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1

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30

2

SOW for Services Provided by the Waste Sampling Characterization Facility (WSCF) for the Environmental Compliance Program during CY 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document defines analytical services the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Environmental Compliance Program (ECP) throughout calendar year (CY) 2000. Two organizations within ECP are responsible for monitoring liquid and gaseous effluents and the environment immediately around facilities that contain or may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring & Reporting (M&R), of Fluor Hanford Environmental Services, is responsible for effluent monitoring data, and Environmental Monitoring & Investigations (EMI), of Waste Management Technical Services, Inc., for near-facility environmental monitoring data. These organizations serve numerous projects, some of which are managed by other companies such as CH2M HILL and Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Monitoring data are collected and evaluated to determine their state of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits, and then published in various reports. M&R is also responsible for issuing this annual statement of work.

ROKKAN, D.J.

2000-06-01

3

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

2010-10-01

4

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

2010-10-01

5

222-S laboratory complex hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5500.3A, Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Operational Emergencies, requires that a facility specific hazards assessment be performed to support Emergency Planning activities. The Hazard Assessment establishes the technical basis for the Emergency Action Levels (EALs) and the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). Emergency Planning activities are provided under contract to DOE through the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This document represents the facility specific hazards assessment for the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratories. The primary mission of 222-S is to provide analytic chemistry support to the Waste Management, Chemical Processing, and Environmental programs at the Hanford Site.

Broz, R.E.

1994-08-29

6

2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. The Components Test Laboratory (T-27) is located in the immediate foreground. Immediately uphill to the left of T-27 is the Boiler Chiller Plant (T-28H). To the left of T-28H is the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D). Behind the T-28D is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B). The twin gantry structure at the left is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

7

76 FR 49491 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration...temporary code under the Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration...participate in the Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

2011-08-10

8

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

9

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. The twin gantry structure in the center is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). To its immediate left in the foreground is a truck well, concrete retaining wall, piping, and stack associated with the oxidizer vault storage area. To the immediate right of T-28 is the concrete Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). At the extreme right is the Long-Term Hydrazine Silo (T-28E). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

10

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2010-10-01

11

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2010-10-01

12

Complex networks and waveforms from acoustic emissions in laboratory earthquakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the physics of acoustic excitations emitted during the cracking of materials is one of the long-standing challenges for material scientists and geophysicists. In this study, we report novel results of applications of functional complex networks on acoustic emission waveforms emitted during the evolution of frictional interfaces. Our results show that laboratory faults at microscopic scales undergo a sequence of generic phases, including strengthening, weakening or fast slip and slow slip, leading to healing. For the first time we develop a formulation on the dissipated energy due to acoustic emission signals in terms of short-term and long-term features (i.e., networks' characteristics) of events. We illuminate the transition from regular to slow ruptures. We show that this transition can lead to the onset of the critical rupture class similar to the direct observations of this phenomenon in the transparent samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate the detailed submicron evolution of the interface due to the short-term evolution of the rupture tip. As another novel result, we find that the nucleation phase of most amplified events follows a nearly constant timescale, corresponding to the initial strengthening or locking of the interface. This likely indicates that a thermally activated process can play a crucial role near the moving crack tip.

Ghaffari, H. O.; Thompson, B. D.; Young, R. P.

2014-07-01

13

The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

Loehlin, James H.; And Others

1982-01-01

14

Epigenetics of Complex Diseases: From General Theory to Laboratory Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite significant effort, understanding the causes and mechanisms of complex non-Mendelian diseases remains a key challenge.\\u000a Although numerous molecular genetic linkage and association studies have been conducted in order to explain the heritable\\u000a predisposition to complex diseases, the resulting data are quite often inconsistent and even controversial. In a similar way,\\u000a identification of environmental factors causal to a disease is

A. Schumacher; A. Petronis

15

Iron-Sulfur-Carbonyl and -Nitrosyl Complexes: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information, materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained, are provided for an experiment on iron-sulfur-carbonyl and -nitrosyl complexes. The experiment involved (1) use of inert atmospheric techniques and thin-layer and flexible-column chromatography and (2) interpretation of infrared, hydrogen and carbon-13 nuclear…

Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

1985-01-01

16

Diamagnetic Anisotropy: Two Iron Complexes as Laboratory Examples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are relatively few experiments describing the NMR properties of bis(amine) iron(II) phthalocyanine complexes. Several features make this experiment attractive: First, it nicely illustrates the diamagnetic anisotropy phenomena, providing both students and teachers an opportunity to gain insight into aspects such as phase correction and…

Fernandez, Ignacio; Sanchez, Jorge Fernando Fernandez

2010-01-01

17

Observations and laboratory simulations of tornadoes in complex topographical regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aerial photos taken along the damage paths of the Joplin, MO, and Tuscaloosa-Birmingham, AL, tornadoes of 2011 captured and preserved several unique patterns of damage. In particular, a few distinct tree-fall patterns were noted along the Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado track that appeared highly influenced by the underlying topography. One such region was the focus of a damage survey and motivated laboratory vortex simulations with a 3-D foam representation of the underlying topography, in addition to simulations performed with idealized 2D topographic features, using Iowa State University's tornado simulator. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore various aspects related to the interaction of a tornado or a tornado-like vortex with its underlying topography. Three topics are examined: 1) Analysis of tornado-induced tree-fall using aerial photography from the Joplin, MO, and Tuscaloosa-Birmingham, AL, tornadoes of 2011, 2) Laboratory investigation of topographical influences on a simulated tornado-like vortex, and 3) On the use of non-standard EF-scale damage indicators to categorize tornadoes.

Karstens, Christopher Daniel

18

Permutation Entropy and Statistical Complexity Analysis of Turbulence in Laboratory Plasmas and the Solar Wind  

E-print Network

The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and fully-developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the WIND spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge fluctuations. The CH ...

Weck, Peter J; Brown, Michael R; Wicks, Robert T

2014-01-01

19

Complexation of transuranic ions by humic substances: Application of laboratory results to the natural system  

SciTech Connect

Environmental investigations show transuranic ions sorb to humic substances. The resulting species are often mobile and are expected to be important vectors in the migration of transuranic ions in natural systems. However, these environmental studies yield no quantitative data useful for modeling. Laboratory complexation experiments with transuranic ions and humic substances generate thermodynamic data required for complexation modeling. The data presented in this work are based on the metal ion charge neutralization model, which is briefly described. When a consistent complexation model is used, similar results are obtained from different experimental conditions, techniques, and laboratories. Trivalent transuranic ions (Cm(III), Am(III)) have been extensively studied with respect to pH, ionic strength, origin of humic acid, and mixed species formation. The complexation of Np(V) has been examined over a large pH and metal ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation of plutonium with humic acid, however further work is needed. Calculations on the Gorleben aquifer system using the thermodynamic data are presented. Critical information lacking from the thermodynamic database is identified. 55 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Czerwinski, K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Kim, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Entsorgungstechnik

1997-12-31

20

Complex plasma laboratory PK3 Plus on the International Space Station  

Microsoft Academic Search

PK-3 Plus is the second-generation laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). It has more advanced hardware, software and diagnostics than its precursor PKE-Nefedov (Nefedov et al 2003 New J. Phys. 5 33). The first experiments with PK-3 Plus show the perfect functioning of the apparatus and provide much better insights

H. M. Thomas; G. E. Morfill; V. E. Fortov; A. V. Ivlev; V. I. Molotkov; A. M. Lipaev; T. Hagl; H. Rothermel; S. A. Khrapak; R. K. Suetterlin; M. Rubin-Zuzic; O. F. Petrov; V. I. Tokarev; S. K. Krikalev

2008-01-01

21

Metal Complexes of Trifluoropentanedione. An Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transition-metal complexes produced by the reactions of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) with 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione form the basis of this general chemistry laboratory exercise. The complexes can be prepared quickly in 40-60% yield from 150 mg of the metal nitrates. Mass spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometry of the reaction products. GCMS is used to show that two isomers result from the formation of the octahedral complex Cr(tfac)3. The end result is a brief survey of the reactions of these first-row transition metals.

Sadoski, Robert C.; Shipp, David; Durham, Bill

2001-05-01

22

A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault  

SciTech Connect

We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette, E-mail: atordesi@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia (Australia)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010 Australia (Australia); Small, Michael [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Behringer, Robert P. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Tse, Chi K. [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2014-03-15

23

Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge Isat. The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma.

Weck, P. J.; Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.; Wicks, R. T.

2015-02-01

24

Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

2010-11-01

25

Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site  

SciTech Connect

A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor.

Paul, R.A. [IT Corp., Durham, NC (United States); Faugl, T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01

26

Effects of borehole design on complex electrical resistivity measurements: laboratory validation and numerical experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geophysical measurements within a borehole are typically affected by the presence of the borehole. The focus of the current study is to quantify the effect of borehole design on broadband electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements within boreholes. Previous studies have shown that effects on the real part of the electrical resistivity are largest for boreholes with large diameters and for materials with a large formation factor. However, these studies have not considered the effect of the well casing and the filter gravel on the measurement of the real part of the electrical resistivity. In addition, the effect of borehole design on the imaginary part of the electrical resistivity has not been investigated yet. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of borehole design on the complex electrical resistivity using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations. In order to do so, we developed a high resolution two dimensional axisymmetric finite element model (FE) that enables us to simulate the effects of several key borehole design parameters (e.g. borehole diameter, thickness of PVC well casing) on the measurement process. For the material surrounding the borehole, realistic values for complex resistivity were obtained from a database of laboratory measurements of complex resistivity from the test site Krauthausen (Germany). The slotted PVC well casing is represented by an effective resistivity calculated from the water-filled slot volume and the PVC volume. Measurements with and without PVC well casing were made with a four-electrode EIT logging tool in a water-filled rain barrel. The initial comparison for the case that the logging tool was inserted in the PVC well casing showed a considerable mismatch between measured and modeled values. It was required to consider a complete electrode model instead of point electrodes to remove this mismatch. This validated model was used to investigate in detail how complex resistivity measurements with different electrode configurations are affected by borehole design. Finally, the plausibility of our results was verified by comparing the simulation results with borehole EIT measurements made at the test site Krauthausen.

Treichel, A.; Huisman, J. A.; Zhao, Y.; Zimmermann, E.; Esser, O.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

2012-12-01

27

Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iron is always present in the atmosphere in concentrations from ~10-9 M (clouds, rain) up to ~10-3 M (fog, particles). Sources are mainly mineral dust emissions. Iron complexes are very good absorbers in the UV-VIS actinic region and therefore photo-chemically reactive. Iron complex photolysis leads to radical production and can initiate radical chain reactions, which is related to the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. These radical chain reactions are involved in the decomposition and transformation of a variety of chemical compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles. Additionally, the photochemical reaction itself can be a degradation pathway for organic compounds with the ability to bind iron. Iron-complexes of atmospherically relevant coordination compounds like oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, tartronate, gluconate, pyruvate and glyoxalate have been investigated in laboratory experiments. Iron speciation depends on the iron-ligand ratio and the pH. The most suitable experimental conditions were calculated with a speciation program (Visual Minteq). The solutions were prepared accordingly and transferred to a 1 cm quartz cuvette and flash-photolyzed with an excimer laser at wavelengths 308 or 351 nm. Photochemically produced Fe2+ has been measured by spectrometry at 510 nm as Fe(phenantroline)32+. Fe2+ overall effective quantum yields have been calculated with the concentration of photochemically produced Fe2+ and the measured energy of the excimer laser pulse. The laser pulse energy was measured with a pyroelectric sensor. For some iron-carboxylate systems the experimental parameters like the oxygen content of the solution, the initial Iron concentration and the incident laser energy were systematically altered to observe an effect on the overall quantum yield. The dependence of some quantum yields on these parameters allows in some cases an interpretation of the underlying photochemical reaction mechanism. Quantum yields of malonate, glutarate and gluconate complexes lie in the range of 0.02 < ? < 0.10, whereas succinate, tartronate, pyruvate and glyoxalate systems have values between 0.16 < ? < 1.26. All quantum yields include contributions from secondary thermal reactions. Furthermore, an attempt was made to differentiate between contributions of individual iron-oxalato complexes to the overall measured quantum yield. The formation and photolysis of the iron-carboxylate complexes and the subsequent reactions of the resulting compounds have been implemented in CAPRAM 3.0 (Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism). Modeling studies were performed to investigate the effects of the expanded iron photochemistry on oxidant budgets, the iron redox-cycling and the processing of secondary organic acids in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles under different environmental conditions. The model studies have shown that, i.e. for pyruvic acid under urban conditions, the photolysis of the iron-pyruvate complex can contribute with about 40 % significantly to the overall degradation flux and represents thus an important loss pathway beside the radical oxidation pathways.

Weller, C.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

2010-12-01

28

Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol  

PubMed Central

The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60–180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

Prather, Kimberly A.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Deane, Grant B.; Stokes, M. Dale; DeMott, Paul J.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Palenik, Brian P.; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Molina, Mario J.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Geiger, Franz M.; Roberts, Gregory C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.; Ebben, Carlena J.; Forestieri, Sara D.; Guasco, Timothy L.; Hersey, Scott P.; Kim, Michelle J.; Lambert, William F.; Modini, Robin L.; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Schoepp, Nathan G.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Zhao, Defeng

2013-01-01

29

Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol.  

PubMed

The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60-180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

Prather, Kimberly A; Bertram, Timothy H; Grassian, Vicki H; Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Demott, Paul J; Aluwihare, Lihini I; Palenik, Brian P; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H; Moffet, Ryan C; Molina, Mario J; Cappa, Christopher D; Geiger, Franz M; Roberts, Gregory C; Russell, Lynn M; Ault, Andrew P; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B; Corrigan, Craig E; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Ebben, Carlena J; Forestieri, Sara D; Guasco, Timothy L; Hersey, Scott P; Kim, Michelle J; Lambert, William F; Modini, Robin L; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E; Ruppel, Matthew J; Ryder, Olivia S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Sullivan, Ryan C; Zhao, Defeng

2013-05-01

30

Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic carbon, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from borehole USGS 136 indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Depth-discrete groundwater samples were collected in the open borehole USGS 136 near 965, 710, and 573 ft BLS using a thief sampler; on the basis of selected constituents, deeper groundwater samples showed no influence from wastewater disposal at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex.

Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

2012-01-01

31

The University of Michigan Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex Eigenvalue Analysis  

E-print Network

for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex Eigenvalue Analysis Real Asymmetric Matrix Eigenvalue Analysis Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise Based on Complex of Michigan Computational Mechanics Laboratory Development of Optimal Design Method for Brake Squeal Noise

Daly, Samantha

32

Gibbs Energy Changes during Cobalt Complexation: A Thermodynamics Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By adding a large quantity of Cl[superscript -] to an aqueous solution of CoCl[subscript 2][multiplied by]6H[subscript 2]O, a mixture containing a red octahedral cobalt complex and a blue tetrahedral complex is produced. When the solution temperature is modified, the equilibrium constant, K[subscript eq], of the complexation reaction is shifted…

DeGrand, Michael J.; Abrams, M. Leigh; Jenkins, Judith L.; Welch, Lawrence E.

2011-01-01

33

Thermal instabilities in a soft and complex lithosphere: laboratory experiments and numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upwelling of hot material in the lithosphere remains far from understood. This is due to the complexity of the mechanical behaviour of lithospheric material, which presents solid as well as viscous properties. Mushroom-shaped less viscous plumes or more viscous finger-shaped diapirs, depending on the viscosity ratio between the rising and the matrix materials, are known to migrate through ductile, quasi-newtonian lithosphere; while dikes fracture and propagate through a solid matrix. But what happens in between these two end-members? To answer this question, we perform a combined study of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on the development of thermal plumes in aqueous solutions of Carbopol, a polymer gel suspension forming a continous network of micrometric sponges. This fluid is shear thinning and presents a yield-stress, whereby flow occurs only if the local stress exceeds a critical value. Below this value, the fluid acts as an elastic solid. Our experimental setup consists of a localized heat-source, placed in the center of a squared plexiglas tank. At t=0, a constant thermal power is applied locally to the fluid. For the numerical simulations, we replace the rigid plastic regions by an extremely viscous fluid, and therefore neglect the elastic contribution to the local stress. We systematically studied the influence of the rheological parameters, as well as the supplied heat. Depending on the Yield number Y0, which compares the thermally-induced stress to the yield stress, three different regims are observed. For low Y0, no convection develops; while for intermediate values, a small-scale convection cell appears and remains confined around the heater. For high Y0, thermal instabilities rise through the tank. Their morphology differs from the mushroom-shape typically encountered in newtonian fluids. Combined temperature and velocity field measurements show that a plug flow develops within the plume thermal anomaly, therefore producing a rising finger-shape with strong shear zones confined along its edges. The characteristics of the instability, as well as the existence of unyielded regions and the development of a damaged zone ahead of the plume as it rises, depend on Y0 but also on the other rheological parameters. The numerical simulations recover well the features observed in the laboratory experiments. This allows us to extend the parameter range of study. Our experimental finger-shaped diapirs present strong similarities with an off-axis diapir in Oman emplaced in a ridge context. This geological object, several kilometers in diameter presents in particular strong shear localization along its edges. Within our fluid mechanics framework, the existence of such an instability in the lithosphere places strong constraints on its parameter range. It suggests that this diapir was emplaced in a partially molten lithosphere. Therefore Herschel-Bulkley fluids like Carbopol might be good candidates to get new insights into the behavior of "soft" geological systems like mid-ocean ridge systems.

Massmeyer, A.; Davaille, A. B.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Di Giuseppe, E.

2012-12-01

34

Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

Kass, David H.

2007-01-01

35

Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

36

Ultraviolet complex refractive index of Martian dust Laboratory measurements of terrestrial analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The optical complex index of refraction of four candidate Martian surface materials has been determined between 0.185 and 0.4 microns using a modified Kubelka-Munk scattering theory. The cadidate materials were limonite, andesite, montmorillonite, and basalt. The effect of scattering has been removed from the results. Also presented are diffuse reflection and transmission data on these samples.

Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.; Pang, K.

1975-01-01

37

Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.  

PubMed

The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed. PMID:9603614

McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

1998-05-01

38

Laboratory Investigations of Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much of Pluto’s surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto’s atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-? UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low-temperature N2-, CH4-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near-IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft in 2015, will give the first close-up measurements of ices and their photoproducts. Laboratory measurements and experiments will provide a better context for the data returned by the spacecraft.

Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

2014-11-01

39

Aggradational and erosional history of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Long-term performance of the low-level waste disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is partially dependent on the stability of the land surface with respect to erosion of cover materials. This document discusses the aggradational and erosional history of the naturally occurring sediments and soils in and around the RWMC, focusing on the late-Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. Other related issues include the ages of the various deposits, the extent to which they have been altered by soil formation and other processes, their relationships to the basalt flows in the area, and the impact of human activity on the materials at the RWMC.

Dechert, T.V.; McDaniel, P.A.; Falen, A.L. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1994-09-01

40

Future directions in controlling the LAMPF-PSR Accelerator Complex at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Four interrelated projects are underway whose purpose is to migrate the LAMPF-PSR Accelerator Complex control systems to a system with a common set of hardware and software components. Project goals address problems in performance, maintenance and growth potential. Front-end hardware, operator interface hardware and software, computer systems, network systems and data system software are being simultaneously upgraded as part of these efforts. The efforts are being coordinated to provide for a smooth and timely migration to a client-sever model-based data acquisition and control system. An increased use of the distributed intelligence at both the front-end and operator interface is a key element of the projects. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Stuewe, R.; Schaller, S.; Bjorklund, E.; Burns, M.; Callaway, T.; Carr, G.; Cohen, S.; Kubicek, D.; Harrington, M.; Poore, R.; Schultz, D.

1991-01-01

41

Laboratory chamber measurements of the longwave extinction spectra and complex refractive indices of African and Asian mineral dusts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

this study we present the first results from laboratory chamber experiments newly designed to investigate the longwave optical properties of mineral dust. Extinction spectra in the 2-16 µm range have been measured in situ (T = 293 K, RH < 2%) for polydispersed pure dust aerosols generated from natural parent soils from Tunisia, Niger, and the Gobi desert. Data are used in combination with particle size distributions to estimate the complex refractive index of each dust sample. Our results show that the magnitude and spectral dependence of the dust extinction and refractive indices differ according to particle mineralogy, suggesting the necessity for regionally resolved optical properties for modeling dust radiative effects in the longwave. The magnitude of extinction is controlled by the particle size distribution and remains significant down to low coarse particle concentrations, indicating that the longwave effect of mineral dust persists throughout long-range transport and is thus relevant at the global scale.

Di Biagio, C.; Formenti, P.; Styler, S. A.; Pangui, E.; Doussin, J.-F.

2014-09-01

42

Site characterization program at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Site Characterization Program is a continuation of the Subsurface Investigation Program (SIP). The scope of the SIP has broadened in response to the results of past work that identified hazardous as well as radionuclide contaminants in the subsurface environment and in response to the need to meet regulatory requirements. Two deep boreholes were cored at the RWMC during FY-1988. Selected sediment samples were submitted for Appendix IX of 40 CFR Part 264 and radionuclide analyses. Detailed geologic logging of archived core was initiated. Stratigraphic studies of the unsaturated zone were conducted. Studies to determine hydrologic properties of sediments and basalts were conducted. Geochemical studies and analyses were initiated to evaluate contaminant and radionuclide speciation and migration in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) geochemical environment. Analyses of interbed sediments in boreholes D15 and 8801D did not confirm the presence of radionuclide contamination in the 240-ft interbed. Analyses of subsurface air and groundwater samples identified five volatile organic compounds of concern: carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

McElroy, D.L.; Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; Vigil, M.J.; Bonzon, C.J.; Landon, J.L.; Laney, P.T.

1989-07-01

43

Historic American Engineering Record, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex  

SciTech Connect

Just as automobiles need fuel to operate, so do nuclear reactors. When fossil fuels such as gasoline are burned to power an automobile, they are consumed immediately and nearly completely in the process. When the fuel is gone, energy production stops. Nuclear reactors are incapable of achieving this near complete burn-up because as the fuel (uranium) that powers them is burned through the process of nuclear fission, a variety of other elements are also created and become intimately associated with the uranium. Because they absorb neutrons, which energize the fission process, these accumulating fission products eventually poison the fuel by stopping the production of energy from it. The fission products may also damage the structural integrity of the fuel elements. Even though the uranium fuel is still present, sometimes in significant quantities, it is unburnable and will not power a reactor unless it is separated from the neutron-absorbing fission products by a method called fuel reprocessing. Construction of the Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Chem Plant started in 1950 with the Bechtel Corporation serving as construction contractor and American Cyanamid Company as operating contractor. Although the Foster Wheeler Corporation assumed responsibility for the detailed working design of the overall plant, scientists at Oak Ridge designed all of the equipment that would be employed in the uranium separations process. After three years of construction activity and extensive testing, the plant was ready to handle its first load of irradiated fuel.

Susan Stacy; Julie Braun

2006-12-01

44

Interactions between iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex and commonly used medications / laboratory studies in rats.  

PubMed

Simple iron salts, such as iron sulphate, often interact with food and other medications reducing bioavailability and tolerability. Iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (IPC, Maltofer) provides a soluble form of non-ionic iron, making it an ideal form of oral iron supplementation. The physicochemical properties of IPC predict a low potential for interactions. The effects of co-administration with aluminium hydroxide (CAS 21645-51-2), acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2), bromazepam (CAS 1812-30-2), calcium acetate (CAS 62-54-4), calcium carbonate (CAS 471-34-1), auranofin (CAS 34031-32-8), magnesium-L-aspartate hydrochloride (CAS 28184-71-6), methyldopa sesquihydrate (CAS 41372-08-1), paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2), penicillamine (CAS 52-67-5), sulfasalazine (CAS 599-79-1), tetracycline hydrochloride (CAS 64-75-5), calcium phosphate (CAS 7757-93-9) in combination with vitamin D3 (CAS 67-97-0), and a multi-vitamin preparation were tested in rats fed an iron-deficient diet. Uptake of iron from radiolabelled IPC with and without concomitant medications was compared. None of the medicines tested had a significant effect on iron uptake. Iron-59 retrieval from blood and major storage organs was 64-76% for IPC alone compared with 59-85% following co-administration with other medications. It is concluded that, under normal clinical conditions, IPC does not interact with these medications. PMID:17691586

Funk, Felix; Canclini, Camillo; Geisser, Peter

2007-01-01

45

The Laboratory and Observational Study of 2-BUTANONE as a Test for Organic Chemical Complexity in Various Interstellar Physical Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have undertaken a combined laboratory, observational, and modeling research program in an attempt to more fully understand the effects that physical environment has on the chemical composition of astronomical sources. To this end, deep millimeter and submillimeter spectral line surveys of multiple interstellar sources with varied physical conditions have been collected. These sources cover a range of physical environments, including hot cores, shocked regions, low-mass star forming regions, and stellar outflows. We have conducted broadband spectral line surveys at ? =1.3 mm of 10 sources at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). These are forerunner observations to our Herschel OT1 program to continue these line surveys at higher frequencies. Only a fraction of the lines observed in the CSO spectra can be assigned to known molecules. Laboratory spectra of many additional candidates for interstellar detection must therefore be collected before these spectral line surveys can be fully-analyzed. One such molecular target is 2-butanone [also known as methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), CH_3COCH_2CH_3], which contains similar functional groups to other known interstellar molecules and is therefore a likely product of interstellar organic chemistry. The microwave spectrum for MEK was collected with the chirped-pulse waveguide Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) spectrometer at New College Florida, and the millimeter and submillimeter spectrum was collected using the direct absorption flow cell spectrometer at Emory University. We will report here both on the laboratory characterization of MEK and the analysis of the observational line surveys in the context of the identification of new, complex organic molecules in the ISM.

Kroll, Jay A.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus; Shipman, Steven T.

2011-06-01

46

Elucidating multipollutant exposure across a complex metropolitan area by systematic deployment of a mobile laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study evaluates a deployment strategy of a heavily instrumented mobile lab for characterizing multipollutant spatial patterns based upon a limited number of measurement days spread over different seasons. The measurements obtained through this deployment strategy are used to gain insight into average pollutant levels between routine monitoring sites and in relation to emission sources in the region, as well as to assess correlations between pollutant patterns to better understand the nature of urban air pollutant mixtures. A wide range of locations were part of the deployment in order to characterize the distribution of chronic exposures potentially allowing development of exposure models. Comparison of the mobile lab averages to the available adjacent air quality monitoring network stations to evaluate their representativeness showed that they were in reasonable agreement with the annual averages at the monitoring sites, thus providing some evidence that, through the deployment approach, the mobile lab is able to capture the main features of the average spatial patterns. The differences between mobile lab and network averages varied by pollutant with the best agreement for NO2 with a percentage difference of 20%. Sharp differences in the average spatial distribution were found to exist between different pollutants on multiple scales, particularly on the sub-urban scale, i.e., the neighborhood to street scales. For example, NO2 was observed to be 210-265% higher by the main highway in the study region compared to the nearby urban background monitoring site, while black carbon was higher by 180-200% and particle number concentration was 300% higher. The repeated measurements of near-roadway gradients showed that the rate of change differed by pollutant with elevated concentrations detected up to 600-700 m away for some pollutants. These results demonstrate that through systematic deployment mobile laboratory measurements can be used to characterize average or typical concentration patterns, thus providing data to assess monitoring site representativeness, spatial relationships between pollutants, and chronic multipollutant exposure patterns useful for evaluating and developing exposure models for outdoor concentrations in an urban environment.

Levy, I.; Mihele, C.; Lu, G.; Narayan, J.; Hilker, N.; Brook, J. R.

2014-07-01

47

Preliminary observations on the impact of complex stress histories on sandstone response to salt weathering: laboratory simulations of process combinations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historic sandstone structures carry an inheritance, or a ‘memory’, of past stresses that the stone has undergone since its placement in a façade. This inheritance, which conditions present day performance, may be made up of long-term exposure to a combination of low magnitude background environmental factors (for example, salt weathering, temperature and moisture cycling) and, superimposed upon these, less frequent but potentially high magnitude events or ‘exceptional’ factors (for example, lime rendering, severe frost events, fire). The impact of complex histories on the decay pathways of historic sandstone is not clearly understood, but this paper seeks to improve that understanding through the use of a laboratory ‘process combination’ study. Blocks of quartz sandstone (Peakmoor, from NW England) were divided into subsets that experienced different histories (lime rendering and removal, fire and freeze-thaw cycles in isolation and combination) that reflected the event timeline of a real medieval sandstone monument in NE Ireland, Bonamargy Friary (McCabe et al. 2006b). These subsets were then subject to salt weathering cycles using a 10% salt solution of NaCl and MgSO4 that represents the ‘every-day’ stress environment of, for example, sandstone structures in coastal, or polluted urban, location. Block response to salt weathering was monitored by collecting, drying and weighing the debris that was released as blocks were immersed in the salt solution at the beginning of each cycle. The results illustrate the complexity of the stone decay system, showing that seemingly small variations in stress history can produce divergent response to salt weathering cycles. Applied to real-world historic sandstone structures, this concept may help to explain the spatial and temporal variability of sandstone response to background environmental factors on a single façade, and encourage conservators to include the role of stress inheritance when selecting and implementing conservation strategies.

McCabe, S.; Smith, B. J.; Warke, P. A.

2007-03-01

48

Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1994-05-25

49

Diagenesis of Metals Chemically Complexed to Bacteria: Laboratory Formation of Metal Phosphates, Sulfides, and Organic Condensates in Artificial Sediments  

PubMed Central

Cells of Bacillus subtilis, when suspended in a 5mM metal solution, bind metals tenaciously to their cell walls. These metal-loaded cells, when mixed with a synthetic sediment and put under laboratory conditions to simulate low-temperature sediment diagenesis, nucleate the formation of a mixed assemblage of crystalline metal phosphates, metal sulfides, and polymeric, metal-complexed, organic residues. The sequential series of diagenetic events leading to the formation of authigenic mineral phases was followed by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The minerals quartz (SiO2) and calcite (CaCO3) were employed in the synthetic sediment. Crystalline magnetite (Fe2O3) and elemental sulfur were added as redox buffering agents to ensure anoxic conditions. Quartz and magnetite appeared unreactive throughout the experimental conditions. Elemental sulfur interacted with the metal-loaded cells, affected both the eventual chemistry and crystal habit of the metal phosphates, and formed a variety of crystalline metal sulfides. Calcite raised the pH of the fluid phase of the sediment, which influenced phosphate mineralization and inhibited metal sulfide genesis. Images PMID:16346230

Beveridge, T. J.; Meloche, J. D.; Fyfe, W. S.; Murray, R. G. E.

1983-01-01

50

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01

51

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

52

A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

2012-01-01

53

Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

2007-01-01

54

How Do Structure and Charge Affect Metal-Complex Binding to DNA? An Upper-Division Integrated Laboratory Project Using Cyclic Voltammetry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced undergraduate laboratory project is described that integrates inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical techniques to reveal differences in binding between cationic metal complexes and anionic DNA (herring testes). Students were guided to formulate testable hypotheses based on the title question and a list of different metal…

Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Reed; Frost, Tony; Margerum, Lawrence D.

2011-01-01

55

RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

SciTech Connect

This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

Pamela R. Cunningham

1992-07-01

56

Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

Porta, Angela R.

2003-01-01

57

Laboratory studies on complex organic molecules on Mars. Part 2 - experimental set-up and related work  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1976 the Viking missions arrived at Mars to search for traces of extinct and extant life. Although this mission brought a range of sophisticated instruments it neiter detected any traces of life, nor any organic compounds in the Martian soil. Since it is still unclear why the Viking landers did not detect any organic molecules, laboratory experiments under simulated

I. L. ten Kate; R. Ruiterkamp; O. Botta; B. Lehmann; C. Gomez Hernandez; N. Boudin; B. H. Foing; P. Ehrenfreund

2002-01-01

58

7.2 DISPERSION IN ATMOSPHERIC CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER WITH WIND SHEARS: FROM LABORATORY MODELS TO COMPLEX SIMULATION STUDIES  

E-print Network

7.2 DISPERSION IN ATMOSPHERIC CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER WITH WIND SHEARS: FROM LABORATORY MODELS, Oklahoma 1. INTRODUCTION Convective boundary layers (CBLs) driven by buoyancy forcings from the bottom or forcing in the boundary layer is primarily represented by convective heat transfer from a warm underlying

Fedorovich, Evgeni

59

Hydrological and meteorological data for an unsaturated-zone study area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988 and 1989  

SciTech Connect

Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and the potential for migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste trenches and pits. This phase of the study is being conducted to provide hydrological and meteorological data for an area adjacent to the northern boundary of the RWMC.

Pittman, J.R.

1995-01-01

60

EVALUATION OF THE COMPLEX TERRAIN DISPERSION MODEL AGAINST LABORATORY OBSERVATIONS: NEUTRAL FLOW OVER 2-D AND 3-D HILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

A comparison is made of the predictions of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDM) with wind-tunnel observations of flow and diffusion in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer over two- and three-dimensional hills. The measure used to evaluate the ability of the mode...

61

Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 Formation Evaluation in the Bakken Complex Using Laboratory Core Data  

E-print Network

SPWLA 51st Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 Formation Evaluation in the Bakken Complex reservoirs, such as the Bakken Shale and its adjoining formations, the Three Forks dolomite, Sanish mudstone (below), and Lodgepole limestone (above). The primary oil targets within the Upper Devonian Bakken

62

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

63

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01

64

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01

65

Impact of surface water recharge on the design of a groundwater monitoring system for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent hydrogeologic studies have been initiated to characterize the hydrogeologic conditions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Measured water levels in wells penetrating the Snake River Plain aquifer near the RWMC and the corresponding direction of flow show change over time. This change is related to water table mounding caused by recharge from excess water diverted from the Big Lost River for flood protection during high flows. Water levels in most wells near the RWMC rise on the order of 10 ft (3 m) in response to recharge, with water in one well rising over 60 ft (18 m). Recharge changes the normal south-southwest direction of flow to the east. Design of the proposed groundwater monitoring network for the RWMC must account for the variable directions of groundwater flow. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Wood, T.R.

1990-01-01

66

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01

67

Field Observations of Fluid Transport in a Complex Heterogeneous Vadose Zone at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicting fluid and contaminant transport in the vadose zone near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INEEL has been problematic due to the complex geology underlying the site. In an attempt to better understand the controlling mechanism of subsurface fluid transport, a system of monitoring instruments were installed in boreholes around the perimeter of newly constructed percolation ponds, consisting of 2 cells each approximately 160,000 ft2 in area. The instrumented region surrounding the ponds has been designated as the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). Continuous discharge to the south cell began in October 2002 at an average flux rate of 1.5 million gallons per day and continued until July 2003 at which time the discharge was switched to the north cell. Hydraulic data were collected nearly continuously, monitoring hydraulic responses to discharge events to both cells. Discharge to the south cell resulted in rapid vertical percolation until reaching the surficial gravel/basalt interface (at about 60 ft below ground surface) at which time rapid lateral transport was observed in a southern direction. A near steady state of water levels was reached during this 10-month period. Switching discharge location only 100 feet to the north cell drastically altered hydrological conditions and flow paths within the subsurface. Recharge was observed in several new locations, while some locations ceased receiving water from the ponds entirely. Other locations temporarily drained, then received "new water" from alternate flow paths a few days later. Prior to switching discharge locations, 3 wells were installed in the north cell at depths of 7 ft, 12 ft, and 19 ft below ground surface. The wells were instrumented with electrical conductivity probes to monitor discharge from the INTEC facility, which receives a high conductivity spike every 12 hours from water softener regeneration. Field observations show that water reached the 7 ft well within a couple hours after the switch, while the other 2 wells remain dry even after one month. Based on these data, it appears that discharge to the north cell percolates vertically to a depth of approximately 10 ft before reaching a low permeability zone, which diverts flow laterally in a northern direction. Field observations of hydrological data indicate that initial water arrival times and locations appear to be controlled by low permeability zones and fast pathways. Arrival progression was neither vertically nor laterally sequential. Importantly, field observations indicate that minor transients in discharge flux and/or location resulted in extreme changes in fluid transport behavior. Based on these observations, it is apparent that our original steady-state conceptual model needs to be modified to incorporate not only lithologic complexities, but also temporal changes in discharge location and flux. Continued field monitoring combined with ongoing tracer testing at the VZRP is aimed at providing the information needed to improve predictive models designed specifically for complex heterogeneous subsurface environments.

Baker, K.; Hull, L.; Mattson, E.; McLing, T.

2003-12-01

68

Development of a New Method to Track Multiple Honey Bees with Complex Behaviors on a Flat Laboratory Arena  

PubMed Central

A computer program that tracks animal behavior, thereby revealing various features and mechanisms of social animals, is a powerful tool in ethological research. Because honeybee colonies are populated by thousands of bees, individuals co-exist in high physical densities and are difficult to track unless specifically tagged, which can affect behavior. In addition, honeybees react to light and recordings must be made under special red-light conditions, which the eyes of bees perceive as darkness. The resulting video images are scarcely distinguishable. We have developed a new algorithm, K-Track, for tracking numerous bees in a flat laboratory arena. Our program implements three main processes: (A) The object (bee's) region is detected by simple threshold processing on gray scale images, (B) Individuals are identified by size, shape and spatiotemporal positional changes, and (C) Centers of mass of identified individuals are connected through all movie frames to yield individual behavioral trajectories. The tracking performance of our software was evaluated on movies of mobile multi-artificial agents and of 16 bees walking around a circular arena. K-Track accurately traced the trajectories of both artificial agents and bees. In the latter case, K-track outperformed Ctrax, well-known software for tracking multiple animals. To investigate interaction events in detail, we manually identified five interaction categories; ‘crossing’, ‘touching’, ‘passing’, ‘overlapping’ and ‘waiting’, and examined the extent to which the models accurately identified these categories from bee's interactions. All 7 identified failures occurred near a wall at the outer edge of the arena. Finally, K-Track and Ctrax successfully tracked 77 and 60 of 84 recorded interactive events, respectively. K-Track identified multiple bees on a flat surface and tracked their speed changes and encounters with other bees, with good performance. PMID:24465422

Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas; Okada, Ryuichi; Radspieler, Gerald; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

2014-01-01

69

Development of a new method to track multiple honey bees with complex behaviors on a flat laboratory arena.  

PubMed

A computer program that tracks animal behavior, thereby revealing various features and mechanisms of social animals, is a powerful tool in ethological research. Because honeybee colonies are populated by thousands of bees, individuals co-exist in high physical densities and are difficult to track unless specifically tagged, which can affect behavior. In addition, honeybees react to light and recordings must be made under special red-light conditions, which the eyes of bees perceive as darkness. The resulting video images are scarcely distinguishable. We have developed a new algorithm, K-Track, for tracking numerous bees in a flat laboratory arena. Our program implements three main processes: (A) The object (bee's) region is detected by simple threshold processing on gray scale images, (B) Individuals are identified by size, shape and spatiotemporal positional changes, and (C) Centers of mass of identified individuals are connected through all movie frames to yield individual behavioral trajectories. The tracking performance of our software was evaluated on movies of mobile multi-artificial agents and of 16 bees walking around a circular arena. K-Track accurately traced the trajectories of both artificial agents and bees. In the latter case, K-track outperformed Ctrax, well-known software for tracking multiple animals. To investigate interaction events in detail, we manually identified five interaction categories; 'crossing', 'touching', 'passing', 'overlapping' and 'waiting', and examined the extent to which the models accurately identified these categories from bee's interactions. All 7 identified failures occurred near a wall at the outer edge of the arena. Finally, K-Track and Ctrax successfully tracked 77 and 60 of 84 recorded interactive events, respectively. K-Track identified multiple bees on a flat surface and tracked their speed changes and encounters with other bees, with good performance. PMID:24465422

Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas; Okada, Ryuichi; Radspieler, Gerald; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

2014-01-01

70

Subsurface Investigations Program at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual progress report, FY-1987  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Investigations Program is obtaining program objectives of a field calibration of a model to predict long-term radionuclide migration and measurement of the actual migration to date. Three deep boreholes were drilled at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to collect sample material for evaluation of radionuclide content in the interbeds, to determine geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the sediments, and to provide monitoring sites for moisture movement in these sediments. Suction lysimeters and heat dissipation sensors were installed in two deep boreholes to collect moisture data. Data from the moisture sensing instruments installed at the RWMC continued to be collected during FY-1987. Because of the large volume of collected data, the RWMC Data Management System was developed and implemented to facilitate the storage, retrieval, and manipulation of the database. Work on the Computer Model Development task focused on a detailed review of previous vadose zone modeling studies at INEL, acquisition and installation of a suite of computer models for unsaturated flow and contaminant transport, and preliminary applications of computer models using site-specific data. Computer models installed on the INEL CRAY computer for modeling transport through the subsurface pathway include SEMTRA, FEMTRA, TRACR3D, MAGNUM, and CHAINT. In addition to the major computer models, eight other codes, referred to as support codes and models, have been acquired and implemented. 27 refs., 70 figs., 22 tabs.

Laney, P.T.; Minkin, S.C.; Baca, R.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Hubbell, J.M.; Hull, L.C.; Russell, B.F.; Stormberg, G.J.; Pittman, J.T.

1988-04-01

71

Soil moisture monitoring results at the radioactive waste management complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, FY-1993  

SciTech Connect

In FY-1993, two tasks were performed for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Low Level Waste Performance Assessment to estimate net infiltration from rain and snow at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) and provide soil moisture data for hydrologic model calibration. The first task was to calibrate the neutron probe to convert neutron count data to soil moisture contents. A calibration equation was developed and applied to four years of neutron probe monitoring data (November 1986 to November 1990) at W02 and W06 to provide soil moisture estimates for that period. The second task was to monitor the soils at two neutron probe access tubes (W02 and W06) located in the SDA of the RWMC with a neutron probe to estimate soil moisture contents. FY-1993 monitoring indicated net infiltration varied widely across the SDA. Less than 1.2 in. of water drained into the underlying basalts near W02 in 1993. In contrast, an estimated 10.9 in. of water moved through the surficial sediments and into the underlying basalts at neutron probe access tube W06. Net infiltration estimates from the November 1986 to November 1990 neutron probe monitoring data are critical to predictive contaminant transport modeling and should be calculated and compared to the FY-1993 net infiltration estimates. In addition, plans are underway to expand the current neutron probe monitoring system in the SDA to address the variability in net infiltration across the SDA.

McElroy, D.L.

1993-11-01

72

Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt with gravel was described. Basalt flows generally ranged in thickness from 3 to 76 ft (average of 14 ft) and varied from highly fractured to dense with high to low vesiculation. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected during certain stages of the drilling and construction process at boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Geophysical logs were examined synergistically with the core material for borehole USGS 140; additionally, geophysical data were examined to confirm geologic and hydrologic similarities between boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 because core was not collected for borehole USGS 141. Geophysical data suggest the occurrence of fractured and (or) vesiculated basalt, dense basalt, and sediment layering in both the saturated and unsaturated zones in borehole USGS 141. Omni-directional density measurements were used to assess the completeness of the grout annular seal behind 6-in. diameter well casing. Furthermore, gyroscopic deviation measurements were used to measure horizontal and vertical displacement at all depths in boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141. Single-well aquifer tests were done following construction at wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 and data examined after the tests were used to provide estimates of specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 140 were estimated at 2,370 gallons per minute per foot [(gal/min)/ft)], 4.06 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 740 feet per day (ft/d), respectively. The specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity for well USGS 141 were estimated at 470 (gal/min)/ft, 5.95 × 104 ft2/d, and 110 ft/d, respectively. Measured flow rates remained relatively constant in well USGS 140 with averages of 23.9 and 23.7 gal/min during the first and second aquifer tests, respectively, and in well USGS 141 with an average of 23.4 gal/min. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from both wells indicated th

Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

2014-01-01

73

Determination of Background Uranium Concentration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer under the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

SciTech Connect

Uranium occurs naturally in the environment and is also a contaminant that is disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. To determine whether uranium concentrations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which underlies the laboratory, are elevated as a result of migration of anthropogenic uranium from the Subsurface Disposal Area in the RWMC, uranium background concentrations are necessary. Guideline values are calculated for total uranium, 234U, 235U, and 238U from analytical results from up to five datasets. Three of the datasets include results of samples analyzed using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) and two of the datasets include results obtained using alpha spectrometry. All samples included in the statistical testing were collected from aquifer monitoring wells located within 10 miles of the RWMC. Results from ID-TIMS and alpha spectrometry are combined when the data are not statistically different. Guideline values for total uranium were calculated using four of the datasets, while guideline values for 234U were calculated using only the alpha spectrometry results (2 datasets). Data from all five datasets were used to calculate 238U guideline values. No limit is calculated for 235U because the ID-TIMS results are not useful for comparison with routine monitoring data, and the alpha spectrometry results are too close to the detection limit to be deemed accurate or reliable for calculating a 235U guideline value. All guideline values presented represent the upper 95% coverage 95% confidence tolerance limits for background concentration. If a future monitoring result is above this guideline, then the exceedance will be noted in the quarterly monitoring report and assessed with respect to other aquifer information. The guidelines (tolerance limits) for total U, 234U, and 238U are 2.75 pCi/L, 1.92 pCi/L, and 0.90 pCi/L, respectively.

Molly K. Leecaster; L. Don Koeppen; Gail L. Olson

2003-06-01

74

State of work for services provided by the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility for effluent monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the services the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide Effluent Monitoring (EM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The internal memo contained in Appendix A identifies the samples Em plans to submit for analysis in CY-1995. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements. This report describes regulatory reporting requirements and WSCF services and data quality objectives.

Gleckler, B.P.

1995-02-01

75

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01

76

In situ technology evaluation and functional and operational guidelines for treatability studies at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide EG G Idaho's Waste Technology Development Department with a basis for selection of in situ technologies for demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to provide information for Feasibility Studies to be performed according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The demonstrations will aid in meeting Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) schedules for remediation of waste at Waste Area Group (WAG) 7. This report is organized in six sections. Section 1, summarizes background information on the sites to be remediated at WAG-7, specifically, the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. Section 2 discusses the identification and screening of in situ buried waste remediation technologies for these sites. Section 3 outlines the design requirements. Section 4 discusses the schedule (in accordance with Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) scoping). Section 5 includes recommendations for the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. A listing of references used to compile the report is given in Section 6. Detailed technology information is included in the Appendix section of this report.

Hyde, R.A.; Donehey, A.J.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.; Rubert, A.L.; Walker, S.

1991-07-01

77

Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have demonstrated by experiment that, in an energetic environment, a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) such as naphthalene will undergo chemical reactions that produce a wide array of more complex species (an aggregate). For a stellar wind of a highly evolved star (post-asymptotic giant branch [post-AGB]), this process would be in addition to what is expected from reactions occurring under thermodynamic equilibrium. A surprising result of that work was that produced in substantial abundance are hydrogenated forms that are hybrids of polycyclic aromatic and polycyclic alkanes. Infrared spectroscopy described here reveals a spectral character for these materials that has much in common with that observed for the constituents of circumstellar clouds of post-AGB stars. It can be demonstrated that a methylene (-CH2-) substructure, as in cycloalkanes, is the likely carrier of the 6.9 microns band emission of dust that has recently been formed around IRAS 22272+5433, NGC 7027, and CPD -56 8032. Ultraviolet spectroscopy previously done with a lower limit of 190 nm had revealed that this molecular aggregate can contribute to the interstellar extinction feature at 2175 angstroms. We have now extended our UV spectroscopy of these materials to 110 nm by a vacuum ultraviolet technique. That work, described here, reveals new spectral characteristics and describes how material newly formed during the late stages of stellar evolution could have produced an extinction feature claimed to exist at 1700 angstroms in the spectrum of HD 145502 and also how the newly formed hydrocarbon material would be transformed/aged in the general interstellar environment. The contribution of this molecular aggregate to the rise in interstellar extinction at wavelengths below 1500 angstroms is also examined. The panspectral measurements of the materials produced in the laboratory, using plasmas of H, He, N, and O to convert the simple PAH naphthalene to an aggregate of complex species, provide insight into possible molecular structure details of newly formed hydrocarbon-rich interstellar dust and its transformation into aged material that becomes resident in the interstellar medium. Specifically the presence of naphthalene-like and butadiene-like conjugated structures as chromophores for the 2175 angstroms ultraviolet extinction feature is indicated.

Arnoult, K. M.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Beegle, L. W.

2000-01-01

78

Skylab mobile laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

1975-01-01

79

Standards Laboratory environments  

SciTech Connect

Standards Laboratory environments need to be carefully selected to meet the specific mission of each laboratory. The mission of the laboratory depends on the specific work supported, the measurement disciplines required and the level of uncertainty required in the measurements. This document reproduces the contents of the Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory Memorandum Number 3B (PSLM-3B) which was issued on May 16, 1988, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office, to guide the laboratories of the Nuclear Weapons Complex in selecting suitable environments. Because of both general interest and specific interest in Standards Laboratory environments this document is being issued in a more available form. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in selection of laboratory environments suitable for standards maintenance and calibration operations. It is not intended to mandate a specific environment for a specific calibration but to direct selection of the environment and to offer suggestions on how to extend precision in an existing and/or achievable (practical) environment. Although this documents pertains specifically to standards laboratories, it can be applied to any laboratory requiring environmental control.

Braudaway, D.W.

1990-09-01

80

Laboratory of Population Genetics  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Population Genetics (LPG) utilizes genetic analysis to gain insight into human biologic processes. Until recently, genetic dissection of phenotypes had been largely limited to investigations in experimental organisms. The dawn of the post-genome era presents the opportunity to extend these investigations to humans. It is the major goal of this laboratory to exploit emerging resources and technology in order to understand the genetic basis of the complex phenotypes related to human cancer.

81

Facile Synthesis of a Macrobicyclic Hexaamine Cobalt(III) Complex Based on Tris(Ethylenediamine)Cobalt(III): An Advanced Undergraduate Inorganic Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information (including relevant chemical reactions), procedures used, and results obtained are provided for the synthesis and characterization of a macrobicyclic complex. The synthesis can be completed within two to three hours and is inexpensive and safe. Suggestions for further experiments are included. (JN)

Harrowfield, Jack MacB.; And Others

1985-01-01

82

Language Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This history of the language laboratory and the factors influencing its growth are briefly traced. Materials and equipment are described, and the problems involved in a laboratory operation are indicated. Also considered is the use of the language laboratory as a teaching machine and as a research device for education in general. A bibliography…

Mathieu, Gustave

1962-01-01

83

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-print Network

, this approach works against the student's natural learning patterns. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory concepts and then builds up to more complex problems. Frequent checks on learning, exercises, and optional the information to everyday experiences. · "Heads Up" interaction elements--pointing out important concepts

84

Assessment of the BD MGIT TBc Identification Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Network of Mycobacteriology Laboratories  

PubMed Central

We evaluate the performance of the TBcID assay in a panel of 100 acid-fast bacilli cultures. Sixty-four isolates were TBcID positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), whereas 36 gave negative results. These included 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria, one nonmycobacterial isolate, one M. tuberculosis, and six M. bovis BCG strains. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.14%, specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 80.55%, respectively. The test is rapid, easy to perform and interpret, and does not require sample preparation or instrumentation. However, a negative result does not exclude the presence of a strain belonging to MTBC, especially when mutations in mpb64 gene are present or some M. bovis BCG strains are isolated. The TBcID showed potential to assist in the identification of MTBC when the implementation and usage of molecular methods are often not possible, principally in resource-limited countries. PMID:24587985

Ramos, Jorge; Couto, Isabel; Narciso, Inácio; Coelho, Elizabeth; Viegas, Sofia

2014-01-01

85

Assessment of the BD MGIT TBc identification test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in a network of mycobacteriology laboratories.  

PubMed

We evaluate the performance of the TBcID assay in a panel of 100 acid-fast bacilli cultures. Sixty-four isolates were TBcID positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), whereas 36 gave negative results. These included 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria, one nonmycobacterial isolate, one M. tuberculosis, and six M. bovis BCG strains. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.14%, specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 80.55%, respectively. The test is rapid, easy to perform and interpret, and does not require sample preparation or instrumentation. However, a negative result does not exclude the presence of a strain belonging to MTBC, especially when mutations in mpb64 gene are present or some M. bovis BCG strains are isolated. The TBcID showed potential to assist in the identification of MTBC when the implementation and usage of molecular methods are often not possible, principally in resource-limited countries. PMID:24587985

Machado, Diana; Ramos, Jorge; Couto, Isabel; Cadir, Nureisha; Narciso, Inácio; Coelho, Elizabeth; Viegas, Sofia; Viveiros, Miguel

2014-01-01

86

A modeling study of contaminant transport resulting from flooding of Pit 9 at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A simulation study was conducted to determine if dissolved-phase transport due to flooding is a viable mechanism for explaining the presence of radionuclides in sedimentary interbeds below the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. In particular, the study focused on {sup 241}Am migration due to flooding of Pit 9 in 1969. A kinetically-controlled source term model was used to estimate the mass of {sup 241}Am that leached as a function of a variable surface infiltration rate. This mass release rate was then used in a numerical simulation of unsaturated flow and transport to estimate the advance due to flooding of the {sup 241}Am front down towards the 110 ft interbed. The simulation included the effect of fractures by superimposing them onto elements that represented the basalt matrix. For the base case, hydraulic and transport parameters were assigned using the best available data. The advance of the {sup 241}Am front due to flooding for this case was minimal, on the order of a few meters. This was due to the strong tendency for {sup 241}Am to sorb onto both basalts and sediments. In addition to the base case simulation, a parametric sensitivity study was conducted which tested the effect of sorption in the fractures, in the kinetic source term, and in the basalt matrix. Of these, the only case which resulted in significant transport was when there was no sorption in the basalt matrix. The indication being that other processes such as transport by radiocolloids or organic complexation may have contributed. However, caution is advised in interpreting these results due to approximations in the numerical method that was used incorporate fractures into the simulation. The approximations are a result of fracture apertures being significantly smaller than the elements over which they are superimposed. The sensitivity of the {sup 241}Am advance to the assumed hydraulic conductivity for the fractures was also tested.

Magnuson, S.O.; Sondrup, A.J.

1992-09-01

87

The Gran Sasso Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gran Sasso underground laboratory is one of the four national laboratories run by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). It is located under the Gran Sasso massif, in central Italy, between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 km far from Rome. It is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world and the most advanced in terms of complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. The scientific program at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, LNGS)is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay and nuclear cross-section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

Votano, L.

2012-09-01

88

The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The Jackson Laboratory was founded in 1929 and in 1983 earned an NCI Cancer Center designation. The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center (JAXCC) comprises three campuses. The approximately 50 JAXCC members have complementary expertise and are united in research aimed at understanding and targeting the genomic complexity of cancer.

89

USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

U.S. Geological Survey

1995-01-01

90

Paleomagnetics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

91

Hydromechanics Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hydromechanics Laboratory supports midshipmen education, as well as midshipmen, faculty and staff research, in the areas of naval architecture and ocean engineering. The laboratory facilities include a large towing tank (380-ft long, 26- ft wide, and 16-ft deep), a small towing tank (120-ft long, 8-ft wide, and 5-ft deep), a coastal engineering wave basin (52-ft long, 48-ft wide, and

David L. Kriebel

92

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity  

E-print Network

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

Way, Andy

93

Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL) at Colorado State University conducts multi-disciplinary research in ecosystem science, with the purpose of improving knowledge of "the complex interactions between humans, management activities, and ecosystems." The recently launched homepage, which is still under construction, includes background information on NREL; descriptions of research projects (a substantial and diverse list); publications, reports, and data; teaching and outreach; and contact information.

94

Geology of the Arco-Big Southern Butte area, eastern Snake River Plain, and volcanic hazards to the radioactive waste management complex, and other waste storage and reactor facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arco-Big Southern Butte area of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, includes a volcanic rift zone and more than 70 Holocene and late Quaternary basalt volcanoes. The Arco volcanic rift zone extends southeast for 50 km from Arco to about 10 km southeast of Big Southern Butte. The rift zone is the locus of extensional faults, graben, fissure basaltic volcanic vents, several rhyolite domes at Big Southern Butte, and a ferrolatite volcano at Cedar Butte. Limited radiometric age data and geological field criteria suggest that all volcanism in the area is younger than 700,000 years; at least 67 separate basaltic eruptions are estimated to have occurred within the last 200,000 years. The average volcanic recurrence interval for the Arco-Big Southern Butte area is approximately one eruption per 3,000 years. Radioactive waste storage and reactor facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory may be subject to potential volcanic hazards. The geologic history and inferred past volcanic events in the Arco-Big Southern Butte area provide a basis for assessing the volcanic hazard. It is recommended that a radiometric age-dating study be performed on rocks in cored drill holes to provide a more precise estimate of the eruption recurrence interval for the region surrounding and including the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. It is also recommended that several geophysical monitoring systems (dry tilt and seismic) be installed to provide adequate warning of future volcanic eruptions.

Kuntz, Mel A.; Kork, John O.

1978-01-01

95

U1A Complex  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2014-10-28

96

U1A Complex  

ScienceCinema

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2015-01-09

97

Afterglow Complex Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

Samarian, A. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M. [GREMI, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Coueedel, L. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); GREMI, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, BP6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

2008-09-07

98

Lunar laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

1986-01-01

99

Laboratory accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

Pettit, R.B.

1998-08-01

100

Thermodynamics Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Thermodynamics Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago developed this Web site to exhibit its research in the "molecular based study of fluids, solids and phase transitions, statistical mechanics of complex systems: equations of state, asymmetric mixtures characterization, surface and interfacial properties," and "solubilities in Liquids and Supercritical Gases." The site provides descriptions and images of the laboratory and equipment including the Atomic Force Microscopes and the Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Screening System. Scientists can learn about the group's research in supercritical fluids and supercritical extractions. The site has a new publications section where reprints of many of the group's papers are available. Researchers can also learn about The 4th International Conference on Fluid and Thermal Energy Conversion, which will be held in Bali Island, Indonesia December 7 - 11, 2003.

Mansoori, G. A. (G. Ali)

101

Archimedes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

102

Integrated Circuits Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Integrated Circuits Laboratory is software that is devoted to helping understand the processing of semiconductor materials. Manufacturing an IC involves a complex interaction of several highly developed technologies. This software is used to fabricate high-performance integrated circuits. In such areas as oxidation, diffusion, Ion implantation, Chemical etching, Photolithography, CVD, Ellipsometer, Plasma etching and Aluminum deposition. IC Lab software offers virtual opportunities to simulate the process of manufacturing a integrated circuit without going into a clean room. All the simulations represent processing steps that are as accurate as possible. This was part of the Learning Invention Labs that MATEC held. Visit the MATEC.org homepage for more information.

Lindor, Felicia

2013-01-01

103

Laboratory dynamos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnetism of the planets, including Earth, is generated by dynamo action, i.e. self-generation of a magnetic field due to the fluid motion of liquid iron inside the planetary cores. During the last decades, laboratory experiments became an essential part of the research on dynamo action, complementing both observations and theory. In this talk, I will review some recent results of the Von-Karman Sodium (VKS) experiment. The VKS experiment has been designed to achieve dynamo action in a turbulent flow of liquid metal. In this experiment, 150 liters of liquid sodium are stirred by the counter-rotation of two bladed discs in a cylindrical tank. When the discs are rotating sufficiently fast, a dipolar magnetic field, aligned with the axis of rotation, is generated by dynamo action. In addition,a lot of dynamical regimes can be observed, like chaotic polarity inversions of the field very similar to geomagnetic reversals. In some cases, the experiment can also generate hemispherical dynamos similar to some planetary fields. These different behaviors will be described within the framework of simple theoretical models. I will discuss how these results, and the corresponding theoretical descriptions, can provide a better understanding of some aspects of the geomagnetic field dynamics. Finally, I will present current perspectives for the next generation of laboratory dynamo experiments.

Gissinger, Christophe

2014-05-01

104

Design and Implementation Issues for Modern Remote Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The design and implementation of remote laboratories present different levels of complexity according to the nature of the equipments operated by the remote laboratory, the requirements imposed on the accessing computers, the network linking the user to the laboratory, and the type of experiments the laboratory supports. This paper addresses the…

Guimaraes, E. G.; Cardozo, E.; Moraes, D. H.; Coelho, P. R.

2011-01-01

105

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

106

Intelligence Dynamics and Representations Artificial Intelligence Laboratory  

E-print Network

Intelligence ­ Dynamics and Representations Luc Steels Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Vrije: intelligence, self­organisation, representation, complex dynamical systems. 1 Introduction Artificial the methods of the artificial [24]. This means that systems are built which exhibit intelligent behavior

Steels, Luc

107

Using the Laboratory to Enhance Student Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Typical hands-on, cookbook laboratory experiences do an extremely poor job of making apparent and playing off students' prior ideas, engendering deep reflection, and promoting understanding of complex content. This chapter addresses how to transform traditional laboratory activities into experiences that are more congruent with how people learn, the National Science Education Standards, and the nature of science.

Clough, Michael P.

2002-01-01

108

Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC).

Bearce

1992-01-01

109

Chemical Kinetics Laboratory Discussion Worksheet.  

PubMed

A laboratory discussion worksheet and its answer key provide instructors and students a discussion model to further the students' understanding of chemical kinetics. This discussion worksheet includes a section for students to augment their previous knowledge about chemical kinetics measurements, an initial check on students' understanding of basic concepts, a group participation model where students work on solving complex-conceptual problems, and a conclusion to help students connect this discussion to their laboratory or lecture class. Additionally, the worksheet has a detailed solution to a more advanced problem to help students understand how the concepts they have put together relate to problems they will encounter during later formal assessments. PMID:24092948

Demoin, Dustin Wayne; Jurisson, Silvia S

2013-09-10

110

When Is a Laboratory a Laboratory?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gives advice on the legal necessity of safety planning for school science (or other) laboratories. Recommends looking into governmental definitions of the term "laboratory" to determine which educational activities should be covered by safety planning. (WRM)

Roy, Ken

1999-01-01

111

Chemistry Laboratory Safety Check  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An accident prevention/safety check list for chemistry laboratories is printed. Included are checks of equipment, facilities, storage and handling of chemicals, laboratory procedures, instruction procedures, and items to be excluded from chemical laboratories. (SL)

Patnoe, Richard L.

1976-01-01

112

Using Rapid Prototyping Tools for Automatic Control System Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the development and implementation of laboratory tools for a control system laboratory is presented. Typical control system laboratory experiments are excessively time- consuming, require complex student instructions, and are inflexible and expensive. These drawbacks are addressed with the proposed system, which incorporates rapid prototyping software development tools, a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI), a DC motor with

Robert S. Cochran; Todd D. Batzel; Peter J. Shull

2006-01-01

113

An Integrated Approach to the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories traditionally expose students to biochemical techniques through a series of independent and usually unrelated laboratory exercises. Efforts to reorganize and update the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at Texas Tech University have centered upon the development of a series of laboratory experiments that focus on a single biological system, the complex 11 (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of Escherichia coli. Students are provided a computer-aided research environment in which to gain practical training in molecular biology, protein purification and enzyme kinetics. The laboratory schedule includes exercises on the succinate dehydrogenase operon (sdh) DNA sequence, and experiments that deal with isolation and characterization of sdh operon DNA, extraction and purification of complex 11 and characterization of complex 11 subunit structure and kinetic parameters. This unified approach to the biochemistry teaching laboratory is specifically designed to impact undergraduate student preparation for future studies, providing exposure to fundamental techniques of biochemistry experimentation and simulating the focused, single system, environment of a research laboratory.

Harman, James G.; Anderson, John A.; Nakashima, Richard A.; Shaw, Robert W.

1995-07-01

114

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

Annual Report 2004 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory RoyalInstitute ofTechnology SE 100 44 Stockholm #12;Alfvén Laboratory Annual Report 2004 i ANNUAL REPORT 2004 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute Annual Report 2004 ii CONTENTS Appendix A Detailed Report from the Division of Plasma Physics Section

Haviland, David

115

The total laboratory solution: a new laboratory E-business model based on a vertical laboratory meta-network.  

PubMed

Major forces are now reshaping all businesses on a global basis, including the healthcare and clinical laboratory industries. One of the major forces at work is information technology (IT), which now provides the opportunity to create a new economic and business model for the clinical laboratory industry based on the creation of an integrated vertical meta-network, referred to here as the "total laboratory solution" (TLS). Participants at the most basic level of such a network would include a hospital-based laboratory, a reference laboratory, a laboratory information system/application service provider/laboratory portal vendor, an in vitro diagnostic manufacturer, and a pharmaceutical/biotechnology manufacturer. It is suggested that each of these participants would add value to the network primarily in its area of core competency. Subvariants of such a network have evolved over recent years, but a TLS comprising all or most of these participants does not exist at this time. Although the TLS, enabled by IT and closely akin to the various e-businesses that are now taking shape, offers many advantages from a theoretical perspective over the current laboratory business model, its success will depend largely on (a) market forces, (b) how the collaborative networks are organized and managed, and (c) whether the network can offer healthcare organizations higher quality testing services at lower cost. If the concept is successful, new demands will be placed on hospital-based laboratory professionals to shift the range of professional services that they offer toward clinical consulting, integration of laboratory information from multiple sources, and laboratory information management. These information management and integration tasks can only increase in complexity in the future as new genomic and proteomics testing modalities are developed and come on-line in clinical laboratories. PMID:11468263

Friedman, B A

2001-08-01

116

The Microscale Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The materials needed and the procedures used in three microscale chemical laboratory experiments are detailed. Included are a microscale organic synthesis, a two-step synthetic sequence for the microscale organic laboratory, and a small-scale equilibrium experiment. (CW)

Zipp, Arden P.

1990-01-01

117

Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012  

E-print Network

CH369T Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012 Instructor: Dr. Gene McDonald Office: WEL 3.270C Phone, and at the same time to introduce you to issues associated with various biotechnology laboratory operations. After

118

EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

1993-01-01

119

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a short study guide from the University of Maryland's Physics Education Research Group on introducing, interpreting, and using complex numbers. Mathematical equations are included to help students understand the nature of complex numbers.

2010-04-01

120

Carney Complex  

MedlinePLUS

... Ephelides (freckles) LAMB syndrome – Lentigines, Atrial Myxoma, and Blue nevi What causes Carney complex? Carney complex is ... melanotic schwannoma, meaning tumors that grow on nerves Blue nevi, which are blue-black moles Osteochondromyxoma (bone ...

121

Theme: Laboratory Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of theme articles discuss setting up laboratory hydroponics units, the school farm at the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico, laboratory experiences in natural resources management and urban horticulture, the development of teaching labs at Derry (PA) High School, management of instructional laboratories, and industry involvement in agricultural…

Bruening, Thomas H.; And Others

1992-01-01

122

Good Laboratory Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

Hadjicostas, Evsevios

123

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA khatib@cs.stanford.edu Oliver Brock Laboratory for Perceptual Robotics Department of Computer Luis Sentis Sriram Viji Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford

Sentis, Luis

124

Laboratory Activities in Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

2012-01-01

125

FORMULARY FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS  

E-print Network

, and safety. In many clinical situations, laboratory animal veterinarians do not have available approved drugs in the Department of Laboratory Animal Science, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals Research and DevelopmentFORMULARY FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS SECOND EDITION Compiled by C. TERRANCE HAWK PhD, DVM, Dipl. ACLAM

Arnold, Jonathan

126

Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

127

Complexity Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

128

Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util-  

E-print Network

RLUOB Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util- ity Office Research building. Capabilities RLUOB provides: · Nearly 20,000 square feet of radiological laboratory

129

Development of an Environmental Virtual Field Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises, field observations and field trips are a fundamental part of many earth science and environmental science courses. Field observations and field trips can be constrained because of distance, time, expense, scale, safety, or complexity of real-world environments. Our objectives were to develop an environmental virtual field…

Ramasundaram, V.; Grunwald, S.; Mangeot, A.; Comerford, N. B.; Bliss, C. M.

2005-01-01

130

Novosibirsk solid-state physics laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work carried out in this laboratory is distinguished by a complex approach, which is characteristic for present-day solid-state physics, in studying mechanical, optical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, and other properties of substances and their inter-relations.

I. I. Novikov; P. G. Strelkov

1967-01-01

131

Teaching Chromatography Using Virtual Laboratory Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though deceptively simple to teach, chromatography presents many nuances and complex interactions that challenge both student and instructor. Time and instrumentation provide major obstacles to a thorough examination of these details in the laboratory. Modern chromatographic method-development software provides an opportunity to overcome this,…

Stone, David C.

2007-01-01

132

42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.  

...supervising high complexity testing; or (3) Hold an earned doctoral degree in a chemical, physical, biological, or clinical laboratory science from an accredited institution and— (i) Be certified and continue to be certified by a...

2014-10-01

133

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The objective of this lesson is to gain a better understanding of complex numbers and their graphs Situation: The Swiss Mathemation, Jean Robert Argand developed a means to graphically represent complex numbers. This led to solving problems related to altenating electrical current, which provides current day luxuries. Could you do the same? Current Knowledge: Use your knowledge of complex number and the coordinate system and with your partner, ...

Mrs. Pierce

2010-11-16

134

COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

135

Software agent technology in the laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The IT (Information Technology) environment in today's laboratories is characterized as being highly distributed, heterogeneous, and in some instances extremely dynamic. Larger organizations have to deal with hundreds of different systems, ranging from standalone workstations and devices in laboratories to fully integrated LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems. An information system operating in such an environment must handle several emerging problems, such as heterogeneous hardware and software platforms, as well as distributed information sources and capabilities. It is also expected that the IT infrastructure scales well, easily integrates with legacy systems, allows resource sharing, and supports day-to-day operations such as information retrieval, data storage, validation, tracking, replication, and archival in a fully automated fashion. By using real-world examples, this presentation will illustrate how software agent technology can be used to manage the ever increasing IT complexity and user demands in the laboratory of the future.

Staab, T. A. (Torsten)

2002-01-01

136

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ................................................................................................................................7 Other TAMU and SIEM Offshore Policies and Programs

137

Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

Gilliom, Laura R.

1992-01-01

138

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

139

Computation as a Bridge between the Laboratory and Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past decade, the many deep connections between terrestrial laboratory studies and astrophysics have been powerfully supported by modern numerical simulation: These calculations are able to make contact with modeling of both physically complex astrophysical phenomena and related phenomena observed in far greater detail in terrestrial laboratories. We will describe several examples that illustrate the power of numerical simulations to bridge laboratory and astrophysical studies.

Rosner, Robert; Cattaneo, F.

2013-06-01

140

Complex derivatives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

2013-03-01

141

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior realm of electric circuits, will give you more experience in applying the very useful principles the concepts of circuits to electrical systems. · Apply the concept of conservation of charge to determine

Minnesota, University of

142

Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

Brame, Ray; And Others

143

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining

Texas at Austin, University of

144

Laboratory animal allergy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of the study presented in this thesis was to estimate the prevalence rate of laboratory animal allergy and to determine its association with risk factors, like allergen exposure level, atopy, gender and other host factors. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among 540 workers at 8 laboratory animal facilities. All participants completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick

A. Hollander

1997-01-01

145

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01

146

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

1999-09-01

147

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 686 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-686 ISSN 1476-2986 Dependable systems for Sentient Computing Andrew C. Rice May 2007 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http

Haddadi, Hamed

148

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 709 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-709 ISSN 1476-2986 Protocols Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2008 Ford published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http

Cambridge, University of

149

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

150

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

151

Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

1989-01-01

152

An Independent Freshman Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a first-year laboratory course designed to fulfill laboratory objectives of reinforcing lecture material, teaching experimental methodology, developing hands-on skills, and imparting a sense of error. The course's six segments examine: digital electronics with students building a photogate timer; error analysis; linear accelerated…

Spencer, C. D.; Seligmann, P. F.

1992-01-01

153

Complex regional pain syndrome  

PubMed Central

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

Sebastin, Sandeep J

2011-01-01

154

Complexity International  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complexity International (CI) is an electronic journal devoted to "the field of complex systems, the generation of complex behaviour from the interaction of multiple parallel processes." The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including genetic algorithms, neural networks, and chaos theory. Because much of the focus is based on technological imitation of biological processes, some of the papers are closely tied to the life sciences. Volumes are added to on a continual basis as papers are accepted. Due to the lengthy acceptance process, it is especially useful that the CI Web site offers drafts of current submissions.

155

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report  

SciTech Connect

The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

2009-03-01

156

Complex Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Written by Tony R. Kuphaldt and Jason Starck, this chapter of All About Circuit's second volume on Alternating Current describes complex numbers: "In order to successfully analyze AC circuits, we need to work with mathematical objects and techniques capable of representing these multi-dimensional quantities. Here is where we need to abandon scalar numbers for something better suited: complex numbers." In addition to the introduction and credits to contributors, the chapter has seven sections: Vectors and AC waveforms, Simple vector addition, Complex vector addition, Polar and rectangular notation, Complex number arithmetic, More on AC "polarity," and Some examples with AC circuits. Each section has clear illustrations and a concise, bulleted review of what was covered at the end.

Kuphaldt, Tony R.

2008-07-15

157

ECSI 322 Oceanography Laboratory -Manual 1 ESCI 322 -Oceanography Laboratory  

E-print Network

ECSI 322 ­ Oceanography Laboratory - Manual 1 ESCI 322 - Oceanography Laboratory Laboratory Manual ­ Oceanography Laboratory - Manual 2 ESCI 322 - Introduction to Oceanography Laboratory Course Syllabus-hand experience with oceanographic research methods 2. Become familiar with marine organisms and coastal processes

Shull, David H.

158

History of the Laboratory Protection Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-print Network

i i #12;#12;History of the Laboratory Protection Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1942, Emergency Preparedness Date Published: March 1992 Prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge of plutonium, known as Clinton Laboratories. -The pilot plant was renamed Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1948

159

Standard laboratory equipment.  

PubMed

This appendix lists pieces of equipment that are standard in the modern toxicology laboratory, i.e., items used extensively in this manual and thus not usually included in the individual materials lists. No attempt has been made to list all items required for each procedure in the Materials list of each protocol; rather, those lists note those items that might not be readily available in the laboratory or that require special preparation. See SUPPLIERS APPENDIX for contact information for commercial vendors of laboratory equipment. PMID:20972961

2001-05-01

160

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOEpatents

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01

161

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

162

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25

163

Tethered gravity laboratories study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following subject areas are covered: (1) thermal control issues; (2) attitude control sybsystem; (3) configuration constraints; (4) payload; (5) acceleration requirements on Variable Gravity Laboratory (VGL); and (6) VGL configuration highlights.

Lucchetti, F.

1989-01-01

164

Tethered gravity laboratories study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

Lucchetti, F.

1989-01-01

165

Genetic Testing Laboratory Directory  

MedlinePLUS

... names, disease names, phenotypes, gene symbols and names, protein names, laboratory names, directors and locations. Search term ... phenotypes by searching for disease names, traits, drugs, proteins and analytes. Find genes by searching gene symbols ...

166

Physics Laboratory in UEC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All the first-year students in the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) take "Basic Physics I", "Basic Physics II" and "Physics Laboratory" as required subjects; Basic Physics I and Basic Physics II are calculus-based physics of mechanics, wave and oscillation, thermal physics and electromagnetics. Physics Laboratory is designed mainly aiming at learning the skill of basic experimental technique and technical writing. Although 95% students have taken physics in the senior high school, they poorly understand it by connecting with experience, and it is difficult to learn Physics Laboratory in the university. For this reason, we introduced two ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems of Physics Laboratory to support students'learning and staff's teaching. By using quantitative data obtained from the ICT systems, we can easily check understanding of physics contents in students, and can improve physics education.

Takada, Tohru; Nakamura, Jin; Suzuki, Masaru

167

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - CORVALLIS  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Research Laboratory - Corvallis is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's - national research center for terrestrial and watershed ecology, aquatic ecoregions, and for the ecological effects of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric p...

168

Organic Laboratory Experiments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailed is a method in which short pieces of teflon tubing may be used for collection tubes for collecting preparative fractions from gas chromatographs. Material preparation, laboratory procedures, and results of this method are discussed. (CW)

Smith, Sherrel

1990-01-01

169

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

170

European Molecular Biology Laboratory  

E-print Network

On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

1973-01-01

171

Safety in Science Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents 12 amendments to the second edition of Safety in Science Laboratories. Covers topics such as regular inspection of equipment, wearing safety glasses, dating stock chemicals, and safe use of chemicals. (MA)

Education in Science, 1978

1978-01-01

172

75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...to more completely address nonclinical studies as they are presently conducted, the...for conducting nonclinical laboratory studies that support or are intended to...

2010-12-21

173

Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory  

E-print Network

Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Platform, The Dolomites, Italy. #12;iii Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

Texas at Austin, University of

174

CCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review  

E-print Network

CCB's Lab 300 in-class safety training. All personnel working within CCBCCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review Attend must complete the department's Laboratory Safety Training. Consult the CCB

Heller, Eric

175

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

176

Theory and laboratory astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Science opportunities in the 1990's are discussed. Topics covered include the large scale structure of the universe, galaxies, stars, star formation and the interstellar medium, high energy astrophysics, and the solar system. Laboratory astrophysics in the 1990's is briefly surveyed, covering such topics as molecular, atomic, optical, nuclear and optical physics. Funding recommendations are given for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Department of Energy. Recommendations for laboratory astrophysics research are given.

Schramm, David N.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Alcock, Charles; Allamandola, Lou; Chevalier, Roger A.; Cline, David B.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Fall, S. Michael; Ferland, Gary J.

1991-01-01

177

Safer Science: Laboratory Relocation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The movement of hazardous chemicals found in high school science laboratories and chemical storerooms can be risky business due to the increased likelihood of an accidental spill, contamination, or other type of mishap. Prudent safety planning and practice need to be addressed in order to eliminate or minimize the potential for chemical incidents. Giving thought to the guidelines outlined in this article will help initiate the process of moving chemical inventories within and between school laboratories and storerooms.

Roy, Ken

2008-10-01

178

On Complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the generic label "complexity", this chapter includes 3 related contributions of different natures. The first one (C1) is a synthetic exposition by Vincent Schächter of James P. Crutchfield's attempt [1] at a general computational representation of the notion of complexity; the second one (C2) is an account of a CeSEF-session devoted to a general discussion of this attempt; the third contribution (C3) consists of a brief note by Vincent Schächter, on the construction of complexity measures, within the framework of the method of relativized conceptualization exposed in the second part of this volume. Considered globally, the sequence indicated above should convey an illustration of the way in which, accordingly to the aim announced in the general introduction, we try to extract from modern scientific representations, methodological essences to be progressively incorporated in the researched formalized epistemology. In the following, Crutchfield is denoted by Cr.

Schächter, Vincent

179

Complex chimerism  

PubMed Central

Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

2013-01-01

180

Job Listings - Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Los Alamos National Laboratory is a premier national security research institution, delivering scientific and engineering solutions for the nation's most crucial and complex problems. Our primary responsibility is ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. In addition to supporting the Lab's core national security mission, our work advances bioscience, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, materials science, and physics disciplines.

181

Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

Wiebe, M. L.

1971-01-01

182

Laboratory production of complex organics in simulated interstellar ices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1 see www.astrochem.org for more information. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Ultraviolet Ir- radiation of Naphthalene in H2O Ice: Implications for Meteorites and Biogenesis. Meteoritics and Planetary Science36, 351-358. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., Cooper, G. &Allamandola, L. (2002) The Formation of Racemic Amino Acids byUltraviolet Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs. Nature, 416, 401U403 Dworkin, J., Deamer, D., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Self-Assembling Amphiphilic Molecules: Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar/Precometary Ices. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 815-819. Krishnamurthy, R., Epstein, S., Cronin, J., Pizzarello, S. &Yuen, G. (1992) Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 56, 4045-4058. Sandford, S. A., Bernstein, M. P., &Dworkin, J. P. (2001). Assessment of the interstellar processes leading to deuterium enrichment in meteoritic organics. Meteoritics and Planetary Sci- ence36, 1117-1133.

Dworkin, J.; Bernstein, M.; Ashbourn, S.; Iraci, L.; Cooper, G.; Sandford, S.; Allamandola, L.

183

Systems integration test laboratory application & experiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early in the development phase of a system—prior to committing to actual hardware/software (HW/SW)—permits early detection of system anomalies, thereby minimizing program development costs while enhancing safety. Later the laboratory can be used to train system operators (for example, pilots, ground crew) in preparation for flight/ground test. In the case of the statically unstable X-29 forward swept wing aircraft, a comprehensive real-time, hardware-in-the-loop test facility was critical in the development of the aircraft's digital fly-by-wire (FBW) flight control system. The X-29 laboratory initially was used to introduce control laws to a simulated real-time environment to verify control system characteristics. Later, actual flight hardware was introduced to the laboratory, at which point the formal system verification/validation test program began. The test program utilized detailed test plans and procedures derived from system requirements and specifications to map out all tests required. This assured that the maximum number of components of the system were exercised in the laboratory, and all components tested had traceability throughout the test program. The end-to-end hardware-in-the loop simulation provided the environment to perform critical failure modes testing, parameter sensitivity evaluation and ultimately pilot/ground crew training during normal and degraded flight control system operation. The X-29 test experience, applicable to the laboratory testing of all critical control systems, has ingrained the philosophy that successful development of complex systems requires an orderly build-up of complexity within the laboratory. By this we mean that components of the simulation are introduced to the laboratory only when previous additions are well understood and formally verified by prescribed testing procedures. First, non-real-time computer models of the system are developed (for example, stability derivatives from scale model wind tunnel data). Upon reaching a level of maturity, these non-real-time codes are implemented and verified in a real-time environment. The real-time implementation is important because it lends itself to interfacing with actual flight hardware and software for final verification/validation (V/V) and training. This philosophy of laboratory management for critical control systems test is not limited to aircraft applications. Any dynamic control system could be developed and tested in a fashion similar to the X-29 control system. The gradual buildup of complexity in the laboratory commencing with non-real-time math modeling, leading to real-time, hard-ware-in-the-loop validation and ultimately operator training is a necessary procedure for obtaining safe, reliable systems. This paper discusses the experience gained from the development of the X-29 digital flight control system, use of the laboratory for development, verification and validation, and how this test philosophy is applied to any system.

Rimer, Melvyn; Falco, Michael; Solan, Michael J.

1991-01-01

184

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.E.2 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for REGULATED bags, autoclaved, and processed as RMW through Stericycle. Laboratory Animal Facilities Incinerator Use

Krovi, Venkat

185

Laboratory safety handbook  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Safety, defined as 'freedom from danger, risk, or injury,' is difficult to achieve in a laboratory environment. Inherent dangers, associated with water analysis and research laboratories where hazardous samples, materials, and equipment are used, must be minimized to protect workers, buildings, and equipment. Managers, supervisors, analysts, and laboratory support personnel each have specific responsibilities to reduce hazards by maintaining a safe work environment. General rules of conduct and safety practices that involve personal protection, laboratory practices, chemical handling, compressed gases handling, use of equipment, and overall security must be practiced by everyone at all levels. Routine and extensive inspections of all laboratories must be made regularly by qualified people. Personnel should be trained thoroughly and repetitively. Special hazards that may involve exposure to carcinogens, cryogenics, or radiation must be given special attention, and specific rules and operational procedures must be established to deal with them. Safety data, reference materials, and texts must be kept available if prudent safety is to be practiced and accidents prevented or minimized.

Skinner, E.L.; Watterson, C.A.; Chemerys, J.C.

1983-01-01

186

NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

2004-01-01

187

fimbriata complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ceratocystis fimbriata is a widely distributed, plant pathogenic fungus that causes wilts and cankers on many woody hosts. Earlier phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences revealed three geographic clades within the C. fimbriata complex that are centered respectively in North America, Latin America and Asia. This study looked for cryptic species within the North American clade. The internal transcribed spacer regions

Jason A. Johnson; Thomas C. Harrington; C. J. B. Engelbrecht

188

Cellulose synthesis: a complex complex.  

PubMed

Cellulose is the world's most abundant biopolymer and a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is comprised of hydrogen-bonded beta-1,4-linked glucan chains that are synthesized at the plasma membrane by large cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Recent advances in visualization of fluorescently labelled complexes have facilitated exploration of regulatory modes of cellulose production. For example, several herbicides, such as isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile that inhibit cellulose production appear to affect different aspects of synthesis. Dual-labelling of cytoskeletal components and CESAs has revealed dynamic feedback regulation between cellulose synthesis and microtubule orientation and organization. In addition, fluorescently tagged CESA2 subunits may substitute for another subunit, CESA6, which suggests both plasticity and specificity for one of the components of the CESA complex. PMID:18485800

Mutwil, Marek; Debolt, Seth; Persson, Staffan

2008-06-01

189

The science of laboratory and project management in regulated bioanalysis.  

PubMed

Pharmaceutical drug development is a complex and lengthy process, requiring excellent project and laboratory management skills. Bioanalysis anchors drug safety and efficacy with systemic and site of action exposures. Development of scientific talent and a willingness to innovate or adopt new technology is essential. Taking unnecessary risks, however, should be avoided. Scientists must strategically assess all risks and find means to minimize or negate them. Laboratory Managers must keep abreast of ever-changing technology. Investments in instrumentation and laboratory design are critical catalysts to efficiency and safety. Matrix management requires regular communication between Project Managers and Laboratory Managers. When properly executed, it aligns the best resources at the right times for a successful outcome. Attention to detail is a critical aspect that separates excellent laboratories. Each assay is unique and requires attention in its development, validation and execution. Methods, training and facilities are the foundation of a bioanalytical laboratory. PMID:24958120

Unger, Steve; Lloyd, Thomas; Tan, Melvin; Hou, Jingguo; Wells, Edward

2014-05-01

190

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

Zirbel, E. L.

2002-12-01

191

LSU Biological Safety Inspection for BSL -2 Laboratories 1 Laboratory  

E-print Network

in biological safety cabinets or other physical containment equipment. Eating, drinking, smoking, handlingLSU Biological Safety Inspection for BSL - 2 Laboratories 1 Laboratory 2 Section Chief a Principle. Standard Biological Safety BSL-2 Laboratories Laboratory Safety Inspection Office of Occupational Health

Stephens, Jacqueline

192

UCSD Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Teaching Laboratories LABORATORY REGULATIONS  

E-print Network

a splash hazard. Safety glasses are designed for use in normal laboratory operations but offer only minimal & textbooks, in the laboratories, in the Science & Engineering Library and in the Chemistry Teaching LabUCSD Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Teaching Laboratories LABORATORY REGULATIONS

Aluwihare, Lihini

193

Laboratory Notebook for Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

All students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook. The notebook is to be either a bound notebook or a spiral notebook. All of your work in class is to be recorded in your notebook. Your laboratory notebook is: --a place to record what you see and do (including mistakes) --a place to record what you THINK about what you see and do --a place to ask QUESTIONS and draw conclusions about the experiences and results --a place to track your feelings and attitudes about your experiences --a seedbed of ideas for experiments and creativity --a record of your accomplishments during your time in this class

BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Barbara Schulz N:Schulz; Barbara REV:2005-04-13 END:VCARD

1994-07-30

194

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Renewable Energy Lab is the U.S. Department of Energy's premier laboratory for renewable energy research and development and a leading laboratory for energy efficiency research and development. The web site provides access to a large array of information that targets many different audiences. There are educational links and classroom activities and projects suited for audiences from primary education through college-level. Other features include information about different forms of energy, databases on renewable energy production, an extensive photo gallery, and information on current research and applications in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

2002-04-01

195

Virtual Reality Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Michigan Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRL) at the College of Engineering explores innovative applications of immersive and non-immersive virtual environments in a variety of areas. For industrial applications, research is focused on virtual prototyping of engineering designs - especially in the automotive and marine industry - the simulation of manufacturing processes, and related engineering tasks. Additional activities include the use of virtual reality in accident simulations, medicine, architecture, archeology, education, and other areas. As an interdisciplinary facility, the VRL collaborates with many disciplines within the university and serves the outside community. Through a combined directorship, the Laboratory cooperates closely with the University of Michigan 3D Lab.

Fogler, H. S.

2008-10-22

196

Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

Bearce, T.D.

1992-01-01

197

Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

Bearce, T.D.

1992-05-01

198

Complex wounds.  

PubMed

Complex wound is the term used more recently to group those well-known difficult wounds, either chronic or acute, that challenge medical and nursing teams. They defy cure using conventional and simple "dressings" therapy and currently have a major socioeconomic impact. The purpose of this review is to bring these wounds to the attention of the health-care community, suggesting that they should be treated by multidisciplinary teams in specialized hospital centers. In most cases, surgical treatment is unavoidable, because the extent of skin and subcutaneous tissue loss requires reconstruction with grafts and flaps. New technologies, such as the negative pressure device, should be introduced. A brief review is provided of the major groups of complex wounds--diabetic wounds, pressure sores, chronic venous ulcers, post-infection soft-tissue gangrenes, and ulcers resulting from vasculitis. PMID:17187095

Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Tuma, Paulo; Carvalho, Viviane Fernandes; Kamamoto, Fábio

2006-12-01

199

Judd Gregg Marine Research Complex The Judd Gregg Marine Research Complex comprises the Coastal  

E-print Network

in coastal marine science, engineering, policy, or management. #12;United States Senator Judd Gregg SenatorJudd Gregg Marine Research Complex The Judd Gregg Marine Research Complex comprises the Coastal Marine Laboratory, Marine Research Pier, and Pier Support Facility located in New Castle, N.H. Together

New Hampshire, University of

200

ChemPages Laboratory Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

201

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

procedure lists all the items Handbook 150 requires be covered in a management review. The records do and Management Reviews #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory's management review

202

Complexity in scalable computing.  

SciTech Connect

The rich history of scalable computing research owes much to a rapid rise in computing platform scale in terms of size and speed. As platforms evolve, so must algorithms and the software expressions of those algorithms. Unbridled growth in scale inevitably leads to complexity. This special issue grapples with two facets of this complexity: scalable execution and scalable development. The former results from efficient programming of novel hardware with increasing numbers of processing units (e.g., cores, processors, threads or processes). The latter results from efficient development of robust, flexible software with increasing numbers of programming units (e.g., procedures, classes, components or developers). The progression in the above two parenthetical lists goes from the lowest levels of abstraction (hardware) to the highest (people). This issue's theme encompasses this entire spectrum. The lead author of each article resides in the Scalable Computing Research and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. Their co-authors hail from other parts of Sandia, other national laboratories and academia. Their research sponsors include several programs within the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and its National Nuclear Security Administration, along with Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program and the Office of Naval Research. The breadth of interests of these authors and their customers reflects in the breadth of applications this issue covers. This article demonstrates how to obtain scalable execution on the increasingly dominant high-performance computing platform: a Linux cluster with multicore chips. The authors describe how deep memory hierarchies necessitate reducing communication overhead by using threads to exploit shared register and cache memory. On a matrix-matrix multiplication problem, they achieve up to 96% parallel efficiency with a three-part strategy: intra-node multithreading, non-blocking inter-node message passing, and a dedicated communications thread to facilitate concurrent communications and computations. On a quantum chemistry problem, they spawn multiple computation threads and communication threads on each node and use one-sided communications between nodes to minimize wait times. They reduce software complexity by evolving a multi-threaded factory pattern in C++ from a working, message-passing program in C.

Rouson, Damian W. I.

2008-12-01

203

Introductory Materials Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an introductory materials science laboratory program which emphasizes crystal structure both on the atomistic and microscopic scale and the dependence of materials properties on structure. The content of this program is classified into four major areas: (1) materials science, (2) mechanical behavior of materials, (3) materials testing…

Ritter, John E., Jr.

204

National Laboratory Dorene Price  

E-print Network

: price@bnl.gov ACTIVATED ALUMINUM HYDRIDE HYDROGEN STORAGE COMPOSITIONS AND USES THEREOF BrookhavenBrookhaven National Laboratory Dorene Price Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored Research for the U.S. Department of Energy. An activated aluminum hydride (AlH3 ) composition to control

205

Telecommunications network management laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work discusses network management laboratory design and implementation at the University of Wollongong in the School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering in years of 2002 and 2003 for a final year specialisation subject called telecommunication network management for telecommunications engineering students. The design and implementation included that of a network management GUI incorporating the fundamental aspects and functionality

I. Raad; P. Vial

2004-01-01

206

LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world in applying the principles of conservation to the very useful realm of electric circuits. OBJECTIVES: After the behavior of the energy output of any element in a circuit; · use the concept of electrical potential

Minnesota, University of

207

Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

Jenkins, David; And Others

208

First International Microgravity Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often

Tracy McMahan; Charlotte Shea; Margaret Wiginton; Valerie Neal; Michele Gately; Lila Hunt; Jean Graben; Julie Tiderman; Denise Accardi

1990-01-01

209

Laboratory Safety Principles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This workshop covers major principles and regulations pertinent to working in laboratories with hazardous materials. It is divided into 45 minute segments dealing with: Radioactive Materials (Staiger); Toxic, Reactive, Carcinogenic, and Teratogenic Chemicals (Carlson); Infectious Agents (Laver); and Fire Safety Concepts and Physical Hazards (Arnston).

Jerry Staiger, Keith Carlson, Jim Laver, Ray Arntson (University of Minnesota; )

2008-04-11

210

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-print Network

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

211

Simulating Laboratory Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

Baker, J. E.; And Others

1986-01-01

212

The Laboratory Notebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides well-organized instructions for keeping a laboratory notebook. In addition to the providing an overview of general rules and organization, the site also discusses organization of conclusions around three central types of outlines for measurement experiments, synthesis experiments and reporting of physical phenomena.

2010-06-25

213

Instrumental Analysis Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

designed for automating the collection and assessment of laboratory exercises is presented. This Web-based system has been extensively used in engineering courses such as control systems, mechanics, and computer programming. Goodle GMS allows the students to submit their results to a…

Munoz de la Pena, Arsenio; Gonzalez-Gomez, David; Munoz de la Pena, David; Gomez-Estern, Fabio; Sequedo, Manuel Sanchez

2013-01-01

214

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of compounds, describing in detail the motivation for the scheme and the development process. This schemeTechnical Report Number 735 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-735 ISSN 1476-2986 Learning compound://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12;Learning compound noun semantics Diarmuid ´O S´eaghdha Summary This thesis

Haddadi, Hamed

215

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

216

Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

217

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

SciTech Connect

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

2011-01-01

218

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

2013-05-28

219

RUNNING A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY AT THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF TRUJILLO AS IT IS USED IN THE FIVE-YEAR ENGLISH TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM. THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF THIS COURSE ARE INTENSIVE, BASED ON A STUDY OF ENGLISH USING LADO-FRIES MATERIALS (FOR LATIN AMERICAN LEARNERS) WHICH REQUIRE FIVE HOURS OF CLASSWORK A WEEK SUPPLEMENTED BY…

REES, ALUN L.W.

220

Idaho National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In operation since 1949, INL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's missions in ensuring the nation's energy security with safe, competitive, and sustainable energy systems and unique national and homeland security capabilities.

221

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-print Network

Innovation for Our Energy Future Sponsorship Format Black Color:Solid Black Vertical Format-A Black Vertical Format-B Black National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable, a market conservatively estimated at $125 million per year. The UAWS is the culmination of more than 10

222

Laboratory Safety and Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains a scientific approach to accident prevention and outlines the safety aspects associated with the handling of chemicals in the secondary school. Provides a check list of unsafe acts and conditions, outlines features of good laboratory management, and gives hints for combating the effects of inflation on science budgets. (GS)

Goodenough, T. J.

1976-01-01

223

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

Polly, David

224

Laboratory Density Functionals  

E-print Network

We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

B. G. Giraud

2007-07-26

225

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Homepage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) homepage provides links to spacecraft and mission information, imagery, news articles, events, features, and public services. Users can access articles and imagery from the Mars Rover and Cassini missions, images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and an El Nino/La Nina Watch.

226

Laboratory For Telerobotic Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory telerobotic system performs such complicated tasks as picking up tools, removing thermal blanket, and replacing screws. Human operator in control room operates remote robot with aid of video monitors, torque and force displays, and force feedback. System used to perform research and to develop telerobotic-repair capabilities equal to those of human operator.

Fiorini, Paolo; Bejczy, Antal K.; Das, Hari; Zak, Haya

1993-01-01

227

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 752 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-752 ISSN 1476-2986 Security of proximity identification systems Gerhard P. Hancke July 2009 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12;Security

Haddadi, Hamed

228

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

concept of inquiry-free Bluetooth tracking that has the potential to offer indoor location informationTechnical Report Number 805 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-805 ISSN 1476-2986 A model personal energy meter Simon Hay September 2011 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44

Haddadi, Hamed

229

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

been used successfully in many areas to track the evolution of systems via their eigenvectors; its in many appli- cations where the evolution of a system can be tracked smoothly via its eigenspaceTechnical Report Number 806 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-806 ISSN 1476-2986 On joint

Haddadi, Hamed

230

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

) for facial expression and head pose tracking. I propose a number of extensions that make location of facialTechnical Report Number 861 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-861 ISSN 1476-2986 Automatic facial phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2014 Tadas Baltrusaitis This technical report

Haddadi, Hamed

231

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

a single location at a single time. However, a blocking system may be deployed at many sites and must trackTechnical Report Number 653 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-653 ISSN 1476-2986 Anonymity phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2005 Richard Clayton This technical report is based

Haddadi, Hamed

232

RAS Laboratory Groups  

Cancer.gov

The RAS Initiative is using multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. Accordingly, the resources of the FNLCR allocated to the RAS Hub have been organized into seven laboratory groups, with each group contributing the most advanced technology available to the collaborative effort.

233

Structural Vibrations Laboratory Demonstrator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objective of this project was to develop a laboratory demonstrator of structural vibrations. When the ground moves under a structure the effect on that structure is dependent upon the relationship between the frequency of the ground motion and the natural frequency of the structure. As this relationship, the frequency ratio, approaches one (1) the effect is at its

Reen E Foley

2006-01-01

234

Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

1998-01-01

235

The Indiana laboratory system: focus on environmental laboratories.  

PubMed

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

Madlem, Jyl M; Hammes, Kara R; Matheson, Shelley R; Lovchik, Judith C

2013-01-01

236

The Indiana Laboratory System: Focus on Environmental Laboratories  

PubMed Central

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

Hammes, Kara R.; Matheson, Shelley R.; Lovchik, Judith C.

2013-01-01

237

Managing complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the\\u000abehavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological\\u000asystems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most\\u000achallenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed\\u000aeconomic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale\\u000asystems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g.,\\u000aauctions, markets)

David P. Chassin; Christian POSSE; Joel MALARD

1998-01-01

238

Changing trends in laboratory testing in the United States: a personal, historical perspective.  

PubMed

This article reflects on my nearly 40 years providing clinical and laboratory genetic services. It reviews the evolution of laboratory and genetic testing from their grant-supported academic research to current complexities. Changes in the economic and academic landscape parallel technological innovations in laboratory testing. My career trajectory parallels the newer trend of genetic testing. I began in academics, working as a student and postdoctoral fellow in academic laboratories that also provided clinical testing services. Next came time in a small molecular laboratory performing diagnosis and testing services. My current position is with a national commercial laboratory company. PMID:23078665

Strom, Charles M

2012-12-01

239

Marine Biological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1888, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) was started in Woods Hole, and since then it has served as a place for world-class biologists and ecologists to gather and work together. Their ambitions are very broad and admirable, and visitors should start by reading through the introduction in the "About MBL" section before looking around further. Most visitors will then want to go to the "Education" area. Here they will find such resources as a marine organism database, a number of full-text classic works on marine organisms, and several image databases. Moving on, visitors might also want to look at the "Research" area, which contains materials on their laboratories, research opportunities at the MBL, and an overview of their current research projects.

240

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2014-11-06

241

Aerospace Robotics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL), operated at Stanford University, focuses its research "on improving robotic performance through the application of feedback control, integrated sensing systems, and task-level autonomy." The systems designed at ARL allow the human operator to have varying levels of control over the robot. Specifically, the robot performs given tasks until it reaches a point that it can not perform on its own. The human can then intervene and direct the robot manually. A comprehensive list of all ARL publications is available on the Web site, ranging from the 1960's to 2002 (many of the publications after 1990 are available for download). There are even movies of laboratory experiments and demonstrations that can be downloaded and viewed. The Projects section explains the various research projects currently underway.

2000-01-01

242

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site depicts the work of the University of Oxford's Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory in the experimental and theoretical aspects of catalytic systems, bioinorganic, co-ordination, organometallic, structural, surface, and solid state chemistry. The site provides a brief summary of the early professors of the department including Oddling who formulated the periodic table, and two noble prize winners, Soddy and Hinshelwood. Students and educators can discover the exciting research endeavors taken on by the twenty academic staff and over one hundred postdoctoral workers, graduate students, Part II chemists, and other academic visitors. The site also describes the instrumentation used at the laboratory including NMR, CMX, and CI/FI spectrometers and various diffractometers.

243

Keeping a Laboratory Notebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The HURI SURI project is developing a regional biotechnology workforce pipeline by expanding and supporting biotechnology research experiences for Jamestown Community College (JCC) undergraduates and disseminating these research experiences and materials to area high school teachers and students. This Microsoft Word document details how to keep a laboratory notebook in a high school or undergraduate science class. This is important because "a laboratory notebook is really required by law for investigators that either work in an industry (e.g. pharmaceutical industry) that is federally regulated or for investigators who have federal grant funding for research (e.g. from the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation)." The document explains how the notebook needs a table of contents, experiment details, and conclusion.

244

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

ScienceCinema

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2015-01-09

245

Quaternary GIS Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

246

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

247

MIT: Space Nanotechnology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Nanotechnology Laboratory (SNL) at MIT conducts research on nanofabrication, nanometer-accuracy x-ray optics fabrication, assembly and metrology, ultra-high resolution lithography, nanometrology, and nano-accuracy diffraction grating fabrication. SNL's pride and joy is the world's most advanced grating patterning tool, the Nanoruler -- a ruler with "ticks" only a few hundred billionths of a meter apart. Applications for the Nanoruler (patent pending) might include the manufacture of computer chips and space physics. More information, including images and a White Paper describing the Nanoruler, are available from this website. The website also provides a history of the Laboratory, a description of other projects, and an extensive list of papers, many of which are short and available online.

248

Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia  

PubMed Central

The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

Wallerstein, Ralph O.

1987-01-01

249

Laboratory monitoring of haemostasis.  

PubMed

Peri-operative coagulation monitoring should begin with the assessment of individual bleeding risk using a standardised bleeding history before the surgical procedure. Laboratory testing should be performed if this history is abnormal or peri-operative bleeding is anticipated. This process sensitively identifies those at risk of peri-operative bleeding and therefore minimises their peri-operative risk, without costly and time-consuming population testing. There are multiple potential causes of haemostatic derangement within the peri-operative period, and an understanding of both normal haemostasis and the coagulation tests available to detect coagulopathy is required to optimise patient management. In bleeding patients, routine coagulation tests should be requested, but one should be aware of the major limitations that exist. Delay whilst waiting for these laboratory results, which, in turn, aggravates coagulopathy, bleeding, blood product requirements, length of surgery and overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:25440398

Fowler, A; Perry, D J

2015-01-01

250

Surgical Planning Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

251

Assessing Undergraduate Laboratory Performance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lab notebook is one element for assessing student laboratory performance. However, it is also important to be able to communicate research results in a journal article format and a visual poster format. Another key aspect to scientific research is the ability to present a research plan. This article describes four assessment tools that can be used in conjunction with undergraduate lab courses that provide the opportunity for the students to practice each of these essential communication skills.

Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Associate Editor of Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Editor of Science's STKE REV)

2006-09-05

252

Electronic commerce software laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

With NSF support we developed a hands-on laboratory to augment our CS453 Electronic Commerce Technologies course. We conducted weekly lab sessions that covered HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Perl, CGI, SQL, ASP, and Flash programming. Each topic was covered over a period of one to three weeks and each topic was supported by 10 to 26 individual programming exercises. Four teaching assistants

Alfred C. Weaver

2004-01-01

253

Image Communications Laboratory (ICL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The UCLA Image Communications Laboratory focuses their research on the image coding and transmission of communications and archiving systems. While the emphasis is on applied research, they are also studying a number of issues of theoretical importance. Areas of research include wireless communications, medical imaging, FPGA implementations, channel/source coding, data compression, image enhancement, and networking. There is also a research paper library where papers can be downloaded.

2005-10-31

254

Sedimentary System Laboratory Photomicrographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains numerous images of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including images photographed at the Laboratory of Sedimentary System at the Seoul National University and photographs from textbooks. Original photographs include photomicrographs of both clastic and carbonate rocks along with back-scattered electron images and photographs of sedimentary rocks and structures in outcrops. Photographs from texts include terrigenous clastic rocks, carbonate rocks and sedimentary structures.

Ii, Yong L.

255

Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) at the University of Maryland is investigating human and robotic performance in space. Among the many projects being conducted at the SSL are a telerobotic spacecraft servicer called Ranger--to be launched into Earth orbit via an expendable rocket in 1997, and a Space Shuttle flight experiment which will investigate human fatigue during extravehicular activities (spacewalks). The SSL Home Page presents the projects, personnel, and facilities of the lab.

256

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System". This web-based system enables investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of this process, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work. Click on the link from this page or any of the pages within this site to be directed to the request system.

257

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01

258

Laboratory studies of interleaving  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a review of laboratory experiments on double-diffusive interleaving. Several configurations are discussed and compared, including thermohaline fronts, heated sidewalls, melting ice-blocks, point heat sources, and double-diffusive plumes, using both the heat-salt and sugar-salt systems to generate property anomalies. Two parallels emerge. The vertical scale of intrusions in most configurations is proportional to the ‘natural’ scale given by the

B. Ruddick

2003-01-01

259

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Established in 1890, the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is one of the best-known and most respected private research institutions in the United States. Over the past century, the Laboratory has supported the careers of seven Nobel Prize recipients and it is particularly well-regarded for its work in the field of genetics research. Today, there are over 400 scientists who work at the facility in Long Island, and their work ranges across the areas of cancer, neuroscience, genomics, and bioinformatics. Their website is a cornucopia of information on their activities, and first-time visitors should start by reading over the "CSHL Headlines" scrolling updates on the homepage. After that, they can look at the "Research" section. Here they will find overviews of their primary research groups and links to some of their specialized facilities, like the Dolan DNA Learning Center. Most visitors will want to visit the "Library and Archives" section. Here they can learn about CSHL authors' publications and look through the digital collections. The digital collections include tributes to Barbara McClintock, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1983, and who worked at the Laboratory for four decades.

260

Laboratory microfusion capability study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility; and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options: the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase 2 study are described in the present report.

1993-05-01

261

Laboratory microfusion capability study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report.

Not Available

1993-05-01

262

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER base that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, pathology, and obstetrical services that are provided services. This arrangement permits the possibility of participation in other components of genetic services

Thompson, Michael

263

Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Advanced technologies and biology have extremely different physical implementations, but they are far more alike in systems-level organization than is widely appreciated. Convergent evolution in both domains produces modular architectures that are composed of elaborate hierarchies of protocols and layers of feedback regulation, are driven by demand for robustness to uncertain environments, and use often imprecise components. This complexity may be largely hidden in idealized laboratory settings and in normal operation, becoming conspicuous only when contributing to rare cascading failures. These puzzling and paradoxical features are neither accidental nor artificial, but derive from a deep and necessary interplay between complexity and robustness, modularity, feedback, and fragility. This review describes insights from engineering theory and practice that can shed some light on biological complexity.

Marie Csete (University of Michigan Medical School; Departments of Anesthesiology and Cell and Developmental Biology); John Doyle (California Institute of Technology;)

2002-03-01

264

Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service. This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

National Research Council (National Research Council Committee on Scientific and Humane Issues in the Use of Random Source Dogs and Cats for Research; Na)

2000-01-01

265

Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2007-01-01

266

[Laboratory diagnostics of urogenital clamidiosis].  

PubMed

Laboratory diagnostic tools of urogenital clamidiosis--PCR, ELISA (IgG and IgM) and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)--were comparatively analyzed. The positive PCR result was checked by another PCR test with a different primer; 5 false positive responses were registered (specificity 99.6%). As against PCR, the sensitivity of ELISA made 53%, its specificity -75.5%, the diagnostic value of positive result -58%, the diagnostic value of negative result -71.6% and the diagnostics accuracy -66.7%. The respective DIF parameters were as follows: 36%, 90%, 81.5%, 54.2% and 60.9%. A high rate of detection (above 90%) of the conditionally pathogenic microflora associated with Chlamydia trachomatis (above 110 microbe cells/ml) was pointed out. Hardnerelli and ureaplasms were more often found in female smears, staphylococci and enterococci--in male sperm. It is underlined as important to hold complex examinations for Chlamidia (PCR, ELISA and DIC as an additional test) combined with bacteriological quantification of the conditionally pathogenic microflora and determination of its resistance to antibiotics. PMID:15804100

Churakov, A A; Kulichenko, A N; Kzakova, E S; Serebrianik, N E; Suvorov, A P; Kutyrev, V V; Glybochko, P V

2005-02-01

267

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-print Network

) thermogravimetric and calorimetric analysis microscopy (visible light, SEM, TEM, AFM) gas and thermal ionization mass spectrometry surface science (Auger spectroscopy, EELS, XPS, SIMS). These capabilities and instrumentation to identify and quantify chemical species and radioactive isotopes in simple and complex media

268

Environmental enrichment for primates in laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental enrichment is a critical component of Refinement, one of the 3Rs underlying humane experimentation on animals. In this paper I discuss why primates housed in laboratories, which often have constraints of space and study protocols, are a special case for enrichment. I outline a framework for categorising the different types of enrichment, using the marmoset as a case study, and summarise the methods used to determine what animals want/prefer. I briefly review the arguments that enrichment does not negatively affect experimental outcomes. Finally I focus on complexity and novelty, choice and control, the underlying features of enrichment that makes it successful, and how combined with a thorough understanding of natural history we can put effective enrichment into practice in laboratories. Throughout the paper I emphasise the need to evaluate enrichment to ensure it is having the desired effect.

Buchanan-Smith, H. M.

2010-06-01

269

Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers  

SciTech Connect

The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

1994-12-01

270

Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands  

E-print Network

on the maximum dry unit weight during compaction. Three different laboratory compaction methods were used: 1) Standard Proctor', 2) Modified Proctor; and 3) Vibrating hammer. The effects of the grain size distribution, particle shape and laboratory compaction...

Delphia, John Girard

2012-06-07

271

Spreadsheets in the Physics Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of computer spreadsheet programs in the physics laboratory is discussed. An example of this application with a conservation of energy laboratory is presented including the cases of a rolling sphere and a sliding sphere. (CW)

Krieger, Michael E.; Stith, James H.

1990-01-01

272

DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)  

Cancer.gov

As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

273

EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

274

New laboratory tools in the assessment of bone quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone quality is a complex set of intricated and interdependent factors that influence bone strength. A number of methods have\\u000a emerged to measure bone quality, taking into account the organic or the mineral phase of the bone matrix, in the laboratory.\\u000a Bone quality is a complex set of different factors that are interdependent. The bone matrix organization can be described

D. Chappard; M. F. Baslé; E. Legrand; M. Audran

2011-01-01

275

Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study the interplanetary medium, asteroids, comets, and planets. Suborbital sounding rockets and groundbased observing platforms form an integral part of these research activities. This report covers the period from approximately October 1999 through September 2000.

Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

276

The Virtual Chemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This networked laboratory simulation provides an environment in which students can select from hundreds of standard chemical reagants and combine them in any way they see fit. Instructors may use this environment in a variety of settings including student homework, group projects, computer lab activities and pre- and post-lab exercises to support varied approaches to chemical education. Activities are stored in our online homework repository which currently includes: acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, molarity, redox chemistry, solubility, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and quantitative analysis.

David Yaron

1999-01-01

277

Laboratory prototype flash evaporator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

Gaddis, J. L.

1972-01-01

278

[Accreditation of forensic laboratories].  

PubMed

According to the framework decision of the European Union Council, genetic laboratories which perform tests for the benefit of the law enforcement agencies and the administration of justice are required to obtain a certificate of accreditation testifying to compliance with the PN EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard. The certificate is the official confirmation of the competence to perform research, an acknowledgement of credibility, impartiality and professional independence. It is also the proof of establishment, implementation and maintenance of an appropriate management system. The article presents the legal basis for accreditation, the procedure of obtaining the certificate of accreditation and selected elements of the management system. PMID:21863740

So?tyszewski, Ireneusz

2010-01-01

279

Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory (PFEL) examines the role of environmental variability on marine ecosystems and commercially important fish stocks. Research areas include comparative fisheries oceanography, physical oceanography, and climate and marine fisheries. This extensive site features both model-derived environmental index products as well as time series data, including sea surface temperature, salinity, isotherm depth, surface winds and pressure maps, and upwelling indices. A live access server also allows users to download and visualize data using a simple graphical user interface. PFEL is also the west coast regional site for the NOAA CoastWatch program, which provides dissemination of oceanographic satellite observation data.

NOAA

280

MIT Space Systems Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1995 to engage in "cutting edge research projects with the goal of directly contributing to the present and future exploration and development of space." Users can find materials on current and past flight projects such as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) and the Interferometry Program Experiment (IPEX). The website also features SSL's ground programs and research facilities. Researchers can view lists of published papers and can download student theses.

281

Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

1972-01-01

282

The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

283

Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

Jackson, Dionne

2005-01-01

284

Mercenaria Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Invertebrate Anatomy Online exercise, featuring the hard-shell clam Mercenaria mercenaria (quahog), is part of an Internet laboratory manual for courses in Invertebrate Zoology. This exercise features an introduction to Mollusca and a step-by-step dissection guide, including hand-drawn figures, defined terms, and detailed explanations of form and function. Students will learn about the external anatomy (shell), muscles, mantle skirts, mantle cavity, mantle folds, siphons, gills, labial palps, hemal system, exhalant chamber, excretory system, digestive system, nervous system, and reproductive system.

Richard Fox

285

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

Not Available

1990-01-01

286

A Useful Laboratory Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently, a high school Science Club generated a large number of questions involving temperature. Therefore, they decided to construct a thermal gradient apparatus in order to conduct a wide range of experiments beyond the standard "cookbook" labs. They felt that this apparatus could be especially useful in future ninth-grade biology classes, in which students must design and conduct individual, inquiry-based experiments as part of their training in scientific methodology. This article describes their experience building and testing a thermal gradient for laboratory use.

Samuel A. Johnson

2008-10-01

287

Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

288

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-print Network

#12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1985 December 1985 Eugene J and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 .........................Contracts and Grants 48 Front Cover: Water levels on the Great Lakes have been in a high regimefor the past

289

John Lygeros Automatic Control Laboratory  

E-print Network

International, Menlo Park, California Research Engineer (part time), Applied Physical Sciences Laboratory May Research Laboratories June 1988 - July 1988: Hellenic Aspropyrgos Refinery, Greece Intern Honors and AwardsJohn Lygeros ETH Zurich Automatic Control Laboratory ETL I 22, Physikstrasse 3 CH-8092 Zurich

Lygeros, John

290

Interdisciplinary Interactions in Underground Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of underground facilities, ranging from simple cavities to fully equipped laboratories, have been established worldwide (1) to evaluate the impacts of emplacing nuclear wastes in underground research laboratories (URLs) and (2) to measure rare physics events in deep underground laboratories (DULs). In this presentation, we compare similarities and differences between URLs and DULs in focus of site characterization, in

J. S. Wang; A. Bettini

2010-01-01

291

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Introduction 1  

E-print Network

JPL Annual Report 1989 Jet Propulsion Laboratory #12;#12;CONTENTS Introduction 1 Director's Message for the period January 1 through December 31, 1989. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California #12;INTRODUCTION TheJet Propulsion Laboratory QPL) of the California Institute

Waliser, Duane E.

292

JET PROPULSION LABORATORY COVER: FROM  

E-print Network

4-00 -4-11 5/q'd.... JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 1991 Annual Report #12;COVER: FROM ~IODEST BEGIN Aeronautlcs and Space Adnurustratlon for the peaod January 1 through December 31, 1991. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Cahforrua Instltute ofTechnology Pasadena,~orrua .-. III #12;IINTRODUCTION Propulsion Laboratory

Waliser, Duane E.

293

Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual  

E-print Network

_______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location of Safety Equipment Nearest to Your Laboratory Safety Shower _______________________ Eye Wash Fountain the science of chemistry. A unique aspect of this laboratory program is that a concerted effort has been made

Guo, Ting

294

Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual  

E-print Network

_______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location of Safety Equipment Nearest to Your Laboratory Safety Shower _______________________ Eye Wash Fountain the science of chemistry. A unique aspect of this laboratory program is that a concerted effort has been made

Guo, Ting

295

Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual  

E-print Network

_______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location of Safety Equipment Nearest to Your Laboratory Safety Shower _______________________ Eye Wash Fountain the science of chemistry. A unique aspect of this laboratory program is that a concerted effort has been made

Guo, Ting

296

Molecular complexes in close and far away  

PubMed Central

In this review, gas-phase chemistry of interstellar media and some planetary atmospheres is extended to include molecular complexes. Although the composition, density, and temperature of the environments discussed are very different, molecular complexes have recently been considered as potential contributors to chemistry. The complexes reviewed include strongly bound aggregates of molecules with ions, intermediate-strength hydrogen bonded complexes (primarily hydrates), and weakly bonded van der Waals molecules. In low-density, low-temperature environments characteristic of giant molecular clouds, molecular synthesis, known to involve gas-phase ion-molecule reactions and chemistry at the surface of dust and ice grains is extended here to involve molecular ionic clusters. At the high density and high temperatures found on planetary atmospheres, molecular complexes contribute to both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Using the observational, laboratory, and theoretical database, the role of molecular complexes in close and far away is discussed. PMID:16740667

Klemperer, William; Vaida, Veronica

2006-01-01

297

What's Happening in the Software Engineering Laboratory?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1976 the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has been dedicated to understanding and improving the way in which one NASA organization the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at Goddard Space Flight Center, develops, maintains, and manages complex flight dynamics systems. This paper presents an overview of recent activities and studies in SEL, using as a framework the SEL's organizational goals and experience based software improvement approach. It focuses on two SEL experience areas : (1) the evolution of the measurement program and (2) an analysis of three generations of Cleanroom experiments.

Pajerski, Rose; Green, Scott; Smith, Donald

1995-01-01

298

GELCASTING: From laboratory development toward industrial production  

SciTech Connect

Gelcasting, a ceramic forming process, was developed to overcome some of the limitations of other complex-shape forming techniques such as injection molding and slip casting. In gelcasting, a concentrated slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers is poured into a mold and then polymerized in-situ to form a green body in the shape of the mold cavity. Thus, it is a combination of polymer chemistry with slip processing and represents minimal departure from standard ceramic processing. The simplicity of the process has attracted industrial partners and by collaboration between them and the developers, the process is being advanced from the laboratory toward industrial production.

Omatete, O.O.; Janney, M.A.; Nunn, S.D.

1995-07-01

299

Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ELVIS (Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science) is an interactive visualization environment that enables scientists, students, and educators to visualize and analyze large, complex, and diverse sets of scientific data. It accomplishes this by presenting the data sets as 2-D, 3-D, color, stereo, and graphic images with movable and multiple light sources combined with displays of solid-surface, contours, wire-frame, and transparency. By simultaneously rendering diverse data sets acquired from multiple sources, formats, and resolutions and by interacting with the data through an intuitive, direct-manipulation interface, ELVIS provides an interactive and responsive environment for exploratory data analysis.

Hansen, Elaine R.; Rodier, Daniel R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.

1994-01-01

300

Laboratory Diagnostics of Botulism  

PubMed Central

Botulism is a potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin. Human pathogenic neurotoxins of types A, B, E, and F are produced by a diverse group of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, including Clostridium botulinum groups I and II, Clostridium butyricum, and Clostridium baratii. The routine laboratory diagnostics of botulism is based on the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in the patient. Detection of toxin-producing clostridia in the patient and/or the vehicle confirms the diagnosis. The neurotoxin detection is based on the mouse lethality assay. Sensitive and rapid in vitro assays have been developed, but they have not yet been appropriately validated on clinical and food matrices. Culture methods for C. botulinum are poorly developed, and efficient isolation and identification tools are lacking. Molecular techniques targeted to the neurotoxin genes are ideal for the detection and identification of C. botulinum, but they do not detect biologically active neurotoxin and should not be used alone. Apart from rapid diagnosis, the laboratory diagnostics of botulism should aim at increasing our understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of the disease. Therefore, the toxin-producing organisms should be routinely isolated from the patient and the vehicle. The physiological group and genetic traits of the isolates should be determined. PMID:16614251

Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

2006-01-01

301

Tethered gravity laboratories study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

Lucchetti, F.

1990-01-01

302

19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING (TYPICALLY COMPLEX) WASTE HOLDING CELL PIPING. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-3212. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

303

Determination of the Workspace of a Complex Manipulation System  

E-print Network

3 Determination of the Workspace of a Complex Manipulation System Tanio Tanev Central Laboratory chains and they arebased on serial connections of links. These manipulators have large workspace and good manipulators. Parallel manipulators have some advantages such as higher stiffnessandgreaterpayload

Borissova, Daniela

304

Cobalt(II) Ammine Complexes as Reversible Absorbers of Oxygen.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiments designed to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere and related areas in the high school laboratories. Considers the application of these activities to other programs. Includes a description of the binuclear complex and recommended procedures. (CW)

Saito, Kazuo; Ogino, Kazuko

1988-01-01

305

Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system  

SciTech Connect

The problem of groundwater contamination at a large number of industrial facilities is well known. Many US Army and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities share this problem of potentially contaminated water as a result of past disposal practices associated with military and energy source development activities. A wide range of contaminants are found at certain installations encompassing industrial pollutants and military-unique materials. The US Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory has been conducting research for a number of years on developing better means to determine the hazards associated with exposure to these types of complex mixtures. The methods involve the use of aquatic organisms together with in vitro mutagenicity assays and analytical chemistry in an integrated biological assessment of a specific site. Integrated Biological Assessment is an important development in the Army`s continuing efforts to locate, clean and monitor sites contaminated as a result of military operations. This method provides meaningful hazard data regarding whether a test medium contains low levels of industrial or military-unique contaminants. This is an important advance in determining which sites are clean and which require remediation. It provides continuing monitoring of the effectiveness of remediation operations. Engineering Computer Opteconomics (ECO), Inc. was tasked, in a collaborative Army and DOE effort, to develop a transportable Integrated Biological Assessment Laboratory Complex. This multimodular Complex is designed to be taken into remote areas to provide the necessary long-term on-site research for determining hazards from low levels of contamination in the environment. Each module of the Complex is designed to be self-sufficient, to provide a safe environment for the operators, and a controlled environment for the test organisms and related critical chemical and biological analyses.

NONE

1994-12-01

306

[Safety in the Microbiology laboratory.  

PubMed

The normal activity in the laboratory of microbiology poses different risks - mainly biological - that can affect the health of their workers, visitors and the community. Routine health examinations (surveillance and prevention), individual awareness of self-protection, hazard identification and risk assessment of laboratory procedures, the adoption of appropriate containment measures, and the use of conscientious microbiological techniques allow laboratory to be a safe place, as records of laboratory-acquired infections and accidents show. Training and information are the cornerstones for designing a comprehensive safety plan for the laboratory. In this article, the basic concepts and the theoretical background on laboratory safety are reviewed, including the main legal regulations. Moreover, practical guidelines are presented for each laboratory to design its own safety plan according its own particular characteristics. PMID:25444041

Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Alados, Juan Carlos; Gómez G de la Pedrosa, Elia; Leiva, José; Pérez, José L

2014-11-01

307

Seeding the Physical and Analytical Laboratory Curriculum with Interdisciplinary Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past five years, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland at College Park has worked to modernize all facets of the undergraduate laboratory experience. Students in the first-year biochemistry laboratory now utilize modern techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology to isolate and characterize the bacterial enzyme alkaline phosphatase. Organic chemistry laboratories are now conducted exclusively with microware. New laboratory-intensive introductory chemistry courses have been developed for out chemistry majors. This Highlight describes innovations in three upper-division laboratories, Physical Chemistry Laboratories I and II and Instrumental Methods of Analysis. Beyond serving as an experimental practicum, an important goal of these laboratories is that students begin to gain an appreciation for the power of chemical measurements to probe the properties of more complex chemical systems. Since physical and analytical methods are increasingly applied to biochemical systems in research, in industrial processes, and in health and environmental regulation, it is appropriate to introduce experiments involving biochemical, environmental, and materials systems to these upper-division laboratories.

Reutt-Robey, Janice; Blough, Neil; Rebbert, Richard

1999-02-01

308

Management of TRU waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1970, defense transuranic (TRU) waste has been placed into 20-year retrievable storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is to remove all retrievably stored TRU waste from the INEL. The INEL is currently developing, designing and constructing

Gertz

1984-01-01

309

Laboratory testing of the voids of a fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory studies of rock fractures are aimed at understanding their mechanical and hydrological behavior. Because the fracture surfaces are not ideal planes, they enclose a void space of complex shape, and are only partially in contact. The geometry of the voids and contacts controls both the mechanical and the hydrological behavior. The mechanical response is strongly dependent on the contact

S. Gentier; D. Billaux; L. van Vliet

1989-01-01

310

Computer integrated laboratory testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective is the integration of computers into the Engineering Materials Science Laboratory course, where existing test equipment is not computerized. The first lab procedure is to demonstrate and produce a material phase change curve. The second procedure is a demonstration of the modulus of elasticity and related stress-strain curve, plastic performance, maximum and failure strength. The process of recording data by sensors that are connected to a data logger which adds a time base, and the data logger in turn connected to a computer, places the materials labs into a computer integrated mode with minimum expense and maximum flexibility. The sensor signals are input into a spread sheet for tabular records, curve generation, and graph printing.

Dahl, Charles C.

1992-01-01

311

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

Okon, Avi B.

2010-01-01

312

Scalable Computing Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Scalable Computing Laboratory was created by the Department of Energy, Ames Lab, and Iowa State University to "improve parallel computing through clustering techniques for use in scientific and engineering computation." One of their past projects included rebuilding the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), the first electronic digital computer. Here visitors can read about building a working replica of the historical computer as well as the background of the original machine and its inventors. Visitors interested in seeing the ABC in action should click on the link "Video" on the left hand side of the homepage. There are two videos here: the first is a seven-minute demonstration of the operation of the ABC and the second an eleven-minute tutorial about the ABC. The "Photos/Diagrams" link contains over two dozen photographs of the large amount of work that went into the making of the working replica of this machine, which was originally built between 1937 and 1942.

2003-01-22

313

MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

314

Digital Teaching Resources Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Alberta, the Digital Teaching Resources Laboratory (DiTRL) is a computer lab for students and faculty designed to help undergraduates learn about biology. DiTRL's site contains instructional multimedia resources that will be useful to a wide range of people, as well as a database of lesson plans and such. Visitors can click on the Instructional Multimedia area to look through multimedia clips on a range of topics, including botany, ecology, and entomology. The Cell Biology section is quite well-developed, and includes interactive activities like "Animal cell mix and match" and "Nerve Action Potential." The Database link leads to an online collection that includes animations, video clips, and text excerpts. Currently, the entire database contains over 8,900 items, and visitors can browse around at their leisure or perform a full-text search. Finally, the site is rounded out by the option for visitors to provide their own feedback.

2012-07-20

315

Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL) consists of (1) highly interactive, web-deliverable psychology experiments and demonstrations, (2) a cumulative data archive from which students can retrieve datasets for analysis, and (3) user-controlled data extraction and analysis tools designed for the diverse needs of end users. One of the goals of the collection is to offer support for student research and educators who are not adept in experimental design and data analysis. Psychology students will be able to collect data, analyze data, and report their findings for class assignments or individual projects. Because psychology is allied to many disciplines--biology, sociology, and political science among them--OPL will contribute to the set of experiments available to students who wish to study psychologically-based issues in related scientific disciplines.

2006-03-08

316

Materials in Nanotechnology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. The six labs available here focus on materials in Nanotechnology. The labs are titled Block Copolymers, Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles, Solar Cells, Ni Nanowires, Silicon Nanowires, and Statistical Process Control. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials

317

Hazards assessment for the INEL Landfill Complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the hazards assessment for the INEL Landfill Complex (LC) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order

J. K. Knudsen; M. B. Calley

1994-01-01

318

Laboratory Investigation of Space and Planetary Dust Grains  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dust in space is ubiquitous and impacts diverse observed phenomena in various ways. Understanding the dominant mechanisms that control dust grain properties and its impact on surrounding environments is basic to improving our understanding observed processes at work in space. There is a substantial body of work on the theory and modeling of dust in space and dusty plasmas. To substantiate and validate theory and models, laboratory investigations and space borne observations have been conducted. Laboratory investigations are largely confined to an assembly of dust grains immersed in a plasma environment. Frequently the behaviors of these complex dusty plasmas in the laboratory have raised more questions than verified theories. Space borne observations have helped us characterize planetary environments. The complex behavior of dust grains in space indicates the need to understand the microphysics of individual grains immersed in a plasma or space environment.

Spann, James

2005-01-01

319

Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-08-01

320

Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc. Vinyl Chloride  

E-print Network

Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc. Vinyl Chloride AMENDED PATHOLOGY Triangle Park, NC 27709 Submitted by: Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc. Street Address: Mailing, 2011 #12; Experimental Pathology Laboratories

Baker, Chris I.

321

Maternally determined adaptation to acidity in Rana arvalis : Are laboratory and field estimates of embryonic stress tolerance congruent?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geographic variation indicating local adaptation, as well as its quantitative genetic basis, is commonly investi- gated in common garden experiments in the laboratory. However, the applicability of laboratory results to the complex conditions experienced by populations in the wild may be limited. Our previous laboratory experiments showed maternally determined local adaptation in embryonic acid-stress tolerance (viz. survival) of the moor

M. Persson; K. Räsänen; A. Laurila; J. Merilä

2007-01-01

322

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology and Laboratory Science: The Basics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology provides students with the basic laboratory skills and knowledge to pursue a career in biotechnology. The manual, written by four biotechnology instructors with over 20 years of teaching experience, incorporates instruction, exercises, and laboratory activities that the authors have been using and perfecting for years. These exercises and activities serve to engage students and help them understand the fundamentals of working in a biotechnology laboratory. Building students' skills through an organized and systematic presentation of materials, procedures, and tasks, the manual will help students explore overarching themes that relate to all biotechnology workplaces. The fundamentals in this manual are critical to the success of research scientists, scientists who develop ideas into practical products, laboratory analysts who analyze samples in forensic, clinical, quality control, environmental, and other testing laboratories.

Brandner, Diana; Kraus, Mary E.; Mowery, Jeanette; Seidman, Lisa A.

2012-03-19

323

Laboratory diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies.  

PubMed

Primary immune deficiency disorders represent a highly heterogeneous group of disorders with an increased propensity to infections and other immune complications. A careful history to delineate the pattern of infectious organisms and other complications is important to guide the workup of these patients, but a focused laboratory evaluation is essential to the diagnosis of an underlying primary immunodeficiency. Initial workup of suspected immune deficiencies should include complete blood counts and serologic tests of immunoglobulin levels, vaccine titers, and complement levels, but these tests are often insufficient to make a diagnosis. Recent advancements in the understanding of the immune system have led to the development of novel immunologic assays to aid in the diagnosis of these disorders. Classically utilized to enumerate lymphocyte subsets, flow cytometric-based assays are increasingly utilized to test immune cell function (e.g., neutrophil oxidative burst, NK cytotoxicity), intracellular cytokine production (e.g., TH17 production), cellular signaling pathways (e.g., phosphor-STAT analysis), and protein expression (e.g., BTK, Foxp3). Genetic testing has similarly expanded greatly as more primary immune deficiencies are defined, and the use of mass sequencing technologies is leading to the identification of novel disorders. In order to utilize these complex assays in clinical care, one must have a firm understanding of the immunologic assay, how the results are interpreted, pitfalls in the assays, and how the test affects treatment decisions. This article will provide a systematic approach of the evaluation of a suspected primary immunodeficiency, as well as provide a comprehensive list of testing options and their results in the context of various disease processes. PMID:24569953

Locke, Bradley A; Dasu, Trivikram; Verbsky, James W

2014-04-01

324

Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

NONE

1997-09-01

325

Titan's ion chemistry: a laboratory perspective.  

PubMed

Some of the most interesting objects in the solar system are those bodies that have significant atmospheres. The discovery that Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has a substantial nitrogen-based atmosphere makes it a prime extraterrestrial object of interest. The advent of the Cassini orbiter spacecraft program that is able to observe and sample Titan's ionosphere adds greatly to this interest. We report here a summary of some of the efforts that have been made in the laboratory to understand the processes responsible for chemical processing of the primary ions formed in Titan's ionosphere, into the ions observed by in situ sampling. The presence of significant hydrocarbons and the colder temperatures of Titan's ionosphere lead to a much greater complexity in the ion chemistry of Titan than is apparent in the ion chemistry of Earth. A review of all the ion-molecule chemistry investigated in laboratory studies relevant to Titan is included as a table. The complexity of some of the hydrocarbon ion structures formed in just three reactive ion-molecule sequences from the primary ions has required a new experimental methodology which is discussed. PMID:17216629

McEwan, Murray J; Anicich, Vincent G

2007-01-01

326

Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

1993-09-01

327

Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

1982-10-01

328

A SURVEY OF LABORATORY AND STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO FARMWORKER EXPOSURE STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Developing internally valid, and perhaps generalizable, farmworker exposure studies is a complex process that involves many statistical and laboratory considerations. Statistics are an integral component of each study beginning with the design stage and continuing to the final da...

329

In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

1991-05-01

330

Complex Tectonism on Ganymede  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex tectonism is evident in these images of Ganymede's surface. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. The 80 kilometer (50 mile) wide lens-shaped feature in the center of the image is located at 32 degrees latitude and 188 degrees longitude along the border of a region of ancient dark terrain known as Marius Regio, and is near an area of younger bright terrain named Nippur Sulcus. The tectonism that created the structures in the bright terrain nearby has strongly affected the local dark terrain to form unusual structures such as the one shown here. The lens-like appearance of this feature is probably due to shearing of the surface, where areas have slid past each other and also rotated slightly. Note that in several places in these images, especially around the border of the lens-shaped feature, bright ridges appear to turn into dark grooves. Analysis of the geologic structures in areas like this are helping scientists to understand the complex tectonic history of Ganymede.

North is to the top-left of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The image covers an area about 63 kilometers (39 miles) by 120 kilometers (75 miles) across at a resolution of 188 meters (627 feet) per picture element. The images were taken on September 6, 1996 at a range of 18,522 kilometers (11,576 miles) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

1997-01-01

331

Current Trends in Remote Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation

LuÍs Gomes; Seta Bogosyan

2009-01-01

332

European underground laboratories: An overview  

E-print Network

Underground laboratories are complementary to those where the research in fundamental physics is made using accelerators. This report focus on the logistic and on the background features of the most relevant laboratories in Europe, stressing also on the low background facilities available. In particular the report is focus on the laboratories involved in the new Europeean project ILIAS with the aim to support the European large infrastructures operating in the astroparticle physics area.

Lino Miramonti

2005-03-31

333

7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.  

...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture...MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science...

2014-01-01

334

7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture...MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science...

2013-01-01

335

7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture...MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science...

2011-01-01

336

7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture...MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science...

2010-01-01

337

7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture...MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science...

2012-01-01

338

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

LBNL 58752 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Laboratory Evaluation of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 3 #12;Abstract A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility

339

40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.  

...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

2014-07-01

340

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

2.A.6 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR GUIDELINES sterilization includes: autoclaving or gas sterilization (ethylene oxide). D. Alcohol is not an acceptable

Krovi, Venkat

341

NSLS source development laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) has initiated an ambitious project to develop fourth generation radiation sources. To achieve this goal, the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) builds on the experience gained at the NSLS, and at the highly successful BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The SDL accelerator system will consist of a high brightness short pulse linac, a station for coherent synchrotron and transition radiation experiments, a short bunch storage ring, and an ultra-violet free electron laser utilizing the NISUS wiggler. The electrons will be provided by a laser photocathode gun feeding a 210 MeV S-band electron linac, with magnetic bunch compression at 80 MeV. Electron bunches as short as 100 {mu}m with 1 nC charge will be used for pump-probe experiments utilizing coherent transition radiation. Beam will also be injected into a compact storage ring which will be a source of millimeter wave coherent synchrotron radiation. The linac will also serve as the driver for an FEL designed to allow the study of various aspects of single pass amplifiers. The first FEL configuration will be as a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL at 900 nm. Seeded beam and sub-harmonic seeded beam operations will push the output wavelength below 200 nm. Chirped pulse amplification (CPA) operation will also be possible, and a planned energy upgrade (by powering a fifth linac section) to 310 MeV will extend the wavelength range of the FEL to below 100 nm.

Ben-Zvi, I.; Blum, E.; Johnson, E.D. [and others

1995-09-01

342

Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

1972-01-01

343

Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory of Michigan State University is on the cutting edge of pest control in the Upper Midwest, whether on agricultural or non-agricultural lands, public or private. Visitors interested in seeing the pesky adversaries of the lab, should click on "Bugs of The Lab", on the left hand side of the page, then click on the subcategory "Research Subjects". Along with photos of a dozen pests, including the "Plum Curculio", "Mites", and the "Oblique-Banded Leaf Roller", visitors can read a description of the pest, learn about and see images of the damage they do to specific crops, and discover where they are found on the plant. The Resistant Pest management Newsletter section on the left-hand side of the page has numerous subsections that should be of interest to visitors. Visitors can "Subscribe to the Newsletter" and peruse "Archives of Past Issues". Also interesting is the "Ask an Expert About Resistance Issues" section, which lists ten regions of the earth, and when one of the regions is clicked on, several experts' names pop up with their area of expertise, e-mail, and location. Additionally, anyone who is an expert and qualified, but is not on the list, may have their name added after filling out the "Expert Application", available on the "Ask an Expert..." homepage. All of the experts are volunteers.

344

Laboratory inspection follow up required Laboratory inspection completed  

E-print Network

and used properly Biological safety cabinets located away from doors and heavily traveled areas and other present Biosafety documentation present (ECP, Protocols, HBV Docs, etc.) Biological cabinets certified Vegas LABORATORY SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST To be completed and signed by the Laboratory Supervisor

Hemmers, Oliver

345

Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and…

Avakian, Harry; And Others

346

Laboratory Three Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description Pendulum  

E-print Network

Laboratory Three ­ Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description ­ Pendulum I. Background When a pendulum swings back and forth its horizontal motion can be described by a periodic function. In this lab will call the spot where the pendulum hangs at rest the "center". The CBL will take measurements every tenth

Larson, Craig E.

347

Mice examined in Animal Laboratory of Lunar Receiving Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landrum Young (seated), Brown and Root-Northrup, and Russell Stullken, Manned Spacecraft Center, examine mice in the Animal laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory which have been inoculated with lunar sample material. wish for peace for all mankind. astronauts will be released from quarantine on August 11, 1969. Donald K. Slayton (right), MSC Director of Flight Crew Operations; and Lloyd Reeder, training coordinator.

1969-01-01

348

Laboratory models of alcoholism: treatment target identification and insight into mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory models, including animal tissues and live animals, have proven useful for discovery of molecular targets of alcohol action as well as for characterization of genetic and environmental factors that influence alcohol's neural actions. Here we consider strengths and weaknesses of laboratory models used in alcohol research and analyze the limitations of using animals to model a complex human disease.

David M Lovinger; John C Crabbe

2005-01-01

349

Microchips, microarrays, biochips and nanochips: personal laboratories for the 21st century  

Microsoft Academic Search

Micro miniaturization of analytical procedures is having significant impact on diagnostic testing, and will enable highly complex clinical testing to be miniaturized and permit testing to move from the central laboratory into non-laboratory settings. The diverse range of micro analytical devices includes microchips, gene chips, bioelectronic chips. They have been applied to several clinically important assays (e.g., PCR, immunoassay). The

Larry J Kricka

2001-01-01

350

A Process for Developing Introductory Science Laboratory Learning Goals to Enhance Student Learning and Instructional Alignment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning goal (LG) identification can greatly inform curriculum, teaching, and evaluation practices. The complex laboratory course setting, however, presents unique obstacles in developing appropriate LGs. For example, in addition to the large quantity and variety of content supported in the general chemistry laboratory program, the interests of…

Duis, Jennifer M.; Schafer, Laurel L.; Nussbaum, Sophia; Stewart, Jaclyn J.

2013-01-01

351

1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog  

USGS Publications Warehouse

PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

Pritt, Jeffrey, (Edited By); Jones, Berwyn E.

1989-01-01

352

An Experiment on Isomerism in Metal-Amino Acid Complexes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information, laboratory procedures, and discussion of results are provided for syntheses of cobalt (III) complexes, I-III, illustrating three possible bonding modes of glycine to a metal ion (the complex cations II and III being linkage/geometric isomers). Includes spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods to distinguish among the…

Harrison, R. Graeme; Nolan, Kevin B.

1982-01-01

353

Sociality influences cultural complexity  

PubMed Central

Archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence suggests a link between a population's size and structure, and the diversity or sophistication of its toolkits or technologies. Addressing these patterns, several evolutionary models predict that both the size and social interconnectedness of populations can contribute to the complexity of its cultural repertoire. Some models also predict that a sudden loss of sociality or of population will result in subsequent losses of useful skills/technologies. Here, we test these predictions with two experiments that permit learners to access either one or five models (teachers). Experiment 1 demonstrates that naive participants who could observe five models, integrate this information and generate increasingly effective skills (using an image editing tool) over 10 laboratory generations, whereas those with access to only one model show no improvement. Experiment 2, which began with a generation of trained experts, shows how learners with access to only one model lose skills (in knot-tying) more rapidly than those with access to five models. In the final generation of both experiments, all participants with access to five models demonstrate superior skills to those with access to only one model. These results support theoretical predictions linking sociality to cumulative cultural evolution. PMID:24225461

Muthukrishna, Michael; Shulman, Ben W.; Vasilescu, Vlad; Henrich, Joseph

2014-01-01

354

On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

Peterson, Valerie J.

2009-01-01

355

Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes  

SciTech Connect

Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-08-01

356

System Complexity and Its Measures: How Complex Is Complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The last few decades of physics, chemistry, biology, computer science, engineering, and social sciences have been marked by\\u000a major developments of views on cognitive systems, dynamical systems, complex systems, complexity, self-organization, and emergent\\u000a phenomena that originate from the interactions among the constituent components (agents) and with the environment, without\\u000a any central authority. How can measures of complexity capture the intuitive

Witold Kinsner

357

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13

358

Forest Pathology and Mycology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Much of this Laboratory's current research is focused on Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death. The site links to downloadable files for a collection of research publication and posters. The website is available in both Spanish and English, and contains links for related laboratories and organizations.

Garbelotto, Matteo

359

Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each organic chemistry student should become familiar with the educational and governmental laboratory safety requirements. One method for teaching laboratory safety is to assign each student to locate safety resources for a specific class laboratory experiment. The student should obtain toxicity and hazardous information for all chemicals used or produced during the assigned experiment. For example, what is the LD50 or LC50 for each chemical? Are there any specific hazards for these chemicals, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, neurotixin, chronic toxin, corrosive, flammable, or explosive agent? The school's "Chemical Hygiene Plan", "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory" (National Academy Press), and "Laboratory Standards, Part 1910 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (Fed. Register 1/31/90, 55, 3227-3335) should be reviewed for laboratory safety requirements for the assigned experiment. For example, what are the procedures for safe handling of vacuum systems, if a vacuum distillation is used in the assigned experiment? The literature survey must be submitted to the laboratory instructor one week prior to the laboratory session for review and approval. The student should then give a short presentation to the class on the chemicals' toxicity and hazards and describe the safety precautions that must be followed. This procedure gives the student first-hand knowledge on how to find and evaluate information to meet laboartory safety requirements.

Luckenbaugh, Raymond W.

1996-11-01

360

Laboratory Syntheses of Insect Pheromones.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information and procedures for the multi-step synthesis of tiger moth and boll weevil pheromones (sex attractants). These syntheses require several laboratory periods. The tiger moth pheromone synthesis is suitable for introductory organic chemistry while the boll weevil pheromone is recommended for an advanced laboratory

Cormier, Russell A.; Hoban, James N.

1984-01-01

361

Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

362

Three Puzzles for Organic Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that laboratory work should be more oriented towards puzzle solving rather than technique or illustration. Offers three organic laboratory puzzles which can be solved by melting point alone. Involves lab work at the 100-200-mg scale but still uses conventional glassware. (MVL)

Todd, David; Pickering, Miles

1988-01-01

363

Laboratory studies of volcanic jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the fluid dynamics volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good

Susan Werner Kieffer; Bradford Sturtevant

1984-01-01

364

Laboratory Safety is Everyone's Responsibility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines a survey of laboratory practices and policies for employee protection from exposure to chemicals. Findings support the argument that academic, industrial, and other research laboratories are different from the manufacturing environment and should have a different toxic chemical policy and standards. (Author/SK)

Brubaker, Inara M.; And Others

1981-01-01

365

ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References  

E-print Network

1 ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References Application Category Literature citation.2: 205-230. #12;ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References cont'd 2 Pure-chemical testing: 6th ASTM Symp. on Aquatic Toxicology. Amer. Soc. Testing and Materials. pp 445-459. Milleman, R. E

366

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PROPER procedures conducted in animal laboratories. Exposure to these allergens can trigger allergic symptoms to using NIOSH N95 dust-mist respirator, all employees must have respiratory fit-testing performed through

Krovi, Venkat

367

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics  

E-print Network

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics Joined Laboratory of mobile robotics has been foun- ded is dedicated to provide achievement of following goals: 1. research and development activities in robotics (Robotna£ka robot, telepresentation lab, and furt- her projects), 2. promotion and popularization

Lucny, Andrej

368

An Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program is a project designed to devise experiments to coordinate the use of instruments in the laboratory programs of physical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and inorganic chemistry at the advanced undergraduate level. It is intended that such experiments would incorporate an introduction to the instrument…

Wise, John H.

369

A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven

Kristin I. Gublo

2003-01-01

370

Educational Outreach at Wilson Laboratory  

E-print Network

, 2002 #12;Goals of Educational Outreach · Wilson Laboratory utilizes its Educational Outreach ProgramEducational Outreach at Wilson Laboratory Lora K. Hine Educational Outreach Coordinator March 6 · The Educational Outreach program recognizes the need to increase meaningful interactions between scientists

371

E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

2002-05-03

372

[Designing a clinical microbiology laboratory].  

PubMed

The microbiology laboratory should be a safe, efficient, and comfortable place for those working there, and a pleasant place for visitors. According to the ISO 15189 standard, it should be spacious enough for the workload to be carried out without jeopardizing quality or the safety of the persons present, whether workers or visitors, and provide optimal comfort to all occupants. In addition, the setup should respect the privacy of patients, and provide controlled access to the different laboratory areas and a safe place for storing clinical samples, manuals, and reagents. In the design of the facilities, the needs of specialists, technicians, and other personnel must converge, without forgetting patients, their relatives, and other visitors. The clinical microbiology laboratory has certain characteristics that make it different from other diagnostic laboratories. Its main activity involves isolation, propagation, and handling of pathogenic microorganisms that pose a risk to the laboratory personnel. To minimize this risk, the laboratory must meet a certain level of biosafety. Moreover, correct interpretation of microbiological cultures depends on the capacity of the laboratory to avoid or minimize the presence of contaminants; hence, proper handling of samples and cultures (aseptic conditions, biosafety cabinet) is mandatory. A number of documents and regulations, from very general to highly specific (biosafety), affect the design of the microbiology laboratory. The aim of this report is to establish the minimum requirements and recommendations for designing clinical microbiology laboratories, based on a review of current regulations. It is contemplated as an aid to microbiology specialists who are designing or planning to reform their laboratories. PMID:19740573

Alados, Juan Carlos; Alcaraz, María Jesús; Aller, Ana Isabel; Miranda, Consuelo; Pérez, José Luis; Romero, Patricia A

2010-01-01

373

Laboratory detection of fungemia.  

PubMed

Patients who are immunosuppressed, receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, or with intravascular catheters in place are at risk for invasive fungal infections. In a significant number nosocomial fungal infections develop. The diagnosis of invasive fungal disease often relies on the detection of the etiologic agent using blood cultures. Great progress has been made in fungal blood culturing over the past 20 years with the development of biphasic media, automated radiometric and nonradiometric systems, and LCS used with selective culture media. The biphasic BHI and Septi-Chek systems provide recovery of the majority of fungal isolates, yet there frequently is an undesirable delay in detection. Lysis of blood cells, aeration by venting, and agitated incubation improve detection with these systems. Automated systems often require a significant initial financial investment but have been shown to be durable and effective in most aspects of blood culturing. They have a limited daily hands on requirement. The newer nonradiometric systems appear to be better than the older systems, especially in time to detection and in the reduction of false-positive signals. The most significant factors, however, may be the volume of blood used in these systems and the resins incorporated in the media to eliminate inhibitors of fungal growth. A significant disadvantage of the automated systems has been their failure to detect certain organisms (C. neoformans and dimorphic fungi); however, the use of newer culture media as well as blind subculturing may partially alleviate this problem. Lysis-centrifugation blood culturing has performed well, is highly sensitive, and permits recovery of both fungi and aerobic bacteria. Because it is flexible, the media selection can be altered to suit any specific growth requirement. It is rapid and permits the identification of most yeast and yeastlike microorganisms within 4 days and of H. capsulatum within 3 weeks. Because this system utilizes solid media, blind subculturing is unnecessary. Quantitation of fungemia is possible and may permit determination of the clinical importance of the microorganism and assessment of the patient's response to treatment. The disadvantages of this system are that it requires a significant amount of the technologist's time to process the specimen, inoculate the various media, and visually examine the culture media throughout the incubation period. A significant contamination rate still exists despite working within a laminar flow biosafety cabinet; this also increases time requirements. The detection of fungemia has markedly improved; the times to detection have decreased to the point of being clinically useful, and several systems are available to accommodate individual laboratory needs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8181236

Geha, D J; Roberts, G D

1994-03-01

374

DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory-- Description: Opportunities to participate in research in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy, and the environment. Discipline(s): Computer Science; Earth, Environmental, and Marine Sciences; Engineering; Life Sciences; Mathematics; Physical Sciences Eligibility: U.S. Citizens and Legal Permanent Residents. Undergraduate Students Location(s): Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) Duration: Summer Term 10 Weeks; Fall/Spring Term 16 weeks Frequency: Spring, Summer, and Fall How to apply: http://www.scied.science.doe.gov Deadline(s): http://www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/erulf/dates.html

375

A Virtual National Laboratory for Reengineering Clinical Translational Science  

PubMed Central

Summary Clinical research is burdened by complex pathways, tedious steps, numerous inefficiencies, and a poor track record of trial completion. The CTSA Program’s consortium supports a unified national effort that has become, in effect, a virtual national laboratory designed to identify, implement, evaluate, and continue process improvement across all the steps required to design, approve, initiate, and complete clinical trials. If it is properly supported by academic centers, industry, and funding agencies, the virtual national laboratory could succeed in advancing and maintaining major improvements in clinical trial conduct and efficiency. PMID:22277966

Dilts, David M.; Rosenblum, Daniel; Trochim, William M.

2013-01-01

376

DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

2003-02-27

377

Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.  

PubMed

Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. PMID:22727005

Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

2012-06-01

378

Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases. Methods An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education. Results A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation. Conclusions Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system. PMID:24164781

2013-01-01

379

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the bit is a thick-walled maraging steel collection tube allowing the powdered sample to be augured up the hole into the sample chamber. For robustness, the wall thickness of the DBA was maximized while still ensuring effective sample collection. There are four recesses in the bit tube that are used to retain the fresh bits in their bit box. The rotating bit is supported by a back-to-back duplex bearing pair within a housing that is connected to the outer DBA housing by two titanium diaphragms. The only bearings on the drill in the sample flow are protected by a spring-energized seal, and an integrated shield that diverts the ingested powdered sample from the moving interface. The DBA diaphragms provide radial constraint of the rotating bit and form the sample chambers. Between the diaphragms there is a sample exit tube from which the sample is transferred to the CHIMRA. To ensure that the entire collected sample is retained, no matter the orientation of the drill with respect to gravity during sampling, the pass-through from the forward to the aft chamber resides opposite to the exit tube.

Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

2012-01-01

380

he Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to  

E-print Network

he Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research. The MSL is a non-classified area in the Materials Science Complex in close proximity to classified and other non-classified materials research facilities. The Materials Science Complex accommodates most

381

Laboratory maintenance of Brucella abortus.  

PubMed

This unit provides protocols for growth of Brucella abortus on solid or in liquid media and for long-term storage of laboratory stocks. Two issues affecting the culture and storage of isolates of this slow-growing bacterium are emphasized: contamination of cultures and outgrowth of attenuated variants lacking a complete lipopolysaccharide. Laboratories planning to work with B. abortus should be aware that Biosafety Level 3 facilities are required. Furthermore, this organism is classified in the U.S. as a Select Agent, which restricts its use to laboratories registered with the U.S. government's Select Agent programs. PMID:18770565

Sun, Yao-Hui; den Hartigh, Andreas B; Tsolis, Renée M; Ficht, Thomas A

2005-10-01

382

University of Idaho: Pedology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website discusses the University of Idaho's pedology laboratory's work primarily focused on the environmental factors and processes that form soils and influence their use and management. Researchers and students can learn about the volcanic ash-influenced soils in the Pacific Northwest, the hydrology of Northern Idaho, and the ability of soils in the Palouse Basin to accommodate ground water recharge. The website provides information on laboratory analysis procedures and data on andisols and andic properties. Users will also find descriptions of graduate theses and dissertations, information on the Maynard A. Fosberg Monolith Collection, and many of the laboratory's abstracts.

383

Microwave remote sensing laboratory design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Application of active and passive microwave remote sensing to the study of ocean pollution is discussed. Previous research efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory were surveyed to derive guidance for the design of a laboratory program of research. The essential issues include: choice of radar or radiometry as the observational technique; choice of laboratory or field as the research site; choice of operating frequency; tank sizes and material; techniques for wave generation and appropriate wavelength spectrum; methods for controlling and disposing of pollutants used in the research; and pollutants other than oil which could or should be studied.

Friedman, E.

1979-01-01

384

Introduction to Biotechnology: Laboratory Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By Linnea Fletcher, Evelyn Goss, Patricia Phelps, and Angela Wheeler, this is the laboratory manual for an introductory biotechnology course. This 134-page Word document describes the basic skills necessary for the biotechnology laboratory, such as safety, mathematics, documentation, calibration, and equipment. Each chapter contains objectives for students to accomplish, some practice lessons and questions, and laboratory activities. Students will also learn some basic processes, such as Restriction Enzyme Mapping of DNA, DNA Fingerprinting, and Southern Blot Analysis. There is also a section on bioinformatics.

Wheeler, Angela

385

Laboratory medicine and sports: between Scylla and Charybdis.  

PubMed

Laboratory medicine is complex and contributes to the diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring and follow-up of acquired and inherited human disorders. The regular practice of physical exercise provides important benefits in heath and disease and sports medicine is thereby receiving growing focus from almost each and every clinical discipline, including laboratory medicine. Sport-laboratory medicine is a relatively innovative branch of laboratory science, which can provide valuable contributions to the diagnosis and follow-up of athletic injuries, and which is acquiring a growing clinical significance to support biomechanics and identify novel genomics and "exercisenomics" patterns that can help identify specific athlete's tendency towards certain types of sport traumas and injuries. Laboratory medicine can also provide sport physicians and coaches with valuable clues about personal inclination towards a certain sport, health status, fitness and nutritional deficiencies of professional, elite and recreational athletes in order to enable a better and earlier prediction of sport injuries, overreaching and overtraining. Finally, the wide armamentarium of laboratory tests represents the milestone for identifying cheating athletes in the strenuous fight against doping in sports. PMID:22868795

Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe; Botrè, Francesco; de la Torre, Xavier; De Vita, Francesco; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Maffulli, Nicola; Marchioro, Lucio; Pacifici, Roberta; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Schena, Federico; Plebani, Mario

2012-08-01

386

Does software design complexity affect maintenance effort?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design complexity of a software system may be characterized within a refinement level (e.g., data flow among modules), or between refinement levels (e.g., traceability between the specification and the design). We analyzed an existing set of data from NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory to test whether changing software modules with high design complexity requires more personnel effort than changing modules with low design complexity. By analyzing variables singly, we identified strong correlations between software design complexity and change effort for error corrections performed during the maintenance phase. By analyzing variables in combination, we found patterns which identify modules in which error corrections were costly to perform during the acceptance test phase.

Epping, Andreas; Lott, Christopher M.

1994-01-01

387

Emergent dynamics of laboratory insect swarms  

PubMed Central

Collective animal behaviour occurs at nearly every biological size scale, from single-celled organisms to the largest animals on earth. It has long been known that models with simple interaction rules can reproduce qualitative features of this complex behaviour. But determining whether these models accurately capture the biology requires data from real animals, which has historically been difficult to obtain. Here, we report three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions, velocities, and accelerations of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. Even though the swarms do not show an overall polarisation, we find statistical evidence for local clusters of correlated motion. We also show that the swarms display an effective large-scale potential that keeps individuals bound together, and we characterize the shape of this potential. Our results provide quantitative data against which the emergent characteristics of animal aggregation models can be benchmarked. PMID:23323215

Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

2013-01-01

388

Complexes of clusters and complexes of stars  

E-print Network

Most star complexes are in fact complexes of stars, clusters and gas clouds; term "star complexes" was introduced as general one disregarding the preferential content of a complex. Generally the high rate of star formation in a complex is accompanied by the high number of bound clusters, including massive ones, what was explained by the high gas pressure in such regions. However, there are also complexes, where clusters seems to be more numerous in relation to stars than in a common complex. The high rate of clusters - but not isolated stars - formation seems to be typical for many isolated bursts of star formation, but deficit of stars might be still explained by the observational selection. The latter cannot, however, explain the complexes or the dwarf galaxies, where the high formation rate of only stars is observed. The possibility of the very fast dissolution of parental clusters just in such regions should itself be explained. Some difference in the physical conditions (turbulence parameters ?) within the initial gas supercloud might be a reason for the high or low stars/clusters number ratio in a complex.

Yu. N. Efremov

2005-12-12

389

The Mycobacterium avium complex.  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing is of increasing interest and importance as new effective antimicrobial agents are identified and evaluated. Antimicrobial resistance has already emerged as an important problem, and methods for circumventing resistance that use combination therapies are now being studied. Images PMID:8358707

Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

1993-01-01

390

IMPROVED LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a program to evaluate an Improved Laboratory Dispersant Effectiveness Test (ILDET) which was developed to replace EPA's Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test (RSDET). The report summarizes the development of the IL...

391

Laboratory directed research and development  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

Not Available

1991-11-15

392

LABCON - Laboratory Job Control program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer program LABCON controls the budget system in a component test laboratory whose workload is made up from many individual budget allocations. A common denominator is applied to an incoming job, to which all effort is charged and accounted for.

Reams, L. T.

1969-01-01

393

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.B.1 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PERSONNEL be sequestered, autoclaved, and then laundered (in that order). c. Hands must be washed immediately after leaving

Krovi, Venkat

394

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

1.D.3 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for ANIMAL/care requirements (i.e. SPF/Barrier housed, conventional housing, own room or multi-room, autoclaved, filter top

Krovi, Venkat

395

Computer-Aided Laboratory Instruction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter introduces how computer-aided instruction may be used in the biology laboratory setting. Descriptions of programs, suggestions on how to find instructional software, and general guides and resources are included.

Catherine J. Schaap (University of Prince Edward Island; )

1989-06-06

396

PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014)  

E-print Network

- 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Chiang 235 Physics chiang@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 Tony Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Joe Mitchell 512

Yoo, S. J. Ben

397

PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015)  

E-print Network

- 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 Xiangdong Zhu 235 Physics zhu@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Andrew Bradshaw 518

Yoo, S. J. Ben

398

[Quality management in medical laboratories].  

PubMed

During the 20th century understanding for quality has changed and international and national requirements for quality have been published. Therefore also medical branches started to establish quality management systems. Quality assurance has always been important for medical laboratories. Certification according to the standard ISO 9001 and accreditation according to the standard ISO 17025 have been the proof of fulfilling quality requirements. The relatively new standard ISO 15189 is the first standard for medical laboratories. This standard includes technical and management requirements for the medical laboratory. The main focus is the proof of competence within the personnel. As this standard is accepted throughout the European Union an increase in accreditations of medical laboratories is predictable. PMID:20454753

Fritzer-Szekeres, M

2010-05-01

399

Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview  

SciTech Connect

Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Neu, Mary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-06-02

400

Statistical Laboratory & Department of Statistics  

E-print Network

Statistical Laboratory & Department of Statistics Annual Report July 1, 2005 to December 31, 2006...............................................33 Statistical Computing Section ......................................34 CSSM and statistical methodology in the nutritional sciences. We were also very pleased to secure a permanent lecturer

401

Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

402

Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

403

Extending the Marine Microcosm Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The traditional range of marine microcosm laboratory experiments is presented as an ideal environment to teach the entire analysis process. The microcosm lab provides student-centered approach with opportunities for collaborative learning and to develop critical communication skills.

Ryswyk, Hal Van; Hall, Eric W.; Petesch, Steven J.; Wiedeman, Alice E.

2007-01-01

404

Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From D.B. McWhorterand D. K. Sunda's 1977 Ground-Water Hydrology and Hydraulics, this two page excerpt outlines and details Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. Here, visitors will find illustrations and formula to understand the concept.

405

NASA Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory. The capabilities and research interests of the lab are: Structural, thermal, & dynamic analysis; Structural, thermal, & dynamic ground-test techniques; Advanced structural instrumentation; and Flight test support.

Horn, Tom

2008-01-01

406

University of Maryland: Geochemistry Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This extensive website features the University of Maryland's Geochemistry Laboratories' efforts to "produce the highest quality elemental and isotopic data, to teach students and visitors the techniques involved with gathering such data," and to develop new methods and instrumentation in the field of elemental and isotope measurements." Users can discover the Thermal Ionization, Plasma, and Gas Source laboratories; as well as the Chemical Processing Lab and the Mineral Separation and Rock Preparation Laboratories. Through the links to the staff members and three of the laboratories, researchers can learn about the department's studies of the Earth's core, mantle, and crust; the atmosphere and hydrosphere; and the isotopic evolution of the solar system. Throughout the website, students and educators can find educational materials on topics including ablation spot characteristics and environmental safety.

407

VMSL: Virtual Mass Spectrometry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents a series of case studies that can be explored using modern mass spectrometry methods. The problem-solving nature of the site provides students a virtual laboratory experience that can supplement access to mass spectrometry instrumentation.

2011-07-05

408

Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratories, Inc.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This non-profit laboratory in Panacea, Florida offers guided field trips, touch tanks, and a glimpse of their in-house research, in addition to being a supplier of guaranteed-live marine specimens to some 1500 laboratories and classrooms in the US and Canada. Also involved in conservation, GSML third oldest sea turtle research and conservation program in the United States. Information on membership and volunteer opportunities are also available.

409

Gallium Safety in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

Cadwallader, L.C.

2003-05-07

410

Gallium Safety in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2003-06-01

411

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY Brookhaven National Laboratory does not tolerate sexual harassment in the workplace. The Laboratory  

E-print Network

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY POLICY Brookhaven National Laboratory does not tolerate sexual harassment in the workplace. The Laboratory intends to maintain a workplace free of threatening, intimidating or harassing conduct, including sexual harassment. BNL is committed to providing

412

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-print Network

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-04-23

413

1. Exterior view of Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T28), looking ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Exterior view of Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking northeast. The taller of the two gantries on the left houses Test Cell 6 (fuel), while the shorter gantry on the right houses Test Cell 7 (oxidizer). This structure serves as the functional center of the Systems Integration Laboratory complex for testing, handling, and storage of the Titan II's hydrazine - and nitrogen tetroxide-based fuel system propellants. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

414

Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

1983-01-01

415

A virtual national laboratory for reengineering clinical translational science.  

PubMed

Clinical research is burdened by inefficiencies and complexities, with a poor record of trial completion, none of which is desirable. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium, including more than 60 clinical research institutions, supports a unified national effort to become, in effect, a virtual national laboratory designed to identify, implement, evaluate, and extend process improvements across all parts of clinical research, from conception to completion. If adequately supported by academic health centers, industry, and funding agencies, the Consortium could become a test bed for improvements that can dramatically reduce wasteful complexity, thus increasing the likelihood of clinical trial completion. PMID:22277966

Dilts, David M; Rosenblum, Daniel; Trochim, William M

2012-01-25

416

MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_  

SciTech Connect

Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

2009-11-01

417

Defense programs industrial partnerships at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Defense Programs face unprecedented challenges of stewardship for an aging nuclear stockpile, cessation of nuclear testing, reduced federal budgets, and a smaller manufacturing complex. Partnerships with industry are essential in developing technology, modernizing the manufacturing complex, and maintaining the safety and reliability of the nation`s nuclear capability. The past decade of federal support for industrial partnerships has promoted benefits to US industrial competitiveness. Recent shifts in government policy have re-emphasized the importance of industrial partnerships in accomplishing agency missions. Nevertheless, abundant opportunities exist for dual-benefit, mission-driven partnerships between the national laboratories and industry. Experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory with this transition is presented.

Freese, K.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Industrial Partnership Office

1996-10-01

418

Simplifying complexity: a review of complexity theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complexity theory has captured the attention of the scientific community to the extent where its proponents tout it as a dominant scientific trend. Geographers, and environmental, human, and regional planners have applied complexity theory to topics ranging from cultural transmission and economic growth to the braiding of rivers. While such a wide array of applications is heartening because it speaks

Steven M. Manson

2001-01-01

419

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

420

RECENT LASER ACCIDENTS AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

Recent laser accidents and incidents at research laboratories across the Department of Energy complex are reviewed in this paper. Factors that contributed to the accidents are examined. Conclusions drawn from the accident reports are summarized and compared. Control measures that could have been implemented to prevent the accidents will be summarized and compared. Recommendations for improving laser safety programs are outlined and progress toward achieving them are summarized.

ODOM, CONNON R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-02

421

Tevatron Run II Series at the Enrico Fermi Laboratory (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Run II Tevatron series at the Enrico Fermi Laboratory was started in March 2001. Numerous improvements to the accelerator complex were made in order to ensure operation of the proton–antiproton Tevatron accelerator with peak luminosity (2–4)·1032 cm–2·sec–1 and to obtain a total luminosity above 5 fb–1 before the LHC physical program starts. The current status of the Run II

R. Moore

2002-01-01

422

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities  

E-print Network

to market viable alternative energy solutions. NREL's world-leading energy decisionNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities Overview The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's primary laboratory

423

AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman  

E-print Network

AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Jet Propulsion, and the Firestone Flight Sciences Laboratory form the Graduate Aeronautical disciplines making up the broad field known as aeronautics. Areas of Research Aeronautics has evolved

Greer, Julia R.

424

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

...Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Book of Methods, 1...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick Ave...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2014-04-01

425

21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include...description of necessary laboratory test procedures to check...accuracy, and precision of any laboratory test procedure used. The official...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick...

2013-04-01

426

21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include...description of necessary laboratory test procedures to check...accuracy, and precision of any laboratory test procedure used. The official...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick...

2012-04-01

427

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Book of Methods, 1...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick Ave...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2013-04-01

428

21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include...description of necessary laboratory test procedures to check...accuracy, and precision of any laboratory test procedure used. The official...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick...

2011-04-01

429

21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.  

...quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include...description of necessary laboratory test procedures to check...accuracy, and precision of any laboratory test procedure used. The official...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick...

2014-04-01

430

21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include...description of necessary laboratory test procedures to check...accuracy, and precision of any laboratory test procedure used. The official...may be obtained from: AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick...

2010-04-01

431

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2010-04-01

432

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Confirming Anthrax Through the Laboratory Response Network Laboratory Testing - FAQs Collecting Specimens Recommended Specimens Information for Specific Groups Laboratory Professionals People Who Work with Animal Products Exposure to Hides/Drums Treatment of Products ...

433

Laborlandschaft : redesigning the industrial laboratory module  

E-print Network

This thesis proposes to redesign the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory typology by rethinking the composition of the laboratory module; the smallest functional sub-unit of the laboratory type. The design for this thesis ...

Farley, Alexander H. (Alexander Hamilton)

2014-01-01

434

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2013-04-01

435

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2011-04-01

436

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2012-04-01

437

Control Systems Engineering Laboratory Daniel E. Rivera  

E-print Network

Control Systems Engineering Laboratory CSEL Daniel E. Rivera Control Systems Engineering Laboratory Behavioral Interventions 1 #12;Control Systems Engineering Laboratory CSEL Presentation Outline · What are adaptive behavioral interventions? · (Brief) overview of control systems engineering, · Analysis and design

Langerhans, Brian

438

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume I SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

439

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume II SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

440

7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.  

...WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories. (a) Metrology laboratories. (1) Any State metrology laboratory currently approved by the NBS ongoing certification program having auditing...

2014-01-01

441

7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories. (a) Metrology laboratories. (1) Any State metrology laboratory currently approved by the NBS ongoing certification program having auditing...

2010-01-01

442

7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories. (a) Metrology laboratories. (1) Any State metrology laboratory currently approved by the NBS ongoing certification program having auditing...

2012-01-01

443

7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories. (a) Metrology laboratories. (1) Any State metrology laboratory currently approved by the NBS ongoing certification program having auditing...

2011-01-01

444

7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories. (a) Metrology laboratories. (1) Any State metrology laboratory currently approved by the NBS ongoing certification program having auditing...

2013-01-01

445

Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these capabilities as a niche market play to success. The niche was further defined by preservation of the ability to handle samples contaminated with radiological materials and those with classification concerns. These decisions enabled early marketing plans to be built on existing clientele and provided an identifiable group to which future marketing could be expanded. Finally, recruitment of key players with commercial laboratory experience proved to be a key factor for success. This experience base was valuable in avoiding early mistakes in the laboratory startup phase and provided some connection to a commercial client base. As the business has grown, professionals with commercial laboratory experience have been recruited and offered ownership in the business as an incentive for joining the group. If the process were to be repeated, early involvement of an individual with commercial sales experience would be helpful in broadening the base of commercial clients. An increased emphasis on research funding such as funding received from Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) sources would be used to form a portion of the economic base for the business. More partnerships with businesses whose services compliment those of the laboratory would expand available client base. More flexible staffing arrangements would be negotiated early on as a cost-control measure. In conclusion, the re-industrialization concept can be successful. Candidates for re-industrialization must be chosen by matching services to be offered to market needs. Implementation is best accomplished by entrepreneurs who personally profit from a successful operation of the business.

Stephenson, Barry A. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc), East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-1702 (United States)

2008-01-15

446

SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E

2008-02-08

447

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation  

E-print Network

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 LABORATORY VENTILATION Contents A. Scope .................................................................................................................3-2 B. General Laboratory Ventilation

Queitsch, Christine

448

Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes  

SciTech Connect

Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

2007-07-01

449

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology Immunohistochemistry Laboratory  

E-print Network

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology ­ Immunohistochemistry Laboratory Page 1 of 1 Document Antibodies Prepared/Reviewed by: Martin Slade, Technical Service Supervisor, Histology Laboratory Joy Cramer

Pawlowski, Wojtek

450

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

LBNL 43382 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Evaluation of PEGIT Duct Connection of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 2 #12

451

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

LBNL 54767 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Duct Tape Durability Testing M of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. Legal

452

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY  

E-print Network

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within the Center for Biological and Computational Learning

Poggio, Tomaso

453

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY  

E-print Network

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts

Poggio, Tomaso

454

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY  

E-print Network

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL of Technology within the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Center for Biological Information Processing

Koch, Christof

455

http://cls.sfsu.edu/ Clinical Laboratory  

E-print Network

in all departments of the clinical laboratory, using samples (blood, urine, etc.) from the human body assurance) Sales and Marketing (biomedical supply, pharmaceutical companies) Laboratory Computer Systems

456

BODEGA MARINE LABORATORY MARINE OPERATIONS GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

BODEGA MARINE LABORATORY MARINE OPERATIONS GUIDELINES These guidelines cover small boat and diving operations at Bodega Marine Laboratory (BML). This document is intended for faculty, staff, and students

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

457

Cervical Histopathology Variability Among Laboratories  

PubMed Central

To inform the proposed systematic adjudicative staining of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN2) and equivocal diagnoses, we characterized diagnostic heterogeneity across 15 laboratories. Laboratory-specific distributions of 37,486 biopsy specimen diagnoses were compared after adjusting for preceding cytology. In a subset of preceding cytology specimens, HPV16 genotyping was considered an indicator of lesion severity. Distributions of normal and CIN1 diagnoses varied widely, with laboratories favoring either normal (5.5%–57.7%) or CIN1 diagnoses (23.3%–86.7%; P < .001 for normal:CIN1 variability). Excluding extreme values, 6.2% to 14.4% of diagnoses were CIN2 (P < .001). For CIN2 diagnoses, HPV16 positivity in the preceding cytology varied between 39.0% in the largest laboratory and 57.4% in others (P < .001), suggesting differential interpretation, not population differences, as a cause of variability. In conclusion, the frequency of diagnoses requiring special staining (p16INK4a immunostaining) to adjudicate equivocal CIN2 will be sizable and vary between laboratories, especially if extended to a fraction of CIN1 lesions. PMID:23429369

Gage, Julia C.; Schiffman, Mark; Hunt, William C.; Joste, Nancy; Ghosh, Arpita; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, Cosette M.

2014-01-01

458

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward  

E-print Network

Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward #12;In 1925. Labconco CorporationLabconco Corporation #12;Laboratory VentilationLaboratory Ventilation #12;Laboratory Ventilation ProductsLaboratory Ventilation Products #12;History of Fume HoodsHistory of Fume Hoods Thomas

Farritor, Shane

459

Fluid Complex Plasmas - Studies at the Particle Level  

SciTech Connect

Complex plasmas are ideal laboratory systems to investigate kinetics of strongly coupled many-particle ensembles. In contrast to colloidal suspensions, the particle dynamics in complex plasmas is virtually undamped. This makes complex plasmas particularly suited to study kinetics of fluids, by observing fully resolved motion of individual particles. In this paper we focus on three major experimental highlights characterizing kinetics of fluid plasmas--laminar shear flows, onset and development of hydrodynamic instabilities, and heterogeneous nucleation in supercooled fluids. Analysis of elementary processes observed in these experiments provides important insights into fundamental generic processes governing fluid behavior, demonstrating significant interdisciplinary potential of the complex plasma research.

Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Nosenko, V.; Pompl, R.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Thomas, H. M. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85741 Garching (Germany)

2008-02-21

460

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships -- The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosts 300 to 400 undergraduate and graduate students and some faculty every summer in support of its world-class scientific facilities and staff and in an effort to help train the nation's next generation of scientists and engineers. Involvement in world-class research provides participants with a set of experiences that support their education and career goals. Typically, participants gain hands-on experience and the opportunity to apply learned theory to real life problems. An experience of this type, and with these resources at a premier state-of-the-art research laboratory is not available in an academic research lab.

461

Complex Elliptic Pendulum  

E-print Network

This paper briefly summarizes previous work on complex classical mechanics and its relation to quantum mechanics. It then introduces a previously unstudied area of research involving the complex particle trajectories associated with elliptic potentials.

Carl M. Bender; Daniel W. Hook; Karta Kooner

2009-12-31

462

Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes  

SciTech Connect

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

2002-01-18

463

Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

464

Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

465

Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection  

MedlinePLUS

Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

466

Quantum Complex Minkowski Space  

E-print Network

The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

2005-05-06

467

Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Materials Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical characterization of novel materials. In this laboratory unknown samples are characterized by identifying and quantifying molecular species present through the implementation of a suite of analytical instrumentation and techniques. This leads to the ability to deconvolute decomposition routes and elucidate reaction mechanisms of materials through thermal and evolved gas analysis. This aids in the synthesis of next generation materials that are tailored to optimize stability and performance. These techniques and next generation materials will have many applications. One particular focus is the stable and conductive tetherable cations for use as membrane materials in anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Another is to understand the leachant contaminants derived from balance of plant materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Once identified and quantified, these organic and ionic species are dosed as contaminants into ex/in-situ fuel cell tests, to determine the effect on durability and performance. This laboratory also acts in support of fuel cell catalysis, manufacturing, and other related projects. The Materials Characterization Laboratory will cover multiple analytical operations, with the overall goal of troubleshooting synthetic materials or process streams to improve performance. Having novel evolved gas analysis and other analytical capabilities; this laboratory provides a viable location to analyze small batch samples, whereas setting up these types of capabilities and expertise would be cost and time prohibitive for most institutions. Experiments that can be performed include: (1) Evolved gas analysis; (2) Heterogeneous catalysis; (3) Trace level contaminants analysis; (4) Catalyst characterization; (5) Kinetics and stability; (6) Hyphenated techniques; and (7) Isotopic analysis for elucidating reaction mechanisms and decoupling chemical reactions.

Not Available

2011-10-01

468

Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the competition results, a down select process will be performed in the upcoming year. Looking ahead, this unified effort has positioned each element for an in-flight lab analysis demonstration of select diagnostics measurements in the 2015 timeframe.

Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

2013-01-01

469

Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

Chadwick, Mark B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-20

470

Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper: Summary of Laboratory Astrophysics Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (NASA LAW) met at NASA Ames Research Center from 1-3 May 2002 to assess the role that laboratory astrophysics plays in the optimization of NASA missions, both at the science conception level and at the science return level. Space missions provide understanding of fundamental questions regarding the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems. In all of these areas the interpretation of results from NASA's space missions relies crucially upon data obtained from the laboratory. We stress that Laboratory Astrophysics is important not only in the interpretation of data, but also in the design and planning of future missions. We recognize a symbiosis between missions to explore the universe and the underlying basic data needed to interpret the data from those missions. In the following we provide a summary of the consensus results from our Workshop, starting with general programmatic findings and followed by a list of more specific scientific areas that need attention. We stress that this is a 'living document' and that these lists are subject to change as new missions or new areas of research rise to the fore.

2002-01-01

471

Follow MIT Lincoln Laboratory online. Facebook: MIT Lincoln Laboratory (Official)  

E-print Network

Laboratory employs some of the nation's best technical talent to support system and technology development pertinent to national security on behalf of the military Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense received the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service in recognition of its distinguished

Reuter, Martin

472

Follow MIT Lincoln Laboratory online. Facebook: MIT Lincoln Laboratory (Official)  

E-print Network

talent to support system and technology development for national security needs. Principal core of the military Services, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the intelligence community, and other government years. On its 25th and 50th anniversaries, the Laboratory received the Secretary of Defense Medal

Reuter, Martin

473

Los Alamos National LaboratoryA National Science Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

Mark B

2012-01-01

474

Federal laboratories for the 21st century  

SciTech Connect

Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1998-04-01

475

A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven these safety presentations, I have created a cooperative online trivia game. It has been my experience that the lab safety trivia game is an effective and entertaining way to teach lab safety.

Gublo, Kristin I.

2003-04-01

476

Laboratory Identification of Arthropod Ectoparasites  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The collection, handling, identification, and reporting of ectoparasitic arthropods in clinical and reference diagnostic laboratories are discussed in this review. Included are data on ticks, mites, lice, fleas, myiasis-causing flies, and bed bugs. The public health importance of these organisms is briefly discussed. The focus is on the morphological identification and proper handling and reporting of cases involving arthropod ectoparasites, particularly those encountered in the United States. Other arthropods and other organisms not of public health concern, but routinely submitted to laboratories for identification, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24396136

Pritt, Bobbi S.

2014-01-01

477

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) promotes its research to "secure an energy future for the nation that is environmentally and economically sustainable." The website summaries the Laboratory's variety of research and technology including photovoltaics, wind, biomass, geothermal energy, and hydrogen and fuel cells. Visitors can find out the latest NREL news and events. Visitors can locate materials about renewable energy and energy efficiency. The Publications Database offers references to a wide range of documents about sustainable energy technologies written or edited by NREL.

478

Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

479

Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

1987-08-01

480

Origin and status of the Gran Sasso INFN Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN (LNGS) is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world. Located in Italy between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 km far from Rome, is a research infrastructure mainly dedicated to astroparticle and neutrino physics. It offers the most advanced underground facility in terms of dimensions, complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. LNGS is one of the four national laboratories run by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The scientific program at LNGS is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter (DM), neutrinoless double beta decay (2?0?) and nuclear cross-section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

Votano, Lucia

2014-11-01

481

Origin and Status of the Gran Sasso INFN Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN (LNGS) is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world. Located in Italy between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 Km far from Rome, is a research infrastructure mainly dedicated to astroparticle and neutrino physics. It offers the most advanced underground facility in terms of dimensions, complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. LNGS is one of the four national laboratories run by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The scientific program at LNGS is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear cross section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

Votano, Lucia

2014-06-01

482

Complexity, creativity and computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creativity, one of the hallmarks of the human spirit, has yet to travel deep into the domain of artificial intelligence and computers. We argue that creativity intrinsically requires and exploits complexity. The dynamic multilevel properties of complex systems give us a natural way of scaling creative solutions, from the everyday to the paradigm shift. In particular, the complexity model implies

T. R. J. Bossomaier; A. W. Snyder

483

Complex-I-ty in aging.  

PubMed

The role of mitochondrial complex I in aging has been studied in both C. elegans and Drosophila, where RNAi knock down of specific complex I subunits has been shown to extend lifespan. More recently, studies in Drosophila have shown that an increase in mitochondrial activity, including complex I-like activity, can also slow aging. In this review, we discuss this apparent paradox. Improved maintenance of mitochondrial activity, mitochondrial homeostasis, may be responsible for lifespan extension in both cases. Decreased electron transport chain activity caused by reducing complex I subunit expression prompts an increase in stress response signaling that leads to enhanced mitochondrial homeostasis during aging. Increased complex I activity, as well as mitochondrial biogenesis, is expected to both directly counteract the decline in mitochondrial health that occurs during aging and may also increase cellular NAD(+) levels, which have been linked to mitochondrial homeostatic mechanisms through activation of sirtuins. We suggest that manipulations that increase or decrease complex I activity both converge on improved mitochondrial homeostasis during aging, resulting in prolonged lifespan. PMID:24961226

Hur, Jae H; Stork, Devon A; Walker, David W

2014-08-01

484

10 CFR 26.155 - Laboratory personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories...personnel. (a) Day-to-day management of the HHS-certified laboratory...responsible for the day-to-day management of the testing laboratory...assumes responsibility for management of the laboratory. This...

2010-01-01

485

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 MARCH, 2010 Prepared for the U

486

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 APRIL, 2013 Prepared for the U

487

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 MAY, 2011 Prepared for the U

488

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 MAY, 2012 Prepared for the U

Knowles, David William

489

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 MARCH, 2008 Prepared for the U

490

LBNL-103E-2008 Laboratory Directed Research  

E-print Network

of California. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Report on Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 MARCH, 2009 Prepared for the U

491

Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Security Programs  

E-print Network

Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Security Programs Dr. Michael A. Kuliasha, Chief Scientist National Security Technologies Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S Security Challenges #12;3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY How Will Our Enemies

492

HISTORY OF THE GRICE MARINE LABORATORY  

E-print Network

in marine biology of the College of Charleston. Grice Marine Laboratory Walking Tour Grice Marine LaboratoryHISTORY OF THE GRICE MARINE LABORATORY The George D. Grice Marine Laboratory, named in honor, faculty offices, an aquarium room, and a research collection of marine invertebrates and fishes. It has

Young, Paul Thomas

493

Characterisation of alkane ?-complexes.  

PubMed

Alkane ?-complexes have evolved from a curious phenomenon to an intermediate of intense interest, fuelling research into the area. Over the last fifteen years, metal alkane complex characterisation has evolved to incorporate reports employing UV/Vis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffractometry. Previously, due to the sparse geometric characterisation of alkane ?-complexes, assumptions regarding bonding geometries and selectivities were made by comparison to related ?-complexes, or by analysis of C-H activation products. This minireview assembles relevant literature that illuminates the metrics of alkane-metal bonding, and critically analyses the binding mode, selectivity and stability of alkane complexes. PMID:25196671

Young, Rowan D

2014-09-26

494

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

1.A.5 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for QUARANTINE OF RABBITS 1.0 Purpose: This procedure outlines the quarantine and feeding regimen for all rabbits involved with the use of rabbits. 3.0 Procedure: 3.1 Rabbits are procured from approved, licensed vendors

Krovi, Venkat

495

Association Euratom -Ris National Laboratory -  

E-print Network

damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses

496

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

497

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.E.12 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for WORKING guidelines that must be followed see attached "Standard Practices" (Attachment). #12;B. Moving cages within on a cart, covered and moved next to the autoclave until they can be autoclaved out of the suite. C

Krovi, Venkat

498

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

1.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for Husbandry, wire lids, food, water, and bedding and enrichment items must be sterilized (autoclaved or irradiated listed above must first be placed in cages and autoclaved prior to being introduced in the SPF facility

Krovi, Venkat

499

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

4.A.3 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for AUTOCLAVE MONITORING AND USE 1.0 Purpose This procedure details the test monitoring and use of autoclaves employed by the CMLAF. 2.0 Scope This procedure applies to CMLAF staff assigned to perform autoclave monitoring. 3

Krovi, Venkat

500

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for JUGULAR VEIN this SOP. 2.0 Procedure A. Equipment 1. Autoclaved surgical instruments: a. Operating scissors 5 ½" b. Eye autoclave or cold sterilant (glutaraldehyde) by immersion. Instruments must be rinsed in sterile saline

Krovi, Venkat