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1

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

This NOC application is provided to update the description of amounts of material handled, and to update the calculation of potential for emissions and resultant calculation of offsite TEDE. This NOC also includes an updated description of the various emission units at WSCF, including use of portable tanks to receive and remove liquid waste contaminated with low levels of radioactive contamination. The resultant, adjusted estimate for TEDE to the hypothetical MEI due to all combined unabated emissions from WSCF is 1.4 E-02 millirem per year. The total adjusted estimate for all combined abated emissions is 2.8 E-03 millirem per year. No single emission unit at the WSCF Complex exceeds a potential (unabated) offsite dose of 2.7 E-03 millirem per year.

BATES, J.A.

2000-05-01

2

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-01-01

3

LABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS  

E-print Network

on the benefits of a laboratory study, namely short time span and minimal use of resources. Field studiesLABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS William D. Humphries, Dennis for studying complex CSCW phenomena. In our prior work a more ecological laboratory approach was developed

McCrickard, Scott

4

Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex  

SciTech Connect

The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-12

5

2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. The Components Test Laboratory (T-27) is located in the immediate foreground. Immediately uphill to the left of T-27 is the Boiler Chiller Plant (T-28H). To the left of T-28H is the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D). Behind the T-28D is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B). The twin gantry structure at the left is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

6

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. The twin gantry structure in the center is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). To its immediate left in the foreground is a truck well, concrete retaining wall, piping, and stack associated with the oxidizer vault storage area. To the immediate right of T-28 is the concrete Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). At the extreme right is the Long-Term Hydrazine Silo (T-28E). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

7

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2012-10-01

8

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2013-10-01

9

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2010-10-01

10

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2011-10-01

11

42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...moderate complexity testing; technical consultant. 493.1409 Section 493.1409 ...moderate complexity testing; technical consultant. The laboratory must have a technical consultant who meets the qualification...

2010-10-01

12

42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493.1415 ...moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the qualification...

2010-10-01

13

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2013-10-01

14

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2011-10-01

15

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2012-10-01

16

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2010-10-01

17

42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493.1453 ...performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the requirements of §...

2010-10-01

18

Zeng-Guang Hou State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems  

E-print Network

Zeng-Guang Hou State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems Institute, China, in 1997. He is a Professor and Deputy Director of the State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His current research

Hickman, Mark

19

The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

Loehlin, James H.; And Others

1982-01-01

20

Epigenetics of Complex Diseases: From General Theory to Laboratory Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite significant effort, understanding the causes and mechanisms of complex non-Mendelian diseases remains a key challenge.\\u000a Although numerous molecular genetic linkage and association studies have been conducted in order to explain the heritable\\u000a predisposition to complex diseases, the resulting data are quite often inconsistent and even controversial. In a similar way,\\u000a identification of environmental factors causal to a disease is

A. Schumacher; A. Petronis

21

Diamagnetic Anisotropy: Two Iron Complexes as Laboratory Examples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are relatively few experiments describing the NMR properties of bis(amine) iron(II) phthalocyanine complexes. Several features make this experiment attractive: First, it nicely illustrates the diamagnetic anisotropy phenomena, providing both students and teachers an opportunity to gain insight into aspects such as phase correction and…

Fernandez, Ignacio; Sanchez, Jorge Fernando Fernandez

2010-01-01

22

Complex organics in laboratory simulations of interstellar/cometary ices.  

PubMed

We present the photochemical and thermal evolution of both non-polar and polar ices representative of interstellar and pre-cometary grains. Ultraviolet photolysis of the non-polar ices comprised of O2, N2, and CO produces CO2, N2O, O3, CO3, HCO, H2CO, and possibly NO and NO2. When polar ice analogs (comprised of H2O, CH3OH, CO, and NH3) are exposed to UV radiation, simple molecules are formed including: H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, and HCO (the formyl radical). Warming produces moderately complex species such as CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), R-CN and/or R-NC (nitriles and/or isonitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. Infrared spectroscopy, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrate that after warming to room temperature what remains is an organic residue composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4) and other complex organics including the amides above and polyoxymethylene (POM) and its derivatives. The formation of these organic species from simple starting mixtures under conditions germane to astrochemistry may have important implications for the organic chemistry of interstellar ice grains, comets and the origins of life. PMID:11541346

Bernstein, M P; Allamandola, L J; Sandford, S A

1997-01-01

23

Errors and electronic prescribing: a controlled laboratory study to examine task complexity and interruption effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo examine the effect of interruptions and task complexity on error rates when prescribing with computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, and to categorize the types of prescribing errors.DesignTwo within-subject factors: task complexity (complex vs simple) and interruption (interruption vs no interruption). Thirty-two hospital doctors used a CPOE system in a computer laboratory to complete four prescribing tasks, half of

Farah Magrabi; Simon Y. W. Li; Richard O. Day; Enrico W. Coiera

2010-01-01

24

A Three-Step Laboratory Sequence to Prepare a Carbene Complex of Silver(I) Chloride  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have developed a multistep inorganic synthesis experiment for our second-year undergraduate teaching laboratory that introduces students to modern organometallic chemistry. The ligands are prepared in two simple steps and the preparation of an air-stable silver carbene complex is accomplished in the third step. The students are introduced to…

Canal, John P.; Ramnial, Taramatee; Langlois, Lisa D.; Abernethy, Colin D.; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

2008-01-01

25

Permutation Entropy and Statistical Complexity Analysis of Turbulence in Laboratory Plasmas and the Solar Wind  

E-print Network

The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and fully-developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the WIND spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge fluctuations. The CH ...

Weck, Peter J; Brown, Michael R; Wicks, Robert T

2014-01-01

26

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01

27

A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Small, Michael; Behringer, Robert P.; Tse, Chi K.

2014-03-01

28

A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault.  

PubMed

We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering. PMID:24697394

Walker, David M; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Small, Michael; Behringer, Robert P; Tse, Chi K

2014-03-01

29

Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

2010-11-01

30

Comparison of in situ uranium KD values with a laboratory determined surface complexation model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reactive solute transport simulations in groundwater require a large number of parameters to describe hydrologic and chemical reaction processes. Appropriate methods for determining chemical reaction parameters required for reactive solute transport simulations are still under investigation. This work compares U(VI) distribution coefficients (i.e. KD values) measured under field conditions with KD values calculated from a surface complexation model developed in the laboratory. Field studies were conducted in an alluvial aquifer at a former U mill tailings site near the town of Naturita, CO, USA, by suspending approximately 10 g samples of Naturita aquifer background sediments (NABS) in 17-5.1-cm diameter wells for periods of 3 to 15 months. Adsorbed U(VI) on these samples was determined by extraction with a pH 9.45 NaHCO3/Na2CO3 solution. In wells where the chemical conditions in groundwater were nearly constant, adsorbed U concentrations for samples taken after 3 months of exposure to groundwater were indistinguishable from samples taken after 15 months. Measured in situ K D values calculated from the measurements of adsorbed and dissolved U(VI) ranged from 0.50 to 10.6 mL/g and the KD values decreased with increasing groundwater alkalinity, consistent with increased formation of soluble U(VI)-carbonate complexes at higher alkalinities. The in situ K D values were compared with KD values predicted from a surface complexation model (SCM) developed under laboratory conditions in a separate study. A good agreement between the predicted and measured in situ KD values was observed. The demonstration that the laboratory derived SCM can predict U(VI) adsorption in the field provides a critical independent test of a submodel used in a reactive transport model. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Curtis, G. P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J. A.

2004-01-01

31

Sandia National Laboratories ASCOT (atmospheric studies in complex terrain) field experiment, September 1980  

SciTech Connect

During the period September 8 through September 25, 1980, Sandia National Laboratories, Division 4774, participated in a series of experiments held in the Geysers area of California. These experiments, aimed at providing data on nighttime drainage flow in complex terrain, were intended to provide a reliable basis for mathematical flow modeling. Tracers were released at several points on a valley rim and sampled by a large number of stations at ground level. Sandia's contribution was to make it possible to derive vertical tracer profiles. This was done by taking air samples from a captive balloon at chosen altitudes between the surface and 450 meters above ground.

Woods, R.O.

1982-04-01

32

Laboratory experimental check of a conceptual model for infiltration under complex rainfall patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental evidence of the accuracy of the model proposed by Corradini et al. (1997, Journal of Hydrology 192: 104-124) for local infiltration-redistribution-reinfiltration in homogeneous soils is given. The model provides infiltration through the time evolution of the soil water content vertical profile, which is described by an ordinary differential equation in any stage of a given rainfall event. A nearly horizontal laboratory slope was used for the experiments performed over both a medium- and a coarse-textured soil. During each experiment characterized by a complex rainfall pattern, the soil water content at different depths was continuously monitored using the time-domain reflectometry method. Our results indicate that the model simulated the experimental vertical profiles of accurately, particularly during the infiltration and reinfiltration stages separated by a rainfall hiatus with redistribution of soil water. These results indicate the reliability of the model in computing the local effective rainfall for hydrological response.

Melone, Florisa; Corradini, Corrado; Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla

2006-02-01

33

Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iron is always present in the atmosphere in concentrations from ~10-9 M (clouds, rain) up to ~10-3 M (fog, particles). Sources are mainly mineral dust emissions. Iron complexes are very good absorbers in the UV-VIS actinic region and therefore photo-chemically reactive. Iron complex photolysis leads to radical production and can initiate radical chain reactions, which is related to the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. These radical chain reactions are involved in the decomposition and transformation of a variety of chemical compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles. Additionally, the photochemical reaction itself can be a degradation pathway for organic compounds with the ability to bind iron. Iron-complexes of atmospherically relevant coordination compounds like oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, tartronate, gluconate, pyruvate and glyoxalate have been investigated in laboratory experiments. Iron speciation depends on the iron-ligand ratio and the pH. The most suitable experimental conditions were calculated with a speciation program (Visual Minteq). The solutions were prepared accordingly and transferred to a 1 cm quartz cuvette and flash-photolyzed with an excimer laser at wavelengths 308 or 351 nm. Photochemically produced Fe2+ has been measured by spectrometry at 510 nm as Fe(phenantroline)32+. Fe2+ overall effective quantum yields have been calculated with the concentration of photochemically produced Fe2+ and the measured energy of the excimer laser pulse. The laser pulse energy was measured with a pyroelectric sensor. For some iron-carboxylate systems the experimental parameters like the oxygen content of the solution, the initial Iron concentration and the incident laser energy were systematically altered to observe an effect on the overall quantum yield. The dependence of some quantum yields on these parameters allows in some cases an interpretation of the underlying photochemical reaction mechanism. Quantum yields of malonate, glutarate and gluconate complexes lie in the range of 0.02 < ? < 0.10, whereas succinate, tartronate, pyruvate and glyoxalate systems have values between 0.16 < ? < 1.26. All quantum yields include contributions from secondary thermal reactions. Furthermore, an attempt was made to differentiate between contributions of individual iron-oxalato complexes to the overall measured quantum yield. The formation and photolysis of the iron-carboxylate complexes and the subsequent reactions of the resulting compounds have been implemented in CAPRAM 3.0 (Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism). Modeling studies were performed to investigate the effects of the expanded iron photochemistry on oxidant budgets, the iron redox-cycling and the processing of secondary organic acids in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles under different environmental conditions. The model studies have shown that, i.e. for pyruvic acid under urban conditions, the photolysis of the iron-pyruvate complex can contribute with about 40 % significantly to the overall degradation flux and represents thus an important loss pathway beside the radical oxidation pathways.

Weller, C.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

2010-12-01

34

Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A complex sequence of layered basalt flows, cinders, and sediment underlies the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. Wells drilled to 700 ft penetrate a sequence of 10 basalt-flow groups and 7 major sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 100,000 to 600,000 years old. The 10 flow groups consist of 22 separate lava flows and flow-units. Each flow group is made up of from one to five petrographically similar flows that erupted from common source areas during periods of less than 200 years. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and wind-blown deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated during periods of volcanic inactivity ranging from thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. Flows and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 600 ft. Flows and sediment below a depth of 600 ft are saturated and make up the uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The areal extent of flow groups and interbeds was determined from well cuttings, cores, geophysical logs, potassium-argon ages, and geomagnetic properties. Stratigraphical control was provided by four sequential basalt flows near the base of the unsaturated zone that have reversed geomagnetic polarity and high emission of natural gamma radiation compared to other flows. Natural gamma logs were used as a primary correlation tool. Natural-gamma emissions, which are generally uniform in related, petrographically similar flows, increase or decrease between petrographically dissimilar flows of different age and source. (USGS)

Anderson, S.R.; Lewis, B.D.

1989-01-01

35

Using MPEG21 DIDL to Represent Complex Digital Objects in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Digital Library  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the use of NISO OpenURL and MPEG-21 Digital Item Processing (DIP) to disseminate complex objects and their contained assets, in a repository architecture designed for the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the architecture, the MPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration Language (DIDL) is used as the XML-based format to represent complex digital objects. Through

Jeroen Bekaert; Patrick Hochstenbach; Herbert Van de Sompel

2003-01-01

36

A solid phase C1q enzyme assay for circulating immune complexes adapted for routine clinical laboratory testing.  

PubMed

An assay for circulating immune complexes (CIC) that is adaptable to a routine clinical laboratory is described. This solid phase C1q (SP C1q) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) uses commercially available reagents and is reproducible with CV% of less than 20% in the abnormal range. We also demonstrate the specificity of the assay for detecting clinically relevant dsDNA-anti-DNA immune complexes. PMID:6353904

James, K; Vahey, A; Robinson, M; Marder, R

1983-10-01

37

Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol.  

PubMed

The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60-180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

Prather, Kimberly A; Bertram, Timothy H; Grassian, Vicki H; Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Demott, Paul J; Aluwihare, Lihini I; Palenik, Brian P; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H; Moffet, Ryan C; Molina, Mario J; Cappa, Christopher D; Geiger, Franz M; Roberts, Gregory C; Russell, Lynn M; Ault, Andrew P; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B; Corrigan, Craig E; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Ebben, Carlena J; Forestieri, Sara D; Guasco, Timothy L; Hersey, Scott P; Kim, Michelle J; Lambert, William F; Modini, Robin L; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E; Ruppel, Matthew J; Ryder, Olivia S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Sullivan, Ryan C; Zhao, Defeng

2013-05-01

38

Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol  

PubMed Central

The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60–180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

Prather, Kimberly A.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Deane, Grant B.; Stokes, M. Dale; DeMott, Paul J.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Palenik, Brian P.; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Molina, Mario J.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Geiger, Franz M.; Roberts, Gregory C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.; Ebben, Carlena J.; Forestieri, Sara D.; Guasco, Timothy L.; Hersey, Scott P.; Kim, Michelle J.; Lambert, William F.; Modini, Robin L.; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Schoepp, Nathan G.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Zhao, Defeng

2013-01-01

39

Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic carbon, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from borehole USGS 136 indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Depth-discrete groundwater samples were collected in the open borehole USGS 136 near 965, 710, and 573 ft BLS using a thief sampler; on the basis of selected constituents, deeper groundwater samples showed no influence from wastewater disposal at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex.

Twining. Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

2012-01-01

40

Hydrologic and Meteorological Data for an Unsaturdated-Zone Study Area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1990-96.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (formerly known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) have been used for burial of r...

K. S. Perkins, J. R. Nimmo, J. R. Pittman

1998-01-01

41

Gibbs Energy Changes during Cobalt Complexation: A Thermodynamics Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By adding a large quantity of Cl[superscript -] to an aqueous solution of CoCl[subscript 2][multiplied by]6H[subscript 2]O, a mixture containing a red octahedral cobalt complex and a blue tetrahedral complex is produced. When the solution temperature is modified, the equilibrium constant, K[subscript eq], of the complexation reaction is shifted…

DeGrand, Michael J.; Abrams, M. Leigh; Jenkins, Judith L.; Welch, Lawrence E.

2011-01-01

42

Title: Measurement Science for Complex Information Systems Submitting OU: Information Technology Laboratory  

E-print Network

and deployment; thus, software components can be tested in a laboratory and unleashed to thousands of users and supporting tools to measure and analyze global system behavior and (2) testing laboratories possess as well as changing environmental conditions. Testing components in multiple combinations is currently

Mills, Kevin

43

Thermal instabilities in a soft and complex lithosphere: laboratory experiments and numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upwelling of hot material in the lithosphere remains far from understood. This is due to the complexity of the mechanical behaviour of lithospheric material, which presents solid as well as viscous properties. Mushroom-shaped less viscous plumes or more viscous finger-shaped diapirs, depending on the viscosity ratio between the rising and the matrix materials, are known to migrate through ductile, quasi-newtonian lithosphere; while dikes fracture and propagate through a solid matrix. But what happens in between these two end-members? To answer this question, we perform a combined study of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on the development of thermal plumes in aqueous solutions of Carbopol, a polymer gel suspension forming a continous network of micrometric sponges. This fluid is shear thinning and presents a yield-stress, whereby flow occurs only if the local stress exceeds a critical value. Below this value, the fluid acts as an elastic solid. Our experimental setup consists of a localized heat-source, placed in the center of a squared plexiglas tank. At t=0, a constant thermal power is applied locally to the fluid. For the numerical simulations, we replace the rigid plastic regions by an extremely viscous fluid, and therefore neglect the elastic contribution to the local stress. We systematically studied the influence of the rheological parameters, as well as the supplied heat. Depending on the Yield number Y0, which compares the thermally-induced stress to the yield stress, three different regims are observed. For low Y0, no convection develops; while for intermediate values, a small-scale convection cell appears and remains confined around the heater. For high Y0, thermal instabilities rise through the tank. Their morphology differs from the mushroom-shape typically encountered in newtonian fluids. Combined temperature and velocity field measurements show that a plug flow develops within the plume thermal anomaly, therefore producing a rising finger-shape with strong shear zones confined along its edges. The characteristics of the instability, as well as the existence of unyielded regions and the development of a damaged zone ahead of the plume as it rises, depend on Y0 but also on the other rheological parameters. The numerical simulations recover well the features observed in the laboratory experiments. This allows us to extend the parameter range of study. Our experimental finger-shaped diapirs present strong similarities with an off-axis diapir in Oman emplaced in a ridge context. This geological object, several kilometers in diameter presents in particular strong shear localization along its edges. Within our fluid mechanics framework, the existence of such an instability in the lithosphere places strong constraints on its parameter range. It suggests that this diapir was emplaced in a partially molten lithosphere. Therefore Herschel-Bulkley fluids like Carbopol might be good candidates to get new insights into the behavior of "soft" geological systems like mid-ocean ridge systems.

Massmeyer, A.; Davaille, A. B.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Di Giuseppe, E.

2012-12-01

44

Chemical transformations of complex mixtures relevant to atmospheric processes: Laboratory and ambient studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of atmospheric chemistry and chemical transformations, which are relevant to conditions in the ambient atmosphere require the investigation of complex mixtures. In the atmosphere, complex mixtures (e.g. diesel emissions) are continually evolving as a result of physical and chemical transformations. This dissertation examines the transformations of modern diesel emissions (DE) in a series of experiments conducted at the European Outdoor Simulation Chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. Experimental design challenges are addressed, and the development of a NOx removal technology (denuder) is described with results from the application of the newly developed NOx denuder in the most recent EUPHORE campaign (2006). In addition, the data from an ambient aerosol study that examines atmospheric transformation products is presented and discussed. Atmospheric transformations of DE and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, along with chemical characterization of polar organic compounds (POC) in the EUPHORE experiments, provides a valuable insight on the tranformations of modern DE in environmentally relevant atmospheres. The greatest SOA production occurred in DE with toluene addition experiments (>40%), followed by DE with HCHO (for OH radical generation) experiments. A small amount of SOA (3%) was observed for DE in dark with N2O5 (for NO3 radical production) experiments. Distinct POC formation in light versus dark experiments suggests the role of OH initiated reactions in these chamber atmospheres. A trend of increasing concentrations of dicarboxylic acids in light versus dark experiments was observed when evaluated on a compound group basis. The production of diacids (as a compound group) demonstrates a consistent indicator for photochemical transformation in relation to studies in the ambient atmosphere. The four toluene addition experiments in this study were performed at different [tol]o/[NOx]o ratios and displayed an average SOA %yield (in relation to toluene) of 5.3+/-1.6%, which is compared to past chamber studies that evaluated the impact of [tol]o/[NO x]o on SOA production in more simplified mixtures. Characterization of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH, nitroarenes), which have been shown to be mutagenic and/or carcinogenic, was performed on time-intergrated samples from the EUPHORE experiments. NPAH concentrations indicated significant formation and/or degradation was taking place. An inter-experimental comparison showed that distinct gas (2-nitronaphthalene) and particle (2-nitrofluoranthene, 4-nitropyrene) phase NPAH production resulted in light versus dark experiments, and degradation most likely due to photolysis was observed for one of the most abundant NPAH (1-nitropyrene) in the ambient atmosphere. The evaluation of dark experiments in high and low NOx conditions, revealed a significantly higher concentration of gas phase NPAH (mostly due to 1-nitronaphthalene) in high NOx experiments. Electrophilic nitration on chamber surfaces or sampling media can not be ruled out as a possible mechanism for the elevated NPAH concentrations. Chapter 5 presents results from an aerosol sampling study at the Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) (3210 MSL, 40.45° N, 106.74° W) in the winter of 2007. The unique geographical character of SPL allows for extended observations/sampling of the free tropospheric interface. Of 84 analytes included in the GC-MS method, over 50 individual water extractable POC were present at concentrations greater than 0.1 ngm-3. Diurnal averages over the sampling period revealed a higher total concentration of POC at night, 211 ngm-3 (105-265 ngm-3), versus day, 160 ngm-3 (137-205 ngm -3), which suggests a more aged nighttime aerosol character. During a snow event (Jan. 11-13, 2007), the concentrations of daytime dicarboxylic acids, which may be considered as atmospheric transformation products, were reduced. Lower actinic flux, reduced transport distance, and ice crystal scavenging may explain this variability. Further evaluation of compound ratios (e.g. diacids to

Samy, Shahryar (Shar)

45

The Binding Constant for Complexation of Bilirubin to Bovine Serum Albumin. An Experiment for the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the binding constant for bilirubin-bovine serum albumin complexation by the Method of Continuous Variations. The experiment applies fundamental concepts of physical chemistry to a commercially available system of biological interest. The experiment is easily completed in a single laboratory period, and students obtain binding constants on the order of 10 7, in good agreement with literature values.

Williams, Kathryn R.; Adhyaru, Bhavin; Pierce, Russell E.; Schulman, Stephen G.

2002-01-01

46

Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

47

Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

Kass, David H.

2007-01-01

48

Future Development Of The Flerov Laboratory Accelerator Complex (Project DRIBs-III)  

SciTech Connect

Future development of the FLNR accelerator complex (project DRIBs-III) includes modernization of existing cyclotrons, construction of a new experimental hall, creation of a new high current cyclotron and of next generation experimental set-ups. Realization of the project is planned for 2010-2016.

Gulbekian, G. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation)

2010-04-30

49

Laboratory Investigations of Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much of Pluto’s surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto’s atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-? UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low-temperature N2-, CH4-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near-IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft in 2015, will give the first close-up measurements of ices and their photoproducts. Laboratory measurements and experiments will provide a better context for the data returned by the spacecraft.

Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

2014-11-01

50

Laboratory Class Project: Using a Cichlid Fish Display Tank to Teach Students about Complex Behavioral Systems  

PubMed Central

Laboratory activities serve several important functions in undergraduate science education. For neuroscience majors, an important and sometimes underemphasized tool is the use of behavioral observations to help inform us about the consequences of changes that are occurring on a neuronal level. To help address this concern, the following laboratory exercise is presented. The current project tested the prediction that the most dominant fish in a tank of cichlids will have gained the most benefits of its position resulting in the greatest growth and hence, become the largest fish. More specifically: (1) is there evidence that a social hierarchy exists among the fish in our tank based on the number of aggressive acts among the four largest fish; (2) if so, does the apparent rank correspond to the size of the fish as predicted by previous studies? Focal sampling and behavior sampling of aggressive acts between fish were utilized in the data collection. Collectively, the data suggest a social dominance hierarchy may be in place with the following rank order from highest to lowest: Fish A > Fish B > Fish D > Fish C. While the largest (Fish A) seems to be at the top, Fish C ended up being ranked lower than Fish D despite the fact that Fish C is larger. Overall, the project was considered a success by the instructor and students. The students offered several suggestions that could improve future versions of this type of project, in particular concerning the process of constructing a poster about the project. The implications of the data and student learning outcomes are discussed. PMID:23493462

Nolan, Brian C.

2010-01-01

51

Historic American Engineering Record, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex  

SciTech Connect

Just as automobiles need fuel to operate, so do nuclear reactors. When fossil fuels such as gasoline are burned to power an automobile, they are consumed immediately and nearly completely in the process. When the fuel is gone, energy production stops. Nuclear reactors are incapable of achieving this near complete burn-up because as the fuel (uranium) that powers them is burned through the process of nuclear fission, a variety of other elements are also created and become intimately associated with the uranium. Because they absorb neutrons, which energize the fission process, these accumulating fission products eventually poison the fuel by stopping the production of energy from it. The fission products may also damage the structural integrity of the fuel elements. Even though the uranium fuel is still present, sometimes in significant quantities, it is unburnable and will not power a reactor unless it is separated from the neutron-absorbing fission products by a method called fuel reprocessing. Construction of the Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Chem Plant started in 1950 with the Bechtel Corporation serving as construction contractor and American Cyanamid Company as operating contractor. Although the Foster Wheeler Corporation assumed responsibility for the detailed working design of the overall plant, scientists at Oak Ridge designed all of the equipment that would be employed in the uranium separations process. After three years of construction activity and extensive testing, the plant was ready to handle its first load of irradiated fuel.

Susan Stacy; Julie Braun

2006-12-01

52

Site characterization program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Site Characterization Program is a continuation of the Subsurface Investigation Program (SIP). The scope of the SIP has broadened in response to the results of past work that identified hazardous as well as radionuclide contaminants in the subsurface environment and in response to the need to meet regulatory requirements. Two deep boreholes were cored at the RWMC during FY-1988. Selected sediment samples were submitted for Appendix IX of 40 CFR Part 264 and radionuclide analyses. Detailed geologic logging of archived core was initiated. Stratigraphic studies of the unsaturated zone were conducted. Studies to determine hydrologic properties of sediments and basalts were conducted. Geochemical studies and analyses were initiated to evaluate contaminant and radionuclide speciation and migration in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) geochemical environment. Analyses of interbed sediments in boreholes D15 and 8801D did not confirm the presence of radionuclide contamination in the 240-ft interbed. Analyses of subsurface air and groundwater samples identified five volatile organic compounds of concern: carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; Vigil, M.J.; Bonzon, C.J.; Landon, J.L.; Laney, P.T.

1989-07-01

53

Elucidating multipollutant exposure across a complex metropolitan area by systematic deployment of a mobile laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study evaluates a deployment strategy of a heavily instrumented mobile lab for characterizing multipollutant spatial patterns based upon a limited number of measurement days spread over different seasons. The measurements obtained through this deployment strategy are used to gain insight into average pollutant levels between routine monitoring sites and in relation to emission sources in the region, as well as to assess correlations between pollutant patterns to better understand the nature of urban air pollutant mixtures. A wide range of locations were part of the deployment in order to characterize the distribution of chronic exposures potentially allowing development of exposure models. Comparison of the mobile lab averages to the available adjacent air quality monitoring network stations to evaluate their representativeness showed that they were in reasonable agreement with the annual averages at the monitoring sites, thus providing some evidence that, through the deployment approach, the mobile lab is able to capture the main features of the average spatial patterns. The differences between mobile lab and network averages varied by pollutant with the best agreement for NO2 with a percentage difference of 20%. Sharp differences in the average spatial distribution were found to exist between different pollutants on multiple scales, particularly on the sub-urban scale, i.e., the neighborhood to street scales. For example, NO2 was observed to be 210-265% higher by the main highway in the study region compared to the nearby urban background monitoring site, while black carbon was higher by 180-200% and particle number concentration was 300% higher. The repeated measurements of near-roadway gradients showed that the rate of change differed by pollutant with elevated concentrations detected up to 600-700 m away for some pollutants. These results demonstrate that through systematic deployment mobile laboratory measurements can be used to characterize average or typical concentration patterns, thus providing data to assess monitoring site representativeness, spatial relationships between pollutants, and chronic multipollutant exposure patterns useful for evaluating and developing exposure models for outdoor concentrations in an urban environment.

Levy, I.; Mihele, C.; Lu, G.; Narayan, J.; Hilker, N.; Brook, J. R.

2014-07-01

54

The Laboratory Production of Complex Organic Molecules in Simulated Interstellar Ices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Much of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. Their low temperatures preclude most chemical reactions, but ionizing radiation can drive reactions that produce a suite of new species, many of which are complex organics. The Astrochemistry Lab at NASA-Ames studies the UV radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to better identify the resulting products and establish links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. Once identified, the spectral properties of the products can be quantified to assist with the search for these species in space. Of particular interest are findings that UV irradiation of interstellar ice analogs produces molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quiriones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones play a variety of roles including electron transport and are used by all organisms. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are irradiated in interstellar ices (Bernstein et al. 2001). Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are irradiated. These amphiphiles self-assemble into membrane-walled vesicles when put in liquid water (Dworkin et al. 2001). Ice irradiation can also produce (Bernstein et al. 2002) and destroy amino acids (Ehrenfreund et al. 2001). Many of the same processes thought to make organics in space should yield products highly enriched in deuterium (D) (Sandford et al. 2001). The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggests that such linkages do exist. By using D as a tracer, we expect to learn more about the different chemical processes occurring in space and their relative importance in the production of different organic compounds and delivery to planetary surfaces.

Dworkin, Jason P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

55

Laboratory chamber measurements of the longwave extinction spectra and complex refractive indices of African and Asian mineral dusts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

this study we present the first results from laboratory chamber experiments newly designed to investigate the longwave optical properties of mineral dust. Extinction spectra in the 2-16 µm range have been measured in situ (T = 293 K, RH < 2%) for polydispersed pure dust aerosols generated from natural parent soils from Tunisia, Niger, and the Gobi desert. Data are used in combination with particle size distributions to estimate the complex refractive index of each dust sample. Our results show that the magnitude and spectral dependence of the dust extinction and refractive indices differ according to particle mineralogy, suggesting the necessity for regionally resolved optical properties for modeling dust radiative effects in the longwave. The magnitude of extinction is controlled by the particle size distribution and remains significant down to low coarse particle concentrations, indicating that the longwave effect of mineral dust persists throughout long-range transport and is thus relevant at the global scale.

Di Biagio, C.; Formenti, P.; Styler, S. A.; Pangui, E.; Doussin, J.-F.

2014-09-01

56

The Laboratory and Observational Study of 2-BUTANONE as a Test for Organic Chemical Complexity in Various Interstellar Physical Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have undertaken a combined laboratory, observational, and modeling research program in an attempt to more fully understand the effects that physical environment has on the chemical composition of astronomical sources. To this end, deep millimeter and submillimeter spectral line surveys of multiple interstellar sources with varied physical conditions have been collected. These sources cover a range of physical environments, including hot cores, shocked regions, low-mass star forming regions, and stellar outflows. We have conducted broadband spectral line surveys at ? =1.3 mm of 10 sources at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). These are forerunner observations to our Herschel OT1 program to continue these line surveys at higher frequencies. Only a fraction of the lines observed in the CSO spectra can be assigned to known molecules. Laboratory spectra of many additional candidates for interstellar detection must therefore be collected before these spectral line surveys can be fully-analyzed. One such molecular target is 2-butanone [also known as methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), CH_3COCH_2CH_3], which contains similar functional groups to other known interstellar molecules and is therefore a likely product of interstellar organic chemistry. The microwave spectrum for MEK was collected with the chirped-pulse waveguide Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) spectrometer at New College Florida, and the millimeter and submillimeter spectrum was collected using the direct absorption flow cell spectrometer at Emory University. We will report here both on the laboratory characterization of MEK and the analysis of the observational line surveys in the context of the identification of new, complex organic molecules in the ISM.

Kroll, Jay A.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus; Shipman, Steven T.

2011-06-01

57

Modularity in the skull and cranial vasculature of laboratory mice: implications for the evolution of complex phenotypes.  

PubMed

The generation of coordinated morphological change over time results from the interconnectedness of evolution and development. The modular architecture of development results in varying degrees of integration and independence among parts of the phenotype, and facilitates the production of phenotypic variation in complex anatomical units composed of multiple tissue types. Here we use geometric morphometrics to investigate modularity in the arterial Circle of Willis (CW) and skull of the CD-1 laboratory mouse. We contrast a hypothesis of tight integration between these tissues with a hypothesis of more modular organization, to determine the level at which natural selection works to generate coordinated change. We report a complex pattern of covariation that indicates that the skull and CW are highly integrated and developmentally linked. Further, we report higher levels of fluctuating asymmetry in the CW than in the skull, suggesting a greater potential for lability in this tissue. These results suggest that epigenetic interactions or genetic influences on regional development are more important determinants of covariation structure than the factors that produce covariation within individual tissues or organ systems. PMID:21210940

Jamniczky, Heather A; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

2011-01-01

58

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

59

Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1994-05-25

60

How Do Structure and Charge Affect Metal-Complex Binding to DNA? An Upper-Division Integrated Laboratory Project Using Cyclic Voltammetry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced undergraduate laboratory project is described that integrates inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical techniques to reveal differences in binding between cationic metal complexes and anionic DNA (herring testes). Students were guided to formulate testable hypotheses based on the title question and a list of different metal…

Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Reed; Frost, Tony; Margerum, Lawrence D.

2011-01-01

61

Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

2007-01-01

62

Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

Porta, Angela R.

2003-01-01

63

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-01-01

64

Report of results of the vapor vacuum extraction test at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the state of Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A test-scale vapor vacuum extraction (VVE) system was installed and operated at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), which is west of Idaho Falls, Idaho and is managed by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office. The system was constructed for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of VVE or vapor venting technology to abate a volatile organic compound (VOC) plume located in the vadose zone below the subsurface disposal area at the complex. To date, the system has been operated for two periods, a two-week test and a four-month test. The purpose of the two-week test was to determine what would be extracted from the borehole and to verify the design of the system to handle what would be extracted.

Chatwin, T.D.; Miyasaki, D.H.; Sisson, J.B.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-08-01

65

Process Description and Operating History for the CPP-601/-640/-627 Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Reprocessing Complex (FRC) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was used for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from the early 1950's until 1992. The reprocessing facilities are now scheduled to be deactivated. As part of the deactivation process, three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units located in the complex must be closed. This document gathers the historical information necessary to provide a rational basis for the preparation of a comprehensive closure plan. Included are descriptions of process operations and the operating history of the FRC. A set of detailed tables record the service history and present status of the process vessels and transfer lines.

E. P. Wagner

1999-06-01

66

Development of a New Method to Track Multiple Honey Bees with Complex Behaviors on a Flat Laboratory Arena  

PubMed Central

A computer program that tracks animal behavior, thereby revealing various features and mechanisms of social animals, is a powerful tool in ethological research. Because honeybee colonies are populated by thousands of bees, individuals co-exist in high physical densities and are difficult to track unless specifically tagged, which can affect behavior. In addition, honeybees react to light and recordings must be made under special red-light conditions, which the eyes of bees perceive as darkness. The resulting video images are scarcely distinguishable. We have developed a new algorithm, K-Track, for tracking numerous bees in a flat laboratory arena. Our program implements three main processes: (A) The object (bee's) region is detected by simple threshold processing on gray scale images, (B) Individuals are identified by size, shape and spatiotemporal positional changes, and (C) Centers of mass of identified individuals are connected through all movie frames to yield individual behavioral trajectories. The tracking performance of our software was evaluated on movies of mobile multi-artificial agents and of 16 bees walking around a circular arena. K-Track accurately traced the trajectories of both artificial agents and bees. In the latter case, K-track outperformed Ctrax, well-known software for tracking multiple animals. To investigate interaction events in detail, we manually identified five interaction categories; ‘crossing’, ‘touching’, ‘passing’, ‘overlapping’ and ‘waiting’, and examined the extent to which the models accurately identified these categories from bee's interactions. All 7 identified failures occurred near a wall at the outer edge of the arena. Finally, K-Track and Ctrax successfully tracked 77 and 60 of 84 recorded interactive events, respectively. K-Track identified multiple bees on a flat surface and tracked their speed changes and encounters with other bees, with good performance. PMID:24465422

Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas; Okada, Ryuichi; Radspieler, Gerald; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

2014-01-01

67

Development of a new method to track multiple honey bees with complex behaviors on a flat laboratory arena.  

PubMed

A computer program that tracks animal behavior, thereby revealing various features and mechanisms of social animals, is a powerful tool in ethological research. Because honeybee colonies are populated by thousands of bees, individuals co-exist in high physical densities and are difficult to track unless specifically tagged, which can affect behavior. In addition, honeybees react to light and recordings must be made under special red-light conditions, which the eyes of bees perceive as darkness. The resulting video images are scarcely distinguishable. We have developed a new algorithm, K-Track, for tracking numerous bees in a flat laboratory arena. Our program implements three main processes: (A) The object (bee's) region is detected by simple threshold processing on gray scale images, (B) Individuals are identified by size, shape and spatiotemporal positional changes, and (C) Centers of mass of identified individuals are connected through all movie frames to yield individual behavioral trajectories. The tracking performance of our software was evaluated on movies of mobile multi-artificial agents and of 16 bees walking around a circular arena. K-Track accurately traced the trajectories of both artificial agents and bees. In the latter case, K-track outperformed Ctrax, well-known software for tracking multiple animals. To investigate interaction events in detail, we manually identified five interaction categories; 'crossing', 'touching', 'passing', 'overlapping' and 'waiting', and examined the extent to which the models accurately identified these categories from bee's interactions. All 7 identified failures occurred near a wall at the outer edge of the arena. Finally, K-Track and Ctrax successfully tracked 77 and 60 of 84 recorded interactive events, respectively. K-Track identified multiple bees on a flat surface and tracked their speed changes and encounters with other bees, with good performance. PMID:24465422

Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas; Okada, Ryuichi; Radspieler, Gerald; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

2014-01-01

68

Soil moisture monitoring results at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, FY-1993  

SciTech Connect

In FY-1993, two tasks were performed for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Low Level Waste Performance Assessment to estimate net infiltration from rain and snow at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) and provide soil moisture data for hydrologic model calibration. The first task was to calibrate the neutron probe to convert neutron count data to soil moisture contents. A calibration equation was developed and applied to four years of neutron probe monitoring data (November 1986 to November 1990) at W02 and W06 to provide soil moisture estimates for that period. The second task was to monitor the soils at two neutron probe access tubes (W02 and W06) located in the SDA of the RWMC with a neutron probe to estimate soil moisture contents. FY-1993 monitoring indicated net infiltration varied widely across the SDA. Less than 1.2 in. of water drained into the underlying basalts near W02 in 1993. In contrast, an estimated 10.9 in. of water moved through the surficial sediments and into the underlying basalts at neutron probe access tube W06. Net infiltration estimates from the November 1986 to November 1990 neutron probe monitoring data are critical to predictive contaminant transport modeling and should be calculated and compared to the FY-1993 net infiltration estimates. In addition, plans are underway to expand the current neutron probe monitoring system in the SDA to address the variability in net infiltration across the SDA.

McElroy, D.L.

1993-11-01

69

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

70

Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt with gravel was described. Basalt flows generally ranged in thickness from 3 to 76 ft (average of 14 ft) and varied from highly fractured to dense with high to low vesiculation. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected during certain stages of the drilling and construction process at boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Geophysical logs were examined synergistically with the core material for borehole USGS 140; additionally, geophysical data were examined to confirm geologic and hydrologic similarities between boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 because core was not collected for borehole USGS 141. Geophysical data suggest the occurrence of fractured and (or) vesiculated basalt, dense basalt, and sediment layering in both the saturated and unsaturated zones in borehole USGS 141. Omni-directional density measurements were used to assess the completeness of the grout annular seal behind 6-in. diameter well casing. Furthermore, gyroscopic deviation measurements were used to measure horizontal and vertical displacement at all depths in boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Single-well aquifer tests were done following construction at wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 and data examined after the tests were used to provide estimates of specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 140 were estimated at 2,370 gallons per minute per foot [(gal/min)/ft)], 4.06 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 740 feet per day (ft/d), respectively. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 141 were estimated at 470 (gal/min)/ft, 5.95 × 104 ft2/d, and 110 ft/d, respectively. Measured flow rates remained relatively constant in well USGS 140 with averages of 23.9 and 23.7 gal/min during the first and second aquifer tests, respectively, and in well USGS 141 with an average of 23.4 gal/min. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from both wells indicated th

Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K. V.

2014-01-01

71

Hydrologic and Meteorological Data for an Unsaturdated-Zone Study Area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1990-96  

SciTech Connect

Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (formerly known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and the potential for migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste trenches and pits. This phase of the study provides hydrologic and meteorological data collected at a designated test trench area adjacent to the northern boundary of the RWMC SDA from 1990 through 1996. The test trench area was constructed by the USGS in 1985. Hydrologic data presented in this report were collected during 1990-96 in the USGS test trench area. Soil-moisture content measurement from disturbed and undisturbed soil were collected approximately monthly during 1990-96 from 11 neutron-probe access holes with a neutron moisture gage. In 1994, three additional neutron access holes were completed for monitoring. A meteorological station inside the test trench area provided data for determination of evapotranspiration rates. The soil-moisture and meteorological data are contained in files on 3-1/2 inch diskettes (disks 1 and 2) included with this report. The data are presented in simple American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format with tab-delimited fields. The files occupy a total of 1.5 megabytes of disk space.

K. S. Perkins, J. R. Nimmo, J. R. Pittman

1998-01-01

72

Determination of Background Uranium Concentration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer under the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

SciTech Connect

Uranium occurs naturally in the environment and is also a contaminant that is disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. To determine whether uranium concentrations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which underlies the laboratory, are elevated as a result of migration of anthropogenic uranium from the Subsurface Disposal Area in the RWMC, uranium background concentrations are necessary. Guideline values are calculated for total uranium, 234U, 235U, and 238U from analytical results from up to five datasets. Three of the datasets include results of samples analyzed using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) and two of the datasets include results obtained using alpha spectrometry. All samples included in the statistical testing were collected from aquifer monitoring wells located within 10 miles of the RWMC. Results from ID-TIMS and alpha spectrometry are combined when the data are not statistically different. Guideline values for total uranium were calculated using four of the datasets, while guideline values for 234U were calculated using only the alpha spectrometry results (2 datasets). Data from all five datasets were used to calculate 238U guideline values. No limit is calculated for 235U because the ID-TIMS results are not useful for comparison with routine monitoring data, and the alpha spectrometry results are too close to the detection limit to be deemed accurate or reliable for calculating a 235U guideline value. All guideline values presented represent the upper 95% coverage 95% confidence tolerance limits for background concentration. If a future monitoring result is above this guideline, then the exceedance will be noted in the quarterly monitoring report and assessed with respect to other aquifer information. The guidelines (tolerance limits) for total U, 234U, and 238U are 2.75 pCi/L, 1.92 pCi/L, and 0.90 pCi/L, respectively.

Molly K. Leecaster; L. Don Koeppen; Gail L. Olson

2003-06-01

73

Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF) maintenance implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is written to satisfy the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program that specifies the general policy and objectives for the establishment of the DOE controlled maintenance programs. These programs provide for the management and performance of cost effective maintenance and repair of the DOE property, which includes facilities. This document outlines maintenance activities associated with the facilities operated by Waste Management Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The objective of this MIP is to provide baseline information for the control and execution of WMH Facility Maintenance activities relative to the requirements of Order 4330.4B, assessment of the WMH maintenance programs, and actions necessary to maintain compliance with the Order. Section 2.0 summarizes the history, mission and description of the WMH facilities. Section 3.0 describes maintenance scope and requirements, and outlines the overall strategy for implementing the maintenance program. Specific elements of DOE Order 4330.4B are addressed in Section 4.0, listing the objective of each element, a discussion of the WMH compliance methodology, and current implementation requirements with references to WMH and HNF policies and procedures. Section 5.0 addresses deviations from policy requirements, and Section 6.0 is a schedule for specific improvements in support of this MIP.

Heinemann, J.L.

1997-08-13

74

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01

75

In situ technology evaluation and functional and operational guidelines for treatability studies at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide EG G Idaho's Waste Technology Development Department with a basis for selection of in situ technologies for demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to provide information for Feasibility Studies to be performed according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The demonstrations will aid in meeting Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) schedules for remediation of waste at Waste Area Group (WAG) 7. This report is organized in six sections. Section 1, summarizes background information on the sites to be remediated at WAG-7, specifically, the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. Section 2 discusses the identification and screening of in situ buried waste remediation technologies for these sites. Section 3 outlines the design requirements. Section 4 discusses the schedule (in accordance with Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) scoping). Section 5 includes recommendations for the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. A listing of references used to compile the report is given in Section 6. Detailed technology information is included in the Appendix section of this report.

Hyde, R.A.; Donehey, A.J.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.; Rubert, A.L.; Walker, S.

1991-07-01

76

Virtual Laboratories > 13. Games of Chance > 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Craps is a popular casino game, because of its complexity and because of the rich variety of bets that can be  

E-print Network

Virtual Laboratories > 13. Games of Chance > 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 4. Craps Craps is a popular casino game, because of its complexity and because of the rich variety of bets that can be made. A typical craps table is shown below: According to Richard Epstein, craps is descended from an earlier game

Demeio, Lucio

77

Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have demonstrated by experiment that, in an energetic environment, a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) such as naphthalene will undergo chemical reactions that produce a wide array of more complex species (an aggregate). For a stellar wind of a highly evolved star (post-asymptotic giant branch [post-AGB]), this process would be in addition to what is expected from reactions occurring under thermodynamic equilibrium. A surprising result of that work was that produced in substantial abundance are hydrogenated forms that are hybrids of polycyclic aromatic and polycyclic alkanes. Infrared spectroscopy described here reveals a spectral character for these materials that has much in common with that observed for the constituents of circumstellar clouds of post-AGB stars. It can be demonstrated that a methylene (-CH2-) substructure, as in cycloalkanes, is the likely carrier of the 6.9 microns band emission of dust that has recently been formed around IRAS 22272+5433, NGC 7027, and CPD -56 8032. Ultraviolet spectroscopy previously done with a lower limit of 190 nm had revealed that this molecular aggregate can contribute to the interstellar extinction feature at 2175 angstroms. We have now extended our UV spectroscopy of these materials to 110 nm by a vacuum ultraviolet technique. That work, described here, reveals new spectral characteristics and describes how material newly formed during the late stages of stellar evolution could have produced an extinction feature claimed to exist at 1700 angstroms in the spectrum of HD 145502 and also how the newly formed hydrocarbon material would be transformed/aged in the general interstellar environment. The contribution of this molecular aggregate to the rise in interstellar extinction at wavelengths below 1500 angstroms is also examined. The panspectral measurements of the materials produced in the laboratory, using plasmas of H, He, N, and O to convert the simple PAH naphthalene to an aggregate of complex species, provide insight into possible molecular structure details of newly formed hydrocarbon-rich interstellar dust and its transformation into aged material that becomes resident in the interstellar medium. Specifically the presence of naphthalene-like and butadiene-like conjugated structures as chromophores for the 2175 angstroms ultraviolet extinction feature is indicated.

Arnoult, K. M.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Beegle, L. W.

2000-01-01

78

Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

N /A

2003-11-03

79

Dynamics and chemistry of Venus' large and complex cloud system : a science case for an in-situ long-term chemical laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The planet Venus is the closest to the planet Earth both geographically and geometrically, with an average solar distance only 0.3AU smaller than that of Earth and an equatorial radius that is only 5% smaller than Earth's. But the similarities appear to end there. How did the environments of Venus and Earth become so divergent? The answer to this question relies upon an understanding of Venus' origins, the nature of its present atmosphere, and the role that the clouds have played in evolution and current state of Venus. Venus' clouds are composed of highly concentrated solutions of sulfuric acid and water. The sulfuric acid is produced photochemically from reactions involving water vapor and various sulfur species such as SO2 in the upper atmosphere around 62 km. The region from 50-60 km altitude is convectively unstable, suggesting that most of the cloud formation here is convectively driven, as are cumulus clouds on Earth but with sulfuric acid taking the place of water as the main condensable species. The clouds of Venus are ubiquitous, play a significant role in the radiative balance of the planet, are used as tracers to probe the atmospheric circulation, and are a key part of a global sulfurohydrological cycle that redistributes key greenhouse gasses such as SO2 and H2O. Thus understanding the clouds of Venus holds the key to understanding how Venus itself came to be the world of extremes that it is today. ESA's Venus Express mission, launched in Nov. 2005, has significantly improved our knowledge about the atmosphere of Venus by providing global long-term remote sensing observations with complete coverage in latitude and local solar time. However major questions remain about key minor species and how they vary throughout the major atmospheric regimes in the upper atmosphere, near the cloud tops where photolysis and condensation processes occur, near the surface where coupling and interchange with the atmosphere occurs, and in the middle atmosphere where they combine through meso-scale convection. In situ sampling of these aerosols represents a key measurement for constraining their properties, and identifying their role in the sulfurohydrological cycle by means of microphysical models of steadily increasing complexity. A probe/lander making a single descent will lack the spatial, temporal and local time coverage to address the coupling of compositional variations with radiative and dynamical properties of the atmosphere at cloud level, requiring a long duration flight. Establishing a long-term chemical laboratory in the cloud layer which would measure the detailed composition of both gas and liquid phases, and their latitudinal, diurnal and vertical variability using a combination of mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, tunable laser transmission spectrometry, and polar nephelometry would significantly address all of these objectives. It would allow the determination of the size distribution, shape, and real and imaginary refractive indices of the cloud particles, and the measurement of intensity and polarization phase functions. Our target species would include those known to be associated with cloud formation (e.g. H2SO4, SO3, SO2, H2O), as well as species important in stratospheric chemistry (e.g. CO, ClCOx, Ox, HCl, HF) and surface-atmosphere buffering (e.g. CO, OCS, SOx, Ox, H2S).

Widemann, Thomas; Määttänen, Anni; Wilquet, Valérie; McGouldrick, Kevin; Jessup, Kandis Lea; Wilson, Colin; Limaye, Sanjay; EuroVenus Consortium, the

2014-05-01

80

Skylab mobile laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

1975-01-01

81

Facile Synthesis of a Macrobicyclic Hexaamine Cobalt(III) Complex Based on Tris(Ethylenediamine)Cobalt(III): An Advanced Undergraduate Inorganic Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information (including relevant chemical reactions), procedures used, and results obtained are provided for the synthesis and characterization of a macrobicyclic complex. The synthesis can be completed within two to three hours and is inexpensive and safe. Suggestions for further experiments are included. (JN)

Harrowfield, Jack MacB.; And Others

1985-01-01

82

Laboratory of Population Genetics  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Population Genetics (LPG) utilizes genetic analysis to gain insight into human biologic processes. Until recently, genetic dissection of phenotypes had been largely limited to investigations in experimental organisms. The dawn of the post-genome era presents the opportunity to extend these investigations to humans. It is the major goal of this laboratory to exploit emerging resources and technology in order to understand the genetic basis of the complex phenotypes related to human cancer.

83

Assessment of the BD MGIT TBc Identification Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Network of Mycobacteriology Laboratories  

PubMed Central

We evaluate the performance of the TBcID assay in a panel of 100 acid-fast bacilli cultures. Sixty-four isolates were TBcID positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), whereas 36 gave negative results. These included 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria, one nonmycobacterial isolate, one M. tuberculosis, and six M. bovis BCG strains. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.14%, specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 80.55%, respectively. The test is rapid, easy to perform and interpret, and does not require sample preparation or instrumentation. However, a negative result does not exclude the presence of a strain belonging to MTBC, especially when mutations in mpb64 gene are present or some M. bovis BCG strains are isolated. The TBcID showed potential to assist in the identification of MTBC when the implementation and usage of molecular methods are often not possible, principally in resource-limited countries. PMID:24587985

Ramos, Jorge; Couto, Isabel; Narciso, Inácio; Coelho, Elizabeth; Viegas, Sofia

2014-01-01

84

Single-phase microemulsification of a complex light-nonaqueous-phase-liquid: Laboratory evaluation of several mixtures of surfactant/alcohol solutions  

SciTech Connect

A recent advance in conventional pump-and-treat technology for aquifer remediation involves the use of surfactant-alcohol mixtures that will form a clear, transparent, thermodynamically stable oil-in-water microemulsion on contact with a residual non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). An initial screening of 86 commercial-grade surfactants for aqueous solubility resulted in selection of 58 that were further tested in batch experiments to evaluate the capacity to solubilize a complex NAPL waste collected from a Superfund site (Operable Unit OU-1) at Hill AFB, UT. The selected group of 58 surfactants represented six classes of anionic, nine classes of nonionic, and one class of amphoteric surfactants. Batch studies on NAPL solubilization identified a number of surfactants suitable for use in the field demonstration phase of the project; a further criterion in surfactant selection was that the flushing solution had a viscosity <2 cp. The best surfactants among this group had HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) values between 12 and 13, and solubilized 10 to 20 g L{sup {minus}1} of the OU-1 NAPL when the surfactant concentration was 3%. Column tests using NAPL-coated glass beads showed that the more efficient surfactants could remove >90% of the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes. Brij 97, an ethoxylated alcohol ether surfactant, showed a high capacity for solubilizing the OU-1 NAPL. In a column test using contaminated Hill AFB aquifer material, flushing with a mixture of 3% Brij 97 and 2.5% n-pentanol removed essentially all of the mass of nine target analytes in the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes without mobilizing the NAPL or destabilizing aquifer colloids.

Rhue, R.D.; Rao, P.S.C.; Annable, M.D.

1999-08-01

85

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity  

E-print Network

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

Way, Andy

86

Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10  

E-print Network

Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller.87 Ă? 10-7 kg-m2 , and Jl = 3 Ă? 10-5 kg-m2 . Page 1 of 7 #12;Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE;Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 10.3 Laboratory Preparation 1. Write a MATLAB script

87

LANGUAGE LABORATORIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE USE OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY HAS GIVEN MANY THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS GOOD LISTENING AND SPEAKING PRACTICE AND HAS BECOME AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING TOOL. THE BASIC PIECE OF EQUIPMENT OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS THE TAPE RECORDER-AND-PLAYBACK, DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH AUDIOPASSIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE-COMPARATIVE STUDY, AND…

BRUBAKER, CHARLES WILLIAM

88

Paleomagnetics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

89

New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology  

E-print Network

of the Department of Global Ecology require offices, common spaces, areas for computer research, wet labs, dry labs. These are (1) offices, conference areas, and administrative space, (2) computer research space, (3) wet research space: Much of the research activity in the new department will be computer based. Approximately 1

90

NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) presents its weather, climate, and air quality investigations. Visitors can discover ETL's theoretical and field observations and sensor and model developments to address complex environmental issues. The website provides detailed descriptions of the Study of Environmental Artic Change (SEARCH), the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) project, and other 2005 programs. Teachers can find educational resources for elementary, middle, and high school.

91

Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL) at Colorado State University conducts multi-disciplinary research in ecosystem science, with the purpose of improving knowledge of "the complex interactions between humans, management activities, and ecosystems." The recently launched homepage, which is still under construction, includes background information on NREL; descriptions of research projects (a substantial and diverse list); publications, reports, and data; teaching and outreach; and contact information.

92

Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11  

E-print Network

Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11 State Feedback Controller of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible joint) introduced in the Laboratory 8 (refer to [1 of the flexible joint: Page 1 of 7 #12;Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 · : motor shaft position

93

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

94

BROOKHAVEN LABORATORY  

E-print Network

, and decision-making processes. We will endeavor to support parents in their critical role. 2. Children develop that stimulates academic/cognitive growth, language, social-emotional development and physical developmentBROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Child Development Center Parent Handbook Revised 2009

Ohta, Shigemi

95

Laboratory Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for flexibility in science research facilities is discussed, with emphasis on the effect of that need on the design of laboratories. The relationship of office space, bench space, and special equipment areas, and the location and distribution of piping and air conditioning, are considered particularly important. This building type study…

Barnett, Jonathan

96

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

2011-06-14

97

On the Future of Laboratory Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary reason for the creation of laboratory education was to help human beings to deal more effectively with complex human relationships and problems. As such, laboratory education shares the same goals with many other types of education. What distinguishes laboratory education from most other education is its basic assumptions concerning the process of education. The traditional educational methods primarily

Chris Argyris

1967-01-01

98

Design and Implementation Issues for Modern Remote Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design and implementation of remote laboratories present different levels of complexity according to the nature of the equipments operated by the remote laboratory, the requirements imposed on the accessing computers, the network linking the user to the laboratory, and the type of experiments the laboratory supports. This paper addresses the design and implementation of remote laboratories employing web technologies,

Eliane Guimaraes; Eleri Cardozo; Daniel H. Moraes; Paulo R. Coelho

2011-01-01

99

Lunar laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

1986-01-01

100

Laboratory accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

Pettit, R.B.

1998-08-01

101

Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12  

E-print Network

Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12 State Feedback Controller of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible link) introduced in the Laboratory 9 (refer to [1 Systems Laboratory ECE3557 · : motor shaft position, measured using channel 1 encoder "ENC1" · : angular

102

Archimedes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

103

Virtual Laboratories  

E-print Network

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07

104

Laboratory investigations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

Russell, Ray W.

1988-01-01

105

Virtual Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

2012-04-27

106

Small Business Manager Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-print Network

Keith Joy Small Business Manager Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Past, Present, and Future #12;2 OAK Excellence in Science and Technology Excellence in science and innovative solutions to complex problems

107

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

108

Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

109

Creep Laboratory manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

A manual for the NPL Creep Laboratory, a collective name given to two testing laboratories, the Uniaxial Creep Laboratory and the Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing Laboratory, is presented. The first laboratory is devoted to uniaxial creep testing and houses approximately 50 high sensitivity creep machines including 10 constant stress cam lever machines. The second laboratory houses a low cycle

S. Osgerby; M. S. Loveday

1992-01-01

110

Centers of Complex Networks Stefan Wuchty,  

E-print Network

Centers of Complex Networks Stefan Wuchty, and Peter F. Stadler#,¶,§ European Media Laboratory. The central vertices in complex networks are of particular interest be- cause they might play the role their role. 1 #12;S. Wuchty, P.F. Stadler: Centers of Complex Networks 2 1. Introduction Complex networks

Stadler, Peter F.

111

FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

2011-01-01

112

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-19

113

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-print Network

is a critical facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supporting environmental, nuclear, national and environmental remediation researching, testing, and validating process flowsheets designing, installingRadiochemical Processing Laboratory #12;Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Housed within the U

114

Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators Peter Roberts*, Lian-Jie Huang, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Charles Burch, Conoco Inc., Michael Fehler and  

E-print Network

Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators Peter Roberts applied to prestack depth migration of the Marmousi synthetic data set. The datawere migrated the reference velocity used for the background phase-shift operation and for defining the slowness perturbation

115

Creating an Advanced Laboratory for K-16 Science Education at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

An innovative laboratory dedicated to plasma science education at the pre-college and undergraduate level will be described. The Plasma Science Education Laboratory (PSEL) will be the first of its kind, a cutting-edge education facility and associated programs that bring the beauty and complexity of plasmas to a greatly expanded range of teachers and students who now rarely have the chance

Andrew Post-Zwicker; Sophia Gershman; Nick Guilbert

2002-01-01

116

The quest for complex molecules in space: Laboratory spectroscopy of n-butyl cyanide, n-C4H9CN, in the millimeter wave region and its astronomical search in Sagittarius B2(N)  

E-print Network

The saturated n-propyl cyanide was recently detected in Sagittarius B2(N). The next larger unbranched alkyl cyanide is n-butyl cyanide. We provide accurate rest frequency predictions beyond the millimeter wave range to search for this molecule in the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N) and facilitate its detection in space. We investigated the laboratory rotational spectrum of $n$-butyl cyanide between 75 GHz and 348 GHz. We searched for emission lines produced by the molecule in our sensitive IRAM 30 m molecular line survey of Sagittarius B2(N). We identified more than one thousand rotational transitions in the laboratory for each of the three conformers for which limited data had been obtained previously in a molecular beam microwave study. The quantum number range was greatly extended to J ~ 120 or more and Ka > 35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations up to about 500 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of the two lower energy conformers. Up...

Ordu, M H; Walters, A; Nuńez, M; Lewen, F; Belloche, A; Menten, K M; Schlemmer, S

2012-01-01

117

An Integrated Approach to the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories traditionally expose students to biochemical techniques through a series of independent and usually unrelated laboratory exercises. Efforts to reorganize and update the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at Texas Tech University have centered upon the development of a series of laboratory experiments that focus on a single biological system, the complex 11 (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of Escherichia coli. Students are provided a computer-aided research environment in which to gain practical training in molecular biology, protein purification and enzyme kinetics. The laboratory schedule includes exercises on the succinate dehydrogenase operon (sdh) DNA sequence, and experiments that deal with isolation and characterization of sdh operon DNA, extraction and purification of complex 11 and characterization of complex 11 subunit structure and kinetic parameters. This unified approach to the biochemistry teaching laboratory is specifically designed to impact undergraduate student preparation for future studies, providing exposure to fundamental techniques of biochemistry experimentation and simulating the focused, single system, environment of a research laboratory.

Harman, James G.; Anderson, John A.; Nakashima, Richard A.; Shaw, Robert W.

1995-07-01

118

Cultural Complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is divided into four parts. The first section (I.) consists of definitions which center on the concept of complexity. As a minimum, the terms, system, complexity, and adaptation as used in this paper need an explanation. The second section (II.) is a sketch of cultural complexity in the real world. I will use Pueblo tribal laws and other

Wolfgang Fikentscher

1998-01-01

119

Verification of complex codes.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, verifying and validating complex codes at Sandia National Laboratories has become a major part of code development. These aspects tackle two important parts of simulation modeling: determining if the models have been correctly implemented - verification, and determining if the correct models have been selected - validation. In this talk, we will focus on verification and discuss the basics of code verification and its application to a few codes and problems at Sandia.

Ober, Curtis Curry

2009-03-01

120

DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY MEDICINE CLINICAL LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY MEDICINE ­ CLINICAL LABORATORIES ­ Phone: 415-353-4731 Email: hangt of the patient. #12;2. Herbal medications. Many herbal medications contain substances and adulterants that can is not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is significant heterogeneity in the herbal

Lim, Wendell

121

[Perspective technologies and researches in the areaof medical laboratory diagnostics].  

PubMed

The main principles of organisation of medical laboratory diagnostics are efficiency of analysis, mobility of laboratory services and quality of researches. These goals can be achieved by the use of portative laboratory analizers, by automation and computerization of the laboratorial service, by development and adoption of new laboratory technologies, integrating different methods and types of research. It is necessary to pay attention to the problem of NPT and indication of pathogenic germs. Priority areas of medical laboratory diagnostics development are: development and use of portative laboratory analyzers; development of chemical, that help to speed up and cheapen researches, improve effectiveness of laboratory diagnostics of infections and indications of pathogenic and other germ; development of new, more sensitive, specific, but simple methods of laboratory analysis; development of complex methods and types of researches, further implementation of methods and researches with different principles of action; development and implementation of new methods of NPT results recording; automation and computerization of the laboratorial diagnostics. PMID:24000640

Ivanov, A M; Zhdanov, K V; Krivoruchko, A A; Ivo?lov, O O

2013-06-01

122

Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories  

E-print Network

Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell Laboratories July 1998 #12;Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell;#12;Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell Laboratories Converted

Janow, Rich

123

National Laboratory Christine Brakel  

E-print Network

of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The technique provides a sensitive reliable method of detectingBrookhaven National Laboratory Christine Brakel Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: brakel@bnl.gov METHOD FOR ASSAYING CLUSTERED DNA DAMAGES Brookhaven National Laboratory

124

National Laboratory Dorene Price  

E-print Network

-attracting reagent and form the mercury sulfide compound. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE #12;Brookhaven National Laboratory Dorene Price Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored Research: price@bnl.gov SOIL REMEDIATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINANTS Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

125

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: the Fusion Laboratories facilities and mission, including the recent tokamak experiments which resulted in the production of more than 9 million watts of thermonuclear energy.

126

Employment at National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

2007-04-01

127

EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

1993-01-01

128

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

Annual Report 2001 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 2001 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 6 2.3 Applied Electrophysics 7 2.3.1 Accelerator

Haviland, David

129

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

i Annual Report 2003 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 Stockholm #12;ii #12;i ANNUAL REPORT 2003 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 7 2

Haviland, David

130

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

Annual Report 2002 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 Stockholm #12;ii #12;ANNUAL REPORT 2002 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.1.1 Plasma Physics ­ Space Group 5

Haviland, David

131

Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

1982-01-01

132

Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory  

E-print Network

1 TENS Text Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory University of Wollongong TENS Text and delivering the text data to the user by electrically stimulating the fingers. Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong #12;2 The TENS Unit Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong

Ward, Koren

133

Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

Steere, Norman V.

1965-01-01

134

INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

2010-01-01

135

The Instructional Development Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Instructional Development Laboratory of Florida State University's Center for Educational Design (CED) is described. Among the major projects of the Laboratory has been the design and implementation of the PLATO computer-assisted instruction system. Included in the report are descriptions of (1) the facilities layout of the Laboratory, (2) the…

Towle, Nelson J.

136

Division of Laboratory Sciences  

E-print Network

and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing#12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers

137

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA khatib@cs.stanford.edu Oliver Brock Laboratory for Perceptual Robotics Department of Computer Luis Sentis Sriram Viji Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford

Sentis, Luis

138

Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

1996-01-01

139

Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util-  

E-print Network

RLUOB Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util- ity Office Research building. Capabilities RLUOB provides: ďż˝ Nearly 20,000 square feet of radiological laboratory

140

Complexity International  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complexity International (CI) is an electronic journal devoted to "the field of complex systems, the generation of complex behaviour from the interaction of multiple parallel processes." The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including genetic algorithms, neural networks, and chaos theory. Because much of the focus is based on technological imitation of biological processes, some of the papers are closely tied to the life sciences. Volumes are added to on a continual basis as papers are accepted. Due to the lengthy acceptance process, it is especially useful that the CI Web site offers drafts of current submissions.

141

Teaching Chromatography Using Virtual Laboratory Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though deceptively simple to teach, chromatography presents many nuances and complex interactions that challenge both student and instructor. Time and instrumentation provide major obstacles to a thorough examination of these details in the laboratory. Modern chromatographic method-development software provides an opportunity to overcome this,…

Stone, David C.

2007-01-01

142

Novosibirsk solid-state physics laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work carried out in this laboratory is distinguished by a complex approach, which is characteristic for present-day solid-state physics, in studying mechanical, optical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, and other properties of substances and their inter-relations.

I. I. Novikov; P. G. Strelkov

1967-01-01

143

Development of an Environmental Virtual Field Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises, field observations and field trips are a fundamental part of many earth science and environmental science courses. Field observations and field trips can be constrained because of distance, time, expense, scale, safety, or complexity of real-world environments. Our objectives were to develop an environmental virtual field…

Ramasundaram, V.; Grunwald, S.; Mangeot, A.; Comerford, N. B.; Bliss, C. M.

2005-01-01

144

LABORATORY #4 --BIOL 111 Cell Craft Game  

E-print Network

, endoplasmic reticulum, mRNA and the nucleus related? (6 pts) #12;LABORATORY #4 -- BIOL 111 Cell Craft Game Eukaryotic cells are extremely complex units where organelles work together as a finely organized team. The Cell Craft game does an excellent job illustrating

145

COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

146

The Guinea-Bissau Family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revisited  

E-print Network

The Guinea-Bissau Family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revisited Ramona Groenheit1, 8 WHO Supranational TB Reference Laboratory, Tuberculosis and Mycobacteria Unit, Institut Pasteur de of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex that, although genotypically closely related, phenotypically demonstrates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

Algorithm and Complexity Issues in  

E-print Network

of Games Considered Finite states: Position on the board matters, history does not (Markov propertyAlgorithm and Complexity Issues in Discrete Multistage Games Michael L. Littman Rutgers University Department of Computer Science Rutgers Laboratory for Real-Life Reinforcement Learning #12;Simple Game

Nau, Dana S.

148

Creep Laboratory manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A manual for the NPL Creep Laboratory, a collective name given to two testing laboratories, the Uniaxial Creep Laboratory and the Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing Laboratory, is presented. The first laboratory is devoted to uniaxial creep testing and houses approximately 50 high sensitivity creep machines including 10 constant stress cam lever machines. The second laboratory houses a low cycle fatigue testing machine of 100 kN capacity driven by a servo-electric actuator, five machines for uniaxial tensile creep testing of engineering ceramics at temperatures up to 1600C, and an electronic creep machine. Details of the operational procedures for carrying out uniaxial creep testing are given. Calibration procedures to be followed in order to comply with the specifications laid down by British standards, and to provide traceability back to the primary standards are described.

Osgerby, S.; Loveday, M. S.

1992-06-01

149

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 5 2.1 Plasma Physics 7 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 10 2.3 Applied Electrophysics 15 2.3.1 Accelerator Technology 15 2.3.2 IndustrialAnnual Report 2004 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory RoyalInstitute ofTechnology SE 100 44

Haviland, David

150

1MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT Lincoln Laboratory  

E-print Network

of excellence ... ... a history of innovation Brett Levasseur (WPI CS `08) John Meklenburg (WPI ECE/BME `11, ECE Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Systems & Technology Communications and Information Technology Laboratory Admission · Selection is competitive -- academic standing is strong factor ­ Performed by WPI

Clancy, Ted

151

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

152

Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

Gilliom, Laura R.

1992-01-01

153

KNOWLEDGE COMPLEXITY VERSUS COMPUTATIONAL COMPLEXITY  

E-print Network

, and Rafi Ostrovsky, with whom I had the opportunity to work closely. Each of them contributed in his own to thank Mihir and Rafi for collaborating with us in the research of knowledge complexity versus

Goldreich, Oded

154

Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAH Analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

155

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

156

LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY WAS ESTABLISHED TO IMPROVE READING ABILITY AND OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS AS AN AID IN THE PREVENTION OF DROPOUTS. THE LABORATORY WAS OPERATED ON A SUMMER SCHEDULE WITH A FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF FROM 45 MINUTES TO 2 1/2 HOURS DAILY. ALL PUPILS WERE 14 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, AND EXPRESSED A DESIRE TO IMPROVE THEIR READING…

ROBERTS, HERMESE E.

157

Laboratory?Acquired Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory-acquired infections due to a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been described. Although the precise risk of infection after an exposure remains poorly defined, surveys of laboratory-acquired infections suggest that Brucella species, Shigella species, Salmonella species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common causes. Infections due to the bloodborne pathogens (hepatitis B virus, hepatitis

Kamaljit Singh

2009-01-01

158

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

of Energy. Competitive Advantage The technology can be used to engineer viral tropism. In additionBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Human Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor - CAR Brookhaven National Laboratory

159

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

. Competitive Advantage The technology provides a MRI scanner combined with a PET scanner whose outputBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Combined PET/MRI Scanner Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

160

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

, and nanocomponents in smart displays. Competitive Advantage The system is simple, modular and allows high throughputBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov Generation of Janus-Type Nanoparticles Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

161

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

. Competitive Advantage The gantry accepts particles and transports through the gantry magnets with very smallBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Gantry for a Particle Therapy Facility Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

162

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The advantages of using a carbon nanotube-assisted drug delivery systemBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov CARBON NANOTUBE ­ BASED DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE Brookhaven National Laboratory

163

National Laboratory Dorene Price  

E-print Network

. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE This spectrometer is an important addition to the currently available particle sizeBrookhaven National Laboratory Dorene Price Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored Research: price@bnl.gov MEASUREMENT OF AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

164

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

and Associated Equipment, 527 (1-2), 166-170. Competitive Advantage The RatCAP is a light self-contained portableBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Small Animal PET Tomograph - RatCAP Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

165

Laboratory for Oceans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is made of the activities of the Laboratory for Oceans. The staff and the research activities are nearly evenly divided between engineering and scientific endeavors. The Laboratory contributes engineering design skills to aircraft and ground based experiments in terrestrial and atmospheric sciences in cooperation with scientists from labs in Earth sciences.

1988-01-01

166

Hoods for Science Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

Horowitz, Harold; and others

167

Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory  

E-print Network

Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Galveston, Texas Penaeid Shrimp Life Cvcle ^.y Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Circular 307 #12;The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory at commercially important species of shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico through four research programs: (1) Shrimp

168

An Independent Freshman Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a first-year laboratory course designed to fulfill laboratory objectives of reinforcing lecture material, teaching experimental methodology, developing hands-on skills, and imparting a sense of error. The course's six segments examine: digital electronics with students building a photogate timer; error analysis; linear accelerated…

Spencer, C. D.; Seligmann, P. F.

1992-01-01

169

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

170

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory  

E-print Network

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory Multi-scale,multi-mode imaging tools to understand the recalcitrant nature of biomass feedstocks and the performance of techniques to deconstruct biomass NREL, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL

171

Waterhighlights 4 CAUSES Laboratory  

E-print Network

Associate Dean for Land-Grant Programs in CAUSES. This is an exciting moment to serve as the WRRI director in curriculum development for the new CAUSES college, I spearheaded the establishment of two new state-of-the-art- lation Laboratory (2010). In 2010, based on the cutting-edge research laboratories of the Institute, new

District of Columbia, University of the

172

The Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This condensed article on the language laboratory describes educational and financial possibilities and limitations, often citing the foreign language program at Purdue University as an example. The author discusses: (1) costs and amortization, (2) preventive maintenance, (3) laboratory design, (4) the multichannel recorder, and (5) visuals. Other…

Hocking, Elton

173

Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

1989-01-01

174

Dental Laboratory Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

175

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric current ­ charges in motion. The current in the CRT was simple

Minnesota, University of

176

LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric

Minnesota, University of

177

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

1999-09-01

178

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01

179

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-print Network

electricity when the sun's output is insufficient and to funnel excess energy back to the grid when sunlightNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory

180

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25

181

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report  

SciTech Connect

The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

2009-03-01

182

Thermosiphon Cooling of a Large Office /Laboratory Complex  

E-print Network

For the past six winters a thermosiphon system has been used with two 2000 ton centrifugal chillers to supply chilled water for building cooling. Whenever the outside wet bulb temperature drops to 45 F or below, the compressors are shut down...

White, T. L.

1981-01-01

183

Laboratory production of complex organics in simulated interstellar ices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1 see www.astrochem.org for more information. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Ultraviolet Ir- radiation of Naphthalene in H2O Ice: Implications for Meteorites and Biogenesis. Meteoritics and Planetary Science36, 351-358. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., Cooper, G. &Allamandola, L. (2002) The Formation of Racemic Amino Acids byUltraviolet Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs. Nature, 416, 401U403 Dworkin, J., Deamer, D., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Self-Assembling Amphiphilic Molecules: Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar/Precometary Ices. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 815-819. Krishnamurthy, R., Epstein, S., Cronin, J., Pizzarello, S. &Yuen, G. (1992) Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 56, 4045-4058. Sandford, S. A., Bernstein, M. P., &Dworkin, J. P. (2001). Assessment of the interstellar processes leading to deuterium enrichment in meteoritic organics. Meteoritics and Planetary Sci- ence36, 1117-1133.

Dworkin, J.; Bernstein, M.; Ashbourn, S.; Iraci, L.; Cooper, G.; Sandford, S.; Allamandola, L.

184

The laboratory module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Of the five modules comprising the Orbiting Quarantine Facility, the Laboratory Module must provide not only an extensive research capability to permit execution of the protocol, but also the flexibility to accommodate second-order testing if nonterrestrial life is discovered in the sample. The biocontainment barriers that protect the sample and the researchers from cross contamination are described. Specifically, the laboratory layout, laboratory equipment, the environmental control and life support system, and containment assurance procedures are discussed. The metal manipulation arm proposed for use within the biocontainment cabinets is described. Sample receipt and processing procedures are outlined.

1981-01-01

185

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOEpatents

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01

186

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

187

NIST Laboratory Programs and the National Voluntary Laboratory  

E-print Network

, Chief, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program #12;2 What Is Laboratory Accreditation of products in U.S. and world markets. What Is the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP#12;#12;11 NIST Laboratory Programs and the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

188

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of covert conflict Shishir Nagaraja, Ross Anderson July 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Nagaraja, Ross Anderson Computer Laboratory JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK forename.surname @ cl

Haddadi, Hamed

189

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

, link graphs and Petri nets James J. Leifer, Robin Milner August 2004 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK 3 #12;Contents: Introduction 5 PART

Haddadi, Hamed

190

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

systems: basic theory Robin Milner September 2001 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory William Gates Building, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK

Haddadi, Hamed

191

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Gateway with publish-subscribe paradigm over wireless network Eiko Yoneki, Jean Bacon February 2003 15 JJ Thomson and Jean Bacon University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building, J J Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

192

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

for language-based transactions Tim Harris August 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD tim

Harris, Timothy

193

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of a coordinate based location system David R. Spence November 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United David Spence University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD

Hand, Steven

194

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

for bigraphical structure Robin Milner February 2004 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone of Cambridge, The Computer Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK February 2004 Abstract

Haddadi, Hamed

195

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Milner January 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http Robin Milner University of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK

Haddadi, Hamed

196

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

policy for an NHS electronic health record service Moritz Y. Becker March 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue electronic health record service Moritz Y. Becker Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge JJ Thomson

Haddadi, Hamed

197

LABORATORY POLICY WORKING ALONE  

E-print Network

& Responsibilities Template Issued By: Environmental Health &Safety Template Revision #: --Part: Laboratory Policy: ______________________________________________________________ Building and Room #'s under supervision of Dr working alone policy. 1. Policy: The following operations/experiments/conditions (specified by principal

Garousi, Vahid

198

The Microscale Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are two microscale chemistry laboratory experiments including "Microscale Syntheses of Heterocyclic Compounds," and "Microscale Acid-Base Extraction--A Colorful Introduction." Materials, procedures and probable results are discussed. (CW)

Zipp, Arden P., Ed.

1990-01-01

199

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - CORVALLIS  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Research Laboratory - Corvallis is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's - national research center for terrestrial and watershed ecology, aquatic ecoregions, and for the ecological effects of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric p...

200

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

201

Ecosystems in the Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

Madders, M.

1975-01-01

202

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476 the Crucible network, creating software tools for use by a wide range of artists including musicians (Nash

Haddadi, Hamed

203

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining......................................................................................................................................6 Reservoir Architecture and Structural Style of Carbonate Shelf-to-Basin Transitions

Texas at Austin, University of

204

Laboratory simulation of volcano seismicity.  

PubMed

The physical processes generating seismicity within volcanic edifices are highly complex and not fully understood. We report results from a laboratory experiment in which basalt from Mount Etna volcano (Italy) was deformed and fractured. The experiment was monitored with an array of transducers around the sample to permit full-waveform capture, location, and analysis of microseismic events. Rapid post-failure decompression of the water-filled pore volume and damage zone triggered many low-frequency events, analogous to volcanic long-period seismicity. The low frequencies were associated with pore fluid decompression and were located in the damage zone in the fractured sample; these events exhibited a weak component of shear (double-couple) slip, consistent with fluid-driven events occurring beneath active volcanoes. PMID:18845753

Benson, Philip M; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Meredith, Philip G; Young, R Paul

2008-10-10

205

Computer Systems Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Computer Systems Laboratory (CSL) Annual Report - 1993 describes the annual activities and accomplishments of the laboratory. Following the Director's Foreword, a CSL overview is presented, followed by overviews of the five technical divisions. The Technology Transfer section describes the vehicles used by CSL to disseminate research and technical information to the public. A list of Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) and FIPS order information conclude the annual report.

Lennon, E. B.; Radack, S. M.; Roach, R. K.

1993-02-01

206

Laboratory Heat Recovery System  

E-print Network

. This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet.... This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet...

Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

1981-01-01

207

Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory  

Cancer.gov

CGR’s high throughput laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and automation systems for a large number of applications. CGR supports DCEG in all stages of cancer research from planning to publishing, including experimental design and project management, sample handling, genotyping and sequencing assay design and execution, development and implementation of bioinformatic pipelines, and downstream scientific research and analytical support.

208

Safer Science: Laboratory Relocation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The movement of hazardous chemicals found in high school science laboratories and chemical storerooms can be risky business due to the increased likelihood of an accidental spill, contamination, or other type of mishap. Prudent safety planning and practice need to be addressed in order to eliminate or minimize the potential for chemical incidents. Giving thought to the guidelines outlined in this article will help initiate the process of moving chemical inventories within and between school laboratories and storerooms.

Roy, Ken

2008-10-01

209

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

210

Complex Systems  

PubMed Central

Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

Goldberger, Ary L.

2006-01-01

211

Complexity in scalable computing.  

SciTech Connect

The rich history of scalable computing research owes much to a rapid rise in computing platform scale in terms of size and speed. As platforms evolve, so must algorithms and the software expressions of those algorithms. Unbridled growth in scale inevitably leads to complexity. This special issue grapples with two facets of this complexity: scalable execution and scalable development. The former results from efficient programming of novel hardware with increasing numbers of processing units (e.g., cores, processors, threads or processes). The latter results from efficient development of robust, flexible software with increasing numbers of programming units (e.g., procedures, classes, components or developers). The progression in the above two parenthetical lists goes from the lowest levels of abstraction (hardware) to the highest (people). This issue's theme encompasses this entire spectrum. The lead author of each article resides in the Scalable Computing Research and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. Their co-authors hail from other parts of Sandia, other national laboratories and academia. Their research sponsors include several programs within the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and its National Nuclear Security Administration, along with Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program and the Office of Naval Research. The breadth of interests of these authors and their customers reflects in the breadth of applications this issue covers. This article demonstrates how to obtain scalable execution on the increasingly dominant high-performance computing platform: a Linux cluster with multicore chips. The authors describe how deep memory hierarchies necessitate reducing communication overhead by using threads to exploit shared register and cache memory. On a matrix-matrix multiplication problem, they achieve up to 96% parallel efficiency with a three-part strategy: intra-node multithreading, non-blocking inter-node message passing, and a dedicated communications thread to facilitate concurrent communications and computations. On a quantum chemistry problem, they spawn multiple computation threads and communication threads on each node and use one-sided communications between nodes to minimize wait times. They reduce software complexity by evolving a multi-threaded factory pattern in C++ from a working, message-passing program in C.

Rouson, Damian W. I.

2008-12-01

212

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

and testing areas, magnet experiment cells, and laser laboratory areas. The laboratory is used 24 hours perNATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY NHMFL FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY SAFETY PROCEDURE SP-3 TITLE Dalton ______________________________________________________ ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH

Weston, Ken

213

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Nonconformities #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Definitions Nonconformity ­ nonfulfillment assessors Nonconformities - September 24, 2013 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

214

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Calibration Certificate Review Discussion #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Calibration Certificate Review calibration so it must be correct, right? #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Annex B's 5

215

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Working for NVLAP #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Presentation Overview · Assessor roles · Assessor Training ­ 2014 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Assessor Definitions · Lead

216

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Outline · Purpose of the Types of Assessments Meeting · Case Study Assessment Techniques ­ September 24, 2013 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory

217

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating Assessor Performance #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Why NVLAP Evaluates? ISO/IEC 17011 - 6 to perform competently. 2Assessor Performance - September 24, 2013 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory

218

Job Listings - Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Los Alamos National Laboratory is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. In addition to supporting the Lab's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines.

219

[Laboratory animal; allergy; asthma].  

PubMed

Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) may develop when susceptible persons are exposed to allergens produced by laboratory animals. LAA is associated with exposure to urine, fur, and salivae of rats, guinea pigs, dogs and rabbits. Approximately 30% of persons who are exposed to laboratory animals may develop LAA and some will also develop asthma. LAA is most likely to occur in persons with previously known allergies, especially to domestic pets. The majority of LAA sufferers experience symptoms within six months their first exposure to laboratory animals; almost all develop symptoms within three years. The most common symptoms are watery eyes and an itchy, runny nose, although skin symptoms and lower respiratory tract symptoms may also occur. Feeding and handling laboratory animals or cleaning their cages generates ten times the amount of allergens compared with undisturbed conditions. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work environment and on organizational and individual protection measures. Pre-placement evaluation and periodic medical surveillance of workers are important pieces of the overall occupational health programme. The emphasis of these medical evaluations should be on counselling and early disease detection. PMID:22022762

Corradi, M; Romano, C; Mutti, A

2011-01-01

220

NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

2004-01-01

221

Mote Marine Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website presents the Mote Marine Laboratory (MML), "an independent, nonprofit research organization dedicated to excellence in marine science and education." The MML website links to information about the laboratory's various research centers including the Center for Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Research, Center for Shark Research, Center for Eco-Toxicology, and Center for Fisheries Enhancement. The MML Center for Coastal Ecology links to information on its three research programs -- Coastal Resources, Benthic Ecology, and Chemical Ecology. The MML research efforts are focused on the Southwest Florida coastal region, and they have academic connections with Florida State University, the University of South Florida, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The MML website also contains information about the lab's staff, Tropical Research Laboratory, and Arthur Vining Davis Library which offers online journals, and links to bibliographic databases.

222

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

Zirbel, E. L.

2002-12-01

223

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01

224

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

ScienceCinema

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28

225

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11

226

Laboratory Notebook for Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

All students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook. The notebook is to be either a bound notebook or a spiral notebook. All of your work in class is to be recorded in your notebook. Your laboratory notebook is: --a place to record what you see and do (including mistakes) --a place to record what you THINK about what you see and do --a place to ask QUESTIONS and draw conclusions about the experiences and results --a place to track your feelings and attitudes about your experiences --a seedbed of ideas for experiments and creativity --a record of your accomplishments during your time in this class

Schulz, Barbara

1994-07-30

227

National Media Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is presented. The mission of the NML is to support current government user data storage needs and assist them in getting the most efficient 'commercial' solutions in the future. The motivation for a National Media Laboratory is as follows: recording systems are the major government image and data exploitation bottleneck; government data recording performance and storage requirements lead commercial practice by 3-5 years; the supporting commercial recorder industry is large but principally focused on video not data formats; lack of standards; and lack of transfer of commercial knowledge base to program offices and operational sites.

Clark, Robert

1992-01-01

228

Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory (MEL) is a division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Its function is to work with companies and perform research to improve manufacturing performance. Because of its broad scope, MEL has five divisions -- Precision Engineering, Manufacturing Metrology, Intelligent Systems, Manufacturing Systems Integration, and Fabrication Technology. The laboratory's homepage offers descriptions, research project information, conference and workshop times, and photo and movie galleries from various projects. There is also a link to an Engineering Metrology Toolbox used to "solve real problems in dimensional measurement."

2001-01-01

229

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

Histotechnology and Pathology Resources - Current Turnaround Times H&E slide preparation: 25 days Immunohistochemistry: 11 days Pathology Slide Evaluation: 30 days Turnaround times are approximate and may be influenced by the complexity of the project.     

230

Requirements for reference (calibration) laboratories in laboratory medicine.  

PubMed

In addition to reference measurement procedures and reference materials, reference or calibration laboratories play an integral role in the implementation of measurement traceability in routine laboratories. They provide results of measurements using higher-order methods, e.g. isotope dilution mass spectrometry and may assign values to materials to be used for external quality assessment programs and to secondary reference materials. The requirements for listing of laboratories that provide reference measurement services include a statement of the metrological level or principle of measurement, accreditation as a calibration laboratory according to ISO 15195 and the participation in a proficiency testing system (regular inter-laboratory comparisons) for reference laboratories. Ring trials are currently conducted for thirty well-defined measurands and the results are made available to all laboratories. Through the use of reference laboratory services that are listed by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine there is the opportunity to further promote traceability and standardisation of laboratory measurements. PMID:18392129

Siekmann, Lothar

2007-11-01

231

Laboratory Safety Principles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This workshop covers major principles and regulations pertinent to working in laboratories with hazardous materials. It is divided into 45 minute segments dealing with: Radioactive Materials (Staiger); Toxic, Reactive, Carcinogenic, and Teratogenic Chemicals (Carlson); Infectious Agents (Laver); and Fire Safety Concepts and Physical Hazards (Arnston).

Jerry Staiger, Keith Carlson, Jim Laver, Ray Arntson (University of Minnesota;); Keith Carlson (University of Minnesota;); Jim Lauer (University of Minnesota;); Ray Amtson (University of Minnesota;)

2008-04-11

232

Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

Grisaffe, S. J.

1985-01-01

233

Laboratory investigation of hypercoagulability.  

PubMed

For many years, the laboratory investigation of patients with thrombophilia has lagged behind that of patients with bleeding diathesis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control and regulate coagulation, and the resultant recognition of new defects, have greatly stimulated clinical laboratory interest in this area. Assays to detect resistance to activated protein C; deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S; and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies are widely available and should form part of the investigation of patients that present with idiopathic thrombosis. Such a work-up will likely provide an explanation for thrombosis in 40 to 60% of patients. Abnormalities of fibrinogen and fibrinolysis may explain still more, although such defects are currently considered rare. In addition, presently unrecognized defects almost certainly exist, and the identification of such individuals will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the hemostatic mechanism. Laboratory tests to define the hypercoagulable state are continually being developed. They include whole blood coagulation and platelet function tests and novel activation markers. However, acceptance of these approaches by clinical laboratories has been slow. PMID:9579632

Francis, J L

1998-01-01

234

Microcomputers in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-semester hour laboratory course introduced junior and senior physics majors to assembly language programing and to interfacing KIM-1 microcomputer to experiments. A general purpose interface to a standard breadboard was developed. Course details, apparatus, and some interfacing projects are given. (Author/SK)

Rafert, Bruce; Nicklin, R. C.

1982-01-01

235

The Neutron Star Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neutron stars provide a rich and unique cosmic laboratory for studying fundamental questions in physics and astrophysics, including the effects of superstrong magnetic fields, nuclear deflagration and detonation in dense matter, neutron superfluidity and proton superconductivity, the properties of the nuclear force at high densities, the expected transition to quark matter, and gravitational physics in the strong-field regime. X- and

Frederick K. Lamb

1998-01-01

236

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

.S. Department of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The technology provides a novel method for controllableBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov SYNTHESIS OF METAL-METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS AND ELECTROCATALYSTS Brookhaven National

237

Laboratory Fish Egg Incubator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction and use of a laboratory fish egg incubator are described. The water reservoir is a standard 5-gal aquarium and the incubator and egg containers are constructed from readily available acrylic materials, silicon caulk, and nylon mesh. This system provides a means of separately incubating eggs from several experimental treatments.

Kent H. Blacklidge; Christopher A. Bidwell

1993-01-01

238

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

Polly, David

239

Mobile Environmental Education Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In May, 1972, the Kingsport (Tennessee) City School System received financial assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority to plan, develop, and implement, as a demonstration environmental education project, the utilization of a mobile laboratory for conducting environmental studies. The project, as described in this booklet, identified four…

Childress, Ronald B.

240

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mike Bond, George Danezis June 2006 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK {Mike.Bond, George.Danezis}@cl.cam.ac.uk 6th June 2006

Haddadi, Hamed

241

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Terminating Consensus Piotr Zieli´nski June 2006 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone Cavendish Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK piotr.zielinski@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract

Haddadi, Hamed

242

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Server Team University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, ENGLAND Xeno Kotsovinos, Anil V.S. Madhavapeddy, Rolf Neugebauer, Ian A. Pratt, Andrew K. Warfield January 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2003

Harris, Timothy

243

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

: A personal projected display for interacting with documents Mark Ashdown, Peter Robinson June 2002 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2002 Mark Ashdown and Peter Robinson University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

244

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

July 2010 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http Rice, Andrew W. Moore Computer Laboratory, University Of Cambridge William Gates Building, 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, CB3 0FD, UK Email: firstname.lastname@cl.cam.ac.uk Kieran Mansley Solarflare

Haddadi, Hamed

245

Laboratory analysis of stardust.  

PubMed

Tiny dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites are identified to have originated in the atmospheres of stars on the basis of their anomalous isotopic compositions. Although isotopic analysis with the ion microprobe plays a major role in the laboratory analysis of these stardust grains, many other microanalytical techniques are applied to extract the maximum amount of information. PMID:23231704

Zinner, Ernst

2013-02-01

246

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY  

E-print Network

logistics operations and secondary services in the area of insurance, customs and carbon footprint trackingFUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space

Heiser, Gernot

247

National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory  

E-print Network

capable accelerator facilities, the next generation of nuclear scientists will have at their dispos- al security, energy, materials science and quantum information processing. In short, the future of nuclear· laboratory in the United States Training ground for 10% of all U.S. nuclear science· doctoral students

248

RAS Laboratory Groups  

Cancer.gov

The RAS Program is using multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. Accordingly, the resources of the FNLCR allocated to the RAS Hub have been organized into seven laboratory groups, with each group contributing the most advanced technology available to the collaborative effort.

249

The Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines  

E-print Network

of Health Population and Public Health Branch Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response #12;Our mission, ON Louise Linarez Technical Supervisor Provincial Laboratory of Public Health Edmonton, AB Jim Orzechowski is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Health Canada Ă?galement disponible en

Bolch, Tobias

250

PENNSYLVANIA APPALACHIAN LABORATORY  

E-print Network

;#12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARYI 1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 05 2. Plan Vision 09 3.V. Rachel Carson 04 #12;05 1. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Mission Statement Through its four laboratories across Maryland, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Boynton, Walter R.

251

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of Cambridge, Homerton College. Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory for program instrumentation in the spirit of Popek and Goldberg's work. Instrumentation also incurs during my studies, Homerton College for the excellent accommodation and the Computer Lab for making

Haddadi, Hamed

252

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

253

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

2013-05-28

254

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 826 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-826 ISSN 1476-2986 GREEN IPTV: a resource and energy efficient network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos December 2012 15 JJ Thomson Avenue://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12;GREEN IPTV: A Resource and Energy Efficient Network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos

Haddadi, Hamed

255

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

technologies. This dissertation specifically focuses on examining the utility of facial affect analysisTechnical Report Number 793 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-793 ISSN 1476-2986 Affect inference in learning environments: a functional view of facial affect analysis using naturalistic data Shazia Afzal

Haddadi, Hamed

256

Standardizing calibration laboratory practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of the calibration lab is becoming more and more important in view of the `global business' environment. Scheduled, regular calibration of test and measuring instruments with measurement traceability to the nationally accepted standards is a prerequisite. Certification to ISO 9000-Quality System Standards becoming a must for exports, the calibration activity being the backbone for quality, calibration laboratory practices

C. Muralikrishna Kumar

1993-01-01

257

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-print Network

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

258

Russell Furr Laboratory Safety &  

E-print Network

; Cal/OSHA investigated the accident UCLA fined $31,875 in 2009 Failure to ensure employees wore appropriate PPE Failure to maintain health & safety training records for laboratory employees Failure Learned from UCLA #12;1. Demonstrate commitment to safety 2. Assess risks and plan for hazards 3

259

Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory  

E-print Network

of electrical energy, hot and cold running sea water, hot and cold domestic water, fresh well water, natural gas, and com- pressed air. Eleven of the research laboratories have constant-temperature water tables. Two to be planted in open water with mini- mum loss. The effect of the rate of flow of sea wat

260

Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

261

Marine Biological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Marine Biological Laboratory is an international center for research, education, and training in biology, biomedicine, and ecology. Site features the latest news and research developments from MBL. Explore all the latest research, education information, including graduate admissions and teacher workshops, and a glimpse at MBL history, facilities, and more. Current news and links to all kinds of additional MBL resources are also available.

262

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

263

A Lean Laboratory  

PubMed Central

During certain months of the year, viral respiratory infections lead to a dramatic increase in pediatric emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Rapid identification of the infectious organism results in timely treatment and reductions in hospital cost and length of stay. Before the introduction of molecular testing to the virology laboratory, diagnosis relied on the standard methods of immunofluorescence and culture. These tests can be labor-intensive and costly. Recent studies have demonstrated the higher sensitivity, faster turnaround, and broader diagnostic spectrum provided by multiplexed RT-PCR assays. Data comparing the laboratory cost and labor efficiency of the tests are lacking. To address this issue, we chose to implement the principles of operational workflow analysis using lean methodology to critically evaluate the potential advantages of a multiplexed RT-PCR assay both in terms of workflow and cost effectiveness. Our results indicated that the implementation of the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel (RVP) resulted in a standardized workflow with decreased requirements in laboratory cost as well as improvement in efficiency. In summary, we demonstrate that, in our laboratory, the Luminex xTAG RVP is more operationally streamlined and cost-effective than standard viral direct fluorescent antibody and culture. Further studies are needed to highlight additional benefits of the test, including shortened hospital stay and improved patient outcome. PMID:21354052

Dundas, Nicola E.; Ziadie, Mandolin S.; Revell, Paula A.; Brock, Evangeline; Mitui, Midori; Leos, N. Kristine; Rogers, Beverly B.

2011-01-01

264

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 532 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-532 ISSN 1476-2986 Internet traffic are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/TechReports/ Series editor: Markus Kuhn ISSN 1476-2986 #12;Abstract Due to the dramatically increasing popularity of the services provided over

Hand, Steven

265

Laboratory Density Functionals  

E-print Network

We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

B. G. Giraud

2007-07-26

266

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department, pharmaceutical or cleaning products. Applications The technology allows the formation of optically active chiral synthetic pathways for producing pharmaceutical compounds. 3. The advantage of performing racemic resolution

267

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Labs Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory Metamaterials Laboratory Surface and Interface Physics Laboratory Molecular Genetics Laboratory Structural Biology Laboratory Initiative Research Units

Fukai, Tomoki

268

Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

Bearce, T.D.

1992-05-01

269

Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

Bearce, T.D.

1992-01-01

270

Open Laboratories in College Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One viable alternative to the conventional, regularly scheduled laboratory session is the open laboratory concept. In this chapter, the authors use the open laboratory system developed at Eastern Kentucky University as a case study to provide insight into the system, including its benefits and challenges. The authors also report on plans to use current and emerging computer technologies to automate laboratory operations.

Tofan, Daniel; Goodbey, Susan; Otieno, Tom

2006-01-01

271

Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

Cambridge, University of

272

ChemPages Laboratory Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

273

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review  

E-print Network

1 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 - July 2, 2009June 30 - July 2, 2009 #12;Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 - July 2 to vertical structure of temperature change] #12;8 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review Geophysical

274

Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

275

Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Advanced technologies and biology have extremely different physical implementations, but they are far more alike in systems-level organization than is widely appreciated. Convergent evolution in both domains produces modular architectures that are composed of elaborate hierarchies of protocols and layers of feedback regulation, are driven by demand for robustness to uncertain environments, and use often imprecise components. This complexity may be largely hidden in idealized laboratory settings and in normal operation, becoming conspicuous only when contributing to rare cascading failures. These puzzling and paradoxical features are neither accidental nor artificial, but derive from a deep and necessary interplay between complexity and robustness, modularity, feedback, and fragility. This review describes insights from engineering theory and practice that can shed some light on biological complexity.

Marie Csete (University of Michigan Medical School; Departments of Anesthesiology and Cell and Developmental Biology); John Doyle (California Institute of Technology;)

2002-03-01

276

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Science Laboratory Biofunctional Synthetic Chemistry Laboratory RNA Biology Laboratory Astrophysical Big

Fukai, Tomoki

277

GRADUATE AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-print Network

GRADUATE AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Experiments and modeling Firestone Flight Sciences Laboratory Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory Karman Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics

278

Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

1998-01-01

279

Surgical Planning Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

280

Flight Dynamics Laboratory overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Flight Dynamics Laboratory (FDL) is one of four Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) and part of the Aeronautical Systems Division located at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The FDL is responsible for the planning and execution of research and development programs in the areas of structures and dynamics, flight controls, vehicle equipment/subsystems, and aeromechanics. Some of the areas being researched in the four FDL divisions are as follows: large space structures (LSS) materials and controls; advanced cockpit designs; bird-strike-tolerant windshields; and hypersonic interceptor system studies. Two of the FDL divisions are actively involved in programs that deal directly with LSS control/structures interaction: the Flight Controls Division and the Structures and Dynamics Division.

Sandford, Thaddeus

1986-01-01

281

Quaternary GIS Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

2007-02-27

282

Marine Biological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1888, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) was started in Woods Hole, and since then it has served as a place for world-class biologists and ecologists to gather and work together. Their ambitions are very broad and admirable, and visitors should start by reading through the introduction in the "About MBL" section before looking around further. Most visitors will then want to go to the "Education" area. Here they will find such resources as a marine organism database, a number of full-text classic works on marine organisms, and several image databases. Moving on, visitors might also want to look at the "Research" area, which contains materials on their laboratories, research opportunities at the MBL, and an overview of their current research projects.

283

Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia  

PubMed Central

The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

Wallerstein, Ralph O.

1987-01-01

284

Keeping a Laboratory Notebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The HURI SURI project is developing a regional biotechnology workforce pipeline by expanding and supporting biotechnology research experiences for Jamestown Community College (JCC) undergraduates and disseminating these research experiences and materials to area high school teachers and students. This Microsoft Word document details how to keep a laboratory notebook in a high school or undergraduate science class. This is important because "a laboratory notebook is really required by law for investigators that either work in an industry (e.g. pharmaceutical industry) that is federally regulated or for investigators who have federal grant funding for research (e.g. from the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation)." The document explains how the notebook needs a table of contents, experiment details, and conclusion.

2013-08-26

285

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

286

Coastal Research Laboratory USF  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is the home page of the laboratory. Users may click to find descriptions of the Coastal Research Program which focuses on two key areas of coastal geology: the process-response systems of beaches, inlets, and tidal sand bodies; and the Holocene history and development of coastal barrier systems. Research projects are primarily concentrated on the west coast of Florida, with some projects encompassing areas of Florida's east coast, the Florida Keys, the southwest Florida shallow shelf, and Puerto Rico. Under Projects, users may see brief descriptions of thesis research. The Geolinks on this site are extensive- over six hundred at the time of review- to: Coastal and Oceanographic Sites, Data and Software, General Geology, Geological Surveys in the United States and International, Government Agencies, Institutes, Issues, Journals and Magazines, Professional Organizations, References, Indexes, and Catalogs, University Geology Departments and Laboratories in the United States and International, and Weather. Users are invited to add sites.

287

A lunar laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration.

Keaton, P. W.; Duke, M. B.

1987-01-01

288

A lunar laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration.

Keaton, P. W.; Duke, M. B.

289

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory advances the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter and energy by providing leadership and resources for qualified researchers to conduct basic research at the frontiers of high energy physics and related disciplines. Fermilab's mission is to advance the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter and energy. Fermilab's world-class scientific research facility allows qualified researchers from around the world to conduct fundamental research at the frontiers of high-energy physics and related disciplines.

2009-05-18

290

Virtual Laboratory: Potential Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page provides an introduction to mechanical energy, focusing on gravity. It includes a java simulation of a dropped ball showing the conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. Non-elastic collisions with the ground are included, although there is no discussion of the resultant lost energy. Users can change the mass, initial energy, and percentage of the energy lost during collisions. This item is part of a larger collection of virtual laboratories for physics, astronomy, and environmental science.

Bothun, Gregory

2007-12-03

291

Naval Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Washington, D.C., the NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps and conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development. Site provides insight into the many accomplishments and on-going research of the lab. Learn about how GPS began and advances in meteorology and radar applications. Information includes the history of the lab, a visitor's guide, and more.

292

Sedimentary System Laboratory Photomicrographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains numerous images of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including images photographed at the Laboratory of Sedimentary System at the Seoul National University and photographs from textbooks. Original photographs include photomicrographs of both clastic and carbonate rocks along with back-scattered electron images and photographs of sedimentary rocks and structures in outcrops. Photographs from texts include terrigenous clastic rocks, carbonate rocks and sedimentary structures.

Ii, Yong L.

293

Hanford cultural resources laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

Wright, M.K.

1995-06-01

294

Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

1973-01-01

295

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

core calculus for Java and Java with effects G.M. Bierman, M.J. Parkinson, A.M. Pitts April 2003 15 JJ G.M. Bierman, M.J. Parkinson, A.M. Pitts Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge.M. Bierman M.J. Parkinson A.M. Pitts University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, J.J. Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

296

Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) at the University of Maryland is investigating human and robotic performance in space. Among the many projects being conducted at the SSL are a telerobotic spacecraft servicer called Ranger--to be launched into Earth orbit via an expendable rocket in 1997, and a Space Shuttle flight experiment which will investigate human fatigue during extravehicular activities (spacewalks). The SSL Home Page presents the projects, personnel, and facilities of the lab.

297

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking.

E. L. Zirbel

2002-01-01

298

Mercy Hall, Science Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students working in the Science Laboratory in Mercy Hall.Back of photograph: Science Lab Mercy Hall Circa 1947-1948. Anon Studios 193 Thames Street, Newport, Rhode Island 02840. German Cote, Rose Marie Jalette, Barbara (?), Sarah Conalty. Now 1987 , it is part of Megley Theater.Circa 1947-1948. Black and white photograph. 24.13 x 19.05 cm. (9.75 x 7.75 in.)

Anon Studios

2008-01-01

299

Mars Science Laboratory Mission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Jet Propulsion Laboratory website contains the science mission overview of the Mars Rover Curiosity. Links provide information about the scientific studies to be performed and the technologies to be employed, both established and innovative. From this overview page the visitor can navigate to numerous other well-illustrated pages that discuss the various vehicles involved, the mission timeline, communication with Earth, the mission team, and more.

2012-08-27

300

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01

301

Laboratory Diagnosis of Amebiasis  

PubMed Central

The detection of Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis, is an important goal of the clinical microbiology laboratory. To assess the scope of E. histolytica infection, it is necessary to utilize accurate diagnostic tools. As more is discovered about the molecular and cell biology of E. histolytica, there is great potential for further understanding the pathogenesis of amebiasis. Molecular biology-based diagnosis may become the technique of choice in the future because establishment of these protozoa in culture is still not a routine clinical laboratory process. In all cases, combination of serologic tests with detection of the parasite (by antigen detection or PCR) offers the best approach to diagnosis, while PCR techniques remain impractical in many developing country settings. The detection of amebic markers in serum in patients with amebic colitis and liver abscess appears promising but is still only a research tool. On the other hand, stool antigen detection tests offer a practical, sensitive, and specific way for the clinical laboratory to detect intestinal E. histolytica. All the current tests suffer from the fact that the antigens detected are denatured by fixation of the stool specimen, limiting testing to fresh or frozen samples. PMID:14557296

Tanyuksel, Mehmet; Petri, William A.

2003-01-01

302

Challenges in small screening laboratories: implementing an on-demand laboratory information management system.  

PubMed

The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, includes a laboratory devoted to High Content Analysis (HCA) of neurons. The goal of the laboratory is to uncover signaling pathways, genes, compounds, or drugs that can be used to promote nerve growth. HCA permits the quantification of neuronal morphology, including the lengths and numbers of axons. HCA of various libraries on primary neurons requires a team-based approach, a variety of process steps and complex manipulations of cells and libraries to obtain meaningful results. HCA itself produces vast amounts of information including images, well-based data and cell-based phenotypic measures. Documenting and integrating the experimental workflows, library data and extensive experimental results is challenging. For academic laboratories generating large data sets from experiments involving thousands of perturbagens, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is the data tracking solution of choice. With both productivity and efficiency as driving rationales, the Miami Project has equipped its HCA laboratory with an On Demand or Software As A Service (SaaS) LIMS to ensure the quality of its experiments and workflows. The article discusses how the system was selected and integrated into the laboratory. The advantages of a SaaS based LIMS over a client-server based system are described. PMID:21631415

Lemmon, Vance P; Jia, Yuanyuan; Shi, Yan; Holbrook, S Douglas; Bixby, John L; Buchser, William

2011-11-01

303

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument of Energy (DoE). Objectives · Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations · Develop a Solar Energy Resources · Offer Unique Training Methods for Solar Monitoring Network Design, Operation

304

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER base that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, pathology, and obstetrical services that are provided services. This arrangement permits the possibility of participation in other components of genetic services

Thompson, Michael

305

Brookhaven National LaboratoryBrookhaven National Laboratory ENERGY INNOVATIONENERGY INNOVATION  

E-print Network

IMPROVING BIOFUEL PRODUCTION Harnessing the power of plants and algae, nature's green factories 28 ScienceBrookhaven National LaboratoryBrookhaven National Laboratory ENERGY INNOVATIONENERGY INNOVATION #12;ENERGY INNOVATION Brookhaven Lab tackles the nation's energy challenges PARTNERS IN DISCOVERY Working

Ohta, Shigemi

306

Allergy to laboratory animals in laboratory technicians and animal keepers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of allergy to laboratory animals (LAA) was investigated in laboratory technicians and animal keepers. In a questionnaire 41 of 101 technicians reported symptoms provoked by work with laboratory animals. On clinical investigation 30 were found to have symptoms and signs related to contact with animals, and allergy was confirmed by radioallergosorbent tests (RAST) and skin tests in 19.

G Agrup; L Belin; L Sjöstedt; S Skerfving

1986-01-01

307

Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

Not Available

2011-10-01

308

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28

309

Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study the interplanetary medium, asteroids, comets, and planets. Suborbital sounding rockets and groundbased observing platforms form an integral part of these research activities. This report covers the period from approximately October 1999 through September 2000.

Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

310

MIT Space Systems Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1995 to engage in "cutting edge research projects with the goal of directly contributing to the present and future exploration and development of space." Users can find materials on current and past flight projects such as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) and the Interferometry Program Experiment (IPEX). The website also features SSL's ground programs and research facilities. Researchers can view lists of published papers and can download student theses.

311

Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

1972-01-01

312

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

Not Available

1990-01-01

313

A Useful Laboratory Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently, a high school Science Club generated a large number of questions involving temperature. Therefore, they decided to construct a thermal gradient apparatus in order to conduct a wide range of experiments beyond the standard "cookbook" labs. They felt that this apparatus could be especially useful in future ninth-grade biology classes, in which students must design and conduct individual, inquiry-based experiments as part of their training in scientific methodology. This article describes their experience building and testing a thermal gradient for laboratory use.

Johnson, Samuel A.; Tutt, Tye

2008-10-01

314

The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

315

The Virtual Chemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This networked laboratory simulation provides an environment in which students can select from hundreds of standard chemical reagants and combine them in any way they see fit. Instructors may use this environment in a variety of settings including student homework, group projects, computer lab activities and pre- and post-lab exercises to support varied approaches to chemical education. Activities are stored in our online homework repository which currently includes: acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, molarity, redox chemistry, solubility, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and quantitative analysis.

Yaron, David

1999-01-01

316

Mercenaria Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Invertebrate Anatomy Online exercise, featuring the hard-shell clam Mercenaria mercenaria (quahog), is part of an Internet laboratory manual for courses in Invertebrate Zoology. This exercise features an introduction to Mollusca and a step-by-step dissection guide, including hand-drawn figures, defined terms, and detailed explanations of form and function. Students will learn about the external anatomy (shell), muscles, mantle skirts, mantle cavity, mantle folds, siphons, gills, labial palps, hemal system, exhalant chamber, excretory system, digestive system, nervous system, and reproductive system.

Fox, Richard; Online, Invertebrate A.

317

Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

2001-01-01

318

Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

Jackson, Dionne

2005-01-01

319

COMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE  

E-print Network

different layers, like operating system and applications, or computer and network. The Laboratory's research. Thus we are researching across the spectrum from hardware compilation to biological modellingCOMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Leaders in Computing Research and Teaching William

Haddadi, Hamed

320

DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)  

Cancer.gov

As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

321

ChemTeacher: Laboratory Methods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Laboratory Methods page includes resources for teaching students about basic laboratory equipment.

2011-01-01

322

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories  

E-print Network

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories The Environmental Health group occupies, and low temperature freezer. Major analytical equipment in the Environmental Health group includes the laboratories for Toxicology, Occupational Health, and Global Health. Available equipment includes an aerosol

Stuart, Amy L.

323

Probing Microcomputer-Based Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) refer to a laboratory where a microcomputer gathers and displays data directly from the environment. Program listings for a response timer (using game paddles) to illustrate the nature of MBLs are presented. (JN)

Lam, Tom

1985-01-01

324

EM laboratories for linear coupling  

SciTech Connect

Broadband, well calibrated, sensitive, and automated laboratories are essential for conducting meaningful phenomenology and susceptibility characterization studies. This presentation gives an overview reflecting the facilities and experiences at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

King, R.J.; Hudson, H.G.; McLeod R.R.

1987-01-01

325

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that started with a view toward the potential threat of terrorist use of biological weapons. As featured in our annual report, activities in this area have grown to many important projects contributing to homeland security and disease prevention and control. At times transformation happens in large steps. Such was the case when nuclear testing stopped in the early 1990s. As one of the nation's nuclear weapon design laboratories, Livermore embarked on the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The objectives are to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile and to develop a science-based, thorough understanding of the performance of nuclear weapons. The ultimate goal is to sustain confidence in an aging stockpile without nuclear testing. Now is another time of major change for the Laboratory as the nation is resizing its nuclear deterrent and NNSA begins taking steps to transform the nuclear weapons complex to meet 21st-century national security needs. As you will notice in the opening commentary to each section of this report, the Laboratory's senior management team is a mixture of new and familiar faces. LLNS drew the best talent from its parent organizations--Bechtel National, UC, Babcock & Wilcox, the Washington Group Division of URS, and Battelle--to lead the Laboratory. We are honored to take on the responsibility and see a future with great opportunities for Livermore to apply its exceptional science and technology to important national problems. We will work with NNSA to build on the successful Stockpile Stewardship Program and transform the nation's nuclear weapons complex to become smaller, safer, more secure, and more cost effective. Our annual report highlights progress in many relevant areas. Laboratory scientists are using astonishing computational capabilities--including BlueGene/L, the world's fastest supercomputer with a revolutionary architecture and over 200,000 processors--to gain key insights about performance of aging nuclear weapons. What we learn will help us sustain the stockpile without nuclear testing. Preparations are underway to start experiments at

Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

2008-04-25

326

Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.  

PubMed

Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

2013-12-01

327

Environmental enrichment for primates in laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental enrichment is a critical component of Refinement, one of the 3Rs underlying humane experimentation on animals. In this paper I discuss why primates housed in laboratories, which often have constraints of space and study protocols, are a special case for enrichment. I outline a framework for categorising the different types of enrichment, using the marmoset as a case study, and summarise the methods used to determine what animals want/prefer. I briefly review the arguments that enrichment does not negatively affect experimental outcomes. Finally I focus on complexity and novelty, choice and control, the underlying features of enrichment that makes it successful, and how combined with a thorough understanding of natural history we can put effective enrichment into practice in laboratories. Throughout the paper I emphasise the need to evaluate enrichment to ensure it is having the desired effect.

Buchanan-Smith, H. M.

2010-06-01

328

Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service. This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

National Research Council (National Research Council Committee on Scientific and Humane Issues in the Use of Random Source Dogs and Cats for Research; Na)

2000-01-01

329

Multiple equilibrium laboratory devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Devices{* } will be demonstrated and videotapes played of a number of laboratory studies that exhibit multiple equilibrium. All devices have two competing effects driving the flow. In two of them, temperature and salinity oppose each other. In another, air and water compete. In a fourth, wave propagation is opposed by inertia. Connection with hypothesized ocean behavior will be made. {* } Whitehead, J. A. 2000 Stratified Convection with Multiple States. Ocean Modelling, 2, 109-121. Whitehead, J. A. W. Gregory Lawson and John Salzig. 2001 Multistate flow devices for geophysical fluid dynamics and climate. American Journal of Physics, 69 546-553. Whitehead, J. A. and P. G. Baines. 2000. Hydraulic Jump Location as a Multiple Equilibrium feature. 2000 Ocean Sciences Meeting, American Geophysical Union, San Antonio Texas, January 25, 2000. Abstract: EOS 80 #46 (Supplement), OS125. Whitehead, J. A. , M. L. E. Timmermans, W. Gregory Lawson, S. N. Bulgakov, A. M. Zatarian, J. F. A. Medina, and John Salzig, Laboratory studies of thermally and/or Salinity-driven flows with partial mixing: Part 1 Stommel transitions and multiple flow states. In preparation

Whitehead, J. A.

2001-12-01

330

Laboratory Diagnostics of Botulism  

PubMed Central

Botulism is a potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin. Human pathogenic neurotoxins of types A, B, E, and F are produced by a diverse group of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, including Clostridium botulinum groups I and II, Clostridium butyricum, and Clostridium baratii. The routine laboratory diagnostics of botulism is based on the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in the patient. Detection of toxin-producing clostridia in the patient and/or the vehicle confirms the diagnosis. The neurotoxin detection is based on the mouse lethality assay. Sensitive and rapid in vitro assays have been developed, but they have not yet been appropriately validated on clinical and food matrices. Culture methods for C. botulinum are poorly developed, and efficient isolation and identification tools are lacking. Molecular techniques targeted to the neurotoxin genes are ideal for the detection and identification of C. botulinum, but they do not detect biologically active neurotoxin and should not be used alone. Apart from rapid diagnosis, the laboratory diagnostics of botulism should aim at increasing our understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of the disease. Therefore, the toxin-producing organisms should be routinely isolated from the patient and the vehicle. The physiological group and genetic traits of the isolates should be determined. PMID:16614251

Lindstrom, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

2006-01-01

331

Chemistry laboratory safety manual available  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemistry laboratory safety manual outlines safe practices for handling hazardous chemicals and chemistry laboratory equipment. Included are discussions of chemical hazards relating to fire, health, explosion, safety equipment and procedures for certain laboratory techniques and manipulations involving glassware, vacuum equipment, acids, bases, and volatile solvents.

Elsbrock, R. G.

1968-01-01

332

Computer Systems Laboratory Research Review  

E-print Network

Computer Systems Laboratory Research Review Joseph Pasquale George Polyzos Computer Systems 92093­0114 April 1991 UCSD Technical Report CS91­181 Abstract At the Computer Systems Laboratory at UCSD, and the UC Micro Program. For more information, send mail to the authors at Computer Systems Laboratory

Polyzos, George C.

333

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to set down a large, mobile laboratory -- the rover Curiosity -- using precision landing technology that makes many of Mars' most the 23 months after landing, Curiosity

334

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to set down a large, mobile laboratory -- the rover Curiosity -- using precision landing technology that makes many of Mars' most intriguing regions viable destinations

Christian, Eric

335

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-print Network

#12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1985 December 1985 Eugene J and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 .........................Contracts and Grants 48 Front Cover: Water levels on the Great Lakes have been in a high regimefor the past

336

Introductory Archaeology: The Inexpensive Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a number of student-focused laboratory exercises that are inexpensive, yet show the scientific character of archaeology. Describes the environmental laboratory exercise which includes the following analysis topics: (1) pollen; (2) earth core; (3) microfaunal; and (4) microwear. Describes the ceramic laboratory which involves…

Rice, Patricia C.

1990-01-01

337

Total laboratory automation in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of systematized automation in clinical laboratories in Japan started in 1981. At that time, about 12 laboratory technicians worked in a typical private University hospital laboratory (average size 1000 beds), whereas in national university hospitals (typical size 600 beds), the number of technicians was as low as 18–25. In 1981, the Kochi Medical School was founded as a

Masahide Sasaki; Takeshi Kageoka; Katsumi Ogura; Hiromi Kataoka; Tadashi Ueta; Shigeyoshi Sugihara

1998-01-01

338

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY SUPPORTED BY: THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION and THE STATE OF FLORIDA OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA · LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 15 2005 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2005 ANNUAL REPORT National High magnetic Field Laboratory 2005 NHMFL

Weston, Ken

339

2. VIEW OF TAN 629 HANGAR COMPLEX TAKEN FROM MAIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF TAN 629 HANGAR COMPLEX TAKEN FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD FACING NORTH, LONGER LENS AND CLOSER VIEW THAN PHOTO 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar No. 629, Scoville, Butte County, ID

340

Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

1988-01-01

341

19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL PIPING. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-3212. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

342

Synthesis of Dinitrogen and Dihydrogen Complexes of Molybdenum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents background information, safety notes, and laboratory procedures for synthesizing dinitrogen and dihydrogen complexes of molybdenum. The one-step method described is suitable for advanced inorganic chemistry classes. (SK)

Archer, Leonard J.; And Others

1981-01-01

343

Complex Tectonism on Ganymede  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex tectonism is evident in these images of Ganymede's surface. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. The 80 kilometer (50 mile) wide lens-shaped feature in the center of the image is located at 32 degrees latitude and 188 degrees longitude along the border of a region of ancient dark terrain known as Marius Regio, and is near an area of younger bright terrain named Nippur Sulcus. The tectonism that created the structures in the bright terrain nearby has strongly affected the local dark terrain to form unusual structures such as the one shown here. The lens-like appearance of this feature is probably due to shearing of the surface, where areas have slid past each other and also rotated slightly. Note that in several places in these images, especially around the border of the lens-shaped feature, bright ridges appear to turn into dark grooves. Analysis of the geologic structures in areas like this are helping scientists to understand the complex tectonic history of Ganymede.

North is to the top-left of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The image covers an area about 63 kilometers (39 miles) by 120 kilometers (75 miles) across at a resolution of 188 meters (627 feet) per picture element. The images were taken on September 6, 1996 at a range of 18,522 kilometers (11,576 miles) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

1997-01-01

344

Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ELVIS (Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science) is an interactive visualization environment that enables scientists, students, and educators to visualize and analyze large, complex, and diverse sets of scientific data. It accomplishes this by presenting the data sets as 2-D, 3-D, color, stereo, and graphic images with movable and multiple light sources combined with displays of solid-surface, contours, wire-frame, and transparency. By simultaneously rendering diverse data sets acquired from multiple sources, formats, and resolutions and by interacting with the data through an intuitive, direct-manipulation interface, ELVIS provides an interactive and responsive environment for exploratory data analysis.

Hansen, Elaine R.; Rodier, Daniel R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.

1994-01-01

345

GELCASTING: From laboratory development toward industrial production  

SciTech Connect

Gelcasting, a ceramic forming process, was developed to overcome some of the limitations of other complex-shape forming techniques such as injection molding and slip casting. In gelcasting, a concentrated slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers is poured into a mold and then polymerized in-situ to form a green body in the shape of the mold cavity. Thus, it is a combination of polymer chemistry with slip processing and represents minimal departure from standard ceramic processing. The simplicity of the process has attracted industrial partners and by collaboration between them and the developers, the process is being advanced from the laboratory toward industrial production.

Omatete, O.O.; Janney, M.A.; Nunn, S.D.

1995-07-01

346

Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

Busby, David C.; And Others

1981-01-01

347

Titan's Chemical Complexity and Dust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, harbors one of the richest atmospheric chemistry in the solar system, initiated by the dissociation of the major neutral species (nitrogen and methane) by ultraviolet solar radiation and associated photoelectrons. Until recently, it was believed that the dust observed in the stratosphere (i.e. micrometer size organic aerosols) was formed in situ through an intense neutral chemistry involving complex organic molecules. However, this understanding of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry is being strongly challenged by recent measurements from the Cassini spacecraft. They revealed an extraordinarily complex thermospheric composition with positive ions extending up to at least hundreds of u/q and negative ions up to at least thousands of u/q. These observations indicate that molecular growth starts at much higher altitudes than previously anticipated and suggest that new formation processes have to be put forward. We review our recent work on Titan's upper atmospheric chemistry. We base our discussion on Cassini observations as well as on a new generation of photochemical/microphysical models and laboratory experiments. We argue that positive ion chemistry is at the origin of complex organic molecules, such as benzene, ammonia and hydrogen isocyanide, and that radiative neutral-neutral association can efficiently form alkanes. We find that macromolecules (m/z > 100) attach electrons and therefore attract the abundant positive ions, which ultimately leads to the formation of the dust. In order to infer the dust chemical composition and structure, we turn towards the analysis of laboratory analogues by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Finally, we emphasize that another space mission to Titan with a new generation of instruments is required to validate the effort currently under progress in the laboratory.

Vuitton, Véronique

348

Complex Systems and Human Complexity in Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts taken from complex systems theory, such as ‘agents’ and ‘attractors’, have been proposed as metaphors in medical practice.This proposal is assessed by a comparison of the notions of complex adaptive systems (CAS) and human complexity. CAS are characterized by the emergence of sophisticated output features of rule-governed non-linear systems. Human complexity is the result of higher mental capacities and

Roger Strand; Guri Rortveit; Edvin Schei

2005-01-01

349

COMPLEX TRAUMA, COMPLEX REACTIONS: ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex trauma occurs repeatedly and escalates over its duration. In families, it is exemplified by domestic violence and child abuse and in other situations by war, prisoner of war or refugee status, and human trafficking. Complex trauma also refers to situations such as acute\\/chronic illness that requires intensive medical intervention or a single traumatic event that is calamitous. Complex trauma

Christine A. Courtois

2004-01-01

350

Complex Trauma, Complex Reactions: Assessment and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex trauma occurs repeatedly and escalates over its duration. In families, it is exemplified by domestic violence and child abuse and in other situations by war, prisoner of war or refugee status, and human trafficking. Complex trauma also refers to situations such as acute\\/chronic illness that requires intensive medical intervention or a single traumatic event that is calamitous. Complex trauma

Christine A. Courtois

2008-01-01

351

Materials in Nanotechnology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. The six labs available here focus on materials in Nanotechnology. The labs are titled Block Copolymers, Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles, Solar Cells, Ni Nanowires, Silicon Nanowires, and Statistical Process Control. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials

2011-03-09

352

The autonomic laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

1999-01-01

353

Basic Nanotechnology Processes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. These twelve labs focus on basic processes in Nanotechnology. Some of the labs are titled Gold Nucleation Analysis, Introduction to LPCVD and PECVD, Introduction to Plasma-based Processing, Liftoff and Surface Modification, and Intro to Scanning Electron Microscopy. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials.

2011-03-08

354

PETC fuel rheology laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of investigations into the rheological properties of alternate fuel mixtures, such as coal-oil mixtures, coal-water mixtures, and coal-alcohol mixtures. Primary emphasis in this paper is placed on the procedures and techniques used to evaluate alternate slurry fuels in the rheology laboratory at PETC through the spring of 1983. Sophisticated, bench-scale equipment was used to examine viscometric properties and to make settling velocity measurements. Examples of the data developed during this program are given to support the choice of measurement procedures and test conditions. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the applicability of various mathematical models for settling characteristics and rheological properties are included. Areas in which additional development of techniques is required are discussed. 25 references, 21 figures, 7 tables.

Ekmann, A.C.; Ekmann, J.M.

1984-08-01

355

Scalable Computing Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Scalable Computing Laboratory was created by the Department of Energy, Ames Lab, and Iowa State University to "improve parallel computing through clustering techniques for use in scientific and engineering computation." One of their past projects included rebuilding the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), the first electronic digital computer. Here visitors can read about building a working replica of the historical computer as well as the background of the original machine and its inventors. Visitors interested in seeing the ABC in action should click on the link "Video" on the left hand side of the homepage. There are two videos here: the first is a seven-minute demonstration of the operation of the ABC and the second an eleven-minute tutorial about the ABC. The "Photos/Diagrams" link contains over two dozen photographs of the large amount of work that went into the making of the working replica of this machine, which was originally built between 1937 and 1942.

2003-01-22

356

Laminar laboratory rivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A viscous fluid flowing over fine plastic grains spontaneously channelizes into a few centimeters-wide river. After reaching its equilibrium shape, this stable laboratory flume is able to carry a steady load of sediments, like many alluvial rivers. When the sediment discharge vanishes, the river size, shape and slope fit the threshold theory proposed by Glover and Florey (1951), which assumes that the Shields parameter is critical on the channel bed. As the sediment discharge is increased, the river widens and flattens. Surprisingly, the aspect ratio of its cross section depends on the sediment discharge only, regardless of the water discharge. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these findings based on the balance between gravity, which pulls particles towards the center of the channel, and the diffusion of bedload particles, which pushes them away from areas of intense bedload.

Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Éric; Métivier, François

2014-05-01

357

Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL) consists of (1) highly interactive, web-deliverable psychology experiments and demonstrations, (2) a cumulative data archive from which students can retrieve datasets for analysis, and (3) user-controlled data extraction and analysis tools designed for the diverse needs of end users. One of the goals of the collection is to offer support for student research and educators who are not adept in experimental design and data analysis. Psychology students will be able to collect data, analyze data, and report their findings for class assignments or individual projects. Because psychology is allied to many disciplines--biology, sociology, and political science among them--OPL will contribute to the set of experiments available to students who wish to study psychologically-based issues in related scientific disciplines.

2006-03-08

358

MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

359

First International Microgravity Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

1990-01-01

360

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

2003-01-01

361

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)  

E-print Network

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla) Department of Chemical Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos

Kuhl, Tonya L.

362

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology and Laboratory Science: The Basics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology provides students with the basic laboratory skills and knowledge to pursue a career in biotechnology. The manual, written by four biotechnology instructors with over 20 years of teaching experience, incorporates instruction, exercises, and laboratory activities that the authors have been using and perfecting for years. These exercises and activities serve to engage students and help them understand the fundamentals of working in a biotechnology laboratory. Building students' skills through an organized and systematic presentation of materials, procedures, and tasks, the manual will help students explore overarching themes that relate to all biotechnology workplaces. The fundamentals in this manual are critical to the success of research scientists, scientists who develop ideas into practical products, laboratory analysts who analyze samples in forensic, clinical, quality control, environmental, and other testing laboratories.

Brandner, Diana; Kraus, Mary E.; Mowery, Jeanette; Seidman, Lisa A.

2012-03-19

363

Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

NONE

1997-09-01

364

40. South Elevation, Revised Drawing of XRay Laboratory, Building No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

40. South Elevation, Revised Drawing of X-Ray Laboratory, Building No. 27, Letterman General Hospital. August 1940. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

365

39. North Elevation, Revised Drawing of XRay Laboratory, Building No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. North Elevation, Revised Drawing of X-Ray Laboratory, Building No. 27, Letterman General Hospital. August 1915. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

366

The Origin of Linguistic Categories SONY Computer Science Laboratory  

E-print Network

The Origin of Linguistic Categories Luc Steels SONY Computer Science Laboratory 6 Rue Amyot, 75005 and behavioral rules by which a group of distributed autonomous agents may develop a joined shared repertoire that language can be viewed as a complex adaptive system [8], [4]. The research explores formal models

Steels, Luc

367

The Invention Factory: Thomas Edison's Laboratories. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson explores the group of buildings in West Orange, New Jersey, built in 1887, that formed the core of Thomas Edison's research and development complex. They consisted of chemistry, physics, and metallurgy laboratories; machine shop; pattern shop; research library; and rooms for experiments. The lesson explains that the prototypes (ideas…

Bolger, Benjamin

368

Subsurface Trapping of Multiphase Plumes in Stratification: Laboratory Investigations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent observations of subsurface plumes near the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill have raised many questions about the physics of multiphase plumes in deep ocean environments. Plume evolution and vertical distribution will be a complex function of chemical composition (oil, gas, water, and chemical dispersants), water column density structure, turbulent mixing, and horizontal currents. Here we present early laboratory experiments from

B. L. White; R. Camassa; R. McLaughlin

2010-01-01

369

Partnership Opportunities with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is ``bringing science to life'' through the creation of knowledge; the invention of new tools and techniques; the scientific analysis of complex situations; and the design, construction and operation of research facilities used by scientists and engineers from throughout the world.

Payne, T.L.; Coxon, G.D.

2000-02-20

370

Computer Simulation and Laboratory Work in the Teaching of Mechanics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a teaching strategy designed to help high school students learn mechanics by involving them in simple experimental work, observing didactic films, running computer simulations, and executing more complex laboratory experiments. Provides an example of the strategy as it is applied to the topic of projectile motion. (TW)

Borghi, L.; And Others

1987-01-01

371

Adsorption of Phosphate on Goethite: An Undergraduate Research Laboratory Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment on the adsorption of phosphate on goethite is presented, which also includes discussion on surface properties, interfaces, acid-base equilibrium, molecular structure and solid state chemistry. It was seen that many students were able to produce qualitatively correct results for a complex system of real interest and they…

Tribe, Lorena; Barja, Beatriz C.

2004-01-01

372

Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes  

SciTech Connect

Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-08-01

373

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

...2014-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2014-01-01

374

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2011-01-01

375

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2012-01-01

376

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2010-01-01

377

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Reports § 211.194 Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...United States Pharmacopeia, National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2010-04-01

378

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Reports § 211.194 Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...United States Pharmacopeia, National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2011-04-01

379

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2013-01-01

380

Knowledge Media Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do students learn in the classroom? How can teachers best utilize new and emerging technologies in the classroom? What can teachers do to seamlessly incorporate technology into the learning experience? These are all questions that are asked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Knowledge Media Laboratory. On their website, users can learn about their work with communities of teachers, faculty, programs, and institutions over the past several years, and also look over some of their informative case studies. The Gallery of Teaching and Learning is a good place to start one’s exploration of the site, as it contains a number of exhibitions that look at how web-based tools can be used in teaching and how scholarship may change as a result of an increasingly networked milieu. One seminal resource on the site is the KEEP Toolkit. With the Toolkit, teachers and others can create engaging knowledge representations on the web for their own use. For visitors who might feel a bit overwhelmed by this, there is also a nice tutorial that explains how the Toolkit can be used.

381

Laboratory development TPV generator  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory model of a TPV generator in the kilowatt range was developed and tested. It was based on methane/oxygen combustion and a spectrally matched selective emitter/collector pair (ytterbia emitter-silicon PV cell). The system demonstrated a power output of 2.4 kilowatts at an overall efficiency of 4.5{percent} without recuperation of heat from the exhaust gases. Key aspects of the effort include: (1) process development and fabrication of mechanically strong selective emitter ceramic textile materials; (2) design of a stirred reactor emitter/burner capable of handling up to 175,000 Btu/hr fuel flows; (3) support to the developer of the production silicon concentrator cells capable of withstanding TPV environments; (4) assessing the apparent temperature exponent of selective emitters; and (5) determining that the remaining generator efficiency improvements are readily defined combustion engineering problems that do not necessitate breakthrough technology. The fiber matrix selective emitter ceramic textile (felt) was fabricated by a relic process with the final heat-treatment controlling the grain growth in the porous ceramic fiber matrix. This textile formed a cylindrical cavity for a stirred reactor. The ideal stirred reactor is characterized by constant temperature combustion resulting in a uniform reactor temperature. This results in a uniform radiant emission from the emitter. As a result of significant developments in the porous emitter matrix technology, a TPV generator burner/emitter was developed that produced kilowatts of radiant energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Holmquist, G.A.; Wong, E.M. [Quantum Group, Inc., 11211 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Waldman, C.H. [Consultant, P.O. Box 231157, Encinitas, California 92023-1157 (United States)

1996-02-01

382

BNL Sources Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS has a long-standing interest in providing the best possible synchrotron radiation sources for its user community, and hence, has recently established the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) to pursue research into fourth generation synchrotron radiation sources. A major element of the program includes development of a high peak power FEL meant to operate in the vacuum ultraviolet. The objective of the program is to develop the source, and experimental technology together to provide the greatest impact on UV science. The accelerator under construction for the SDL consists of a high brightness RF photocathode electron gun followed by a 230 MeV short pulse linac incorporating a magnetic chicane for pulse compression. The gun drive laser is a wide bandwidth Ti: Sapphire regenerative amplifier capable of pulse shaping which will be used to study non- linear emittance compensation. Using the compressor, 1 nC bunches with a length as small as 50 {mu}m sigma (2 kA peak current) are available for experiments. In this paper we briefly describe the facility and detail our plans for utilizing the 10 m long NISUS wiggler to carry out single pass FEL experiments. These include a 1 {mu}m SASE demonstration, a seeded beam demonstration at 300 nm, and a High Gain Harmonic Generation experiment at 200 mn. The application of chirped pulse amplification to this type of FEL will also be discussed.

Ben-Zvi, I.; Graves, W.; Heese, R.; Johnson, E.D.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

1997-01-01

383

Spectrometers beyond the laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Two new types of miniature Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) presently being built have enabled this technology to be taken out of the laboratory and into the field. Both designs are very rugged, use little power to run, and can be made extremely small and lightweight. They are excellent candidates for airborne use, both in aircraft and satellite applications. One, the Mcro FT, is a mass balanced linear reciprocating scan operating in the 1-2 scan per second speed range. The other, the Turbo FT, uses a rotary scan, enabling it to run at much higher speeds, from 10 to 1000 scans per second. Either type can be built in the visible, near K and thermal IR wavelength ranges, and provide spectral resolution of 1-2 wave-numbers. Results obtained in all these wavelength ranges are presented here. The rotary configuration is more suited to airborne and satellite survey type deployments, due mostly to its rapid scan rate. Either of these sensors will fit into a small, commercially available stabilized pod which can easily be attached to a helicopter or light plane. This results in a very economical flight spectrometer system. 11 figs.

Wadsworth, W. [Designs & Prototypes, West Simsbury, CT (United States)

1996-11-01

384

Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory of Michigan State University is on the cutting edge of pest control in the Upper Midwest, whether on agricultural or non-agricultural lands, public or private. Visitors interested in seeing the pesky adversaries of the lab, should click on "Bugs of The Lab", on the left hand side of the page, then click on the subcategory "Research Subjects". Along with photos of a dozen pests, including the "Plum Curculio", "Mites", and the "Oblique-Banded Leaf Roller", visitors can read a description of the pest, learn about and see images of the damage they do to specific crops, and discover where they are found on the plant. The Resistant Pest management Newsletter section on the left-hand side of the page has numerous subsections that should be of interest to visitors. Visitors can "Subscribe to the Newsletter" and peruse "Archives of Past Issues". Also interesting is the "Ask an Expert About Resistance Issues" section, which lists ten regions of the earth, and when one of the regions is clicked on, several experts' names pop up with their area of expertise, e-mail, and location. Additionally, anyone who is an expert and qualified, but is not on the list, may have their name added after filling out the "Expert Application", available on the "Ask an Expert..." homepage. All of the experts are volunteers.

385

Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

1993-09-01

386

Current Trends in Remote Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation

LuÍs Gomes; Seta Bogosyan

2009-01-01

387

Brookhaven National Laboratory Internship Program  

E-print Network

1 Brookhaven National Laboratory Internship Program New Appointment should the intern contact if they cannot come in? How? ___________________________________ What What project will the intern be collaborating on? _____________________________________________ What

Ohta, Shigemi

388

[The use of cryosupernatant plasma in complex treatment of pancreonecrosis].  

PubMed

Comparative study of results of complex treatment of pancreonecrosis in 60 patients using cryosupernatant plasma (CSNP) and fresh frozen plasma was carried out. Better positive dynamics in some laboratory indices, less lethality and better outcomes were marked with use of CSNP. It can be used instead of fresh frozen plasma in complex treatment of pancreonecrosis and concomitant DIC syndrome. PMID:18833146

Tse?makh, E A; Bombizo, V A; Buldakov, P N; Siniavin, A V; Osipov, E S; Meliksetian, A D; Orekhov, D A; Smirnova, O I

2008-01-01

389

Complexation of Actinides in Solution: Thermodynamic Measurementsand Structural Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a brief introduction of the studies of actinide complexation in solution at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An integrated approach of thermodynamic measurements and structural characterization is taken to obtain fundamental understanding of actinide complexation in solution that is of importance in predicting the behavior of actinides in separation processes and environmental transport.

Rao, L.

2007-02-01

390

Mice examined in Animal Laboratory of Lunar Receiving Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landrum Young (seated), Brown and Root-Northrup, and Russell Stullken, Manned Spacecraft Center, examine mice in the Animal laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory which have been inoculated with lunar sample material. wish for peace for all mankind. astronauts will be released from quarantine on August 11, 1969. Donald K. Slayton (right), MSC Director of Flight Crew Operations; and Lloyd Reeder, training coordinator.

1969-01-01

391

UF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

the upper 6 inches. If soil is wet, spread soil on clean paper or other suitable material to air dryUF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory 2390 Mowry Road/PO Box through the mail. Note: ďż˝ Consult an expert to determine if plant growth problems require soil testing

Florida, University of

392

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gross alpha\\/beta\\/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed

Buddemeier

1999-01-01

393

Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

2012-01-01

394

Laboratory singing sand avalanches.  

PubMed

Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

2010-02-01

395

Complexes of clusters and complexes of stars  

E-print Network

Most star complexes are in fact complexes of stars, clusters and gas clouds; term "star complexes" was introduced as general one disregarding the preferential content of a complex. Generally the high rate of star formation in a complex is accompanied by the high number of bound clusters, including massive ones, what was explained by the high gas pressure in such regions. However, there are also complexes, where clusters seems to be more numerous in relation to stars than in a common complex. The high rate of clusters - but not isolated stars - formation seems to be typical for many isolated bursts of star formation, but deficit of stars might be still explained by the observational selection. The latter cannot, however, explain the complexes or the dwarf galaxies, where the high formation rate of only stars is observed. The possibility of the very fast dissolution of parental clusters just in such regions should itself be explained. Some difference in the physical conditions (turbulence parameters ?) within the initial gas supercloud might be a reason for the high or low stars/clusters number ratio in a complex.

Yu. N. Efremov

2005-12-12

396

The Target Preparation Laboratory at Daresbury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Target Preparation Laboratory at Daresbury Laboratory is described. This laboratory provides targets for the UK Nuclear Physics community whose experimental programme is performed in several laboratories worldwide. Details are given of its present capabilities and range of targets produced.

Morrall, P. S.

2008-06-01

397

Simplicial complexes Further ideas  

E-print Network

Graphs Simplicial complexes Further ideas Critical Groups of Simplicial Complexes Art Duval1, Martin Critical Groups of Simplicial Complexes #12;Graphs Simplicial complexes Further ideas Sandpiles and chip-firing Algebra Reduced Laplacian and spanning trees Sandpiles and chip-firing Motivation Think

Duval, Art

398

RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences Laboratory for Cell Signaling  

E-print Network

for Lymphocyte Differentiation Laboratory for Transcriptional Regulation Laboratory for Immune Cell System Laboratory for Integrative Genomics Laboratory for Disease Systems Modeling Laboratory for Cell Functional Systems Laboratory for Molecular Live-Cell Quantification Laboratory for Metabolomics Laboratory

Fukai, Tomoki

399

A SURVEY OF LABORATORY AND STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO FARMWORKER EXPOSURE STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Developing internally valid, and perhaps generalizable, farmworker exposure studies is a complex process that involves many statistical and laboratory considerations. Statistics are an integral component of each study beginning with the design stage and continuing to the final da...

400

Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

401

The Mycobacterium avium complex.  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing is of increasing interest and importance as new effective antimicrobial agents are identified and evaluated. Antimicrobial resistance has already emerged as an important problem, and methods for circumventing resistance that use combination therapies are now being studied. Images PMID:8358707

Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

1993-01-01

402

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-print Network

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-03-23

403

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

working with animals should be aware of the potential danger from animal bites and/or other mishaps3.F.1 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for EXPOSURE what to do in event of an injury related to working with Laboratory Animals. 2.0 Scope This procedure

Krovi, Venkat

404

Laboratory Air Handling Unit System  

E-print Network

An innovative AHU system is presented in this paper. The proposed AHU system is called a Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) system since it is most suitable for the buildings where one section (laboratory) has 100% exhaust while the other section...

Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01

405

OCCUPATION--LANGUAGE LABORATORY DIRECTOR.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TRUE PROFESSIONAL STATUS FOR A LABORATORY DIRECTOR, PLUS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT OF SUCH INSTRUCTION, WILL GIVE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ADEQUATE RETURN FOR THEIR INVESTMENT IN ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. BY BEING INVOLVED IN IMPORTANT RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES, THE DIRECTOR OF A LANGUAGE LABORATORY CAN SERVE ALSO TO FREE THE TEACHER AND…

TURNER, DAYMOND

406

Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection  

E-print Network

Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility #12;Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF ArgonneNationalLaboratory's NaturalConvection will incorporate passive safety systems, many in the form of natural circulation loops, to ensure safe and long

Kemner, Ken

407

Programming for the Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present book is an attempt to stimulate thinking on the nature of the problems involved in writing material for language laboratory use in relation to the teaching of five languages widely taught in Britain today. All the contributors to this volume are language teachers currently using the language laboratory in their work. The editor notes…

Turner, John D., Ed.

408

The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The Jackson Laboratory was started in 1929 and in 1983 it was designated as an NCI cancer center. The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center (JLCC) conducts basic research using the mouse as a research tool since mice and humans share 95 percent of the same genes and basic physiology.

409

The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation  

E-print Network

? NVLAP is: · A system for accrediting laboratories found competent to perform specific tests · Nearly 800 testing and calibration laboratories 3An Introduction to NVLAP (rev. 2010-10-29) #12;NVLAP · Cryptographic & Security Testing ~ 12 labs · Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry ~ 25 labs · Environmental Testing

410

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PROPER procedures conducted in animal laboratories. Exposure to these allergens can trigger allergic symptoms to using NIOSH N95 dust-mist respirator, all employees must have respiratory fit-testing performed through

Krovi, Venkat

411

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY EQUAL OPPORTUNITY &  

E-print Network

opportunity for all employees in an environment free from harassment should be regarded as the Laboratory, citizenship, age, different abilities, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender continue to be proud of the inclusive work environment at the Laboratory. We will recognize individual

412

Adapting lean to histology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histology laboratories (histolabs) can increase productivity and reduce turnaround time and errors by using any one of several available management tools. After a few years of operation, all histolabs develop workflow problems. Histology laboratories handling more than 20 000 cases per year benefit the most from implementing management tools, as occurred in the 25 facilities summarized in this article. Discontinuous workflow,

René J. Buesa

2009-01-01

413

Laboratory studies of volcanic jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the fluid dynamics volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good

Susan Werner Kieffer; Bradford Sturtevant

1984-01-01

414

Communication Laboratories: Genesis, Assessment, Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Claims the quality of educational preparation in basic communication skills is insufficient for students to compete in the new millennium. Discusses the communication laboratory as one educational strategy for addressing the issue of communication competency. Describes the rationale for creating a communication laboratory, curricula and…

Ellis, Kathleen; Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela; Hackman, Michael Z.

2000-01-01

415

Forest Pathology and Mycology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Much of this Laboratory's current research is focused on Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death. The site links to downloadable files for a collection of research publication and posters. The website is available in both Spanish and English, and contains links for related laboratories and organizations.

Garbelotto, Matteo

2007-09-04

416

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

.8.1 The veterinary technicians will submit the white card, animal removal card, and complete animal medical record2.C.2 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR ANIMAL animal rooms and in the Laboratory Animal Facilities office, at all locations. 3.2 The animal removal

Krovi, Venkat

417

Blood Loss from Laboratory Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Laboratory tests can be an important source of blood loss in hospitals, especially for new- borns and patients in intensive care. The aim of this study was to quantify blood loss for laboratory diagnos- tic tests in a large number of patients in a teaching hospital. Methods: We estimated blood loss by multiplying the number and volumes of sampling

Dirk Wisser; Klaus van Ackern; Ernst Knoll; Hermann Wisser; Thomas Bertsch

418

A MULTIDISCPLINARY CONTROL SYSTEMS LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hallmark of the newly configured Rowan College of Engineering undergraduate program is multidisciplinary education with a laboratory emphasis. The development of a new multidisciplinary control laboratory upholds our hallmark very well. We attempt to address the demand of industry for acquiring control engineers (1) with a broad set of skills and a comprehension of the diverse practical applications of

Ravi P. Ramachandran; Stephanie Farrell; Jawaharlal Mariappan

419

Mound Laboratory's quality control organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A philosophy of quality sets the stage for quality achievement at Mound Laboratory. Quality does not just happen; it is effected by management programs which encompass cost effectiveness and productivity, which establish realistic quality standards for products and services, and which, then, require compliance to those standards (tolerance for error). The organization chart for quality control at Mound Laboratory is

Wysong

1976-01-01

420

Mound Laboratory environmental control program  

Microsoft Academic Search

From symposium on the physical behavior of radioactive containment in ; the atmosphere; V1enna, Austria (12 Nov 1973). The radiation monitoring progrann ; at Mound Laboratory is reviewed briefly. The in-plant monitoring system detects ; and measures continuously all waste discharges, and this is supplemented by ; weekly deta1led laboratory analysis of samples to ensure compliance with air ; quality

Hebb

1974-01-01

421

Jet Propulsion Laboratory ANNUAL REPORT  

E-print Network

Jet Propulsion Laboratory ANNUAL REPORT National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 1 2 #12 page: A colorful bow shock in dust clouds sur- rounding the giant star Zeta Ophiuchi, imaged," and with Mars Curiosity, we did. Director'sMessage Director, Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2 #12;JANUARY FEBRUARY

Waliser, Duane E.

422

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

Barnett, Sara

423

Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head  

E-print Network

Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head Laboratory for Motor Learning Control RIKEN Brain Science.yamaguchi@riken.jp Education 1975 BSc in Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo 1980 PhD in Biology, School of Science, University of Tokyo 1987 PhD in Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Tokyo Research

Kazama, Hokto

424

GUIDELINES FOR SAFE LABORATORY PRACTICES  

E-print Network

-3914 ____________________________________________________ Fall 2004 #12;2 Table of Contents I. Introduction 3 II. Safety Links on the Internet 3 III. Cardinal Health & Safety: 5-3550 Yale Health Services: 2-0123 Chemistry Business Manager (Joanne Bentley): 2 Rules of Laboratory Safety 4 IV. Cardinal Rules of Laser Safety 5 V. Laboratory Accidents 6 A-i. General

Haller, Gary L.

425

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics  

E-print Network

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics Joined Laboratory of mobile robotics has been foun- ded is dedicated to provide achievement of following goals: 1. research and development activities in robotics (RobotnaÂŁka robot, telepresentation lab, and furt- her projects), 2. promotion and popularization

Lucny, Andrej

426

Simplifying complexity: a review of complexity theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complexity theory has captured the attention of the scientific community to the extent where its proponents tout it as a dominant scientific trend. Geographers, and environmental, human, and regional planners have applied complexity theory to topics ranging from cultural transmission and economic growth to the braiding of rivers. While such a wide array of applications is heartening because it speaks

Steven M. Manson

2001-01-01

427

Complexes of clusters and complexes of stars  

E-print Network

Most star complexes are in fact complexes of stars, clusters and gas clouds; term "star complexes" was introduced as general one disregarding the preferential content of a complex. Generally the high rate of star formation in a complex is accompanied by the high number of bound clusters, including massive ones, what was explained by the high gas pressure in such regions. However, there are also complexes, where clusters seems to be more numerous in relation to stars than in a common complex. The high rate of clusters - but not isolated stars - formation seems to be typical for many isolated bursts of star formation, but deficit of stars might be still explained by the observational selection. The latter cannot, however, explain the complexes or the dwarf galaxies, where the high formation rate of only stars is observed. The possibility of the very fast dissolution of parental clusters just in such regions should itself be explained. Some difference in the physical conditions (turbulence parameters ?) within t...

Efremov, Yu N

2005-01-01

428

Titan's chemical complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review here our current knowledge of Titan's gas phase chemistry. We base our discussion on photochemical models as well as on laboratory experiments. We identify the lower mass positive [1,2] and negative [3] ions detected in the upper atmosphere and we show that their formation is a direct consequence of the presence of heavy neutrals. We demonstrate that the observed densities of CO, CO2 and H2O can be explained by a combination of exogenous O, and OH/H2O input [4]. We argue that benzene [5] and ammonia [6] are created in the upper atmosphere through complex chemical processes involving both neutral and ion chemistry. These species diffuse downward where they are at the origin of heavier aromatics and amines, respectively. Finally, we discuss the impact on hydrocarbon densities of recent theoretical calculations of the rate constants of association reactions [7]. [1] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and V. G. Anicich, Astrophys. J., 647, L175 (2006). [2] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and M. J. McEwan, Icarus, 191, 722 (2007). [3] V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, R. V. Yelle, M. Galand, A. Wellbrock, G. R. Lewis, A. J. Coates and J.-E. Wahlund, Planet. Space Sci., 57, 1558 (2009). [4] S. M. Hörst, V. Vuitton, and R. V. Yelle, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006 (2008). [5] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and J. Cui, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E05007 (2008). [6] R. V. Yelle, V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, S. J. Klippenstein, M. A. Smith, S. M. Hörst and J. Cui, Faraday Discuss., 147, 31 (2010). [7] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle, S. J. Klippenstein and P. Lavvas, Astrophys. J., in press.

Vuitton, Veronique

2012-04-01

429

Laboratory Animal Science Issues in the Design and Conduct of Studies with Endocrine-active Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of rodent models for research and testing on endo- crine-active compounds necessitates an awareness of a number of laboratory animal science issues to standardize bioassay methods and facilitate reproducibility of results between laboratories. These issues are not unique to endo- crine research but are particularly important in this field due to the complexities and interdependencies of the endocrine

Jeffrey I. Everitt; Paul M. D. Foster

2004-01-01

430

Modeling, Analysis, Simulation and Control of Laboratory Automation Systems Using Petri Nets: Part 1. Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A move from fixed, statically scheduled laboratory automation systems to more dynamic and adaptive behavior introduces complexities and challenges that have not been thoroughly explored in the field of laboratory automation. Powerful tools are required for the systematic modeling, analysis, simulation, and control of such systems. In this first part of a tutorial series, we introduce and explore Petri nets

Mark F. Russo; Alan Sasso

2005-01-01

431

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the bit is a thick-walled maraging steel collection tube allowing the powdered sample to be augured up the hole into the sample chamber. For robustness, the wall thickness of the DBA was maximized while still ensuring effective sample collection. There are four recesses in the bit tube that are used to retain the fresh bits in their bit box. The rotating bit is supported by a back-to-back duplex bearing pair within a housing that is connected to the outer DBA housing by two titanium diaphragms. The only bearings on the drill in the sample flow are protected by a spring-energized seal, and an integrated shield that diverts the ingested powdered sample from the moving interface. The DBA diaphragms provide radial constraint of the rotating bit and form the sample chambers. Between the diaphragms there is a sample exit tube from which the sample is transferred to the CHIMRA. To ensure that the entire collected sample is retained, no matter the orientation of the drill with respect to gravity during sampling, the pass-through from the forward to the aft chamber resides opposite to the exit tube.

Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

2012-01-01

432

E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

2002-05-03

433

Simplicial Structure on Complexes.  

E-print Network

While chain complexes are equipped with a differential $d$ satisfying $d^2 = 0$, their generalizations called $N$-complexes have a differential $d$ satisfying $d^N = 0$. In this paper we show that the lax nerve of the category of chain complexes is pointwise adjoint equivalent to the décalage of the simplicial category of $N$-complexes. This reveals additional simplicial structure on the lax nerve of the category of chain complexes which provides a categorfication of the triangulated homotopy category of chain complexes. We study this phenomena in general and present evidence that the axioms of triangulated categories have simplicial origin.

Djalal Mirmohades

434

75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...include additional specific responsibilities of sponsors of nonclinical laboratory studies. 5. Animal Welfare In the United States, the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C 2131-2159) governs the treatment and use of [[Page 80013

2010-12-21

435

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Safety in the Analytical Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety issues specifically related to the analytical laboratory are discussed including hazardous reagents, transferring samples, cleaning apparatus, eye protection, and equipment damage. Special attention is given to techniques which not only endanger the technician but also endanger expensive equipment. (CW)

Ewing, Galen W.

1990-01-01

436

Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

Sizemore, Jim

2011-10-01

437

Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases. Methods An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education. Results A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation. Conclusions Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system. PMID:24164781

2013-01-01

438

Microwave remote sensing laboratory design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Application of active and passive microwave remote sensing to the study of ocean pollution is discussed. Previous research efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory were surveyed to derive guidance for the design of a laboratory program of research. The essential issues include: choice of radar or radiometry as the observational technique; choice of laboratory or field as the research site; choice of operating frequency; tank sizes and material; techniques for wave generation and appropriate wavelength spectrum; methods for controlling and disposing of pollutants used in the research; and pollutants other than oil which could or should be studied.

Friedman, E.

1979-01-01

439

Introduction to Biotechnology: Laboratory Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By Linnea Fletcher, Evelyn Goss, Patricia Phelps, and Angela Wheeler, this is the laboratory manual for an introductory biotechnology course. This 134-page Word document describes the basic skills necessary for the biotechnology laboratory, such as safety, mathematics, documentation, calibration, and equipment. Each chapter contains objectives for students to accomplish, some practice lessons and questions, and laboratory activities. Students will also learn some basic processes, such as Restriction Enzyme Mapping of DNA, DNA Fingerprinting, and Southern Blot Analysis. There is also a section on bioinformatics.

Wheeler, Angela; Fletcher, Linnea; Goss, Evelyn; Phelps, Patricia

2009-09-30

440

Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

Not Available

2011-10-01

441

DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

2003-02-27

442

Complex regional pain syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

443

Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

444

Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

445

Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

446

Quantum Complex Minkowski Space  

E-print Network

The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

2005-05-06

447

Complex systems: An introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristic feature of complex systems is the emergence of unexpected properties or behaviour. Complexity, beyond a certain threshold, may even lead to the emergence of new principles. It is\\u000a a one-way traffic: The new principles and features may be sometimes deducible from, but are not reducible to, those operating\\u000a at the lower levels of complexity. Reductionism stands discounted. Complexity

V. K. Wadhawan

2009-01-01

448

Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands  

E-print Network

A total of 62 cohesiveness sands were tested to rographics. investigate the importance of the water content, grain size distribution, grading of the soil, particle shape, grain crushing during testing and laboratory compaction test method...

Delphia, John Girard

2012-06-07

449

Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From D.B. McWhorterand D. K. Sunda's 1977 Ground-Water Hydrology and Hydraulics, this two page excerpt outlines and details Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. Here, visitors will find illustrations and formula to understand the concept.

2008-02-07

450

User Manual Frick Chemistry Laboratory  

E-print Network

facility houses the chemistry department and accommodates labora- tory space for both research and teaching to ensure prompt resolutions to any building-related issues, with minimal disruption to your laboratory

Torquato, Salvatore

451

University of Maryland: Geochemistry Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This extensive website features the University of Maryland's Geochemistry Laboratories' efforts to "produce the highest quality elemental and isotopic data, to teach students and visitors the techniques involved with gathering such data," and to develop new methods and instrumentation in the field of elemental and isotope measurements." Users can discover the Thermal Ionization, Plasma, and Gas Source laboratories; as well as the Chemical Processing Lab and the Mineral Separation and Rock Preparation Laboratories. Through the links to the staff members and three of the laboratories, researchers can learn about the department's studies of the Earth's core, mantle, and crust; the atmosphere and hydrosphere; and the isotopic evolution of the solar system. Throughout the website, students and educators can find educational materials on topics including ablation spot characteristics and environmental safety.

452

NASA Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory. The capabilities and research interests of the lab are: Structural, thermal, & dynamic analysis; Structural, thermal, & dynamic ground-test techniques; Advanced structural instrumentation; and Flight test support.

Horn, Tom

2008-01-01

453

Computer-Aided Laboratory Instruction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter introduces how computer-aided instruction may be used in the biology laboratory setting. Descriptions of programs, suggestions on how to find instructional software, and general guides and resources are included.

Catherine J. Schaap (University of Prince Edward Island;)

1989-06-06

454

Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

455

Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

456

Lab VII -1 LABORATORY VII  

E-print Network

, whether you are discussing baseball, galaxies, or subatomic particles. Describing rotations requires, the approximation of objects as point particles gives an incomplete picture of the real world. This laboratory

Minnesota, University of

457

Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

Clark, Douglas W.

1979-01-01

458

Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

Wood, H. John

2004-01-01

459

Commissioning a materials research laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the process of commissioning a new 150,000 sq. ft. research facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The laboratory being constructed is a showcase of modern design methods being built at a construction cost of less than $180 per sq. ft. This is possible in part because of the total commissioning activities that are being utilized for this project. The laboratory's unique approach to commissioning will be presented in this paper. The process will be followed through from the conceptual stage on into the actual construction portion of the laboratory. Lessons learned and cost effectiveness will be presented in a manner that will be usable for others making commissioning related decisions. Commissioning activities at every stage of the design will be presented along with the attributed benefits. Attendees will hear answers to the what, when, who, and why questions associated with commissioning of this exciting project.

SAVAGE,GERALD A.

2000-03-28

460

Laboratory Techniques for the Blind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

Tombaugh, Dorothy

1972-01-01

461

Strategic Technology JET PROPULSION LABORATORY  

E-print Network

Strategic Technology Directions JET PROPULSION LABORATORY National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 0 9 #12;© 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged. #12;Strategic Technology Directions 2009 offers a distillation of technologies, their links to space missions

Waliser, Duane E.

462

Practical Interfacing in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This text describes in practical terms how to use a desk-top computer to monitor and control laboratory experiments. The author clearly explains how to design electronic circuits and write computer programs to sense, analyse and display real-world quantities, including displacement, temperature, force, sound, light, and biomedical potentials. The book includes numerous laboratory exercises and appendices that provide practical information on microcomputer architecture and interfacing, including complete circuit diagrams and component lists. Topics include analog amplification and signal processing, digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion, electronic sensors and actuators, digital and analog interfacing circuits, and programming. Only a very basic knowledge of electronics is assumed, making it ideal for college-level laboratory courses and for practising engineers and scientists. Everything you need to know about using a PC to monitor and control laboratory experiments Full of practical circuit designs and C-code examples Ideal for students and practising scientists

Derenzo, Stephen E.

2003-05-01

463

Digital Techniques for Laboratory Measurements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes techniques and equipment intended to both improve laboratory measurements and also form a background for more advanced work by introducing the concepts of electronic and digital circuits. (GS)

Dart, S. Leonard

1975-01-01

464

PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014)  

E-print Network

- 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Chiang 235 Physics chiang@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 Tony Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Joe Mitchell 512

Yoo, S. J. Ben

465

Polymer Preparations in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six laboratory procedures for preparing polymers which have been used in a course for undergraduate industrial arts students, who have a concentration in plastics technology but have not taken more than one year of college chemistry. (BT)

Lampman, Gary M.; And Others

1979-01-01

466

A laboratory animal science pioneer.  

PubMed

Nikolaos Kostomitsopoulos, DVM, PhD, Head of Laboratory Animal Facilities and Designated Veterinarian, Center of Clinical, Experimental Surgery and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. PMID:25333597

2014-10-21

467

Conundrum of Combinatorial Complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines fundamental problems underlying difficulties encountered by pattern recognition algorithms, neural networks, and rule systems. These problems are manifested as combinatorial complexity of algorithms, of their computational or training requirements. The paper relates particular types of complexity problems to the roles of a priori knowledge and adaptive learning. Paradigms based on adaptive learning lead to the complexity of

Leonid I. Perlovsky

1998-01-01

468

Linguistic Complexity and Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental study investigating the interaction of linguistic complexity and performance in child language acquisition tests the hypothesis that children learning a first language acquire relatively complex sentences somewhat later than less complex sentences. In one of three tests, the subjects, 44 children aged 3.6 to 6 years, were presented…

Smith, Carlota S.; van Kleeck, Anne

469

Simply Complex by Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reality--real life--is complex, more complex than can be imagined. The majority of our most pressing issues confronted in the management of organizations are overwhelmingly complex. I make the case for a systems design approach as a remedy. Examples introduced in this paper illuminate conceptual tools that advance how people transform their…

Nelson, Harold G.

2007-01-01

470

Complex fuzzy soft multisets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we combine two definitions, namely fuzzy soft multiset and complex fuzzy set to construct the definition of a complex fuzzy soft multiset and study its properties. In other words, we study the extension of a fuzzy soft multiset from real numbers to complex numbers. We also introduce its basic operations, namely complement, union and intersection. Some examples are given.

Alkouri, Abd Ulazeez M.; Salleh, Abdul Razak

2014-09-01

471

Analyse complexe Raymond Mortini  

E-print Network

Analyse complexe Raymond Mortini Universit´e Paul Verlaine - Metz Metz,22 d´ecembre 2013 R. Mortini () Analyse complexe Metz, 22 d´ecembre 2013 1 / 10 #12;Equations de Cauchy-Riemann Proposition Soit C un ouvert et f : C. R. Mortini () Analyse complexe Metz, 22 d´ecembre 2013 2 / 10 #12;Equations de Cauchy

Mortini, Raymond

472

Analyse complexe Raymond Mortini  

E-print Network

Analyse complexe Raymond Mortini Universit´e Paul Verlaine - Metz Metz,11 novembre 2013 R. Mortini () Analyse complexe Metz, 11 novembre 2013 1 / 1 #12;1 Limites et holomorphie A Notions basiques i2 = -1 R. Mortini () Analyse complexe Metz, 11 novembre 2013 2 / 1 #12;1 Limites et holomorphie A Notions basiques i

Mortini, Raymond

473

Minimal atomic complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We define minimal atomic complexes and irreducible complexes, and we prove that they are the same. The irreducible complexes admit homological characterizations that make them easy to recognize. These concepts apply both to spaces and to spectra. On the spectrum level, our characterizations allow us to show that such familiar spectra as ko, eo2, and BoP at the prime 2,

A. J. Baker; J. P. May

2004-01-01

474

A Virtual Digital Forensics Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the concept of a virtual digital forensic laboratory, which incorporates networked examination and storage\\u000a machines, secure communications, multi-factor authentication, role-based access control, and case management and digital asset\\u000a management systems. Laboratory activities such as the examination, storage and presentation of digital evidence can be geographically\\u000a distributed and accessed over a network by users with the appropriate credentials.

Philip Craiger; Paul Burke; Christopher Marberry; Mark Pollitt

2008-01-01

475

Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system  

PubMed Central

The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein–protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S.; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

2011-01-01

476

Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.  

PubMed

The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

2011-08-01

477

RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation  

E-print Network

RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation Laboratory for Neurobiology of Synapse Laboratory for Neural Circuit Theory Laboratory for Circuit and Behavioral Physiology Laboratory for Cortical Circuit Plasticity Laboratory for Memory Mechanisms Laboratory for Behavioral

Fukai, Tomoki

478

A Study of Cognitive Change Resulting from Participation in Human Relations Laboratory Training. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The specific hypotheses tested were that: (1) participation in a two-week laboratory changes the cognitive structure of those participating; (2) the extent of change varies with the initial level of cognitive complexity of the participant; and (3) the better the match, as seen by the participant, between the complexity of the learning environment…

Sobel, Ronald

479

[Errors in laboratory daily practice].  

PubMed

Legislation set by GBEA (Guide de bonne exécution des analyses) requires that, before performing analysis, the laboratory directors have to check both the nature of the samples and the patients identity. The data processing of requisition forms, which identifies key errors, was established in 2000 and in 2002 by the specialized biochemistry laboratory, also with the contribution of the reception centre for biological samples. The laboratories follow a strict criteria of defining acceptability as a starting point for the reception to then check requisition forms and biological samples. All errors are logged into the laboratory database and analysis report are sent to the care unit specifying the problems and the consequences they have on the analysis. The data is then assessed by the laboratory directors to produce monthly or annual statistical reports. This indicates the number of errors, which are then indexed to patient files to reveal the specific problem areas, therefore allowing the laboratory directors to teach the nurses and enable corrective action. PMID:17264047

Larrose, C; Le Carrer, D

2007-01-01

480

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01

481

Background complexity affects colour preference in bumblebees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flowers adapted for hummingbird pollination are typically red. This correlation is usually explained by the assertion that nectar- or pollen-stealing bees are “blind” to red flowers. However, laboratory studies have shown that bees are capable of locating artificial red flowers and often show no innate preference for blue over red. We hypothesised that these findings might be artefacts of the simplified laboratory environment. Using bumblebees ( Bombus impatiens) that had been trained to visit red and blue artificial flowers, we tested whether colour preference was influenced by complexity of the background on which they were foraging. Many bees were indifferent to flower colour when tested using a uniform green background like those commonly used in laboratory studies, but all bees showed strong colour preferences (usually for blue) when flowers were presented against a photograph of real foliage. Overall, preference for blue flowers was significantly greater on the more realistic, complex background. These results support the notion that the red of “hummingbird syndrome” flowers can function to reduce bee visits despite the ability of bees to detect red and highlight the need to consider context when drawing inferences about pollinator preferences from laboratory data.

Forrest, Jessica; Thomson, James D.

2009-08-01

482

The Hirudo medicinalis species complex  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, Hildebrandt and Lemke (Naturwissenschaften 98:995-1008, 2011) argued that the taxonomic status of the three European medicinal leeches, Hirudo medicinalis Linnaeus 1758, Hirudo verbana Carena 1820, and Hirudo orientalis Utevsky and Trontelj (Parasitol Res 98:61-66, 2005) is "questionable" since "all three species interbreed in the laboratory". This statement is in conflict with data published by Elliott and Kutschera (Freshwater Reviews 4:21-41, 2011), indicating that these leeches, which are reciprocally copulating hermaphrodites, represent reproductively isolated biospecies. Here, I summarize evidence indicating that these three European taxa, plus the North African "dragon leech" ( Hirudo troctina Johnson 1816), must be interpreted as a complex of closely related species, and that the economically most important taxon H. verbana is polymorphic.

Kutschera, U.

2012-05-01

483

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY E  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY ECL - REDOX - RESEARCH ANALYSIS CENTER RAC - BASIC MATERIALS LABORATORY BML - VERTICAL LIFT FACILITY VLF

1980-01-01

484

Laboratory Exercises to Teach Clinically Relevant Chemistry of Antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. Design. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. Assessment. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with <25% of students who had not completed the laboratory exercises. Conclusion. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students’ performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises. PMID:24672070

Chelette, Candace T.

2014-01-01

485

[On the means of securing analytical reliability of laboratory results].  

PubMed

The article is composed in the form of discussion with authors of another article published in the same issue of journal. The publication considers factors impacting analytical quality of results of clinical laboratory analyses. The cases in question are content of normative documents in force, expedience to complete them with more specific requirements to producers of laboratory analysis tools and recommendations for laboratories on implementation of verification of characteristics of techniques and medical tools for diagnostic in vitro. The article also considers requirements to metrologic traceability of control materials and necessity of formation of national reference system for laboratory medicine. The description of projects of methodical documents proposed to be considered by the profile expert commission on clinical laboratory diagnostic of Minzdrav of Russia is presented. These documents include complex of requirements to producers of medical tools for diagnostic in vitro. The proposal is expressed to develop a normative document of top status to establish a unified system of requirements implemented in all executive and methodical documents concerning regulation of access of medical tools for diagnostic in vitro, supporting security of application and quality of clinical laboratory analyses. PMID:25080787

Men'shikov, V V

2014-03-01

486

Complex Correspondence Principle  

SciTech Connect

Quantum mechanics and classical mechanics are distinctly different theories, but the correspondence principle states that quantum particles behave classically in the limit of high quantum number. In recent years much research has been done on extending both quantum and classical mechanics into the complex domain. These complex extensions continue to exhibit a correspondence, and this correspondence becomes more pronounced in the complex domain. The association between complex quantum mechanics and complex classical mechanics is subtle and demonstrating this relationship requires the use of asymptotics beyond all orders.

Bender, Carl M.; Meisinger, Peter N. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Hook, Daniel W. [Theoretical Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wang Qinghai [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2010-02-12

487

Characterisation of alkane ?-complexes.  

PubMed

Alkane ?-complexes have evolved from a curious phenomenon to an intermediate of intense interest, fuelling research into the area. Over the last fifteen years, metal alkane complex characterisation has evolved to incorporate reports employing UV/Vis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffractometry. Previously, due to the sparse geometric characterisation of alkane ?-complexes, assumptions regarding bonding geometries and selectivities were made by comparison to related ?-complexes, or by analysis of C-H activation products. This minireview assembles relevant literature that illuminates the metrics of alkane-metal bonding, and critically analyses the binding mode, selectivity and stability of alkane complexes. PMID:25196671

Young, Rowan D

2014-09-26

488

Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these capabilities as a niche market play to success. The niche was further defined by preservation of the ability to handle samples contaminated with radiological materials and those with classification concerns. These decisions enabled early marketing plans to be built on existing clientele and provided an identifiable group to which future marketing could be expanded. Finally, recruitment of key players with commercial laboratory experience proved to be a key factor for success. This experience base was valuable in avoiding early mistakes in the laboratory startup phase and provided some connection to a commercial client base. As the business has grown, professionals with commercial laboratory experience have been recruited and offered ownership in the business as an incentive for joining the group. If the process were to be repeated, early involvement of an individual with commercial sales experience would be helpful in broadening the base of commercial clients. An increased emphasis on research funding such as funding received from Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) sources would be used to form a portion of the economic base for the business. More partnerships with businesses whose services compliment those of the laboratory would expand available client base. More flexible staffing arrangements would be negotiated early on as a cost-control measure. In conclusion, the re-industrialization concept can be successful. Candidates for re-industrialization must be chosen by matching services to be offered to market needs. Implementation is best accomplished by entrepreneurs who personally profit from a successful operation of the business.

Stephenson, Barry A. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc), East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-1702 (United States)

2008-01-15

489

MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_  

SciTech Connect

Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

2009-11-01

490

Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system  

E-print Network

Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system Arnaud LELEVE, Hcene BENMOHAMED, Patrick laboratory systems bound to be integrated in a global homogeneous educational environment (providing other a system (with appropriate commandability and observability), to let learners follow a remote laboratory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

491

Laborlandschaft : redesigning the industrial laboratory module  

E-print Network

This thesis proposes to redesign the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory typology by rethinking the composition of the laboratory module; the smallest functional sub-unit of the laboratory type. The design for this thesis ...

Farley, Alexander H. (Alexander Hamilton)

2014-01-01

492

http://cls.sfsu.edu/ Clinical Laboratory  

E-print Network

health labs, community health projects, environmental testing, Peace Corps) Specialty Laboratorieshttp://cls.sfsu.edu/ Clinical Laboratory Science Internship Program Performs laboratory analyses in all departments of the clinical laboratory, using samples (blood, urine, etc.) from the human body

493

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2010-07-01

494

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2013-07-01

495

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2011-07-01

496

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2012-07-01

497

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2010-04-01

498

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2011-04-01

499

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2014-04-01

500

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2013-04-01