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1

Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) complex consists of the main structure (WSCF) and four support structures located in the 600 Area of the Hanford site east of the 200 West area and south of the Hanford Meterology Station. WSCF is to be used for low level sample analysis, less than 2 mRem. The Laboratory features state-of-the-art analytical and low level radiological counting equipment for gaseous, soil, and liquid sample analysis. In particular, this facility is to be used to perform Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 sample analysis in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Protocols, room air and stack monitoring sample analysis, waste water treatment process support, and contractor laboratory quality assurance checks. The samples to be analyzed contain very low concentrations of radioisotopes. The main reason that WSCF is considered a Nuclear Facility is due to the storage of samples at the facility. This maintenance Implementation Plan has been developed for maintenace functions associate with the WSCF.

Not Available

1994-10-01

2

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

This NOC application is provided to update the description of amounts of material handled, and to update the calculation of potential for emissions and resultant calculation of offsite TEDE. This NOC also includes an updated description of the various emission units at WSCF, including use of portable tanks to receive and remove liquid waste contaminated with low levels of radioactive contamination. The resultant, adjusted estimate for TEDE to the hypothetical MEI due to all combined unabated emissions from WSCF is 1.4 E-02 millirem per year. The total adjusted estimate for all combined abated emissions is 2.8 E-03 millirem per year. No single emission unit at the WSCF Complex exceeds a potential (unabated) offsite dose of 2.7 E-03 millirem per year.

BATES, J.A.

2000-05-01

3

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30

4

Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex  

SciTech Connect

The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-12

5

Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. The low temperatures of these ices (T < 50 K) preclude most chemical reactions, but photolysis can drive reactions that produce a suite of new species, many of which are complex organics. We study the UV and proton radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to explore links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in comets and meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggest that such links are plausible. Once identified, these species may serve as markers of interstellar heritage of cometary dust and meteorites. Of particular interest are our findings that UV photolysis of interstellar ice analogs produce molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quinones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones are essential in vital metabolic roles such as electron transport. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are photolyzed in interstellar ices. In the case of anthracene-containing ices, we have observed the production of 9-anthrone and 9,10 anthraquinone, both of which have been observed in the Murchison meteorite. Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are photolyzed. These amphiphiles self-assemble into fluorescent vesicles when placed in liquid water, as do Murchison extracts. Both have the ability to trap an ionic dye. Photolysis of plausible ices can also produce alanine, serine, and glycine as well as a number of small alcohols and amines. Flash heating of the room temperature residue generated by such experiments generates mass spectral distributions similar to those of IDPs. The detection of high D/H ratios in some interstellar molecular species, and the knowledge that many of the organics, such as hydroxy and amino acids, in primitive meteorites are D-enriched provides evidence for a connection between intact organic material in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. Thus, some of the oxidized aromatics, amphiphiles, amino acids, hydroxy acids, and other compounds found in meteorites may have had an interstellar ancestry and not solely a product of parent body aqueous alteration. Such compounds should also be targeted for searches of organics in cometary dust.

Dworkin, J. P.

2003-01-01

6

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

7

76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services...Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The Demonstration is mandated by section 3113 of the...

2011-07-05

8

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. The twin gantry structure in the center is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). To its immediate left in the foreground is a truck well, concrete retaining wall, piping, and stack associated with the oxidizer vault storage area. To the immediate right of T-28 is the concrete Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). At the extreme right is the Long-Term Hydrazine Silo (T-28E). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

9

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2013-10-01

10

42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...complexity testing; technical supervisor. 493.1447 Section 493.1447 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high...

2010-10-01

11

76 FR 49491 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration; Extension of the Deadline for Submission...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The deadline for submitting supporting...request a temporary code under the Demonstration, which ended on August 1,...

2011-08-10

12

Laboratory evaluations in HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex.  

PubMed

Laboratory tests can provide useful information about the presence and effects of HIV-1 in the CNS, but have thus far not yielded definitive diagnostic or prognostic markers of HIV-1-related cognitive and motor complex. The most clinically useful laboratory procedures are MR imaging and CSF examinations. The routine clinical use of MR imaging and CSF examinations, however, is still restricted to providing information for detecting and excluding secondary effects of HIV-1 infection. MR imaging and CT do not appear to be sensitive enough at current resolutions to provide early detection of HIV-1 CNS effects nor to follow disease progression. Several CSF variables are extremely promising as early markers of primary HIV-1 infection of the brain, and may provide preclinical indications for onset of treatment and for evaluation of treatment efficacy. These include CSF quinolinic acid levels, acid dissociated p24 antigen levels, neopterin or beta 2m, intrathecal IgG synthesis rate, and possibly quantitated PCR levels of HIV-1 viral load. Procedures such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, SPECT, PET, computerized EEG, EP, and ERPs are all promising candidates for early detection or localization of HIV-1-related brain dysfunction, but at this time all must still be considered primarily research tools. Before any of these procedures can provide reliable diagnostic and prognostic information about primary HIV-1 neurologic disease, currently on-going longitudinal evaluations of large numbers of asymptomatic HIV-1-infected individuals as they progress to neurologically symptomatic disease must be completed. There is currently no laboratory marker in blood or CSF that definitively predicts the risk for HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex. HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex remains a clinical diagnosis, which is made on the basis of positive neurologic signs and symptoms and abnormal neuropsychological findings after other causes of neurologic disease are excluded. Laboratory measures, such as the electrophysiologic methods and some CSF variables, are likely to remain adjuncts to the diagnosis because, with few exceptions, they provide data that are nonspecific as to etiopathogenesis. Dynamic imaging, electrophysiologic methods, and CSF indices provide presumptive evidence for the presence of HIV-1-associated CNS damage, and with clinical and neuropsychological evidence, could be used to establish a new definition of primary HIV-1-associated CNS disease along the lines used in establishing a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8190671

Syndulko, K; Singer, E J; Nogales-Gaete, J; Conrad, A; Schmid, P; Tourtellotte, W W

1994-03-01

13

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2013-10-01

14

Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to d...

D. L. Ward R. L. Skaggs S. A. Breithaupt S. R. Waichler T. Kim

2010-01-01

15

The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

Loehlin, James H.; And Others

1982-01-01

16

Metallo Complexes: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment in which several metallo complexes with different central atoms are prepared. Background information on these compounds is provided, including requirements for their formation, preparation methods, and comments on their general properties and analysis. (JN)

Kauffman, George B.; And Others

1984-01-01

17

Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat  

SciTech Connect

Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

Gilbert, H.K.

1985-01-01

18

Complex organics in laboratory simulations of interstellar/cometary ices.  

PubMed

We present the photochemical and thermal evolution of both non-polar and polar ices representative of interstellar and pre-cometary grains. Ultraviolet photolysis of the non-polar ices comprised of O2, N2, and CO produces CO2, N2O, O3, CO3, HCO, H2CO, and possibly NO and NO2. When polar ice analogs (comprised of H2O, CH3OH, CO, and NH3) are exposed to UV radiation, simple molecules are formed including: H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, and HCO (the formyl radical). Warming produces moderately complex species such as CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), R-CN and/or R-NC (nitriles and/or isonitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. Infrared spectroscopy, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrate that after warming to room temperature what remains is an organic residue composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4) and other complex organics including the amides above and polyoxymethylene (POM) and its derivatives. The formation of these organic species from simple starting mixtures under conditions germane to astrochemistry may have important implications for the organic chemistry of interstellar ice grains, comets and the origins of life. PMID:11541346

Bernstein, M P; Allamandola, L J; Sandford, S A

1997-01-01

19

Addressing complexity in laboratory experiments: the scaling of dilute multiphase flows in magmatic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinematic and dynamic scaling of dilute multiphase mixtures in magmatic systems is the only guarantee for the geological verisimilitude of laboratory experiments. We present scaling relations that can provide a more complete framework to scale dilute magmatic systems because they explicitly take into account the complexity caused by the feedback between particles (crystal, bubble, or pyroclast) and the continuous

Alain Burgisser; George W. Bergantz; Robert E. Breidenthal

2005-01-01

20

A Three-Step Laboratory Sequence to Prepare a Carbene Complex of Silver(I) Chloride  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have developed a multistep inorganic synthesis experiment for our second-year undergraduate teaching laboratory that introduces students to modern organometallic chemistry. The ligands are prepared in two simple steps and the preparation of an air-stable silver carbene complex is accomplished in the third step. The students are introduced to…

Canal, John P.; Ramnial, Taramatee; Langlois, Lisa D.; Abernethy, Colin D.; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

2008-01-01

21

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01

22

Complex plasma laboratory PK3 Plus on the International Space Station  

Microsoft Academic Search

PK-3 Plus is the second-generation laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). It has more advanced hardware, software and diagnostics than its precursor PKE-Nefedov (Nefedov et al 2003 New J. Phys. 5 33). The first experiments with PK-3 Plus show the perfect functioning of the apparatus and provide much better insights

H. M. Thomas; G. E. Morfill; V. E. Fortov; A. V. Ivlev; V. I. Molotkov; A. M. Lipaev; T. Hagl; H. Rothermel; S. A. Khrapak; R. K. Suetterlin; M. Rubin-Zuzic; O. F. Petrov; V. I. Tokarev; S. K. Krikalev

2008-01-01

23

Complex plasma research on ISS PKE-Nefedov, PK-3 Plus, PK-4, and impact laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The international research on ISS in dusty plasma (also known as complex plasma) under prolonged microgravity condition entered a new area in March 2001: The PKE-Nefedov facility (formerly called PKE 3) performed its first experiment in radio-frequency induced complex plasmas. This bilateral German-Russian research facility operated successfully in over 13 missions over 5 years until its internal resources were consumed—resulting so far in over 30 peer-reviewed scientific publications. In place of PKE-Nefedov is the next generation experiment apparatus PK 3 Plus with refined and more powerful instruments and diagnostics, which had its on-orbit commissioning in January 2006. While PK 3 Plus will further investigate the radio-frequency induced plasmas for the next few years the new PK-4 research facility is under development for investigation of direct-current induced complex plasma. Because the highly successful series of stand-alone PK experiment facilities cover only a fraction of the overall complex plasma research field the IMPACT (International Multi-User Plasma, Atmospheric and Cosmic Dust Twin) Laboratory project was initiated. The IMPF/ICAPS (IMPACT) Laboratory is the logical next step to provide a home and rallying point for the worldwide growing research efforts under microgravity conditions in the fields of dusty plasma and interactions of cosmic and atmospheric particle systems.

Seurig, R.; Morfill, G.; Fortov, V.; Hofmann, P.

2009-09-01

24

A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Small, Michael; Behringer, Robert P.; Tse, Chi K.

2014-03-01

25

Assessment of postsurgical distress and pain in laboratory mice by nest complexity scoring.  

PubMed

Preliminary studies have suggested a correlation between postsurgical pain and nest building behaviour in laboratory mice. However, there is no standardized measure for estimating pain by means of nest building performance. Here, we investigated nest building under various conditions, and scored nest complexity to assess postsurgical pain. Mice of both sexes, different strains [C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and B6D2-Tg(Pr-mSMalphaActin)V5rCLR-25], and kept under different housing conditions, showed no differences in their latency to use the offered nest material. Healthy female C57BL/6J mice were engaged 4.3% of the day with nest building and showed three peaks of this behaviour: in the beginning and middle of the light phase, and in the second half of the dark phase. For assessment of postsurgical pain, female C57BL/6J mice underwent a sham embryo transfer +/? different doses of the analgesic carprofen or control treatment. Nest complexity scoring at 9?h after the experimental treatments (i.e. at the end of the light phase) resulted in less than 10% of animals with noticeably manipulated nest material (nestlet) after surgery and more than 75% of healthy mice having built identifiable-to-complex nests or had noticeably manipulated nestlets, while animals after anaesthesia-only showed intermediate nest complexity. Carprofen analgesia resulted in no (5?mg/kg) or only slight (50?mg/kg) improvement of nest complexity after surgery. Thus, nest complexity scoring can be incorporated into daily laboratory routine and can be used in mice as a sensitive tool for detecting reduced wellbeing and general condition, but probably not for determining the efficacy of pain treatment. PMID:23563122

Jirkof, Paulin; Fleischmann, Thea; Cesarovic, Nikola; Rettich, Andreas; Vogel, Johannes; Arras, Margarete

2013-07-01

26

Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

2010-11-01

27

Comparison of in situ uranium KD values with a laboratory determined surface complexation model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reactive solute transport simulations in groundwater require a large number of parameters to describe hydrologic and chemical reaction processes. Appropriate methods for determining chemical reaction parameters required for reactive solute transport simulations are still under investigation. This work compares U(VI) distribution coefficients (i.e. KD values) measured under field conditions with KD values calculated from a surface complexation model developed in the laboratory. Field studies were conducted in an alluvial aquifer at a former U mill tailings site near the town of Naturita, CO, USA, by suspending approximately 10 g samples of Naturita aquifer background sediments (NABS) in 17-5.1-cm diameter wells for periods of 3 to 15 months. Adsorbed U(VI) on these samples was determined by extraction with a pH 9.45 NaHCO3/Na2CO3 solution. In wells where the chemical conditions in groundwater were nearly constant, adsorbed U concentrations for samples taken after 3 months of exposure to groundwater were indistinguishable from samples taken after 15 months. Measured in situ K D values calculated from the measurements of adsorbed and dissolved U(VI) ranged from 0.50 to 10.6 mL/g and the KD values decreased with increasing groundwater alkalinity, consistent with increased formation of soluble U(VI)-carbonate complexes at higher alkalinities. The in situ K D values were compared with KD values predicted from a surface complexation model (SCM) developed under laboratory conditions in a separate study. A good agreement between the predicted and measured in situ KD values was observed. The demonstration that the laboratory derived SCM can predict U(VI) adsorption in the field provides a critical independent test of a submodel used in a reactive transport model. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Curtis, G. P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J. A.

2004-01-01

28

Sampling and analysis plan for sampling of liquid waste streams generated by 222-S Laboratory Complex operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) establishes the requirements and guidelines to be used by the Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. personnel in characterizing liquid waste generated at the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The characterization...

A. B. Benally

1997-01-01

29

Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site  

SciTech Connect

A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor.

Paul, R.A. [IT Corp., Durham, NC (United States); Faugl, T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01

30

Laboratory experimental check of a conceptual model for infiltration under complex rainfall patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental evidence of the accuracy of the model proposed by Corradini et al. (1997, Journal of Hydrology 192: 104-124) for local infiltration-redistribution-reinfiltration in homogeneous soils is given. The model provides infiltration through the time evolution of the soil water content vertical profile, which is described by an ordinary differential equation in any stage of a given rainfall event. A nearly horizontal laboratory slope was used for the experiments performed over both a medium- and a coarse-textured soil. During each experiment characterized by a complex rainfall pattern, the soil water content at different depths was continuously monitored using the time-domain reflectometry method. Our results indicate that the model simulated the experimental vertical profiles of accurately, particularly during the infiltration and reinfiltration stages separated by a rainfall hiatus with redistribution of soil water. These results indicate the reliability of the model in computing the local effective rainfall for hydrological response.

Melone, Florisa; Corradini, Corrado; Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla

2006-02-01

31

Complex apodization Lyot coronagraphy for the direct imaging of exoplanet systems: design, fabrication, and laboratory demonstration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review the design, fabrication, performance, and future prospects for a complex apodized Lyot coronagraph for highcontrast exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. We present a newly designed circular focal plane mask with an inner working angle of 2.5 ?/D. Thickness-profiled metallic and dielectric films superimposed on a glass substrate provide control over both the real and imaginary parts of the coronagraph wavefront. Together with a deformable mirror for control of wavefront phase, the complex Lyot coronagraph potentially exceeds billion-to-one contrast over dark fields extending to within angular separations of 2.5 ?/D from the central star, over spectral bandwidths of 20% or more, and with throughput efficiencies better than 50%. Our approach is demonstrated with a linear occulting mask, for which we report our best laboratory imaging contrast achieved to date. Raw image contrasts of 3×10-10 over 2% bandwidths, 6×10-10 over 10% bandwidths, and 2×10-9 over 20% bandwidths are consistently achieved across high contrast fields extending from an inner working angle of 3 ?/D to a radius of 15 ?/D. Occulter performance is analyzed in light of experiments and optical models, and prospects for further progress are summarized. The science capability of the hybrid Lyot coronagraph is compared with requirements for ACCESS, a representative space coronagraph concept for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanet systems. This work has been supported by NASA’s Strategic Astrophysics Technology / Technology Demonstrations for Exoplanet Missions (SAT/TDEM) program.

Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Gordon, Brian; Krist, John; Mawet, Dimitri

2012-09-01

32

Errors and electronic prescribing: a controlled laboratory study to examine task complexity and interruption effects  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the effect of interruptions and task complexity on error rates when prescribing with computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, and to categorize the types of prescribing errors. Design Two within-subject factors: task complexity (complex vs simple) and interruption (interruption vs no interruption). Thirty-two hospital doctors used a CPOE system in a computer laboratory to complete four prescribing tasks, half of which were interrupted using a counterbalanced design. Measurements Types of prescribing errors, error rate, resumption lag, and task completion time. Results Errors in creating and updating electronic medication charts that were measured included failure to enter allergy information; selection of incorrect medication, dose, route, formulation, or frequency of administration from lists and drop-down menus presented by the CPOE system; incorrect entry or omission in entering administration times, start date, and free-text qualifiers; and omissions in prescribing and ceasing medications. When errors occurred, the error rates across the four prescribing tasks ranged from 0.5% (1 incorrect medication selected out of 192 chances for selecting a medication or error opportunities) to 16% (5 failures to enter allergy information out of 32 error opportunities). Any impact of interruptions on prescribing error rates and task completion times was not detected in our experiment. However, complex tasks took significantly longer to complete (F(1, 27)=137.9; p<0.001) and when execution was interrupted they required almost three times longer to resume compared to simple tasks (resumption lag complex=9.6?seconds, SD=5.6; resumption lag simple=3.4?seconds, SD=1.7; t(28)=6.186; p<0.001). Conclusion Most electronic prescribing errors found in this study could be described as slips in using the CPOE system to create and update electronic medication charts. Cues available within the user interface may have aided resumption of interrupted tasks making CPOE systems robust to some interruption effects. Further experiments are required to rule out any effect interruption might have on CPOE error rates.

Li, Simon Y W; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

2010-01-01

33

Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iron is always present in the atmosphere in concentrations from ~10-9 M (clouds, rain) up to ~10-3 M (fog, particles). Sources are mainly mineral dust emissions. Iron complexes are very good absorbers in the UV-VIS actinic region and therefore photo-chemically reactive. Iron complex photolysis leads to radical production and can initiate radical chain reactions, which is related to the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. These radical chain reactions are involved in the decomposition and transformation of a variety of chemical compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles. Additionally, the photochemical reaction itself can be a degradation pathway for organic compounds with the ability to bind iron. Iron-complexes of atmospherically relevant coordination compounds like oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, tartronate, gluconate, pyruvate and glyoxalate have been investigated in laboratory experiments. Iron speciation depends on the iron-ligand ratio and the pH. The most suitable experimental conditions were calculated with a speciation program (Visual Minteq). The solutions were prepared accordingly and transferred to a 1 cm quartz cuvette and flash-photolyzed with an excimer laser at wavelengths 308 or 351 nm. Photochemically produced Fe2+ has been measured by spectrometry at 510 nm as Fe(phenantroline)32+. Fe2+ overall effective quantum yields have been calculated with the concentration of photochemically produced Fe2+ and the measured energy of the excimer laser pulse. The laser pulse energy was measured with a pyroelectric sensor. For some iron-carboxylate systems the experimental parameters like the oxygen content of the solution, the initial Iron concentration and the incident laser energy were systematically altered to observe an effect on the overall quantum yield. The dependence of some quantum yields on these parameters allows in some cases an interpretation of the underlying photochemical reaction mechanism. Quantum yields of malonate, glutarate and gluconate complexes lie in the range of 0.02 < ? < 0.10, whereas succinate, tartronate, pyruvate and glyoxalate systems have values between 0.16 < ? < 1.26. All quantum yields include contributions from secondary thermal reactions. Furthermore, an attempt was made to differentiate between contributions of individual iron-oxalato complexes to the overall measured quantum yield. The formation and photolysis of the iron-carboxylate complexes and the subsequent reactions of the resulting compounds have been implemented in CAPRAM 3.0 (Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism). Modeling studies were performed to investigate the effects of the expanded iron photochemistry on oxidant budgets, the iron redox-cycling and the processing of secondary organic acids in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles under different environmental conditions. The model studies have shown that, i.e. for pyruvic acid under urban conditions, the photolysis of the iron-pyruvate complex can contribute with about 40 % significantly to the overall degradation flux and represents thus an important loss pathway beside the radical oxidation pathways.

Weller, C.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

2010-12-01

34

Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic carbon, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from borehole USGS 136 indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Depth-discrete groundwater samples were collected in the open borehole USGS 136 near 965, 710, and 573 ft BLS using a thief sampler; on the basis of selected constituents, deeper groundwater samples showed no influence from wastewater disposal at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex.

Twining. Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

2012-01-01

35

Elucidating multipollutant exposure across a complex metropolitan area by systematic deployment of a mobile laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In urban areas, air quality is the outcome of multiple emission sources, each emitting a different combination of air pollutants. The result is a complex mixture of pollutants with a different spatiotemporal variability for each constituent. Studies exploring average spatial patterns across urban areas typically rely on air quality monitoring networks of a few sites, short multi-site saturation monitoring campaigns measuring a limited number of pollutants and/or air quality models. Each of these options has limitations. This study elucidates the main complexities of urban air quality with respect to small scale spatial differences for multiple pollutants so as to gain a better understanding of the variability in exposure estimates in urban areas. Mobile measurements of 23 air pollutants were taken at high resolution in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and examined with respect to space, time and their interrelationships. The same route was systematically followed on 34 measurement days spread over different seasons and measurements were compared to adjacent air quality monitoring network stations. This approach allowed linkage of the mobile measurements to the network observations and to generate average maps that provide reliable information on the typical, annual average spatial pattern. Sharp differences in the spatial distribution were found to exist between different pollutants on the sub-urban scale, i.e. the neighbourhood to street scales, even for pollutants usually associated with the same specific sources. Nearby microenvironments may have a wide range in average pollution levels varying by up to 300%, which may cause large misclassification errors in estimating chronic exposures in epidemiological studies. For example, NO2 measurements next to a main road microenvironment are shown to be 210-265% higher than levels measured at a nearby urban background monitoring site, while black carbon is higher by 180-200% and ultrafine particles are 300% higher. For some pollutants (e.g. SO2 and benzene), there is good correspondence on a large scale due to similar emission sources, but differences on a small scale in proximity to these sources. Moreover. hotspots of different pollutants were identified and quantified. These results demonstrate the ability of an independent heavily instrumented mobile laboratory survey to quantify the representativeness of the monitoring sites to unmonitored locations, reveal the complex relationships between pollutants and understand chronic multi-pollutant exposure patterns associated with outdoor concentrations in an urban environment.

Levy, I.; Mihele, C.; Lu, G.; Narayan, J.; Hilker, N.; Brook, J. R.

2012-12-01

36

Sampling and analysis plan for sampling of liquid waste streams generated by 222-S Laboratory Complex operations  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) establishes the requirements and guidelines to be used by the Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. personnel in characterizing liquid waste generated at the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The characterization process to verify the accuracy of process knowledge used for designation and subsequent management of wastes consists of three steps: to prepare the technical rationale and the appendix in accordance with the steps outlined in this SAP; to implement the SAP by sampling and analyzing the requested waste streams; and to compile the report and evaluate the findings to the objectives of this SAP. This SAP applies to portions of the 222-S Laboratory Complex defined as Generator under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Any portion of the 222-S Laboratory Complex that is defined or permitted under RCRA as a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility is excluded from this document. This SAP applies to the liquid waste generated in the 222-S Laboratory Complex. Because the analytical data obtained will be used to manage waste properly, including waste compatibility and waste designation, this SAP will provide directions for obtaining and maintaining the information as required by WAC173-303.

Benally, A.B.

1997-08-14

37

Sampling and analysis plan for sampling of liquid waste streams generated by 222-S Laboratory Complex operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) establishes the requirements and guidelines to be used by the Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. personnel in characterizing liquid waste generated at the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The characterization process to verify the accuracy of process knowledge used for designation and subsequent management of wastes consists of three steps: to prepare the technical

Benally

1997-01-01

38

The Binding Constant for Complexation of Bilirubin to Bovine Serum Albumin. An Experiment for the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the binding constant for bilirubin-bovine serum albumin complexation by the Method of Continuous Variations. The experiment applies fundamental concepts of physical chemistry to a commercially available system of biological interest. The experiment is easily completed in a single laboratory period, and students obtain binding constants on the order of 10 7, in good agreement

Kathryn R. Williams; Bhavin Adhyaru; Russell E. Pierce; Stephen G. Schulman

2002-01-01

39

Complexities associated with the molecular and proteomic identification of Paecilomyces species in the clinical mycology laboratory.  

PubMed

Paecilomyces species are emerging fungal pathogens. Morphological identifications are complicated by similarities among the members of the P. variotii complex as well as to some Rasamsonia and Hamigera species. The purpose of this study was to compare matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with molecular diagnostic standards (i.e., multilocus DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2, D1/D2 regions, and part of the ?-tubulin gene) for the identification of Paecilomyces spp. encountered in two clinical mycology laboratories. A total of 77 clinical isolates identified morphologically as P. variotii (n = 21), P. lilacinus (n = 52), and Paecilomyces spp. not otherwise specified (n = 4) were included. In accord with the most recent taxonomy, all P. lilacinus isolates were confirmed as Purpureocillium lilacinum by both sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS. Fungi phenotypically resembling P. variotii or Paecilomyces spp. were identified by molecular techniques as P. variotii sensu stricto (n = 12), P. formosus (n = 3), P. dactylethromorphus (n = 3), Rasamsonia argillacea (n = 4), or R. piperina (n = 1) and at the genus level as an isolate of a Hamigera sp. and a Paecilomyces sp. There was 92.2% (71/77) agreement between the molecular and proteomic methods only after supplementation of the MALDI-TOF MS database with type strains. Paecilomyces variotii-like organisms required multilocus DNA interrogations for differentiation and account for all of the fungi whose identification was missed by MALDI-TOF MS. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS was a rapid and reliable alternative to multilocus sequencing. However, significant augmentation of the commercially available database was required to reproducibly identify this group of important human pathogens. PMID:24687961

Barker, Adam P; Horan, Jennifer L; Slechta, E Susan; Alexander, Barbara D; Hanson, Kimberly E

2014-07-01

40

Thermal instabilities in a soft and complex lithosphere: laboratory experiments and numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upwelling of hot material in the lithosphere remains far from understood. This is due to the complexity of the mechanical behaviour of lithospheric material, which presents solid as well as viscous properties. Mushroom-shaped less viscous plumes or more viscous finger-shaped diapirs, depending on the viscosity ratio between the rising and the matrix materials, are known to migrate through ductile, quasi-newtonian lithosphere; while dikes fracture and propagate through a solid matrix. But what happens in between these two end-members? To answer this question, we perform a combined study of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on the development of thermal plumes in aqueous solutions of Carbopol, a polymer gel suspension forming a continous network of micrometric sponges. This fluid is shear thinning and presents a yield-stress, whereby flow occurs only if the local stress exceeds a critical value. Below this value, the fluid acts as an elastic solid. Our experimental setup consists of a localized heat-source, placed in the center of a squared plexiglas tank. At t=0, a constant thermal power is applied locally to the fluid. For the numerical simulations, we replace the rigid plastic regions by an extremely viscous fluid, and therefore neglect the elastic contribution to the local stress. We systematically studied the influence of the rheological parameters, as well as the supplied heat. Depending on the Yield number Y0, which compares the thermally-induced stress to the yield stress, three different regims are observed. For low Y0, no convection develops; while for intermediate values, a small-scale convection cell appears and remains confined around the heater. For high Y0, thermal instabilities rise through the tank. Their morphology differs from the mushroom-shape typically encountered in newtonian fluids. Combined temperature and velocity field measurements show that a plug flow develops within the plume thermal anomaly, therefore producing a rising finger-shape with strong shear zones confined along its edges. The characteristics of the instability, as well as the existence of unyielded regions and the development of a damaged zone ahead of the plume as it rises, depend on Y0 but also on the other rheological parameters. The numerical simulations recover well the features observed in the laboratory experiments. This allows us to extend the parameter range of study. Our experimental finger-shaped diapirs present strong similarities with an off-axis diapir in Oman emplaced in a ridge context. This geological object, several kilometers in diameter presents in particular strong shear localization along its edges. Within our fluid mechanics framework, the existence of such an instability in the lithosphere places strong constraints on its parameter range. It suggests that this diapir was emplaced in a partially molten lithosphere. Therefore Herschel-Bulkley fluids like Carbopol might be good candidates to get new insights into the behavior of "soft" geological systems like mid-ocean ridge systems.

Massmeyer, A.; Davaille, A. B.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Di Giuseppe, E.

2012-12-01

41

Contributions by Wave Propagation Laboratory to EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) complex-terrain model-development project. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) participated in the Environmental Protection Agency's Complex Terrain Model Development Project, whose objective is development of numerical air-quality models valid in complex terrain. Particular attention was given to impaction of elevated plumes on high terrain during stable (nocturnal) conditions. WPL operated a plume-mapping lidar, acoustic sounders (some with Doppler capability), sonic anemometers, a tethered sonde, and crosswind optical anemometers. Measurements were usually displayed in real time for experimental guidance and later processed with quality assurance for quantitative analysis. A synopsis of data acquisition and archiving is given for each experiment, including a review of the results of scientific analyses already completed.

Eberhard, W.L.

1986-12-01

42

The Binding Constant for Complexation of Bilirubin to Bovine Serum Albumin. An Experiment for the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the binding constant for bilirubin-bovine serum albumin complexation by the Method of Continuous Variations. The experiment applies fundamental concepts of physical chemistry to a commercially available system of biological interest. The experiment is easily completed in a single laboratory period, and students obtain binding constants on the order of 10 7, in good agreement with literature values.

Williams, Kathryn R.; Adhyaru, Bhavin; Pierce, Russell E.; Schulman, Stephen G.

2002-01-01

43

Chemical transformations of complex mixtures relevant to atmospheric processes: Laboratory and ambient studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of atmospheric chemistry and chemical transformations, which are relevant to conditions in the ambient atmosphere require the investigation of complex mixtures. In the atmosphere, complex mixtures (e.g. diesel emissions) are continually evolving as a result of physical and chemical transformations. This dissertation examines the transformations of modern diesel emissions (DE) in a series of experiments conducted at the

2009-01-01

44

Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples - An adjunct to cultural method of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Tuberculosis, a communicable disease with significant morbidity and mortality, is the leading cause of death in the world from bacterial infectious disease. Because of its public health importance, there is need for rapid and definitive method of detecting the causative organism. Several approaches have been attempted, but the molecular methods, especially Polymerase Chain Reaction assays are the most promising for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. Aim: This study was aimed at using Polymerase Chain Reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples using universal sample processing methodology. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred clinical samples sent to Tuberculosis laboratories in Ibadan and Osogbo, Nigeria, were enrolled in this study. The samples were processed by universal sample processing methodology for PCR; smear microscopy was carried out on sputum samples by Ziehl Nelseen staining technique; and cultured on Middlebrook agar medium containing oleic acid albumin dextrose complex supplement after decontamination of samples. Results: Ninety six (48%) samples were detected positive for M. tuberculosis complex by polymerase chain reaction using the combination of boiling and vortexing and microscopy detected 72 (36%) samples positive for acid fast bacilli. Using culture method as gold standard, it was found that polymerase chain reaction assay was more sensitive (75.5%) and specific (94.8%) than microscopy (sensitivity of 48.5% and specificity of 85.7%) in detecting M. tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. There was significant difference in detecting M. tuberculosis from clinical samples when compared to microscopy (p<0.05). Conclusion: The study recommends that direct molecular detection of M. tuberculosis complex is sensitive and specific and polymerase chain reaction method should be used as an adjunct to other methods of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis.

Alli, Oyebode A. T.; Ogbolu, Olusoga D.; Alaka, Olubunmi O.

2011-01-01

45

Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iron is always present in the atmosphere in concentrations from ~10-9 M (clouds, rain) up to ~10-3 M (fog, particles). Sources are mainly mineral dust emissions. Iron complexes are very good absorbers in the UV-VIS actinic region and therefore photo-chemically reactive. Iron complex photolysis leads to radical production and can initiate radical chain reactions, which is related to the oxidizing

C. Weller; A. Tilgner; H. Herrmann

2010-01-01

46

Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

Kass, David H.

2007-01-01

47

Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

48

Rigorous Potentiometric Determination of Metal Complexes Stability Constants: An Undergraduate Laboratory Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work an undergraduate laboratory practice is described corresponding to both experimental and computational methods used in potentiometric equilibrium constants determinations. As an example of these determinations the system formed by Cu(II) and D-galacturonic acid was selected. Both the deprotonation constant for the ligand and the equilibrium constants for the metal chelates were determined by using the program BEST.

Escandar, Graciela M.; Federico Sala, Luis

1997-11-01

49

Development and implementation of an electronic interface for complex clinical laboratory instruments without a vendor-provided data transfer interface  

PubMed Central

Background: Clinical pathology laboratories increasingly use complex instruments that incorporate chromatographic separation, e.g. liquid chromatography, with mass detection for rapid identification and quantification of biochemicals, biomolecules, or pharmaceuticals. Electronic data management for these instruments through interfaces with laboratory information systems (LIS) is not generally available from the instrument manufacturers or LIS vendors. Unavailability of a data management interface is a limiting factor in the use of these instruments in clinical laboratories where there is a demand for high-throughput assays with turn-around times that meet patient care needs. Materials and Methods: Professional society guidelines for design and transfer of data between instruments and LIS were used in the development and implementation of the interface. File transfer protocols and support utilities were written to facilitate transfer of information between the instruments and the LIS. An interface was created for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy instruments to manage data in the Sunquest® LIS. Results: Interface validation, implementation and data transfer fidelity as well as training of technologists for use of the interface was performed by the LIS group. The technologists were familiarized with the data verification process as a part of the data management protocol. The total time for the technologists for patient/control sample data entry, assay results data transfer, and results verification was reduced from approximately 20 s per sample to <1 s per sample. Sample identification, results data entry errors, and omissions were eliminated. There was electronic record of the technologist performing the assay runs and data management. Conclusions: Development of a data management interface for complex, chromatography instruments in clinical laboratories has resulted in rapid, accurate, verifiable information transfers between instruments and LIS. This has eliminated manual data entry that is prone to errors and enabled technologists to focus on analytical applications on the instruments.

Blank, Gary E.; Virji, Mohamed A.

2011-01-01

50

Future Development Of The Flerov Laboratory Accelerator Complex (Project DRIBs-III)  

SciTech Connect

Future development of the FLNR accelerator complex (project DRIBs-III) includes modernization of existing cyclotrons, construction of a new experimental hall, creation of a new high current cyclotron and of next generation experimental set-ups. Realization of the project is planned for 2010-2016.

Gulbekian, G. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation)

2010-04-30

51

Determination of Background Uranium Concentration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer under the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium occurs naturally in the environment and is also a contaminant that is disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. To determine whether uranium concentrations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which underlies the laboratory, are elevated as a result of migration of anthropogenic uranium from the Subsurface Disposal Area

Molly K. Leecaster; L. Don Koeppen; Gail L. Olson

2003-01-01

52

Site characterization program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Site Characterization Program is a continuation of the Subsurface Investigation Program (SIP). The scope of the SIP has broadened in response to the results of past work that identified hazardous as well as radionuclide contaminants in the subsurface environment and in response to the need to meet regulatory requirements. Two deep boreholes were cored at the RWMC during FY-1988. Selected sediment samples were submitted for Appendix IX of 40 CFR Part 264 and radionuclide analyses. Detailed geologic logging of archived core was initiated. Stratigraphic studies of the unsaturated zone were conducted. Studies to determine hydrologic properties of sediments and basalts were conducted. Geochemical studies and analyses were initiated to evaluate contaminant and radionuclide speciation and migration in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) geochemical environment. Analyses of interbed sediments in boreholes D15 and 8801D did not confirm the presence of radionuclide contamination in the 240-ft interbed. Analyses of subsurface air and groundwater samples identified five volatile organic compounds of concern: carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; Vigil, M.J.; Bonzon, C.J.; Landon, J.L.; Laney, P.T.

1989-07-01

53

Laboratory simulation of interstellar grain chemistry and the production of complex organic molecules  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle infrared (5000 to 500 cm(-1), 2 to 20 microns m), the spectral region most diagnostic of molecular vibrations. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds, are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory ices one can determine the composition and abundance of the icy materials frozen on the cold (10K) dust grains present in the interior of molecular clouds. These grains and their ice mantles may well be the building blocks from which comets are made. As an illustration of the processes which can take place as an ice is irradiated and subsequently warmed, researchers present the infrared spectra of the mixture H2O:CH3OH:CO:NH3:C6H14 (100:50:10:10:10). Apart from the last species, the ratio of these compounds is representative of the simplest ices found in interstellar clouds. The last component was incorporated into this particular experiment as a tracer of the behavior of a non-aromatic hydrocarbon. The change in the composition that results from ultraviolet photolysis of this ice mixture using a UV lamp to simulate the interstellar radiation field is shown. Photolysis produces CO, CO2, CH4, HCO, H2CO, as well as a family of moderately volatile hydrocarbons. Less volatile carbonaceous materials are also produced. The evolution of the infrared spectrum of the ice as the sample is warmed up to room temperature is illustrated. Researchers believe that the changes are similar to those which occur as ice is ejected from a comet and warmed up by solar radiation. The warm-up sequence shows that the nitrile or iso-nitrile bearing compound produced during photolysis evaporates between 200 and 250K, suggesting that it is carried by a small molecular species. These molecules could be similar to the source material in Comet Halley that is ejected in grains into the coma, freed by sublimation, and photolyzed by solar radiation to produce the observed jets.

Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Valero, G. J.

1990-01-01

54

The Laboratory and Observational Study of 2-BUTANONE as a Test for Organic Chemical Complexity in Various Interstellar Physical Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have undertaken a combined laboratory, observational, and modeling research program in an attempt to more fully understand the effects that physical environment has on the chemical composition of astronomical sources. To this end, deep millimeter and submillimeter spectral line surveys of multiple interstellar sources with varied physical conditions have been collected. These sources cover a range of physical environments, including hot cores, shocked regions, low-mass star forming regions, and stellar outflows. We have conducted broadband spectral line surveys at ? =1.3 mm of 10 sources at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). These are forerunner observations to our Herschel OT1 program to continue these line surveys at higher frequencies. Only a fraction of the lines observed in the CSO spectra can be assigned to known molecules. Laboratory spectra of many additional candidates for interstellar detection must therefore be collected before these spectral line surveys can be fully-analyzed. One such molecular target is 2-butanone [also known as methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), CH_3COCH_2CH_3], which contains similar functional groups to other known interstellar molecules and is therefore a likely product of interstellar organic chemistry. The microwave spectrum for MEK was collected with the chirped-pulse waveguide Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) spectrometer at New College Florida, and the millimeter and submillimeter spectrum was collected using the direct absorption flow cell spectrometer at Emory University. We will report here both on the laboratory characterization of MEK and the analysis of the observational line surveys in the context of the identification of new, complex organic molecules in the ISM.

Kroll, Jay A.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus; Shipman, Steven T.

2011-06-01

55

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01

56

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

57

Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

2007-01-01

58

How Do Structure and Charge Affect Metal-Complex Binding to DNA? An Upper-Division Integrated Laboratory Project Using Cyclic Voltammetry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced undergraduate laboratory project is described that integrates inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical techniques to reveal differences in binding between cationic metal complexes and anionic DNA (herring testes). Students were guided to formulate testable hypotheses based on the title question and a list of different metal…

Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Reed; Frost, Tony; Margerum, Lawrence D.

2011-01-01

59

A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

2012-01-01

60

RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

SciTech Connect

This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

Pamela R. Cunningham

1992-07-01

61

Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the vicinity of the thermal test complex at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico environs, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

In the summer of 2006, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM), collected surface soil samples at 37 locations within one mile of the vicinity of the newly constructed Thermal Test Complex (TTC) for the purpose of determining baseline conditions against which potential future impacts to the environs from operations at the facility could be assessed. These samples were submitted to an offsite analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference set against which to assess potential future operational impacts at the TTC. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data are presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

Miller, Mark Laverne; Nieto, Danielle M.

2007-01-01

62

Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

Porta, Angela R.

2003-01-01

63

Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy of Titan's Tholins in Liquid Methane and Liquid Ethane: Can Complex Organics in Titan's Lakes be Detected?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we present a Titan’s lakes experimental simulation we have performed in order to examine the spectroscopic signature of a liquid methane and a liquid ethane in contact with laboratory analogs (tholins) of Titan’s aerosols.

Nna-Mvondo, D.; Singh, S.; Mège, D.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tobie, G.; McKay, C. P.

2014-02-01

64

EVALUATION OF THE COMPLEX TERRAIN DISPERSION MODEL AGAINST LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS: NEUTRAL FLOW OVER 2-D AND 3-D HILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

A comparison is made of the predictions of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDM) with wind-tunnel observations of flow and diffusion in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer over two- and three-dimensional hills. The measure used to evaluate the ability of the mode...

65

Initial laboratory studies into the chemical and radiological aging of organic materials in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex  

SciTech Connect

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated over many years from plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct bearing on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. The major portion of organic materials that have been added to the tanks consists of tributyl phosphate, dibutyl phosphate, butyl alcohol, hexone (methyl isobutyl ketone), normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriadetic acid (HEDTA), other complexants, and lesser quantities of ion exchange polymers and minor organic compounds. A study of how thermal and radiological processes that may have changed the composition of organic tanks constituents has been initiated after a review of the open literature revealed little information was available about the rates and products of these processes under basic pH conditions. This paper will detail the initial findings as they relate to gas generation, e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and to changes in the composition of the organic and inorganic components brought about by ``Aging`` processes.

Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-03-01

66

Occurrence of hybrids and laboratory evidence of fertility among three species of the Phyllosoma complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Mexico.  

PubMed

In seven studied communities of Western Mexico, triatomine specimens were sympatrically collected, some with atypical morphological characteristics in contrast to pure specimens, which were presumed to be hybrids. More than 200 specimens of Meccus pallidipennis and Meccus longipennis with brown-yellow markings on dorsal connexival segments were collected in Ahuacapán and Quitupan. In La Mesa, more than 60 specimens similar to Meccus picturatus in most morphological characteristics (including size) were collected, although they presented a largely yellowish corium like M. pallidipennis. Interfertility was proven between all of the studied wild hybrid specimens, as well as between all the experimental laboratory hybrids. Two different phenotypes (M. picturatus and M. longipennis) were obtained from crosses between M. picturatus x M. picturatus and M. longipennis x M. longipennis from the three studied localities in state of Nayarit as from La Mesita. Results support the hypothesis that the subspecific ranking of those triatomines may, therefore, be more appropriate because reproductive isolation has not been developed and complete interbreeding was recorded. PMID:20140373

Martínez-Ibarra, José Alejandro; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Vences, Mauro Omar; Tapia-González, José María; Espinoza-Gutiérrez, Bertha

2009-12-01

67

Field Observations of Fluid Transport in a Complex Heterogeneous Vadose Zone at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicting fluid and contaminant transport in the vadose zone near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INEEL has been problematic due to the complex geology underlying the site. In an attempt to better understand the controlling mechanism of subsurface fluid transport, a system of monitoring instruments were installed in boreholes around the perimeter of newly constructed percolation ponds, consisting of 2 cells each approximately 160,000 ft2 in area. The instrumented region surrounding the ponds has been designated as the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). Continuous discharge to the south cell began in October 2002 at an average flux rate of 1.5 million gallons per day and continued until July 2003 at which time the discharge was switched to the north cell. Hydraulic data were collected nearly continuously, monitoring hydraulic responses to discharge events to both cells. Discharge to the south cell resulted in rapid vertical percolation until reaching the surficial gravel/basalt interface (at about 60 ft below ground surface) at which time rapid lateral transport was observed in a southern direction. A near steady state of water levels was reached during this 10-month period. Switching discharge location only 100 feet to the north cell drastically altered hydrological conditions and flow paths within the subsurface. Recharge was observed in several new locations, while some locations ceased receiving water from the ponds entirely. Other locations temporarily drained, then received "new water" from alternate flow paths a few days later. Prior to switching discharge locations, 3 wells were installed in the north cell at depths of 7 ft, 12 ft, and 19 ft below ground surface. The wells were instrumented with electrical conductivity probes to monitor discharge from the INTEC facility, which receives a high conductivity spike every 12 hours from water softener regeneration. Field observations show that water reached the 7 ft well within a couple hours after the switch, while the other 2 wells remain dry even after one month. Based on these data, it appears that discharge to the north cell percolates vertically to a depth of approximately 10 ft before reaching a low permeability zone, which diverts flow laterally in a northern direction. Field observations of hydrological data indicate that initial water arrival times and locations appear to be controlled by low permeability zones and fast pathways. Arrival progression was neither vertically nor laterally sequential. Importantly, field observations indicate that minor transients in discharge flux and/or location resulted in extreme changes in fluid transport behavior. Based on these observations, it is apparent that our original steady-state conceptual model needs to be modified to incorporate not only lithologic complexities, but also temporal changes in discharge location and flux. Continued field monitoring combined with ongoing tracer testing at the VZRP is aimed at providing the information needed to improve predictive models designed specifically for complex heterogeneous subsurface environments.

Baker, K.; Hull, L.; Mattson, E.; McLing, T.

2003-12-01

68

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01

69

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01

70

Impact of surface water recharge on the design of a groundwater monitoring system for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent hydrogeologic studies have been initiated to characterize the hydrogeologic conditions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Measured water levels in wells penetrating the Snake River Plain aquifer near the RWMC and the corresponding direction of flow show change over time. This change is related to water table mounding caused by recharge from excess water diverted from the Big Lost River for flood protection during high flows. Water levels in most wells near the RWMC rise on the order of 10 ft (3 m) in response to recharge, with water in one well rising over 60 ft (18 m). Recharge changes the normal south-southwest direction of flow to the east. Design of the proposed groundwater monitoring network for the RWMC must account for the variable directions of groundwater flow. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Wood, T.R.

1990-01-01

71

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

72

Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt with gravel was described. Basalt flows generally ranged in thickness from 3 to 76 ft (average of 14 ft) and varied from highly fractured to dense with high to low vesiculation. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected during certain stages of the drilling and construction process at boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Geophysical logs were examined synergistically with the core material for borehole USGS 140; additionally, geophysical data were examined to confirm geologic and hydrologic similarities between boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 because core was not collected for borehole USGS 141. Geophysical data suggest the occurrence of fractured and (or) vesiculated basalt, dense basalt, and sediment layering in both the saturated and unsaturated zones in borehole USGS 141. Omni-directional density measurements were used to assess the completeness of the grout annular seal behind 6-in. diameter well casing. Furthermore, gyroscopic deviation measurements were used to measure horizontal and vertical displacement at all depths in boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Single-well aquifer tests were done following construction at wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 and data examined after the tests were used to provide estimates of specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 140 were estimated at 2,370 gallons per minute per foot [(gal/min)/ft)], 4.06 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 740 feet per day (ft/d), respectively. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 141 were estimated at 470 (gal/min)/ft, 5.95 × 104 ft2/d, and 110 ft/d, respectively. Measured flow rates remained relatively constant in well USGS 140 with averages of 23.9 and 23.7 gal/min during the first and second aquifer tests, respectively, and in well USGS 141 with an average of 23.4 gal/min. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from both wells indicated th

Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K. V.

2014-01-01

73

Mobile/portable transuranic waste characterization systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a model for their use complex-wide  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has implemented mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems to characterize transuranic (TRU) waste in storage for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. These mobile systems are being used to characterize and repackage waste to meet the full requirements of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the WIPP Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems are being used to supplement the capabilities and throughputs of existing facilities. Utilization of mobile systems is a key factor that is enabling LANL to (1) reduce its TRU waste work-off schedule from 36 years to 8.5 years; (2) eliminate the need to construct a $70M+ TRU waste characterization facility; (3) have waste certified for shipment to WIPP when WIPP opens; (4) continue to ship TRU waste to WIPP at the rate of 5000 drums per year; and (5) reduce overall costs by more than $200M. Aggressive implementation of mobile and portable systems throughout the Department of Energy complex through a centralized-distributed services model will result in similar advantages complex-wide.

Derr, E.D.; Harper, J.R.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.

1997-05-01

74

Laboratory Animal Facilities. Laboratory Design Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Design of laboratory animal facilities must be functional. Accordingly, the designer should be aware of the complex nature of animal research and specifically the type of animal research which will be conducted in a new facility. The building of animal-care facilities in research institutions requires special knowledge in laboratory animal…

Jonas, Albert M.

1965-01-01

75

In situ technology evaluation and functional and operational guidelines for treatability studies at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide EG G Idaho's Waste Technology Development Department with a basis for selection of in situ technologies for demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to provide information for Feasibility Studies to be performed according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The demonstrations will aid in meeting Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) schedules for remediation of waste at Waste Area Group (WAG) 7. This report is organized in six sections. Section 1, summarizes background information on the sites to be remediated at WAG-7, specifically, the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. Section 2 discusses the identification and screening of in situ buried waste remediation technologies for these sites. Section 3 outlines the design requirements. Section 4 discusses the schedule (in accordance with Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) scoping). Section 5 includes recommendations for the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. A listing of references used to compile the report is given in Section 6. Detailed technology information is included in the Appendix section of this report.

Hyde, R.A.; Donehey, A.J.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.; Rubert, A.L.; Walker, S.

1991-07-01

76

Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

N /A

2003-11-03

77

Geologic processes in the RWMC area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Implications for long term stability and soil erosion at the radioactive waste management complex  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is the disposal and storage facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Transuranic waste and mixed wastes were also disposed at the RWMC until 1970. It is located in the southwestern part of the INEL about 80 km west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. The INEL occupies a portion of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), a low-relief, basalt, and sediment-floored basin within the northern Rocky Mountains and northeastern Basin and Range Province. It is a cool and semiarid, sagebrush steppe desert characterized by irregular, rolling terrain. The RWMC began disposal of INEL-generated wastes in 1952, and since 1954, wastes have been accepted from other Federal facilities. Much of the waste is buried in shallow trenches, pits, and soil vaults. Until about 1970, trenches and pits were excavated to the basalt surface, leaving no sediments between the waste and the top of the basalt. Since 1970, a layer of sediment (about 1 m) has been left between the waste and the basalt. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has developed regulations specific to radioactive-waste disposal, including environmental standards and performance objectives. The regulation applicable to all DOE facilities is DOE Order 5820.2A (Radioactive Waste Management). An important consideration for the performance assessment of the RWMC is the long-term geomorphic stability of the site. Several investigators have identified geologic processes and events that could disrupt a radioactive waste disposal facility. Examples of these {open_quotes}geomorphic hazards{close_quotes} include changes in stream discharge, sediment load, and base level, which may result from climate change, tectonic processes, or magmatic processes. In the performance assessment, these hazards are incorporated into scenarios that may affect the future performance of the RWMC.

Hackett, W.R.; Tullis, J.A.; Smith, R.P. [and others

1995-09-01

78

Skylab mobile laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

1975-01-01

79

Dynamics and chemistry of Venus' large and complex cloud system : a science case for an in-situ long-term chemical laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The planet Venus is the closest to the planet Earth both geographically and geometrically, with an average solar distance only 0.3AU smaller than that of Earth and an equatorial radius that is only 5% smaller than Earth's. But the similarities appear to end there. How did the environments of Venus and Earth become so divergent? The answer to this question relies upon an understanding of Venus' origins, the nature of its present atmosphere, and the role that the clouds have played in evolution and current state of Venus. Venus' clouds are composed of highly concentrated solutions of sulfuric acid and water. The sulfuric acid is produced photochemically from reactions involving water vapor and various sulfur species such as SO2 in the upper atmosphere around 62 km. The region from 50-60 km altitude is convectively unstable, suggesting that most of the cloud formation here is convectively driven, as are cumulus clouds on Earth but with sulfuric acid taking the place of water as the main condensable species. The clouds of Venus are ubiquitous, play a significant role in the radiative balance of the planet, are used as tracers to probe the atmospheric circulation, and are a key part of a global sulfurohydrological cycle that redistributes key greenhouse gasses such as SO2 and H2O. Thus understanding the clouds of Venus holds the key to understanding how Venus itself came to be the world of extremes that it is today. ESA's Venus Express mission, launched in Nov. 2005, has significantly improved our knowledge about the atmosphere of Venus by providing global long-term remote sensing observations with complete coverage in latitude and local solar time. However major questions remain about key minor species and how they vary throughout the major atmospheric regimes in the upper atmosphere, near the cloud tops where photolysis and condensation processes occur, near the surface where coupling and interchange with the atmosphere occurs, and in the middle atmosphere where they combine through meso-scale convection. In situ sampling of these aerosols represents a key measurement for constraining their properties, and identifying their role in the sulfurohydrological cycle by means of microphysical models of steadily increasing complexity. A probe/lander making a single descent will lack the spatial, temporal and local time coverage to address the coupling of compositional variations with radiative and dynamical properties of the atmosphere at cloud level, requiring a long duration flight. Establishing a long-term chemical laboratory in the cloud layer which would measure the detailed composition of both gas and liquid phases, and their latitudinal, diurnal and vertical variability using a combination of mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, tunable laser transmission spectrometry, and polar nephelometry would significantly address all of these objectives. It would allow the determination of the size distribution, shape, and real and imaginary refractive indices of the cloud particles, and the measurement of intensity and polarization phase functions. Our target species would include those known to be associated with cloud formation (e.g. H2SO4, SO3, SO2, H2O), as well as species important in stratospheric chemistry (e.g. CO, ClCOx, Ox, HCl, HF) and surface-atmosphere buffering (e.g. CO, OCS, SOx, Ox, H2S).

Widemann, Thomas; Määttänen, Anni; Wilquet, Valérie; McGouldrick, Kevin; Jessup, Kandis Lea; Wilson, Colin; Limaye, Sanjay; EuroVenus consortium, the

2014-05-01

80

Laboratory Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geophysical properties of near-Earth objects (NEOs) can best be studied using radio tomography and seismology. Reflection and transmission radio tomography is best suited for measuring the complex electric permittivity of poorly conducting materials to reveal the internal structure of NEOs. Such NEOs are primarily comet nuclei and carbonaceous asteroids. Seismic experiments are most suitable for studying elastic properties of consolidated materials to reveal material strengths of stony and iron-nickel asteroids. Thus, the two methods are complementary for investigating comets and asteroids of all types. Analysis of reflection and transmission radio tomography of heterogeneous irregular shaped bodies is very difficult. Scattering by internal and outer boundaries, differences in the refractive indices of heterogeneous materials, and attenuation by electric conductivity complicate the analyses. For this reason laboratory simulations with scaled objects and scaled wavelengths is extremely useful to check the reliability of inversion techniques of radio signals to arrive at the interior structure of an NEO. Another approach to obtaining quantitative information on the composition and structure of an NEO is through induced seismology. There are two approaches to producing seismic waves: small explosive charges and impactors. Experimental work has been performed in the laboratory to examine the impulse delivered by explosives. Wave travel times can be used to back out basic material properties and first order structure of an NEO. For example, if distinct arrival pulses for P and S waves are recorded and the explosive initiation/impact time and location are known, then it is possible to determine the elastic properties of bulk and shear modulus. Reflections in the seismograms allow a determination of material boundaries in an NEO. Original arrival time is important since Q numbers for stony NEO material are presumed to be high, as they were on the Moon, and thus it is expected that there will be extensive ringing and noise. Other types of NEO materials will have differing seismic characteristics.

Huebner, W. F.; Walker, J.; Gustafson, B.

81

Laboratory of Population Genetics  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Population Genetics (LPG) utilizes genetic analysis to gain insight into human biologic processes. Until recently, genetic dissection of phenotypes had been largely limited to investigations in experimental organisms. The dawn of the post-genome era presents the opportunity to extend these investigations to humans. It is the major goal of this laboratory to exploit emerging resources and technology in order to understand the genetic basis of the complex phenotypes related to human cancer.

82

42 CFR 493.1445 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1445 ...that the physical plant and environmental conditions of the laboratory...on-site supervision of high complexity test performance by testing...training for the type and complexity of the services...

2013-10-01

83

Facile Synthesis of a Macrobicyclic Hexaamine Cobalt(III) Complex Based on Tris(Ethylenediamine)Cobalt(III): An Advanced Undergraduate Inorganic Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information (including relevant chemical reactions), procedures used, and results obtained are provided for the synthesis and characterization of a macrobicyclic complex. The synthesis can be completed within two to three hours and is inexpensive and safe. Suggestions for further experiments are included. (JN)

Harrowfield, Jack MacB.; And Others

1985-01-01

84

LANGUAGE LABORATORIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE USE OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY HAS GIVEN MANY THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS GOOD LISTENING AND SPEAKING PRACTICE AND HAS BECOME AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING TOOL. THE BASIC PIECE OF EQUIPMENT OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS THE TAPE RECORDER-AND-PLAYBACK, DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH AUDIOPASSIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE-COMPARATIVE STUDY, AND…

BRUBAKER, CHARLES WILLIAM

85

Assessment of the BD MGIT TBc identification test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in a network of mycobacteriology laboratories.  

PubMed

We evaluate the performance of the TBcID assay in a panel of 100 acid-fast bacilli cultures. Sixty-four isolates were TBcID positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), whereas 36 gave negative results. These included 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria, one nonmycobacterial isolate, one M. tuberculosis, and six M. bovis BCG strains. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.14%, specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 80.55%, respectively. The test is rapid, easy to perform and interpret, and does not require sample preparation or instrumentation. However, a negative result does not exclude the presence of a strain belonging to MTBC, especially when mutations in mpb64 gene are present or some M. bovis BCG strains are isolated. The TBcID showed potential to assist in the identification of MTBC when the implementation and usage of molecular methods are often not possible, principally in resource-limited countries. PMID:24587985

Machado, Diana; Ramos, Jorge; Couto, Isabel; Cadir, Nureisha; Narciso, Inácio; Coelho, Elizabeth; Viegas, Sofia; Viveiros, Miguel

2014-01-01

86

The Gran Sasso Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gran Sasso underground laboratory is one of the four national laboratories run by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). It is located under the Gran Sasso massif, in central Italy, between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 km far from Rome. It is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world and the most advanced in terms of complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. The scientific program at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, LNGS)is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay and nuclear cross-section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

Votano, L.

2012-09-01

87

Documentation of a simple environmental pathways model of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. [DOSTOMAN code  

SciTech Connect

The DOSTOMAN code calculates compartment inventories of radioactivity for all model compartments defined. Calculations are performed for the entire period of time simulated, at user-designated intervals. This output permits tracking of radionuclide movement within and from the disposal site. Simulation runs were performed for /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Am for the duration of the site's operational period. For calculational purposes only, this period was assumed to extend to the year 2093. Sensitivity analyses, in which the relative importance of biotic and abiotic transport processes in radionuclide migration was evaluated, were performed for the EDS and CDS models. Interactive effects between transport processes were examined, as were time-dependent changes in process sensitivities. Results of the analyses are useful in defining the adequacy of present environmental monitoring activities. The current monitoring program addresses all pertinent environmental media. The level of comprehensiveness in sampling each medium, however, does not reflect differences in importance of the various transport processes. A number of special studies, in progress or planned, are expected to aid in improving the monitoring program. Limitations of the DOSTOMAN model, as applied to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, are discussed. Modeling of atmospheric and hydrologic dispersion of contaminants, and consideration of seasonal dynamics of transport processes, are identified as most deserving of attention. It is recognized that, to the extent that further refinements of the monitoring program are based on model projections, resolution of these limitations is important. Recommendations are offered for work needed to deal with these limitations, many of which are already planned for implementation.

Shuman, R.D.; Case, M.J.; Rope, S.K.

1985-09-01

88

Single-phase microemulsification of a complex light-nonaqueous-phase-liquid: Laboratory evaluation of several mixtures of surfactant/alcohol solutions  

SciTech Connect

A recent advance in conventional pump-and-treat technology for aquifer remediation involves the use of surfactant-alcohol mixtures that will form a clear, transparent, thermodynamically stable oil-in-water microemulsion on contact with a residual non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). An initial screening of 86 commercial-grade surfactants for aqueous solubility resulted in selection of 58 that were further tested in batch experiments to evaluate the capacity to solubilize a complex NAPL waste collected from a Superfund site (Operable Unit OU-1) at Hill AFB, UT. The selected group of 58 surfactants represented six classes of anionic, nine classes of nonionic, and one class of amphoteric surfactants. Batch studies on NAPL solubilization identified a number of surfactants suitable for use in the field demonstration phase of the project; a further criterion in surfactant selection was that the flushing solution had a viscosity <2 cp. The best surfactants among this group had HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) values between 12 and 13, and solubilized 10 to 20 g L{sup {minus}1} of the OU-1 NAPL when the surfactant concentration was 3%. Column tests using NAPL-coated glass beads showed that the more efficient surfactants could remove >90% of the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes. Brij 97, an ethoxylated alcohol ether surfactant, showed a high capacity for solubilizing the OU-1 NAPL. In a column test using contaminated Hill AFB aquifer material, flushing with a mixture of 3% Brij 97 and 2.5% n-pentanol removed essentially all of the mass of nine target analytes in the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes without mobilizing the NAPL or destabilizing aquifer colloids.

Rhue, R.D.; Rao, P.S.C.; Annable, M.D.

1999-08-01

89

USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

U.S. Geological Survey

1995-01-01

90

42 CFR 493.1407 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1407 Standard...Ensure that the physical plant and environmental conditions of the laboratory are appropriate...appropriate training for the type and complexity of the services offered, and...

2013-10-01

91

NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) presents its weather, climate, and air quality investigations. Visitors can discover ETL's theoretical and field observations and sensor and model developments to address complex environmental issues. The website provides detailed descriptions of the Study of Environmental Artic Change (SEARCH), the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) project, and other 2005 programs. Teachers can find educational resources for elementary, middle, and high school.

92

NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) presents its weather, climate, and air quality investigations. Visitors can discover ETL's theoretical and field observations and sensor and model developments to address complex environmental issues. The website provides detailed descriptions of the Study of Environmental Artic Change (SEARCH), the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) project, and other 2005 programs. Teachers can find educational resources for elementary, middle, and high school.

2007-05-16

93

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

94

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

2011-06-14

95

Lunar laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

1986-01-01

96

Laboratory accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

Pettit, R.B.

1998-08-01

97

Laboratory Simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geophysical properties of near-Earth objects (NEOs) can best be studied using radio tomography and seismology. Reflection and transmission radio tomography is best suited for measuring the complex electric permittivity of poorly conducting materials to reveal the internal structure of NEOs. Such NEOs are primarily comet nuclei and carbonaceous asteroids. Seismic experiments are most suitable for studying elastic properties of consolidated

W. F. Huebner; J. Walker; B. Gustafson

2004-01-01

98

Geology of the Arco-Big Southern Butte area, eastern Snake River Plain, and volcanic hazards to the radioactive waste management complex, and other waste storage and reactor facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arco-Big Southern Butte area of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, includes a volcanic rift zone and more than 70 Holocene and late Quaternary basalt volcanoes. The Arco volcanic rift zone extends southeast for 50 km from Arco to about 10 km southeast of Big Southern Butte. The rift zone is the locus of extensional faults, graben, fissure basaltic volcanic vents, several rhyolite domes at Big Southern Butte, and a ferrolatite volcano at Cedar Butte. Limited radiometric age data and geological field criteria suggest that all volcanism in the area is younger than 700,000 years; at least 67 separate basaltic eruptions are estimated to have occurred within the last 200,000 years. The average volcanic recurrence interval for the Arco-Big Southern Butte area is approximately one eruption per 3,000 years. Radioactive waste storage and reactor facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory may be subject to potential volcanic hazards. The geologic history and inferred past volcanic events in the Arco-Big Southern Butte area provide a basis for assessing the volcanic hazard. It is recommended that a radiometric age-dating study be performed on rocks in cored drill holes to provide a more precise estimate of the eruption recurrence interval for the region surrounding and including the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. It is also recommended that several geophysical monitoring systems (dry tilt and seismic) be installed to provide adequate warning of future volcanic eruptions.

Kuntz, Mel A.; Kork, John O.

1978-01-01

99

Archimedes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

100

Laboratory investigations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

Russell, Ray W.

1988-01-01

101

Virtual Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

2012-04-30

102

Project Laboratory in Mathematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What's it like to do mathematical research? The "Project Laboratory in Mathematics" course from MIT's OpenCourseWare provides some fine insights into this endeavor. The course was originally developed by Professor Haynes Miller and features information about how to help students "explore puzzling and complex mathematical situations." The site includes selected video lectures from the course, instructor insights, and a selection of projects and examples, such as "The Dynamics of Successive Differences Over Z and R." Also, the site includes information on how to customize this course for a variety of settings, along with examples of classroom activities and helpful resources.

2013-01-01

103

Integrated Circuits Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Integrated Circuits Laboratory is software that is devoted to helping understand the processing of semiconductor materials. Manufacturing an IC involves a complex interaction of several highly developed technologies. This software is used to fabricate high-performance integrated circuits. In such areas as oxidation, diffusion, Ion implantation, Chemical etching, Photolithography, CVD, Ellipsometer, Plasma etching and Aluminum deposition. IC Lab software offers virtual opportunities to simulate the process of manufacturing a integrated circuit without going into a clean room. All the simulations represent processing steps that are as accurate as possible. This was part of the Learning Invention Labs that MATEC held. Visit the MATEC.org homepage for more information.

Lindor, Felicia

2013-01-01

104

Review of the transport of selected radionuclides in the interim risk assessment for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Waste Area Group 7 Operable Unit 7-13/14, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent technical review of the Interim Risk Assessment (IRA) and Contaminant Screening for the Waste Area Group 7 (WAG-7) Remedial Investigation, the draft Addendum to the Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 WAG-7 comprehensive Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS), and supporting documents that were prepared by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Inc. The purpose of the technical review was to assess the data and geotechnical approaches that were used to estimate future risks associated with the release of the actinides americium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium to the Snake River Plain aquifer from wastes buried in pits and trenches at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex in southeastern Idaho within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Radionuclides have been buried in pits and trenches at the SDA since 1957 and 1952, respectively. Burial of transuranic wastes was discontinued in 1982. The five specific tasks associated with this review were defined in a ?Proposed Scope of Work? prepared by the DOE, and a follow-up workshop held in June 1998. The specific tasks were (1) to review the radionuclide sampling data to determine how reliable and significant are the reported radionuclide detections and how reliable is the ongoing sampling program, (2) to assess the physical and chemical processes that logically can be invoked to explain true detections, (3) to determine if distribution coefficients that were used in the IRA are reliable and if they have been applied properly, (4) to determine if transport model predictions are technically sound, and (5) to identify issues needing resolution to determine technical adequacy of the risk assessment analysis, and what additional work is required to resolve those issues.

Rousseau, Joseph P.; Landa, Edward R.; Nimmo, John R.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Anderson, Steven R.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Bossong, Clifford R.; Orr, Brennon R.

2005-01-01

105

Amebiasis: Laboratory Diagnosis. Part III. Laboratory Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Study program designed for individual instruction. The lesson presents diagnostic characteristics of the various species of intestinal amoeba and the laboratory methods used for laboratory examinations.

M. M. Brooke R. K. Carver D. M. Melvin R. L. Reynolds J. H. Harless

1976-01-01

106

Multicellular microorganisms: laboratory versus nature  

PubMed Central

Our present in-depth knowledge of the physiology and regulatory mechanisms of microorganisms has arisen from our ability to remove them from their natural, complex ecosystems into pure liquid cultures. These cultures are grown under optimized laboratory conditions and allow us to study microorganisms as individuals. However, microorganisms naturally grow in conditions that are far from optimal, which causes them to become organized into multicellular communities that are better protected against the harmful environment. Moreover, this multicellular existence allows individual cells to differentiate and acquire specific properties, such as forming resistant spores, which benefit the whole population. The relocation of natural microorganisms to the laboratory can result in their adaptation to these favourable conditions, which is accompanied by complex changes that include the repression of some protective mechanisms that are essential in nature. Laboratory microorganisms that have been cultured for long periods under optimized conditions might therefore differ markedly from those that exist in natural ecosystems.

Palkova, Zdena

2004-01-01

107

Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

Miller, Glen M.; And Others

1993-01-01

108

Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

109

Design and Implementation Issues for Modern Remote Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The design and implementation of remote laboratories present different levels of complexity according to the nature of the equipments operated by the remote laboratory, the requirements imposed on the accessing computers, the network linking the user to the laboratory, and the type of experiments the laboratory supports. This paper addresses the…

Guimaraes, E. G.; Cardozo, E.; Moraes, D. H.; Coelho, P. R.

2011-01-01

110

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

111

Using the Laboratory to Enhance Student Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Typical hands-on, cookbook laboratory experiences do an extremely poor job of making apparent and playing off students' prior ideas, engendering deep reflection, and promoting understanding of complex content. This chapter addresses how to transform traditional laboratory activities into experiences that are more congruent with how people learn, the National Science Education Standards, and the nature of science.

Clough, Michael P.

2002-01-01

112

Legionnaires' Disease Laboratory Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a practical working laboratory manual for clinical and environmental microbiology laboratories concerned with the laboratory diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease, or the recovery of Legionella spp. from the environment. Details are given for perform...

P. H. Edelstein

1983-01-01

113

Shape complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of 3D shapes that are represented in digital form and processed in CAD\\/CAM\\/CAE, entertainment, biomedical, and other applications has increased considerably. Much research was focused on coping with or on reducing shape complexity. But, what exactly is shape complexity? We discuss several complexity measures and the corresponding complexity reduction techniques. Algebraic complexity measures the degree of polynomials needed

Jarek Rossignac

2005-01-01

114

Qualitative and quantitative study on drainage networks at laboratory scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although simulated drainage networks at the laboratory scale would represent highly-simplified models of natural drainages, they would provide a significant contribute to the comprehension of the complex dynamics governing the fluvial systems. Laboratory experiments also give the advantage to detect transient growth phases shedding some light on the knowledge of temporal and spatial landform evolution. Perhaps, pioneering laboratory experiments on

G. Oliveto; D. Palma; A. di Domenico

2009-01-01

115

Laboratory test system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to develop a laboratory test capability for evaluating new and existing digital product designs. In recent years, Bendix Kansas City has become more active in syppling early development hardware to the design laboratories for evaluation. Because of the more complex electronic designs being used in new components, more highly automated test systems are needed to evaluate development hardware. To meet this requirement, a universal test system was developed to provide both basic test capabilities and flexibility to adapt easily to specific product applications. This laboratory evaluation system will reduce the need to develop complex dedicated test systems for each new product design, while still providing the benefits of an automated system. A special purpose interface chassis was designed and fabricated to permit a standardized interface between the test system and the product application. Connector assignments by system functions provide convenience and function isolation. Standard cables were used to reduce the need for special purpose hardware. Electrical testing of a developmental electronics assembly demonstrated the adaptability of this system for a typical product application. Both the interface hardware and the software were developed for this application.

Asher, G.L.

1980-03-01

116

SIGLa: an adaptable LIMS for multiple laboratories  

PubMed Central

Background The need to manage large amounts of data is a clear demand for laboratories nowadays. The use of Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) to achieve this is growing each day. A LIMS is a complex computational system used to manage laboratory data with emphasis in quality assurance. Several LIMS are available currently. However, most of them have proprietary code and are commercialized with a high cost. Moreover, due to its complexity, LIMS are usually designed to comply with the needs of one kind of laboratory, making it very difficult to reuse a LIMS. In this work we describe the Sistema Integrado de Gerência de Laboratórios (SIGLa), an open source LIMS with a new approach designed to allow it to adapt its activities and processes to various types of laboratories. Results SIGLa incorporates a workflow management system, making it possible to create and manage customized workflows. For each new laboratory a workflow is defined with its activities, rules and procedures. During the execution, for each workflow created, the values of attributes defined in a XPDL file (which describe the workflow) are stored in SIGLa’s database, allowing then to be managed and retrieved upon request. These characteristics increase system’s flexibility and extend its usability to include the needs of multiple types of laboratories. To construct the main functionalities of SIGLa a workflow of a proteomic laboratory was first defined. To validate the SIGLa capability of adapting to multiples laboratories, on this paper we study theprocess and the needs of a microarray laboratory and define its workflow. This workflow has been defined in a period of about two weeks, showing the efficiency and flexibility of the tool. Conclusions Using SIGLa it has been possible to construct a microarray LIMS in a few days illustrating the flexibility and power of the method proposed. With SIGLa’s development we hope to contribute positively to the area of management of complex data in laboratory by managing its large amounts of data, guaranteeing the consistence of the data and increasing the laboratory productivity. We also hope to make possible to laboratories with little resources to afford a high level system for complex data management.

2010-01-01

117

The Paradigm Laboratory Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project aims to develop problem-based inquiry learning laboratories that have science majors in introductory chemistry laboratories transfer an understanding of the attitudes and methods of scientific inquiry to knowledge and experiences in their disciplines of study.

Heppert, Joseph A.

2011-04-06

118

Tethered gravity laboratories study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

Lucchetti, F.

1989-01-01

119

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: the Fusion Laboratories facilities and mission, including the recent tokamak experiments which resulted in the production of more than 9 million watts of thermonuclear energy.

120

Intelligent Mobility Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents activities to develop and equip a laboratory for robot mobility research and development. The laboratory includes mobile robots, testing systems, instrumentation, analysis tools, as well as test and analysis procedures. Robot mobilit...

G. Witus

2006-01-01

121

An Electronics "Unit Laboratory"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a laboratory teaching technique in which a single topic (in this case, bipolar junction transistors) is studied over a period of weeks under the supervision of one staff member, who also designs the laboratory work. (MLH)

Davies, E. R.; Penton, S. J.

1976-01-01

122

The Microscale Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The materials needed and the procedures used in three microscale chemical laboratory experiments are detailed. Included are a microscale organic synthesis, a two-step synthetic sequence for the microscale organic laboratory, and a small-scale equilibrium experiment. (CW)

Zipp, Arden P.

1990-01-01

123

Evaluation of Milk Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Procedures for collection of sampling and laboratory survey data, establishment of an acceptable split sample program and statistical analysis of split sample results, and other administrative practices in state approval of milk laboratories are summarize...

1965-01-01

124

Engineering Design Laboratory Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document provides a brief description of the systems available for use in the Engineering Design Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland. The Engineering Design Laboratory was established to study the p...

A. B. Feeney

1991-01-01

125

INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various impr...

C. R. Clark G. C. Knighton N. P. Hallinan R. S. Fielding

2010-01-01

126

INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

2010-01-01

127

Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

2013-01-01

128

Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

Steere, Norman V.

1965-01-01

129

Laboratory 0: Error Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The collection of data is an important part of all laboratory work, and interpreting the data is the major part of a laboratory report. Laboratory 0 presents a brief overview of techniques and concepts needed to estimate and analyze the errors inherent in experimental work.

Virtual Labs, Real Data (Cornell University)

2011-01-19

130

Good Laboratory Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

Hadjicostas, Evsevios

131

Laboratory-acquired Brucellosis  

PubMed Central

We report two laboratory-acquired Brucella melitensis infections that were shown to be epidemiologically related. Blood culture isolates were initially misidentified because of variable Gram stain results, which led to misdiagnoses and subsequent laboratory exposures. Notifying laboratory personnel who unknowingly processed cultures from brucellosis patients is an important preventive measure.

Gallo, Richard; Kelly, Molly; Limberger, Ronald J.; DeAngelis, Karen; Cain, Louise; Wallace, Barbara; Dumas, Nellie

2004-01-01

132

The Instructional Development Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Instructional Development Laboratory of Florida State University's Center for Educational Design (CED) is described. Among the major projects of the Laboratory has been the design and implementation of the PLATO computer-assisted instruction system. Included in the report are descriptions of (1) the facilities layout of the Laboratory, (2) the…

Towle, Nelson J.

133

Laboratory Turnaround Time  

PubMed Central

Turnaround time (TAT) is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This review summarises the literature regarding laboratory TAT, focusing on the different definitions, measures, expectations, published data, associations with clinical outcomes and approaches to improve TAT. It aims to provide a consolidated source of benchmarking data useful to the laboratory in setting TAT goals and to encourage introduction of TAT monitoring for continuous quality improvement. A 90% completion time (sample registration to result reporting) of <60 minutes for common laboratory tests is suggested as an initial goal for acceptable TAT.

Hawkins, Robert C

2007-01-01

134

Cosmic Complexity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess experimentation would not be able to produce life elsewhere

Mather, John C.

2012-01-01

135

Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

1996-01-01

136

Polyelectrolyte Complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter presents selected ideas concerning complexes that are formed either by oppositely charged polyelectrolytes or by polyelectrolytes and surfactants of opposite charge. The polyelectrolyte complexes polyelectrolyte complexe (PECs PEC ), which are surfactant-free, form typical structures of a low degree of order such as the ladder ladder-egg structure - and scrambled-egg structures scrambled-egg structure . In contrast, polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes

Andreas F. Thünemann; Martin Müller; Herbert Dautzenberg; Jean-François Joanny; Hartmut Löwen

137

Complexity Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

138

Development of an Environmental Virtual Field Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises, field observations and field trips are a fundamental part of many earth science and environmental science courses. Field observations and field trips can be constrained because of distance, time, expense, scale, safety, or complexity of real-world environments. Our objectives were to develop an environmental virtual field…

Ramasundaram, V.; Grunwald, S.; Mangeot, A.; Comerford, N. B.; Bliss, C. M.

2005-01-01

139

Novosibirsk solid-state physics laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work carried out in this laboratory is distinguished by a complex approach, which is characteristic for present-day solid-state physics, in studying mechanical, optical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, and other properties of substances and their inter-relations.

I. I. Novikov; P. G. Strelkov

1967-01-01

140

Immune complexes in ankylosing spondylitis.  

PubMed Central

Immune complexes have been reported in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and may implicate infectious agents. Serum samples from 49 patients with AS were assayed for immune complexes by polyethylene glycol precipitation, followed by radial immunodiffusion and pepsinogen binding immunoassay. Both methods showed increases in IgA containing immune complexes, which correlated with serum IgA and with IgA rheumatoid factor concentrations, but did not show increases in other immune complex components. Increased immune complexes were associated with peripheral joint synovitis, but showed no correlation with other clinical or laboratory indices of disease activity. Immune complexes from nine AS serum samples and one AS synovial fluid were electrophoretically separated then probed with anti-Klebsiella pneumoniae, but AS specific antigens were not identified. This study did not suggest a major role for immune complexes in AS without peripheral disease, nor provide serological evidence for the involvement of klebsiella antigens. Images

MacLean, I L; Archer, J R; Cawley, M I; Kidd, B L; O'Hara, B P; Pegley, F S; Thompson, P W

1992-01-01

141

Cyclotomic complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We construct a triangulated category of cyclotomic complexes (homological analogues of the cyclotomic spectra of Bökstedt and Madsen) along with a version of the topological cyclic homology functor TC for cyclotomic complexes and an equivariant homology functor (commuting with TC) from cyclotomic spectra to cyclotomic complexes. We also prove that the category of cyclotomic complexes essentially coincides with the twisted 2-periodic derived category of the category of filtered Dieudonné modules, which were introduced by Fontaine and Lafaille. Under certain conditions we show that the functor TC on cyclotomic complexes is the syntomic cohomology functor.

Kaledin, D.

2013-10-01

142

The Regional Educational Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Regional Educational Laboratory Program is the U.S. Department of Education's largest research and development investment designed to help educators, policymakers, and communities improve schools and help all students attain their potential. The network of 10 regional laboratories works to ensure that those involved in education improvement at…

Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Reform Assistance and Dissemination.

143

JHU Virtual laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This virtual laboratory, which accompanies the Johns Hopkins University course "500.101 What is Engineering?" uses JAVA interactive technology to offer students experiment-oriented problems via the WWW or CD-ROM. The objective of the course and the virtual laboratory is to introduce beginning science and engineering students to

Karweit, Michael

144

Hoods for Science Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

Horowitz, Harold; and others

145

Planning a Laboratory?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Factors for the planning of functional, economical and safe laboratory facilities are discussed, with emphasis on the economical results of planning for a specific purpose and for the specific needs of each occupant. A questionnaire is suggested as a useful tool for determining requirements. Other areas for consideration include--(1) laboratory

Kunhardt, Keith R.

1968-01-01

146

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

147

Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

Brame, Ray; And Others

148

LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY WAS ESTABLISHED TO IMPROVE READING ABILITY AND OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS AS AN AID IN THE PREVENTION OF DROPOUTS. THE LABORATORY WAS OPERATED ON A SUMMER SCHEDULE WITH A FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF FROM 45 MINUTES TO 2 1/2 HOURS DAILY. ALL PUPILS WERE 14 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, AND EXPRESSED A DESIRE TO IMPROVE THEIR READING…

ROBERTS, HERMESE E.

149

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

1999-09-01

150

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01

151

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

152

Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAH Analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

153

Software agent technology in the laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The IT (Information Technology) environment in today's laboratories is characterized as being highly distributed, heterogeneous, and in some instances extremely dynamic. Larger organizations have to deal with hundreds of different systems, ranging from standalone workstations and devices in laboratories to fully integrated LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems. An information system operating in such an environment must handle several emerging problems, such as heterogeneous hardware and software platforms, as well as distributed information sources and capabilities. It is also expected that the IT infrastructure scales well, easily integrates with legacy systems, allows resource sharing, and supports day-to-day operations such as information retrieval, data storage, validation, tracking, replication, and archival in a fully automated fashion. By using real-world examples, this presentation will illustrate how software agent technology can be used to manage the ever increasing IT complexity and user demands in the laboratory of the future.

Staab, T. A. (Torsten)

2002-01-01

154

Australia's marine virtual laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and d) run the assembled configuration in a cloud computing environment, or download the assembled configuration and packaged data to run on any other system of the user's choice. MARVL is now being applied in a number of case studies around Australia ranging in scale from locally confined estuaries to the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand. In time we expect the range of models offered will include biogeochemical models.

Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

2014-05-01

155

New hydraulics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The DeFrees Hydraulics Laboratory was opened in June 1984 as a 500-m2 addition to the former hydraulics teaching laboratory in Cornell University's School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Total laboratory space is now about 800 m2 and is dedicated to basic and applied research and teaching in hydraulics, fluid mechanics, and hydrology. Three major equipment installations are in progress: a 33-m wave tank with a random wave generator for coastal/ocean engineering research, a 24-m wind-water tunnel for stratified flow and interfacial transfer research, and a 24-m tilting flume for open channel turbulence and sediment transport research.

156

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOEpatents

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01

157

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the faciliti...

1969-01-01

158

Naval Research Laboratory Overview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) mission is to conduct a broadly based multidisciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development directed toward maritime applications of new and improved materials, techniques, equipment,...

2009-01-01

159

Tethered gravity laboratories study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following subject areas are covered: (1) thermal control issues; (2) attitude control sybsystem; (3) configuration constraints; (4) payload; (5) acceleration requirements on Variable Gravity Laboratory (VGL); and (6) VGL configuration highlights.

Lucchetti, F.

1989-01-01

160

Ecosystems in the Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

Madders, M.

1975-01-01

161

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

162

Automotive Laboratory Instrumentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Automotive laboratory instrumentation may be divided into the five broad classifications, power absorption and measurement, temperature measurement and control, pressure measurements, fluid flow, and dimensional measurement. Many of these instruments find...

1968-01-01

163

Evaluation of Water Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication provides performance standards for evaluation of the bacteriological laboratory procedures and equipment as required by the 1962 Edition of the Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards and is in conformance with the 12th Edition of S...

1966-01-01

164

Retainer for laboratory animals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

Lee, R. W.

1979-01-01

165

Designing Complexity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

Glanville, Ranulph

2007-01-01

166

ASHRAE's Living Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE recently remodeled its headquarters building in Atlanta with the intention of making the building a LEED Gold building. As part of that renovation the building was enhanced with additional sensors and monitoring equipment to allow it to serve as a Living Laboratory for use by members and the general public to study the detailed energy use and performance of buildings. This article provides an overview of the Living Laboratory and its capabilities.

Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Brambley, Michael R.

2008-10-01

167

Safer Science: Laboratory Relocation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The movement of hazardous chemicals found in high school science laboratories and chemical storerooms can be risky business due to the increased likelihood of an accidental spill, contamination, or other type of mishap. Prudent safety planning and practice need to be addressed in order to eliminate or minimize the potential for chemical incidents. Giving thought to the guidelines outlined in this article will help initiate the process of moving chemical inventories within and between school laboratories and storerooms.

Roy, Ken

2008-10-01

168

Biotechnology Laboratory: Micropipet Technique  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Micropipets are used in almost all biotechnology experiments. These precise instruments allow for the dispensing of extremely small volumes. This laboratory exercise will teach students to learn how to operate a micropipet, understand measuring volumes in microliters, and convert metric volumes. This seven-page pdf contains teacher information for conducting the lab, the laboratory exercise itself with complete instructions, and a student activity for them to complete as they work through the exercise.

2008-08-13

169

Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory  

Cancer.gov

CGR’s high throughput laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and automation systems for a large number of applications. CGR supports DCEG in all stages of cancer research from planning to publishing, including experimental design and project management, sample handling, genotyping and sequencing assay design and execution, development and implementation of bioinformatic pipelines, and downstream scientific research and analytical support.

170

COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

171

Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.  

PubMed

Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:19399049

Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

1999-08-16

172

Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.  

PubMed

Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:18268748

Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

1998-03-20

173

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

174

Galactic Neighborhood and Laboratory Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The galactic neighborhood, extending from the Milky Way to redshifts of about 0.1, is our unique local laboratory for detailed study of galaxies and their interplay with the environment. Such study provides a foundation of knowledge for interpreting observations of more distant galaxies and their environment. The Astro 2010 Science Frontier Galactic Neighborhood Panel identified four key sci- entific questions: 1) What are the flows of matter and energy in the circumgalac- tic medium? 2) What controls the mass-energy-chemical cycles within galaxies? 3) What is the fossil record of galaxy assembly from first stars to present? 4) What are the connections between dark and luminous matter? These questions, essential to the understanding of galaxies as interconnected complexes, can be addressed most effectively and/or uniquely in the galactic neighborhood. The panel also highlighted the discovery potential of time-domain astronomy and astrometry with powerful new techniques and facilities to greatly advance our understanding of the precise connections among stars, galaxies, and newly dis- covered transient events. The relevant needs for laboratory astrophysics will be emphasized, especially in the context of supporting NASA missions.

Wang, Q. D.

2011-05-01

175

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Written by Tony R. Kuphaldt and Jason Starck, this chapter of All About Circuit's second volume on Alternating Current describes complex numbers: "In order to successfully analyze AC circuits, we need to work with mathematical objects and techniques capable of representing these multi-dimensional quantities. Here is where we need to abandon scalar numbers for something better suited: complex numbers." In addition to the introduction and credits to contributors, the chapter has seven sections: Vectors and AC waveforms, Simple vector addition, Complex vector addition, Polar and rectangular notation, Complex number arithmetic, More on AC "polarity," and Some examples with AC circuits. Each section has clear illustrations and a concise, bulleted review of what was covered at the end.

Kuphaldt, Tony R.

2008-07-15

176

Complex Clouds  

article title:  Multi-layer Clouds Over the South Indian Ocean     ... Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging ...

2013-04-16

177

Softball Complex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Parks and Recreation Department of Montgomery, Alabama, has developed a five-field softball complex as part of a growing community park with facilities for camping, golf, aquatics, tennis, and picnicking. (MJB)

Ellis, Jim

1977-01-01

178

Complex Rays.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Methods for tracking local plane-wave fields with complex phase have recently received attention. In the time-harmonic regime and in lossless media, such fields are frequently referred to as evanescent; they arise exterior to surfacewave guiding structure...

L. B. Felsen

1974-01-01

179

Good Laboratory Practices for Molecular Genetic Testing for Heritable Diseases and Conditions. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 58, No. RR-6, June 12, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized as waived (from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived based on the complexity of the tests; tests of moderate and high complexity are n...

2009-01-01

180

Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

1991-12-01

181

Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

Wiebe, M. L.

1971-01-01

182

Complex regional pain syndrome  

PubMed Central

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature.

Sebastin, Sandeep J

2011-01-01

183

Complex trauma.  

PubMed

Complex trauma refers to traumatic events that are chronic, interpersonal, and occur within the context of caregiving relationships; the term also describes the pattern of symptoms associated with such experiences. This article explores the prevalence, causes, and phenomenology of complex trauma in children and adolescents. The investigators also describe family-related and system-related issues, assessment strategies, diagnostic challenges, and clinical intervention options. PMID:24656584

Kliethermes, Matthew; Schacht, Megan; Drewry, Kate

2014-04-01

184

Laboratory investigations of impact-generated plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics of plasma that was produced in laboratory by hypervelocity impacts were investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of generation of magnetic fields by meteoritic impacts and to explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields on the lunar surface. The impact-generated magnetic fields were found to exhibit spatial and temporal complexity that depended on the impact angle, the velocity, and the projectile/target composition. The results suggest that crater-related paleomagnetism associated with this mechanism should exhibit similar complexity with spatial wavelengths on the order of a fraction of the crater radius.

Crawford, David A.; Schultz, Peter H.

1991-01-01

185

Exploration Laboratory Analysis - ARC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL). The SMEMCL provided diagnosis and treatment for the evidence-based medical conditions and hence, a basis for developing ELA functional requirements.

Krihak, Michael K.; Fung, Paul P.

2012-01-01

186

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11

187

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Renewable Energy Lab is the U.S. Department of Energy's premier laboratory for renewable energy research and development and a leading laboratory for energy efficiency research and development. The web site provides access to a large array of information that targets many different audiences. There are educational links and classroom activities and projects suited for audiences from primary education through college-level. Other features include information about different forms of energy, databases on renewable energy production, an extensive photo gallery, and information on current research and applications in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

2002-04-01

188

Lunar receiving laboratory.  

PubMed

The Lunar Receiving Laboratory will be the permanent depository of a portion of the collection of lunar samples; it will safeguard the collection, providing continuing security and ensuring scientific integrity. In carrying out the time-dependent experiments and continuing functions of the laboratory, NASA will rely on visiting expert scientists supplementing a relatively small resident staff; outside scientists will be relied upon for most investigations and detailed analyses of samples. It is believed that the designed procedures and facilities provided will ensure the maximum scientific return from the Apollo Program in the way of information from lunar samples. PMID:17737398

McLane, J C; King, E A; Flory, D A; Richardson, K A; Dawson, J P; Kemmerer, W W; Wooley, B C

1967-02-01

189

UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of California at Berkeley Seismological Laboratory home page provides access to the many programs, products and activities of the Laboratory. Earthquake monitoring activities include maps of recent events, weekly seismicity maps and current seismograms. Users may attempt to make their own seismogram, report an earthquake or watch movies of earthquake events. Descriptions of the seismic networks in California and their seismic datasets as well as earthquake preparedness information are also available. A list of seismology-related resources for teachers is provided with descriptions and links to each resource.

190

Job Listings - Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Los Alamos National Laboratory is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. In addition to supporting the Lab's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines.

191

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

Histotechnology and Pathology Resources - Current Turnaround Times H&E slide preparation: 25 days Immunohistochemistry: 11 days Pathology Slide Evaluation: 30 days Turnaround times are approximate and may be influenced by the complexity of the project.     

192

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

193

Laboratory investigation of hypercoagulability.  

PubMed

For many years, the laboratory investigation of patients with thrombophilia has lagged behind that of patients with bleeding diathesis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control and regulate coagulation, and the resultant recognition of new defects, have greatly stimulated clinical laboratory interest in this area. Assays to detect resistance to activated protein C; deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S; and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies are widely available and should form part of the investigation of patients that present with idiopathic thrombosis. Such a work-up will likely provide an explanation for thrombosis in 40 to 60% of patients. Abnormalities of fibrinogen and fibrinolysis may explain still more, although such defects are currently considered rare. In addition, presently unrecognized defects almost certainly exist, and the identification of such individuals will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the hemostatic mechanism. Laboratory tests to define the hypercoagulable state are continually being developed. They include whole blood coagulation and platelet function tests and novel activation markers. However, acceptance of these approaches by clinical laboratories has been slow. PMID:9579632

Francis, J L

1998-01-01

194

Sandia Laboratories energy programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is provided of energy programs being conducted in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. About 75 percent of the resources of this laboratory are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those

C. D. Lundergan; P. L. Meady; R. S. Gillespie

1977-01-01

195

Regional Educational Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains progress reports on some of the ongoing activities of the Regional Educational Laboratories, whose primary objective is to create and demonstrate a variety of tested alternatives to existing educational practice. In each instance the address and region served are given, together with information on the governing board and…

Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.

196

PUBLICATIONS; GULF BREEZE LABORATORY  

EPA Science Inventory

The bibliography, inclusive from 1967 through 1978, lists all publications authored by researchers employed by the Environmental Research Laboratory, Gulf Breeze, and its field station on St. Johns Island, SC, or by researchers conducting studies under funding or direction of the...

197

Caltech Micromachining Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Entirely different and exotic machining techniques are required for creating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other extremely small devices. The Caltech Micromachining Laboratory maintains this archive of research highlights and papers on its homepage, including a paper on a MEMS-driven flapping wing for a palm-sized aerial vehicle.

1969-12-31

198

Instrumental Analysis Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

designed for automating the collection and assessment of laboratory exercises is presented. This Web-based system has been extensively used in engineering courses such as control systems, mechanics, and computer programming. Goodle GMS allows the students to submit their results to a…

Munoz de la Pena, Arsenio; Gonzalez-Gomez, David; Munoz de la Pena, David; Gomez-Estern, Fabio; Sequedo, Manuel Sanchez

2013-01-01

199

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

200

RUNNING A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY AT THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF TRUJILLO AS IT IS USED IN THE FIVE-YEAR ENGLISH TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM. THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF THIS COURSE ARE INTENSIVE, BASED ON A STUDY OF ENGLISH USING LADO-FRIES MATERIALS (FOR LATIN AMERICAN LEARNERS) WHICH REQUIRE FIVE HOURS OF CLASSWORK A WEEK SUPPLEMENTED BY…

REES, ALUN L.W.

201

Writing the Laboratory Notebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this book is to teach the principles of proper scientific notekeeping. The principles presented in this book are goals for which working scientists must strive. Chapter 1, "The Reasons for Notekeeping," is an overview of the process of keeping a laboratory notebook. Chapter 2, "The Hardware of Notekeeping," is intended especially…

Kanare, Howard M.

202

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

2013-05-28

203

Laboratory analysis of stardust.  

PubMed

Tiny dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites are identified to have originated in the atmospheres of stars on the basis of their anomalous isotopic compositions. Although isotopic analysis with the ion microprobe plays a major role in the laboratory analysis of these stardust grains, many other microanalytical techniques are applied to extract the maximum amount of information. PMID:23231704

Zinner, Ernst

2013-02-01

204

Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

Grisaffe, S. J.

1985-01-01

205

The Laboratory Notebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides well-organized instructions for keeping a laboratory notebook. In addition to the providing an overview of general rules and organization, the site also discusses organization of conclusions around three central types of outlines for measurement experiments, synthesis experiments and reporting of physical phenomena.

2010-06-25

206

Perifosine Laboratory Information  

Cancer.gov

CONFIDENTIAL KRX 401 Technical Data Perifosine (NSC 639966 ) Laboratory Information Information on Clinical Conditions1 Topic Conditions Comments References Stock solution Solutions of 0.1-30 µM perifosine were diluted with 100 mM PBS Stable enough

207

Idaho National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In operation since 1949, INL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's missions in ensuring the nation's energy security with safe, competitive, and sustainable energy systems and unique national and homeland security capabilities.

208

Introducing Laboratory Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a simple, 10-item quiz designed to make students aware that they must learn laboratory safety. The items include questions on acid/base accidents, several types of fire extinguishers, and safety glassses. Answers and some explanations are included. (DH)

DeLorenzo, Ronald

1985-01-01

209

Telecommunications network management laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work discusses network management laboratory design and implementation at the University of Wollongong in the School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering in years of 2002 and 2003 for a final year specialisation subject called telecommunication network management for telecommunications engineering students. The design and implementation included that of a network management GUI incorporating the fundamental aspects and functionality

I. Raad; P. Vial

2004-01-01

210

Intelligent Fuzzy Controllers Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Intelligent Fuzzy Controllers Laboratory has been developed in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Western Michigan University with the help of a DURIP grant by the Department of Defense (6) and generous donations by ABB Automation Technology Products. This new lab is to support research, the development of advanced courses, and graduate projects in the area of

Janos L Grantner; Ramakrishna Gottipati; George A Fodor

2004-01-01

211

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

212

Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

Thiel, Sandra J.

213

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fermilab is a national science laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy and the home of the Tevatron, the world's second-largest particle accelerator. Through this portal, users can learn about Fermilab's experiments, research, projects, and publications. The lab also sponsors an extensive outreach program for K-20 educators and learners, much of which may be accessed online.

Laboratory, Fermi N.

2003-10-10

214

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

SciTech Connect

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

2011-01-01

215

Safety in Laboratories: Indian Scenario  

PubMed Central

Health and safety in clinical laboratories is becoming an increasingly important subject as a result of emergence of highly infectious diseases such as Hepatitis and HIV. A cross sectional study was carried out to study the safety measures being adopted in clinical laboratories of India. Heads of laboratories of teaching hospitals of India were subjected to a standardized, pretested questionnaire. Response rate was 44.8%. only 60% of laboratories had person in-charge of safety in laboratory. Seventy three percent of laboratories had safety education program regarding hazards. In 91% of laboratories staff is using protective clothing while working in laboratories. Hazardous material regulations are followed in 78% of laboratories. Regular health check ups are carried among laboratory staff in 43.4% of laboratories. Safety manual is available in 56.5% of laboratories. 73.9% of laboratories are equipped with fire extinguishers. Fume cupboards are provided in 34.7% of laboratories and they are regularly checked in 87.5% of these laboratories. In 78.26% of laboratories suitable measures are taken to minimize formation of aerosols. In 95.6% of laboratories waste is disposed off as per bio-medical waste management handling rules. Laboratory of one private medical college was accredited with NABL and safety parameters were better in that laboratory. Installing safety engineered devices apparently contributes to significant decrease in injuries in laboratories; laboratory safety has to be a part of overall quality assurance programme in hospitals. Accreditation has to be made necessary for all laboratories.

Mustafa, Ajaz; Farooq, A. Jan; Qadri, GJ; S. A., Tabish

2008-01-01

216

Revitalizing chemistry laboratory instruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation involves research in three major domains of chemical education as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. program in chemistry at Miami University with a major emphasis on chemical education, and concurrent study in organic chemistry. Unit I, Development and Assessment of a Column Chromatography Laboratory Activity, addresses the domain of Instructional Materials Development and Testing. This unit outlines the process of developing a publishable laboratory activity, testing and revising that activity, and subsequently sharing that activity with the chemical education community. A laboratory activity focusing on the separation of methylene blue and sodium fluorescein was developed to demonstrate the effects of both the stationary and mobile phase in conducting a separation. Unit II, Bringing Industry to the Laboratory, addresses the domain of Curriculum Development and Testing. This unit outlines the development of the Chemistry of Copper Mining module, which is intended for use in high school or undergraduate college chemistry. The module uses the learning cycle approach to present the chemistry of the industrial processes of mining copper to the students. The module includes thirteen investigations (three of which are web-based and ten which are laboratory experiments) and an accompanying interactive CD-ROM, which provides an explanation of the chemistry used in copper mining with a virtual tour of an operational copper mine. Unit III, An Alternative Method of Teaching Chemistry. Integrating Lecture and the Laboratory, is a project that addresses the domain of Research in Student Learning. Fundamental Chemistry was taught at Eastern Arizona College as an integrated lecture/laboratory course that met in two-hour blocks on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The students taking this integrated course were compared with students taking the traditional 1-hour lectures held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with accompanying 3-hour lab on Tuesday or Thursday. There were 119 students in the test group, 522 students in the Shelton control group and 556 students in the McBride control group. Both qualitative data and quantitative data were collected. A t-test was used to test significance.

McBride, Phil Blake

217

Complex Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This book explores the exciting new field of complexity. It features in-depth coverage of important theoretical areas, including fractals, chaos, nonlinear dynamics, artificial life, and self organization. It also provides overviews of complexity in several applied areas, including parallel computation, control systems, neural systems, and ecosystems. Contributors examine some of the properties that best characterize complex systems, including algorithmic richness, nonlinearity, and abundant interactions between components. In this way the book draws themes, especially the ideas of connectivity and natural computation, that reveal deep, underlying similarities among phenomena that have formerly been treated as completely distinct. Researchers in a wide array of fields, including ecology, neuroscience, computer science, and mathematics, will find this volume to be a fascinating collection of ideas.

Bossomaier, Terry R. J.; Green, David G.

2000-07-01

218

Complex chimerism  

PubMed Central

Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant.

Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

2013-01-01

219

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25

220

Analysis and simulation of complex power systems  

SciTech Connect

The design and optimization of complex power systems is complicated by the numerous possible interactions between the system`s components and the difficulty of determining the optimal set of system parameters to satisfy design requirements. The problem is compounded for dynamic systems, whose interactions constantly change with time. Argonne National Laboratory is analyzing and simulating complex power systems to facilitate the design process.

Ewing, T.F.

1995-03-01

221

Guidelines for EMC laboratory accreditation  

Microsoft Academic Search

NABL (National Accreditation Board for Test and Calibration Laboratories) has already issued NABL-101 Acceptance criteria for accrediting test laboratories. This is based on International Standard ISO\\/IEC Guide 25. Further there are separate guidelines issued for specialised areas like biological and radiological laboratories. However, the EMC laboratory is being assessed along with any other test parameter which is being accredited. The

A. Sathyanaryanan; U. K. Nandwani

1999-01-01

222

ChemPages Laboratory Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

223

Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

224

Researching Complexity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

Sumara, Dennis J.

2000-01-01

225

Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

1998-01-01

226

Treatment of 1,10-phenanthroline laboratory wastewater using the solar photo-Fenton process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The red Fe2+–phenanthroline complex is the basis of a classical spectrophotometric method for determination of iron. Due to the toxicity of this complexing agent, direct disposal of the wastewaters generated in analytical laboratories is not environmentally safe. This work evaluates the use of the solar photo-Fenton process for the treatment of laboratory wastewaters containing phenanthroline. Firstly, the degradation of phenanthroline

Milady Renata Apolinário da Silva; Alam Gustavo Trovó; Raquel Fernandes Pupo Nogueira

2007-01-01

227

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

228

WINCS Laboratory Performance Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Winds-Ions-Neutral Composition Suite (WINCS) instrument was designed and developed jointly by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for ionosphere-thermosphere investigations in orbit between 120 and 550 km altitude. The WINCS design provides the following measurements in a single package with a low Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP): 7.6 x 7.6 x 7.1 cm outer dimensions, 0.75 kg total mass, and about 1.3 Watt total power: neutral winds, neutral temperature, neutral density, neutral composition, ion drifts, ion temperature, ion density and ion composition. Initial laboratory performance and calibration results will be presented on the WINCS sensor.

Nicholas, A. C.; Herrero, F.; Finne, T. T.; Jones, H. H.; Roman, P.; Bichell, J.; Wincs Sensor Team

2011-12-01

229

Local laboratory ventilation devices  

SciTech Connect

This article is a discussion of the ``other`` laboratory ventilation devices described in OSHA`s laboratory standard that could be used in lieu of traditional chemical fume hoods. The reference ``local`` or ``other`` ventilation device is used with little or no information provided as to the type, design, or performance criteria appropriate for specific applications, as was done in excruciating detail for their fume hood cousins. Equally curious is the fact that no performance test criteria were established for this category of equipment. Therefore, great care must be taken by the designer to determine the specific application intended for each unit specified and confirm that its use is appropriate for the task. In light of these standards, manufacturers have responded with many new and innovative products.

Koenigsberg, J. [GPR Planners Collaborative, White Plains, NY (United States)

1995-10-01

230

Quaternary GIS Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

231

TARDEC's robotics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) recently opened a 5000 square foot robotics laboratory known as the TARDEC Robotics Laboratory. The focus of the lab is on robotics research, both basic and applied, in the area of robot mobility. Mobility is the key problem for light weight robotic systems, and the TARDEC Robotics Lab will develop innovative ways to deal with the mobility issues. The lab will also test and evaluate robotic systems in all aspects of mobility and control. The lab has the highest concentration of senior researchers at TARDEC, and is committed to maintaining in- house research talent so that new combat concepts using robots can be evaluated effectively by the Army. This paper serves as an introduction to the lab, its missions, goals, capabilities and programs.

Gorsich, David J.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Muench, Paul L.

2001-09-01

232

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site depicts the work of the University of Oxford's Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory in the experimental and theoretical aspects of catalytic systems, bioinorganic, co-ordination, organometallic, structural, surface, and solid state chemistry. The site provides a brief summary of the early professors of the department including Oddling who formulated the periodic table, and two noble prize winners, Soddy and Hinshelwood. Students and educators can discover the exciting research endeavors taken on by the twenty academic staff and over one hundred postdoctoral workers, graduate students, Part II chemists, and other academic visitors. The site also describes the instrumentation used at the laboratory including NMR, CMX, and CI/FI spectrometers and various diffractometers.

233

Quaternary GIS Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

2007-02-27

234

Aerospace Robotics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL), operated at Stanford University, focuses its research "on improving robotic performance through the application of feedback control, integrated sensing systems, and task-level autonomy." The systems designed at ARL allow the human operator to have varying levels of control over the robot. Specifically, the robot performs given tasks until it reaches a point that it can not perform on its own. The human can then intervene and direct the robot manually. A comprehensive list of all ARL publications is available on the Web site, ranging from the 1960's to 2002 (many of the publications after 1990 are available for download). There are even movies of laboratory experiments and demonstrations that can be downloaded and viewed. The Projects section explains the various research projects currently underway.

2000-01-01

235

Cleanroom laboratory challenge overcome.  

PubMed

Ronan Quinn, managing director of interior construction specialist Ardmac, describes the challenges of building and fitting out a new cleanroom laboratory for blood and bone marrow therapeutic treatment at Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin in Dublin. The "state-of-the-art" facility, which fully complies with the recent EU Directive concerning human tissues and cells, has been well received by the client and end-users alike, but, as he explains, there were many obstacles to overcome during its completion. PMID:21058627

Quinn, Ronan

2010-10-01

236

Pygmalion in the laboratory.  

PubMed

Testers and bystanders can inadvertently lead subjects to answers in laboratories and in classrooms, in face-to-face tests of human beings and other animals. Many modern investigators avoid leading by using blind tests scrupulously. This article shows how to design blind tests and illustrates common methodological errors that allow leading to confound experimental results. The object is to help experimenters, editors, and readers detect and avoid a common experimental error that often has profound theoretical implications. PMID:22324284

Gardner, R Allen; Scheel, Matthew H; Shaw, Heidi L

2011-01-01

237

Virtual Laboratory: Potential Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page provides an introduction to mechanical energy, focusing on gravity. It includes a java simulation of a dropped ball showing the conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. Non-elastic collisions with the ground are included, although there is no discussion of the resultant lost energy. Users can change the mass, initial energy, and percentage of the energy lost during collisions. This item is part of a larger collection of virtual laboratories for physics, astronomy, and environmental science.

Bothun, Gregory

2007-12-03

238

Naval Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Washington, D.C., the NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps and conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development. Site provides insight into the many accomplishments and on-going research of the lab. Learn about how GPS began and advances in meteorology and radar applications. Information includes the history of the lab, a visitor's guide, and more.

239

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System". This web-based system enables investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of this process, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work. Click on the link from this page or any of the pages within this site to be directed to the request system.

240

Sedimentary System Laboratory Photomicrographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains numerous images of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including images photographed at the Laboratory of Sedimentary System at the Seoul National University and photographs from textbooks. Original photographs include photomicrographs of both clastic and carbonate rocks along with back-scattered electron images and photographs of sedimentary rocks and structures in outcrops. Photographs from texts include terrigenous clastic rocks, carbonate rocks and sedimentary structures.

Ii, Yong L.

241

Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

1973-01-01

242

Assessing Undergraduate Laboratory Performance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lab notebook is one element for assessing student laboratory performance. However, it is also important to be able to communicate research results in a journal article format and a visual poster format. Another key aspect to scientific research is the ability to present a research plan. This article describes four assessment tools that can be used in conjunction with undergraduate lab courses that provide the opportunity for the students to practice each of these essential communication skills.

Elizabeth Adler (AAAS;); Nancy Gough (AAAS;)

2006-09-05

243

SECOND FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627) WARM LABORATORY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

SECOND FLOOR PLAN OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) WARM LABORATORY ROOM, DECONTAMINATION ROOM, HOT CHEMISTRY LABORATORY, AND MULTICURIE CELL ROOM. INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0627-00-098-105066. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 4272-14-103. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

244

Smart Grid Integration Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

Wade Troxell

2011-09-30

245

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer simulations performed on NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program supercomputers at Livermore. ASC Purple and BlueGene/L, the world's fastest computer, together provide nearly a half petaflop (500 trillion operations per second) of computer power for use by the three NNSA national laboratories. Livermore-led teams were awarded the Gordon Bell Prize for Peak Performance in both 2005 and 2006. The winning simulations, run on BlueGene/L, investigated the properties of materials at the length and time scales of atomic interactions. The computing power that makes possible such detailed simulations provides unprecedented opportunities for scientific discovery. Laboratory scientists are meeting the extraordinary challenge of creating experimental capabilities to match the resolution of supercomputer simulations. Working with a wide range of collaborators, we are developing experimental tools that gather better data at the nanometer and subnanosecond scales. Applications range from imaging biomolecules to studying matter at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. The premier high-energy-density experimental physics facility in the world will be the National Ignition Facility (NIF) when construction is completed in 2009. We are leading the national effort to perform the first fusion ignition experiments using NIF's 192-beam laser and prepare to explore some of the remaining important issues in weapons physics. With scientific colleagues from throughout the nation, we are also designing revolutionary experiments on NIF to advance the fields of astrophysics, planetary physics, and materials science. Mission-directed, multidisciplinary science and technology at Livermore is also focused on reducing the threat posed by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction as well as their acquisition and use by terrorists. The Laboratory helps this important national effort by providing its unique expertise, integration analyses, and operational support to the Department of Homeland Security. For this vital facet of the Laboratory's national security mission, we are developing advanced technologies, such as

Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

2007-05-24

246

Complex Systems  

PubMed Central

Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease.

Goldberger, Ary L.

2006-01-01

247

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28

248

Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

Not Available

2011-10-01

249

Laboratory Limits on Neutrino Masses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent neutrino oscillation experiments have obtained nonzero differences of squared neutrino masses and therefore proven that neutrinos are massive particles. The values of the neutrino masses have to be determined in a different way. There are two classes of laboratory experiments, both of which have yielded up to now only upper limits on neutrino masses. The direct mass experiments investigate the kinematics of weak decays, obtaining information about the neutrino mass without further requirements. Here, the tritium ? decay experiments give the most stringent results. The search for neutrinoless double ? decay is also very sensitive to the neutrino mass states. However, this search is complementary to direct neutrino mass experiments, since it requires neutrinos to be identical to their antiparticles and probes a linear combination of neutrino masses including complex phases. This chapter is structured as follows. After an introduction in Sect. 2.1, the two approaches are discussed together with the current experimental results in Sects. 2.2 and 2.3, followed by consideration of the outlook for future activities in Sect. 2.4.

Weinheimer, Christian

250

Lunar Receiving Laboratory Project History  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As early as 1959, the Working Group on Lunar Exploration within NASA advocated that 'one of the prime objectives of the first lunar landing mission should be the collection of samples for return to Earth, where they could be subjected to detailed study and analysis.' Within NASA, neither this group nor any other scientists working with the Agency were concerned about back contamination issues. Outside of NASA, back contamination concerns had been raised as early as 1960. Although NASA did not seem to pay any attention to the concerns at that time, the scientific community continued to be interested in the topic. In 1962 and again in 1963, as the Apollo Program loomed large, further discussions were held. These early discussions of back contamination did not make their way into NASA's administration, however, and when Manned Spacecraft Center personnel began to articulate early concepts for the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL), the back contamination issue was not considered. Once this concern became a major focus, however, the LRL's development became increasingly complex. This is the history of that development.

Mangus, Susan; Larsen, William

2004-01-01

251

The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

252

Mercenaria Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Invertebrate Anatomy Online exercise, featuring the hard-shell clam Mercenaria mercenaria (quahog), is part of an Internet laboratory manual for courses in Invertebrate Zoology. This exercise features an introduction to Mollusca and a step-by-step dissection guide, including hand-drawn figures, defined terms, and detailed explanations of form and function. Students will learn about the external anatomy (shell), muscles, mantle skirts, mantle cavity, mantle folds, siphons, gills, labial palps, hemal system, exhalant chamber, excretory system, digestive system, nervous system, and reproductive system.

Fox, Richard; Online, Invertebrate A.

253

Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

Jackson, Dionne

2005-01-01

254

Novae as Thermonuclear Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fred Hoyle undertook a study of observational consequences of the thermonuclear paradigm for the nova event in the years following his 1972 resignation from Cambridge University. The most fruitful of these have been in the areas of gamma-ray astronomy, by which one attempts to measure the level of radioactivity in the nova envelope, and of presolar grain studies in laboratories, by which one measures anomalous isotopic ratios that fingerprint condensation in the thermonuclear event. This work summarizes progress with these two astronomical measures of the novae.

Clayton, D. D.

2003-07-01

255

MIT Space Systems Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1995 to engage in "cutting edge research projects with the goal of directly contributing to the present and future exploration and development of space." Users can find materials on current and past flight projects such as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) and the Interferometry Program Experiment (IPEX). The website also features SSL's ground programs and research facilities. Researchers can view lists of published papers and can download student theses.

256

Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

1972-01-01

257

NTNU Virtual Physics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This repository of Java applets, created to demonstrate principles of physics, is provided by physicist Fu-Kwun Hwang of the National Taiwan Normal University. 40 applets are available at this time in the fields of mechanics, dynamics, waves, thermodynamics, electromagnetic field and optics. Although the applets are accompanied by sparse explanatory information, the Virtual Physics Laboratory still would be an excellent supplement to a basic physics class. Note that connection speed to the Taiwanese site is fairly slow and that ten international mirror sites are provided.

Hwang, Fu-Kwun.

2007-05-01

258

Gait Analysis Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

1976-01-01

259

Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

2001-01-01

260

A Useful Laboratory Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently, a high school Science Club generated a large number of questions involving temperature. Therefore, they decided to construct a thermal gradient apparatus in order to conduct a wide range of experiments beyond the standard "cookbook" labs. They felt that this apparatus could be especially useful in future ninth-grade biology classes, in which students must design and conduct individual, inquiry-based experiments as part of their training in scientific methodology. This article describes their experience building and testing a thermal gradient for laboratory use.

Johnson, Samuel A.; Tutt, Tye

2008-10-01

261

[Accreditation of forensic laboratories].  

PubMed

According to the framework decision of the European Union Council, genetic laboratories which perform tests for the benefit of the law enforcement agencies and the administration of justice are required to obtain a certificate of accreditation testifying to compliance with the PN EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard. The certificate is the official confirmation of the competence to perform research, an acknowledgement of credibility, impartiality and professional independence. It is also the proof of establishment, implementation and maintenance of an appropriate management system. The article presents the legal basis for accreditation, the procedure of obtaining the certificate of accreditation and selected elements of the management system. PMID:21863740

So?tyszewski, Ireneusz

2010-01-01

262

Laboratory Measurements of Subsynchronous Resonance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A selection of results obtained from a laboratory system specially designed to investigate subsynchronous resonance are presented. This laboratory system was designed to model as closely as possible the nuclear powered turbo-generators to be installed at ...

D. J. N. Limebeer R. G. Harley M. A. Lahoud H. L. Nattrass

1980-01-01

263

The Laboratory in Professional Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of laboratory experience in professional education is discussed. Although laboratory experiments are often expensive and demanding on faculty time, they can offer a unique experience to the veterinary medicine student. (BH)

Kaplan, Harold N.

1979-01-01

264

Nanophotonics at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is leveraging the extensive CMOS, MEMS, compound semiconductor, and nanotechnology fabrication and test resources at Sandia National Laboratories to explore new science and technology in photonic crystals, plasmonics, metamaterials, and silicon photonics.

McCormick, Frederick Bossert

2008-10-01

265

Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Scholar Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Management and Technical Report describing Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Scholar Program at the Geophysics Directorate. Forty-two (42) Phillips Laboratory Scholars have been active in the exploratory and advanced development for one (1) year research per...

W. D. Peele E. L. Steele

1993-01-01

266

CG 16 - Laboratory Casework Checklist  

Cancer.gov

Checklist for Laboratory Casework Any program utilizing the Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. procurement system for laboratory casework must adhere to this process. 1) Check off the casework piece(s) to be purchased 2) Send checklist to Purchasing with

267

Laboratory Characterization of Adobe (Scottsdale).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Personnel of the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, Mississippi, conducted a laboratory investigation to characterize the strength and constitutive property behavior of an adobe from Scot...

H. B. Beatty P. A. Reed R. E. Moxley S. A. Akers S. S. Graham

2012-01-01

268

DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)  

Cancer.gov

As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

269

EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

270

Phillips Laboratory Scholar Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USAF Phillips Laboratory Scholar Program provided research opportunities for qualified doctorate-level engineers and scientists to work in the laboratory either at Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., or at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M. Twenty-seven scholars participated during the period of the contract, including four during the period 1 July 1997-28 May 1998. Dr. Sean Carey used UV extinction data to investigate the properties of interstellar dust grains and used data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) to investigate the structure of infrared-dark clouds. Dr. Brian Kane used data from the Five Colleges Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to investigate the structure and kinematics of Bok globules, which are small, isolated, star-forming clouds in our galaxy. Dr. Anthony Midey measured rate constants for ion-molecule reactions, using a high-temperature flowing afterglow (HTFA) apparatus. Dr. Susan Triantafillou adapted the lattice Boltzmann (LB) computational method to the prediction of atmospheric phenomena, including cloud development and turbulent eddies. Results of these research efforts are described in the individual contributions of the Scholars to this final report.

Peele, Janette D.

1998-05-01

271

Microgravity Emissions Laboratory Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL) was developed for the support, simulation, and verification of the International Space Station microgravity environment. The MEL utilizes an inertial measurement system using acceleration emissions generated by various operating components of the space station. These emissions, if too large, could hinder the science performed on the space station by disturbing the microgravity environment. Typical test components are disk drives, pumps, motors, solenoids, fans, and cameras. These components will produce inertial forces, which disturb the microgravity on-orbit station environment. These components, usually housed within a station rack, must meet acceleration limits imposed at the rack interface for minimizing the onboard station-operating environment. The NASA Glenn Research Center developed this one-of-a-kind laboratory for testing components and, eventually, rack-level configurations. The MEL approach is to measure the component's generated inertial forces. This force is a product of the full diagonal mass matrix including the test setup (the center of gravity, mass moment of inertia, and weight) and the resolved diagonal rigid-body acceleration determined from measurements using the 10 apparatus accelerometers. The mass matrix can be test derived. The bifilar torsional pendulum method is used to measure the moment of inertia for the test component.

Goodnight, Thomas W.; McNelis, Anne M.

2001-01-01

272

Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

1993-09-01

273

Laboratory Diagnostics of Botulism  

PubMed Central

Botulism is a potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin. Human pathogenic neurotoxins of types A, B, E, and F are produced by a diverse group of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, including Clostridium botulinum groups I and II, Clostridium butyricum, and Clostridium baratii. The routine laboratory diagnostics of botulism is based on the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in the patient. Detection of toxin-producing clostridia in the patient and/or the vehicle confirms the diagnosis. The neurotoxin detection is based on the mouse lethality assay. Sensitive and rapid in vitro assays have been developed, but they have not yet been appropriately validated on clinical and food matrices. Culture methods for C. botulinum are poorly developed, and efficient isolation and identification tools are lacking. Molecular techniques targeted to the neurotoxin genes are ideal for the detection and identification of C. botulinum, but they do not detect biologically active neurotoxin and should not be used alone. Apart from rapid diagnosis, the laboratory diagnostics of botulism should aim at increasing our understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of the disease. Therefore, the toxin-producing organisms should be routinely isolated from the patient and the vehicle. The physiological group and genetic traits of the isolates should be determined.

Lindstrom, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

2006-01-01

274

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01

275

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

ScienceCinema

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28

276

Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2007-01-01

277

The Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thirty years have passed since, thanks to Antonino Zichichi, the project for the largest underground laboratory in the world was conceived and brought to the attention of Italian authorities. The Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN have become a scientific reality of worldwide pre-eminence, in an expanding area of research where elementary particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology overlap. I briefly present here the main scientific challenges of underground laboratories and the activity and future perspectives of the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratory.

Coccia, Eugenio

2012-12-01

278

Frederick National Laboratory Visiting Scholar Opportunity: Optical Microscopy and Analysis Laboratory  

Cancer.gov

AIPSmall Animal Imaging ProgramThe Small Animal Imaging Program (SAIP), a program within the Laboratory Animal Sciences Program Directorate (LASP), FNLCR, SAIC-Frederick, provides in vivo imaging techniques to assist researchers in investigating intact complex biological systems; characterizing mouse models and molecular imaging probes for early detection and therapy; imaging disease-related biomarkers and pathways; monitoring tumors in vivo; and serial imaging for preclinical drug efficacy studies.

279

Interdisciplinary Interactions in Underground Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of underground facilities, ranging from simple cavities to fully equipped laboratories, have been established worldwide (1) to evaluate the impacts of emplacing nuclear wastes in underground research laboratories (URLs) and (2) to measure rare physics events in deep underground laboratories (DULs). In this presentation, we compare similarities and differences between URLs and DULs in focus of site characterization, in

J. S. Wang; A. Bettini

2010-01-01

280

Laboratory Materials: Affordances or Constraints?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory instruction is critical to the understanding of biology and is a central piece of biological sciences instruction. Although much investigation has focused on the content of biology laboratory exercises, we contend that understanding the extent to which the laboratory materials can aid or limit experimental investigation is of equal…

Jordan, Rebecca C.; Ruibal-Villasenor, Maria; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Etkina, Eugenia

2011-01-01

281

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that started with a view toward the potential threat of terrorist use of biological weapons. As featured in our annual report, activities in this area have grown to many important projects contributing to homeland security and disease prevention and control. At times transformation happens in large steps. Such was the case when nuclear testing stopped in the early 1990s. As one of the nation's nuclear weapon design laboratories, Livermore embarked on the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The objectives are to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile and to develop a science-based, thorough understanding of the performance of nuclear weapons. The ultimate goal is to sustain confidence in an aging stockpile without nuclear testing. Now is another time of major change for the Laboratory as the nation is resizing its nuclear deterrent and NNSA begins taking steps to transform the nuclear weapons complex to meet 21st-century national security needs. As you will notice in the opening commentary to each section of this report, the Laboratory's senior management team is a mixture of new and familiar faces. LLNS drew the best talent from its parent organizations--Bechtel National, UC, Babcock & Wilcox, the Washington Group Division of URS, and Battelle--to lead the Laboratory. We are honored to take on the responsibility and see a future with great opportunities for Livermore to apply its exceptional science and technology to important national problems. We will work with NNSA to build on the successful Stockpile Stewardship Program and transform the nation's nuclear weapons complex to become smaller, safer, more secure, and more cost effective. Our annual report highlights progress in many relevant areas. Laboratory scientists are using astonishing computational capabilities--including BlueGene/L, the world's fastest supercomputer with a revolutionary architecture and over 200,000 processors--to gain key insights about performance of aging nuclear weapons. What we learn will help us sustain the stockpile without nuclear testing. Preparations are underway to start experiments at

Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

2008-04-25

282

Environmental enrichment for primates in laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental enrichment is a critical component of Refinement, one of the 3Rs underlying humane experimentation on animals. In this paper I discuss why primates housed in laboratories, which often have constraints of space and study protocols, are a special case for enrichment. I outline a framework for categorising the different types of enrichment, using the marmoset as a case study, and summarise the methods used to determine what animals want/prefer. I briefly review the arguments that enrichment does not negatively affect experimental outcomes. Finally I focus on complexity and novelty, choice and control, the underlying features of enrichment that makes it successful, and how combined with a thorough understanding of natural history we can put effective enrichment into practice in laboratories. Throughout the paper I emphasise the need to evaluate enrichment to ensure it is having the desired effect.

Buchanan-Smith, H. M.

2010-06-01

283

Laboratory chemical hoods: a historical perspective.  

PubMed

A historical review of laboratory fume hoods leads to a consideration of the current status of structural design, operating characteristics (with special reference to face velocity), safety (relative to standardized test results), energy conservation, and certification methods. Noteworthy are (1) the increasing complexity of instrumentation designed to assure full safety function plus airflow modulation to minimize energy consumption; (2) the extreme plasticity of accepted and recommended face velocity values; (3) the insensitivity of standardized hood test protocols to variations in face velocity; and (4) a serious lack of correlation between operator risk, face velocity, and standard hood test results. Safety considerations lead to the selection of laboratory fume hoods having the highest demonstrated containment capability. This is in spite of the fact that most hood operations have a low hazard rating. Energy savings could be realized if the face velocity of each hood could be modulated to match the risk associated with the work being conducted. PMID:12688850

First, Melvin W

2003-01-01

284

Structural Determination Of Titan Aerosol Laboratory Simulants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using 1H, 13C and 15N multidimensional NMR we have investigated laboratory plasma tholins and EUV generated photochemical solids for common structural motifs. These common structures largely determine the potential chemistry of these materials. As stimulants for Titan organic haze aerosols, these studies yield valuable information regarding the complex organic solids which reside on Titan's surface and potentially reacted with periodic liquid phase aqueous materials. Such information is necessary for intelligent design of future surface mission analytical instrumentation and also provides insights into the prebiotic potential on Titan. The results will be discussed in the context of our earlier work regarding the production of haze aerosols under ionospheric simulations at the Advanced Light Source as well as hydrolytic kinetic studies of laboratory tholins. This work was supported by NASA Exobiology award #NNX08AO13G and NASA Astrobiology Initiative through JPL subcontract 1372177 to the University of Arizona.

Smith, Mark A.; Upton, K.; Liu, G.; Imanaka, H.

2010-10-01

285

Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers  

SciTech Connect

The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

1994-12-01

286

Evoked potential measurement and analysis on a small laboratory computer.  

PubMed

A program is described for the collection and subsequent analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials using a LINC-8 computer. The program allows simple evoked-potentials analysis in centers where a small laboratory computer may be available but sophisticated instrumentation such as a computer of average transients is not available. This program provides an efficient method of easily obtaining information concerning the conduction pathways of the nervous system as well as the cerebral function; the program can be implemented on small laboratory computers which most hospitals currently own, without the associated cost or complexity of additional hardware in the laboratory. Combining utilization of a small laboratory computer with an easily programmable method provides an approach for evoked potential analysis which is well within the financial and technical scope of most neurophysiology laboratories. PMID:755603

Cohen, B A; Myklebust, J

1978-09-01

287

Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service. This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

National Research Council (National Research Council Committee on Scientific and Humane Issues in the Use of Random Source Dogs and Cats for Research; Na)

2000-01-01

288

Oculomotor behavior and perceptual strategies in complex tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

While we know a great deal about the dynamics and characteristics of eye movements in relatively simple tasks performed under reduced laboratory conditions, we know less about oculomotor behavior in complex, multi-step tasks. Complex tasks are not necessarily difficult. Part of the transition from 'hard' to 'easy' in completing complex tasks is the gradual reduction in conscious effort required to

Jeff B. Pelz; Roxanne Canosa

2001-01-01

289

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

Okon, Avi B.

2010-01-01

290

MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

291

Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL) consists of (1) highly interactive, web-deliverable psychology experiments and demonstrations, (2) a cumulative data archive from which students can retrieve datasets for analysis, and (3) user-controlled data extraction and analysis tools designed for the diverse needs of end users. One of the goals of the collection is to offer support for student research and educators who are not adept in experimental design and data analysis. Psychology students will be able to collect data, analyze data, and report their findings for class assignments or individual projects. Because psychology is allied to many disciplines--biology, sociology, and political science among them--OPL will contribute to the set of experiments available to students who wish to study psychologically-based issues in related scientific disciplines.

2006-03-08

292

Tochilinite Produced in Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tochilinite was firstly identified in the serpentinites from Voronezh region, Russia, in 1971. Later this mineral was recognized to be a major matrix phase of the most primitive carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM) where tochilinite as a mixed-layer structure occurs among serpentine group minerals, olivine, pyroxene, pyrrhotite etc. Terrestrial tochilinite has been suggested to result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration of serpentinite. The origin of the chondritic tochilinite is still not known, partly because of failure to synthesis this mineral. As for as we know, since 1971, there was no publication about successful synthesis of tochilinite. Here we present results of the first laboratory synthesis of tochilinite as a product of interaction of Fe(II) hydroxides with H2S at 80 degrees C, and total concentration of reduced sulfur ions in solution lower than 10-4M at pH 7.8 and lower than 1M at pH 11.5.

Kozerenko, S. V.; Organova, N. J.; Fadeev, V. V.; Magazina, L. O.; Kolpakova, N. N.; Kopneva, L. A.

1996-03-01

293

Scalable Computing Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Scalable Computing Laboratory was created by the Department of Energy, Ames Lab, and Iowa State University to "improve parallel computing through clustering techniques for use in scientific and engineering computation." One of their past projects included rebuilding the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), the first electronic digital computer. Here visitors can read about building a working replica of the historical computer as well as the background of the original machine and its inventors. Visitors interested in seeing the ABC in action should click on the link "Video" on the left hand side of the homepage. There are two videos here: the first is a seven-minute demonstration of the operation of the ABC and the second an eleven-minute tutorial about the ABC. The "Photos/Diagrams" link contains over two dozen photographs of the large amount of work that went into the making of the working replica of this machine, which was originally built between 1937 and 1942.

2003-01-22

294

Chemistry Laboratory Techniques  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning to navigate the treacherous shoals of the chemistry laboratory is tricky business. Fortunately, interested parties can use this fine online course from MIT's OpenCourseWare to become more familiar with such matters. The course consists of "intensive practical training in basic chemistry lab techniques" and the site includes a host of instructional videos. The manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franze and Dr. Kevin M. Shea in collaboration with a number of their colleagues. Visitors can make their way through the syllabus, course calendar, labs, and the study materials. In the Study Materials area, visitors will find ten videos, including "Using a Balance," "Melting Point Determination," and "Thin-Layer Chromatography." Students of chemistry and educators will find this site most useful and will wish to share it widely with others.

295

An Organoleptic Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flavorings in foods and fragrances in personal care products is a topic often discussed in chemistry classes designed for the general education of non-science majors. A laboratory experiment has been designed to accompany the lecture topic. Compounds in ten different classes of organic molecules that are used in the fragrance and food industry are provided to students. Students whiff the vapors of each compound and describe the organoleptic properties using a set of terms utilized in the fragrance and food industry. A set of questions guides students to an understanding of the relationship between structure of molecules and smell. Students are permitted to create their own fragrance based on the results of the experiment. Student response has been favorable. The experiment rectifies misconceptions students have about structure and odor, and gives positive reinforcement to the lecture material.

Risley, John M.

1996-12-01

296

Construction Engineering Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) research facility is part of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (USAERDC) of the Army Corps of Engineers' research and development organization. CERL "conducts research and development in infrastructure and environmental sustainment." New technologies that the lab develops are used "to help military installations provide and maintain quality training lands and facilities for soldiers and their families." Some applications are also found in the private sector. The research is organized into numerous themes, including the study of enduring buildings, ecosystem management, land use planning, and seismic engineering. The website describes each of the themes and offers a link to its database of publications and products/capabilities. Visitors can also search the database by keyword. Another section of the website describes the portal software used to develop and maintain the website.

297

Digital Teaching Resources Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Alberta, the Digital Teaching Resources Laboratory (DiTRL) is a computer lab for students and faculty designed to help undergraduates learn about biology. DiTRL's site contains instructional multimedia resources that will be useful to a wide range of people, as well as a database of lesson plans and such. Visitors can click on the Instructional Multimedia area to look through multimedia clips on a range of topics, including botany, ecology, and entomology. The Cell Biology section is quite well-developed, and includes interactive activities like "Animal cell mix and match" and "Nerve Action Potential." The Database link leads to an online collection that includes animations, video clips, and text excerpts. Currently, the entire database contains over 8,900 items, and visitors can browse around at their leisure or perform a full-text search. Finally, the site is rounded out by the option for visitors to provide their own feedback.

2012-07-20

298

Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Bern, and International Atomic Energy Agency. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method, not a mass spectrometry method. A magneto-optical trap is used to capture neutral atoms (rather than ions) of the desired isotope using laser beams. A photo-sensor detects the laser induced fluorescence emitted by the individual trapped atoms. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. In an experiment demonstrating that ATTA-3 can analyze 39Ar/Ar ratios in environmental samples, no interference from other atomic or molecular species was observed at the 1x10^-16 level (Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 103001; 2011). This work proved the feasibility of performing 39Ar dating using the ATTA method. We are supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, and by Argonne National Laboratory.

Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

2013-12-01

299

Basic Nanotechnology Processes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. These twelve labs focus on basic processes in Nanotechnology. Some of the labs are titled Gold Nucleation Analysis, Introduction to LPCVD and PECVD, Introduction to Plasma-based Processing, Liftoff and Surface Modification, and Intro to Scanning Electron Microscopy. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials.

2011-03-08

300

Laminar laboratory rivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A viscous fluid flowing over fine plastic grains spontaneously channelizes into a few centimeters-wide river. After reaching its equilibrium shape, this stable laboratory flume is able to carry a steady load of sediments, like many alluvial rivers. When the sediment discharge vanishes, the river size, shape and slope fit the threshold theory proposed by Glover and Florey (1951), which assumes that the Shields parameter is critical on the channel bed. As the sediment discharge is increased, the river widens and flattens. Surprisingly, the aspect ratio of its cross section depends on the sediment discharge only, regardless of the water discharge. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these findings based on the balance between gravity, which pulls particles towards the center of the channel, and the diffusion of bedload particles, which pushes them away from areas of intense bedload.

Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Éric; Métivier, François

2014-05-01

301

First International Microgravity Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

1990-01-01

302

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

2003-01-01

303

What's Happening in the Software Engineering Laboratory?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1976 the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has been dedicated to understanding and improving the way in which one NASA organization the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at Goddard Space Flight Center, develops, maintains, and manages complex flight dynamics systems. This paper presents an overview of recent activities and studies in SEL, using as a framework the SEL's organizational goals and experience based software improvement approach. It focuses on two SEL experience areas : (1) the evolution of the measurement program and (2) an analysis of three generations of Cleanroom experiments.

Pajerski, Rose; Green, Scott; Smith, Donald

1995-01-01

304

New laboratory tools in the assessment of bone quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone quality is a complex set of intricated and interdependent factors that influence bone strength. A number of methods have\\u000a emerged to measure bone quality, taking into account the organic or the mineral phase of the bone matrix, in the laboratory.\\u000a Bone quality is a complex set of different factors that are interdependent. The bone matrix organization can be described

D. Chappard; M. F. Baslé; E. Legrand; M. Audran

2011-01-01

305

Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Advanced technologies and biology have extremely different physical implementations, but they are far more alike in systems-level organization than is widely appreciated. Convergent evolution in both domains produces modular architectures that are composed of elaborate hierarchies of protocols and layers of feedback regulation, are driven by demand for robustness to uncertain environments, and use often imprecise components. This complexity may be largely hidden in idealized laboratory settings and in normal operation, becoming conspicuous only when contributing to rare cascading failures. These puzzling and paradoxical features are neither accidental nor artificial, but derive from a deep and necessary interplay between complexity and robustness, modularity, feedback, and fragility. This review describes insights from engineering theory and practice that can shed some light on biological complexity.

Marie Csete (University of Michigan Medical School; Departments of Anesthesiology and Cell and Developmental Biology); John Doyle (California Institute of Technology;)

2002-03-01

306

Laboratory testing in pharmacies.  

PubMed

Point-of-care testing (POCT) is traditionally defined as laboratory diagnostics performed at or near the site where clinical care is delivered. POCT thereby combines sample collection, analysis, and reporting of results into a robust integrated testing structure, with a simple user interface. The availability of reliable devices and consolidated tests for patient screening, diagnosis and monitoring has allowed broad diffusion of POCT to the patient's bedside, physician offices, pharmacies, other healthcare facilities, supermarkets, and even into the patient's home. However, current evidence clearly shows that POCT can be subjective, and might even amplify the traditional problems encountered in the preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical phases of the total testing process. This may especially be seen in inappropriateness of the test request, collection of unsuitable biological materials, inaccurate test performances, larger analytical imprecision, unsuitable report formatting, delayed reporting of critical value, and report recording/retrieval. POCT patient care service in the pharmacy can be regarded as a valuable option for the present and future since it might be beneficial for all parties. However, several economic, clinical and regulatory issues should also be addressed before this opportunity can turn into a real advantage for patients and the entire healthcare system. The most appropriate allocation of POCT within the diagnostic pathway, as well as its adjuvant role in screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diseases should also be clearly established in order to prevent widespread and deregulated implementation. PMID:20441470

Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Trenti, Tommaso

2010-07-01

307

Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.  

PubMed Central

The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness.

Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gomara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

2004-01-01

308

Ocean Climate Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A division of the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) described in the March 31, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/sci-engr/current/index.html#1), the Ocean Climate Laboratory performs scientific analyses of oceanographic data, develops ocean climatologies, investigates "interannual to decadal-scale ocean climate variability using historical ocean data," builds global ocean databases, and facilitates the international exchange of oceanographic data. The Homepage provides access to summarized data via the What's New section; recent releases include the CD-ROM World Ocean Database for 1998 (WOD98, described on site), and data files on "High resolution (1/4 degree) temperature and salinity analyses of the world's oceans" (.pts format) or "seasonal analyses of phosphate" (.pts format), among others. Additionally, users may browse the Products section for detailed descriptions of data quality control methods (including statistical analyses). An impressive list of publications provides an overview of the Lab's research activities in the Publications section, and researcher lists are provided in the People section.

309

BNL Sources Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS has a long-standing interest in providing the best possible synchrotron radiation sources for its user community, and hence, has recently established the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) to pursue research into fourth generation synchrotron radiation sources. A major element of the program includes development of a high peak power FEL meant to operate in the vacuum ultraviolet. The objective of the program is to develop the source, and experimental technology together to provide the greatest impact on UV science. The accelerator under construction for the SDL consists of a high brightness RF photocathode electron gun followed by a 230 MeV short pulse linac incorporating a magnetic chicane for pulse compression. The gun drive laser is a wide bandwidth Ti: Sapphire regenerative amplifier capable of pulse shaping which will be used to study non- linear emittance compensation. Using the compressor, 1 nC bunches with a length as small as 50 {mu}m sigma (2 kA peak current) are available for experiments. In this paper we briefly describe the facility and detail our plans for utilizing the 10 m long NISUS wiggler to carry out single pass FEL experiments. These include a 1 {mu}m SASE demonstration, a seeded beam demonstration at 300 nm, and a High Gain Harmonic Generation experiment at 200 mn. The application of chirped pulse amplification to this type of FEL will also be discussed.

Ben-Zvi, I.; Graves, W.; Heese, R.; Johnson, E.D.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

1997-01-01

310

Knowledge Media Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do students learn in the classroom? How can teachers best utilize new and emerging technologies in the classroom? What can teachers do to seamlessly incorporate technology into the learning experience? These are all questions that are asked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Knowledge Media Laboratory. On their website, users can learn about their work with communities of teachers, faculty, programs, and institutions over the past several years, and also look over some of their informative case studies. The Gallery of Teaching and Learning is a good place to start one’s exploration of the site, as it contains a number of exhibitions that look at how web-based tools can be used in teaching and how scholarship may change as a result of an increasingly networked milieu. One seminal resource on the site is the KEEP Toolkit. With the Toolkit, teachers and others can create engaging knowledge representations on the web for their own use. For visitors who might feel a bit overwhelmed by this, there is also a nice tutorial that explains how the Toolkit can be used.

311

Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

1972-01-01

312

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation, properly...testing and standardization of laboratory reference standards, reagents...the periodic calibration of laboratory instruments, apparatus, gauges, and recording...

2010-04-01

313

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation, properly...testing and standardization of laboratory reference standards, reagents...the periodic calibration of laboratory instruments, apparatus, gauges, and recording...

2009-04-01

314

Current Trends in Remote Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation

LuÍs Gomes; Seta Bogosyan

2009-01-01

315

Partnership Opportunities with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is ``bringing science to life'' through the creation of knowledge; the invention of new tools and techniques; the scientific analysis of complex situations; and the design, construction and operation of research facilities used by scientists and engineers from throughout the world.

Payne, T.L.; Coxon, G.D.

2000-02-20

316

Integration of laboratory testing and constitutive modeling of soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

A soil constitutive model that correctly captures soil behavior under general loading modes is requisite to solving complex boundary value geotechnical engineering problems. Available laboratory tests provide information on material behavior within a very limited range of stress–strain paths and do not cover the full range of loading paths experienced in a boundary value problem. Soil behavior information developed from

Qingwei Fu; Youssef M. A. Hashash; Sungmoon Jung; Jamshid Ghaboussi

2007-01-01

317

Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented.

Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I. [and others

1994-09-01

318

NASA Lewis Propulsion Systems Laboratory Customer Guide Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This manual describes the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Lewis Research Center. The PSL complex supports two large engine test cells (PSL-3 and PSL-4) that are capable of providing flight simulation to altitudes of 70,000 ft. Facility variabl...

R. H. Soeder

1994-01-01

319

Hyporheic exchange with heterogeneous streambeds: Laboratory experiments and modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyporheic exchange is generally analyzed with the assumption of a homogeneous hyporheic zone. In reality, streambed sediments have a heterogeneous structure, and this natural heterogeneity produces spatially variable interfacial fluxes and complex hyporheic exchange patterns. To assess the basic effects of sediment structure on hyporheic exchange, we performed salt and dye injection experiments in a recirculating laboratory flume with two

Mashfiqus Salehin; Aaron I. Packman; Matthew Paradis

2004-01-01

320

Laboratory Spectroscopy of Ices of Astrophysical Interest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ongoing and future NASA and ESA astronomy missions need detailed information on the spectra of a variety of molecular ices to help establish the identity and abundances of molecules observed in astronomical data. Examples of condensed-phase molecules already detected on cold surfaces include H2O, CO, CO2, N2, NH3, CH4, SO2, O2, and O3. In addition, strong evidence exists for the solid-phase nitriles HCN, HC3N, and C2N2 in Titan's atmosphere. The wavelength region over which these identifications have been made is roughly 0.5 to 100 micron. Searches for additional features of complex carbon-containing species are in progress. Existing and future observations often impose special requirements on the information that comes from the laboratory. For example, the measurement of spectra, determination of integrated band strengths, and extraction of complex refractive indices of ices (and icy mixtures) in both amorphous and crystalline phases at relevant temperatures are all important tasks. In addition, the determination of the index of refraction of amorphous and crystalline ices in the visible region is essential for the extraction of infrared optical constants. Similarly, the measurement of spectra of ions and molecules embedded in relevant ices is important. This laboratory review will examine some of the existing experimental work and capabilities in these areas along with what more may be needed to meet current and future NASA and ESA planetary needs.

Hudson, Reggie; Moore, M. H.

2011-01-01

321

Titan's ion chemistry: a laboratory perspective.  

PubMed

Some of the most interesting objects in the solar system are those bodies that have significant atmospheres. The discovery that Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has a substantial nitrogen-based atmosphere makes it a prime extraterrestrial object of interest. The advent of the Cassini orbiter spacecraft program that is able to observe and sample Titan's ionosphere adds greatly to this interest. We report here a summary of some of the efforts that have been made in the laboratory to understand the processes responsible for chemical processing of the primary ions formed in Titan's ionosphere, into the ions observed by in situ sampling. The presence of significant hydrocarbons and the colder temperatures of Titan's ionosphere lead to a much greater complexity in the ion chemistry of Titan than is apparent in the ion chemistry of Earth. A review of all the ion-molecule chemistry investigated in laboratory studies relevant to Titan is included as a table. The complexity of some of the hydrocarbon ion structures formed in just three reactive ion-molecule sequences from the primary ions has required a new experimental methodology which is discussed. PMID:17216629

McEwan, Murray J; Anicich, Vincent G

2007-01-01

322

Environment for scientific laboratories  

SciTech Connect

In the past several years a number of major environment building efforts have been undertaken. Some environments that are operational are: Smalltalk, Gandalf, Interlisp, and Toolpack. The Ada Environment continues to grow steadily. Why do we need another environment. The reason is, of course, that we believe that our requirements and constraints are quite different from those for whom the above environments were designed. We believe that other installations that produce large scientific programs may have similar requirements. We also believe that environments can be assembled from software tools already in use. Software development becomes increasingly more expensive. It is important to understand how resources already in existence may be used effectively as building blocks in the creation of new systems. We currently have a number of research efforts directed towards the creation of environments. We describe an environment that is being built largely from existing software tools. Most government and scientific laboratories do not have the resources for a project as large as an environment. However, environments do not have to be built from scratch nor does one have to be built from existing tools in a bottom up manner. Ideally, in an installation that has a large body of existing tools, one can construct a chosen environment by adapting software already on hand. In this paper we describe a framework that may be used to put together software tools, a database management system, and a user interface. The result is that one can build a powerful environment with a modest support staff. We know of no other such attempt that has been made for an integrated system of this type. Our ideas for an environment framework have been realized in a particular environment we have christened Amicus in the hope that it will be our programmer's friend.

Blattner, M.; Johnson, K.; Skedzielewski, S.; Streeter, C.; Sumikawa, D.; Zimmerman, D.

1983-06-01

323

Mice examined in Animal Laboratory of Lunar Receiving Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landrum Young (seated), Brown and Root-Northrup, and Russell Stullken, Manned Spacecraft Center, examine mice in the Animal laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory which have been inoculated with lunar sample material. wish for peace for all mankind. astronauts will be released from quarantine on August 11, 1969. Donald K. Slayton (right), MSC Director of Flight Crew Operations; and Lloyd Reeder, training coordinator.

1969-01-01

324

Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper: Summary of Laboratory Astrophysics Needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (NASA LAW) met at NASA Ames Research Center from 1-3 May 2002 to assess the role that laboratory astrophysics plays in the optimization of NASA missions, both at the science conception level and at the science ret...

2002-01-01

325

Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-08-01

326

Habitat complexity, brain, and behavior.  

PubMed

More complex brains and behaviors have arisen repeatedly throughout both vertebrate and invertebrate evolution. The challenge is to tease apart the forces underlying such change. In this review, I show how habitat complexity influences both brain and behavior in African cichlid fishes, drawing on examples from primates and birds where appropriate. These species groups share a number of similarities. They exhibit a considerable range of brain to body weight within their group. Often highly visual, the species show a diversity of habitat types, social systems, and cognitive abilities. Phylogenies are well established. In closely-related cichlid fishes from the monophyletic Ectodine clade of Lake Tanganyika, habitat complexity is directly correlated with social variables, including species richness, diversity, and abundance. Total brain size, telencephalic and cerebellar size are positively correlated with habitat complexity. Visual acuity and spatial memory are also enhanced in cichlids living in more complex environments. I speculate that species-specific neural effects of environmental complexity could be the consequence of the corresponding social changes. However, environmental and social forces affect brains differently. Environmental forces exert a broader effect on brain structures than social ones, suggesting either allometric expansion of the brain structures in concert with brain size and/or co-evolution of these structures. To advance our understanding of the mechanism by which habitat complexity affects brain and behavior will require the use of closely-related species, quantification of complexity, hypothesis testing restricting analysis to a single variable and path analyses to explore the order of importance of such variables. We will also need new experimental paradigms exploring the cognitive and survival value of brain and brain structure changes both in the laboratory and in the wild. PMID:18836258

Shumway, Caroly A

2008-01-01

327

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103 Section 280.103...QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be...

2009-01-01

328

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103 Section 280.103...QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be...

2010-01-01

329

Laboratory detection of fungemia.  

PubMed

Patients who are immunosuppressed, receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, or with intravascular catheters in place are at risk for invasive fungal infections. In a significant number nosocomial fungal infections develop. The diagnosis of invasive fungal disease often relies on the detection of the etiologic agent using blood cultures. Great progress has been made in fungal blood culturing over the past 20 years with the development of biphasic media, automated radiometric and nonradiometric systems, and LCS used with selective culture media. The biphasic BHI and Septi-Chek systems provide recovery of the majority of fungal isolates, yet there frequently is an undesirable delay in detection. Lysis of blood cells, aeration by venting, and agitated incubation improve detection with these systems. Automated systems often require a significant initial financial investment but have been shown to be durable and effective in most aspects of blood culturing. They have a limited daily hands on requirement. The newer nonradiometric systems appear to be better than the older systems, especially in time to detection and in the reduction of false-positive signals. The most significant factors, however, may be the volume of blood used in these systems and the resins incorporated in the media to eliminate inhibitors of fungal growth. A significant disadvantage of the automated systems has been their failure to detect certain organisms (C. neoformans and dimorphic fungi); however, the use of newer culture media as well as blind subculturing may partially alleviate this problem. Lysis-centrifugation blood culturing has performed well, is highly sensitive, and permits recovery of both fungi and aerobic bacteria. Because it is flexible, the media selection can be altered to suit any specific growth requirement. It is rapid and permits the identification of most yeast and yeastlike microorganisms within 4 days and of H. capsulatum within 3 weeks. Because this system utilizes solid media, blind subculturing is unnecessary. Quantitation of fungemia is possible and may permit determination of the clinical importance of the microorganism and assessment of the patient's response to treatment. The disadvantages of this system are that it requires a significant amount of the technologist's time to process the specimen, inoculate the various media, and visually examine the culture media throughout the incubation period. A significant contamination rate still exists despite working within a laminar flow biosafety cabinet; this also increases time requirements. The detection of fungemia has markedly improved; the times to detection have decreased to the point of being clinically useful, and several systems are available to accommodate individual laboratory needs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8181236

Geha, D J; Roberts, G D

1994-03-01

330

Laboratory volcano geodesy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

2014-05-01

331

Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

332

Laboratory Activities for Introductory Astronomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents sample laboratory activities designed for use in astronomy teaching, including naked eye observations, instrument construction, student projects, and cloudy weather activities. Appended are bibliographies of journal articles and reference books and lists of films, laboratory manuals, and distributors of apparatus and teaching aids. (CC)

Kruglak, Haym

1973-01-01

333

Evaluation of Calibration Laboratories Performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the main goals of interlaboratory comparisons (ILCs) is the evaluation of the laboratories performance for the routine calibrations they perform for the clients. In the frame of Accreditation of Laboratories, the national accreditation boards (NABs) in collaboration with the national metrology institutes (NMIs) organize the ILCs needed to comply with the requirements of the international accreditation organizations. In order that an ILC is a reliable tool for a laboratory to validate its best measurement capability (BMC), it is needed that the NMI (reference laboratory) provides a better traveling standard—in terms of accuracy class or uncertainty—than the laboratories BMCs. Although this is the general situation, there are cases where the NABs ask the NMIs to evaluate the performance of the accredited laboratories when calibrating industrial measuring instruments. The aim of this article is to discuss the existing approaches for the evaluation of ILCs and propose a basis for the validation of the laboratories measurement capabilities. An example is drafted with the evaluation of the results of mercury-in-glass thermometers ILC with 12 participant laboratories.

Filipe, Eduarda

2011-12-01

334

Adapting lean to histology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histology laboratories (histolabs) can increase productivity and reduce turnaround time and errors by using any one of several available management tools. After a few years of operation, all histolabs develop workflow problems. Histology laboratories handling more than 20 000 cases per year benefit the most from implementing management tools, as occurred in the 25 facilities summarized in this article. Discontinuous workflow,

René J. Buesa

2009-01-01

335

A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven

Kristin I. Gublo

2003-01-01

336

Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author

J. A. Kopta; C. J. Springer

1987-01-01

337

LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

338

Accreditation or Certification for Laboratories?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation is focused on explaining the significance of accreditation and certification for laboratories and illustrates the usefulness of both procedures. The implementation of these procedures in laboratories is described, pointing out their similarities and differences. Reference is made to some publications. The discussion reflects the existing practice.

Tsimillis, Kyriacos C.

339

OCCUPATION--LANGUAGE LABORATORY DIRECTOR.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TRUE PROFESSIONAL STATUS FOR A LABORATORY DIRECTOR, PLUS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT OF SUCH INSTRUCTION, WILL GIVE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ADEQUATE RETURN FOR THEIR INVESTMENT IN ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. BY BEING INVOLVED IN IMPORTANT RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES, THE DIRECTOR OF A LANGUAGE LABORATORY CAN SERVE ALSO TO FREE THE TEACHER AND…

TURNER, DAYMOND

340

Laboratory solvent reuse -- Liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to develop a method for reduction of waste solvent in the Process Engineering Chemistry Laboratory. The liquid chromatographs are the largest generators of explosive-contaminated waste in the laboratory. We developed a successful process for the reuse of solvents from the liquid chromatographs and demonstrated the utility of the process in the assay of hexanitrostilbene.

Quinlin, W.T.; Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01

341

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

Barnett, Sara

342

Laboratory studies of volcanic jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the fluid dynamics volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good

Susan Werner Kieffer; Bradford Sturtevant

1984-01-01

343

Forest Pathology and Mycology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Much of this Laboratory's current research is focused on Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death. The site links to downloadable files for a collection of research publication and posters. The website is available in both Spanish and English, and contains links for related laboratories and organizations.

Garbelotto, Matteo

2007-09-04

344

Library Dedicated to Laboratory Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Efforts to establish a library for laboratory instructional materials is being initiated by a group of concerned university educators. The main function of this library will be to collect descriptions of biological systems and supporting materials that are effective in laboratory instruction. Contributors are being solicited. (Author/MA)

BioScience, 1978

1978-01-01

345

Synthesis of Dinitrogen and Dihydrogen Complexes of Molybdenum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents background information, safety notes, and laboratory procedures for synthesizing dinitrogen and dihydrogen complexes of molybdenum. The one-step method described is suitable for advanced inorganic chemistry classes. (SK)

Archer, Leonard J.; And Others

1981-01-01

346

2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. Monitor Building 4203/E-4 is hidden behind barrier (4216/E-17). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Control Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

347

Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

1988-01-01

348

1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog  

USGS Publications Warehouse

PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

Edited by Pritt, Jeffrey; Jones, Berwyn E.

1989-01-01

349

Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

350

Testing containment of laboratory hoods  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory fume hoods often do not adequately provide protection to a chemist or technician at the hood. The reason for failure of the hoods to perform adequately are varied and, in many instances, difficult to determine. In some cases, the laboratory hood manufacturer has provided equipment that does not reflect the state of art in controlling laboratory exposures. In other cases, the architect or engineer has disregarded the function of the hood thus the design of the installation is faulty and the hood will not work. The contractor may have installed the system so poorly that it will not adequately function. Finally, the chemist or technician may misuse the hood, causing poor performance. This paper considers a method of evaluating the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Using the method, the paper examines several instances where the laboratory fume hood performed inadequately, quantifies the performance and identifies the cause of poor performance.

Knutson, G.W.

1987-06-01

351

Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

Busby, David C.; And Others

1981-01-01

352

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the bit is a thick-walled maraging steel collection tube allowing the powdered sample to be augured up the hole into the sample chamber. For robustness, the wall thickness of the DBA was maximized while still ensuring effective sample collection. There are four recesses in the bit tube that are used to retain the fresh bits in their bit box. The rotating bit is supported by a back-to-back duplex bearing pair within a housing that is connected to the outer DBA housing by two titanium diaphragms. The only bearings on the drill in the sample flow are protected by a spring-energized seal, and an integrated shield that diverts the ingested powdered sample from the moving interface. The DBA diaphragms provide radial constraint of the rotating bit and form the sample chambers. Between the diaphragms there is a sample exit tube from which the sample is transferred to the CHIMRA. To ensure that the entire collected sample is retained, no matter the orientation of the drill with respect to gravity during sampling, the pass-through from the forward to the aft chamber resides opposite to the exit tube.

Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

2012-01-01

353

A SURVEY OF LABORATORY AND STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO FARMWORKER EXPOSURE STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Developing internally valid, and perhaps generalizable, farmworker exposure studies is a complex process that involves many statistical and laboratory considerations. Statistics are an integral component of each study beginning with the design stage and continuing to the final da...

354

A study of technology transfer arrangements for national laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The transfer of technology to industrial partners and users is a complex task. The interactions between federal laboratories and industry and the market knowledge and ability to assess the needs of business users are beyond the charter of a federal laboratory. Therefore, new organizational mechanisms are required in order to obtain full commercial value from the laboratories' efforts. This paper will analyze cases of new ventures emerging from technology developed within federal laboratories. Seven models will be identified for technology transfer. These are the Information Dissemination Model, the Licensing Model, the Venture Capital Model, the Large Company-Joint Venture Model, the Incubator-Science Park Model, the Ferret Model, and the Agriculture Extension Model. Out of 13 laboratories, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Partnership will be identified as having the greatest potential for successful implementation. The arrangement is a proposed consortium of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of California, venture capitalists, industrial firms, and federal and state agencies. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Dorf, R.C.; Worthington, K.K.F.

1987-08-25

355

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Safety in the Analytical Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety issues specifically related to the analytical laboratory are discussed including hazardous reagents, transferring samples, cleaning apparatus, eye protection, and equipment damage. Special attention is given to techniques which not only endanger the technician but also endanger expensive equipment. (CW)

Ewing, Galen W.

1990-01-01

356

OSHA Laboratory Standard: Driving Force for Laboratory Safety!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Laboratory Safety Standards as the major driving force in establishing and maintaining a safe working environment for teachers and students. (Author)

Roy, Kenneth R.

2000-01-01

357

Trial of integrated laboratory practice.  

PubMed

In most laboratory practices for students in medical schools, a laboratory guidebook is given to the students, in which the procedures are precisely described. The students merely follow the guidebook without thinking deeply, which spoils the students and does not entice them to think creatively. Problem-based learning (PBL) could be one means for the students themselves to actively learn, find problems, and resolve them. Such a learning attitude nurtures medical students with lifelong learning as healthcare professionals. We merged PBL and laboratory practices to promote deep thinking habits and developed an integrated laboratory practice. We gave a case sheet to groups of students from several schools. The students raised hypotheses after vivid discussion, designed experimental protocols, and performed the experiments. If the results did not support or disproved the hypothesis, the students set up another hypothesis followed by experiments, lasting for 4 or 5 consecutive days. These procedures are quite similar to those of professional researchers. The main impact achieved was the fact that the students developed the experimental design by themselves, for the first time in their college lives. All students enjoyed the laboratory practice, which they had never experienced before. This is an antidote to the guidebook-navigated traditional laboratory practice, which disappoints many students. As educators in basic medical sciences stand on the edge in terms of educating the next generation, there is a need to provide a strong foundation for medical students to design and perform scientific experiments. The integrated laboratory practice may provide the solution. PMID:21652510

Matsuo, Osamu; Takahashi, Yuzo; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakashima, Akira; Morita, Hironobu

2011-06-01

358

Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.  

PubMed

Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. PMID:22727005

Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

2012-06-01

359

Video recording laboratory experiments for open laboratory environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 400-level CIMT (computer-integrated manufacturing technology) class entitled Manufacturing Applications of Sensor Technology, a series of laboratory assignments has been developed to teach PLC (programmable logic controller)-based and PC-based data acquisition, as well as how sensors play a vital role in CIM environments. Student feedback suggested that laboratory assignments would require less time and the students would learn the

T. E. Kostek

1991-01-01

360

Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University.

Murad, C.; Rubio, D.; Ponce, S.; Álvarez Abri, A.; Terrón, A.; Vicencio, D.; Fascioli, E.

2007-11-01

361

University of Idaho: Pedology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website discusses the University of Idaho's pedology laboratory's work primarily focused on the environmental factors and processes that form soils and influence their use and management. Researchers and students can learn about the volcanic ash-influenced soils in the Pacific Northwest, the hydrology of Northern Idaho, and the ability of soils in the Palouse Basin to accommodate ground water recharge. The website provides information on laboratory analysis procedures and data on andisols and andic properties. Users will also find descriptions of graduate theses and dissertations, information on the Maynard A. Fosberg Monolith Collection, and many of the laboratory's abstracts.

362

Introduction to Biotechnology: Laboratory Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By Linnea Fletcher, Evelyn Goss, Patricia Phelps, and Angela Wheeler, this is the laboratory manual for an introductory biotechnology course. This 134-page Word document describes the basic skills necessary for the biotechnology laboratory, such as safety, mathematics, documentation, calibration, and equipment. Each chapter contains objectives for students to accomplish, some practice lessons and questions, and laboratory activities. Students will also learn some basic processes, such as Restriction Enzyme Mapping of DNA, DNA Fingerprinting, and Southern Blot Analysis. There is also a section on bioinformatics.

Wheeler, Angela; Fletcher, Linnea; Goss, Evelyn; Phelps, Patricia

2009-09-30

363

An Example of a Laboratory Teaching Experience in a Professional Year (Plan B) Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory teaching experience (L.T.E.) was designed to focus on three teaching behaviors. It was recognized that a behavioral approach to teaching simplified its complexity by isolating specific teaching behaviors. Discusses the development and evaluation of the laboratory teaching experience. (Author/RK)

Miller, P. J.; And Others

1978-01-01

364

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1991. Each project in the PNL research program is a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. Examples include

1992-01-01

365

Implementing a Network for Electronic Surveillance Reporting from Public Health Reference Laboratories: An International Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic data reporting from public health laboratories to a central site pro- vides a mechanism for public health officials to rapidly identify problems and take action to prevent further spread of disease. However, implementation of reference laboratory systems is much more complex than simply adopting new technology, especially in international settings. We describe three major areas to be considered by

Nancy H. Bean; Stanley M. Martin

2001-01-01

366

E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

2002-05-03

367

COMPLEX TRAUMA, COMPLEX REACTIONS: ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex trauma occurs repeatedly and escalates over its duration. In families, it is exemplified by domestic violence and child abuse and in other situations by war, prisoner of war or refugee status, and human trafficking. Complex trauma also refers to situations such as acute\\/chronic illness that requires intensive medical intervention or a single traumatic event that is calamitous. Complex trauma

Christine A. Courtois

2004-01-01

368

Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

Wood, H. John

2004-01-01

369

Mars Science Laboratory's Descent Stage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This portion of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, called the descent stage, does its main work during the final few minutes before touchdown on Mars.

The descent stage will provide rocket-powered deceleration for a phase of the arrival at Mars after the phases using the heat shield and parachute. When it nears the surface, the descent stage will lower the rover on a bridle the rest of the way to the ground.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011.

This image was taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2008-01-01

370

Laboratory Techniques for the Blind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

Tombaugh, Dorothy

1972-01-01

371

Commissioning a materials research laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the process of commissioning a new 150,000 sq. ft. research facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The laboratory being constructed is a showcase of modern design methods being built at a construction cost of less than $180 per sq. ft. This is possible in part because of the total commissioning activities that are being utilized for this project. The laboratory's unique approach to commissioning will be presented in this paper. The process will be followed through from the conceptual stage on into the actual construction portion of the laboratory. Lessons learned and cost effectiveness will be presented in a manner that will be usable for others making commissioning related decisions. Commissioning activities at every stage of the design will be presented along with the attributed benefits. Attendees will hear answers to the what, when, who, and why questions associated with commissioning of this exciting project.

SAVAGE,GERALD A.

2000-03-28

372

Swimming in Small Laboratory Animals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Forced swimming in small laboratory animals has been widely used for studying the physiology and capacity of the organism in response to stress. The following studies have been accomplished: Swimming as a test of performance; Factors affecting swimming; U...

C. A. Dawson S. M. Horvath

1969-01-01

373

Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From D.B. McWhorterand D. K. Sunda's 1977 Ground-Water Hydrology and Hydraulics, this two page excerpt outlines and details Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. Here, visitors will find illustrations and formula to understand the concept.

2008-02-07

374

Argonne National Laboratory 1986 Publications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Te...

J. A. Kopta C. J. Springer

1987-01-01

375

Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

376

Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

377

Safety and Health Topics: Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A website created by the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OSHA) highlighting standards, standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories.

2011-01-01

378

Air Resources Laboratory 1992 Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Laboratory provides scientific advice to elements of NOAA and other Government agencies on environmental problems, emergency assistance, and climate change. ARL research is oriented around three major themes, as follow: (1) Air Quality and Dispersion ...

1993-01-01

379

LABCON - Laboratory Job Control program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer program LABCON controls the budget system in a component test laboratory whose workload is made up from many individual budget allocations. A common denominator is applied to an incoming job, to which all effort is charged and accounted for.

Reams, L. T.

1969-01-01

380

Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview  

SciTech Connect

Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Neu, Mary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-06-02

381

Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

Clark, Douglas W.

1979-01-01

382

Optoelectronics Laboratory Annual Report, 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the second annual report of the Optoelectronics Laboratory, a new and independently responsible operational unit within Helsinki University of Technology. Presently basic research is carried out in the field of optical properties of semiconductor ...

H. Collan T. Tuomi

1992-01-01

383

Polymer Preparations in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six laboratory procedures for preparing polymers which have been used in a course for undergraduate industrial arts students, who have a concentration in plastics technology but have not taken more than one year of college chemistry. (BT)

Lampman, Gary M.; And Others

1979-01-01

384

[Quality management in medical laboratories].  

PubMed

During the 20th century understanding for quality has changed and international and national requirements for quality have been published. Therefore also medical branches started to establish quality management systems. Quality assurance has always been important for medical laboratories. Certification according to the standard ISO 9001 and accreditation according to the standard ISO 17025 have been the proof of fulfilling quality requirements. The relatively new standard ISO 15189 is the first standard for medical laboratories. This standard includes technical and management requirements for the medical laboratory. The main focus is the proof of competence within the personnel. As this standard is accepted throughout the European Union an increase in accreditations of medical laboratories is predictable. PMID:20454753

Fritzer-Szekeres, M

2010-05-01

385

Digital Techniques for Laboratory Measurements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes techniques and equipment intended to both improve laboratory measurements and also form a background for more advanced work by introducing the concepts of electronic and digital circuits. (GS)

Dart, S. Leonard

1975-01-01

386

Extending the Marine Microcosm Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The traditional range of marine microcosm laboratory experiments is presented as an ideal environment to teach the entire analysis process. The microcosm lab provides student-centered approach with opportunities for collaborative learning and to develop critical communication skills.

Ryswyk, Hal Van; Hall, Eric W.; Petesch, Steven J.; Wiedeman, Alice E.

2007-01-01

387

A Combustion Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a combustion laboratory facility and experiments for a senior-level (undergraduate) course in mechanical engineering. The experiment reinforces basic thermodynamic concepts and provides many students with their first opportunity to work with a combustion system. (DH)

Peters, James E.

1985-01-01

388

USGS: National Water Quality Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The USGS's "National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) offers environmental analytical services, including inorganic, organic, and radiochemical constituents, and provides high-quality, reproducible data." Researchers can find a summary of the Laboratory's capabilities, facilities, technology, areas of expertise, and accreditations and certificates. The website offers a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation of its mission. Users can find technical memoranda, a list of NWQL reports and journal articles, and factsheets.

389

Misleading biochemical laboratory test results  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients.

Nanji, Amin A.

1984-01-01

390

Underground laboratory in Feiberg, GDR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the Department of Physics of the Mining Academy in Freiberg an underground laboratory for low-level radioactivity measurements has been established. The measuring room is situated at a depth of about 140 m below the earth surface in gneiss rocks in a cavern of an old mine. Results of the radon as well as the gamma radiation measurements are discussed. The parameters of devices for tritium and silicon-32 measurements in comparison with those obtained in the surface laboratory are presented.

Hebert, D.; Fröhlich, K.; Franke, T.; Gellermann, R.; Unterricker, S.; Kim, J. H.

1986-11-01

391

[Coding for clinical laboratory information].  

PubMed

The field of clinical laboratory tests is facing an increase in the number of test items as well as a corresponding diversification due to the demands of medical institutions as well as improvements in analytical techniques. To respond to this situation, medical institutions have been promoting systematization of their testing procedures; information exchange among the institutions has likewise expanded with the use of media such as on-line systems and internet. Standardization of interfaces has been proposed to secure a common framework compatible with different types of information. Some embodiments in this country includes; (1) Interface Standards on Clinical Laboratory Information For information exchange, the format and reporting comments used in the media systems were standardized under the sponsorship of The Medical Information System Development Center, with a publication issued on 1993. (2) Standardization of Laboratory Test Code Standardization of codes for information exchange has been established under the sponsorship of The Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (Laboratory Test Coding Committee), through the systematization of laboratory test code used in media systems. A publication entitled "Classification & Coding for Clinical Laboratory Tests (8th edition in 1992, 9th edition in 1994 and supplement in 1996)" has been issued. The system for "Classification & Coding for Clinical Laboratory Tests" is divided into 5 components; (1) analyte code, (2) identification code, (3) specimen code, (4) methodology code, and (5) data classification code. The Laboratory test codes are precisely classified by "(1) analyte code", and then are identified by combination of additional codes such as specimen and methodology codes. In this year, we are making a new easily-used-codes composed of 5 Arabic figures. PMID:9306714

Sakurabayashi, I

1997-06-01

392

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01

393

Macroenzymes: biochemical characterization, clinical significance, and laboratory detection.  

PubMed

"Macroenzymes" are enzymes in serum that have formed high-molecular-mass complexes, either by self-polymerization or by association with other serum components. Many enzymes in serum that are measured in clinical chemistry laboratories can occur in a macroenzyme form. Macroenzymes are interesting clinically because of their association with several diseases, including autoimmune diseases and liver disease, and are being investigated as possible diagnostic markers. Most importantly, macroenzymes frequently interfere with the interpretation of serum enzyme results, and as a result can cause diagnostic and therapeutic errors. We review the biochemical characterization, clinical significance, and laboratory detection of macroenzymes. PMID:2686862

Remaley, A T; Wilding, P

1989-12-01

394

DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

2003-02-27

395

National Laboratories Role in Nuclear Cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 20 years ago, the U.S. government embarked on an unprecedented task in size and complexity: cleaning up the legacy left by the country’s nuclear production mission. The challenges of this legacy involve site closure, waste processing and disposal, and soil and groundwater remediation, necessary to protect the public and the environment. In meeting these challenges, the national laboratories have played a pivotal role in both understanding the nature and extent of the problems and developing and testing technological solutions. Similar problems to the ones faced in the United States are now being addressed in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. The scientific and technical underpinnings developed in the U.S. labs may help other countries reduce risks and costs. While much has been accomplished in the United States, challenges remain. These challenges may be best solved in a collaborative environment, bringing together expertise across international borders.

Walton, Terry L.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Connolly, Michael; Mcginnis, Phil C.; Manke, Kristin L.

2008-01-15

396

Microbe Hunting in Laboratory Animal Research  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in nucleic acid diagnostic technologies have revolutionized microbiology by facilitating rapid, sensitive pathogen surveillance and differential diagnosis of infectious diseases. With the expansion and dissemination of genomic sequencing technology scientists are discovering new microbes at an accelerating pace. In this article we review recent progress in the field of pathogen surveillance and discovery with a specific focus on applications in the field of laboratory animal research. We discuss the challenges in proving a causal relationship between the presence of a candidate organism and disease. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of various assay platforms and describe a staged strategy for viral diagnostics. To illustrate the complexity of pursuing pathogen discovery research, we include examples from our own work that are intended to provide insights into the process that led to the selection of particular strategies.

Palacios, Gustavo; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian

2014-01-01

397

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY E  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY ECL - REDOX - RESEARCH ANALYSIS CENTER RAC - BASIC MATERIALS LABORATORY BML - VERTICAL LIFT FACILITY VLF

1980-01-01

398

Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these capabilities as a niche market play to success. The niche was further defined by preservation of the ability to handle samples contaminated with radiological materials and those with classification concerns. These decisions enabled early marketing plans to be built on existing clientele and provided an identifiable group to which future marketing could be expanded. Finally, recruitment of key players with commercial laboratory experience proved to be a key factor for success. This experience base was valuable in avoiding early mistakes in the laboratory startup phase and provided some connection to a commercial client base. As the business has grown, professionals with commercial laboratory experience have been recruited and offered ownership in the business as an incentive for joining the group. If the process were to be repeated, early involvement of an individual with commercial sales experience would be helpful in broadening the base of commercial clients. An increased emphasis on research funding such as funding received from Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) sources would be used to form a portion of the economic base for the business. More partnerships with businesses whose services compliment those of the laboratory would expand available client base. More flexible staffing arrangements would be negotiated early on as a cost-control measure. In conclusion, the re-industrialization concept can be successful. Candidates for re-industrialization must be chosen by matching services to be offered to market needs. Implementation is best accomplished by entrepreneurs who personally profit from a successful operation of the business.

Stephenson, Barry A. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc), East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-1702 (United States)

2008-01-15

399

Test report for initial test of 6266 Building filter assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This is the test report for the initial test of the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) 6266 Building high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter assemblies. This supports the start-up of WSCF.

Prather, M.C.

1994-08-01

400

Laboratory Exercises to Teach Clinically Relevant Chemistry of Antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. Design. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. Assessment. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with <25% of students who had not completed the laboratory exercises. Conclusion. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students’ performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises.

Chelette, Candace T.

2014-01-01

401

An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

1976-01-01

402

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Confirming Anthrax Through the Laboratory Response Network Laboratory Testing - FAQs Collecting Specimens Recommended Specimens Information for Specific Groups Laboratory Professionals People Who Work with Animal Products Exposure to Hides/Drums Treatment of Products ...

403

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2013-04-01

404

Computational Laboratory for Automatic Target Recognition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We have built the NYU ATR Laboratory, also known as the RLAB, a computational laboratory for research and education in Automatic Target Recognition (ATR). The laboratory contains a cluster of workstations connected by a fast network, significant data stor...

B. Goldberg E. Freudenthal D. Geiger

2000-01-01

405

Laboratory Design for Modern Analytical Instruments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is planning two new buildings which will include analytical chemistry laboratories housing spectroscopic instruments. The rationale used in designing these laboratories is discussed. (ERA citation 04:050398)

G. V. Wheeler

1979-01-01

406

Investigative Learning in Undergraduate Freshman Biology Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and implementation of an investigative laboratory class. The new laboratory design has been determined to be a success by faculty, teaching assistants, and students. Includes a sample laboratory description. (DKM)

McKenzie, Woodrow L.; Glasson, George E.

1998-01-01

407

Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

408

Naval Biodynamics Laboratory 1993 Command History.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Naval Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL) was established as the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory Detachment (NAMRLD) in April 1971 by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. NAMRLD was a detachment of the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory ...

1993-01-01

409

SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E

2008-02-08

410

MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_  

SciTech Connect

Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

2009-11-01

411

Laboratory monitoring of new anticoagulants.  

PubMed

Maintaining a balance between bleeding and clotting has always been a challenge in treating coagulation disorders. A perturbation in that balance can be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. As a result, anticoagulant monitoring is extremely important, and inappropriate testing may lead to complications. There are now a variety of new anticoagulant drugs in clinical use including several direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs), such as argatroban, bivalirudin, and hirudin, as well as a Factor Xa inhibitor, fondaparinux. There are pitfalls associated with some of the currently used laboratory monitoring tests, and newer alternative laboratory monitoring tests have been investigated (Walenga and Hoppensteadt, Semin Thromb Hemost 2004;30:683-695). In addition, laboratory testing can assist with transitioning patients from DTI to warfarin therapy. PMID:20131309

Castellone, Donna D; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

2010-03-01

412

Laboratory aspects of Lyme borreliosis.  

PubMed Central

Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease), a common tick-borne disorder of people and domestic animals in North America and Europe, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Following the discovery and initial propagation of this agent in 1981 came revelations that other tick-associated infectious disorders are but different forms of Lyme borreliosis. A challenge for the clinician and microbiology laboratory is confirmation that a skin rash, a chronic meningitis, an episode of myocarditis, or an arthritic joint is the consequence of B. burgdorferi infection. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis may be established by (i) directly observing the spirochete in host fluid or tissue, (ii) recovering the etiologic spirochete from the patient in culture medium or indirectly through inoculation of laboratory animals, or (iii) carrying out serologic tests with the patient's serum or cerebrospinal fluid. The last method, while lacking in discriminatory power, is the most efficacious diagnostic assay for most laboratories at present. Images

Barbour, A G

1988-01-01

413

Laboratory maintenance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.  

PubMed

Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human pathogen of mucosal surfaces, thus laboratory manipulations must include appropriate safety measures. The growth requirements and behavior of the gonococcus are significantly different from many bacteria, necessitating modifications of common laboratory techniques. A fastidious organism, N. gonorrhoeae requires enriched media in a CO2 atmosphere at 35 degrees to 37 degrees C for growth. In addition, N. gonorrhoeae expresses potent autolysins whose activity increases following glucose depletion during stationary phase, leading to cell death. Long believed to be an obligate aerobe, the gonococcus is capable of anaerobic growth when provided with a suitable electron acceptor. This unit provides information for both aerobic and anaerobic growth, basic long-term and daily maintenance of gonococcal cultures, as well as safety considerations for laboratory studies. PMID:18770539

Spence, Janice M; Wright, Lori; Clark, Virginia L

2008-02-01

414

Alerting of Laboratory Critical Values  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Critical value is defined as a result suggesting that the patient is in danger unless appropriate action is taken immediately. We designed an automated reporting system of critical values and evaluated its performance. Fifteen critical values were defined and 2-4 doctors were assigned to receive short message service (SMS).Laboratory results in LIS and EMR were called back to the DIA server. The rule engine named U-brain in the CDSS server was run in real-time and decision if the laboratory data was critical was made. The CDSS system for alerting of laboratory critical values was fast and stable without additional burden to the entire EMR system. Continuous communication with clinicians and feedback of clinical performance are mandatory for the refinement and development of user-friendly CDSS contents. Appropriate clinical parameters are necessary for demonstration of the usefulness of the system.

Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Paik, Hyeon Young; Lee, Chi Woo; Bang, Su Mi; Hong, Joon Seok; Lee, Hyun Joo; Cho, In-Sook; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Hyun-Young; Kim, Yoon

415

Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com).

Hut, Piet

2008-05-01

416

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: A Chemical Laboratory Safety Audit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is an inspection form developed for use by college students to perform laboratory safety inspections. The form lists and classifies chemicals and is used to locate such physical facilities as: fume hoods, eye-wash fountains, deluge showers, and flammable storage cabinets. (BT)

Reich, Arthur R.; Harris, L. E.

1979-01-01

417

Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

Chadwick, Mark B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-20

418

Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper: Summary of Laboratory Astrophysics Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (NASA LAW) met at NASA Ames Research Center from 1-3 May 2002 to assess the role that laboratory astrophysics plays in the optimization of NASA missions, both at the science conception level and at the science return level. Space missions provide understanding of fundamental questions regarding the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems. In all of these areas the interpretation of results from NASA's space missions relies crucially upon data obtained from the laboratory. We stress that Laboratory Astrophysics is important not only in the interpretation of data, but also in the design and planning of future missions. We recognize a symbiosis between missions to explore the universe and the underlying basic data needed to interpret the data from those missions. In the following we provide a summary of the consensus results from our Workshop, starting with general programmatic findings and followed by a list of more specific scientific areas that need attention. We stress that this is a 'living document' and that these lists are subject to change as new missions or new areas of research rise to the fore.

2002-01-01

419

Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Materials Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical characterization of novel materials. In this laboratory unknown samples are characterized by identifying and quantifying molecular species present through the implementation of a suite of analytical instrumentation and techniques. This leads to the ability to deconvolute decomposition routes and elucidate reaction mechanisms of materials through thermal and evolved gas analysis. This aids in the synthesis of next generation materials that are tailored to optimize stability and performance. These techniques and next generation materials will have many applications. One particular focus is the stable and conductive tetherable cations for use as membrane materials in anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Another is to understand the leachant contaminants derived from balance of plant materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Once identified and quantified, these organic and ionic species are dosed as contaminants into ex/in-situ fuel cell tests, to determine the effect on durability and performance. This laboratory also acts in support of fuel cell catalysis, manufacturing, and other related projects. The Materials Characterization Laboratory will cover multiple analytical operations, with the overall goal of troubleshooting synthetic materials or process streams to improve performance. Having novel evolved gas analysis and other analytical capabilities; this laboratory provides a viable location to analyze small batch samples, whereas setting up these types of capabilities and expertise would be cost and time prohibitive for most institutions. Experiments that can be performed include: (1) Evolved gas analysis; (2) Heterogeneous catalysis; (3) Trace level contaminants analysis; (4) Catalyst characterization; (5) Kinetics and stability; (6) Hyphenated techniques; and (7) Isotopic analysis for elucidating reaction mechanisms and decoupling chemical reactions.

Not Available

2011-10-01

420

Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the competition results, a down select process will be performed in the upcoming year. Looking ahead, this unified effort has positioned each element for an in-flight lab analysis demonstration of select diagnostics measurements in the 2015 timeframe.

Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

2013-01-01

421

Evolution of Biological Complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its envi- ronment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of

Christoph Adami; Charles Ofria; Travis C. Collier

2000-01-01

422

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

423

Laboratory identification of arthropod ectoparasites.  

PubMed

The collection, handling, identification, and reporting of ectoparasitic arthropods in clinical and reference diagnostic laboratories are discussed in this review. Included are data on ticks, mites, lice, fleas, myiasis-causing flies, and bed bugs. The public health importance of these organisms is briefly discussed. The focus is on the morphological identification and proper handling and reporting of cases involving arthropod ectoparasites, particularly those encountered in the United States. Other arthropods and other organisms not of public health concern, but routinely submitted to laboratories for identification, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24396136

Mathison, Blaine A; Pritt, Bobbi S

2014-01-01

424

A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven these safety presentations, I have created a cooperative online trivia game. It has been my experience that the lab safety trivia game is an effective and entertaining way to teach lab safety.

Gublo, Kristin I.

2003-04-01

425

Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers  

SciTech Connect

Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L. [Institute of Physics and Mathematics, University of Michoacan, Bdg. C3-Ciudad Universitaria, Morelia, Michoacan, 58040 (Mexico)

2006-09-25

426

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) promotes its research to "secure an energy future for the nation that is environmentally and economically sustainable." The website summaries the Laboratory's variety of research and technology including photovoltaics, wind, biomass, geothermal energy, and hydrogen and fuel cells. Visitors can find out the latest NREL news and events. Visitors can locate materials about renewable energy and energy efficiency. The Publications Database offers references to a wide range of documents about sustainable energy technologies written or edited by NREL.

427

Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

2006-01-04

428

RECENT LASER ACCIDENTS AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

Recent laser accidents and incidents at research laboratories across the Department of Energy complex are reviewed in this paper. Factors that contributed to the accidents are examined. Conclusions drawn from the accident reports are summarized and compared. Control measures that could have been implemented to prevent the accidents will be summarized and compared. Recommendations for improving laser safety programs are outlined and progress toward achieving them are summarized.

ODOM, CONNON R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-02

429

Laboratory tools for DSP based real-time simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Real-time simulation is proving very useful in simulating complex and expensive systems using the high performance multi-processors. It has many applications in the area of testing of controllers and protection systems under real-field like situations. In this project, an effort has been made to prepare a low-cost system to carry out real-time simulation in an educational laboratory setting. The system

Rashesh P. Mehta; Mahesh B. Patil; Mukul Chandorkar

2011-01-01

430

The Lunar Surface: A Dusty Plasma Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lunar surface is an excellent laboratory to study dusty plasma processes that are relevant to all airless planetary objects. The solar wind and UV radiation lead to charging of exposed surfaces, and the formation of plasma sheaths above them. Near-surface intense electric fields are thought to be capable of mobilizing and transporting small charged dust particles. Remote sensing and in situ observations indicating dust transport on the Moon date back to the Apollo era and remain highly controversial. There are many unresolved issues about the physical processes that have to this point prevented the development of a coherent explanation for the existing observations. Dust transport on airless bodies can significantly alter our interpretation of spectral identification of asteroids, the small-scale surface features of Mercury, and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos. Understanding the behavior of dust laden plasma sheaths is of interest in basic plasma and planetary sciences, and holds the key to efficient dust hazard mitigation for the long-term use of optical and mechanical equipment used for robotic and/or human exploration. NASA Lunar Science Institute's Colorado Center of Lunar Dust is focused on experimental and theoretical investigations of dusty plasmas, and the effects of hypervelocity dust impacts on surfaces. This presentation will describe a series of small-scale laboratory experiments investigating the properties of photoelectron sheaths, and the emergence of intense electric fields near boundaries of lit and dark surfaces and regions shielded and exposed to the solar wind plasma flow. Our progress in the analysis and interpretation of the laboratory observations using simple analytic models and complex plasma simulation tools indicates that these models can be used to predict the expected properties of the lunar near-surface environment with increasing confidence. Based on our laboratory and theoretical efforts, we will also report on the status of the science, measurement and instrument requirements for a Lunar Dust Transport Package (LDTP) to be placed on the lunar surface. LDTP will measure the time-dependent characteristics of the plasma sheath, and observe both the high-speed impacts of interplanetary and interstellar dust, and the putative fluxes of low-speed, highly charged lunar dust particles. LDTP will bring closure to decades-long open issues about dusty plasma effects on the lunar surface, and all other airless bodies in our solar system.

Horanyi, M.; Brain, D.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

2011-12-01

431

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13

432

Titan's chemical complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review here our current knowledge of Titan's gas phase chemistry. We base our discussion on photochemical models as well as on laboratory experiments. We identify the lower mass positive [1,2] and negative [3] ions detected in the upper atmosphere and we show that their formation is a direct consequence of the presence of heavy neutrals. We demonstrate that the observed densities of CO, CO2 and H2O can be explained by a combination of exogenous O, and OH/H2O input [4]. We argue that benzene [5] and ammonia [6] are created in the upper atmosphere through complex chemical processes involving both neutral and ion chemistry. These species diffuse downward where they are at the origin of heavier aromatics and amines, respectively. Finally, we discuss the impact on hydrocarbon densities of recent theoretical calculations of the rate constants of association reactions [7]. [1] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and V. G. Anicich, Astrophys. J., 647, L175 (2006). [2] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and M. J. McEwan, Icarus, 191, 722 (2007). [3] V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, R. V. Yelle, M. Galand, A. Wellbrock, G. R. Lewis, A. J. Coates and J.-E. Wahlund, Planet. Space Sci., 57, 1558 (2009). [4] S. M. Hörst, V. Vuitton, and R. V. Yelle, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006 (2008). [5] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle and J. Cui, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E05007 (2008). [6] R. V. Yelle, V. Vuitton, P. Lavvas, S. J. Klippenstein, M. A. Smith, S. M. Hörst and J. Cui, Faraday Discuss., 147, 31 (2010). [7] V. Vuitton, R. V. Yelle, S. J. Klippenstein and P. Lavvas, Astrophys. J., in press.

Vuitton, Veronique

2012-04-01

433

Federal laboratories for the 21st century  

SciTech Connect

Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1998-04-01

434

Laboratory Procedures for Medical Assistants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the manual is to provide the medical assisting student a text which presents the common laboratory procedures in use today in physician's offices. The procedures for performing a complete urinalysis are outlined, along with those for carrying out various hematological tests. Information is also presented to help the student learn to…

Johnson, Pauline

435

Preparing Chimpanzees for Laboratory Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chimpanzee is the only representative of the Great Apes that is extensively involved in biomedical research in primate laboratories. These apes are used as animal models in a variety of studies, including research on infectious disease, parasitic disease, pharmacokinetic studies, neuro- science, cognition, and behavior. Chimpanzees used in biomedical research in the United States reside largely in six specialized

Mollie A. Bloomsmith; Steven J. Schapiro; Elizabeth A. Strobert

436

Running a Research Utilization Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the experiences of the Research Utilization Laboratory (RUL) of the Chicago Jewish Vocational Service over a five-year period. The topic is approached in terms of the elements involved in the utilization of research and in terms of the problems the RUL encountered. (Author)

Soloff, Asher; And Others

1975-01-01

437

Guide for Science Laboratory Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

General and specific safety procedures and recommendations for secondary school science laboratories are provided in this guide. Areas of concern include: (1) chemicals (storage, disposal, toxicity, unstable and incompatible chemicals); (2) microorganisms; (3) plants; (4) animals; (5) electricity; (6) lasers; (7) rockets; (8) eye safety and…

McDermott, John J.

438

Stationary Engineering Laboratory Manual--2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Stationary Engineering Laboratory Manual 2 was designed for vocational/technical high school students who have received instruction in the basics of stationary engineering. It was developed for students who will be operating a live plant and who will be responsible for supplying steam for heating, cooking, and baking. Each lesson in the manual…

Steingress, Frederick M.; Frost, Harold J.

439

The Pond Is Our Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This science teacher's laboratory is a pond within walking distance of his school that provides a stimulating environment for exploring the natural world. With simple materials students practice making careful observations, taking measurements and compiling and graphing information for their science studies. They also extend their pond experiences…

Marchewka, Barbara Turco

1978-01-01

440

ORAD Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, the Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry specializes in the analysis of satellite altimeter data related to problems in physical oceanography and marine geophysics. The Web site provides links to currently active projects with information such as near-real time sea level altimeter data, historical data, European Space Agency data, geophysics data, and more.

1969-12-31

441

Laboratory Animal Welfare Supplement IV.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is the fourth supplement to a 1984 bibliography on laboratory animal welfare. Items presented were selected because they represent some of the most significant of those providing recent information or because they were considered useful. The period covered is October, 1986 through October, 1987. Monographs, conference proceedings,…

Gluckstein, Fritz P., Comp.

442

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources, Northeast Utilities and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, RERL promotes education and research in solar and wind energy conversion technologies. The research program provides graduate students opportunities to develop a program of study and a thesis topic, at the M.S or Ph. D. level, in one of the currently active renewable energy research programs.

2007-10-17

443

CBRN mobile laboratories in Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes the experiences in Italy with the CBRN (Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear) defense mobile laboratories. These laboratories were constructed by the Italian Army and the Italian Fire Brigades. The purpose of these mobile laboratories is to allow quick transport of the labs to the area of crisis in order to support emergency response in case of CBRN events. The differences between two alternative solutions will be developed in the paper. The first solution is when the lab is to be located in the "dangerous area" (this solution was chosen by the Italian Army) and the alternative approach is to place the mobile lab just outside the dangerous area (this approach was selected by the Italian Fire Brigades). One of the most important devices inside the lab is the isolator (also called "glove box") which allows safe ingress and handling of the "suspicious" samples from the external environment. The isolator has a special chamber for transfer of the sample from the outside. The pressure of the isolator is permanently kept below the air pressure inside the lab by means of one (or more) fan. The operators perform the sample preparations or part of the analysis by handling the sample with the gloves. The material flow inside the lab will be described depending on the kind of identification analysis to be done on the samples. Other devices installed on the mobile CBRN laboratories are: biohazard hood (UE regulation, containment level 2); autoclave; freezer; cleaning skid (tanks, pumps, etc.).

Mari, Giorgio; Giraudi, Giampaolo; Bellino, Mariarosa; Pazienza, Michele; Garibaldi, Claudio; Lancia, Corrado

2009-05-01

444

Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

1985-01-01

445

Standard Specifications for Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Specifications are presented covering the components of electronic and electro-mechanical equipment, non-electrical materials for the teacher-student positions, and other items of a miscellaneous nature to provide for a complete, workable language laboratory facility. Instructions for the use of specifications are included for the purchaser,…

North Carolina State Dept. of Administration, Raleigh.

446

Daresbury Laboratory 1993/1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scientific programme based on the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) has continued in 1993/94 to be at the centre of the Daresbury Laboratory's work. The wide range of research in materials and surface science, atomic and molecular physics, chemistry ...

A. G. Buckley

1993-01-01

447

Staffing benchmarks for histology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes annual workloads for staff positions and work flow productivity (WFP) values from 247 human pathology, 31 veterinary, and 35 forensic histology laboratories (histolabs). There are single summaries for veterinary and forensic histolabs, but the data from human pathology are divided into 2 groups because of statistically significant differences between those from Spain and 6 Hispano American countries

René J. Buesa

2010-01-01

448

Productivity standards for histology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The information from 221 US histology laboratories (histolabs) and 104 from 24 other countries with workloads from 600 to 116 000 cases per year was used to calculate productivity standards for 23 technical and 27 nontechnical tasks and for 4 types of work flow indicators. The sample includes 254 human, 40 forensic, and 31 veterinary pathology services. Statistical analyses demonstrate that

René J. Buesa

2010-01-01

449

Computer control of check laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

By control of technical or organizational-technical objects is meant the introduction of corrections into their operating regimes and procedures on the basis of the information obtained and processed concerning these objects. Control of the work of a check laboratory presupposes, in particular, the periodic introduction of corrections into the solution of such problems as the selection of the optimal number

L. N. Zakashanskii; L. A. Lubochkov; D. I. Maiorov

1971-01-01

450

Virtual Molecular Dynamics Laboratory (VMDL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Molecular Dynamics Laboratory is a software and curriculum package that enables students to work with research quality molecular dynamics simulations. Users can easily visualize atomic motion, manipulate atomic interactions, and quantitatively investigate the resulting macroscopic properties of biological, chemical, and physical systems.

Studies, Center F.

451

Hadron Spectroscopy at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent results on hadron spectroscopy from Jefferson Laboratory's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) are presented. In particular we present results from the baryon resonance program for both electro- and photo- production. Also, we present very preliminary results on meson spectroscopy in p interactions, and new results on the observation of the exotic baryon, the Theta +.

Dennis P. Weygand

2004-08-01

452

Microcomputers in the physics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microcomputers are now being used extensively in physics laboratories and it is important for students to gain some computer literacy at an early stage. This article describes the facilities developed and the strategies followed at The Queen's University of Belfast to encourage the effective use of microcomputers.

Findlay, D.; Lamb, M. J.

1993-03-01

453

Off-Campus Laboratory Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Milligan College instituted an off-campus laboratory program for its student teachers. A team of classroom teachers works with the prospective teachers. At the sophomore level some observation and teaching is done by students who are then evaluated. During the junior level a student is assigned one child to aid in reading abilities for 5 weeks.…

Gilbreath, Allie Lou Felton

454

Laboratory Maintenance of Rickettsia rickettsii  

PubMed Central

This unit includes protocols for the laboratory maintenance of the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, including propagation in mammalian cell cultures, as well as isolation, counting, and storage procedures. Regulations for working with R. rickettsii in biosafety level 3 containment are also discussed.

Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

2009-01-01

455

Laboratory Connections. Gas Monitoring Transducers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses three types of sensors; pressure, gas detection, and relative humidity. Explains their use for laboratory measurements of gas pressure and detection of specific gaseous species. Shows diagrams of devices and circuits along with examples and applications including microcomputer interfacing. (RT)

Powers, Michael H.

1988-01-01

456

School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide presents information about ordering, using, storing, and maintaining chemicals in the high school laboratory. The guide also provides information about chemical waste, safety and emergency equipment, assessing chemical hazards, common safety symbols and signs, and fundamental resources relating to chemical safety, such as Material…

Brundage, Patricia; Palassis, John

2006-01-01

457

Institute of Laboratory Animal Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Institute Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) is a component of the Commission on Life Sciences (CLS), National Research Council (NRC). Partial support for ILAR has been provided for many years from file Department of file Army to enable ILAR to fulfill...

R. Dell

2000-01-01

458

Institute for Laboratory Animal Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) is a component of the Division on Earth and Life Studies (DELS) at The National Academies. The Department of the Army has provided partial support for ILAR for many years to enable to ILAR fulfill its mi...

J. Zurlo

2002-01-01

459

Parent Handbook, Laboratory Nursery School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for parents whose children attend the laboratory nursery school of the University of Minnesota, this handbook contains information regarding the nursery school's goals, operation, and policies. Specifically, the booklet discusses program philosophy and content as they relate to training new teachers and conducting research, specifying…

Galle, Lynn

460

Pollution Microbiology, A Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is designed for use in the laboratory phase of courses dealing with microbial aspects of pollution. It attempts to cover the subject area broadly in four major categories: (1) microorganisms in clean and polluted waters, (2) carbonaceous pollutants, (3) nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, and sulfur as pollutants, and (4) sanitary…

Finstein, Melvin S.

461

Botulism: Laboratory Methods and Epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although food botulism (FB) in Argentina was described by 1911, the first documented outbreak was recorded in 1922. In 1957, an outbreak of type A FB caused by red bell peppers was the first laboratory confirmation of botulism in Argentina. From 1922 to 1997, 70 FB outbreaks affecting 242 persons with 111 deaths (case fatality rate, 46%) were reported in

Rafael Alfredo Fernández; Alberto Segundo Ciccarelli

1999-01-01

462

SAFETY IN THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

MONTHLY ARTICLES ON LABORATORY SAFETY THAT APPEARED IN THE "JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION" BETWEEN JANUARY 1964, AND JANUARY 1967, ARE COMBINED IN THIS MANUAL FOR HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CHEMISTRY TEACHERS. A GENERAL SECTION DEALS WITH (1) RESPONSIBILITY FOR ACCIDENT PREVENTION, (2) SAFETY CONSIDERATION IN RESEARCH PROPOSALS, (3) A SAFETY…

STEERE, NORMAN V.

463

In-Flight Laboratory Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One-year study objectives align with HRP requirements. HRP requirements include measurement panels for research and medical operations - These measurement panels are distinctly different. Instrument requirements are defined - Power, volume and mass not quite a critical limitation as for medical operations (deep space exploration missions). One-year evaluation goals will lead HHC towards in-flight laboratory analysis capability.

Baumann, David; Perusek, Gail; Nelson, Emily; Krihak, Michael; Brown, Dan

2012-01-01

464

Biological Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This laboratory located about 40 miles west of Detroit, near the intersection of highways I-94 and US-23, can be reached by bus, railroad, or via commercial airlines to Detroit Willow Run or Metropolitan airports. Field biological stations are located in Wisconsin at Ashland; in Ohio at Sandusky; and in Michigan at Ludington, Marquette, Millersburg, and Northville.

Moffett, James W.

1963-01-01

465

Laser Safety in the Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deals with the subject of laser hazards, laser hazards control, and laser safety practices in the laboratory. Describes four categories of hazards: radiative, electrical, explosive, and toxic, and explains the status of federal regulations that seek to define lazer hazards and control safety standards. (Author/GS)

Weichel, H.; And Others

1974-01-01

466

Laser Safety in the Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the subject of laser hazards, laser hazards control, and laser safety practices in the laboratory. Laser hazards, which fall into four categories (radiative, electrical, explosive, and toxic) are described in detail. Following this, the status of federal regulations which seek to define laser hazards control and safety standards is briefly reviewed. The paper concludes with a

H. Weichel; W. A. Danne; L. S. Pedrotti

1974-01-01

467

ORAD Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, the Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry specializes in the analysis of satellite altimeter data related to problems in physical oceanography and marine geophysics. The Web site provides links to currently active projects with information such as near-real time sea level altimeter data, historical data, European Space Agency data, geophysics data, and more.

2008-04-01

468

Surgical Planning Laboratory Image Gallery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. The SPL offers of series of over 60 MPEG movies on topics such as neurosurgery, multiple sclerosis, the brain, abdominal surgery, flow analysis, and thoracic surgery, among others.

1996-01-01

469

A Unified Introductory Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory procedures are explained for taking benzoic acid and using it or one of its derivatives throughout an introductory lab course. Synthesis, purification, weight determination, identification of an acid, equilibrium constant, salt preparation, salt analysis, and salt solubility measurements are involved in the semester's experience. (DS)

Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

1971-01-01