Investigation into the potential use of Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Methylglyoxal fibres as antibacterial wound dressing components

    E-print Network

    Bulman, Sophie E L; Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J; Carr, Chris

    2015-01-01

    As problems of antibiotic resistance increase, a continuing need for effective bioactive wound dressings is anticipated for the treatment of infected chronic wounds. Naturally derived antibacterial agents, such as Manuka honey, consist of a mixture of compounds, more than one of which can influence antimicrobial potency. The non-peroxide bacteriostatic properties of Manuka honey have been previously linked to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO). The incorporation of MGO as a functional antibacterial additive during fibre production was explored as a potential route for manufacturing wound dressing components. Synthetic MGO and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were fabricated into webs of sub-micron fibres by means of electrostatic spinning of an aqueous spinning solution. Composite fabrics were also produced by direct deposition of the PVA-MGO fibres onto a preformed spunbonded nonwoven substrate. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectros...

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent local infection in Oral Surgery: Use or abuse?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel Sancho-Puchades; José María Herráez-Vilas; Leonardo Berini-Aytés; Cosme Gay-Escoda

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotics have a well-documented efficacy in the treatment of established infections and as prophylactic agents in medi- cally compromised patients. However, the systematic administration of antibiotics to prevent local infections in fit patients is much more controversial. The aim of this paper is to reflect on the justification for prophylactic usage of antibiotics to prevent wound infection and to reason

  17. A novel option in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for chronic and acute wound care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Afshin Rahmanian-Schwarz; Lina-Marie Willkomm; Philipp Gonser; Bernhard Hirt; Hans-Eberhard Schaller

    IntroductionNegative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a widely accepted technique in treatment of all kinds of wounds. After a long period of clinical application of the V.A.C.™ system (KCI Inc., San Antonio, Texas, USA) a number of options for delivery of NPWT are now commercially available. There is an urgent need for evidence demonstrating clinical efficacy of these new

  18. Wound healing efficacy of a chitosan-based film-forming gel containing tyrothricin in various rat wound models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Young; Jun, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Joon; Hwang, Kyu-Mok; Choi, Sung Rak; Han, Sang Duk; Son, Mi-Won; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the healing effects of a chitosan-based, film-forming gel containing tyrothricin (TYR) in various rat wound models, including burn, abrasion, incision, and excision models. After solidification, the chitosan film layer successfully covered and protected a variety of wounds. Wound size was measured at predetermined timepoints after wound induction, and the effects of the film-forming gel were compared with negative (no treatment) and positive control groups (commercially available sodium fusidate ointment and TYR gel). In burn, abrasion and excision wound models, the film-forming gel enabled significantly better healing from 1 to 6 days after wound induction, compared with the negative control. Importantly, the film-forming gel also enabled significantly better healing compared with the positive control treatments. In the incision wound model, the breaking strength of wound strips from the group treated with the film-forming gel was significantly increased compared with both the negative and positive control groups. Histological studies revealed advanced granulation tissue formation and epithelialization in wounds treated with the film-forming gel. We hypothesize that the superior healing effects of the film-forming gel are due to wound occlusion, conferred by the chitosan film. Our data suggest that this film-forming gel may be useful in treating various wounds, including burn, abrasion, incision and excision wounds. PMID:24715576

  19. Cellular and Genetic Analysis of Wound Healing in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    To establish a genetic system to study postembryonic wound healing, we characterized epidermal wound healing in Drosophila larvae. Following puncture wounding, larvae begin to bleed but within an hour a plug forms in the wound gap. Over the next couple of hours the outer part of the plug melanizes to form a scab, and epidermal cells surrounding the plug orient toward it and then fuse to form a syncytium. Subsequently, more-peripheral cells orient toward and fuse with the central syncytium. During this time, the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is activated in a gradient emanating out from the wound, and the epidermal cells spread along or through the wound plug to reestablish a continuous epithelium and its basal lamina and apical cuticle lining. Inactivation of the JNK pathway inhibits epidermal spreading and reepithelialization but does not affect scab formation or other wound healing responses. Conversely, mutations that block scab formation, and a scabless wounding procedure, provide evidence that the scab stabilizes the wound site but is not required to initiate other wound responses. However, in the absence of a scab, the JNK pathway is hyperinduced, reepithelialization initiates but is not always completed, and a chronic wound ensues. The results demonstrate that the cellular responses of wound healing are under separate genetic control, and that the responses are coordinated by multiple signals emanating from the wound site, including a negative feedback signal between scab formation and the JNK pathway. Cell biological and molecular parallels to vertebrate wound healing lead us to speculate that wound healing is an ancient response that has diversified during evolution. PMID:15269788

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct in healing of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vijay; Bhandari, Prem S; Rajagopalan, Satyamoorthy; Mukherjee, Mrinal K

    2015-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has emerged as a cutting-edge technology and provides an alternative solution to the problem of wounds. This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of this technique in the treatment of chronic wounds. A prospective clinical study was used to evaluate our experience in use of NPWT in the healing of pressure ulcers and chronic wounds over 2 years. The primary end point of the study group was the time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue and full reepithelialisation without drainage. All patients with sepsis were excluded from the study. The statistical analysis of the data was carried out. Of the 60 patients studied, 41 had associated comorbidities including diabetes mellitus. The commonest site of occurrence was the lower limb. Coverage in the form of a flap was required at presentation in 63·33% of patients. However, after initiation of NPWT, none of them required the procedure and they healed spontaneously either by secondary intention or by skin grafting. The time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue was 14·36 ± 4·24 days. Complete healing of wounds occurred by 33·1 ± 10·22 days. There was a statistically significant difference in the volume of the wounds before and after the intervention (P = 0·000). Complications resulting from NPWT were minimal. This technique is an excellent adjunct to surgical debridement. PMID:23855645

  1. Prevalence of Immune Disease in Patients with Wounds Presenting to a Tertiary Wound Healing Center

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Schilling, Amber; Germinario, Anthony; Mete, Mihyre; Kim, Paul; Steinberg, John; Attinger, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and account for considerable healthcare and socioeconomic costs. Leg ulcers are a recognized complication of immune disease, and the purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of immune disease in a cohort of patients with chronic wounds, and to compare wound outcomes in the subjects with and without immune disease. Retrospective chart review was completed on consecutive patients scheduled with the plastic surgeon in the Georgetown University Center for Wound Healing between January 1 and March 31, 2009. Of the 520 patients scheduled for appointments, 340 were eligible for inclusion. The prevalence of immune disease was higher than expected with 78 of 340 patients (23%) having associated immune disease. At presentation, wounds in patients with immune disease had a significantly larger mean surface area (33.4cm2 (69.05) compared to 22.5 cm2 (63.65), p=0.02). Split thickness skin graft (STSG) and bioengineered alternative tissue (BAT) graft data was available on 177 grafts from 55 subjects. There was a significantly lower response rate to STSG in subjects with immune disease (50% compared to 97%, p=0.0002), but response rates to BAT were not different. The association between immune diseases and chronic wounds may provide unique insights into pathways of wound healing, and warrants further study. PMID:22168783

  2. Treatment Options to Manage Wound Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Curtis E.; Kennedy, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioburden is an accepted barrier to chronic wound healing. Defining the significance, phenotype, clinical classification, and treatment guidelines has been historically lacking of evidence and based on paradigms that do not represent the scientific or clinical reality. The Problem Chronic wound bioburden is typically abundant, polymicrobial, and extremely diverse. These microbes naturally adopt biofilm phenotypes, which are quite often viable but not culturable, thereby going undetected. The failures of culture-based detection have led to abandonment of routine bioburden evaluation and aggressive treatment or, worse, to assume bioburden is not a significant barrier. Predictably, treatment regimens to address biofilm phenotypes lagged behind our diagnostic tools and understanding. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Microbial DNA-based diagnostic tools and treatment regimens have emerged, which provide and leverage objective information, resulting in a dramatic impact on outcomes. Relevance to Clinical Care Modern medicine demands decisions based on objective evidence. The diagnostic and treatment protocols reviewed herein empower clinicians to practice modern medicine with regard to bioburden, with DNA level certainty. Conclusion Bioburden is a significant barrier to healing for all chronic wounds. Molecular diagnostics provide the first objective means of assessing wound bioburden. The accuracy and comprehensive data from such diagnostic methodologies provide clinicians with the ability to employ patient-specific treatment options, targeted to each patient's microbial wound census. Based on current outcomes data, the most effective therapeutic options are topical (TPL) antibiofilm agents (ABF) combined with TPL antibiotics (ABX). In specific patients, systemic ABX and selective biocides are also appropriate, but not exclusive of ABF combined with TPL ABX. PMID:24527291

  3. Staphylococcus aureus recognition by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells via TLR2/MyD88/PGE2 stimulates granulopoiesis in wounds.

    PubMed

    Granick, Jennifer L; Falahee, Patrick C; Dahmubed, Delsheen; Borjesson, Dori L; Miller, Lloyd S; Simon, Scott I

    2013-09-01

    During bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) differentiate into polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the bone marrow. We reported that HSPCs recruited to Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice undergo granulopoiesis, whereas other authors have demonstrated their differentiation in vitro after Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/MyD88 stimulation. Here, we examined this pathway in HSPC trafficking and granulopoiesis within S aureus-infected wounds. Lineage- HSPCs from TLR2- or MyD88-deficient mice injected into infected wounds of wild-type (WT) mice exhibited impaired granulopoiesis. However, HSPCs from WT mice produced similar numbers of PMNs whether transferred into wounds of TLR2-, MyD88-deficient, or WT mice. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which stimulates HSPC survival and proliferation, was produced by HSPCs after TLR2 stimulation, suggesting that TLR2/MyD88 activation promotes granulopoiesis in part by production and autocrine activity of PGE2. Pretreatment of TLR2- or MyD88-deficient HSPCs with PGE2 rescued granulocytic differentiation in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that bone marrow-derived lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ cells produced PGE2 and underwent granulopoiesis after TLR2 stimulation. lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ cells deficient in TLR2 or MyD88 produced PMNs after PGE2 treatment when transferred into uninfected wounds. We conclude that granulopoiesis in S aureus-infected wounds is induced by TLR2/MyD88 activation of HSPCs through a mechanism that involves autocrine production and activity of PGE2. PMID:23869087

  4. [Facing wound healing-let our mind soar].

    PubMed

    Han, Chun-mao

    2012-02-01

    When I started my career as a burn doctor, I looked over all those chapters dealing with wound healing wishing desperately to help me understand the healing process and mechanism of wound. Whereas is that the whole picture of wound healing? Decades have passed; we are still following these protocols. Do we really have nothing better to do with wound healing? When I was asked to write this comment, I was thinking that we should think high and wide in facing wound healing. PMID:22490531

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy and wound-healing property of a topical ointment containing nitric-oxide-loaded zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Utku K.; Bhattacharyya, Aparna; Samuels, Joshua; Sedlak, Jason; Trikha, Ritika; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Weingarten, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Topical delivery of nitric oxide (NO) through a wound dressing has the potential to reduce wound infections and improve healing of acute and chronic wounds. This study characterized the antibacterial efficacy of an ointment containing NO-loaded, zinc-exchanged zeolite A that releases NO upon contact with water. The release rate of NO from the ointment was measured using a chemiluminescence detection system. Minimum bactericidal concentration assays were performed using five common wound pathogens, including Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii), Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungus (Candida albicans). The time dependence of antimicrobial activity was characterized by performing log-reduction assays at four time points after 1–8 h ointment exposure. The cytotoxicity of the ointment after 24 h was assessed using cultured 3T3 fibroblast cells. Minimum microbicidal concentrations (MMCs) for bacterial organisms (5×107 c.f.u.) ranged from 50 to 100 mg ointment (ml media)?1; the MMC for C. albicans (5×104 c.f.u.) was 50 mg ointment (ml media)?1. Five to eight log reductions in bacterial viability and three log reductions in fungal viability were observed after 8 h exposure to NO–zeolite ointment compared with untreated organisms. Fibroblasts remained viable after 24 h exposure to the same concentration of NO–zeolite ointment as was used in antimicrobial tests. In parallel studies, full-thickness cutaneous wounds on Zucker obese rats healed faster than wounds treated with a control ointment. These data indicate that ointment containing NO-loaded zeolites could potentially be used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial wound-healing dressing. PMID:24196133

  6. Electrospun antibacterial polyurethane-cellulose acetate-zein composite mats for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Gnanasekaran, Gopalsamy; Sathishkumar, Yesupatham; Lee, Yang Soo; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an antibacterial electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds with diameters around 400-700 nm were prepared by physically blending polyurethane (PU) with two biopolymers such as cellulose acetate (CA) and zein. Here, PU was used as the foundation polymer, was blended with CA and zein to achieve desirable properties such as better hydrophilicity, excellent cell attachment, proliferation and blood clotting ability. To prevent common clinical infections, an antimicrobial agent, streptomycin sulfate was incorporated into the electrospun fibers and its antimicrobial ability against the gram negative and gram positive bacteria were examined. The interaction between fibroblasts and the PU-CA and PU-CA-zein-drug scaffolds such as viability, proliferation, and attachment were characterized. PU-CA-zein-drug composite nanoscaffold showed enhanced blood clotting ability in comparison with pristine PU nanofibers. The presence of CA and zein in the nanofiber membrane improved its hydrophilicity, bioactivity and created a moist environment for the wound, which can accelerate wound recovery. PMID:24507360

  7. The effect of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on wound healing using a dressing model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Karen B; Cordell, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the promising antibacterial effects of Melaleuca alternifolia, or tea tree essential oil. The study detailed here replicates in humans a 2004 in vitro study that used a dressing model over Petri dishes to determine the antimicrobial effects of the fumes of tea tree essential oil. The current study used the same dressing model with patients who had wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Ten participants volunteered for the quasi-experimental study, and four of the 10 were used as matched participants to compare wound healing times between conventional treatment alone and conventional treatment plus fumes of tea tree essential oil. The results demonstrated decreased healing time in all but one of the participants treated with tea tree oil. The differences between the matched participants were striking. The results of this small investigational study indicate that additional study is warranted. PMID:23848210

  8. Incisional Hernia Classification Predicts Wound Complications Two Years after Repair.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny M; Oyefule, Omobolanle O; Stewart, Melissa K; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2015-07-01

    Classification of ventral hernias (VHs) into categories that impact surgical outcome is not well defined. The European Hernia Society (EHS) classification divides ventral incisional hernias by midline or lateral location. This study aimed to determine whether EHS classification is associated with wound complications after