Sample records for wscf laboratory complex

  1. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF)

    SciTech Connect

    BATES, J.A.

    2000-05-01

    This NOC application is provided to update the description of amounts of material handled, and to update the calculation of potential for emissions and resultant calculation of offsite TEDE. This NOC also includes an updated description of the various emission units at WSCF, including use of portable tanks to receive and remove liquid waste contaminated with low levels of radioactive contamination. The resultant, adjusted estimate for TEDE to the hypothetical MEI due to all combined unabated emissions from WSCF is 1.4 E-02 millirem per year. The total adjusted estimate for all combined abated emissions is 2.8 E-03 millirem per year. No single emission unit at the WSCF Complex exceeds a potential (unabated) offsite dose of 2.7 E-03 millirem per year.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

    2008-09-30

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

  3. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  13. LABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS

    E-print Network

    McCrickard, Scott

    LABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS William D. Humphries, Dennis. Carroll Penn State University State College, PA This paper describes a new laboratory model developed for studying complex CSCW phenomena. In our prior work a more ecological laboratory approach was developed

  14. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bartley; Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-01-01

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory

  15. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  16. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  17. 76 FR 49491 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration; Extension of...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The deadline...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The...

  18. 76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration AGENCY: Centers...Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The Demonstration...3113 for being a complex diagnostic laboratory test under the Demonstration. The...

  19. 2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. The Components Test Laboratory (T-27) is located in the immediate foreground. Immediately uphill to the left of T-27 is the Boiler Chiller Plant (T-28H). To the left of T-28H is the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D). Behind the T-28D is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B). The twin gantry structure at the left is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

    2010-05-01

    In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

  1. Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Many of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. The low temperatures of these ices (T < 50 K) preclude most chemical reactions, but photolysis can drive reactions that produce a suite of new species, many of which are complex organics. We study the UV and proton radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to explore links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in comets and meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggest that such links are plausible. Once identified, these species may serve as markers of interstellar heritage of cometary dust and meteorites. Of particular interest are our findings that UV photolysis of interstellar ice analogs produce molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quinones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones are essential in vital metabolic roles such as electron transport. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are photolyzed in interstellar ices. In the case of anthracene-containing ices, we have observed the production of 9-anthrone and 9,10 anthraquinone, both of which have been observed in the Murchison meteorite. Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are photolyzed. These amphiphiles self-assemble into fluorescent vesicles when placed in liquid water, as do Murchison extracts. Both have the ability to trap an ionic dye. Photolysis of plausible ices can also produce alanine, serine, and glycine as well as a number of small alcohols and amines. Flash heating of the room temperature residue generated by such experiments generates mass spectral distributions similar to those of IDPs. The detection of high D/H ratios in some interstellar molecular species, and the knowledge that many of the organics, such as hydroxy and amino acids, in primitive meteorites are D-enriched provides evidence for a connection between intact organic material in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. Thus, some of the oxidized aromatics, amphiphiles, amino acids, hydroxy acids, and other compounds found in meteorites may have had an interstellar ancestry and not solely a product of parent body aqueous alteration. Such compounds should also be targeted for searches of organics in cometary dust.

  2. Advanced Benchmarking for Complex Building Types: Laboratories as an Exemplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul A.; Clear, Robert; Kircher, Kevin; Webster, Tom; Lee, Kwang Ho; Hoyt, Tyler

    2010-08-01

    Complex buildings such as laboratories, data centers and cleanrooms present particular challenges for energy benchmarking because it is difficult to normalize special requirements such as health and safety in laboratories and reliability (i.e., system redundancy to maintain uptime) in data centers which significantly impact energy use. For example, air change requirements vary widely based on the type of work being performed in each laboratory space. We present methods and tools for energy benchmarking in laboratories, as an exemplar of a complex building type. First, we address whole building energy metrics and normalization parameters. We present empirical methods based on simple data filtering as well as multivariate regression analysis on the Labs21 database. The regression analysis showed lab type, lab-area ratio and occupancy hours to be significant variables. Yet the dataset did not allow analysis of factors such as plug loads and air change rates, both of which are critical to lab energy use. The simulation-based method uses an EnergyPlus model to generate a benchmark energy intensity normalized for a wider range of parameters. We suggest that both these methods have complementary strengths and limitations. Second, we present"action-oriented" benchmarking, which extends whole-building benchmarking by utilizing system-level features and metrics such as airflow W/cfm to quickly identify a list of potential efficiency actions which can then be used as the basis for a more detailed audit. While action-oriented benchmarking is not an"audit in a box" and is not intended to provide the same degree of accuracy afforded by an energy audit, we demonstrate how it can be used to focus and prioritize audit activity and track performance at the system level. We conclude with key principles that are more broadly applicable to other complex building types.

  3. 42 CFR 493.20 - Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.20 Laboratories performing tests of moderate...

  4. 42 CFR 493.25 - Laboratories performing tests of high complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of high complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.25 Laboratories performing tests of high...

  5. 42 CFR 493.25 - Laboratories performing tests of high complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of high complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.25 Laboratories performing tests of high...

  6. 42 CFR 493.20 - Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.20 Laboratories performing tests of moderate...

  7. 42 CFR 493.25 - Laboratories performing tests of high complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of high complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.25 Laboratories performing tests of high...

  8. 42 CFR 493.20 - Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.20 Laboratories performing tests of moderate...

  9. 42 CFR 493.25 - Laboratories performing tests of high complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of high complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.25 Laboratories performing tests of high...

  10. 42 CFR 493.20 - Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.20 Laboratories performing tests of moderate...

  11. 42 CFR 493.20 - Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of moderate complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.20 Laboratories performing tests of moderate...

  12. 42 CFR 493.25 - Laboratories performing tests of high complexity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratories performing tests of high complexity...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 493.25 Laboratories performing tests of high...

  13. Summary of Laboratory Capabilities Fact Sheets Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility and 222-S Laboratory Complex

    SciTech Connect

    HADLEY, R.M.

    2002-09-12

    This summary of laboratory capabilities is provided to assist prospective responders to the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Requests for Proposal (RFP) issued or to be issued. The RFPs solicit development of treatment technologies as categorized in the CHG Requests for Information (RFI): Solid-Liquid Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG01; Cesium and Technetium Separations Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG02; Sulfate Removal Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG03; Containerized Grout Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG04; Bulk Vitrification Technology - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG05; and TRU Tank Waste Solidification for Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - SOL: Reference-Number-CHG06 Hanford Analytical Services, Technology Project Management (TPM), has the capability and directly related experience to provide breakthrough innovations and solutions to the challenges presented in the requests. The 222-S Complex includes the 70,000 sq ft 222-S Laboratory, plus several support buildings. The laboratory has 11 hot cells for handling and analyzing highly radioactive samples, including tank farm waste. Inorganic, organic, and radiochemical analyses are performed on a wide variety of air, liquid, soil, sludge, and biota samples. Capabilities also include development of process technology and analytical methods, and preparation of analytical standards. The TPM staff includes many scientists with advanced degrees in chemistry (or closely related fields), over half of which are PhDs. These scientists have an average 20 years of Hanford experience working with Hanford waste in a hot cell environment. They have hundreds of publications related to Hanford tank waste characterization and process support. These would include, but are not limited to, solid-liquid separations engineering, physical chemistry, particle size analysis, and inorganic chemistry. TPM has had revenues in excess of $1 million per year for the past decade in above technology or similar related work. The abbreviated Bibliography, which follows, is an example of experience for Solicitations 1,2 and 3.

  14. Complex networks and waveforms from acoustic emissions in laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Thompson, B. D.; Young, R. P.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the physics of acoustic excitations emitted during the cracking of materials is one of the long-standing challenges for material scientists and geophysicists. In this study, we report novel results of applications of functional complex networks on acoustic emission waveforms emitted during the evolution of frictional interfaces. Our results show that laboratory faults at microscopic scales undergo a sequence of generic phases, including strengthening, weakening or fast slip and slow slip, leading to healing. For the first time we develop a formulation on the dissipated energy due to acoustic emission signals in terms of short-term and long-term features (i.e., networks' characteristics) of events. We illuminate the transition from regular to slow ruptures. We show that this transition can lead to the onset of the critical rupture class similar to the direct observations of this phenomenon in the transparent samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate the detailed submicron evolution of the interface due to the short-term evolution of the rupture tip. As another novel result, we find that the nucleation phase of most amplified events follows a nearly constant timescale, corresponding to the initial strengthening or locking of the interface. This likely indicates that a thermally activated process can play a crucial role near the moving crack tip.

  15. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  16. Epigenetics of Complex Diseases: From General Theory to Laboratory Experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Schumacher; A. Petronis

    Despite significant effort, understanding the causes and mechanisms of complex non-Mendelian diseases remains a key challenge.\\u000a Although numerous molecular genetic linkage and association studies have been conducted in order to explain the heritable\\u000a predisposition to complex diseases, the resulting data are quite often inconsistent and even controversial. In a similar way,\\u000a identification of environmental factors causal to a disease is

  17. Diamagnetic Anisotropy: Two Iron Complexes as Laboratory Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ignacio; Sanchez, Jorge Fernando Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    There are relatively few experiments describing the NMR properties of bis(amine) iron(II) phthalocyanine complexes. Several features make this experiment attractive: First, it nicely illustrates the diamagnetic anisotropy phenomena, providing both students and teachers an opportunity to gain insight into aspects such as phase correction and…

  18. Complex organics in laboratory simulations of interstellar/cometary ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1997-05-01

    We present the photochemical and thermal evolution of both non-polar and polar ices representative of interstellar and pre-cometary grains. Ultraviolet photolysis of the non-polar ices comprised of O_2, N_2, and CO produces CO_2, N_2O, O_3, CO_3, HCO, H_2CO, and possibly NO and NO_2. When polar ice analogs (comprised of H_2O, CH_3OH, CO, and NH_3) are exposed to UV radiation, simple molecules are formed including: H_2, H_2CO, CO_2, CO, CH_4, and HCO. (the formyl radical). Warming produces moderately complex species such as CH_3CH_2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH_2 (formamide), CH_3C(=O)NH_2 (acetamide), R-CN and/or R-NC (nitriles and/or isonitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. Infrared spectroscopy, ^1H and^13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrate that after warming to room temperature what remains is an organic residue composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C_6H_12N_4) and other complex organics including the amides above and polyoxymethylene (POM) and its derivatives. The formation of these organic species from simple starting mixtures under conditions germane to astrochemistry may have important implications for the organic chemistry of interstellar ice grains, comets and the origins of life.

  19. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Anderson; B. D. Lewis

    1989-01-01

    A complex sequence of layered basalt flows, cinders, and sediment underlies the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. Wells drilled to 700 feet penetrate a sequence of 10 basalt-flow groups and 7 major sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 100,000 to 600,000 years old. The 10 flow groups consist of 22

  20. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho national Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Anderson; B. D. Lewis

    1989-01-01

    A complex sequence of layered basalt flows, cinders, and sediment underlies the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. Wells drilled to 700 ft penetrate a sequence of 10 basalt-flow groups and 7 major sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 100,000 to 600,000 years old. The 10 flow groups consist of 22

  1. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of the unsaturated zone, Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Rightmire; B. D. Lewis

    1987-01-01

    To assess the potential migration of low-level radioactive waste in the shallow subsurface, a study on the geochemistry of the unsaturated zone at the Radioactive Waste Management complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, on the eastern Snake River Plain in southeastern Idaho was done. Stable isotope and chemical data suggest that the perched water obseved beneath the RWMC is not

  2. Complex plasma laboratory PK3 Plus on the International Space Station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. M. Thomas; G. E. Morfill; V. E. Fortov; A. V. Ivlev; V. I. Molotkov; A. M. Lipaev; T. Hagl; H. Rothermel; S. A. Khrapak; R. K. Suetterlin; M. Rubin-Zuzic; O. F. Petrov; V. I. Tokarev; S. K. Krikalev

    2008-01-01

    PK-3 Plus is the second-generation laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). It has more advanced hardware, software and diagnostics than its precursor PKE-Nefedov (Nefedov et al 2003 New J. Phys. 5 33). The first experiments with PK-3 Plus show the perfect functioning of the apparatus and provide much better insights

  3. A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette, E-mail: atordesi@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia (Australia)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia (Australia); Small, Michael [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Behringer, Robert P. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Tse, Chi K. [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-03-15

    We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

  4. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  5. Comparison of in situ uranium KD values with a laboratory determined surface complexation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Reactive solute transport simulations in groundwater require a large number of parameters to describe hydrologic and chemical reaction processes. Appropriate methods for determining chemical reaction parameters required for reactive solute transport simulations are still under investigation. This work compares U(VI) distribution coefficients (i.e. KD values) measured under field conditions with KD values calculated from a surface complexation model developed in the laboratory. Field studies were conducted in an alluvial aquifer at a former U mill tailings site near the town of Naturita, CO, USA, by suspending approximately 10 g samples of Naturita aquifer background sediments (NABS) in 17-5.1-cm diameter wells for periods of 3 to 15 months. Adsorbed U(VI) on these samples was determined by extraction with a pH 9.45 NaHCO3/Na2CO3 solution. In wells where the chemical conditions in groundwater were nearly constant, adsorbed U concentrations for samples taken after 3 months of exposure to groundwater were indistinguishable from samples taken after 15 months. Measured in situ K D values calculated from the measurements of adsorbed and dissolved U(VI) ranged from 0.50 to 10.6 mL/g and the KD values decreased with increasing groundwater alkalinity, consistent with increased formation of soluble U(VI)-carbonate complexes at higher alkalinities. The in situ K D values were compared with KD values predicted from a surface complexation model (SCM) developed under laboratory conditions in a separate study. A good agreement between the predicted and measured in situ KD values was observed. The demonstration that the laboratory derived SCM can predict U(VI) adsorption in the field provides a critical independent test of a submodel used in a reactive transport model. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complexity of the Interpersonal Self and Affective Reactions to Interpersonal Stressors in Life and in the Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence H. Cohen; Natalia Pane; Hugh S. Smith

    1997-01-01

    Self-complexity refers to the number and interrelatedness of a person's conceptions of himself or herself. In both a naturalistic survey and a laboratory study, we applied self-complexity theory to test a marker of cognitive vulnerability to interpersonal stress, specifically the aspect impact quotient (AIQ) of the interpersonal self. A high interpersonal AIQ reflects an interpersonal self with a large number

  7. Naturally acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in laboratory pig-tailed macaques

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A; Wilbur, Alicia K; Westmark, Andrew; Horn, Dara; Johnson, Jordan; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a case series from a primate research facility. The index case, a 4-year-old pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) experimentally infected with chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVSF162 P4), developed weight loss and was euthanized. Based on necropsy results the animal was diagnosed with opportunistic atypical mycobacteriosis associated with simian AIDS (SAIDS). Subsequently, tissues from the index animal, as well as tissues and oral mucosal swabs from six SHIV-infected contacts, were analyzed using molecular methods and found to contain nucleic acid sequences characteristic of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). These data suggest that existing protocols fail to reliably detect MTBC infection in laboratory primates used as experimental models.

  8. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease. PMID:25988157

  9. Errors and electronic prescribing: a controlled laboratory study to examine task complexity and interruption effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon Y W; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of interruptions and task complexity on error rates when prescribing with computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, and to categorize the types of prescribing errors. Design Two within-subject factors: task complexity (complex vs simple) and interruption (interruption vs no interruption). Thirty-two hospital doctors used a CPOE system in a computer laboratory to complete four prescribing tasks, half of which were interrupted using a counterbalanced design. Measurements Types of prescribing errors, error rate, resumption lag, and task completion time. Results Errors in creating and updating electronic medication charts that were measured included failure to enter allergy information; selection of incorrect medication, dose, route, formulation, or frequency of administration from lists and drop-down menus presented by the CPOE system; incorrect entry or omission in entering administration times, start date, and free-text qualifiers; and omissions in prescribing and ceasing medications. When errors occurred, the error rates across the four prescribing tasks ranged from 0.5% (1 incorrect medication selected out of 192 chances for selecting a medication or error opportunities) to 16% (5 failures to enter allergy information out of 32 error opportunities). Any impact of interruptions on prescribing error rates and task completion times was not detected in our experiment. However, complex tasks took significantly longer to complete (F(1, 27)=137.9; p<0.001) and when execution was interrupted they required almost three times longer to resume compared to simple tasks (resumption lag complex=9.6?seconds, SD=5.6; resumption lag simple=3.4?seconds, SD=1.7; t(28)=6.186; p<0.001). Conclusion Most electronic prescribing errors found in this study could be described as slips in using the CPOE system to create and update electronic medication charts. Cues available within the user interface may have aided resumption of interrupted tasks making CPOE systems robust to some interruption effects. Further experiments are required to rule out any effect interruption might have on CPOE error rates. PMID:20819867

  10. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.R.; Lewis, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    A complex sequence of layered basalt flows, cinders, and sediment underlies the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. Wells drilled to 700 ft penetrate a sequence of 10 basalt-flow groups and 7 major sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 100,000 to 600,000 years old. The 10 flow groups consist of 22 separate lava flows and flow-units. Each flow group is made up of from one to five petrographically similar flows that erupted from common source areas during periods of less than 200 years. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and wind-blown deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated during periods of volcanic inactivity ranging from thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. Flows and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 600 ft. Flows and sediment below a depth of 600 ft are saturated and make up the uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The areal extent of flow groups and interbeds was determined from well cuttings, cores, geophysical logs, potassium-argon ages, and geomagnetic properties. Stratigraphical control was provided by four sequential basalt flows near the base of the unsaturated zone that have reversed geomagnetic polarity and high emission of natural gamma radiation compared to other flows. Natural gamma logs were used as a primary correlation tool. Natural-gamma emissions, which are generally uniform in related, petrographically similar flows, increase or decrease between petrographically dissimilar flows of different age and source. (USGS)

  11. Sampling and analysis plan for sampling of liquid waste streams generated by 222-S Laboratory Complex operations

    SciTech Connect

    Benally, A.B.

    1997-08-14

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) establishes the requirements and guidelines to be used by the Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. personnel in characterizing liquid waste generated at the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The characterization process to verify the accuracy of process knowledge used for designation and subsequent management of wastes consists of three steps: to prepare the technical rationale and the appendix in accordance with the steps outlined in this SAP; to implement the SAP by sampling and analyzing the requested waste streams; and to compile the report and evaluate the findings to the objectives of this SAP. This SAP applies to portions of the 222-S Laboratory Complex defined as Generator under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Any portion of the 222-S Laboratory Complex that is defined or permitted under RCRA as a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility is excluded from this document. This SAP applies to the liquid waste generated in the 222-S Laboratory Complex. Because the analytical data obtained will be used to manage waste properly, including waste compatibility and waste designation, this SAP will provide directions for obtaining and maintaining the information as required by WAC173-303.

  12. Elucidating multipollutant exposure across a complex metropolitan area by systematic deployment of a mobile laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, I.; Mihele, C.; Lu, G.; Narayan, J.; Hilker, N.; Brook, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    In urban areas, air quality is the outcome of multiple emission sources, each emitting a different combination of air pollutants. The result is a complex mixture of pollutants with a different spatiotemporal variability for each constituent. Studies exploring average spatial patterns across urban areas typically rely on air quality monitoring networks of a few sites, short multi-site saturation monitoring campaigns measuring a limited number of pollutants and/or air quality models. Each of these options has limitations. This study elucidates the main complexities of urban air quality with respect to small scale spatial differences for multiple pollutants so as to gain a better understanding of the variability in exposure estimates in urban areas. Mobile measurements of 23 air pollutants were taken at high resolution in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and examined with respect to space, time and their interrelationships. The same route was systematically followed on 34 measurement days spread over different seasons and measurements were compared to adjacent air quality monitoring network stations. This approach allowed linkage of the mobile measurements to the network observations and to generate average maps that provide reliable information on the typical, annual average spatial pattern. Sharp differences in the spatial distribution were found to exist between different pollutants on the sub-urban scale, i.e. the neighbourhood to street scales, even for pollutants usually associated with the same specific sources. Nearby microenvironments may have a wide range in average pollution levels varying by up to 300%, which may cause large misclassification errors in estimating chronic exposures in epidemiological studies. For example, NO2 measurements next to a main road microenvironment are shown to be 210-265% higher than levels measured at a nearby urban background monitoring site, while black carbon is higher by 180-200% and ultrafine particles are 300% higher. For some pollutants (e.g. SO2 and benzene), there is good correspondence on a large scale due to similar emission sources, but differences on a small scale in proximity to these sources. Moreover. hotspots of different pollutants were identified and quantified. These results demonstrate the ability of an independent heavily instrumented mobile laboratory survey to quantify the representativeness of the monitoring sites to unmonitored locations, reveal the complex relationships between pollutants and understand chronic multi-pollutant exposure patterns associated with outdoor concentrations in an urban environment.

  13. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  14. The University of Michigan Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex Eigenvalue Analysis

    E-print Network

    Daly, Samantha

    for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex Eigenvalue Analysis Real Asymmetric Matrix Eigenvalue Analysis Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex of Michigan Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise

  15. Complexities associated with the molecular and proteomic identification of Paecilomyces species in the clinical mycology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Barker, Adam P; Horan, Jennifer L; Slechta, E Susan; Alexander, Barbara D; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2014-07-01

    Paecilomyces species are emerging fungal pathogens. Morphological identifications are complicated by similarities among the members of the P. variotii complex as well as to some Rasamsonia and Hamigera species. The purpose of this study was to compare matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with molecular diagnostic standards (i.e., multilocus DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2, D1/D2 regions, and part of the ?-tubulin gene) for the identification of Paecilomyces spp. encountered in two clinical mycology laboratories. A total of 77 clinical isolates identified morphologically as P. variotii (n = 21), P. lilacinus (n = 52), and Paecilomyces spp. not otherwise specified (n = 4) were included. In accord with the most recent taxonomy, all P. lilacinus isolates were confirmed as Purpureocillium lilacinum by both sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS. Fungi phenotypically resembling P. variotii or Paecilomyces spp. were identified by molecular techniques as P. variotii sensu stricto (n = 12), P. formosus (n = 3), P. dactylethromorphus (n = 3), Rasamsonia argillacea (n = 4), or R. piperina (n = 1) and at the genus level as an isolate of a Hamigera sp. and a Paecilomyces sp. There was 92.2% (71/77) agreement between the molecular and proteomic methods only after supplementation of the MALDI-TOF MS database with type strains. Paecilomyces variotii-like organisms required multilocus DNA interrogations for differentiation and account for all of the fungi whose identification was missed by MALDI-TOF MS. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS was a rapid and reliable alternative to multilocus sequencing. However, significant augmentation of the commercially available database was required to reproducibly identify this group of important human pathogens. PMID:24687961

  16. Contributions by Wave Propagation Laboratory to EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) complex-terrain model-development project. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) participated in the Environmental Protection Agency's Complex Terrain Model Development Project, whose objective is development of numerical air-quality models valid in complex terrain. Particular attention was given to impaction of elevated plumes on high terrain during stable (nocturnal) conditions. WPL operated a plume-mapping lidar, acoustic sounders (some with Doppler capability), sonic anemometers, a tethered sonde, and crosswind optical anemometers. Measurements were usually displayed in real time for experimental guidance and later processed with quality assurance for quantitative analysis. A synopsis of data acquisition and archiving is given for each experiment, including a review of the results of scientific analyses already completed.

  17. Recent developments of high-complexity HgCdTe focal plane arrays at leti infrared laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Destéfanis; A. Astier; J. Baylet; P. Castelein; J. P. Chamonal; E. Deborniol; O. Gravand; F. Marion; J. L. Martin; A. Million; P. Rambaud; F. Rothan; J. P. Zanatta

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we present recent developments of the research in France at LETI infrared laboratory in the field of complex\\u000a third-generation HgCdTe IRCMOS focal plane arrays (FPAs). We illustrate this with three prototypes of FPAs made at LETI, which\\u000a have involved some technological improvements from the standard process today in production at Sofradir. We present, using\\u000a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)

  18. Gibbs Energy Changes during Cobalt Complexation: A Thermodynamics Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGrand, Michael J.; Abrams, M. Leigh; Jenkins, Judith L.; Welch, Lawrence E.

    2011-01-01

    By adding a large quantity of Cl[superscript -] to an aqueous solution of CoCl[subscript 2][multiplied by]6H[subscript 2]O, a mixture containing a red octahedral cobalt complex and a blue tetrahedral complex is produced. When the solution temperature is modified, the equilibrium constant, K[subscript eq], of the complexation reaction is shifted…

  19. Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples – An adjunct to cultural method of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Oyebode A. T.; Ogbolu, Olusoga D.; Alaka, Olubunmi O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis, a communicable disease with significant morbidity and mortality, is the leading cause of death in the world from bacterial infectious disease. Because of its public health importance, there is need for rapid and definitive method of detecting the causative organism. Several approaches have been attempted, but the molecular methods, especially Polymerase Chain Reaction assays are the most promising for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. Aim: This study was aimed at using Polymerase Chain Reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples using universal sample processing methodology. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred clinical samples sent to Tuberculosis laboratories in Ibadan and Osogbo, Nigeria, were enrolled in this study. The samples were processed by universal sample processing methodology for PCR; smear microscopy was carried out on sputum samples by Ziehl Nelseen staining technique; and cultured on Middlebrook agar medium containing oleic acid albumin dextrose complex supplement after decontamination of samples. Results: Ninety six (48%) samples were detected positive for M. tuberculosis complex by polymerase chain reaction using the combination of boiling and vortexing and microscopy detected 72 (36%) samples positive for acid fast bacilli. Using culture method as gold standard, it was found that polymerase chain reaction assay was more sensitive (75.5%) and specific (94.8%) than microscopy (sensitivity of 48.5% and specificity of 85.7%) in detecting M. tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. There was significant difference in detecting M. tuberculosis from clinical samples when compared to microscopy (p<0.05). Conclusion: The study recommends that direct molecular detection of M. tuberculosis complex is sensitive and specific and polymerase chain reaction method should be used as an adjunct to other methods of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22540099

  20. Development and implementation of an electronic interface for complex clinical laboratory instruments without a vendor-provided data transfer interface

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Gary E.; Virji, Mohamed A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Clinical pathology laboratories increasingly use complex instruments that incorporate chromatographic separation, e.g. liquid chromatography, with mass detection for rapid identification and quantification of biochemicals, biomolecules, or pharmaceuticals. Electronic data management for these instruments through interfaces with laboratory information systems (LIS) is not generally available from the instrument manufacturers or LIS vendors. Unavailability of a data management interface is a limiting factor in the use of these instruments in clinical laboratories where there is a demand for high-throughput assays with turn-around times that meet patient care needs. Materials and Methods: Professional society guidelines for design and transfer of data between instruments and LIS were used in the development and implementation of the interface. File transfer protocols and support utilities were written to facilitate transfer of information between the instruments and the LIS. An interface was created for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy instruments to manage data in the Sunquest® LIS. Results: Interface validation, implementation and data transfer fidelity as well as training of technologists for use of the interface was performed by the LIS group. The technologists were familiarized with the data verification process as a part of the data management protocol. The total time for the technologists for patient/control sample data entry, assay results data transfer, and results verification was reduced from approximately 20 s per sample to <1 s per sample. Sample identification, results data entry errors, and omissions were eliminated. There was electronic record of the technologist performing the assay runs and data management. Conclusions: Development of a data management interface for complex, chromatography instruments in clinical laboratories has resulted in rapid, accurate, verifiable information transfers between instruments and LIS. This has eliminated manual data entry that is prone to errors and enabled technologists to focus on analytical applications on the instruments. PMID:21383937

  1. Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

  2. Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kass, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

  3. Laboratory Investigations of Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Much of Pluto’s surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto’s atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-? UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low-temperature N2-, CH4-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near-IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft in 2015, will give the first close-up measurements of ices and their photoproducts. Laboratory measurements and experiments will provide a better context for the data returned by the spacecraft.

  4. Aggradational and erosional history of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dechert, T.V.; McDaniel, P.A.; Falen, A.L. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Long-term performance of the low-level waste disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is partially dependent on the stability of the land surface with respect to erosion of cover materials. This document discusses the aggradational and erosional history of the naturally occurring sediments and soils in and around the RWMC, focusing on the late-Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. Other related issues include the ages of the various deposits, the extent to which they have been altered by soil formation and other processes, their relationships to the basalt flows in the area, and the impact of human activity on the materials at the RWMC.

  5. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  6. Racial divergence of a rare laboratory-evolved centromeric fission Cytorace of nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bijaya, Thongatabam; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2010-05-01

    Fissioncytorace-1, a member of the nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila is an evolutionary product of centric fission, which had occurred in the chromosome X3 of Cytorace 1, a hydridization product of Drosophila nasuta nasuta male (2n=8) and Drosophila nasuta albomicans female (2n=6). Cytorace 1 (males 2n=7; females 2n=6) has inherited this chromosome from its D. n. albomicans parent. The chromosome X3 of D. n. albomicans is a derivative of a centric fusion between the acrocentric chromosome 3 and the chromosome X of D. n. nasuta. The Fissioncytorace-1 has crossed 200 generations from the time of its evolution in the laboratory environment. When this centromeric fission race was subjected to some of the morphophenotypic and fitness assessment to find its overall population fitness showed, increased body size, sternopleural bristle, ovarioles, lifetime fecundity and fertility with reduced interspecific competitive ability and hatching success when compared with its parent (Cytorace 1). These results suggest that the hybrid races must have encountered an early event of recombinational raciation during their evolution in the laboratory environment, which is a unique observation in animal system illustrating the increase in the tempo of evolution after the event of hybridization. PMID:20795370

  7. Elucidating multipollutant exposure across a complex metropolitan area by systematic deployment of a mobile laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, I.; Mihele, C.; Lu, G.; Narayan, J.; Hilker, N.; Brook, J. R.

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluates a deployment strategy of a heavily instrumented mobile lab for characterizing multipollutant spatial patterns based upon a limited number of measurement days spread over different seasons. The measurements obtained through this deployment strategy are used to gain insight into average pollutant levels between routine monitoring sites and in relation to emission sources in the region, as well as to assess correlations between pollutant patterns to better understand the nature of urban air pollutant mixtures. A wide range of locations were part of the deployment in order to characterize the distribution of chronic exposures potentially allowing development of exposure models. Comparison of the mobile lab averages to the available adjacent air quality monitoring network stations to evaluate their representativeness showed that they were in reasonable agreement with the annual averages at the monitoring sites, thus providing some evidence that, through the deployment approach, the mobile lab is able to capture the main features of the average spatial patterns. The differences between mobile lab and network averages varied by pollutant with the best agreement for NO2 with a percentage difference of 20%. Sharp differences in the average spatial distribution were found to exist between different pollutants on multiple scales, particularly on the sub-urban scale, i.e., the neighborhood to street scales. For example, NO2 was observed to be 210-265% higher by the main highway in the study region compared to the nearby urban background monitoring site, while black carbon was higher by 180-200% and particle number concentration was 300% higher. The repeated measurements of near-roadway gradients showed that the rate of change differed by pollutant with elevated concentrations detected up to 600-700 m away for some pollutants. These results demonstrate that through systematic deployment mobile laboratory measurements can be used to characterize average or typical concentration patterns, thus providing data to assess monitoring site representativeness, spatial relationships between pollutants, and chronic multipollutant exposure patterns useful for evaluating and developing exposure models for outdoor concentrations in an urban environment.

  8. Laboratory simulation of interstellar grain chemistry and the production of complex organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Valero, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle infrared (5000 to 500 cm(-1), 2 to 20 microns m), the spectral region most diagnostic of molecular vibrations. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds, are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory ices one can determine the composition and abundance of the icy materials frozen on the cold (10K) dust grains present in the interior of molecular clouds. These grains and their ice mantles may well be the building blocks from which comets are made. As an illustration of the processes which can take place as an ice is irradiated and subsequently warmed, researchers present the infrared spectra of the mixture H2O:CH3OH:CO:NH3:C6H14 (100:50:10:10:10). Apart from the last species, the ratio of these compounds is representative of the simplest ices found in interstellar clouds. The last component was incorporated into this particular experiment as a tracer of the behavior of a non-aromatic hydrocarbon. The change in the composition that results from ultraviolet photolysis of this ice mixture using a UV lamp to simulate the interstellar radiation field is shown. Photolysis produces CO, CO2, CH4, HCO, H2CO, as well as a family of moderately volatile hydrocarbons. Less volatile carbonaceous materials are also produced. The evolution of the infrared spectrum of the ice as the sample is warmed up to room temperature is illustrated. Researchers believe that the changes are similar to those which occur as ice is ejected from a comet and warmed up by solar radiation. The warm-up sequence shows that the nitrile or iso-nitrile bearing compound produced during photolysis evaporates between 200 and 250K, suggesting that it is carried by a small molecular species. These molecules could be similar to the source material in Comet Halley that is ejected in grains into the coma, freed by sublimation, and photolyzed by solar radiation to produce the observed jets.

  9. X-ray structure analysis of the polycrystalline complex of copper (II) chloride with 1,5-dimethyltetrazole. Application of synchrotron radiation and laboratory diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkevich, L. S.; Lyakhov, A. S.; Shmakov, A. N.; Efimov, V. V.; Ivashkevich, O. A.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the complex of copper (II) chloride CuCl2 L, where L is 1,5-dimethyltetrazole, was refined with the Rietveld method using three sets of powder diffraction data obtained at laboratory diffractometers and with synchrotron radiation. The comparative analysis of the results of the structure refinement was performed; this analysis showed that the application of the laboratory data for the wavelength of X-rays ? = 1.7902 Å (Co K? radiation) provides the structural characteristics of the complex comparable in accuracy with those obtained using the synchrotron radiation for the wavelength ? = 1.5443 Å.

  10. Hydrological and meteorological data for an unsaturated-zone study area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988 and 1989

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pittman

    1995-01-01

    Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and

  11. Geologic data collected and analytical procedures used during a geochemical investigation of the unsaturated zone, Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Rightmire; B. D. Lewis

    1987-01-01

    To assess the potential migration of low-level radioactive waste in the shallow subsurface it is necessary to understand the hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the unsaturated zone. This data collection study was completed for the unsaturated zone at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, on the eastern Snake River Plain in southeastern Idaho. Geologic data were needed

  12. Geologic processes in the RWMC area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Implications for long term stability and soil erosion at the radioactive waste management complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. Hackett; J. A. Tullis; R. P. Smith

    1995-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is the disposal and storage facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Transuranic waste and mixed wastes were also disposed at the RWMC until 1970. It is located in the southwestern part of the INEL about 80 km west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. The INEL occupies a portion of

  13. Diagenesis of Metals Chemically Complexed to Bacteria: Laboratory Formation of Metal Phosphates, Sulfides, and Organic Condensates in Artificial Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T. J.; Meloche, J. D.; Fyfe, W. S.; Murray, R. G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis, when suspended in a 5mM metal solution, bind metals tenaciously to their cell walls. These metal-loaded cells, when mixed with a synthetic sediment and put under laboratory conditions to simulate low-temperature sediment diagenesis, nucleate the formation of a mixed assemblage of crystalline metal phosphates, metal sulfides, and polymeric, metal-complexed, organic residues. The sequential series of diagenetic events leading to the formation of authigenic mineral phases was followed by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The minerals quartz (SiO2) and calcite (CaCO3) were employed in the synthetic sediment. Crystalline magnetite (Fe2O3) and elemental sulfur were added as redox buffering agents to ensure anoxic conditions. Quartz and magnetite appeared unreactive throughout the experimental conditions. Elemental sulfur interacted with the metal-loaded cells, affected both the eventual chemistry and crystal habit of the metal phosphates, and formed a variety of crystalline metal sulfides. Calcite raised the pH of the fluid phase of the sediment, which influenced phosphate mineralization and inhibited metal sulfide genesis. Images PMID:16346230

  14. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  15. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  16. Temasek laboratories efficient full-wave EMC (TLEFEMC V 1.0) code for analysis of antennas mounted on large and complex platform: Introduction, validation, and application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao-Fu Wang; Xiao-Chun Nie; Ning Yuan; Yeow-Beng Gan; Bee Hua Tay; Yeow Kwang Tai

    2008-01-01

    Fast and accurate full-wave analysis of antennas mounted on large and complex platform is very useful and yet a challenging area in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) assessment. This paper introduces our Temasek Laboratories (TL) efficient full-wave EMC (TLEFEMC V1.0) code for attempting to solve this challenging problem up to a certain frequency of interest. This code is a great effort made

  17. Hydrological and meteorological data for an unsaturated-zone study area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988 and 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and the potential for migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste trenches and pits. This phase of the study is being conducted to provide hydrological and meteorological data for an area adjacent to the northern boundary of the RWMC.

  18. EVALUATION OF THE COMPLEX TERRAIN DISPERSION MODEL AGAINST LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS: NEUTRAL FLOW OVER 2-D AND 3-D HILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison is made of the predictions of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDM) with wind-tunnel observations of flow and diffusion in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer over two- and three-dimensional hills. The measure used to evaluate the ability of the mode...

  19. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Jr. Wright; J. C. Corey

    2002-01-01

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total

  20. Optical alteration of complex organics induced by ion irradiation:. 1. Laboratory experiments suggest unusual space weathering trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Lyuba; Baratta, Giuseppe; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Starukhina, Larissa; Dotto, Elisabetta; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Arnold, Gabriele; Distefano, Elisa

    2004-07-01

    Most ion irradiation experiments relevant to primitive outer Solar System objects have been performed on ice and silicate targets. Here we present the first ion irradiation experiments performed on natural complex hydrocarbons (asphaltite and kerite). These materials are very dark in the visible and have red-sloped spectra in the visible and near-infrared. They may be comparable in composition and structure to refractory organic solids on the surfaces of primitive outer Solar System objects. We irradiated the samples with 15-400 keV H +, N +, Ar ++, and He + ions and measured their reflectance spectra in the range of 0.3-2.5 ?m before ion implantation and after each irradiation step. The results show that irradiation-induced carbonization gradually neutralizes the spectral slopes of these red organic solids. This implies a similar space weathering trend for the surfaces of airless bodies optically dominated by spectrally red organic components. The reduction of spectral slope was observed in all experiments. Irradiation with 30 keV protons, which transfers energy to the target mostly via electronic (inelastic) collisions, showed lower efficiency than the heavier ions. We found that spectral alteration in our experiments increased with increasing contribution of nuclear versus electronic energy loss. This implies that nuclear (elastic) energy deposition plays an important role in changing the optical properties of irradiated refractory complex hydrocarbon materials. Finally, our results indicated that temperature variations from 40 K to room temperature did not influence the spectral properties of these complex hydrocarbon solids.

  1. Impact of surface water recharge on the design of a groundwater monitoring system for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent hydrogeologic studies have been initiated to characterize the hydrogeologic conditions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Measured water levels in wells penetrating the Snake River Plain aquifer near the RWMC and the corresponding direction of flow show change over time. This change is related to water table mounding caused by recharge from excess water diverted from the Big Lost River for flood protection during high flows. Water levels in most wells near the RWMC rise on the order of 10 ft (3 m) in response to recharge, with water in one well rising over 60 ft (18 m). Recharge changes the normal south-southwest direction of flow to the east. Design of the proposed groundwater monitoring network for the RWMC must account for the variable directions of groundwater flow. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  3. Development of a new method to track multiple honey bees with complex behaviors on a flat laboratory arena.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas; Okada, Ryuichi; Radspieler, Gerald; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    A computer program that tracks animal behavior, thereby revealing various features and mechanisms of social animals, is a powerful tool in ethological research. Because honeybee colonies are populated by thousands of bees, individuals co-exist in high physical densities and are difficult to track unless specifically tagged, which can affect behavior. In addition, honeybees react to light and recordings must be made under special red-light conditions, which the eyes of bees perceive as darkness. The resulting video images are scarcely distinguishable. We have developed a new algorithm, K-Track, for tracking numerous bees in a flat laboratory arena. Our program implements three main processes: (A) The object (bee's) region is detected by simple threshold processing on gray scale images, (B) Individuals are identified by size, shape and spatiotemporal positional changes, and (C) Centers of mass of identified individuals are connected through all movie frames to yield individual behavioral trajectories. The tracking performance of our software was evaluated on movies of mobile multi-artificial agents and of 16 bees walking around a circular arena. K-Track accurately traced the trajectories of both artificial agents and bees. In the latter case, K-track outperformed Ctrax, well-known software for tracking multiple animals. To investigate interaction events in detail, we manually identified five interaction categories; 'crossing', 'touching', 'passing', 'overlapping' and 'waiting', and examined the extent to which the models accurately identified these categories from bee's interactions. All 7 identified failures occurred near a wall at the outer edge of the arena. Finally, K-Track and Ctrax successfully tracked 77 and 60 of 84 recorded interactive events, respectively. K-Track identified multiple bees on a flat surface and tracked their speed changes and encounters with other bees, with good performance. PMID:24465422

  4. Mobile/portable transuranic waste characterization systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a model for their use complex-wide

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, E.D.; Harper, J.R.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.

    1997-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has implemented mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems to characterize transuranic (TRU) waste in storage for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. These mobile systems are being used to characterize and repackage waste to meet the full requirements of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the WIPP Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems are being used to supplement the capabilities and throughputs of existing facilities. Utilization of mobile systems is a key factor that is enabling LANL to (1) reduce its TRU waste work-off schedule from 36 years to 8.5 years; (2) eliminate the need to construct a $70M+ TRU waste characterization facility; (3) have waste certified for shipment to WIPP when WIPP opens; (4) continue to ship TRU waste to WIPP at the rate of 5000 drums per year; and (5) reduce overall costs by more than $200M. Aggressive implementation of mobile and portable systems throughout the Department of Energy complex through a centralized-distributed services model will result in similar advantages complex-wide.

  5. Mobile/portable transuranic waste characterization systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a model for their use complex-wide

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, E.D.; Harper, J.R.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.

    1997-02-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has implemented mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems to characterize TRU waste in storage for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. These mobile systems are being used to characterize and repackage waste to meet the full requirements of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the WIPP Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems are being used to supplement the capabilities and throughputs of existing facilities. Utilization of mobile systems is a key factor that is enabling LANL to: (1) reduce its TRU waste work-off schedule from 36 years to 8.5 years; (2) eliminate the need to construct a $70M+ TRU waste characterization facility; (3) have waste certified for shipment to WIPP when WIPP opens; (4) continue to ship TRU waste to WIPP at the rate of 5000 drums per year; and, (5) reduce overall costs by more than $200M. Aggressive implementation of mobile and portable systems throughout the DOE complex through a centralized-distributed services model will result in similar advantages complex-wide.

  6. Hydrologic and Meteorological Data for an Unsaturdated-Zone Study Area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1990-96

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Perkins, J. R. Nimmo, J. R. Pittman

    1998-01-01

    Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (formerly known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and the potential for migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste trenches and pits. This phase of the study provides hydrologic and meteorological data collected at a designated test trench area adjacent to the northern boundary of the RWMC SDA from 1990 through 1996. The test trench area was constructed by the USGS in 1985. Hydrologic data presented in this report were collected during 1990-96 in the USGS test trench area. Soil-moisture content measurement from disturbed and undisturbed soil were collected approximately monthly during 1990-96 from 11 neutron-probe access holes with a neutron moisture gage. In 1994, three additional neutron access holes were completed for monitoring. A meteorological station inside the test trench area provided data for determination of evapotranspiration rates. The soil-moisture and meteorological data are contained in files on 3-1/2 inch diskettes (disks 1 and 2) included with this report. The data are presented in simple American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format with tab-delimited fields. The files occupy a total of 1.5 megabytes of disk space.

  7. Laboratory Animal Facilities. Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Albert M.

    1965-01-01

    Design of laboratory animal facilities must be functional. Accordingly, the designer should be aware of the complex nature of animal research and specifically the type of animal research which will be conducted in a new facility. The building of animal-care facilities in research institutions requires special knowledge in laboratory animal…

  8. Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF) maintenance implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, J.L.

    1997-08-13

    This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is written to satisfy the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program that specifies the general policy and objectives for the establishment of the DOE controlled maintenance programs. These programs provide for the management and performance of cost effective maintenance and repair of the DOE property, which includes facilities. This document outlines maintenance activities associated with the facilities operated by Waste Management Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The objective of this MIP is to provide baseline information for the control and execution of WMH Facility Maintenance activities relative to the requirements of Order 4330.4B, assessment of the WMH maintenance programs, and actions necessary to maintain compliance with the Order. Section 2.0 summarizes the history, mission and description of the WMH facilities. Section 3.0 describes maintenance scope and requirements, and outlines the overall strategy for implementing the maintenance program. Specific elements of DOE Order 4330.4B are addressed in Section 4.0, listing the objective of each element, a discussion of the WMH compliance methodology, and current implementation requirements with references to WMH and HNF policies and procedures. Section 5.0 addresses deviations from policy requirements, and Section 6.0 is a schedule for specific improvements in support of this MIP.

  9. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  10. Comparison of in vitro Antifungal Activities of Amphotericin B Lipid Complex with Itraconazole against 708 Clinical Yeast Isolates and Opportunistic Moulds Determined by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Methods M27-A and M38-P

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfonso Javier Carrillo-Muñoz; Maite Ruesga; Sonia Brio; Oscar del Valle; Virginia Rodriguez; Patricia Santos; Juan Manuel Hernández-Molina; Emilia Cantón; Javier Pemán; Josep Guarro; Guillermo Quindós

    2002-01-01

    We compared the in vitro antifungal activity of amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC) with that of itraconazole (ITZ) against 535 yeast strains and 173 opportunistic filamentous fungi by using a microdilution method (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M27-A and M38-P). The overall geometric mean MIC was 0.13 ?g\\/ml and 0.177 ?g\\/ml for ITZ and ABLC, respectively, and the MIC50

  11. Application of Genotype MTBDRplus in rapid detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex as well as its resistance to isoniazid and rifampin in a high volum laboratory in Southern China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lei ZhangYuanxing; Yuanxing Ye; Lina Duo; Tingting Wang; Xingbo Song; Xiaojun Lu; Binwu Ying; Lanlan Wang

    2011-01-01

    The alarmingly worsening epidemics of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) call urgent need for a simple method for the rapid\\u000a detection of drug-resistant TB in clinical settings. In an attempt to establish a rapid procedure for laboratory diagnosis\\u000a of TB and investigate the local TB epidemiology, molecular line probe assay of the Genotype MTBDRplus was used to identify\\u000a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC)

  12. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  13. Facile Synthesis of a Macrobicyclic Hexaamine Cobalt(III) Complex Based on Tris(Ethylenediamine)Cobalt(III): An Advanced Undergraduate Inorganic Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrowfield, Jack MacB.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including relevant chemical reactions), procedures used, and results obtained are provided for the synthesis and characterization of a macrobicyclic complex. The synthesis can be completed within two to three hours and is inexpensive and safe. Suggestions for further experiments are included. (JN)

  14. Hydrological and meteorological data for an unsaturated zone study near the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho: 1985--86

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pittman

    1989-01-01

    The hydrologic properties of the unsaturated zone and amount of net recharge to the system must be determined to field-calibrate a mathematical model to predict the long-term migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone. This study is being conducted to provide that necessary data for a specific area. Radioactive waste has been buried at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex)

  15. Assessment of the BD MGIT TBc identification test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in a network of mycobacteriology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Ramos, Jorge; Couto, Isabel; Cadir, Nureisha; Narciso, Inácio; Coelho, Elizabeth; Viegas, Sofia; Viveiros, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of the TBcID assay in a panel of 100 acid-fast bacilli cultures. Sixty-four isolates were TBcID positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), whereas 36 gave negative results. These included 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria, one nonmycobacterial isolate, one M. tuberculosis, and six M. bovis BCG strains. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.14%, specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 80.55%, respectively. The test is rapid, easy to perform and interpret, and does not require sample preparation or instrumentation. However, a negative result does not exclude the presence of a strain belonging to MTBC, especially when mutations in mpb64 gene are present or some M. bovis BCG strains are isolated. The TBcID showed potential to assist in the identification of MTBC when the implementation and usage of molecular methods are often not possible, principally in resource-limited countries. PMID:24587985

  16. A modeling study of contaminant transport resulting from flooding of Pit 9 at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, S.O.; Sondrup, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    A simulation study was conducted to determine if dissolved-phase transport due to flooding is a viable mechanism for explaining the presence of radionuclides in sedimentary interbeds below the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. In particular, the study focused on {sup 241}Am migration due to flooding of Pit 9 in 1969. A kinetically-controlled source term model was used to estimate the mass of {sup 241}Am that leached as a function of a variable surface infiltration rate. This mass release rate was then used in a numerical simulation of unsaturated flow and transport to estimate the advance due to flooding of the {sup 241}Am front down towards the 110 ft interbed. The simulation included the effect of fractures by superimposing them onto elements that represented the basalt matrix. For the base case, hydraulic and transport parameters were assigned using the best available data. The advance of the {sup 241}Am front due to flooding for this case was minimal, on the order of a few meters. This was due to the strong tendency for {sup 241}Am to sorb onto both basalts and sediments. In addition to the base case simulation, a parametric sensitivity study was conducted which tested the effect of sorption in the fractures, in the kinetic source term, and in the basalt matrix. Of these, the only case which resulted in significant transport was when there was no sorption in the basalt matrix. The indication being that other processes such as transport by radiocolloids or organic complexation may have contributed. However, caution is advised in interpreting these results due to approximations in the numerical method that was used incorporate fractures into the simulation. The approximations are a result of fracture apertures being significantly smaller than the elements over which they are superimposed. The sensitivity of the {sup 241}Am advance to the assumed hydraulic conductivity for the fractures was also tested.

  17. Single-phase microemulsification of a complex light-nonaqueous-phase-liquid: Laboratory evaluation of several mixtures of surfactant/alcohol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rhue, R.D.; Rao, P.S.C.; Annable, M.D.

    1999-08-01

    A recent advance in conventional pump-and-treat technology for aquifer remediation involves the use of surfactant-alcohol mixtures that will form a clear, transparent, thermodynamically stable oil-in-water microemulsion on contact with a residual non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). An initial screening of 86 commercial-grade surfactants for aqueous solubility resulted in selection of 58 that were further tested in batch experiments to evaluate the capacity to solubilize a complex NAPL waste collected from a Superfund site (Operable Unit OU-1) at Hill AFB, UT. The selected group of 58 surfactants represented six classes of anionic, nine classes of nonionic, and one class of amphoteric surfactants. Batch studies on NAPL solubilization identified a number of surfactants suitable for use in the field demonstration phase of the project; a further criterion in surfactant selection was that the flushing solution had a viscosity <2 cp. The best surfactants among this group had HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) values between 12 and 13, and solubilized 10 to 20 g L{sup {minus}1} of the OU-1 NAPL when the surfactant concentration was 3%. Column tests using NAPL-coated glass beads showed that the more efficient surfactants could remove >90% of the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes. Brij 97, an ethoxylated alcohol ether surfactant, showed a high capacity for solubilizing the OU-1 NAPL. In a column test using contaminated Hill AFB aquifer material, flushing with a mixture of 3% Brij 97 and 2.5% n-pentanol removed essentially all of the mass of nine target analytes in the NAPL after flushing with <10 pore volumes without mobilizing the NAPL or destabilizing aquifer colloids.

  18. Environmental Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Information is provided regarding the Association of Environmental Laboratories which consists of environmental analysts concerned with the quality of laboratories charged with providing information in the field of environmental measurements. Included is a list of charter members and a statement of the goals of the organization. (MLB)

  19. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  20. Paleomagnetics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

  1. An innovative approach that was used to assess the air quality impacts of a large complex facility (Los Alamos National Laboratory) that has the potential to emit hundreds of toxic air pollutants in small quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, J.; Kogan, V. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Gorman-Bates, K. [GRAM, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Sitewide EIS for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of its evaluation of future use for the facility. An air quality analysis is required to estimate the potential impacts of the release of air pollutants from a facility that uses hundreds of toxic chemicals. These chemicals are currently used in 30 separately managed groups of operations or laboratory complexes--known as Technical Areas (TAs). Emission data and stack parameter information are currently not available. Undertaking an emission inventory, which would have been required for a conventional air quality impact analysis, would have been both costly and time consuming. An innovative and cost-effective methodology was therefore developed to assess the potential air quality impacts of the emissions of toxic air pollutants released from this facility. This methodology is based on the use of threshold emission values (TEVs), which are, for the purpose of this study, the maximum rates of each pollutant that could be emitted into the atmosphere from each TA that would not contravene health-related guideline values. TEVs unique to each TA were developed for each of the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic toxic pollutants emitted from facility using EPA`s ISC3 dispersion model, and prototypical stack and building parameters. Once the TEVs were established for each TA, comparisons were made on a pollutant-specific basis between these values and conservatively estimated potential emissions rates that were based primarily on the purchase rates of these chemicals to identify those pollutants which may cause potentially significant adverse air quality impacts. This approach allowed over 95 percent of the toxic air pollutants to be eliminated from further consideration, and enabled the detailed analysis to focus on the remaining 5 percent.

  2. Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL) at Colorado State University conducts multi-disciplinary research in ecosystem science, with the purpose of improving knowledge of "the complex interactions between humans, management activities, and ecosystems." The recently launched homepage, which is still under construction, includes background information on NREL; descriptions of research projects (a substantial and diverse list); publications, reports, and data; teaching and outreach; and contact information.

  3. BROOKHAVEN LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ............................................. 6 Child Care Options.................................................. 7 Parent's Rights, and surrogate parents seeking to support each child's unique needs. 4. Learning is a process that is guided soBROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Child Development Center Parent Handbook Revised 2009

  4. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests This section provides ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  5. Hydromechanics Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Kriebel

    The Hydromechanics Laboratory supports midshipmen education, as well as midshipmen, faculty and staff research, in the areas of naval architecture and ocean engineering. The laboratory facilities include a large towing tank (380-ft long, 26- ft wide, and 16-ft deep), a small towing tank (120-ft long, 8-ft wide, and 5-ft deep), a coastal engineering wave basin (52-ft long, 48-ft wide, and

  6. Visgraf Laboratory IMPA Visgraf Laboratory IMPA

    E-print Network

    1 Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA CNMAC 99 CNMAC 99 jonas@impa.br @impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.br www.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf

  7. EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -1- EE 448 Preface 2/26/2007 Laboratory Introduction #12;EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -2- I. INTRODUCTION The electric machinery laboratory provides students with the opportunity to examine and experiment with different types

  8. Appalachian Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

  9. Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10

    E-print Network

    Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a DC Servo 10.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to position the gears, we will use the state space model of the DC servo introduced in the laboratory 3 (refer to [1

  10. An Integrated Approach to the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James G. Harman; John A. Anderson; Richard A. Nakashima; Robert W. Shaw

    1995-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories traditionally expose students to biochemical techniques through a series of independent and usually unrelated laboratory exercises. Efforts to reorganize and update the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at Texas Tech University have centered upon the development of a series of laboratory experiments that focus on a single biological system, the complex 11 (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of Escherichia coli. Students are

  11. Review of the transport of selected radionuclides in the interim risk assessment for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Waste Area Group 7 Operable Unit 7-13/14, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Landa, Edward R.; Nimmo, John R.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Anderson, Steven R.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Bossong, Clifford R.; Orr, Brennon R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent technical review of the Interim Risk Assessment (IRA) and Contaminant Screening for the Waste Area Group 7 (WAG-7) Remedial Investigation, the draft Addendum to the Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 WAG-7 comprehensive Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS), and supporting documents that were prepared by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Inc. The purpose of the technical review was to assess the data and geotechnical approaches that were used to estimate future risks associated with the release of the actinides americium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium to the Snake River Plain aquifer from wastes buried in pits and trenches at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex in southeastern Idaho within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Radionuclides have been buried in pits and trenches at the SDA since 1957 and 1952, respectively. Burial of transuranic wastes was discontinued in 1982. The five specific tasks associated with this review were defined in a ?Proposed Scope of Work? prepared by the DOE, and a follow-up workshop held in June 1998. The specific tasks were (1) to review the radionuclide sampling data to determine how reliable and significant are the reported radionuclide detections and how reliable is the ongoing sampling program, (2) to assess the physical and chemical processes that logically can be invoked to explain true detections, (3) to determine if distribution coefficients that were used in the IRA are reliable and if they have been applied properly, (4) to determine if transport model predictions are technically sound, and (5) to identify issues needing resolution to determine technical adequacy of the risk assessment analysis, and what additional work is required to resolve those issues.

  12. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  13. 10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

  14. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  15. The Clinical Laboratories (Chemistry and Hematology)

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    280 Chapter The Clinical Laboratories (Chemistry and Hematology) Donna MacMillan and Kent B. Lewandrowski The clinical laboratories (Clinical Chemistry and Hematology) at the Mas- sachusetts General and complex set of separate facilities. On the other hand, there is little mention of hematology

  16. Virtual Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-04-27

    The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

  17. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  18. Gamma-ray and surface organic results of the robotic survey of Pit 9 at INEL. Technical evaluations report for work done at the raiological waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Summer, 1991

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Clegg; M. Rowland; J. Pence

    1991-01-01

    The Buried Waste Robotics Program demonstrated and evaluated robotic techniques to non-invasively characterize a representative radiological burial area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (ML). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) contributed a large, NaI gamma-ray detector system and a photo-ionization organics detector to this program. This Program mounted multiple geophysics, nucleonic, and chemical sensor systems on the Solder Robot Interface

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  20. 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Clancy, Ted

    Systems #12;5MIT Lincoln Laboratory Space Surveillance Example Research Areas Asteroid Detection Bio and Decision Support (Secure ­ Countermeasure Resistant) Space Control Air and Missile Defense Technology · About the Laboratory ­ Overview ­ Research Areas ­ Demographics · The MQP program ­ Logistics

  1. A Combined Virtual and Remote Laboratory for Microcontroller

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KwanSun Choi; Saeron Han; Sunghwan Kim; Dongsik Kim; Jongsik Lim; Dal Ahn; Changwan Jeon

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a This paper describes a web-based combined laboratory for a 8051 microcontroller-related experiment which is composed of a\\u000a virtual lab and a real time remote laboratory. Authorized users are allowed to have access to both labs using a web browser.\\u000a The virtual laboratory cooperates with the remote laboratory to help learners easily understand the principal concepts and\\u000a the process of complex

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan: FY 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the operation and direction plan for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of the US Department of Energy. The topics of the plan include the laboratory mission and core competencies, the laboratory strategic plan; the laboratory initiatives in molecular sciences, microbial biotechnology, global environmental change, complex modeling of physical systems, advanced processing technology, energy technology development, and medical technologies and systems; core business areas, critical success factors, and resource projections.

  3. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-print Network

    in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer state feedback controller for endpoint position control in the face of flexibility effects for a flexible joint mounted on the SRV-02DC servomotor. For this, we will use the state space model

  4. Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators Peter Roberts*, Lian-Jie Huang, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Charles Burch, Conoco Inc., Michael Fehler and

    E-print Network

    a Fourier migration method, known alternatively as either the phase-screen (Huang & Wu, 1996) or split-step methods such as finite- difference (Bevc, 1997), common-offset split-step DSR (Popovici, 1996), and semi Fourier (Stoffa et al., 1990) method, on increasingly more complex model data. The eventual goal

  5. Virtual Laboratories > 13. Games of Chance > 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Craps is a popular casino game, because of its complexity and because of the rich variety of bets that can be

    E-print Network

    Demeio, Lucio

    casino game, because of its complexity and because of the rich variety of bets that can be made) = 244 495 0.49292,(I = 0) = 251 495 0.50707 Note that craps is nearly a fair game. Bets There are a bewildering variety of bets that can be made in craps. In the exercises in this subsection, we will discuss

  6. LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of conservation. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Apply that you will be doing these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. The purpose

  7. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  8. Carney Complex

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ephelides (freckles) LAMB syndrome – Lentigines, Atrial Myxoma, and Blue nevi What causes Carney complex? Carney complex is ... melanotic schwannoma, meaning tumors that grow on nerves Blue nevi, which are blue-black moles Osteochondromyxoma (bone ...

  9. New trends in Air Traffic Complexity D. Delahaye and S. Puechmorel

    E-print Network

    Baehr, Christophe

    New trends in Air Traffic Complexity D. Delahaye and S. Puechmorel Applied Math Laboratory, ENAC March 8, 2010 D. Delahaye and S. Puechmorel (Applied Math Laboratory, ENAC)New trends in Air Traffic Laboratory, ENAC)New trends in Air Traffic Complexity March 8, 2010 2 / 36 #12;Agenda Why complexity metrics

  10. Cultural Complexity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Fikentscher

    1998-01-01

    This paper is divided into four parts. The first section (I.) consists of definitions which center on the concept of complexity. As a minimum, the terms, system, complexity, and adaptation as used in this paper need an explanation. The second section (II.) is a sketch of cultural complexity in the real world. I will use Pueblo tribal laws and other

  11. The quest for complex molecules in space: Laboratory spectroscopy of n-butyl cyanide, n-C4H9CN, in the millimeter wave region and its astronomical search in Sagittarius B2(N)

    E-print Network

    Ordu, M H; Walters, A; Nuñez, M; Lewen, F; Belloche, A; Menten, K M; Schlemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    The saturated n-propyl cyanide was recently detected in Sagittarius B2(N). The next larger unbranched alkyl cyanide is n-butyl cyanide. We provide accurate rest frequency predictions beyond the millimeter wave range to search for this molecule in the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N) and facilitate its detection in space. We investigated the laboratory rotational spectrum of $n$-butyl cyanide between 75 GHz and 348 GHz. We searched for emission lines produced by the molecule in our sensitive IRAM 30 m molecular line survey of Sagittarius B2(N). We identified more than one thousand rotational transitions in the laboratory for each of the three conformers for which limited data had been obtained previously in a molecular beam microwave study. The quantum number range was greatly extended to J ~ 120 or more and Ka > 35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations up to about 500 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of the two lower energy conformers. Up...

  12. Computer Laboratory (William Gates Building)

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Computer Laboratory (William Gates Building) Microsoft Research Laboratory Marconi Building (under construction) Whittle Laboratory (Engineering) location of Cavendish Laboratory (Physics) Madingley Road The Computer Laboratory is in the William Gates Building on the West Cambridge Site, just south of Madingley

  13. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Argonne National Laboratory Bechtel Technology and Consulting General Atomics Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts September 1, 2005 - November 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive Westborough, MA 01581 version 2.0 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst 160 Governors Drive

  15. COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

  16. Estimation of Hydraulic Properties Influencing Recharge and Contaminant Transport through Complex Vadose Zones by Analyzing Perched Water Data from the 1994 Large-Scale Infiltration Test at the Idaho National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, K. M.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Layers of strong geologic contrast within the vadose zone can control recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers. Above the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, multiple sedimentary interbeds are interspersed between fractured basalt. These interbeds have a variety of thicknesses and hydraulic properties, and can impede water flow, which allows perched water to collect on the interbeds. The Large-Scale Infiltration Test (LSIT) of 1994 at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) maintained a circular pond, 200 meters in diameter, at a constant head for 20 days. Monitoring wells were arranged in circles of different radii around and within the pond, and perched water levels on a major sedimentary interbed, 55 meters below ground surface, were measured over time. Data showed that water formed a mound on the interbed before seeping through the interbed. Such behavior is consistent with a hypothesis of rapid flow through the fractured basalt being impeded by the sedimentary interbed. In 2014, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, used a modified version of a Hantush (1967) equation to model the time-dependent perched water table heights from the LSIT as a function of radial distance from the pond center. The modeled volume change between time-steps and the known inflows to the pond were used in a mass balance to estimate the time-varying volume of water seeping through the interbed. This volume of water, the height of perched water, and the interbed thickness were used in Darcy's Law to estimate the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the impeding interbed. Results indicate a slightly higher effective conductivity than laboratory measurements of small core samples taken from the interbed, reflecting the presence of fractures or other heterogeneities that facilitate field-scale flow through the interbed. Applied to other locations, this method can improve estimates of recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers.

  17. Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: the Fusion Laboratories facilities and mission, including the recent tokamak experiments which resulted in the production of more than 9 million watts of thermonuclear energy.

  19. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

  20. Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    CH369T Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012 Instructor: Dr. Gene McDonald Office: WEL 3.270C Phone, and at the same time to introduce you to issues associated with various biotechnology laboratory operations. After

  1. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  2. Teaching Chromatography Using Virtual Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Though deceptively simple to teach, chromatography presents many nuances and complex interactions that challenge both student and instructor. Time and instrumentation provide major obstacles to a thorough examination of these details in the laboratory. Modern chromatographic method-development software provides an opportunity to overcome this,…

  3. Laboratory Chemical Hoods: A Historical Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melvin W. First

    2003-01-01

    A historical review of laboratory fume hoods leads to a consideration of the current status of structural design, operating characteristics (with special reference to face velocity), safety (relative to standardized test results), energy conservation, and certification methods. Noteworthy are (1) the increasing complexity of instrumentation designed to assure full safety function plus airflow modulation to minimize energy consumption; (2) the

  4. www.yorku.ca/research Spine Laboratory

    E-print Network

    www.yorku.ca/research Spine Laboratory -- Biomechanics at York School of Kinesiology and Health Schinkel-Ivy People expose their spines to complex or multi-axis loading on a daily basis, such as getting on a computer and doing assembly-line work. The Spine Lab investigates neck, mid-back and low-back spinal

  5. Laboratory simulation of organic grain mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza-Gomez, Celia X.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory simulations have been conducted of interstellar space conditions conducive to grain mantle evolution, including the photoproduction of a material which resembles the organic refractory mantle on interstellar grains. Upon analysis by various methods these organic refractory samples are noted to consist of a complex mixture of long, cross-linked chains, with a high probability of being aromatic carbon molecules.

  6. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  7. Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ward, Koren

    1 TENS Text Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory University of Wollongong TENS Text and delivering the text data to the user by electrically stimulating the fingers. Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong #12;2 The TENS Unit Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong

  8. OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING LABORATORY The Expressive Power of Binary Submodular Functions Stanislav Zivn´y, David Cohen, Peter Jeavons Computing Laboratory, University of Oxford Rutgers, 22 January LABORATORY Problem Which submodular polynomials can be expressed by (or decomposed into) quadratic submodular

  9. The Canfranc Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; García, E.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortíz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the forthcoming enlargement of the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) which will allow to host new international Astroparticle Physics experiments and therefore to broaden the European underground research area. The new Canfranc Underground Laboratory will operate in coordination (through the ILIAS Project) with the Gran Sasso (Italy), Modane (France) and Boulby (UK) underground laboratories.

  10. Laboratory 0: Error Analysis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Virtual Labs, Real Data (Cornell University)

    2011-01-19

    The collection of data is an important part of all laboratory work, and interpreting the data is the major part of a laboratory report. Laboratory 0 presents a brief overview of techniques and concepts needed to estimate and analyze the errors inherent in experimental work.

  11. Good Laboratory Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  12. Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Sentis, Luis

    Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA khatib@cs.stanford.edu Oliver Brock Laboratory for Perceptual Robotics Department of Computer Luis Sentis Sriram Viji Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford

  13. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  14. Complexe oplossingen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margot Scholte

    2010-01-01

    Samenvatting  Ik ben al enige tijd gefascineerd door ‘complexe oplossingen’. Complexe oplossingen zijn oplossingen die qua complexiteit\\u000a niet in verhouding staan tot het ervaren probleem. Denk aan de paarse krokodil: je ziet je verloren opblaasbeest achter glas,\\u000a maar je mag hem niet meenemen, voordat je aan alle procedures hebt voldaan.

  15. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  16. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  17. Software agent technology in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Staab, T. A. (Torsten)

    2002-01-01

    The IT (Information Technology) environment in today's laboratories is characterized as being highly distributed, heterogeneous, and in some instances extremely dynamic. Larger organizations have to deal with hundreds of different systems, ranging from standalone workstations and devices in laboratories to fully integrated LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems. An information system operating in such an environment must handle several emerging problems, such as heterogeneous hardware and software platforms, as well as distributed information sources and capabilities. It is also expected that the IT infrastructure scales well, easily integrates with legacy systems, allows resource sharing, and supports day-to-day operations such as information retrieval, data storage, validation, tracking, replication, and archival in a fully automated fashion. By using real-world examples, this presentation will illustrate how software agent technology can be used to manage the ever increasing IT complexity and user demands in the laboratory of the future.

  18. Assessment of a Virtual Laboratory for Geotechnical Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Robert Wyatt; Pedro Arduino; Emir Jose Macari

    In the study of engineering science phenomena, there is no substitute for hands-on experience opportunities. However, despite the extent to which laboratories are commonplace in engineering education, many obstacles stand in the way of achieving satisfactory hands-on experience. The cost of laboratories and associated experiments, in terms of time, space, and finances, limits the complexity of experiments that can be

  19. Does Software Design Complexity Affect Maintenance Effort?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Epping; Christopher M. Lott

    1994-01-01

    The design complexity of a software system may be characterized within a refinement level (e.g., data flow among modules), or between refinement levels (e.g., traceability between the specification and the design). We analyzed an existing set of data from NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory to test whether changing software modules with high de- sign complexity requires more personnel effort than changing

  20. Preventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires AgendaAgenda

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Preventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires #12;AgendaAgenda Flash over VideoFlash over Video Laboratory Fire LossLaboratory Fire Loss Lab Fire RegulationsLab Fire Regulations Fire Safety over VideoState Flash over Video #12;Laboratory Fire LossLaboratory Fire Loss Structure Fires

  1. Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  2. AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL

    E-print Network

    Sislian, J. P.

    AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL 1. Introduction 2. Laboratory Format 3. Recommended Guidelines for Experiment Reports 4. Laboratory Notebooks 5. Report Marking Procedures 6. Course Mark compared to the systems you will find in the Undergraduate Laboratory. Typically, experimental setups

  3. Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  4. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    #12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1977 October 1977 Eugene J Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve, recommend

  5. Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  6. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  7. Remote Didactic Laboratory \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregorio Andria; Aldo Baccigalupi; Mladen Borsic; Paolo Carbone; Pasquale Daponte; Claudio De Capua; Alessandro Ferrero; Domenico Grimaldi; Annalisa Liccardo; Nicola Locci; Anna Maria Lucia Lanzolla; David Macii; Carlo Muscas; Lorenzo Peretto; Dario Petri; Sergio Rapuano; Maria Riccio; Simona Salicone; Fabrizio Stefani

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Didactic Laboratory Laboratorio Didattico Remoto - LA.DI.RE. ldquoG. Savastanordquo is the e-learning measurement laboratory supported by the Italian Ministry of Education and University. It involves about 20 Italian universities and provides students of electric and electronic measurement courses with access to remote measurement laboratories delivering different didactic activities related to measurement experiments. In order to demonstrate the versatility

  8. Remote Didactic Laboratory \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregorio Andria; Aldo Baccigalupi; Mladen Borsic; Paolo Carbone; Pasquale Daponte; Claudio De Capua; Alessandro Ferrero; Domenico Grimaldi; Annalisa Liccardo; Nicola Locci; Anna Maria Lucia Lanzolla; David Macii; Carlo Muscas; Lorenzo Peretto; Dario Petri; Sergio Rapuano; Maria Riccio; Simona Salicone; Fabrizio Stefani

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Didactic Laboratory Laboratorio Didattico Remoto -LA.DI.RE. “G. Savastano” is an e-learning measurement laboratory supported by the Italian Ministry of Education and University. It provides the students of electric and electronic measurement courses with access to remote measurement laboratories, delivering different didactic activities related to measurement experiments. The core of the software architecture is the integration of the Learning

  9. Laboratories Inc. Software Specifications

    E-print Network

    Whitenoise Laboratories Inc. Software Specifications For Tinnitus Utilizing Whitenoise Substitution and more specifically how it is implemented in an application called Tinnitus. Initial research supports

  10. Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  11. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

  12. Bioseparations and Biomaterials Laboratory Laboratory Notebook Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    good research laboratory practice when running experiments and recording data. Guidelines: 1. Obtain number) and protocols. 9. Your research is only as good as your documentation of observations be recorded directly into notebook as obtained. It is bad practice to take data, etc. on loose paper, kim

  13. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Technical Report Number 727 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-727 ISSN 1476-2986 A novel auto J. Wassell Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely environments has a significant impact on the coverage range and quality of the radio links between the wireless

  14. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  15. Practical Laboratory Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. R.

    This book is intended as a guide for people who are planning chemistry and physics research laboratories. It deals with the importance of effective communication between client and architect, the value of preliminary planning, and the role of the project officer. It also discusses the size and layout of individual laboratories, the design of…

  16. Quality in Teaching Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubington, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a Japanese process-oriented approach called KAIZEN for improving the quality of existing teaching laboratories. It provides relevant quality measurements and indicates how quality can be improved. Use of process criteria sidesteps the difficulty of defining quality for laboratory experiments and allows separation of student assessment…

  17. Local laboratory ventilation devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koenigsberg

    1995-01-01

    This article is a discussion of the ``other`` laboratory ventilation devices described in OSHA`s laboratory standard that could be used in lieu of traditional chemical fume hoods. The reference ``local`` or ``other`` ventilation device is used with little or no information provided as to the type, design, or performance criteria appropriate for specific applications, as was done in excruciating detail

  18. Hoods for Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Harold; and others

    Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

  19. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  20. Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

  1. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Information on the Tethered Gravity Laboratory on the International Space Station is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include active control, low gravity processes identification, systems analysis, tether interfaces with the Laboratory, elevator and payload configurations, elevator subsystems, and accelerometer technology requirements.

  2. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  3. Haskins Laboratories Physiological

    E-print Network

    rotation 80 Operation of the EMMA 2.0 real-time display system 82 Proposed contents of extended .PRM filesHART: Haskins Laboratories Real-Time Physiological Signal Analysis Systems Philip Rubin, Michael D The Haskins Laboratories Real-Time acquisition and analysis system (HART) provides for on-line capture of up

  4. Clinical laboratories: production industry or medical services?

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The current failure to evidence any link between laboratory tests, clinical decision-making and patient outcomes, and the scarcity of financial resources affecting healthcare systems worldwide, have put further pressure on the organization and delivery of laboratory services. Consolidation, merger, and laboratory downsizing have been driven by the need to deliver economies of scale and cut costs per test while boosting productivity. Distorted economics, based on payment models rewarding volume and efficiency rather than quality and clinical effectiveness, have underpinned the entrance of clinical laboratories into the production industry thus forcing them to relinquish their original mission of providing medical services. The sea change in laboratory medicine in recent years, with the introduction of ever newer and ever more complex tests, including 'omics', which impact on clinical decision-making, should encourage clinical laboratories to return to their original mission as long as payments models are changed. Rather than being considered solely in terms of costs, diagnostic testing must be seen in the context of an entire hospital stay or an overall payment for a care pathway: the testing process should be conceived as a part of the patient's entire journey. PMID:25405721

  5. fimbriata complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason A. Johnson; Thomas C. Harrington; C. J. B. Engelbrecht

    Ceratocystis fimbriata is a widely distributed, plant pathogenic fungus that causes wilts and cankers on many woody hosts. Earlier phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences revealed three geographic clades within the C. fimbriata complex that are centered respectively in North America, Latin America and Asia. This study looked for cryptic species within the North American clade. The internal transcribed spacer regions

  6. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  7. Palindrome complexity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-paul Allouche; Michael Baake; Julien Cassaigne; David Damanik

    2003-01-01

    We study the palindrome complexity of infinite sequences on finite alphabets, i.e., the number of palindromic factors (blocks) of given length occurring in a given se- quence. We survey the known results and obtain new results for some sequences, in particular for Rote sequences and for fixed points of primitive morphisms of constant length belonging to \\

  8. Stereoregularity Drives Precipitation in Polyelectrolyte Complex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew; Perry, Sarah; Leon, Lorraine; Kade, Matthew; Priftis, Dimitris; Black, Katie; Hoffman, Kyle; Whitmer, Jonathan; Qin, Jian; de Pablo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of stereoregularity on the formation of polypeptide-based complex formation and assembly into micelles, hydrogels and ordered phases. We demonstrate that fluid complex coacervate formation (rather than solid complex precipitation) between oppositely charged polypeptides requires at least one racemic partner in order to disrupt backbone hydrogen bonding networks and prevent the hydrophobic collapse of the polymers into compact, fibrillar secondary structures. Computer simulations bear this out and enable visualization of the molecular structure of the complexes. The ability to choose between conditions of fluid phase formation and solid phase formation is a useful tool in developing new self-assembled materials based on polyelectrolyte complex formation. Support from the Argonne National Laboratory Laboratory Research and Development Program (2011-217) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Treatment of 1,10-phenanthroline laboratory wastewater using the solar photo-Fenton process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milady Renata Apolinário da Silva; Alam Gustavo Trovó; Raquel Fernandes Pupo Nogueira

    2007-01-01

    The red Fe2+–phenanthroline complex is the basis of a classical spectrophotometric method for determination of iron. Due to the toxicity of this complexing agent, direct disposal of the wastewaters generated in analytical laboratories is not environmentally safe. This work evaluates the use of the solar photo-Fenton process for the treatment of laboratory wastewaters containing phenanthroline. Firstly, the degradation of phenanthroline

  10. Complex Carbohydrate Research Center Request for Analytical Services

    E-print Network

    Prestegard, James H.

    synthesis and analysis of complex carbohydrates as a service to scientists in university, industrialComplex Carbohydrate Research Center Request for Analytical Services The CCRC offers custom and government laboratories. Assistance is also offered to those who need information on complex carbohydrates

  11. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  12. COMPLEX NUMBERS 1. Definition of complex numbers

    E-print Network

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    COMPLEX NUMBERS 1. Definition of complex numbers Complex conjugate, Magnitude Operations Addition, multiplication, reciprocal number 2. Representation of complex numbers in polar complex variable #12;2.2.A Complex numbers #12;#12;3 #12;4 #12;In short, Anytime we write Ae j we

  13. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

  16. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOEpatents

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  17. CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER in providing professional expertise for a large program serving the Central South region of Ontario Regional Laboratory Medicine Program (jointly administered by Hamilton Health Sciences and the St. Joseph

  18. A virtual laboratory for medical image analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sílvia D. Olabarriaga; Tristan Glatard; Piter T. de Boer

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and usage of a virtual laboratory for medical image analysis. It is fully based on the Dutch grid, which is part of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) production infrastructure and driven by the gLite middleware. The adopted service-oriented architecture enables decoupling the user-friendly clients running on the user's workstation from the complexity of

  19. Job Listings - Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. In addition to supporting the Lab's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines.

  20. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  1. Performing laboratory compliance audits.

    PubMed

    Keoppel, P

    2001-01-01

    Billions of dollars are paid improperly each year because of laboratory service billing errors that include services not covered, incorrect coding, lack of medical necessity, and unsupported services. An important part of a laboratory compliance program is the compliance audit. This article discusses barriers to a successful audit, audit skills for the laboratory, areas to cover in an audit, and writing the audit report. Intermountain Health Care (IHC) is an integrated health-care system consisting of 20 hospitals in Utah and Idaho, health plans with 450,000 directly covered lives and contracts to third-party insurance companies covering 500,000 additional lives, and 75 other facilities with 400 employed physicians. Approximately 1,000 of IHC's 23,000 employees work in laboratories. PMID:11822264

  2. Videotapes in Laboratory Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, P.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of video taped demonstrations of basic laboratory techniques at Sussex University to provide students with opportunities to learn individually at their own pace. Included is a list of 12 tapes on elementary organic techniques. (CC)

  3. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    E-print Network

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  4. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-print Network

    gear and modem electronic devices including a #12;closed circuit TV system for observing action of gear it was razed in 1958 to make room for a modem 3-story structure. The new laboratory-office building has 24

  5. Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-02

    This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

  6. Laboratory Heat Recovery System

    E-print Network

    Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    . This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - CORVALLIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Research Laboratory - Corvallis is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's - national research center for terrestrial and watershed ecology, aquatic ecoregions, and for the ecological effects of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric p...

  8. National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya

    E-print Network

    nonchiral reactants that can be used as an ingredient in a number of goods including personal care is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department

  9. Retainer for laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

  10. Organic Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sherrel

    1990-01-01

    Detailed is a method in which short pieces of teflon tubing may be used for collection tubes for collecting preparative fractions from gas chromatographs. Material preparation, laboratory procedures, and results of this method are discussed. (CW)

  11. National Laboratory Accreditation Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, A. [Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment, Topeka, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) is a voluntary association of state, federal officials, and the private sector organized for purposes of developing national performance standards for environmental laboratories and for state and federal accrediting authorities. NELAC`s intent is to foster the generation of environmental laboratory data of known and documented quality. This paper presents the structure of the conference, how the NELAC standards are developed, and the scope of the program. The roles and responsibilities of the accrediting authorities and of the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (NELAP), is discussed. Implementation of the NELAC standards by accrediting authorities is currently underway, a discussion of how NELAP will be implemented is included.

  12. Ecosystems in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madders, M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

  13. Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    CGR’s high throughput laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and automation systems for a large number of applications. CGR supports DCEG in all stages of cancer research from planning to publishing, including experimental design and project management, sample handling, genotyping and sequencing assay design and execution, development and implementation of bioinformatic pipelines, and downstream scientific research and analytical support.

  14. Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual Department of Chemistry University of California - Davis Davis, CA 95616 Winter 2014 #12;Student Name _____________________ Locker # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number

  15. Strategic Technology JET PROPULSION LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Strategic Technology Directions JET PROPULSION LABORATORY National Aeronautics and Space, and science goals for NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It derives from and updates the previous also represent technology capabilities that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory believes are essential

  16. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment of Annex A Requirements #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Annex A Committee · Thomas Hettenhouser Laboratory Accreditation Program Recent Committee Discussions · Lack of NVLAP symbol use · Interpretation

  17. Thermosiphon Cooling of a Large Office /Laboratory Complex 

    E-print Network

    White, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    included a 'free cooling' system with high flux evaporator tubes. This system approximately doubles the old thermosiphon capacity and reduces compressor power by 17%. This paper reviews system design and operating data....

  18. Thermosiphon Cooling of a Large Office /Laboratory Complex

    E-print Network

    White, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    For the past six winters a thermosiphon system has been used with two 2000 ton centrifugal chillers to supply chilled water for building cooling. Whenever the outside wet bulb temperature drops to 45 F or below, the compressors are shut down...

  19. Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

    1991-12-01

    Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

  20. Bimetallic complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfdieter A. Schenk; Thomas Gutmann

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis and reactions of bimetallic Zr(II)–Mo(0) complexes with bridging C5H4PPh2 ligands (henceforth abbreviated as Cp?) are described. Reaction of Cp2?ZrCl2 (1) with n-butyllithium in THF produces a metastable material tentatively formulated as Cp2?Zr·2 LiCl·4 THF (2). Diphenyldisulfide instantaneously converts 2 into the Zr(IV) dithiolate Cp2?Zr(SPh)2 (3). When 2 is treated with [Mo(CO)4(norbornadiene)], an unstable intermediate is formed which can

  1. 3. Complex Numbers 17 3 Complex Numbers

    E-print Network

    Givental, Alexander

    3. Complex Numbers 17 3 Complex Numbers Law and Order Life is unfair: The quadratic equation x2 - 1 solutions to the equation. This is how complex numbers could have been invented. More formally, complex numbers a and b are called respectively the real part and imagi- nary part of the complex number z

  2. Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marie Csete (University of Michigan Medical School; Departments of Anesthesiology and Cell and Developmental Biology)

    2002-03-01

    Advanced technologies and biology have extremely different physical implementations, but they are far more alike in systems-level organization than is widely appreciated. Convergent evolution in both domains produces modular architectures that are composed of elaborate hierarchies of protocols and layers of feedback regulation, are driven by demand for robustness to uncertain environments, and use often imprecise components. This complexity may be largely hidden in idealized laboratory settings and in normal operation, becoming conspicuous only when contributing to rare cascading failures. These puzzling and paradoxical features are neither accidental nor artificial, but derive from a deep and necessary interplay between complexity and robustness, modularity, feedback, and fragility. This review describes insights from engineering theory and practice that can shed some light on biological complexity.

  3. Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl

    E-print Network

    Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl Nabil A. NIMER Dept . Biotechnology & Genetic thatQA is defined as the overall program that ensures that the final results reported by the laboratory areensures that the final results reported by the laboratory are correct.correct. ""The aim of quality

  4. Laboratory safety handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, E.L.; Watterson, C.A.; Chemerys, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Safety, defined as 'freedom from danger, risk, or injury,' is difficult to achieve in a laboratory environment. Inherent dangers, associated with water analysis and research laboratories where hazardous samples, materials, and equipment are used, must be minimized to protect workers, buildings, and equipment. Managers, supervisors, analysts, and laboratory support personnel each have specific responsibilities to reduce hazards by maintaining a safe work environment. General rules of conduct and safety practices that involve personal protection, laboratory practices, chemical handling, compressed gases handling, use of equipment, and overall security must be practiced by everyone at all levels. Routine and extensive inspections of all laboratories must be made regularly by qualified people. Personnel should be trained thoroughly and repetitively. Special hazards that may involve exposure to carcinogens, cryogenics, or radiation must be given special attention, and specific rules and operational procedures must be established to deal with them. Safety data, reference materials, and texts must be kept available if prudent safety is to be practiced and accidents prevented or minimized.

  5. Undergraduate Laboratory for Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Mitchio; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Dickert, Jeffrey M.; Essy, Blair R.; Claypool, Christopher L.

    1996-02-01

    Surface science has developed into a multidisciplinary field of research with applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to semiconductor etching (1). Aspects of surface chemistry are now included in physical chemistry textbooks (2) and undergraduate curricula (3), but the perceived cost and complexity of equipment has deterred the introduction of surface science methods in undergraduate laboratories (4). Efforts to expose chemistry undergraduates to state-of-the-art surface instrumentation have just begun (5). To provide our undergraduates with hands-on experience in using standard techniques for characterizing surface morphology, adsorbates, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms, we have developed a set of surface science experiments for our physical chemistry laboratory sequence. The centerpiece of the laboratory is an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for studies of single crystal surfaces. This instrument, shown in the figure, has surface analysis capabilities including low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The laboratory exercises involve experiments on the well-studied Pt(111) surface. Students prepare a previously mounted single crystal sample by sputtering it with an argon ion gun and heating it under O2. Electron diffraction patterns from the cleaned surface are then obtained with a reverse view LEED apparatus (Princeton Instruments). Images are captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera interfaced to a personal computer for easy downloading and subsequent analysis. Although the LEED images from a Pt(111) surface can be readily interpreted using simple diffraction arguments, this lab provides an excellent context for introducing Miller indices and reciprocal lattices (6). The surface chemical composition can be investigated by Auger spectroscopy, using the LEED apparatus as a simple energy analyzer. The temperature programmed desorption experiment, which is nearly complete, will be be added to the curriculum this academic year. This experiment introduces students to the concepts of surface adsorption and desorption kinetics. The sample mount can be both heated to 900 oC and cooled by liquid nitrogen, allowing the study of the desorption of a variety of adsorbates, both chemisorbed and physisorbed. Adsorbed species evolving from the heated surface are detected with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Initially, students will study the desorption kinetics of CO from a Pt(111) surface for a range of coverages and temperature programming rates in order to obtain rate parameters and to test the validity of Redhead's relationship between the activation energy of desorption and the peak desorption temperature. They then will be introduced to the mechanisms of surface reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood) in a study of CO oxidation on this surface. We have also set up a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) laboratory using a commercially available instrument (Burleigh Instruments, Inc.), which complements the UHV surface structure experiments by introducing the topography of a real surface, for example, with steps and defect sites. With the apparatus now completed, we can explore other possible developments, for example, an applied physics track designed around experiments on semiconductor substrates. Future additions include X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and completion of a separate surface infrared spectroscopy experiment on supported catalysts. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, Division of Undergraduate Education Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI) Program (Grant No. DUE-9352254) and an AT&T Special Purpose Grant. Literature Cited Somorjai, G. Introduction to Surface Chemistry and Catalysis; Wiley: New York, 1994; Woodruff, D. P.; Delchar, T. A. Modem Techniques of Surface Science; Cambridge University: Cambridge, 1986; Christmann, K. Introduction to Surface Physical Chemistry; Springer Verlag: New York, 1991; Adamson, A. W. Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, 5th ed.; Wiley: New York, 1990. See for example Atki

  6. Exploration Laboratory Analysis - ARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Fung, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL). The SMEMCL provided diagnosis and treatment for the evidence-based medical conditions and hence, a basis for developing ELA functional requirements.

  7. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  8. Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbel, E. L.

    2002-12-01

    A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

  9. Adaptive Evolution for the Study of Complex Phenotypes in Microbial Systems 

    E-print Network

    Reyes Barrios, Luis Humberto

    2013-07-24

    , generally associated with complex phenotypes. The poor understanding of complex phenotypes associated with increased production poses a challenge for the rational design of strains of more robust microbial producers. Laboratory adaptive evolution is a...

  10. Laboratory Workers, Supervisors and Administration

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Laboratory Workers, Supervisors and Administration Laboratory Ventilation Management Program Guidance Document Laboratory Workers, Supervisors and Administration For the purpose of the lab ventilation or group of labs because they work with hazardous chemicals in the laboratory. Other members of this group

  11. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1981 December 1981 Eugene J . Aubert and Development Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve

  12. Biochemistry Laboratory II Course Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Houston, Paul L.

    1 Biochemistry Laboratory II CHEM 4582 Course Syllabus #12;2 General Information COURSE OBJECTIVE The primary objective of this course is for students to learn laboratory methods for characterizing biological Laboratory I) TEXT None ­ see T-Square for reading assignments OTHER REQUIREMENTS Laboratory coat **NEW

  13. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    #12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980 December I980 Eugene J of Research and Development Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories

  14. Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

  15. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia for Technology. FIRE has benefited from the prior design and R&D activities on BPX, TPX and ITER. Advanced Energy

  16. Clinical audit in the laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R T Erasmus; A E Zemlin

    2009-01-01

    Audits are part of the continuous quality improvement process and one of the key elements of clinical governance. Laboratory-based clinical audits are concerned primarily with the everyday aspects of laboratory services and are a means of providing feedback to the users of the laboratory and its staff. They involve measuring the performance of laboratory services against established standards. These standards

  17. UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of California at Berkeley Seismological Laboratory home page provides access to the many programs, products and activities of the Laboratory. Earthquake monitoring activities include maps of recent events, weekly seismicity maps and current seismograms. Users may attempt to make their own seismogram, report an earthquake or watch movies of earthquake events. Descriptions of the seismic networks in California and their seismic datasets as well as earthquake preparedness information are also available. A list of seismology-related resources for teachers is provided with descriptions and links to each resource.

  18. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Lab is the U.S. Department of Energy's premier laboratory for renewable energy research and development and a leading laboratory for energy efficiency research and development. The web site provides access to a large array of information that targets many different audiences. There are educational links and classroom activities and projects suited for audiences from primary education through college-level. Other features include information about different forms of energy, databases on renewable energy production, an extensive photo gallery, and information on current research and applications in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  19. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fogler, H. Scott

    The University of Michigan Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRL) at the College of Engineering explores innovative applications of immersive and non-immersive virtual environments in a variety of areas. For industrial applications, research is focused on virtual prototyping of engineering designs - especially in the automotive and marine industry - the simulation of manufacturing processes, and related engineering tasks. Additional activities include the use of virtual reality in accident simulations, medicine, architecture, archeology, education, and other areas. As an interdisciplinary facility, the VRL collaborates with many disciplines within the university and serves the outside community. Through a combined directorship, the Laboratory cooperates closely with the University of Michigan 3D Lab.

  20. Laboratory Math for Biotechnology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This "Course-in-a-Box" from Bio-Link is a good starting point for instructors to develop a course on basic laboratory math. New biotechnology students "often need a 'refresher' of basic algebra, scientific notation, logarithms and graphing." This course provides an opportunity to focus on math skills alone without also studying laboratory techniques. This course includes a detailed schedule with learning outcomes, classroom activities, PowerPoint lectures, and instructors' notes. A free login is required to access the materials.

  1. Molecular complexes in close and far away

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William; Vaida, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    In this review, gas-phase chemistry of interstellar media and some planetary atmospheres is extended to include molecular complexes. Although the composition, density, and temperature of the environments discussed are very different, molecular complexes have recently been considered as potential contributors to chemistry. The complexes reviewed include strongly bound aggregates of molecules with ions, intermediate-strength hydrogen bonded complexes (primarily hydrates), and weakly bonded van der Waals molecules. In low-density, low-temperature environments characteristic of giant molecular clouds, molecular synthesis, known to involve gas-phase ion-molecule reactions and chemistry at the surface of dust and ice grains is extended here to involve molecular ionic clusters. At the high density and high temperatures found on planetary atmospheres, molecular complexes contribute to both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Using the observational, laboratory, and theoretical database, the role of molecular complexes in close and far away is discussed. PMID:16740667

  2. Signal Classification through Multifractal Analysis and Complex Domain Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Frey, Brendan J.

    Signal Classification through Multifractal Analysis and Complex Domain Neural Networks W. Kinsner Signal and Data Compression Laboratory *Department of Psychology University of Manitoba, Winnipeg signals produced by nonlinear systems. The classification and analysis of these signals is important

  3. Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

  4. 2. VIEW OF TAN 629 HANGAR COMPLEX TAKEN FROM MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF TAN 629 HANGAR COMPLEX TAKEN FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD FACING NORTH, LONGER LENS AND CLOSER VIEW THAN PHOTO 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar No. 629, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL PIPING. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-3212. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. 2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. Monitor Building 4203/E-4 is hidden behind barrier (4216/E-17). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Control Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Visgraf Laboratory -IMPAVisgraf Laboratory -IMPAVisgraf Laboratory -IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC 99 Frontiers ofFrontiers of

    E-print Network

    1 Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC@impa.br@impa.br Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA Rio de JaneiroRio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.brwww.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC 99

  8. Laboratory Animal Science Program

    Cancer.gov

    Histotechnology and Pathology Resources - Current Turnaround Times H&E slide preparation: 25 days Immunohistochemistry: 11 days Pathology Slide Evaluation: 30 days Turnaround times are approximate and may be influenced by the complexity of the project.     

  9. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space of around 200 m² located at NICTA's Australian Technology Park offices in Redfern. The lab is driven

  10. Idaho National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In operation since 1949, INL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's missions in ensuring the nation's energy security with safe, competitive, and sustainable energy systems and unique national and homeland security capabilities.

  11. Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

  12. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12 Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12 involves taking a lot of very similar pho- tographs with only slightly varying settings. This has

  13. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2009 Marco Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12]. For example, a lot of papers were evaluating and comparing application identification methods without accurate

  14. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2008 Diarmuid ´O S´eaghdha This technical by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam that worked in the end, experiments that didn't, stress, relief, more stress, some croquet and an awful lot

  15. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2002 Agathoniki Trigoni This technical report Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/TechReports/ Series.0). There has been a lot of re- search on the execution of relational queries and their optimization using

  16. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2013 Stephen Kell This technical report Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476 finished. Rather than thanking people for anything they helped me complete, I'd like to thank a lot

  17. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2011 Ekaterina V. Shutova of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam very constructive and involved comments on this thesis, that changed it a lot and for the better. Anna

  18. Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

    This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

  19. The Laboratory Notebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-06-25

    This site provides well-organized instructions for keeping a laboratory notebook. In addition to the providing an overview of general rules and organization, the site also discusses organization of conclusions around three central types of outlines for measurement experiments, synthesis experiments and reporting of physical phenomena.

  20. Laboratory Animal Science Program

    Cancer.gov

    The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

  1. Laboratory Density Functionals

    E-print Network

    B. G. Giraud

    2007-07-26

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  2. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Laboratory Duties and Responsibilities

    E-print Network

    Jalali. Bahram

    .g., fume hoods) and safety equipment (e.g., emergency showers/eyewashes, fire extinguishers) become non and safety of all personnel who handle hazardous chemicals in his/her laboratory. The PI/LS may delegate operating procedures associated with chemical safety for regulated substances 2. Identify hazards

  4. Laboratory Safety Principles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jerry Staiger, Keith Carlson, Jim Laver, Ray Arntson (University of Minnesota; )

    2008-04-11

    This workshop covers major principles and regulations pertinent to working in laboratories with hazardous materials. It is divided into 45 minute segments dealing with: Radioactive Materials (Staiger); Toxic, Reactive, Carcinogenic, and Teratogenic Chemicals (Carlson); Infectious Agents (Laver); and Fire Safety Concepts and Physical Hazards (Arnston).

  5. Division of Laboratory Sciences

    E-print Network

    're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing measurement of chemicals, including nutritional and dietary indicators, in people's blood or urine work. One of our long-standing programs helps assure the quality of newborn blood spot screening tests

  6. National Ice Core Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    USGS

    This facility stores, curates and studies ice cores recovered from glaciers from around the world. The site provides a photo gallery and description about each step of the process of drilling, transporting and analyzing the core. There is also a database of basic information about each core held at the laboratory and links to global change research information.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

  8. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Technical Report Number 826 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-826 ISSN 1476-2986 GREEN IPTV: a resource and energy efficient network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos December 2012 15 JJ Thomson Avenue://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12;GREEN IPTV: A Resource and Energy Efficient Network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos

  9. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  10. Marine Biological Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Marine Biological Laboratory is an international center for research, education, and training in biology, biomedicine, and ecology. Site features the latest news and research developments from MBL. Explore all the latest research, education information, including graduate admissions and teacher workshops, and a glimpse at MBL history, facilities, and more. Current news and links to all kinds of additional MBL resources are also available.

  11. A Lean Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Dundas, Nicola E.; Ziadie, Mandolin S.; Revell, Paula A.; Brock, Evangeline; Mitui, Midori; Leos, N. Kristine; Rogers, Beverly B.

    2011-01-01

    During certain months of the year, viral respiratory infections lead to a dramatic increase in pediatric emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Rapid identification of the infectious organism results in timely treatment and reductions in hospital cost and length of stay. Before the introduction of molecular testing to the virology laboratory, diagnosis relied on the standard methods of immunofluorescence and culture. These tests can be labor-intensive and costly. Recent studies have demonstrated the higher sensitivity, faster turnaround, and broader diagnostic spectrum provided by multiplexed RT-PCR assays. Data comparing the laboratory cost and labor efficiency of the tests are lacking. To address this issue, we chose to implement the principles of operational workflow analysis using lean methodology to critically evaluate the potential advantages of a multiplexed RT-PCR assay both in terms of workflow and cost effectiveness. Our results indicated that the implementation of the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel (RVP) resulted in a standardized workflow with decreased requirements in laboratory cost as well as improvement in efficiency. In summary, we demonstrate that, in our laboratory, the Luminex xTAG RVP is more operationally streamlined and cost-effective than standard viral direct fluorescent antibody and culture. Further studies are needed to highlight additional benefits of the test, including shortened hospital stay and improved patient outcome. PMID:21354052

  12. EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    Polly, David

    EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

  13. Caltech Micromachining Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Entirely different and exotic machining techniques are required for creating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other extremely small devices. The Caltech Micromachining Laboratory maintains this archive of research highlights and papers on its homepage, including a paper on a MEMS-driven flapping wing for a palm-sized aerial vehicle.

  14. RUNNING A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REES, ALUN L.W.

    THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY AT THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF TRUJILLO AS IT IS USED IN THE FIVE-YEAR ENGLISH TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM. THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF THIS COURSE ARE INTENSIVE, BASED ON A STUDY OF ENGLISH USING LADO-FRIES MATERIALS (FOR LATIN AMERICAN LEARNERS) WHICH REQUIRE FIVE HOURS OF CLASSWORK A WEEK SUPPLEMENTED BY…

  15. PENNSYLVANIA APPALACHIAN LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Laboratory - Oyster Research #12;07 Plan Summary The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science;#12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARYI 1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 05 2. Plan Vision 09 3.V. Rachel Carson 04 #12;05 1. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Mission Statement

  16. Clinical Laboratory Helper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szucs, Susan C.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides competencies and tasks for the position of clinical laboratory helper; it serves as both a career exploration experience and/or entry-level employment training. A list of 25 validated competencies and tasks covers careers from entry level to those that must be mastered to earn an associate degree in clinical…

  17. Laboratory Culture of Tautog

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean M. Perry; Renee Mercaldo-Allen; Catherine A. Kuropat; James B. Hughes

    1998-01-01

    Spawning of field-captured adult tautog Tautoga onitis was accomplished under laboratory conditions. Natural spawning of tautog produced more viable embryos and larvae than did strip-spawning. Embryos were cultured to hatching and raised successfully through the larval stage to juveniles. Newly hatched larvae were fed protozoans from day 0 to day 6 posthatch, rotifers from day 2 to day 20 posthatch,

  18. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Homepage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) homepage provides links to spacecraft and mission information, imagery, news articles, events, features, and public services. Users can access articles and imagery from the Mars Rover and Cassini missions, images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and an El Nino/La Nina Watch.

  19. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    to tag sequence grammars and the RASP system parser Ted Briscoe March 2006 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge and the RASP system parser Ted Briscoe Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge ejb@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract (RASP) system. It is intended to help users of RASP understand the linguistic and engineering rationale

  20. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    of this analysis to prove the security of a `blind quantum computation' protocol, whereby Alice gets Bob to performTechnical Report Number 595 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-595 ISSN 1476-2986 Representations of quantum operations, with applications to quantum cryptography Pablo J. Arrighi July 2004 15 JJ Thomson

  1. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    source of inspiration and motivation. I am grateful to Gates Cambridge whose scholarship has enabled me in evolving software Silvia Breu June 2013 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 of Cambridge, Newnham College. Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory

  2. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  3. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Technical Report Number 703 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-703 ISSN 1476-2986 Lazy Susan: dumb dramatic innovation and evolution of services. However, this openness permits many abuses of open-access://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2007 Jon Crowcroft, Tim Deegan, Christian Kreibich, Richard Mortier, Nicholas Weaver Technical

  4. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Research Council (National Research Council Committee on Scientific and Humane Issues in the Use of Random Source Dogs and Cats for Research; Na)

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service. This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

  5. Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)

    E-print Network

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla) Department of Chemical Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos

  6. New laboratory tools in the assessment of bone quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Chappard; M. F. Baslé; E. Legrand; M. Audran

    2011-01-01

    Bone quality is a complex set of intricated and interdependent factors that influence bone strength. A number of methods have\\u000a emerged to measure bone quality, taking into account the organic or the mineral phase of the bone matrix, in the laboratory.\\u000a Bone quality is a complex set of different factors that are interdependent. The bone matrix organization can be described

  7. Laboratory Safety Manual Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Laboratory Safety Manual Table of Contents I. Emergency Procedures a. Laboratory Contact Information b. Location of Laboratory Emergency Equipment c. Laboratory Hazard and Evacuation Maps d. University Emergency Procedures II. University Policies and Procedures a. Rice University Laboratory Safety

  8. Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

    1994-12-01

    The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

  9. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  10. Laboratory chemical hoods: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    First, Melvin W

    2003-01-01

    A historical review of laboratory fume hoods leads to a consideration of the current status of structural design, operating characteristics (with special reference to face velocity), safety (relative to standardized test results), energy conservation, and certification methods. Noteworthy are (1) the increasing complexity of instrumentation designed to assure full safety function plus airflow modulation to minimize energy consumption; (2) the extreme plasticity of accepted and recommended face velocity values; (3) the insensitivity of standardized hood test protocols to variations in face velocity; and (4) a serious lack of correlation between operator risk, face velocity, and standard hood test results. Safety considerations lead to the selection of laboratory fume hoods having the highest demonstrated containment capability. This is in spite of the fact that most hood operations have a low hazard rating. Energy savings could be realized if the face velocity of each hood could be modulated to match the risk associated with the work being conducted. PMID:12688850

  11. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  12. Keeping a Laboratory Notebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The HURI SURI project is developing a regional biotechnology workforce pipeline by expanding and supporting biotechnology research experiences for Jamestown Community College (JCC) undergraduates and disseminating these research experiences and materials to area high school teachers and students. This Microsoft Word document details how to keep a laboratory notebook in a high school or undergraduate science class. This is important because "a laboratory notebook is really required by law for investigators that either work in an industry (e.g. pharmaceutical industry) that is federally regulated or for investigators who have federal grant funding for research (e.g. from the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation)." The document explains how the notebook needs a table of contents, experiment details, and conclusion.

  13. TARDEC's robotics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsich, David J.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Muench, Paul L.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) recently opened a 5000 square foot robotics laboratory known as the TARDEC Robotics Laboratory. The focus of the lab is on robotics research, both basic and applied, in the area of robot mobility. Mobility is the key problem for light weight robotic systems, and the TARDEC Robotics Lab will develop innovative ways to deal with the mobility issues. The lab will also test and evaluate robotic systems in all aspects of mobility and control. The lab has the highest concentration of senior researchers at TARDEC, and is committed to maintaining in- house research talent so that new combat concepts using robots can be evaluated effectively by the Army. This paper serves as an introduction to the lab, its missions, goals, capabilities and programs.

  14. Local laboratory ventilation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsberg, J. [GPR Planners Collaborative, White Plains, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This article is a discussion of the ``other`` laboratory ventilation devices described in OSHA`s laboratory standard that could be used in lieu of traditional chemical fume hoods. The reference ``local`` or ``other`` ventilation device is used with little or no information provided as to the type, design, or performance criteria appropriate for specific applications, as was done in excruciating detail for their fume hood cousins. Equally curious is the fact that no performance test criteria were established for this category of equipment. Therefore, great care must be taken by the designer to determine the specific application intended for each unit specified and confirm that its use is appropriate for the task. In light of these standards, manufacturers have responded with many new and innovative products.

  15. Quaternary GIS Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

  16. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  17. Laboratory Animal Science Program

    Cancer.gov

    The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System". This web-based system enables investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of this process, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work. Click on the link from this page or any of the pages within this site to be directed to the request system.

  18. Naval Research Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Washington, D.C., the NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps and conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development. Site provides insight into the many accomplishments and on-going research of the lab. Learn about how GPS began and advances in meteorology and radar applications. Information includes the history of the lab, a visitor's guide, and more.

  19. Image Communications Laboratory (ICL)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The UCLA Image Communications Laboratory focuses their research on the image coding and transmission of communications and archiving systems. While the emphasis is on applied research, they are also studying a number of issues of theoretical importance. Areas of research include wireless communications, medical imaging, FPGA implementations, channel/source coding, data compression, image enhancement, and networking. There is also a research paper library where papers can be downloaded.

  20. Lunar Receiving Laboratory Project History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangus, Susan; Larsen, William

    2004-01-01

    As early as 1959, the Working Group on Lunar Exploration within NASA advocated that 'one of the prime objectives of the first lunar landing mission should be the collection of samples for return to Earth, where they could be subjected to detailed study and analysis.' Within NASA, neither this group nor any other scientists working with the Agency were concerned about back contamination issues. Outside of NASA, back contamination concerns had been raised as early as 1960. Although NASA did not seem to pay any attention to the concerns at that time, the scientific community continued to be interested in the topic. In 1962 and again in 1963, as the Apollo Program loomed large, further discussions were held. These early discussions of back contamination did not make their way into NASA's administration, however, and when Manned Spacecraft Center personnel began to articulate early concepts for the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL), the back contamination issue was not considered. Once this concern became a major focus, however, the LRL's development became increasingly complex. This is the history of that development.

  1. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility; and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options: the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase 2 study are described in the present report.

  2. Seismic evaluation of the U1a complex at the Nevada Test Site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R R McCamant; A M Davito; K R Hahn; R C Murray; D S Ng; V K Sahni; K M Schnechter; M Van Dyke

    1998-01-01

    As part of an overall safety evaluation of the Ula Complex, a seismic evaluation of structures, systems, and components (SSC) was conducted. A team of seismic, safety, and operation engineers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Bechtel Nevada (BN) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was chartered to perform the seismic evaluation. The UlA Complex is located in Area 1

  3. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  4. Optical diffraction microscopy in a teaching laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre; Rankenburg, Ivan C.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss an optics experiment that reproduces all important aspects of diffraction microscopy or coherent diffractive imaging. This technique is used to reconstruct an object's image from its diffraction pattern. The experimental setup is described in detail and only requires material readily available in a well-equipped optics teaching laboratory. The data analysis procedure is explained, in particular the reconstruction part, for which an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is used. The method is illustrated by showing the complex-valued reconstruction of an insect wing from a diffraction pattern measured with this setup.

  5. Extracting distinct behaviors from laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    Throughout nature, self-organized collective motion in animal groups produces rich and complex behaviors. Many modeling approaches have been proposed from continuum to discrete agent based models which are capable of emulating the behavior observed in flocks and swarms. Most models assume uniformity in the way individuals interact and discard differences between individuals and changes of behavior with time. While in many cases individual differences may average out in large groups of animals, this is not likely the case for small groups. By measuring trajectories and kinematics of individual Chironomids in laboratory mating swarms, we assess the dynamics of individual behavior and discuss the impact of our results on current models.

  6. Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.; Rodier, Daniel R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.

    1994-01-01

    ELVIS (Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science) is an interactive visualization environment that enables scientists, students, and educators to visualize and analyze large, complex, and diverse sets of scientific data. It accomplishes this by presenting the data sets as 2-D, 3-D, color, stereo, and graphic images with movable and multiple light sources combined with displays of solid-surface, contours, wire-frame, and transparency. By simultaneously rendering diverse data sets acquired from multiple sources, formats, and resolutions and by interacting with the data through an intuitive, direct-manipulation interface, ELVIS provides an interactive and responsive environment for exploratory data analysis.

  7. ChemTeacher: Laboratory Methods

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Laboratory Methods page includes resources for teaching students about basic laboratory equipment.

  8. Nanophotonics at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert

    2008-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is leveraging the extensive CMOS, MEMS, compound semiconductor, and nanotechnology fabrication and test resources at Sandia National Laboratories to explore new science and technology in photonic crystals, plasmonics, metamaterials, and silicon photonics.

  9. DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)

    Cancer.gov

    As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

  10. Laboratory Air Handling Unit System 

    E-print Network

    Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative AHU system is presented in this paper. The proposed AHU system is called a Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) system since it is most suitable for the buildings where one section (laboratory) has 100% exhaust ...

  11. 37 Keys to Laboratory Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruys, Theodorus

    1969-01-01

    Flexibility, adaptability, and expandability are requirements for good laboratory design. This report contains suggestions for improving laboratory planning, construction, and utilization in certain key areas. Special attention is given to incorporating safety equipment and special nonreactive materials. (RA)

  12. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Outline · Purpose of the Types of Assessments Accreditation Program Assessment - Definition · Process undertaken by an accreditation body to assess

  13. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Calibration Certificate Review Discussion #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Calibration Certificate Review do not have the staff with the competency your account deserves." This is a quote from an accredited

  14. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Assessing Traceability and Uncertainty Impacts on Traceability #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pertinent Accreditation Program The Requirements: Handbook 150 5.6.1 General All equipment used for tests and

  15. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training NIST Handbook 150 ISO/IEC 17025 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NIST Handbook 150 2006 Edition NVLAP 3 Accreditation process 4 Management requirements for accreditation 5 Technical requirements

  16. Complex Tectonism on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Complex tectonism is evident in these images of Ganymede's surface. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. The 80 kilometer (50 mile) wide lens-shaped feature in the center of the image is located at 32 degrees latitude and 188 degrees longitude along the border of a region of ancient dark terrain known as Marius Regio, and is near an area of younger bright terrain named Nippur Sulcus. The tectonism that created the structures in the bright terrain nearby has strongly affected the local dark terrain to form unusual structures such as the one shown here. The lens-like appearance of this feature is probably due to shearing of the surface, where areas have slid past each other and also rotated slightly. Note that in several places in these images, especially around the border of the lens-shaped feature, bright ridges appear to turn into dark grooves. Analysis of the geologic structures in areas like this are helping scientists to understand the complex tectonic history of Ganymede.

    North is to the top-left of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The image covers an area about 63 kilometers (39 miles) by 120 kilometers (75 miles) across at a resolution of 188 meters (627 feet) per picture element. The images were taken on September 6, 1996 at a range of 18,522 kilometers (11,576 miles) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  17. An Experiment on Isomerism in Metal-Amino Acid Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, R. Graeme; Nolan, Kevin B.

    1982-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and discussion of results are provided for syntheses of cobalt (III) complexes, I-III, illustrating three possible bonding modes of glycine to a metal ion (the complex cations II and III being linkage/geometric isomers). Includes spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods to distinguish among the…

  18. Bodega Marine Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Bodega Bay, California, BML mission is to lead the way to the multi-disciplinary scientific understanding required to solve complex environmental problems on the marine and terrestrial sides of the tideline in northern California. Site includes information on faculty, facilities, current research, news and events, and a wealth of real-time and archived data and maps.

  19. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    or adding significant overhead. My experimental results show the improvements in vertical handover latency, which varied between small time reductions and "zero" latency, for the case of soft handovers. Finally the complexities and dynamic behaviour posed by the environment. #12;4 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 13 1

  20. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    -personal attitudes and emotional states. Because our body is specialised to perform a variety of everyday tasks;Summary The human body has evolved to perform sophisticated tasks from locomotion to the use of tools psychology, character animation and speech recognition. Complex actions are modelled using Hidden Markov

  1. Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haviland, David

    heating and anomalous diffusion of electrons 65 A.2.4 Complex plasmas 67 A.2.5 The VASIMR plasma rocket 118 C.2.1 Diagnostics development for the VASIMR rocket engine 118 C.2.2 High power magnetrons 119 #12

  2. 39. North Elevation, Revised Drawing of XRay Laboratory, Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. North Elevation, Revised Drawing of X-Ray Laboratory, Building No. 27, Letterman General Hospital. August 1915. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 40. South Elevation, Revised Drawing of XRay Laboratory, Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. South Elevation, Revised Drawing of X-Ray Laboratory, Building No. 27, Letterman General Hospital. August 1940. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Partnership Opportunities with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.L.; Coxon, G.D.

    2000-02-20

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is ``bringing science to life'' through the creation of knowledge; the invention of new tools and techniques; the scientific analysis of complex situations; and the design, construction and operation of research facilities used by scientists and engineers from throughout the world.

  5. Adsorption of Phosphate on Goethite: An Undergraduate Research Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribe, Lorena; Barja, Beatriz C.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the adsorption of phosphate on goethite is presented, which also includes discussion on surface properties, interfaces, acid-base equilibrium, molecular structure and solid state chemistry. It was seen that many students were able to produce qualitatively correct results for a complex system of real interest and they…

  6. The Invention Factory: Thomas Edison's Laboratories. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolger, Benjamin

    This lesson explores the group of buildings in West Orange, New Jersey, built in 1887, that formed the core of Thomas Edison's research and development complex. They consisted of chemistry, physics, and metallurgy laboratories; machine shop; pattern shop; research library; and rooms for experiments. The lesson explains that the prototypes (ideas…

  7. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    #12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1985 December 1985 Eugene J and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 .........................Contracts and Grants 48 Front Cover: Water levels on the Great Lakes have been in a high regimefor the past

  8. Total laboratory automation in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahide Sasaki; Takeshi Kageoka; Katsumi Ogura; Hiromi Kataoka; Tadashi Ueta; Shigeyoshi Sugihara

    1998-01-01

    The history of systematized automation in clinical laboratories in Japan started in 1981. At that time, about 12 laboratory technicians worked in a typical private University hospital laboratory (average size 1000 beds), whereas in national university hospitals (typical size 600 beds), the number of technicians was as low as 18–25. In 1981, the Kochi Medical School was founded as a

  9. Chemistry 419 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Chemistry 419 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Spring, 2008 Lecture/Discussion 1:00 Tuesday, Brittney Young Required Text: Chemistry 419 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory - University Bookstore. Students are required to perform seven laboratories from among those offered this quarter. The first week

  10. LABORATORY I FORCES AND EQUILIBRIUM

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY I FORCES AND EQUILIBRIUM Lab I -1 In biological systems, most objects of interest system. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Determine and 6), and chapter 15 (section 4). It is likely that you will be doing some of these laboratory

  11. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY COVER: FROM

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    4-00 -4-11 5/q'd.... JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 1991 Annual Report #12;COVER: FROM ~IODEST BEGIN Aeronautlcs and Space Adnurustratlon for the peaod January 1 through December 31, 1991. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Cahforrua Instltute ofTechnology Pasadena,~orrua .-. III #12;IINTRODUCTION Propulsion Laboratory

  12. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Introduction 1

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    JPL Annual Report 1989 Jet Propulsion Laboratory #12;#12;CONTENTS Introduction 1 Director's Message for the period January 1 through December 31, 1989. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California #12;INTRODUCTION TheJet Propulsion Laboratory QPL) of the California Institute

  13. Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory Your business tag line here. The goal of this project into a living, hands-on IPM teaching laboratory. This laboratory will be used to instruct clientele in whole-farm approaches to adopting IPM systems through various workshops to be held in conjunction with the UF/IFAS Small

  14. Laboratory Materials: Affordances or Constraints?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Rebecca C.; Ruibal-Villasenor, Maria; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory instruction is critical to the understanding of biology and is a central piece of biological sciences instruction. Although much investigation has focused on the content of biology laboratory exercises, we contend that understanding the extent to which the laboratory materials can aid or limit experimental investigation is of equal…

  15. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory

  16. Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare National Institutes of Health PublicHealthService PolicyonHumane Care and Use of LaboratoryAnimals #12;Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals Revised August, 2002 #12;Preface This 2002 reprint of the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy

  17. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  18. VIEW OF KENNEDY AVIONICS TEST SET LABORATORY, ROOM NO. MM6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF KENNEDY AVIONICS TEST SET LABORATORY, ROOM NO. MM6, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. A SURVEY OF LABORATORY AND STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO FARMWORKER EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing internally valid, and perhaps generalizable, farmworker exposure studies is a complex process that involves many statistical and laboratory considerations. Statistics are an integral component of each study beginning with the design stage and continuing to the final da...

  20. Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study the interplanetary medium, asteroids, comets, and planets. Suborbital sounding rockets and groundbased observing platforms form an integral part of these research activities. This report covers the period from approximately October 1999 through September 2000.

  1. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  2. Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  3. Laboratory prototype flash evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

  4. MIT Space Systems Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1995 to engage in "cutting edge research projects with the goal of directly contributing to the present and future exploration and development of space." Users can find materials on current and past flight projects such as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) and the Interferometry Program Experiment (IPEX). The website also features SSL's ground programs and research facilities. Researchers can view lists of published papers and can download student theses.

  5. Write Effective Laboratory Reports

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kraus, Mary Ellen

    The ability to write a good laboratory report is an essential skill for all scientists. For many students, however, producing a well-written lab report is a laborious task. This document presents some useful pointers on lab report writing, and a discussion of lab report content so that students will have a better idea of expectations for their work. Checklists are included so that students can insure that they have met the requirements. The file is available in both pdf and doc versions.

  6. Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

  7. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  8. The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

  9. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  10. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA, which chemically analyze peanuts for aflatoxin...

  11. The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

  12. Multiple equilibrium laboratory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    Devices{* } will be demonstrated and videotapes played of a number of laboratory studies that exhibit multiple equilibrium. All devices have two competing effects driving the flow. In two of them, temperature and salinity oppose each other. In another, air and water compete. In a fourth, wave propagation is opposed by inertia. Connection with hypothesized ocean behavior will be made. {* } Whitehead, J. A. 2000 Stratified Convection with Multiple States. Ocean Modelling, 2, 109-121. Whitehead, J. A. W. Gregory Lawson and John Salzig. 2001 Multistate flow devices for geophysical fluid dynamics and climate. American Journal of Physics, 69 546-553. Whitehead, J. A. and P. G. Baines. 2000. Hydraulic Jump Location as a Multiple Equilibrium feature. 2000 Ocean Sciences Meeting, American Geophysical Union, San Antonio Texas, January 25, 2000. Abstract: EOS 80 #46 (Supplement), OS125. Whitehead, J. A. , M. L. E. Timmermans, W. Gregory Lawson, S. N. Bulgakov, A. M. Zatarian, J. F. A. Medina, and John Salzig, Laboratory studies of thermally and/or Salinity-driven flows with partial mixing: Part 1 Stommel transitions and multiple flow states. In preparation

  13. In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  14. Alternatives to field-based experiences: The comparative effects of on-campus laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim K. Metcalf; M. A. Ronen Hammer; Pamela A. Kahlich

    1996-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effects of a sequence of on-campus laboratory experiences with an intensive early field experience in the preparation of preservice secondary teachers. Specifically, the study examined the effects of the experiences on teachers' ability to: (a) reflect on and explain complex pedagogical episodes, and (b) plan and implement organized, meaningful lessons. Laboratory teachers engaged in a

  15. A Process for Developing Introductory Science Laboratory Learning Goals to Enhance Student Learning and Instructional Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duis, Jennifer M.; Schafer, Laurel L.; Nussbaum, Sophia; Stewart, Jaclyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Learning goal (LG) identification can greatly inform curriculum, teaching, and evaluation practices. The complex laboratory course setting, however, presents unique obstacles in developing appropriate LGs. For example, in addition to the large quantity and variety of content supported in the general chemistry laboratory program, the interests of…

  16. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feiyue Wang; Richard R. Goulet; Peter M. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the

  17. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Ices of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing and future NASA and ESA astronomy missions need detailed information on the spectra of a variety of molecular ices to help establish the identity and abundances of molecules observed in astronomical data. Examples of condensed-phase molecules already detected on cold surfaces include H2O, CO, CO2, N2, NH3, CH4, SO2, O2, and O3. In addition, strong evidence exists for the solid-phase nitriles HCN, HC3N, and C2N2 in Titan's atmosphere. The wavelength region over which these identifications have been made is roughly 0.5 to 100 micron. Searches for additional features of complex carbon-containing species are in progress. Existing and future observations often impose special requirements on the information that comes from the laboratory. For example, the measurement of spectra, determination of integrated band strengths, and extraction of complex refractive indices of ices (and icy mixtures) in both amorphous and crystalline phases at relevant temperatures are all important tasks. In addition, the determination of the index of refraction of amorphous and crystalline ices in the visible region is essential for the extraction of infrared optical constants. Similarly, the measurement of spectra of ions and molecules embedded in relevant ices is important. This laboratory review will examine some of the existing experimental work and capabilities in these areas along with what more may be needed to meet current and future NASA and ESA planetary needs.

  18. Titan's ion chemistry: a laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Murray J; Anicich, Vincent G

    2007-01-01

    Some of the most interesting objects in the solar system are those bodies that have significant atmospheres. The discovery that Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has a substantial nitrogen-based atmosphere makes it a prime extraterrestrial object of interest. The advent of the Cassini orbiter spacecraft program that is able to observe and sample Titan's ionosphere adds greatly to this interest. We report here a summary of some of the efforts that have been made in the laboratory to understand the processes responsible for chemical processing of the primary ions formed in Titan's ionosphere, into the ions observed by in situ sampling. The presence of significant hydrocarbons and the colder temperatures of Titan's ionosphere lead to a much greater complexity in the ion chemistry of Titan than is apparent in the ion chemistry of Earth. A review of all the ion-molecule chemistry investigated in laboratory studies relevant to Titan is included as a table. The complexity of some of the hydrocarbon ion structures formed in just three reactive ion-molecule sequences from the primary ions has required a new experimental methodology which is discussed. PMID:17216629

  19. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  1. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  2. DD-R-15(EN) Clearance Laboratory

    E-print Network

    of radon gas from soil into the laboratory the foundation has been supplied with a membrane. The laboratory of cross contamination from the nuclear facilities. 2 Clearance Laboratory The Clearance Laboratory has

  3. 21 CFR 606.140 - Laboratory controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory controls. 606.140 Section 606.140...MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Laboratory Controls § 606.140 Laboratory controls. Laboratory control...

  4. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL 58752 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Laboratory Evaluation of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 3 #12;Abstract A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility

  5. 21 CFR 606.140 - Laboratory controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory controls. 606.140 Section 606.140...MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Laboratory Controls § 606.140 Laboratory controls. Laboratory control...

  6. LABORATORY SAFETY CHECK LIST DAY MONTH YEAR

    E-print Network

    Machel, Hans

    LABORATORY SAFETY CHECK LIST Date ____ ______________ ____ DAY MONTH Designate CHEMATIX Designate A. Laboratory Signage and Identification Criteria yes no n/a Comments / Corrective Action Taken Correction Date Initial 1 Main entrance laboratory doors have a Laboratory Hazard

  7. 21 CFR 606.140 - Laboratory controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory controls. 606.140 Section 606.140...MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Laboratory Controls § 606.140 Laboratory controls. Laboratory control...

  8. 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ELIGIBILITY All postdocs and graduate

  9. 2013BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2013BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ELIGIBILITY All postdocs and graduate

  10. 2014BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2014BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY CALL FOR PAPERS YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY YOUNG RESEARCHER SYMPOSIUM 2012BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ELIGIBILITY All postdocs and graduate

  11. 21 CFR 606.140 - Laboratory controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory controls. 606.140 Section 606.140...MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Laboratory Controls § 606.140 Laboratory controls. Laboratory control...

  12. 21 CFR 606.140 - Laboratory controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Laboratory controls. 606.140 Section 606.140...MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Laboratory Controls § 606.140 Laboratory controls. Laboratory control...

  13. Scalable Computing Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-22

    The Scalable Computing Laboratory was created by the Department of Energy, Ames Lab, and Iowa State University to "improve parallel computing through clustering techniques for use in scientific and engineering computation." One of their past projects included rebuilding the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), the first electronic digital computer. Here visitors can read about building a working replica of the historical computer as well as the background of the original machine and its inventors. Visitors interested in seeing the ABC in action should click on the link "Video" on the left hand side of the homepage. There are two videos here: the first is a seven-minute demonstration of the operation of the ABC and the second an eleven-minute tutorial about the ABC. The "Photos/Diagrams" link contains over two dozen photographs of the large amount of work that went into the making of the working replica of this machine, which was originally built between 1937 and 1942.

  14. MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

  15. Laboratory Technique Videos

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Students of organic chemistry will find this website from the University of Alberta to be a most welcome find. Created by a team of educational experts at the University, the videos here demonstrate a variety of techniques that are commonly used in laboratory settings. There are a dozen videos here, and they include "Filtration", "Reflux", "Distillation", and "Using a Separatory Funnel". The films here are available in a number of different formats, including Quick Time and Windows Media. The site also includes an "Interactive Tutorials" section. Here visitors will find tutorials that will introduce them to spectroscopy, separation and isolation, and the rather amusing world of "Detective O-Chem", which asks the user to take on a fictional avian flu outbreak.

  16. Laminar laboratory rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Éric; Métivier, François

    2014-05-01

    A viscous fluid flowing over fine plastic grains spontaneously channelizes into a few centimeters-wide river. After reaching its equilibrium shape, this stable laboratory flume is able to carry a steady load of sediments, like many alluvial rivers. When the sediment discharge vanishes, the river size, shape and slope fit the threshold theory proposed by Glover and Florey (1951), which assumes that the Shields parameter is critical on the channel bed. As the sediment discharge is increased, the river widens and flattens. Surprisingly, the aspect ratio of its cross section depends on the sediment discharge only, regardless of the water discharge. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these findings based on the balance between gravity, which pulls particles towards the center of the channel, and the diffusion of bedload particles, which pushes them away from areas of intense bedload.

  17. Construction Engineering Research Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) research facility is part of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (USAERDC) of the Army Corps of Engineers' research and development organization. CERL "conducts research and development in infrastructure and environmental sustainment." New technologies that the lab develops are used "to help military installations provide and maintain quality training lands and facilities for soldiers and their families." Some applications are also found in the private sector. The research is organized into numerous themes, including the study of enduring buildings, ecosystem management, land use planning, and seismic engineering. The website describes each of the themes and offers a link to its database of publications and products/capabilities. Visitors can also search the database by keyword. Another section of the website describes the portal software used to develop and maintain the website.

  18. Chemistry Laboratory Techniques

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Learning to navigate the treacherous shoals of the chemistry laboratory is tricky business. Fortunately, interested parties can use this fine online course from MIT's OpenCourseWare to become more familiar with such matters. The course consists of "intensive practical training in basic chemistry lab techniques" and the site includes a host of instructional videos. The manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franze and Dr. Kevin M. Shea in collaboration with a number of their colleagues. Visitors can make their way through the syllabus, course calendar, labs, and the study materials. In the Study Materials area, visitors will find ten videos, including "Using a Balance," "Melting Point Determination," and "Thin-Layer Chromatography." Students of chemistry and educators will find this site most useful and will wish to share it widely with others.

  19. Materials in Nanotechnology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. The six labs available here focus on materials in Nanotechnology. The labs are titled Block Copolymers, Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles, Solar Cells, Ni Nanowires, Silicon Nanowires, and Statistical Process Control. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials

  20. The autonomic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Low, P A; Opfer-Gehrking, T L

    1999-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve. PMID:11542437

  1. The autonomic laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  2. First International Microgravity Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

    1990-01-01

    This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

  3. Does software design complexity affect maintenance effort?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epping, Andreas; Lott, Christopher M.

    1994-01-01

    The design complexity of a software system may be characterized within a refinement level (e.g., data flow among modules), or between refinement levels (e.g., traceability between the specification and the design). We analyzed an existing set of data from NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory to test whether changing software modules with high design complexity requires more personnel effort than changing modules with low design complexity. By analyzing variables singly, we identified strong correlations between software design complexity and change effort for error corrections performed during the maintenance phase. By analyzing variables in combination, we found patterns which identify modules in which error corrections were costly to perform during the acceptance test phase.

  4. Portuguese refiner starts up new gasoline complex

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-03-13

    Petroleos de Portugal S.A. (Petrogal) has started up a new $85 million gasoline complex at its Sines, Portugal, refinery. The complex includes HF alkylation and Hydrisom units. The refinery also has completed an overall $650 million upgrade that includes a new visbreaker and vacuum column. Petrogal says the project has increased gasoline production to about 30,000 b/d. Major units constructed for the overall refinery expansion included: a 35,000 b/sd FCCU; a 26,000 b/sd visbreaker; a 45,000 b/sd vacuum distillation unit; two extractive mercaptan columns; an amylene treater; a sulfur-recovery system; and an 8,000 b/sd alkylation complex. The paper describes the gasoline complex, laboratory, safety, control room operation, and start-up.

  5. Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  6. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey, (Edited By); Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  7. Quality control in the pulmonary function laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, J L

    1982-07-01

    The addition of computers to pulmonary function laboratories has reduced quality-control problems. After standards for a test have been selected, the computer can enforce adherence to them. The computer can be programmed to perform periodic calibration checks and other self-diagnostic procedures to ensure that instrumentation and human errors have not gone undetected. The computer can be used to verify that reference values are within acceptable limits and that results for a particular patient are at least internally consistent. The computer greatly reduces the number of measurements and calculations that must be done by hand and therefore improves laboratory efficiency and reduces the probability of human error. Quality-control samples can be processed more frequently with the use of a computer because this task consumes less time than when done by laboratory personnel. Some disadvantages of quality control that have appeared since the introduction of the computer are the potential for undetected failure of computer hardware and software, a risk that has increased with the increase in software complexity, and the potential for the loss of large amounts of information because of its being stored on a single digital medium. To effect quality control in the pulmonary function laboratory one should (1) ensure that procedures and software conform to standards, (2) follow routine calibration-check procedures, (3) check test results for internal consistency and for consistency with other test results, (4) conduct periodic testing of a quality-control subject or reference sample, (5) continually evaluate software performance, (6) carefully evaluate changes in instrumentation and software, and (7) maintain duplicate copies of data on different types of mass storage media. PMID:10315285

  8. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands 

    E-print Network

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01

    laboratory compaction methods have focused on determining the maximum This thesis follows the style and format of the Canadian Geotechnical JournaL possible dry unit weight of the soil (i. e. vibrating table compaction test, modified vibrating table... on the effectiveness of laboratory compaction. 2) Determine the effect of three different laboratory compaction procedures (i. e. Standard Proctor, Modified Proctor and the Vibrating Hammer tests) on the compaction of cohesionless sands. 3 ) Correlate the various...

  9. European underground laboratories: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino

    2005-09-01

    Underground laboratories are complementary to those where the research in fundamental physics is made using accelerators. This report focus on the logistic and on the background features of the most relevant laboratories in Europe, stressing also on the low background facilities available. In particular the report is focus on the laboratories involved in the new Europeean project ILIAS with the aim to support the European large infrastructures operating in the astroparticle physics sector.

  10. Current Trends in Remote Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LuÍs Gomes; Seta Bogosyan

    2009-01-01

    Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation

  11. Evaluating Software Complexity Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine J. Weyuker

    1988-01-01

    A set of properties of syntactic software complexity measures is proposed to serve as a basis for the evaluation of such measures. Four known complexity measures are evaluated and compared using these criteria. This formalized evaluation clarifies the strengths and weaknesses of the examined complexity measures, which include the statement count, cyclomatic number, effort measure, and data flow complexity measures.

  12. E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

    2002-05-03

    Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

  13. Follow MIT Lincoln Laboratory online. Facebook: MIT Lincoln Laboratory (Official)

    E-print Network

    Reuter, Martin

    . Lincoln Laboratory has been in existence for 60 years. On its 25th and 50th anniversaries, the Laboratory and Workshops 55 Awards and Recognition 58 R&D 100 Awards 60 60th Anniversary Celebration 63 Educational annual report 1951­2011 celebrating sixty years #12;Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Lincoln

  14. Follow MIT Lincoln Laboratory online. Facebook: MIT Lincoln Laboratory (Official)

    E-print Network

    Reuter, Martin

    and Missile Defense Technology 26 Communication Systems 28 Cyber Security 30 Intelligence, Surveillance Laboratory. The Laboratory conducts research and development pertinent to national security on behalfTional SecuriTy #12;M I T L I N C O L N L A B O R AT O R Y Technology in Support of National Security annual

  15. Comparative study between open ended laboratory and traditional laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norliza Abd. Rahman; Noorhisham Tan Kofli; Mohd Sobri Takriff; Siti Rozaimah Sheikh Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    The traditional laboratory work based on guided assignment will not be adequate within the outcome based learning environment. Innovative approaches that require active involvement of the students in the learning activities are necessary in ensuring that the targeted learning outcomes are achieved. The Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, introduced open ended laboratory work in 2008 as

  16. Laboratory Three Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Larson, Craig E.

    Laboratory Three ­ Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description ­ Pendulum I. Background When a pendulum swings back and forth its horizontal motion can be described by a periodic function. In this lab will call the spot where the pendulum hangs at rest the "center". The CBL will take measurements every tenth

  17. he Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to

    E-print Network

    he Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research. The MSL is a non-classified area in the Materials Science Complex in close proximity to classified and other non-classified materials research facilities. The Materials Science Complex accommodates most

  18. A Study of Cognitive Change Resulting from Participation in Human Relations Laboratory Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Ronald

    The specific hypotheses tested were that: (1) participation in a two-week laboratory changes the cognitive structure of those participating; (2) the extent of change varies with the initial level of cognitive complexity of the participant; and (3) the better the match, as seen by the participant, between the complexity of the learning environment…

  19. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    SciTech Connect

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

    2003-02-27

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

  20. Protein Complexes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, J. Harry; Abreu, Marco; Wimble, Christopher; Uetz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of protein complexes have recently become available for Escherichia coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, yielding 443 and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, respectively. We have coupled the results of these mass spectrometry-characterized protein complexes with the 285 “gold standard” protein complexes identified by EcoCyc. A comparison with databases of gene orthology, conservation, and essentiality identified proteins conserved or lost in complexes of other species. For instance, of 285 “gold standard” protein complexes in E. coli, less than 10% are fully conserved among a set of 7 distantly-related bacterial “model” species. Complex conservation follows one of three models: well-conserved complexes, complexes with a conserved core, and complexes with partial conservation but no conserved core. Expanding the comparison to 894 distinct bacterial genomes illustrates fractional conservation and the limits of co-conservation among components of protein complexes: just 14 out of 285 model protein complexes are perfectly conserved across 95% of the genomes used, yet we predict more than 180 may be partially conserved across at least half of the genomes. No clear relationship between gene essentiality and protein complex conservation is observed, as even poorly conserved complexes contain a significant number of essential proteins. Finally, we identify 183 complexes containing well-conserved components and uncharacterized proteins which will be interesting targets for future experimental studies. PMID:25723151

  1. Good laboratory practices for molecular genetic testing for heritable diseases and conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Gagnon, MariBeth; Shahangian, Shahram; Anderson, Nancy L; Howerton, Devery A; Boone, Joe D

    2009-06-12

    Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized as waived (from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived based on the complexity of the tests; tests of moderate and high complexity are nonwaived tests. Laboratories that perform molecular genetic testing are subject to the general CLIA quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the CLIA personnel requirements for tests of high complexity. Although many laboratories that perform molecular genetic testing comply with applicable regulatory requirements and adhere to professional practice guidelines,specific guidelines for quality assurance are needed to ensure the quality of test performance. To enhance the oversight of genetic testing under the CLIA framework,CDC and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have taken practical steps to address the quality management concerns in molecular genetic testing,including working with the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC). This report provides CLIAC recommendations for good laboratory practices for ensuring the quality of molecular genetic testing for heritable diseases and conditions. The recommended practices address the total testing process (including the preanalytic,analytic,and postanalytic phases),laboratory responsibilities regarding authorized persons,confidentiality of patient information,personnel competency,considerations before introducing molecular genetic testing or offering new molecular genetic tests,and the quality management system approach to molecular genetic testing. These recommendations are intended for laboratories that perform molecular genetic testing for heritable diseases and conditions and for medical and public health professionals who evaluate laboratory practices and policies to improve the quality of molecular genetic laboratory services. This report also is intended to be a resource for users of laboratory services to aid in their use of molecular genetic tests and test results in health assessment and care. Improvements in the quality and use of genetic laboratory services should improve the quality of health care and health outcomes for patients and families of patients. PMID:19521335

  2. RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation Laboratory for Neurobiology of Synapse Laboratory for Neural Circuit Theory Laboratory for Circuit and Behavioral Physiology Laboratory for Cortical Circuit Plasticity Laboratory for Memory Mechanisms Laboratory for Behavioral

  3. Laboratory testing the Anaconda.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, J R; Heller, V; Farley, F J M; Hearn, G E; Rainey, R C T

    2012-01-28

    Laboratory measurements of the performance of the Anaconda are presented, a wave energy converter comprising a submerged water-filled distensible tube aligned with the incident waves. Experiments were carried out at a scale of around 1:25 with a 250 mm diameter and 7 m long tube, constructed of rubber and fabric, terminating in a linear power take-off of adjustable impedance. The paper presents some basic theory that leads to predictions of distensibility and bulge wave speed in a pressurized compound rubber and fabric tube, including the effects of inelastic sectors in the circumference, longitudinal tension and the surrounding fluid. Results are shown to agree closely with measurements in still water. The theory is developed further to provide a model for the propagation of bulges and power conversion in the Anaconda. In the presence of external water waves, the theory identifies three distinct internal wave components and provides theoretical estimates of power capture. For the first time, these and other predictions of the behaviour of the Anaconda, a device unlike almost all other marine systems, are shown to be in remarkably close agreement with measurements. PMID:22184668

  4. Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory of Michigan State University is on the cutting edge of pest control in the Upper Midwest, whether on agricultural or non-agricultural lands, public or private. Visitors interested in seeing the pesky adversaries of the lab, should click on "Bugs of The Lab", on the left hand side of the page, then click on the subcategory "Research Subjects". Along with photos of a dozen pests, including the "Plum Curculio", "Mites", and the "Oblique-Banded Leaf Roller", visitors can read a description of the pest, learn about and see images of the damage they do to specific crops, and discover where they are found on the plant. The Resistant Pest management Newsletter section on the left-hand side of the page has numerous subsections that should be of interest to visitors. Visitors can "Subscribe to the Newsletter" and peruse "Archives of Past Issues". Also interesting is the "Ask an Expert About Resistance Issues" section, which lists ten regions of the earth, and when one of the regions is clicked on, several experts' names pop up with their area of expertise, e-mail, and location. Additionally, anyone who is an expert and qualified, but is not on the list, may have their name added after filling out the "Expert Application", available on the "Ask an Expert..." homepage. All of the experts are volunteers.

  5. Ocean Climate Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A division of the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) described in the March 31, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/sci-engr/current/index.html#1), the Ocean Climate Laboratory performs scientific analyses of oceanographic data, develops ocean climatologies, investigates "interannual to decadal-scale ocean climate variability using historical ocean data," builds global ocean databases, and facilitates the international exchange of oceanographic data. The Homepage provides access to summarized data via the What's New section; recent releases include the CD-ROM World Ocean Database for 1998 (WOD98, described on site), and data files on "High resolution (1/4 degree) temperature and salinity analyses of the world's oceans" (.pts format) or "seasonal analyses of phosphate" (.pts format), among others. Additionally, users may browse the Products section for detailed descriptions of data quality control methods (including statistical analyses). An impressive list of publications provides an overview of the Lab's research activities in the Publications section, and researcher lists are provided in the People section.

  6. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

  7. Knowledge Media Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How do students learn in the classroom? How can teachers best utilize new and emerging technologies in the classroom? What can teachers do to seamlessly incorporate technology into the learning experience? These are all questions that are asked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Knowledge Media Laboratory. On their website, users can learn about their work with communities of teachers, faculty, programs, and institutions over the past several years, and also look over some of their informative case studies. The Gallery of Teaching and Learning is a good place to start one’s exploration of the site, as it contains a number of exhibitions that look at how web-based tools can be used in teaching and how scholarship may change as a result of an increasingly networked milieu. One seminal resource on the site is the KEEP Toolkit. With the Toolkit, teachers and others can create engaging knowledge representations on the web for their own use. For visitors who might feel a bit overwhelmed by this, there is also a nice tutorial that explains how the Toolkit can be used.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness. PMID:15306394

  9. Laboratory development TPV generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Glenn A.; Wong, Eva M.; Waldman, Cye H.

    1996-02-01

    A laboratory model of a TPV generator in the kilowatt range was developed and tested. It was based on methane/oxygen combustion and a spectrally matched selective emitter/collector pair (ytterbia emitter-silicon PV cell). The system demonstrated a power output of 2.4 kilowatts at an overall efficiency of 4.5% without recuperation of heat from the exhaust gases. Key aspects of the effort include: 1) process development and fabrication of mechanically strong selective emitter ceramic textile materials; 2) design of a stirred reactor emitter/burner capable of handling up to 175,000 Btu/hr fuel flows; 3) support to the developer of the production silicon concentrator cells capable of withstanding TPV environments; 4) assessing the apparent temperature exponent of selective emitters; and 5) determining that the remaining generator efficiency improvements are readily defined combustion engineering problems that do not necessitate breakthrough technology. The fiber matrix selective emitter ceramic textile (felt) was fabricated by a relic process with the final heat-treatment controlling the grain growth in the porous ceramic fiber matrix. This textile formed a cylindrical cavity for a stirred reactor. The ideal stirred reactor is characterized by constant temperature combustion resulting in a uniform reactor temperature. This results in a uniform radiant emission from the emitter. As a result of significant developments in the porous emitter matrix technology, a TPV generator burner/emitter was developed that produced kilowatts of radiant energy.

  10. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Sara

    This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

  11. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    .8.1 The veterinary technicians will submit the white card, animal removal card, and complete animal medical record2.C.2 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR ANIMAL animal rooms and in the Laboratory Animal Facilities office, at all locations. 3.2 The animal removal

  12. Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckenbaugh, Raymond W.

    1996-11-01

    Each organic chemistry student should become familiar with the educational and governmental laboratory safety requirements. One method for teaching laboratory safety is to assign each student to locate safety resources for a specific class laboratory experiment. The student should obtain toxicity and hazardous information for all chemicals used or produced during the assigned experiment. For example, what is the LD50 or LC50 for each chemical? Are there any specific hazards for these chemicals, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, neurotixin, chronic toxin, corrosive, flammable, or explosive agent? The school's "Chemical Hygiene Plan", "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory" (National Academy Press), and "Laboratory Standards, Part 1910 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (Fed. Register 1/31/90, 55, 3227-3335) should be reviewed for laboratory safety requirements for the assigned experiment. For example, what are the procedures for safe handling of vacuum systems, if a vacuum distillation is used in the assigned experiment? The literature survey must be submitted to the laboratory instructor one week prior to the laboratory session for review and approval. The student should then give a short presentation to the class on the chemicals' toxicity and hazards and describe the safety precautions that must be followed. This procedure gives the student first-hand knowledge on how to find and evaluate information to meet laboartory safety requirements.

  13. Chemistry 417 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Chemistry 417 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Fall, 2008 Lecture: 13:00 Tuesday and Thursday 331 Senning tba 174 Klamath Required Texts: Chemistry 417: Physical Chemistry Laboratory - University.b.: This text is also used in Chemistry 429 Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry by James R. Barrante

  14. Programming for the Language Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, John D., Ed.

    The present book is an attempt to stimulate thinking on the nature of the problems involved in writing material for language laboratory use in relation to the teaching of five languages widely taught in Britain today. All the contributors to this volume are language teachers currently using the language laboratory in their work. The editor notes…

  15. A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristin I. Gublo

    2003-01-01

    At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven

  16. Determining laboratory value: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-03-01

    This article will describe how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one addresses how to define fair market value, how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two, to be printed in April, will address how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516267

  17. Determining laboratory value: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-04-01

    This article describes how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one defined fair market value, addressed how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two addresses how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516270

  18. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

  19. Three Puzzles for Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, David; Pickering, Miles

    1988-01-01

    Notes that laboratory work should be more oriented towards puzzle solving rather than technique or illustration. Offers three organic laboratory puzzles which can be solved by melting point alone. Involves lab work at the 100-200-mg scale but still uses conventional glassware. (MVL)

  20. Hybrid & Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Lee, Dongwon

    Hybrid & Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory www.vss.psu.edu/hhvrl Joel R. Anstrom, Director 201 The Pennsylvania Transportation Institute Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory will contribute to the advancement of hybrid and hydrogen vehicle technology to promote the emerging hydrogen economy by providing

  1. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Kopta; C. J. Springer

    1987-01-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author

  2. LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY NIGHT!

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY NIGHT! Saturday March 22, 2008 ARENA FOOTBALL Game time - 7 of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory along with their friends and families to come out and enjoy a night for further information at mnieves@sanjosesabercats.com *Tickets MUST be purchased through the SaberCats Front

  3. Evaluation of Ris National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    #12;Evaluation of Risø National Laboratory Ministry of Information Technology and Research May 2001 #12;Evaluation of Risø National Laboratory This publication is available free of charge subject-mail: fsk@fsk.dk Printet by: K. Larsen & Søn A/S No. of copies: 2.000 ISBN: 87-90890-61-2 Front cover

  4. Forest Pathology and Mycology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Garbelotto, Matteo

    Much of this Laboratory's current research is focused on Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death. The site links to downloadable files for a collection of research publication and posters. The website is available in both Spanish and English, and contains links for related laboratories and organizations.

  5. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    3.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PROPER procedures conducted in animal laboratories. Exposure to these allergens can trigger allergic symptoms to using NIOSH N95 dust-mist respirator, all employees must have respiratory fit-testing performed through

  6. Simulated Laboratory in Digital Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Thomas G.

    Design of computer circuits used to be a pencil and paper task followed by laboratory tests, but logic circuit design can now be done in half the time as the engineer accesses a program which simulates the behavior of real digital circuits, and does all the wiring and testing on his computer screen. A simulated laboratory in digital logic has been…

  7. Automatic Control Laboratory ETH, Zurich

    E-print Network

    Lygeros, John

    Automatic Control Laboratory ETH, Z¨urich Physikstrasse 3 8092 Z¨urich, Switzerland +41 44 632 22 71 How to get to the Automatic Control Laboratory (IfA) From the Z¨urich airport: · By Taxi. Taxi of the Airport Center. There are also ticket machines close to the elevators down to the platforms. A button

  8. Accreditation or Certification for Laboratories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimillis, Kyriacos C.

    This presentation is focused on explaining the significance of accreditation and certification for laboratories and illustrates the usefulness of both procedures. The implementation of these procedures in laboratories is described, pointing out their similarities and differences. Reference is made to some publications. The discussion reflects the existing practice.

  9. Evaluation of Calibration Laboratories Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipe, Eduarda

    2011-12-01

    One of the main goals of interlaboratory comparisons (ILCs) is the evaluation of the laboratories performance for the routine calibrations they perform for the clients. In the frame of Accreditation of Laboratories, the national accreditation boards (NABs) in collaboration with the national metrology institutes (NMIs) organize the ILCs needed to comply with the requirements of the international accreditation organizations. In order that an ILC is a reliable tool for a laboratory to validate its best measurement capability (BMC), it is needed that the NMI (reference laboratory) provides a better traveling standard—in terms of accuracy class or uncertainty—than the laboratories BMCs. Although this is the general situation, there are cases where the NABs ask the NMIs to evaluate the performance of the accredited laboratories when calibrating industrial measuring instruments. The aim of this article is to discuss the existing approaches for the evaluation of ILCs and propose a basis for the validation of the laboratories measurement capabilities. An example is drafted with the evaluation of the results of mercury-in-glass thermometers ILC with 12 participant laboratories.

  10. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating Assessor Performance #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Why NVLAP Evaluates? ISO/IEC 17011 - 6.3 Monitoring 6.3.1 The accreditation body shall ensure the satisfactory performance of the assessment

  11. The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation

    E-print Network

    The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) An Introduction #12;What is NVLAP? NVLAP is: · A system for accrediting laboratories found competent to perform specific tests by the Numbers · Established in 1976 · Accreditation offered in 18 fields of testing; 8 fields of calibration

  12. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Completing the Assessment Report 1 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ISO/IEC 17011:2004 5.3 Document control The accreditation body shall establish procedures to control all documents (internal and external

  13. Utilizing Land-Livestock Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amator, Fred

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Arizona for the purpose of utilizing land-livestock laboratories based upon a model concept. The concept, as proposed, was identified as an organizational plan which demands the involvement of all students in a specific organized class-laboratory activity of production agriculture. (Author)

  14. Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics

    E-print Network

    Lucny, Andrej

    Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics Joined Laboratory of mobile robotics has been foun- ded is dedicated to provide achievement of following goals: 1. research and development activities in robotics (Robotna£ka robot, telepresentation lab, and furt- her projects), 2. promotion and popularization

  15. Open Laboratory for Robotics Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josep Fernández; Alicia Casals

    2004-01-01

    Laboratories are key components in the learning process of applied matters. The laboratory enables students to acquire methodologies, work habitude, knowledge on equipment operation and experience, in conditions as near as possible to their future professional activity. The evolution of communication and information technologies opens new possibilities in educational methods. The purpose of this paper is to present a Web

  16. Computer laboratory library Brief guide

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    . Consult the printed lists for help in locating a specific project. Technical reports from the LaboratoryComputer laboratory library Brief guide Opening hours The library is open and staffed between 9am gain access outside of these hours using their `Cotag' card. Collections The library holds a wide range

  17. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    E-print Network

    Amancio, Diego R; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1209/0295-5075/100/58002

    2013-01-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus point...

  18. Managing transferability of laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lippi, Giuseppe; Solero, Giovanni Pietro; Poli, Giovanni; Plebani, Mario

    2006-12-01

    Considerable attention has been focused on definition and enhancement of the analytical quality in laboratory testing over the past decades. Advances in laboratory technology and computer informatics have allowed a major sense of confidence with the analytical phase and more efforts should now be focused on extra-analytical areas of improvement, that should further strengthen the link between cost effectiveness and clinical outcome. Deduction and implementation of common reference intervals, to be possibly shared by a regional network of clinical laboratories, appear so far a crucial step to increase efficiency and harmonization. With the experience gained from External Quality Control exercises and with the consensus of several contributory laboratories, this process is underway in Italy. Quality performances resulting from widespread implementation of common reference intervals and longitudinal comparison of patient's data, will allow clinical laboratories to accomplish with a major transferability, amplifying health benefits and meeting increasing health systems demand. PMID:16860301

  19. Testing containment of laboratory hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, G.W.

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory fume hoods often do not adequately provide protection to a chemist or technician at the hood. The reason for failure of the hoods to perform adequately are varied and, in many instances, difficult to determine. In some cases, the laboratory hood manufacturer has provided equipment that does not reflect the state of art in controlling laboratory exposures. In other cases, the architect or engineer has disregarded the function of the hood thus the design of the installation is faulty and the hood will not work. The contractor may have installed the system so poorly that it will not adequately function. Finally, the chemist or technician may misuse the hood, causing poor performance. This paper considers a method of evaluating the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Using the method, the paper examines several instances where the laboratory fume hood performed inadequately, quantifies the performance and identifies the cause of poor performance.

  20. Fluid Complex Plasmas - Studies at the Particle Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Nosenko, V.; Pompl, R.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Thomas, H. M. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2008-02-21

    Complex plasmas are ideal laboratory systems to investigate kinetics of strongly coupled many-particle ensembles. In contrast to colloidal suspensions, the particle dynamics in complex plasmas is virtually undamped. This makes complex plasmas particularly suited to study kinetics of fluids, by observing fully resolved motion of individual particles. In this paper we focus on three major experimental highlights characterizing kinetics of fluid plasmas--laminar shear flows, onset and development of hydrodynamic instabilities, and heterogeneous nucleation in supercooled fluids. Analysis of elementary processes observed in these experiments provides important insights into fundamental generic processes governing fluid behavior, demonstrating significant interdisciplinary potential of the complex plasma research.

  1. [On the means of securing analytical reliability of laboratory results].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The article is composed in the form of discussion with authors of another article published in the same issue of journal. The publication considers factors impacting analytical quality of results of clinical laboratory analyses. The cases in question are content of normative documents in force, expedience to complete them with more specific requirements to producers of laboratory analysis tools and recommendations for laboratories on implementation of verification of characteristics of techniques and medical tools for diagnostic in vitro. The article also considers requirements to metrologic traceability of control materials and necessity of formation of national reference system for laboratory medicine. The description of projects of methodical documents proposed to be considered by the profile expert commission on clinical laboratory diagnostic of Minzdrav of Russia is presented. These documents include complex of requirements to producers of medical tools for diagnostic in vitro. The proposal is expressed to develop a normative document of top status to establish a unified system of requirements implemented in all executive and methodical documents concerning regulation of access of medical tools for diagnostic in vitro, supporting security of application and quality of clinical laboratory analyses. PMID:25080787

  2. Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

  3. Laboratory singing sand avalanches.

    PubMed

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

  4. Environment for scientific laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.; Johnson, K.; Skedzielewski, S.; Streeter, C.; Sumikawa, D.; Zimmerman, D.

    1983-06-01

    In the past several years a number of major environment building efforts have been undertaken. Some environments that are operational are: Smalltalk, Gandalf, Interlisp, and Toolpack. The Ada Environment continues to grow steadily. Why do we need another environment. The reason is, of course, that we believe that our requirements and constraints are quite different from those for whom the above environments were designed. We believe that other installations that produce large scientific programs may have similar requirements. We also believe that environments can be assembled from software tools already in use. Software development becomes increasingly more expensive. It is important to understand how resources already in existence may be used effectively as building blocks in the creation of new systems. We currently have a number of research efforts directed towards the creation of environments. We describe an environment that is being built largely from existing software tools. Most government and scientific laboratories do not have the resources for a project as large as an environment. However, environments do not have to be built from scratch nor does one have to be built from existing tools in a bottom up manner. Ideally, in an installation that has a large body of existing tools, one can construct a chosen environment by adapting software already on hand. In this paper we describe a framework that may be used to put together software tools, a database management system, and a user interface. The result is that one can build a powerful environment with a modest support staff. We know of no other such attempt that has been made for an integrated system of this type. Our ideas for an environment framework have been realized in a particular environment we have christened Amicus in the hope that it will be our programmer's friend.

  5. The Hirudo medicinalis species complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.

    2012-05-01

    Recently, Hildebrandt and Lemke (Naturwissenschaften 98:995-1008, 2011) argued that the taxonomic status of the three European medicinal leeches, Hirudo medicinalis Linnaeus 1758, Hirudo verbana Carena 1820, and Hirudo orientalis Utevsky and Trontelj (Parasitol Res 98:61-66, 2005) is "questionable" since "all three species interbreed in the laboratory". This statement is in conflict with data published by Elliott and Kutschera (Freshwater Reviews 4:21-41, 2011), indicating that these leeches, which are reciprocally copulating hermaphrodites, represent reproductively isolated biospecies. Here, I summarize evidence indicating that these three European taxa, plus the North African "dragon leech" ( Hirudo troctina Johnson 1816), must be interpreted as a complex of closely related species, and that the economically most important taxon H. verbana is polymorphic.

  6. Laboratory surface astrochemistry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, V. L.; Rosu-Finsen, A.; Lasne, J.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Although several research groups have studied the formation of H2 on interstellar dust grains using surface science techniques, few have explored the formation of more complex molecules. A small number of these reactions produce molecules that remain on the surface of interstellar dust grains and, over time, lead to the formation of icy mantles. The most abundant of these species within the ice is H2O and is of particular interest as the observed molecular abundance cannot be accounted for using gas-phase chemistry alone. This article provides a brief introduction to the astronomical implications and motivations behind this research and the requirement for a new dual atomic beam ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system. Further details of the apparatus design, characterisation, and calibration of the system are provided along with preliminary data from atomic O and O2 beam dosing on bare silica substrate and subsequent temperature programmed desorption measurements. The results obtained in this ongoing research may enable more chemically accurate surface formation mechanisms to be deduced for this and other species before simulating the kinetic data under interstellar conditions.

  7. A virtual national laboratory for reengineering clinical translational science.

    PubMed

    Dilts, David M; Rosenblum, Daniel; Trochim, William M

    2012-01-25

    Clinical research is burdened by inefficiencies and complexities, with a poor record of trial completion, none of which is desirable. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium, including more than 60 clinical research institutions, supports a unified national effort to become, in effect, a virtual national laboratory designed to identify, implement, evaluate, and extend process improvements across all parts of clinical research, from conception to completion. If adequately supported by academic health centers, industry, and funding agencies, the Consortium could become a test bed for improvements that can dramatically reduce wasteful complexity, thus increasing the likelihood of clinical trial completion. PMID:22277966

  8. Emergent dynamics of laboratory insect swarms

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2013-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour occurs at nearly every biological size scale, from single-celled organisms to the largest animals on earth. It has long been known that models with simple interaction rules can reproduce qualitative features of this complex behaviour. But determining whether these models accurately capture the biology requires data from real animals, which has historically been difficult to obtain. Here, we report three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions, velocities, and accelerations of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. Even though the swarms do not show an overall polarisation, we find statistical evidence for local clusters of correlated motion. We also show that the swarms display an effective large-scale potential that keeps individuals bound together, and we characterize the shape of this potential. Our results provide quantitative data against which the emergent characteristics of animal aggregation models can be benchmarked. PMID:23323215

  9. Complex Elliptic Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Carl M. Bender; Daniel W. Hook; Karta Kooner

    2009-12-31

    This paper briefly summarizes previous work on complex classical mechanics and its relation to quantum mechanics. It then introduces a previously unstudied area of research involving the complex particle trajectories associated with elliptic potentials.

  10. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  11. Software complexity measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph P. Kearney; Robert L. Sedlmeyer; William B. Thompson; Michael A. Gray; Michael A. Adler

    1986-01-01

    Inappropriate use of software complexity measures can have large, damaging effects by rewarding poor programming practices and demoralizing good programmers. Software complexity measures must be critically evaluated to determine the ways in which they can best be used.

  12. Laboratory cost and utilization containment.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J W; Root, J M; White, D C

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyzed laboratory costs and utilization in 3,771 cases of Medicare inpatients admitted to a New England academic medical center ("the Hospital") from October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. The data were derived from the Hospital's Decision Resource System comprehensive data base. The authors established a historical reference point for laboratory costs as a percentage of total inpatient costs using 1981-82 Medicare claims data and cost report information. Inpatient laboratory costs were estimated at 9.5% of total inpatient costs for pre-Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) Medicare discharges. Using this reference point and adjusting for the Hospital's 1990 case mix, the "expected" laboratory cost was 9.3% of total cost. In fact, the cost averaged 11.5% (i.e., 24% above the expected cost level), and costs represented an even greater percentage of DRG reimbursement at 12.9%. If we regard the reimbursement as a total cost target (to eliminate losses from Medicare), then that 12.9% is 39% above the "expected" laboratory proportion of 9.3%. The Hospital lost an average of $1,091 on each DRG inpatient. The laboratory contributed 29% to this loss per case. Compared to other large hospitals, the Hospital was slightly (3%) above the mean direct cost per on-site test and significantly (58%) above the mean number of inpatient tests per inpatient day compared to large teaching hospitals. The findings suggest that careful laboratory cost analyses will become increasingly important as the proportion of patients reimbursed in a fixed manner grows. The future may hold a prospective zero-based laboratory budgeting process based on predictable patterns of DRG admissions or other fixed-reimbursement admission and laboratory utilization patterns. PMID:10113716

  13. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  14. Laboratories are Needed to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-print Network

    Institute of Technology Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia Laboratory for Technology. FIRE has benefited from the prior design and R&D activities on BPX, TPX and ITER

  15. Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, C.; Rubio, D.; Ponce, S.; Álvarez Abri, A.; Terrón, A.; Vicencio, D.; Fascioli, E.

    2007-11-01

    In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University.

  16. Association for Biology Laboratory Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1979, the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) promotes "information exchange among university and college educators actively concerned with teaching biology in a laboratory setting." The ABLE website contains information about grants, past and future annual conferences, and membership. ABLE also posts employment opportunities, and an extensive array of links organized into categories for General Biology, Online Journals, Biological Animations, Suppliers of Biological Materials, Comprehensive Links Pages, and more. In addition, ABLE makes available current and past newsletters and a collection of abstracts and full-text articles from _Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching_, a publication based on the proceedings of the ABLE annual conference.

  17. Microwave remote sensing laboratory design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.

    1979-01-01

    Application of active and passive microwave remote sensing to the study of ocean pollution is discussed. Previous research efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory were surveyed to derive guidance for the design of a laboratory program of research. The essential issues include: choice of radar or radiometry as the observational technique; choice of laboratory or field as the research site; choice of operating frequency; tank sizes and material; techniques for wave generation and appropriate wavelength spectrum; methods for controlling and disposing of pollutants used in the research; and pollutants other than oil which could or should be studied.

  18. Complex numbers Quaternions

    E-print Network

    Complex numbers Quaternions Imaginary numbers and Quaternions Katrin Leschke University of Leicester June 29, 2010 Katrin Leschke Imaginary numbers and Quaternions #12;Complex numbers Quaternions Imaginary numbers and Quaternions #12;Complex numbers Quaternions Vectors in 2d­space A vector in 2d

  19. Quaternionic Complexes Andreas Cap

    E-print Network

    Drmota, Michael

    Quaternionic Complexes Andreas Cap University of Vienna Berlin, March 2007 Andreas Cap (University of Vienna) Quaternionic Complexes Berlin, March 2007 1 / 19 #12;based on the joint article math.DG/0508534 with V. Soucek (Prague) Andreas Cap (University of Vienna) Quaternionic Complexes Berlin, March 2007 2

  20. A Complexity Measure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. McCabe

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a graph-theoretic complexity measure and illustrates how it can be used to manage and control program complexity. The paper first explains how the graph theory concepts apply and gives an intuitive explanation of the graph concepts in programming terms. The control graphs of several actual FORTRAN programs are then presented to illustrate the correlation between intuitive complexity