Science.gov

Sample records for x-ray attenuation coefficient

  1. Uranium soft x-ray total attenuation coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Oliver, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium total attenuation coefficients were measured continuously from 0.84 to 6.0 keV and at selected higher energies using a vacuum single crystal diffractometer and flow-proportional counter. Statistical fluctuations ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The overall accuracy was 3%. Prominent structure was measured within 20 eV of the M/sub 5/ (3.552 keV) and M/sub 4/ (3.728 keV) edges. Jump ratios were determined from log-log polynomial fits to data at energies apart from the near-edge regions. These data were compared with calculations based on a relativistic HFS central potential model and with previously tabulated data.

  2. New consistency tests for high-accuracy measurements of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by the X-ray extended-range technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C.T.; Islam, M.T.; Rae, N.A.; Tran, C.Q.; Glover, J.L.; Barnea, Z.

    2012-09-25

    An extension of the X-ray extended-range technique is described for measuring X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by introducing absolute measurement of a number of foils - the multiple independent foil technique. Illustrating the technique with the results of measurements for gold in the 38-50 keV energy range, it is shown that its use enables selection of the most uniform and well defined of available foils, leading to more accurate measurements; it allows one to test the consistency of independently measured absolute values of the mass attenuation coefficient with those obtained by the thickness transfer method; and it tests the linearity of the response of the counter and counting chain throughout the range of X-ray intensities encountered in a given experiment. In light of the results for gold, the strategy to be ideally employed in measuring absolute X-ray mass attenuation coefficients, X-ray absorption fine structure and related quantities is discussed.

  3. Theoretical explanation of the relationship between backscattered electron and x-ray linear attenuation coefficients in calcified tissues.

    PubMed

    Wong, F S; Elliott, J C

    1997-11-01

    X-ray absorption and backscattered electron (BSE) microscopies are two commonly used techniques for estimating mineral contents in calcified tissues. The resolution in BSE images is usually higher than in x-ray images, but due to the previous lack of good standards to quantify the grey levels in BSE images of bones and teeth, x-ray microtomography (XMT) images of the same specimens have been used for calibration. However, the physics of these two techniques is different: for a specimen with a given composition, the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient is proportional to density, but there is no such relation with the BSE coefficient. To understand the reason that this calibration appears to be valid, the behaviour of simulated bone samples was investigated. In this, the bone samples were modelled as having three phases: hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), protein, and void (either empty or completely filled with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), a resin which is usually used for embedding bones and teeth in microscopic studies). The x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (calculated using published data) and the BSE coefficients (calculated using Monte Carlo simulation) were compared for samples of various phase proportions. It was found that the BSE coefficient correlated only with the x-ray attenuation coefficient for samples with PMMA infiltration. This was attributed to the properties of PMMA (density and mean atomic number) being very similar to those of the protein; therefore, the sample behaves like a two-phase system which allows the establishment of a monotonic relation between density and BSE coefficient. With the newly developed standards (brominated and iodinated dimethacrylate esters) for BSE microscopy of bone, grey levels can be converted to absolute BSE coefficients by linear interpolation, from which equivalent densities can be determined. PMID:9418207

  4. X-ray extended-range technique for precision measurement of the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient and Im( f) for copper using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Tran, C. Q.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D.; Barnea, Z.

    2001-08-01

    We reconsider the long-standing problem of accurate measurement of atomic form factors for fundamental and applied problems. We discuss the X-ray extended-range technique for accurate measurement of the mass attenuation coefficient and the imaginary component of the atomic form factor. Novelties of this approach include the use of a synchrotron with detector normalisation, the direct calibration of dominant systematics using multiple thicknesses, and measurement over wide energy ranges with a resulting improvement of accuracies by an order of magnitude. This new technique achieves accuracies of 0.27-0.5% and reproducibility of 0.02% for attenuation of copper from 8.84 to 20 keV, compared to accuracies of 10% using atomic vapours. This precision challenges available theoretical calculations. Discrepancies of 10% between current theory and experiments can now be addressed.

  5. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples. PMID:25464176

  6. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and the imaginary part of the form factor of silicon using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    We used the x-ray extended-range technique to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of silicon with an accuracy between 0.27% and 0.5% in the 5 keV-20 keV energy range. Subtraction of the x-ray scattering contribution enabled us to derive the corresponding x-ray photoelectric absorption coefficients and determine the absolute value of the imaginary part of the atomic form factor of silicon. Discrepancies between the experimental values of the mass attenuation coefficients and theoretically calculated values are discussed. New approaches to the theoretical calculation will be required to match the precision and accuracy of the experimental results.

  7. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold in the 38-50-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M T; Rae, N A; Glover, J L; Barnea, Z; de Jonge, M D; Tran, C Q; Wang, J; Chantler, C T

    2010-11-12

    We used synchrotron x rays to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold at nine energies from 38 to 50 keV with accuracies of 0.1%. Our results are much more accurate than previous measurements in this energy range. A comparison of our measurements with calculated mass attenuation coefficients shows that our measurements fall almost exactly midway between the XCOM and FFAST calculated theoretical values, which differ from one another in this energy region by about 4%, even though the range includes no absorption edge. The consistency and accuracy of these measurements open the way to investigations of the x-ray attenuation in the region of the L absorption edge of gold.

  8. Measurements of the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient for low atomic number materials at energies 32-66 and 140 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2005-03-01

    The X-ray linear attenuation coefficient was measured for materials containing elements hydrogen to calcium. Characteristic X-rays with energies 32- 66 keV were produced by X-ray fluorescence using a secondary target system, and 140 keV gamma rays were obtained from an unsealed 99 mTc source. The photon beams were highly collimated and recorded using energy dispersive detection. A high-purity germanium detector was utilised to distinguish between measurements with K α and K β characteristic X-rays, and the gamma ray measurements used a sodium iodide detector. Samples were selected on the basis of having known composition and mass densities were measured using a pycnometer. The samples comprised six plastics, seven crystalline materials, three tissue substitute materials, three liquids and six salt solutions. Our results have an uncertainty of less than 2% and are a few percent lower than values predicted by the tabulations.

  9. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper using 8.85-20 keV synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Tran, C. Q.; Barnea, Z.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D. J.; Balaic, D. X.

    2001-12-01

    This work presents the x-ray extended range technique for measuring x-ray mass attenuation coefficients. This technique includes the use of multiple foil attenuators at each energy investigated, allowing independent tests of detector linearity and of the harmonic contributions to the monochromated synchrotron beam. Measurements over a wide energy range allow the uncertainty of local foil thickness to be minimized by the calibration of thin sample measurements to those of thick samples. The use of an extended criterion for sample thickness selection allows direct determination of dominant systematics, with an improvement of accuracies compared to previous measurements by up to factors of 20. Resulting accuracies for attenuation coefficients of copper (8.84 to 20 keV) are 0.27-0.5 %, with reproducibility of 0.02%. We also extract the imaginary component of the form factor from the data with the same accuracy. Results are compared to theoretical calculations near and away from the absorption edge. The accuracy challenges available theoretical calculations, and observed discrepancies of 10% between current theory and experiments can now be addressed.

  10. X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 66 X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables (Web, free access)   This database collects tables and graphs of the form factors, the photoabsorption cross section, and the total attenuation coefficient for any element (Z <= 92).

  11. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form-factor of tin over the energy range of 29 keV-60 keV.

    SciTech Connect

    de Jonge, M. D.; Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Dhal, B. P.; Paterson, D.; Kanter, E. P.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.; Beno, M. A.; Linton, J. A.; Jennings, G.; Univ. of Melbourne; Australian Synchrotron Project

    2007-01-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  12. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients for four mixtures using X-rays from 13 keV up to 40 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Esposito, A.; Chiti, M.; Gentile, A.

    2001-06-01

    The total absorption coefficients for some selected organic compounds relevant to health physics, Triaflol BN (C 3H 4O 2) n, Triaflol TN (C 12H 18O 7) n, Kapton (C 44H 20O 10) n, and Melinex (C 10H 8N 4O 4) n were measured in the X-ray energy range from 13 keV up to about 40 keV using a collimator, high purity germanium detector with thin Be window and variable energy X-ray source. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained using the XCOM code. The agreement is generally good within a few percent.

  13. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of molybdenum over the 13.5-41.5-keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Cookson, David J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Mashayekhi, Ali

    2005-03-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [Chantler , Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of molybdenum in the x-ray energy range of 13.5-41.5keV to 0.02-0.15 % accuracy. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct where necessary a number of experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for molybdenum and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The imaginary component of the atomic form-factor f2 is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-15 % persist between the calculated and observed values.

  14. X-ray mass attenuation coefficients and imaginary components of the atomic form factor of zinc over the energy range of 7.2-15.2 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Nicholas A.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Hester, James R.

    2010-02-15

    The x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of zinc are measured in a high-accuracy experiment between 7.2 and 15.2 keV with an absolute accuracy of 0.044% and 0.197%. This is the most accurate determination of any attenuation coefficient on a bending-magnet beamline and reduces the absolute uncertainty by a factor of 3 compared to earlier work by advances in integrated column density determination and the full-foil mapping technique described herein. We define a relative accuracy of 0.006%, which is not the same as either the precision or the absolute accuracy. Relative accuracy is the appropriate parameter for standard implementation of analysis of near-edge spectra. Values of the imaginary components f'' of the x-ray form factor of zinc are derived. Observed differences between the measured mass attenuation coefficients and various theoretical calculations reach a maximum of about 5% at the absorption edge and up to 2% further than 1 keV away from the edge. The measurements invite improvements in the theoretical calculations of mass attenuation coefficients of zinc.

  15. X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 126 X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest (Web, free access)   Tables and graphs of the photon mass attenuation coefficient and the mass energy-absorption coefficient are presented for all of the elements Z = 1 to 92, and for 48 compounds and mixtures of radiological interest. The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray, gamma ray, bremsstrahlung) from 1 keV to 20 MeV.

  16. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  17. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  18. The attenuation of X-rays emitted by supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schocken, K.

    1973-01-01

    The attenuation of X-rays in Arnett's C-12 detonation supernova model is computed. The attenuation of X-rays in the filaments of the Crab Nebula is computed using a model for the filaments by Woltjer and a model by Davidson and Tucker. An empirical expression by Gorenstein, Kellogg, and Gursky for the optical thickness of the interstellar medium for three supernova remnants is analyzed.

  19. Dual-energy X-ray analysis using synchrotron computed tomography at 35 and 60 keV for the estimation of photon interaction coefficients describing attenuation and energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Stewart; Schleich, Nanette

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for dual-energy X-ray analysis (DEXA) is tested using measurements of the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ. The key is a mathematical model that describes elemental cross sections using a polynomial in atomic number. The model is combined with the mixture rule to describe μ for materials, using the same polynomial coefficients. Materials are characterized by their electron density Ne and statistical moments Rk describing their distribution of elements, analogous to the concept of effective atomic number. In an experiment with materials of known density and composition, measurements of μ are written as a system of linear simultaneous equations, which is solved for the polynomial coefficients. DEXA itself involves computed tomography (CT) scans at two energies to provide a system of non-linear simultaneous equations that are solved for Ne and the fourth statistical moment R4. Results are presented for phantoms containing dilute salt solutions and for a biological specimen. The experiment identifies 1% systematic errors in the CT measurements, arising from third-harmonic radiation, and 20-30% noise, which is reduced to 3-5% by pre-processing with the median filter and careful choice of reconstruction parameters. DEXA accuracy is quantified for the phantom as the mean absolute differences for Ne and R4: 0.8% and 1.0% for soft tissue and 1.2% and 0.8% for bone-like samples, respectively. The DEXA results for the biological specimen are combined with model coefficients obtained from the tabulations to predict μ and the mass energy absorption coefficient at energies of 10 keV to 20 MeV. PMID:25931101

  20. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards in the 16.59-25.26 keV photon energy range and their density profile using x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marashdeh, M W; Bauk, S; Tajuddin, A A; Hashim, R

    2012-04-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard with four different particle sizes (samples A, B, C and D) and natural raw Rhizophora spp. wood (sample E) were determined using single-beam photon transmission in the energy range between 16.59 and 25.26 keV. This was done by determining the attenuation of K(α1) X-ray fluorescent (XRF) photons from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin targets. The results were compared with theoretical values of young-age breast (Breast 1) and water calculated using a XCOM computer program. It was found that the mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards to be close to the calculated XCOM values in water than natural Rhizophora spp. wood. Computed tomography (CT) scans were then used to determine the density profile of the samples. The CT scan results showed that the Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard has uniform density compared to natural Rhizophora spp. wood. In general, the differences in the variability of the profile density decrease as the particle size of the pellet samples decreases. PMID:22304963

  1. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value. PMID:14620065

  2. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, B. J.; Davis, J. R.; Grant, J. A.; Morgan, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value.

  3. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer's law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ1-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  4. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-18

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  5. Detailed Tabulation of Atomic Form Factors, Photoelectric Absorption and Scattering Cross Section, and Mass Attenuation Coefficients in the Vicinity of Absorption Edges in the Soft X-Ray (Z=30-36, Z=60-89, E=0.1 keV-10 keV), Addressing Convergence Issues of Earlier Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.

    2000-07-01

    Reliable knowledge of the complex x-ray form factor [Re(f ) and f″] and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient (σPE) is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, radiation safety, and XAFS studies. Discrepancies between currently used theoretical approaches of 200% exist for numerous elements from 1 to 3 keV x-ray energies. The key discrepancies are due to the smoothing of edge structure, the use of nonrelativistic wave functions, and the lack of appropriate convergence of wave functions. This paper addresses these key discrepancies and derives new theoretical results of substantially higher accuracy in near-edge soft x-ray regions. The high-energy limitations of the current approach are also illustrated. The energy range covered is 0.1 to 10 keV. The associated figures and tabulation demonstrate the current comparison with alternate theory and with available experimental data. In general, experimental data are not sufficiently accurate to establish the errors and inadequacies of theory at this level. However, the best experimental data and the observed experimental structure as a function of energy are strong indicators of the validity of the current approach. New developments in experimental measurement hold great promise in making critical comparisons with theory in the near future.

  6. Density and atomic number measurements with spectral x-ray attenuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heismann, B. J.; Leppert, J.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2003-08-01

    X-ray attenuation measurements are widely used in medical and industrial applications. The usual results are one- to three-dimensional representations of the attenuation coefficient μ(r). In this paper, we present the ρZ projection algorithm for obtaining the density ρ(r) and atomic number Z(r) with an energy-resolving x-ray method. As input data the algorithm uses at least two measurements μ1,μ2,… with different spectral weightings of the source spectrum S(E) and/or detector sensitivity D(E). Analytically, ρ is a function of μ1-cμ2, c=const, and Z is a function of μ1/μ2. The full numerical treatment yields ρ(μ1,μ2) and Z(μ1,μ2) with S(E) and D(E) as commutative parametric functions. We tested the method with dual-energy computed tomography measurements of an organic sample and a set of chemical solutions with predefined ρ and Z. The resulting images show ρ and Z as complementary information: The density ρ reflects the morphology of the objects, whereas the atomic number Z=number of electrons/atom describes the material distribution. For our experimental setup we obtain an absolute precision of 0.1 for Z and 20 mg/cm3 for ρ. The ρZ projection can potentially lead to these classes of quantitative information for various scientific, industrial, and medical applications.

  7. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions.

    PubMed

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Wallis, Matthew G

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature. PMID:26961507

  8. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  9. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  10. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  11. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  12. New techniques provide low-cost X-ray inspection of highly attenuating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stupin, D.M.; Mueller, K.H.; Viskoe, D.A.; Howard, B.; Poland, R.W.; Schneberk, D.; Dolan, K.; Thompson, K.; Stoker, G.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of an arms reduction treaty between the United States and the Russian Federation, both countries will each be storing over 40,000 containers of plutonium. To help detect any deterioration of the containers and prevent leakage, the authors are designing a digital radiography and computed tomography system capable of handling this volume reliably, efficiently, and at a lower cost. The materials to be stored have very high x-ray attenuations, and, in the past, were inspected using 1- to 24-MV x-ray sources. This inspection system, however, uses a new scintillating (Lockheed) glass and an integrating CCD camera. Preliminary experiments show that this will permit the use of a 450-kV x-ray source. This low-energy system will cost much less than others designed to use a higher-energy x-ray source because it will require a less expensive source, less shielding, and less floor space. Furthermore, they can achieve a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution by using their knowledge of the point-spread function of the x-ray imaging system and a least-squares fitting technique.

  13. The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Les, C. M.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yan, C. H.; Cleek, T. M.; Wills, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the material characteristics of bone marrow with aging can be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities. In the context of computed tomography, dual-energy computed techniques have been used to correct for changes in marrow composition. However, dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (DE-QCT) protocols, while increasing the accuracy of the measurement, reduce the precision and increase the radiation dose to the patient in comparison to single-energy quantitative computed tomography (SE-QCT) protocols. If the attenuation properties of the marrow for a particular bone can be shown to be relatively constant with age, it should be possible to use single-energy techniques without experiencing errors caused by unknown marrow composition. Marrow was extracted by centrifugation from 10 mm thick frontal sections of 34 adult cadaver calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17-65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation coefficient of each marrow sample were determined. For purposes of comparing our results, we then computed an effective CT number at two GE CT/i scan voltages (80 and 120 kVp) for each specimen. The coefficients of variation for the density, CT number at 80 kVp and CT number at 120 kVp were each less than 1%, and the parameters did not change significantly with age (p > 0.2, r2 < 0.02, power > 0.8 where the minimum acceptable r2 = 0.216). We could demonstrate no significant gender-associated differences in these relationships. These data suggest that calcaneal bone marrow X-ray attenuation properties and marrow density are essentially constant from the third through sixth decades of life.

  14. In vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intratumor injection of indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang; Luo, Qingming; Liang, Wenxi; Lu, Jinling

    2003-12-01

    We report our experimental results of in vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intra-tumor injection of indocyanine green (ICG). An eight- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mouse weighting between 15 and 20 g is used in the experiments, which has been implanted with myeloma cell line (SP2/0) two week before. The system used to monitor the intratumor diffusion of ICG is a digital x-ray imaging system. It works at 33kVp, 0.3mAs, 4 seconds and 1.5×magnification. The objective of this research is to study the x-ray attenuation at different area, which represented by gray-scale value. Compare to the ROI in the tissue without ICG and ROI of black background in the image, there is an obvious change before and after injecting ICG in the tumor, which is the area ICG can diffuse to. It shows the feasibility of using digital x-ray imaging system to dynamically, effectively and noninterventionly monitor the diffusion of the ICG.

  15. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  16. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  17. The criteria for measuring average density by x-ray attenuation: The role of spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, W.

    1999-07-29

    It is well known that the attenuation of X-rays as they pass through a material can be used to quantify the amount of matter in their path. This is the basis for the gamma ray densitometer which can measure the amount of material on a moving conveyor belt. It is also the rationale for using X-rays for medical imaging as the attenuation can discriminate between tissue of different density and composition, yielding images of great diagnostic utility. Spatial resolution is obviously important with regard to detecting small features. However, it is less obvious that it plays an important role in obtaining quantitative information from the X-ray transmission data since the spatial resolution of the instrument can affect the accuracy of those measurements. This problem is particularly severe in the case of computed tomography where the accuracy of the reconstruction is dependent on the accuracy of the initial projection data. It should be noted that spatial resolution is not a concern for the case where the material is uniform. Here uniform is defined by small variations related to either the scale size of the resolution element in the detector, or to the size of a collimated X-ray beam. However, if the material has non-homogeneous composition or changes in density on the scale size of the systems spatial resolution, then there can be effects that will compromise the transmission data before it is acquired and these errors can not be corrected by any subsequent data processing. A method is presented for computing the density measurement error which parameterizes the effect in terms of the actual modulation on the face of the detector and the attenuation in the material. For cases like stacks of lead plates the errors can exceed 80%.

  18. Research on reducing radiation exposure for clinical applications of X-ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Min-Cheol; Han, Man-Seok; So, Woon-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Seung-Yeol

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed at identifing areas with low radiation exposure where workers could be taken in the examination room in case that they had to hold the patients by estimating the attenuation of primary radiation and measuring the spatial distribution of scattered radiation. The laboratory equipment included on the X-ray generator, a phantom (human phantom), and a dosimeter. The experiment measured the performance of the examination system (dose reproducibility), the dose of primary radiation (X-rays), and the dose of scattered radiation (secondary radiation). Both the primary and the scattered radiation were attenuated by a factor of tube in vacuum experimental tests of the inverse square law. In this study, the attenuation was 2 ˜ 2.246 for primary radiation and 2 ˜ 2.105 for secondary radiation. Natural attenuation occurred as the X-rays passed through air, and an attenuation equation was established in this study. The equation for primary radiation (1st dose) was y = A1* exp(- x/t1)+ y0. The high-intensity contour of the direction for the cathode was wider than that of the direction for the anode, showing a wide range on the rear side of the cathode and on the rear side of the anode. We tried to find the positions where the workers' radiation exposure could be reduced. When the medical radiation workers have to hold the patient for an abdominal examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the left side of the patient. For a lumbar-spine lateral examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and behind the patient, and for a femur AP (anterior-posterior) examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the right side of the patient.

  19. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated. PMID:26698041

  20. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorptionmore » images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.« less

  1. Single-shot Z(eff) dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, M P; Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M

    2015-04-01

    The Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n=1-δ+iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density n(e) and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Z(eff), a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorption images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot-Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Z(eff) values of test objects within the 4-12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Z(eff) mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Z(eff) from refraction and attenuation measurements with moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of high energy density research, such as shocked materials and inertial confinement fusion experiments, as well as material science and nondestructive testing. PMID:25967162

  2. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; White, R. Allen; Atkinson, E. Neely; Cody, Dianna D.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. Methods: An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semilogarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. Results: The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R{sup 2} > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. Conclusions: The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).

  3. Imaging method based on attenuation, refraction and ultra-small-angle-scattering of x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Wernick, Miles N.; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Oltulu, Oral; Zhong, Zhong

    2005-09-20

    A method for detecting an image of an object by measuring the intensity at a plurality of positions of a transmitted beam of x-ray radiation emitted from the object as a function of angle within the transmitted beam. The intensity measurements of the transmitted beam are obtained by a crystal analyzer positioned at a plurality of angular positions. The plurality of intensity measurements are used to determine the angular intensity spectrum of the transmitted beam. One or more parameters, such as an attenuation property, a refraction property and a scatter property, can be obtained from the angular intensity spectrum and used to display an image of the object.

  4. Estimation of effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences for volumetric breast density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue; Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andrew; Kshirsagar, Ashwini

    2014-03-01

    Breast density has been identified to be a risk factor of developing breast cancer and an indicator of lesion diagnostic obstruction due to masking effect. Volumetric density measurement evaluates fibro-glandular volume, breast volume, and breast volume density measures that have potential advantages over area density measurement in risk assessment. One class of volume density computing methods is based on the finding of the relative fibro-glandular tissue attenuation with regards to the reference fat tissue, and the estimation of the effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences between the fibro-glandular and fat tissue is key to volumetric breast density computing. We have modeled the effective attenuation difference as a function of actual x-ray skin entrance spectrum, breast thickness, fibro-glandular tissue thickness distribution, and detector efficiency. Compared to other approaches, our method has threefold advantages: (1) avoids the system calibration-based creation of effective attenuation differences which may introduce tedious calibrations for each imaging system and may not reflect the spectrum change and scatter induced overestimation or underestimation of breast density; (2) obtains the system specific separate and differential attenuation values of fibroglandular and fat for each mammographic image; and (3) further reduces the impact of breast thickness accuracy to volumetric breast density. A quantitative breast volume phantom with a set of equivalent fibro-glandular thicknesses has been used to evaluate the volume breast density measurement with the proposed method. The experimental results have shown that the method has significantly improved the accuracy of estimating breast density.

  5. Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Gwinner, G.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism for most ions in X-ray photoionized cosmic plasmas. Reliably modeling and interpreting spectra from these plasmas requires accurate low temperature DR rate Coefficients. Of particular importance are the DR rate coefficients for the iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII-Fe XXIV). These ions are predicted to play an important role in determining the thermal structure and line emission of X-ray photoionized plasmas, which form in the media surrounding accretion powered sources such as X-ray binaries (XRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and cataclysmic variables (Savin et al., 2000). The need for reliable DR data of iron L-shell ions has become particularly urgent after the launches of Chandra and XMM-Newton. These satellites are now providing high-resolution X-ray spectra from a wide range of X-ray photoionized sources. Interpreting the spectra from these sources requires reliable DR rate coefficients. However, at the temperatures relevant, for X-ray photoionized plasmas, existing theoretical DR rate coefficients can differ from one another by factors of two to orders of magnitudes.

  6. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W.; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated.

  7. Resonant Raman scattering contribution to attenuation of x rays at energies in lower vicinity of the K-shell ionization threshold of some elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sharma, Veena; Kumar, Sunil; Alrakabi, Muhanad; Mehta, D.; Singh, Nirmal

    2009-05-15

    Attenuation of the x rays and gamma rays in the {sub 22}Ti, {sub 41}Nb, {sub 69}Tm, {sub 70}Yb, and {sub 71}Lu elements have been measured with special emphasis for the x ray energies (E{sub in}) in lower vicinity of the K shell ionization threshold (B{sub K}) of the element. The incident photon beam is obtained from decay of the {sup 55}Fe, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 57}Co radioisotopes, and fluorescence of the {sub 23}V, {sub 70}Yb, {sub 71}Lu, {sub 74}W, {sub 76}Os, and {sub 90}Th targets excited by the x rays and gamma rays from the radioisotopes. The measurements were performed using energy dispersive setups involving Ge detectors. The measured attenuation coefficients agree with the available theoretical values except at the photon energies with (B{sub K}-E{sub in}) less than or nearly equal to the K-shell width (GAMMA{sub K}), where significant positive deviations as large as factor of 2 have been observed. In view of reliability of the available theoretical cross sections for the photoionization and the photon scattering processes, the magnitude of positive alteration at the photon energy in lower vicinity of the ionization threshold is attributed to the K shell resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process and the corresponding cross sections have been deduced. Possible matrix effects in the energy dispersive x ray spectrometry due to RRS are also discussed.

  8. Three-dimensional x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, B.P.; Deckman, H.W.; Roberge, W.G.; D'Amico, K.L.

    1987-09-18

    The new technique of x-ray microtomography nondestructively generates three-dimensional maps of the x-ray attenuation coefficient inside small samples with approximately 1 percent accuracy and with resolution approaching 1 micrometer. Spatially resolved elemental maps can be produced with synchrotron x-ray sources by scanning samples at energies just above and below characteristic atomic absorption edges. The system consists of a high-resolution imaging x-ray detector and high-speed algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The design and operation of the microtomography device are described, and tomographic images that illustrate it performance with both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources are presented.

  9. X-Ray cone-beam phase tomography formulas based on phase-attenuation duality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2005-08-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the phase-retrieval formula based on the phase-attenuation duality that we recently proposed in previous brief communication. We have incorporated the effects of x-ray source coherence and detector resolution into the phase-retrieval formula as well. Since only a single image is needed for performing the phase retrieval by means of this new approach, we point out the great advantages of this new approach for implementation of phase tomography. We combine our phase-retrieval formula with the Feldkamp-Davis-Kresss (FDK) cone-beam reconstruction algorithm to provide a three-dimensional phase tomography formula for soft tissue objects of relatively small sizes, such as small animals or human breast. For large objects we briefly show how to apply Katsevich's cone-beam reconstruction formula to the helical phase tomography as well. PMID:19498608

  10. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  11. Evaluation of conversion coefficients relating air-kerma to H*(10) using primary and transmitted x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology energy range.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; Mariano, L; Tomal, A; Costa, P R

    2016-03-01

    According to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the relationship between effective dose and incident air-kerma is complex and depends on the attenuation of x-rays in the body. Therefore, it is not practical to use this quantity for shielding design purposes. This correlation is adopted in practical situations by using conversion coefficients calculated using validated mathematical models by the ICRU. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is a quantity adopted by the IAEA for monitoring external exposure. Dose constraint levels are established in terms of H*(10), while the radiation levels in radiometric surveys are calculated by means of the measurements of air-kerma with ion chambers. The resulting measurements are converted into ambient dose equivalents by conversion factors. In the present work, an experimental study of the relationship between the air-kerma and the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent was conducted using different experimental scenarios. This study was done by measuring the primary x-ray spectra and x-ray spectra transmitted through materials used in dedicated chest radiographic facilities, using a CdTe detector. The air-kerma to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients were calculated from these measured spectra. The resulting values of the quantity ambient dose equivalent using these conversion coefficients are more realistic than those available in the literature, because they consider the real energy distribution of primary and transmitted x-ray beams. The maximum difference between the obtained conversion coefficients and the constant value recommended in national and international radiation protection standards is 53.4%. The conclusion based on these results is that a constant coefficient may not be adequate for deriving the ambient dose equivalent. PMID:26835613

  12. Calibrating the X-ray attenuation of liquid water and correcting sample movement artefacts during in operando synchrotron X-ray radiographic imaging of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Nan; Chevalier, Stéphane; Hinebaugh, James; Yip, Ronnie; Lee, Jongmin; Antonacci, Patrick; Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray radiography, due to its high temporal and spatial resolutions, provides a valuable means for understanding the in operando water transport behaviour in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The purpose of this study is to address the specific artefact of imaging sample movement, which poses a significant challenge to synchrotron-based imaging for fuel cell diagnostics. Specifically, the impact of the micrometer-scale movement of the sample was determined, and a correction methodology was developed. At a photon energy level of 20 keV, a maximum movement of 7.5 µm resulted in a false water thickness of 0.93 cm (9% higher than the maximum amount of water that the experimental apparatus could physically contain). This artefact was corrected by image translations based on the relationship between the false water thickness value and the distance moved by the sample. The implementation of this correction method led to a significant reduction in false water thickness (to ∼0.04 cm). Furthermore, to account for inaccuracies in pixel intensities due to the scattering effect and higher harmonics, a calibration technique was introduced for the liquid water X-ray attenuation coefficient, which was found to be 0.657 ± 0.023 cm(-1) at 20 keV. The work presented in this paper provides valuable tools for artefact compensation and accuracy improvements for dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging of fuel cells. PMID:26917148

  13. Attenuation correction for small animal SPECT imaging using x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-15

    Photon attenuation in small animal nuclear medicine scans can be significant when using isotopes that emit lower energy photons such as iodine-125. We have developed a method to use microCT data to perform attenuation corrected small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A microCT calibration phantom was first imaged, and the resulting calibration curve was used to convert microCT image values to linear attenuation coefficient values that were then used in an iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm. This method was applied to reconstruct a SPECT image of a uniform phantom filled with {sup 125}I-NaI. Without attenuation correction, the image suffered a 30% decrease in intensity in the center of the image, which was removed with the addition of attenuation correction. This reduced the relative standard deviation in the region of interest from 10% to 6%.

  14. Prediction coefficient estimation in Markov random fields for iterative x-ray CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Sauer, Ken; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Yu, Zhou; Bouman, Charles

    2012-02-01

    Bayesian estimation is a statistical approach for incorporating prior information through the choice of an a priori distribution for a random field. A priori image models in Bayesian image estimation are typically low-order Markov random fields (MRFs), effectively penalizing only differences among immediately neighboring voxels. This limits spectral description to a crude low-pass model. For applications where more flexibility in spectral response is desired, potential benefit exists in models which accord higher a priori probability to content in higher frequencies. Our research explores the potential of larger neighborhoods in MRFs to raise the number of degrees of freedom in spectral description. Similarly to classical filter design, the MRF coefficients may be chosen to yield a desired pass-band/stop-band characteristic shape in the a priori model of the images. In this paper, we present an alternative design method, where high-quality sample images are used to estimate the MRF coefficients by fitting them into the spatial correlation of the given ensemble. This method allows us to choose weights that increase the probability of occurrence of strong components at particular spatial frequencies. This allows direct adaptation of the MRFs for different tissue types based on sample images with different frequency content. In this paper, we consider particularly the preservation of detail in bone structure in X-ray CT. Our results show that MRF design can be used to obtain bone emphasis similar to that of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) with a bone kernel.

  15. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  16. Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, D. W.; Gwinner, G.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2002-11-01

    Low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism for most ions in X-ray photoionized cosmic plasmas. Reliably modeling and interpreting spectra from these plasmas requires accurate low temperature DR rate coefficients. Of particular importance are the DR rate coefficients for the iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII -Fe XXIV). These ions are predicted to play an important role in determining the thermal structure and line emission of X-ray photoionized plasmas, which form in the media surrounding accretion powered sources such as X-ray binaries (XRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and cataclysmic variables (Savin et al. 2000). The need for reliable DR data of iron L-shell ions has become particularly urgent after the launches of Chandra and XMM-Newton. These satellites are now providing high-resolution X-ray spectra from a wide range of X-ray photoionized sources. Interpreting the spectra from these sources requires reliable DR rate coefficients. However, at the temperatures relevant for X-ray photoionized plasmas, existing theoretical DR rate coefficients can differ from one another by factors of two to orders of magnitudes. To address the need for accurate low temperature DR rate coefficients of the iron L-shell ions, we have initiated a program of measurements for DR via 2 to 2 core excitations using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring located at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. To date measurements have been carried out for Fe XVIII (Savin et al. 1997, 1999), Fe XIX (Savin et al. 1999), Fe XX (Savin et al. 2002), Fe XXI, Fe XXII, and Fe XXIV. Here we review our work to date, discuss the implications of our results, and map out our future research efforts. This work was supported in part by NASA SARA Program grant NAG5-5261, the German Federal Minister for Education and Research (BMBF), and the German Research Council (DFG).

  17. Mass-energy absorption coefficient and backscatter factor ratios for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Seuntjens, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    For low-energy (up to 150 kV) x-rays, the ratio of mass-energy absorption coefficients for water to air, , and the backscatter factor B are used in the conversion of air kerma, measured free-in-air, to water kerma on the surface of a water phantom. For clinical radiotherapy, similar conversion factors are needed for the determination of the absorbed dose to biological tissues on (or near) the surface of a human body. We have computed the ratios and B factor ratios for different biological tissues including muscle, soft tissue, lung, skin and bone relative to water. The ratios were obtained by integrating the respective mass-energy absorption coefficients over the in-air primary photon spectra. We have also calculated the ratios at different depths in a water phantom in order to convert the measured in-phantom water kerma to the absorbed dose to various biological tissues. The EGS4/DOSIMETER Monte Carlo code system has been used for the simulation of the energy fluence at different depths in a water phantom irradiated by a kilovoltage x-ray beam of variable beam quality (HVL: 0.1 mm Al-5 mm Cu), field size and source-surface distance (SSD). The same code was also used in the calculation of the B factor ratios, soft tissue to water and bone to water. The results show that the B factor for bone differs from the B factor for water by up to 20% for a 100 kV beam (HVL: 2.65 mm Al) with a 100 field. On the other hand, the difference in the B factor between water and soft tissue is insignificant (well within 1% generally). This means that the B factors for water may be directly used to

  18. X-ray attenuation of adipose breast tissue: in-vitro and in-vivo measurements using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Erhard, Klaus; Berggren, Karl; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cederström, Björn; Johansson, Henrik; Lundqvist, Mats; Moa, Elin; Homan, Hanno; Willsher, Paula; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Wallis, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    The development of new x-ray imaging techniques often requires prior knowledge of tissue attenuation, but the sources of such information are sparse. We have measured the attenuation of adipose breast tissue using spectral imaging, in vitro and in vivo. For the in-vitro measurement, fixed samples of adipose breast tissue were imaged on a spectral mammography system, and the energy-dependent x-ray attenuation was measured in terms of equivalent thicknesses of aluminum and poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). For the in-vivo measurement, a similar procedure was applied on a number of spectral screening mammograms. The results of the two measurements agreed well and were consistent with published attenuation data and with measurements on tissue-equivalent material.

  19. Attenuation coefficient determination of printed ABS and PLA samples in diagnostic radiology standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, G. R.; Corrêa, E. L.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Campos, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    IAEA code of practice TRS-457 states that standard phantoms should offer the same primary attenuation and scatter production as relevant body section of a representative patient. Material cost, availability and dimensional stability must also be considered. The goal of this study is to determine the attenuation coefficient of printed ABS and PLA samples in standard X-ray beams, verifying if phantoms printed with these materials could be an easier-handle substitute for PMMA, enabling the creation of different designs in an easier and cheaper way. Results show that PMMA presents higher attenuation coefficient, followed by PLA and ABS, which means that thinner PMMA layer creates higher radiation attenuation.

  20. A semianalytic model to extract differential linear scattering coefficients of breast tissue from energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Boileau, Michel M.; Wang Yinkun

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this work is to develop a technique to measure the x-ray diffraction signals of breast biopsy specimens. A biomedical x-ray diffraction technology capable of measuring such signals may prove to be of diagnostic use to the medical field. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements coupled with a semianalytical model were used to extract the differential linear scattering coefficients [{mu}{sub s}(x)] of breast tissues on absolute scales. The coefficients describe the probabilities of scatter events occurring per unit length of tissue per unit solid angle of detection. They are a function of the momentum transfer argument, x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}, where {theta}=scatter angle and {lambda}=incident wavelength. The technique was validated by using a 3 mm diameter 50 kV polychromatic x-ray beam incident on a 5 mm diameter 5 mm thick sample of water. Water was used because good x-ray diffraction data are available in the literature. The scatter profiles from 6 deg. to 15 deg. in increments of 1 deg. were measured with a 3 mmx3 mmx2 mm thick cadmium zinc telluride detector. A 2 mm diameter Pb aperture was placed on top of the detector. The target to detector distance was 29 cm and the duration of each measurement was 10 min. Ensemble averages of the results compare well with the gold standard data of A. H. Narten [''X-ray diffraction data on liquid water in the temperature range 4 deg. C-200 deg. C, ORNL Report No. 4578 (1970)]. An average 7.68% difference for which most of the discrepancies can be attributed to the background noise at low angles was obtained. The preliminary measurements of breast tissue are also encouraging.

  1. Effect of X-Ray Attenuation of Arterial Obstructions on Intravenous Thrombolysis and Outcome after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Grant; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Lindley, Richard I.; Sandercock, Peter A. G.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the x-ray attenuation of intra-arterial obstruction measured on non-contrast CT in ischemic stroke can predict response to thrombolysis and subsequent functional outcome. Methods The Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3) was a multicenter randomized-controlled trial of intravenous thrombolysis (rt-PA) given within six hours of ischemic stroke. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. In a subgroup of 109 IST-3 patients (38 men, median age 82 years), a single reader, masked to all clinical and other imaging data, manually measured x-ray attenuation (Hounsfield Units, HU) on non-contrast CT at the location of angiographically-proven intra-arterial obstructions, pre-randomization and at 24–48 hour follow-up. We calculated change in attenuation between scans. We assessed the impact of pre-randomization arterial obstruction attenuation on six-month functional outcome. Results Most arterial obstructions (64/109, 59%) were hyperattenuating (mean 51.0 HU). Compared with control, treatment with rt-PA was associated with a greater, but non-significant, reduction in obstruction attenuation at follow-up (-8.0 HU versus -1.4 HU in patients allocated control, p = 0.117). In multivariable ordinal regression analysis controlled for patient age, stroke severity, location and extent of obstruction, time from stroke onset to baseline scan and rt-PA treatment allocation, the attenuation of pre-randomization arterial obstruction was not independently associated with six-month outcome (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.94–1.03, p = 0.516). Conclusions In ischemic stroke, the x-ray attenuation of the arterial obstruction may decline more rapidly from baseline to 24–48 hours following treatment with thrombolysis but we found no evidence that baseline arterial obstruction attenuation predicts six-month outcome. PMID:26701648

  2. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  3. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image. PMID:23470559

  4. A program for calculating and plotting soft-X-ray optical interaction coefficients for molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. M.; Davis, J. C.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Perera, R. C. C.

    1990-05-01

    Comprehensive tables for atomic scattering factor components f1 and f2 were compiled by Henke et al. for the extended photon region of 350-10000 eV. Accurate calculations of optical interaction coefficients for absorption, reflection and scattering by material systems (e.g. filters, multi-layers, etc.), which have widespread application, can be based simply upon the atomic scattering factors for the elements comprising the material, except near the absorption threshold energies. These calculations based upon the weighted sum of f1 and f2 for each atomic species present can be very tedious if done by hand. This led us to develop Optical Constants Grapher (OCG), a user-friendly program to perform these calculations on an IBM PC or compatible computer. By entering the chemical formula, density and thickness of up to six molecules, values of f1, f2, mass absorption, transmission efficiencies, attenuation lengths, mirror reflectivities and complex indices of refraction can be calculated and plotted as a function of energy or wavelength. This program and its user's manual are available from the authors.

  5. Noninvasive Femur Bone Volume Estimation Based on X-Ray Attenuation of a Single Radiographic Image and Medical Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiattisin, Supaporn; Chamnongthai, Kosin

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is an indicator of osteoporosis that is an increasingly serious disease, particularly for the elderly. To calculate BMD, we need to measure the volume of the femur in a noninvasive way. In this paper, we propose a noninvasive bone volume measurement method using x-ray attenuation on radiography and medical knowledge. The absolute thickness at one reference pixel and the relative thickness at all pixels of the bone in the x-ray image are used to calculate the volume and the BMD. First, the absolute bone thickness of one particular pixel is estimated by the known geometric shape of a specific bone part as medical knowledge. The relative bone thicknesses of all pixels are then calculated by x-ray attenuation of each pixel. Finally, given the absolute bone thickness of the reference pixel, the absolute bone thickness of all pixels is mapped. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on 300 subjects were performed. We found that the method provides good estimations of real BMD values of femur bone. Estimates shows a high linear correlation of 0.96 between the volume Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) of CT-SCAN and computed vBMD (all P<0.001). The BMD results reveal 3.23% difference in volume from the BMD of CT-SCAN.

  6. Attenuation coefficients for water quality trading.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arturo A; Chen, Xiaoli; Fox, Jessica; Fulda, Matt; Dorsey, Rebecca; Seapy, Briana; Glenday, Julia; Bray, Erin

    2014-06-17

    Water quality trading has been proposed as a cost-effective approach for reducing nutrient loads through credit generation from agricultural or point source reductions sold to buyers facing costly options. We present a systematic approach to determine attenuation coefficients and their uncertainty. Using a process-based model, we determine attenuation with safety margins at many watersheds for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads as they transport from point of load reduction to the credit buyer. TN and TP in-stream attenuation generally increases with decreasing mean river flow; smaller rivers in the modeled region of the Ohio River Basin had TN attenuation factors per km, including safety margins, of 0.19-1.6%, medium rivers of 0.14-1.2%, large rivers of 0.13-1.1%, and very large rivers of 0.04-0.42%. Attenuation in ditches transporting nutrients from farms to receiving rivers is 0.4%/km for TN, while for TP attenuation in ditches can be up to 2%/km. A 95 percentile safety margin of 30-40% for TN and 6-10% for TP, applied to the attenuation per km factors, was determined from the in-stream sensitivity of load reductions to watershed model parameters. For perspective, over 50 km a 1% per km factor would result in 50% attenuation = 2:1 trading ratio. PMID:24866482

  7. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorption images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.

  8. Robust determination of mass attenuation coefficients of materials with unknown thickness and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    An alternative approach is used to measure normalized mass attenuation coefficients (µ/ρ) of materials with unknown thickness and density. The adopted procedure is based on the use of simultaneous emission of Kα and Kβ X-ray lines as well as gamma peaks from radioactive sources in transmission geometry. 109Cd and 60Co radioactive sources were used for the purpose of the investigation. It has been observed that using the simultaneous X- and/or gamma rays of different energy allows accurate determination of relative mass attenuation coefficients by eliminating the dependence of µ/ρ on thickness and density of the material.

  9. Attenuation properties and percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms using computed tomography (CT) and treatment planning system (TPS) at high energy x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Abdullah, R.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A set of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms with dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm3. The mass attenuation coefficient of the phantom was measured using 60Co gamma source. The phantoms were scanned using Computed Tomography (CT) scanner and the percentage depth dose (PDD) of the phantom was calculated using treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray and compared to that in solid water phantoms. The result showed that the mass attenuation coefficient of tannin-based Rhizohora spp. phantoms was near to the value of water with χ2 value of 1.2. The measured PDD also showed good agreement with solid water phantom at both 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray with percentage deviation below 8% at depth beyond the maximum dose, Zmax.

  10. Scattered X-ray beam nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G.; Kosanetzky, J.

    1989-08-01

    X-ray scatter interactions generally dominate the linear attenuation coefficient at the photon energies typical of medical and industrial radiography. Specific advantages of X-ray scatter imaging, including a flexible choice of measurement geometry, direct 3D-imaging capability (tomography) and improved information for material characterization, are illustrated with results from Compton and coherent scatter devices. Applications of a Compton backscatter scanner (ComScan) in the aerospace industry and coherent scatter imaging in security screening are briefly considered.

  11. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  12. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  13. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    PubMed Central

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm−3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  14. GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION IN X-RAY BINARIES: AN APPLICATION TO LSI + 61{sup 0}303

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Paul D.; LeBohec, Stephan; Vincent, Stephane

    2011-04-20

    The X-ray binary LSI + 61{sup 0}303 consisting of a main-sequence Be star and a compact object has been detected in the TeV range with MAGIC and VERITAS, and showed a clear intensity modulation as a function of the orbital phase. We describe a gamma-ray attenuation model and apply it to this system. Our first result is that interaction of high energy photons with the background radiation produced by the main-sequence star alone does not account for the observed modulation. We then include interactions between very high energy radiation and matter and are able to constrain fundamental parameters of the system such as the mass of the compact object and the density of circumstellar matter around the Be star. In our analysis of the TeV data, we find that the compact object has mass M{sub 2} > 2.5 M{sub sun} at the 99% confidence level, implying it is most likely a black hole. However, we find a column density which conflicts with results from X-ray observations, suggesting that attenuation may not play an important role in the modulation.

  15. Relating x-ray attenuation measurements to water content and distribution in SB-15D core

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J

    1996-09-30

    Making improved estimates of the water content of The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam power from the resource. A series of coordinated physical properties measurements form core recovered from the SB-15D, reported in this volume in a series of papers, have been made to better understand water storage and to relate water content and distribution to observable geophysical properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. A principal objective here is to report new interpretations of x-ray scans made within 72 hours of core recovery from SB-15D, which suggest, taking advantage of preliminary measurements of capillary suction for metagraywacke, that water content was low in much of the preserved core.

  16. Attenuation efficiency of X-ray and comparison to gamma ray and neutrons in composite metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Bourham, Mohamed; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2015-12-01

    Steel-steel composite metal foams (S-S CMFs) and Aluminum-steel composite metal foams (Al-S CMFs) with various sphere sizes and matrix materials were manufactured and investigated for nuclear and radiation environments applications. 316 L Stainless steel, high-speed T15 steel and aluminum materials were used as the matrix material together with 2, 4 and 5.2 mm steel hollow spheres to manufacture various types of composite metal foams (CMFs). High-speed T15 steel is selected due to its high tungsten and vanadium concentration (both high-Z elements) to further improve the shielding efficiency of CMFs. This new type of S-S CMF is called high-Z steel-steel composite metal foam (HZ S-S CMF). Radiation shielding efficiency of all types of CMFs was explored for the attenuation of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. The experimental results were compared with pure lead and Aluminum A356, and verified theoretically through XCOM and Monte Carlo Z-particle Transport Code (MCNP). It was observed that the radiation shielding effectiveness of CMFs is relatively independent of sphere sizes as long as the ratio of sphere-wall thickness to its outer-radius stays constant. However, the smaller spheres seem to be more efficient in general due to the fine fluctuation in the gray value profile of their 2D Micro-CT images. S-S CMFs and Al-S CMFs are respectively 275% and 145% more effective for X-ray attenuation than Aluminum A356. Compared to pure lead, CMFs show adequate attenuation with additional advantages of being lightweight and more environmentally friendly. The mechanical performance of HZ S-S CMFs under quasi-static compression was compared to that of other classes of S-S CMF. It is observed that the addition of high-Z elements to the matrix of CMFs improved their shielding against X-rays, low energy gamma rays and neutrons, while maintained their low density, high mechanical properties and high-energy absorption capability.

  17. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, R. H.; Alone, S. T.; Bichile, G. K.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2007-05-01

    Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (μ), mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), total atomic cross-section (σ_{tot}), total electronic cross-section (σ_{ele}) and the effective atomic number (Z_{eff}) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe_{2}O_{4}). The values of γ-ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive γ-ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of μ/ρ and Z_{eff} agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

  18. Effect of ilmenite on the attenuation coefficient of gamma ray shielding cementious matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ramadan, Wageeh; El-Zakla, Tarek; Sayed, Magda; El-Dessouky, Mohamed; Sakr, Khaled

    2015-11-01

    The current work investigated the effect of the Portland cement mixed with different percentages of water and ilmenite ore on the attenuation of gamma radiation as shielding blocks. Different concentrations of ilmenite from 5% up to 20% with different grain size were mixed with cement. The properties of the investigated blocks, as compressive strength, wet and dry density, absorption and porosity percentages, were studied. The thermal stability of the studied samples and their X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were examined through thermogravimetric analysis and XRD respectively. In addition, the attenuation coefficients of the considered samples for gamma radiation were performed using gamma ray spectrometer. The results revealed that, the maximum linear attenuation coefficient (µ) and minimum transmission fraction were performed for cement mixed with 10% of ilmenite and with the size range 106-250 µm.

  19. SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison of calibration coefficients at radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; McCaffrey, J.; Shen, H.; Saraví, M.; Stefanic, A.; Montaño Ortiz, G.; Carlos, M.; da Silva, C.; Álvarez, J.; Tovar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Air-kerma calibration coefficients were compared at the radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x ray beams in the SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison for members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrología (SIM). Five SIM laboratories participated in the comparison: NIST, NRC, ININ, CNEA and LNMRI, the NIST being the pilot laboratory. Results from the comparison are linked to the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison reference value through the NIST-BIPM comparison made in 2003 and will meet requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to support several CMCs (calibration and measurement capability claims) of the participants. The comparison began in October of 2007 and the measurements were completed in September 2008. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air-kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The evaluation of the degrees of equivalence was performed as described in the comparison protocol. The comparison of the calibration coefficients for the four chambers is based on the average ratios of the calibration coefficients measured at the NIST and at each participating laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  1. Determination of attenuation coefficients, thicknesses and effective atomic numbers for CuInSe 2 semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, Ugˇur; Baltaş, Hasan; Çelik, Ahmet; Bacaksız, Emin

    2006-06-01

    The X-rays attenuation coefficients for Cu, In and Se in elemental state and the semiconductor CuInSe2 were measured at 15 different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the following secondary targets: Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te and Ba. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular 241Am radioactive source were used to excite secondary target and X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. A method to determine the thickness of thin film with XRF is described. Additionally, the effect of absorption edges on effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy in composite semiconductor sample was discussed. Obtained values were compared with calculated values.

  2. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  3. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique. PMID:24027617

  4. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Baltas, H; Celik, A; Kiris, E; Cevik, U

    2012-07-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic, numbers (Z(eff)), effective electron densities (N(e)) and photon interaction cross section (σ(a)) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. PMID:22128356

  5. X-ray attenuation measurements in a cavitating mixing layer for instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio determination

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschlimann, Vincent; Barre, Stephane; Legoupil, Samuel

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze a two-dimensional cavitating shear layer. The global aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding and modeling of cavitation phenomenon in a 2D turbulent sheared flow which can be considered as quite representative of cavitating rocket engine turbopomp inducers. This 2D mixing layer flow provided us a well documented test case which can be used for the characterization of the cavitation effects in sheared flows. The development of a velocity gradient was observed inside a liquid water flow: Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities developed at the interface. Vaporizations and implosions of cavitating structures inside the vortices were observed. X-ray attenuation measurements were performed to estimate the amount of vapor present inside the mixing area. Instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio fields were acquired. The real spatial resolutions are 0.5 mm with 2000 fps and 1.5 mm with 20 000 fps. The effective time resolution is equal to the camera frame rate up to a 19% void ratio variation between two consecutive images. This seems to be sufficient in the context of the present flow configuration. The two-phase structures present inside the mixing area were analyzed at three different cavitation levels and their behaviors were compared to non-cavitating flow dynamic. Convection velocities and vortices shedding frequencies were estimated. Results show that vapor was transported by the turbulent velocity field. Statistical analysis of the void ratio signal was carried out up to the fourth order moment. This study provided a global understanding of the cavitating structure evolution and of the cavitation effects on turbulent sheared flows.

  6. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  7. Using Variable Temperature Powder X-Ray Diffraction to Determine the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid MgO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsepius, Nicholas C.; DeVore, Thomas C.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Warnaar, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was developed by using variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine [alpha] for MgO (periclase)and was tested in the Applied Physical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Laboratories at James Madison University. The experiment which was originally designed to provide undergraduate students with a…

  8. X ray attenuation measurements for high-temperature materials characterization and in-situ monitoring of damage accumulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation is to develop and apply x ray attenuation measurement systems that are capable of: (1) characterizing density variations in high-temperature materials, e.g., monolithic ceramics, ceramic and intermetallic matrix composites, and (2) noninvasively monitoring damage accumulation and failure sequences in ceramic matrix composites under room temperature tensile testing. This dissertation results in the development of: (1) a point scan digital radiography system, and (2) an in-situ x ray material testing system. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading shows the effect of preexisting volume flaws on the fracture behavior of composites. Results show that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulation during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber matrix debonding, fiber bridging, and fiber pullout are imaged throughout the tensile loading of the specimens. Further in-situ radiography is found to be a practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the silicon carbide fibers and the reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post test x ray imaging can provide for greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior.

  9. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Majid; Mohammadi, Ali

    2008-05-01

    The compounds Na 2B 4O 7, H 3BO 3, CdCl 2 and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the γ rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H 3BO 3 with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds.

  10. Dose reduction in fluoroscopic interventions using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) x-ray attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented , a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  11. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5–6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement. PMID:24817800

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and X-ray Attenuation Properties of Ultrasmall BiOI Nanoparticles: Toward Renal Clearable Particulate CT Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A unique decelerated hydrolytic procedure is developed and reported here for the preparation of ultrasmall nanoparticles (NPs) of PVP-coated BiOI with a narrow size distribution, i.e., 2.8 ± 0.5 nm. The crystal structure of this compound is determined by X-ray powder diffraction using the bulk materials. The stability, cytotoxicity, and potential use of the PVP-coated ultrasmall BiOI NPs as a CT contrast agent are investigated. Because of the combined X-ray attenuation effect of bismuth and iodine, such NPs exhibit a CT value that is among the best of those of the inorganic nanoparticle-based CT contrast agents reported in the literature. PMID:25283335

  13. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  14. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  15. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  16. Application of x-ray techniques in precision farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Selcuk; Inanc, Feyzi; Gray, Joseph N.; Colvin, Thomas S.

    2000-05-01

    The precision farming is a relatively new concept basing farming upon quantitative determination of various parameters in the farming practices. One of these parameters is accurate measurement of grain flow rates on real time basis. Although there are various techniques already available for this purpose, x-rays provide a very competitive alternative to the current state of art. In this work, the use of low energy bremsstrahlung x-ray, up to 30 keV, densitometry is demonstrated for grain flow rate measurements. Mass flow rates for corn are related to measured x-ray intensity in gray scale units with a 0.99 correlation coefficient for flow rates ranging from 2 kg/s to 6 kg/s. Higher flow rate values can be measured by using slightly more energetic x-rays or a higher tube current. Measurements were done in real time at a 30 Hz sampling rate. Flow rate measurements are independent of grain moisture due to a negligible change in the x-ray attenuation coefficients at typical moisture content values from 15% to 25%. Grain flow profile changes do not affect measurement accuracy. X-rays easily capture variations in the corn stream. Due to the low energy of the x-ray photons, biological shielding can easily be accomplished with 2 mm thick lead foil or 5 mm of steel.

  17. Revealing the powdering methods of black makeup in Ancient Egypt by fitting microstructure based Fourier coefficients to the whole x-ray diffraction profiles of galena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungár, T.; Martinetto, P.; Ribárik, G.; Dooryhée, E.; Walter, Ph.; Anne, M.

    2002-02-01

    Galena (PbS) is a major ingredient in ancient Egyptian eye makeup. The microstructure of PbS in Egyptian cosmetic powders is used as a fingerprint and is matched with the microstructures produced artificially in geological galena minerals. The microstructure of PbS is determined by x-ray diffraction peak profile analysis in terms of dislocation density, crystallite size, and size distribution. High-resolution powder diffractograms were measured at the ESRF Grenoble synchrotron source with high resolution and high peak-to-background ratios. The Fourier coefficients of the first nine measured reflections of galena are fitted using physically based Fourier coefficients of strain and size functions. Strain anisotropy is accounted for by the dislocation model of the mean square strain. The x-ray data are supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs, and are compared with archæological documents. It enables us to describe the procedures of eye makeup manufacturing in the Middle and New Kingdoms of Egypt some 2000 years before Christ.

  18. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, G.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Aylıkcı, V.; Bakkaloğlu, Ö. F.

    2009-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  19. 6 MV x-ray spectra obtained by small field size attenuation measurements in water and their use in small field size dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cenney W.

    Direct measurement of x-ray spectra produced by medical linear accelerators is not possible because of high intensity and energy of the radiation involved. Knowledge of energy spectra are very useful in determination of parameters that convert from ionization chamber measurements to absorbed dose. Many indirect methods for determination of x-ray spectra in therapy beams have been developed. In the present work photon beams generated by a 6-MV Varian 6000 linear accelerator were used to obtain small field (0.5 x 0.5 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm 2 at 0.5 cm increments per side) attenuation values in water for the depths from 5 to 30 cm, at 5 cm increments. Attenuation values lying between those depths were interpolated using the Newton-Coates method and attenuation data of zero-field was obtained by extrapolation. Based on the measured attenuation curves, the relative air kerma and photon energy x-ray spectra were derived for all investigating fields using a user input parameter program and an iterative procedure. The attenuation curves of the radiation fields were calculated using the reconstructed spectrum. They were compared with the measured attenuation data at each iteration step until a satisfactory fit between the measured and calculated attenuation curves was obtained. In order for derived spectra to be of practical use in radiotherapy treatment planning, they must accurate reproduce measured dose distribution data. From the knowledge of the incident beam attenuation and the incident x-ray energy spectrum for the zero-field, the percentage depth dose of the zero-field was calculated at different points along the Central Axis. The percentage depth doses of larger fields were calculated by applying of the Relative Scatter Factor to the percentage depth dose of the zero-field. The agreement was within 1.11% for all fields, ranging from 0.5 x 0.5 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm2 at 0.5 cm increments per side. Further, the reconstructed spectrum for 4 x 4 cm2 field size was used in Monte

  20. Correction for multiple scattering of unpolarized photons in attenuation coefficient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.E.; Sumini, M.; Satori, R.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations of the diffusion of unpolarized photons in thin thickness targets have been performed with recourse to a vector transport model taking rigorously into account the polarization introduced by the scattering interactions. An order-of-interactions solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for photons was used to describe the multiple scattering terms due to the prevailing effects in the X-ray regime. An analytical expression for the correction factor to the attenuation coefficient is given in term of the solid angle subtended by the detector and the energy interval characterizing the detection response. Although the main corrections are due to the influence of the pure Rayleigh effect, first- and second-order chains involving the Rayleigh and Compton effects have been considered as possible sources of overlapping contributions to the transmitted intensity. The extent of the corrections is estimated and some examples are given for pure element targets.

  1. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers for some natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.; Şahin, M.

    2009-09-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ m) for SiO 2 {Quartz (1 1 0 1), Quartz (1 1 0 0) and Quartz (0 0 0 1)}, KAlSi 3O 8 {Orthoclase (0 1 0), Orthoclase (1 0 0)}, CaSO 4·2H 2O (gypsum), FeS 2 (pyrite) and Mg 2Si 2O 6 (pyroxene) natural minerals were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Atomic and electronic cross sections ( σ t and σ e), the effective atomic and electron numbers or electron densities ( Z eff and N eff) were determined using the obtained μ m values for investigated samples.

  2. Optical attenuation coefficient in individual ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Little, Anree; Hoffman, Abigail; Haegel, Nancy M

    2013-03-11

    Attenuation coefficient measurements for the propagation of bandedge luminescence are made on individual ZnO nanowires by combining the localized excitation capability of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to record the distribution and intensity of wave-guided emission. Measurements were made for individual nanostructures with triangular cross-sections ranging in diameter from 680 to 2300 nm. The effective attenuation coefficient shows an inverse dependence on nanowire diameter (d(-1)), indicating scattering losses due to non-ideal waveguiding behavior. PMID:23482201

  3. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  4. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  5. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  6. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  7. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  8. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index.

    PubMed

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  9. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index

    PubMed Central

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  10. Determination of Mass Attenuation Coefficients for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ahmet; Çevik, Uǧur; Baltaş, Hasan; Bacaksiz, Emin

    2007-04-01

    This work presents mass attenuation coefficients values of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 semiconductor thin films commonly used in photovoltaic devices. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured at different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te, Ba and Nd secondary targets. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular Am-241 radioactive source were used to excite secondary targets. Characteristic X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with theoretical values calculated using WinXCOM program.

  11. Determination of Mass Attenuation Coefficients for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Ahmet; Cevik, Ugur; Baltas, Hasan; Bacaksiz, Emin

    2007-04-23

    This work presents mass attenuation coefficients values of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 semiconductor thin films commonly used in photovoltaic devices. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured at different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te, Ba and Nd secondary targets. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular Am-241 radioactive source were used to excite secondary targets. Characteristic X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with theoretical values calculated using WinXCOM program.

  12. X-ray microtomography at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, C. E.; Wang, Y.; Gaudio, S.; Clark, A.; Yamada, A.; Sanehira, T.; Rivers, M.

    2009-05-01

    X-ray microtomography at high pressure is now possible with the rotating anvil apparatus (RAA) on the 13-BM- D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Lab). The high-pressure X-ray tomography microscope (HPXTM) can be used to determine densities of amorphous materials (glasses and melts) and in situ characterization of 3D microstructure of multiphase materials subject to temperature and shear deformation [1, 2]. Densities may be obtained directly by volume rendering or from X-ray absorption. The rotating anvil apparatus is compressed by a 250-ton hydraulic press between concentric thrust bearings. Toroidal and truncated cylindrical (Drickamer) anvils can be accommodated. The latter anvils perform well up to 11.5 GPa and 1873K, using boron epoxy/diamond epoxy gaskets and X-ray transparent aluminum or polytherimide plastic containment rings. Differential rotation allows for controlled sample deformation. Pressure is determined by energy dispersive diffraction of an internal standard by convenient switching from monochromatic and polychromatic radiation. In-situ calibrations of linear attenuation coefficient permit bracketing of natural basalt density to better than 1 percent relative, while [2] used volume rendering to determine the compressibility of magnesium silicate glasses and supercooled liquid. The utility of the RRA to characterize microstructural evolution will be discussed. [1] Wang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 073709, 2005. [2] Lesher et al., PEPI, in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.pepi.2008.10.023, 2009

  13. Determination of Thermal Expansion Coefficients and Locating the Temperature-Induced Phase Transition in Methylammonium Lead Perovskites Using X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, T Jesper; Schwan, L Josef; Ottosson, Mikael; Hagfeldt, Anders; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-16

    Lead halogen perovskites, and particularly methylammonium lead iodine, CH3NH3PbI3, have recently attracted considerable interest as alternative solar cell materials, and record solar cell efficiencies have now surpassed 20%. Concerns have, however, been raised about the thermal stability of methylammonium lead iodine, and a phase transformation from a tetragonal to a cubic phase has been reported at elevated temperature. Here, this phase transition has been investigated in detail using temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transformation is pinpointed to 54 °C, which is well within the normal operating range of a typical solar cell. The cell parameters were extracted as a function of the temperature, from which the thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. The latter was found to be rather high (αv = 1.57 × 10(-4) K(-1)) for both the tetragonal and cubic phases. This is 6 times higher than the thermal expansion coefficient for soda lime glass and CIGS and 11 times larger than that of CdTe. This could potentially be of importance for the mechanical stability of perovskite solar cells in the temperature cycling experienced under normal day-night operation. The experimental knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficients and precise determination of the cell parameters can potentially also be valuable while conducting density functional theory simulations on these systems in order to deliver more accurate band structure calculations. PMID:26457861

  14. Effect of fluoroscopic X-ray beam spectrum on air-kerma measurement accuracy: implications for establishing correction coefficients on interventional fluoroscopes with KAP meters.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the displayed reference plane air kerma (Ka,r) or air kerma-area product (Pk,a) over a broad spectrum of X-ray beam qualities on clinically used interventional fluoroscopes incorporating air kerma-area product meters (KAP meters) to measure X-ray output. The second goal was to investigate the accuracy of a correction coefficient (CC) determined at a single beam quality and applied to the measured Ka,r over a broad spectrum of beam qualities. Eleven state-of-the-art interventional fluoroscopes were evaluated, consisting of eight Siemens Artis zee and Artis Q systems and three Philips Allura FD systems. A separate calibrated 60 cc ionization chamber (external chamber) was used to determine the accuracy of the KAP meter over a broad range of clinically used beam qualities. For typical adult beam qualities, applying a single CC deter-mined at 100 kVp with copper (Cu) in the beam resulted in a deviation of < 5% due to beam quality variation. This result indicates that applying a CC determined using The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 190 protocol or a similar protocol provides very good accuracy as compared to the allowed ± 35% deviation of the KAP meter in this limited beam quality range. For interventional fluoroscopes dedicated to or routinely used to perform pediatric interventions, using a CC established with a low kVp (~ 55-60 kVp) and large amount of Cu filtration (~ 0.6-0.9 mm) may result in greater accuracy as compared to using the 100 kVp values. KAP meter responses indicate that fluoroscope vendors are likely normalizing or otherwise influencing the KAP meter output data. Although this may provide improved accuracy in some instances, there is the potential for large discrete errors to occur, and these errors may be difficult to identify. PMID:27167287

  15. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  16. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  17. Evaluation of Crystal Orientation for (K,Na)NbO3 Films Using X-ray Diffraction Reciprocal Space Map and Relationship between Crystal Orientation and Piezoelectric Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kenji; Suenaga, Kazufumi; Watanabe, Kazutoshi; Horikiri, Fumimasa; Mishima, Tomoyoshi; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2012-07-01

    We have found an effective method for the evaluation of the crystal orientation of (K,Na)NbO3 (KNN) films in the (K,Na)NbO3/Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si structure using X-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal space maps. Previously, the crystal structure and orientation of such (K,Na)NbO3 films were evaluated using 2θ/θ XRD, and were considered to be the pseudocubic perovskite structure with preferential (001) orientation and no (111) orientation. Here, we applied the new method using XRD reciprocal space maps, and discovered that the (K,Na)NbO3 films had some degree of KNN(111) orientation. We calculated the KNN(001)- and KNN(111)-orientation volume fractions for the (K,Na)NbO3 films from the (101) diffraction peaks originating from the KNN(001)- and KNN(111)-orientation elements in the XRD reciprocal space maps, considering the calibration factors obtained from pole-figure simulations, and examined the relationship between the crystal orientation and d31 piezoelectric coefficient in the (K,Na)NbO3 films. The results indicated that the d31 piezoelectric coefficient increases with increasing (001)-orientation volume fraction.

  18. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  19. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  20. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  1. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  2. High accuracy experimental determination of copper and zinc mass attenuation coefficients in the 100 eV to 30 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Gerlach, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Haschke, M.; Beckhoff, B.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of atomic fundamental parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients with low uncertainties, is of decisive importance in elemental quantification using x-ray fluorescence analysis techniques. Several databases are accessible and frequently used within a large community of users. These compilations are most often in good agreement for photon energies in the hard x-ray ranges. However, they significantly differ for low photon energies and around the absorption edges of any element. In a joint cooperation of the metrology institutes of France and Germany, mass attenuation coefficients of copper and zinc were determined experimentally in the photon energy range from 100 eV to 30 keV by independent approaches using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at SOLEIL (France) and BESSY II (Germany), respectively. The application of high-accuracy experimental techniques resulted in mass attenuation coefficient datasets determined with low uncertainties that are directly compared to existing databases. The novel datasets are expected to enhance the reliability of mass attenuation coefficients.

  3. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  4. Attenuation coefficient of usable solar radiation of the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junfang; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Kahru, Mati

    2016-05-01

    Usable solar radiation (USR) represents spectrally integrated solar energy in the spectral range of 400-560 nm, a domain where photons penetrate the most in oceanic waters and thus contribute to photosynthesis and heating at deeper depths. Through purely numerical simulations, it was found that the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling USR (Kd(USR), m-1) is nearly a constant vertically in the upper water column for clear waters and most turbid waters. Subsequently an empirical model was developed to estimate Kd(USR) based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd(490), m-1). We here evaluate this relationship using data collected from a wide range of oceanic and coastal environments and found that the relationship between Kd(490) and Kd(USR) developed via the numerical simulation is quite robust. We further refined this relationship to extend the applicability to "clearest" natural waters. This refined relationship was then used to produce sample distribution of Kd(USR) of global oceans. As expected, extremely low Kd(USR) (˜0.02 m-1) was observed in ocean gyres, while significantly higher Kd(USR) (˜5.2 m-1) was found in very turbid coastal regions. A useful application of Kd(USR) is to easily and accurately propagate surface USR to deeper depths, potentially to significantly improve the estimation of basin scale primary production and heat fluxes in the upper water column.

  5. Electron-Iron Recombination Rate Coefficients and Photoionization Cross Section for S XIV and SXV for X-ray and UV modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2008-03-01

    radiation damping, channel couplings, interference of DR and RR, and relativistic fine structure effects. The comprehensive datasets are applicable for various models such as for ionization balance and recombil1ation-cascade for UV and X-ray lines.

  6. A study on photon attenuation coefficients of different wood materials with different densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, B.; Nageswara Rao, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A study on the variation of linear attenuation coefficients with the densities of the wood samples is under taken. The soft wood and hard wood samples were collected from the forest area of Pakal in Warangal district. The linear and mass attenuation coefficients are measured using gamma ray spectrometry based on NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energies of 662 KeV and 59.5 KeV respectively. The mass attenuation coefficient values measured from experiment and are compared with theoretical methods using XCOM program. The plots of density versus linear attenuation coefficient for different wood materials correspond to higher order polynomial are presented. It is observed that variation of linear attenuation coefficient depends on densities of materials. The Chloroxylon swietenia with more density has more linear attenuation coefficient at 59.5 KeV and 662 KeV. The variation in attenuation coefficient attributed to chemical composition of wood used in the experiment.

  7. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients for YBaCuO superconductor at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, U.; Baltas, H.; Çelik, S.; Karaca, I.; Kopya, I.

    2005-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for Y2O3, BaCO3, CuO compounds, and solid-state forms of YBa2Cu3O7 superconductor were determined at energies of 57.5, 59.5, 65.2, 74.8, 77.1, 87.3, 94.6, 98.4, 122, and 136 keV. The samples were irradiated using a 241Am point source emitting 59.5 keV photon energies and a 57Co point source emitting 122 and 136 keV photon energies. The other energies were obtained using secondary targets such as Ta, Bi2O3, and (CH3COO)2UO22H2O. The gamma- and x-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Samples were selected on the basis of known composition and mass densities were measured using a densitometer. The experimental results obtained in this study are compared with theoretical values.

  8. A consistent tissue attenuation coefficient estimator using bubble harmonic echoes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Sheng-Kai; Tsao, Jenho

    2010-12-01

    The ultrasonic property of soft tissue can be quantified by its attenuation coefficient α. Traditionally the backscattering signal of tissue is used to estimate α. To improve precision, a large number of spatially independent samples of tissue echoes are required for averaging. In this paper, we propose a new estimation method, which makes use of microbubbles to provide temporally independent samples for averaging. It is easier for temporal sampling to maintain ergodicity and provide a large number of independent samples for statistical averaging. A stochastic model for the harmonic signals of an ideal bubble attenuated by tissue is derived based on Kuc's and Miller's works. An estimator of α is then presented. This estimator is consistent and could be biased because of the unknown squarelaw relation between the second and fundamental harmonics for non-ideal bubble oscillation. In experimental works, we design a simplified phantom for demonstrating the performance of the proposed estimator. It is shown that both first and second harmonics can estimate α consistently. However, the interference of the tissue backscattering signal may cause additional estimation error using the first harmonic. PMID:21156361

  9. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  10. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Other conditions for which the test may ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 10/22/2014 Updated ...

  11. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  12. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  13. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  14. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  15. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  16. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  17. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  18. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  19. Biomedical elemental analysis and imaging using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Dejun, Xue ); Bockman, R.S. ); Saubermann, A.J. . Health Science Center)

    1990-01-01

    The application of synchrotron x-ray microscopy to biomedical research is currently in progress at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The current status of the x-ray microscope (XRM) is reviewed from a technical standpoint. Some of the items considered are photon flux, spatial resolution, quantitation, minimum detection limits, and beam-induced specimen damage. Images can be produced by measurement of fluorescent x rays or of the attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation coefficients can be made by scanning the specimen past the beam. Computed microtomography (CMT) can be used for non- destructive images through the specimen in either the emission or absorption mode. Examples of measurements made with the XRM are given.

  20. Quantitative determination of two polymorphic forms of imatinib mesylate in a drug substance and tablet formulation by X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bellur Atici, Esen; Karlığa, Bekir

    2015-10-10

    Imatinib has been identified as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinases, including Bcr-Abl. The active substance used in drug product is the mesylate salt form of imatinib, a phenylaminopyrimidine derivative and chemically named as N-(3-(4-(pyridin-3-yl) pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-4-methylphenyl)-4-((4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) methyl)-benzamide methanesulfonic acid salt. It exhibits many polymorphic forms and most stable and commercialized polymorphs are known as α and β forms. Molecules in α and β polymorphic forms exhibit significant conformational differences due to their different intra- and intermolecular interactions, which stabilize their molecular conformations and affect their physicochemical properties such as bulk density, melting point, solubility, stability, and processability. The manufacturing process of a drug tablet included granulation, compression, coating, and drying may cause polymorphic conversions. Therefore, polymorphic content of the drug substance should be controlled during quality control and stability testing. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) methods were evaluated for determination of the polymorphic content of the drug substance and drug product; and PXRD was the most accurate technique and selected as preferred method and validated. Prior to development of a quantification method, pure α and β polymorphs were characterized and used throughout the method development and validation studies. Mixtures with different ratios of α and β forms were scanned using X-ray diffractometer with a scan rate of 0.250°/min over an angular range of 19.5-21.0° 2θ and the peak heights for characteristic peak of β form at 20.5 ± 0.2° 2θ diffraction angle were used to generate a calibration curve. The detection limit of β polymorph in α form imatinib mesylate tablets was found as 4% and

  1. X-ray properties of an anthropomorphic breast phantom for MRI and x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Melanie; Badal, Andreu; Jennings, Robert J.; de las Heras, Hugo; Myers, Kyle J.; Badano, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the x-ray properties of a dual-modality, anthropomorphic breast phantom whose MRI properties have been previously evaluated. The goal of this phantom is to provide a platform for optimization and standardization of two- and three-dimensional x-ray and MRI breast imaging modalities for the purpose of lesion detection and discrimination. The phantom is constructed using a mixture of lard and egg whites, resulting in a variable, tissue-mimicking structure with separate adipose- and glandular-mimicking components. The phantom can be produced with either a compressed or uncompressed shape. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were estimated using elemental compositions from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and the atomic interaction models from the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and compared with human values from the literature. The image structure was examined quantitatively by calculating and comparing spatial covariance matrices of the phantom and patient mammography images. Finally, a computerized version of the phantom was created by segmenting a computed tomography scan and used to simulate x-ray scatter of the phantom in a mammography geometry. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were within 20% and 15% of the values for adipose and glandular tissues, respectively, which is within the estimation error of these values. Matching was improved at higher energies (>20 keV). Tissue structures in the phantom have a size similar to those in the patient data, but are slightly larger on average. Correlations in the patient data appear to be longer than those in the phantom data in the anterior-posterior direction; however, they are within the error bars of the measurement. Simulated scatter-to-primary ratio values of the phantom images were as high as 85% in some areas and were strongly affected by the heterogeneous nature of the phantom. Key physical x-ray properties of

  2. A model for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Du, Ke-Ping; Arnone, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance (Kd) is an important parameter for ocean studies. For the vast ocean the only feasible means to get fine-scale measurements of Kd is by ocean color remote sensing. At present, values of Kd from remote sensing are estimated using empirical algorithms. Such an approach is insufficient to provide an understanding regarding the variation of Kd and contains large uncertainties in the derived values. In this study a semianalytical model for Kd is developed based on the radiative transfer equation, with values of the model parameters derived from Hydrolight simulations using the averaged particle phase function. The model is further tested with data simulated using significantly different particle phase functions, and the modeled Kd are found matching Hydrolight Kd very well (˜2% average error and ˜12% maximum error). Such a model provides an improved interpretation about the variation of Kd and a basis to more accurately determine Kd (especially using data from remote sensing).

  3. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers

  4. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 - 25.26 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941).

  5. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  6. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers for Cr, Fe and Ni alloys at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2009-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ m), for Cr, Fe, Ni and Fe xNi 1-x ( x = 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3 and 0.2), Fe xCr yNi 1-(x+y) ( x = 0.7, y = 0.1; x = 0.5, y = 0.2; x = 0.4, y = 0.3; x = 0.3, y = 0.3; x = 0.2, y = 0.2 and x = 0.1, y = 0.2) and Ni xCr 1-x ( x = 0.8, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.2) alloys were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 10 mCi Cd-109 and 100 mCi Am-241 radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections ( σ t and σ e), effective atomic and electron numbers ( Z eff and N eff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated 3d alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. The experimental values were compared with the calculated values for all samples.

  7. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  8. A generalized porosity formalism for isotropic and anisotropic effective opacity and its effects on X-ray line attenuation in clumped O star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2012-02-01

    We present a generalized formalism for treating the porosity-associated reduction in continuum opacity that occurs when individual clumps in a stochastic medium become optically thick. As in previous work, we concentrate on developing bridging laws between the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We consider geometries resulting in either isotropic or anisotropic effective opacity, and, in addition to an idealized model in which all clumps have the same local overdensity and scale, we also treat an ensemble of clumps with optical depths set by Markovian statistics. This formalism is then applied to the specific case of bound-free absorption of X-rays in hot star winds, a process not directly affected by clumping in the optically thin limit. We find that the Markov model gives surprisingly similar results to those found previously for the single-clump model, suggesting that porous opacity is not very sensitive to details of the assumed clump distribution function. Further, an anisotropic effective opacity favours escape of X-rays emitted in the tangential direction (the 'venetian blind' effect), resulting in a 'bump' of higher flux close to line centre as compared to profiles computed from isotropic porosity models. We demonstrate how this characteristic line shape may be used to diagnose the clump geometry, and we confirm previous results that for optically thick clumping to significantly influence X-ray line profiles, very large porosity lengths, defined as the mean free path between clumps, are required. Moreover, we present the first X-ray line profiles computed directly from line-driven instability simulations using a 3D patch method, and find that porosity effects from such models also are very small. This further supports the view that porosity has, at most, a marginal effect on X-ray line diagnostics in O stars, and therefore that these diagnostics do indeed provide a good 'clumping insensitive' method for deriving O star mass-loss rates.

  9. A Generalised Porosity Formalism for Isotropic and Anisotropic Effective Opacity and Its Effects on X-ray Line Attenuation in Clumped O Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a generalised formalism for treating the porosity-associated reduction in continuum opacity that occurs when individual clumps in a stochastic medium become optically thick. As in previous work, we concentrate on developing bridging laws between the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We consider geometries resulting in either isotropic or anisotropic effective opacity, and, in addition to an idealised model in which all clumps have the same local overdensity and scale, we also treat an ensemble of clumps with optical depths set by Markovian statistics. This formalism is then applied to the specific case of bound-free absorption of X- rays in hot star winds, a process not directly affected by clumping in the optically thin limit. We find that the Markov model gives surprisingly similar results to those found previously for the single clump model, suggesting that porous opacity is not very sensitive to details of the assumed clump distribution function. Further, an anisotropic effective opacity favours escape of X-rays emitted in the tangential direction (the venetian blind effect), resulting in a bump of higher flux close to line centre as compared to profiles computed from isotropic porosity models. We demonstrate how this characteristic line shape may be used to diagnose the clump geometry, and we confirm previous results that for optically thick clumping to significantly influence X-ray line profiles, very large porosity lengths, defined as the mean free path between clumps, are required. Moreover, we present the first X-ray line profiles computed directly from line-driven instability simulations using a 3-D patch method, and find that porosity effects from such models also are very small. This further supports the view that porosity has, at most, a marginal effect on X-ray line diagnostics in O stars, and therefore that these diagnostics do indeed provide a good clumping insensitive method for deriving O star mass-loss rates.

  10. A Generalised Porosity Formalism for Isotropic and Anisotropic Effective Opacity and its Effects on X-ray Line Attenuation in Clumped O Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cohen, David H.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a generalised formalism for treating the porosity-associated reduction in continuum opacity that occurs when individual clumps in a stochastic medium become optically thick. As in previous work, we concentrate on developing bridging laws between the limits of optically thin and thick clumps. We consider geometries resulting in either isotropic or anisotropic effective opacity, and, in addition to an idealised model in which all clumps have the same local overdensity and scale, we also treat an ensemble of clumps with optical depths set by Markovian statistics. This formalism is then applied to the specific case of bound-free absorption of X- rays in hot star winds, a process not directly affected by clumping in the optically thin limit. We find that the Markov model gives surprisingly similar results to those found previously for the single clump model, suggesting that porous opacity is not very sensitive to details of the assumed clump distribution function. Further, an anisotropic effective opacity favours escape of X-rays emitted in the tangential direction (the venetian blind effect), resulting in a bump of higher flux close to line centre as compared to profiles computed from isotropic porosity models. We demonstrate how this characteristic line shape may be used to diagnose the clump geometry, and we confirm previous results that for optically thick clumping to significantly influence X-ray line profiles, very large porosity lengths, defined as the mean free path between clumps, are required. Moreover, we present the first X-ray line profiles computed directly from line-driven instability simulations using a 3-D patch method, and find that porosity effects from such models also are very small. This further supports the view that porosity has, at most, a marginal effect on X-ray line diagnostics in O stars, and therefore that these diagnostics do indeed provide a good clumping insensitive method for deriving O star mass-loss rates.

  11. Extension of depth-resolved reconstruction of attenuation coefficients in optical coherence tomography for slim samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Martin; Lengenfelder, B.; Kanawade, R.; Klämpfl, F.; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Coherent light propagating through turbid media is attenuated due to scattering and absorption. The decrease of the intensity of the coherent light is described by the attenuation coefficient. The measured decay of the coherent light through turbid media with optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to reconstruct the attenuation coefficient. Since most of the OCT systems work in the near-infrared region, they are the optical window from 800-1400 nm in tissue. Hence, the most part of the attenuation coefficient is caused due to the scattering. Therefore, deriving the attenuation coefficient is one way to get an approximation of the scattering coefficient which is difficult to access even up to day. Moreover, OCT measurements are one of the few possibilities to derive physical properties with micrometre resolution of the media under investigation.

  12. Investigation of Sandstones Wetting by X-ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquesa, Leonardo C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Nagata, Rodrigo

    2011-08-01

    X-ray microtomography is a non-destructive imaging technique. It consists in cross-sections object reconstruction based in the linear attenuation coefficient maps achieved through the object illuminating by a X-ray beam at different angular positions. It has been used by various researches to supply microstructural informations of materials as ceramic filters, pills, titanium prosthesis and reservoir rocks. An item of great interest has been the characterization of the liquid phase presence in porous space. This paper shows the X-ray microtomography methodology employed to achieve qualitative and quantitative results about Botucatu sandstones wetting. It was used a Skyscan, 1172 model, which employs an X-ray tube with W anode and a cone beam. This laboratory based equipment is able to provide images of until 1 μm spatial resolution. The employed samples were two cores of layered Botucatu sandstone, named ARN1 and ARN 2. These samples were scanned in two situations each one, dried and wet. 2D images, porosity values for each 2D image, total average porosity and pose size distribution for the dried and wet situation were compared. H20-NaCl-KI solution was employed for the samples wetting procedure. The two samples were scanned with 4.84 μm spatial resolution. The total average porosities obtained for ARN1 sample before and after wetting were 4.4±0.7% and 1.8±0.4%, respectively.

  13. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  14. Point symmetry in x-ray shadow imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V.V.; Shabel'nikov, L.G.

    1988-04-01

    General geometrical features have been examined to identify point-group symmetries in x-ray imaging systems. In a stereospecific system, the group is the b/w antisymmetry group 2/m'. In a computerized tomography system, the symmetry is described by the limiting Curie group /infinity//m/center dot/m, while for a tomosynthesis system (transaxial tomography), it is /infinity//m. The operations in these groups have been examined in the production of shadow images involving distributed attenuation coefficients, particularly for stereospecific images recorded with an MIR-3 x-ray microscope. Curie's principle is used to show that reconstructed paired images for two intersecting objects can be considered as the equivalent of stereoscopic pairs for computer-aided tomography, which is not so for transaxial tomography.

  15. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  16. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  17. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  18. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  19. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  20. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  1. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  2. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  3. Water equivalence of micelle gels for x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjiara, T.; Hill, R.; Kuncic, Z.; Bosi, S.; Baldock, C.

    2013-06-01

    Micelle gel is a radiochromic hydrogel with the potential to be used as a three dimensional (3D) radiation dosimeter. Since an ideal dosimeter should present water equivalent properties, in this study the water equivalence of two formulations of micelle gel has been investigated by calculating electron density, effective atomic number, fractional interaction probabilities, mass attenuation coefficient. The depth doses for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams have also modelled using Monte Carlo code. Based on the results of this work, micelle gels can be considered as water equivalent dosimeters.

  4. Combining x-ray and photoacoustics for in vivo tumor imaging with gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guojia; Yang, Sihua; Yuan, Yi; Xing, Da

    2011-09-01

    We have demonstrated a new hybrid cancer imaging method combining x-ray and photoacoustic imaging with multifunctional gold nanorods as contrast agents. The two imaging modalities provide complementary contrast mechanisms. X-ray imaging exploits the high attenuation coefficient of gold nanorods, while photoacoustic imaging takes advantage of the strong optical absorption of the nanorods. The fused image has presented both location and vasculature of the tumor. Our experimental results demonstrate that this combined modality has the capability to provide anatomical and functional information of tumor for accurate medical diagnosis and imaging-guided therapy.

  5. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  6. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods. PMID:26995732

  7. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  8. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  9. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  10. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  11. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  12. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  13. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  14. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  15. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  16. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  17. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  19. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  20. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  1. Comparison of RNFL thickness and RPE-normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient for glaucoma diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a method to determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) attenuation coefficient, based on normalization on the retinal pigment epithelium, was introduced. In contrast to conventional RNFL thickness measures, this novel measure represents a scattering property of the RNFL tissue. In this paper, we compare the RNFL thickness and the RNFL attenuation coefficient on 10 normal and 8 glaucomatous eyes by analyzing the correlation coefficient and the receiver operator curves (ROCs). The thickness and attenuation coefficient showed moderate correlation (r=0.82). Smaller correlation coefficients were found within normal (r=0.55) and glaucomatous (r=0.48) eyes. The full separation between normal and glaucomatous eyes based on the RNFL attenuation coefficient yielded an area under the ROC (AROC) of 1.0. The AROC for the RNFL thickness was 0.9875. No statistically significant difference between the two measures was found by comparing the AROC. RNFL attenuation coefficients may thus replace current RNFL thickness measurements or be combined with it to improve glaucoma diagnosis.

  2. X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A compact laboratory x-ray "nano-CT" scanner has been created for 3D non-invasive imaging with 150-200 nanometers 3D spatial resolution, using advanced x-ray technologies and specific physical phenomena for signal detection. This spatial resolution in volume terms is 3 orders better than can be achieved in synchrotron tomography, 5 orders better then in existing laboratory micro-CT instruments and 10-12 orders better in comparison to clinical CT. The instrument employs an x-ray source with a 300-400nm x-ray spot size and uses small-angle scattering to attain a detail detectability of 150-200nm. An object manipulator allows positioning and rotation with an accuracy of 150nm. The x-ray detector is based on an intensified CCD with single-photon sensitivity. A typical acquisition cycle for 3D reconstruction of the full object volume takes from 10 to 60 minutes, with the collection of several hundred angular views. Subsequent volumetric reconstruction produces results as a set of cross sections with isotropic voxel size down to 140 x 140 x 140nm, or as a 3D-model, which can be virtually manipulated and measured. This unique spatial resolution in non-invasive investigations gives previously unattainable 3D images in several application areas, such as composite materials, paper and wood microstructure, biomedical applications and others.

  3. Attenuation of the Squared Canonical Correlation Coefficient under Varying Estimates of Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Celia M.

    2010-01-01

    Research pertaining to the distortion of the squared canonical correlation coefficient has traditionally been limited to the effects of sampling error and associated correction formulas. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of attenuation of the squared canonical correlation coefficient under varying conditions of score reliability.…

  4. Mass attenuation coefficients of composite materials by Geant4, XCOM and experimental data: comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.; Singh, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of this present study is focused on testing the applicability of Geant4 electromagnetic models for studying mass attenuations coefficients for different types of composite materials at 59.5, 80, 356, 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The simulated results of mass attenuation coefficients were compared with the experimental and theoretical XCOM data for the same samples and a good agreement has been observed. The results indicate that this process can be followed to determine the data on the attenuation of gamma rays with the several energies in different materials. The modeling for photon interaction parameters was standard for any type of composite samples. The Geant4 code can be utilized for gamma ray attenuation coefficients for the sample at different energies, which may sometimes be impractical by experiment investigation.

  5. Brain tumor CT attenuation coefficients: semiquantitative analysis of histograms.

    PubMed

    Ratzka, M; Haubitz, I

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on work in progress on semiquantitative curve analyses of histograms of brain tumors. Separation of statistical groups of attenuation values obtained by computer calculation is done separately from scanning, using histogram printouts as the data input for a programmable calculator. This method is discussed together with its results in 50 cases of malignant gliomas. The detection of hidden tissue portions and the more accurate evaluation of partial enhancement effects have been the investigators' main concerns to the present time; however, this method may allow more specific diagnosis of malignancy and changes in tumor characteristics than visual assessment alone. This has not been proven by studies that have evaluated large numbers of cases, but seems to be worth pursuing as a new approach. PMID:6410783

  6. Application of micron X-ray CT based on micro-PIXE to investigate the distribution of Cs in silt particles for environmental remediation in Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Keizo; Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Itoh, Shin; Sata, Daichi; Ohnuma, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Toshiro; Arai, Hiromu; Arai, Hirotsugu; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Terakawa, Atsuki; Kim, Seong-Yun

    2016-03-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) using characteristic X-rays produced in micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to investigate the internal structure of silt particles and develop new methods to decontaminate soil containing radioactive cesium. We obtained 3D attenuation coefficient images of silt particles with a diameter of approximately 100 μm for V K and Cr K X-rays. Owing to the absorption edges of the Cs L-shell, the differences between the V K and Cr K X-ray images revealed the spatial distribution of Cs atoms in the silt particles. Cs atoms were distributed over the surfaces of the silt particles to a thickness of approximately 10 μm. This information is useful for the decontamination of silt contaminated by radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

  7. Mass attenuation coefficient calculations of different detector crystals by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebru Ermis, Elif; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2015-07-01

    Calculations of gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of various detector materials (crystals) were carried out by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) method at different gamma-ray energies. NaI, PVT, GSO, GaAs and CdWO4 detector materials were chosen in the calculations. Calculated coefficients were also compared with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) values. Obtained results through this method were highly in accordance with those of the NIST values. It was concluded from the study that FLUKA MC method can be an alternative way to calculate the gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of the detector materials.

  8. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  9. Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Joetta M; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Moss, Cal E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

  10. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  11. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  12. FXG mass attenuation coefficient evaluation for radiotherapy routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M. V.; de Almeida, A.; Costa, R. T.; Perles, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of a radioactive beam energy or quality is important in radiotherapy once it is correlated with the type, size, and localization of the tumor. One indicative of the radiation quality is the half-value-layer (HVL), the material thickness which reduces the beam intensity to half. The analysis of a treatment beam spectrum can be inferred through its homogeneity coefficient (HC, ratio between the first and the second HVL) that for values >= 0.7 has the indication to be adequate for treatments. Another important indicator of radiation quality is the mass absorption coefficient (cm2/g), related to the photons energies absorbed in a particular exposed material. Once that several materials can be used as radiation detectors for X and γ dosimetry, this work has the purpose to verify the ferrous Xylenol gelatin (FXG) material performance, through its μ/ρ behavior and compare it with the μ/ρ behavior for soft tissue. The X and γ energies where selected, in the energies normally used in radiotherapy and their spectra were evaluated using the HC coefficient. The μ/ρ, for the FXG material, were obtained experimentally and from simulation with X-COM and a developed routine using the GEANT4 Library. From the results from all μ/ρ values obtained for the FXG material, when compared to those from water, one can see similar behaviors, when one considers measurements for energies greater than 78.0 keV. These results indicate that, once the human body is composed with +/-80 % of water, the FXG for the energies used, could also be used as soft tissue simulator.

  13. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  14. Context sensitive cardiac x-ray imaging: a machine vision approach to x-ray dose control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Keeble, Claire; Magee, Derek R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cardiac x-ray imaging systems regulate their radiation output based on the thickness of the patient to maintain an acceptable signal at the input of the x-ray detector. This approach does not account for the context of the examination or the content of the image displayed. We have developed a machine vision algorithm that detects iodine-filled blood vessels and fits an idealized vessel model with the key parameters of contrast, diameter, and linear attenuation coefficient. The spatio-temporal distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient samples, when appropriately arranged, can be described by a simple linear relationship, despite the complexity of scene information. The algorithm was tested on static anthropomorphic chest phantom images under different radiographic factors and 60 dynamic clinical image sequences. It was found to be robust and sensitive to changes in vessel contrast resulting from variations in system parameters. The machine vision algorithm has the potential of extracting real-time context sensitive information that may be used for augmenting existing dose control strategies.

  15. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  16. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  17. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies ... be pregnant. Alternative Names ... CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014: ...

  18. Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas: Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for L-Shell Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Bartsch, T.; Brandau, C.; Chen, M. H.; Grieser, M.; Gwinner, G.; Hoffknecht, A.; Kahn, S. M.; Linkemann, J.

    2000-01-01

    Iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII to Fe XXIV) play an important role in determining the line emission and thermal and ionization structures of photoionized gases. Existing uncertainties in the theoretical low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for these ions significantly affects our ability to model and interpret observations of photoionized plasmas. To help address this issue, we have initiated a laboratory program to produce reliable low temperature DR rates. Here, we present some of our recent results and discuss some of their astrophysical implications.

  19. Obtaining flat x-ray images from round objects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A technique to correct deficiencies in x-ray images of cylindrical or spherical objects that are a consequence of the geometry of the sample is derived, for both two-dimensional (2D) and linescan imaging. The methods described involve the use of attenuators specifically shaped to equalize the x-ray ...

  20. Linear thermal expansion coefficient determination using in situ curvature and temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements applied to metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy-grown AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaßdorf, A.; Zeimer, U.; Grenzer, J.; Weyers, M.

    2013-07-01

    AlxGa1-xAs grown on GaAs is known to be almost perfectly lattice matched with a maximum lattice mismatch of 0.14% at room temperature and even less at temperatures of 700 °C-800 °C. However, as layer structures for edge-emitting diode lasers exhibit an increasing overall thickness of several microns of AlxGa1-xAs, e.g., diode lasers comprising a super-large optical cavity, the accumulated elastic strain energy increases as well. Depending on the growth temperature the formation energy of dislocations can be reached, which is limiting the pseudomorphic growth. In this regard, the thermal expansion coefficient difference between layer and substrate is an important parameter. We utilize in situ curvature measurements during growth of AlxGa1-xAs by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy to determine the thermal expansion coefficient α. The curvature change with increasing layer thickness, as well as with wafer temperature at constant layer thickness is used to assess α. This is compared to ex situ temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements to obtain α. All determined values for α are in good agreement, yielding αAlAs=4.1×10-6 K-1 for a given GaAs linear thermal expansion coefficient of αGaAs=5.73×10-6 K-1.

  1. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, D.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography.

  2. Determination of mass attenuation coefficient of low-Z dosimetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some low-Z dosimetric materials with potential applications in dosimetry, medical and radiation protection have been investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation code Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP). Appreciable variations are noted for the mass attenuation coefficient by changing the photon energy. The MCNP-simulated parameters are compared with the experimental data wherever possible and theoretical values through the WinXcom program. The simulated results obtained by MCNP generally agree well with the experiment and WinXcom predictions for various low-Z dosimetric and tissue substitute materials. In addition, the mass attenuation coefficients around the k-edges for low-Z dosimetric materials estimated from the MCNP code agree very well with WinXcom prediction. Finally, the results indicate that this simulation process can be followed to determine the interaction parameters of gamma rays in such low-Z materials for which there are no satisfactory experimental values available.

  3. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  4. Study of photon attenuation coefficients of some multielement materials. [123-1250 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandal, G.S. ); Singh, K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-03-01

    Total photon mass attenuation of six multielement shielding materials (concrete, plaster of paris, quick lime, black cement, white cement, and silica) is measured in the 123- to 1,250-keV energy range. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Considerable sensitivity of the total mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers to variations in oxygen content are found in these multielement materials.

  5. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  6. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  7. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  8. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Jonathan I.; Morris, Christopher L.

    2011-06-07

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  9. A calibration transmission method to determine the gamma-ray linear attenuation coefficient without a collimator.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jong-In; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the gamma-ray linear attenuation coefficient of a sample with unknown chemical composition can be determined through a systematic calibration of the correlation between the linear attenuation coefficient, gamma-ray energy and the relative degree of attenuation. For calibration, H2O, MnO2, NaCl, Na2CO3 and (NH4)2SO4 were used as reference materials. Point-like gamma-ray sources with modest activity of approximately 37kBq, along with an HPGe detector, were used in the measurements. A semi-empirical formula was derived to calculate the linear attenuation coefficients as a function of the relative count rate and the gamma-ray energy. The method was applied to the determination of the linear attenuation coefficients for K2CrO4 and SiO2 test samples in the same setup used in calibration. The experimental result agreed well with the ones calculated by elementary data. PMID:25997111

  10. Effective density and mass attenuation coefficient for building material in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salinas, I C P; Conti, C C; Lopes, R T

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents values for density and mass attenuation coefficient of building materials commonly used in Brazil. Transmission measurements were performed to provide input information for simulations with MCNP4B code. The structure for the clay bricks was simulated as a mix of all material layers and an effective density determined. The mass attenuation coefficients were determined for the 50-3,000 keV gamma-ray energy range. A comparison with results for similar materials found in the literature showed good agreement. PMID:16257357

  11. Phase contrast imaging using a micro focus x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-09-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging, a new technique to increase the imaging contrast for the tissues with close attenuation coefficients, has been studied since mid 1990s. This technique reveals the possibility to show the clear details of the soft tissues and tumors in small scale resolution. A compact and low cost phase contrast imaging system using a conventional x-ray source is described in this paper. Using the conventional x-ray source is of great importance, because it provides the possibility to use the method in hospitals and clinical offices. Simple materials and components are used in the setup to keep the cost in a reasonable and affordable range.Tungsten Kα1 line with the photon energy 59.3 keV was used for imaging. Some of the system design details are discussed. The method that was used to stabilize the system is introduced. A chicken thigh bone tissue sample was used for imaging followed by the image quality, image acquisition time and the potential clinical application discussion. High energy x-ray beam can be used in phase contrast imaging. Therefore the radiation dose to the patients can be greatly decreased compared to the traditional x-ray radiography.

  12. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P. ); Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  13. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  14. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  15. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  16. Measurement of the mass attenuation coefficients and electron densities for BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, U.; Baltaş, H.

    2007-03-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, Cu metals, Bi2O3, PbO, SrCO3, CaO, CuO compounds and solid-state forms of Bi1.7Pb0.3Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 superconductor were determined at 57.5, 65.2, 77.1, 87.3, 94.6, 122 and 136 keV energies. The samples were irradiated using a 57Co point source emitted 122 and 136 keV γ-ray energies. The X-ray energies were obtained using secondary targets such as Ta, Bi2O3 and (CH3COO)2UO22H2O. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The effect of absorption edges on electron density, effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy in composite superconductor samples was discussed. Obtained values were compared with theoretical values.

  17. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os ( Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Necati; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Apaydın, Gökhan; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-08-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2O 3, Yb 2O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time.

  18. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  20. Phase-contrast x-ray tomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, Ulrich; Beckmann, Felix; Bartscher, Markus; Biermann, Theodor; Busch, Frank; Guennewig, Olaf

    1997-10-01

    The principle and experimental l realization of x-ray phase- contrast in compute assisted microtomography ((mu) CT) at the micrometer resolution level is described. The camera used is a modification of a setup previously developed by us for attenuation-contrast (mu) CT using synchrotron x-rays. Phase detection is accomplished by employing the x-ray interferometer. By using x-ray phase contrast it is possible to image structural details in low-z biological tissues much better than with absorption contrast. The advantage of phase over attenuation contrast is not limited to light element or to low x-ray energies. Examples of applying phase contrast (mu) CT to the structural investigation of rat trigeminal nerve are given.

  1. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  2. Comparison of attenuation coefficients for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, M.; Rataj, J.; Vandlik, S.

    2011-07-01

    The paper summarizes the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence with E > 0.5 MeV through a reactor pressure vessel for vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) reactor types measured and/or calculated for mock-up experiments, as well as for operated nuclear power plant (NPP) units. The attenuation coefficient is possible to evaluate directly only by using the retro-dosimetry, based on a combination of the measured activities from the weld sample and concurrent ex-vessel measurement. The available neutron fluence attenuation coefficients (E > 0.5 MeV), calculated and measured at a mock-up experiment simulating the VVER-440-unit conditions, vary from 3.5 to 6.15. A similar situation is used for the calculations and mock-up experiment measurements for the VVER-1000 RPV, where the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence varies from 5.99 to 8.85. Because of the difference in calculations for the real units and the mock-up experiments, the necessity to design and perform calculation benchmarks both for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 would be meaningful if the calculation model is designed adequately to a given unit. (authors)

  3. High-contrast X-ray micro-tomography of low attenuation samples using large area hybrid semiconductor pixel detector array of 10 × 5 Timepix chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Krejci, F.; Bartl, B.; Dudak, J.; Kuba, J.; Kvacek, J.; Zemlicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide excellent imaging properties such as unlimited dynamic range, high spatial resolution, high frame rate and energy sensitivity. Nevertheless, a limitation in the use of these devices for imaging has been the small sensitive area of a few square centimetres. In the field of microtomography we make use of a large area pixel detector assembled from 50 Timepix edgeless chips providing fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 7.15 cm2. We have successfully demonstrated that the enlargement of the sensitive area enables high-quality tomographic measurements of whole objects with high geometrical magnification without any significant degradation in resulting reconstructions related to the chip tilling and edgeless sensor technology properties. The technique of micro-tomography with the newly developed large area detector is applied for samples formed by low attenuation, low contrast materials such a seed from Phacelia tanacetifolia, a charcoalified wood sample and a beeswax seal sample.

  4. Quantification of numerical aperture-dependence of the OCT attenuation coefficient (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, Liliana M.; Bloemen, Paul R.; Almasian, Mitra; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite the improvements in early cancer diagnosis, adequate diagnostic tools for early staging of bladder cancer tumors are lacking [1]. MEMS-probes based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) provide cross-sectional imaging with a high-spatial resolution at a high-imaging speed, improving visualization of cancerous tissue [2-3]. Additionally, studies show that the measurement of localized attenuation coefficient allows discrimination between healthy and cancerous tissue [4]. We have designed a new miniaturized MEMS-probe based on OCT that will optimize early diagnosis by improving functional visualization of suspicious lesions in bladder. During the optical design phase of the probe, we have studied the effect of the numerical aperture (NA) on the OCT signal attenuation. For this study, we have employed an InnerVision Santec OCT system with several numerical apertures (25mm, 40mm, 60mm, 100mm, 150mm and 200mm using achromatic lenses). The change in attenuation coefficient was studied using 15 dilutions of intralipid ranging between 6*10-5 volume% and 20 volume%. We obtained the attenuation coefficient from the OCT images at several fixed positions of the focuses using established OCT models (e.g. single scattering with known confocal point spread function (PSF) [5] and multiple scattering using the Extended Huygens Fresnel model [6]). As a result, a non-linear increase of the scattering coefficient as a function of intralipid concentration (due to dependent scattering) was obtained for all numerical apertures. For all intralipid samples, the measured attenuation coefficient decreased with a decrease in NA. Our results suggest a non-negligible influence of the NA on the measured attenuation coefficient. [1] Khochikar MV. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Indian J Urol 2011 Apr-Jun; 27(2): 218-225. [2] Sun J and Xie H. Review Article MEMS-Based Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography. IJO 2011, Article ID 825629, 12 pages. doi:10

  5. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  6. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  7. Reduction of TGS image reconstruction times using separable attenuation coefficient models

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Prettyman, T.H.; Sheppard, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) method for assaying transuranic and low-level waste produces low-resolution {open_quotes}density{close_quotes} images of 208-l waste drums at two or more transmission gamma-ray energies and uses these to make detailed attenuation corrections at neighboring emission gamma-ray energies. For example, we have used the 136-, 285-, and 401-keV lines from a {sup 75}Se transmission source to correct for attenuation of the 129-, 203-, 345-, and 414-keV lines in {sup 239}Pu assays. The list can expand to 20 or more emission energies when performing multiple-isotope assays. Methods for projecting attenuation images from transmission to emission energies were recently discussed with emphasis on the problems encountered when the opacity of a sample leads to poor counting statistics. This report focuses on increases in computational speed that can be attained by using separable attenuation coefficient models.

  8. Implications of X-ray tube parameter deviations in X-ray reference fields.

    PubMed

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2016-02-01

    For the purpose of radiation protection, ICRU Report 57/ICRP Publication 74 provides a list of monoenergetic conversion coefficients to be used with, among others, photon reference fields generated with X-ray tubes. A comprehensive definition of these photon reference fields can be found in international standard ISO 4037; however, it lacks thorough indication of the allowed deviations of essential parameters that influence these X-ray reference fields. These parameters are the high-voltage tube potential, the thickness of the beryllium window and the purity and thickness of the filter materials used to create different radiation qualities. Small variations of these parameters can lead to significant changes in the created X-ray spectra and, hence, the spectra-dependent conversion coefficients for phantom-related radiation-protection quantities. This can lead to situations in which the conversion coefficients listed in ISO 4037 cannot be used, resulting in time-consuming spectrometry measurements. In this work, the impact on the resulting conversion coefficients is investigated using a simplified mathematical approximation model. The findings are validated with an independent X-ray spectra calculation programme. As a result, well-founded upper limit values on the allowed deviations of the essential X-ray tube parameters are proposed to be used in a future revision of ISO 4037. PMID:25889609

  9. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 – 25.26 keV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941)

  10. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  11. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  12. Emission-based estimation of lung attenuation coefficients for attenuation correction in time-of-flight PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-06-21

    In standard segmentation-based MRI-guided attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data on hybrid PET/MRI systems, the inter/intra-patient variability of linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) is ignored owing to the assignment of a constant LAC to each tissue class. This can lead to PET quantification errors, especially in the lung regions. In this work, we aim to derive continuous and patient-specific lung LACs from time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data using the maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation (MLAA) algorithm. The MLAA algorithm was constrained for estimation of lung LACs only in the standard 4-class MR attenuation map using Gaussian lung tissue preference and Markov random field smoothness priors. MRAC maps were derived from segmentation of CT images of 19 TOF-PET/CT clinical studies into background air, lung, soft tissue and fat tissue classes, followed by assignment of predefined LACs of 0, 0.0224, 0.0864 and 0.0975 cm(-1), respectively. The lung LACs of the resulting attenuation maps were then estimated from emission data using the proposed MLAA algorithm. PET quantification accuracy of MRAC and MLAA methods was evaluated against the reference CT-based AC method in the lungs, lesions located in/near the lungs and neighbouring tissues. The results show that the proposed MLAA algorithm is capable of retrieving lung density gradients and compensate fairly for respiratory-phase mismatch between PET and corresponding attenuation maps. It was found that the mean of the estimated lung LACs generally follow the trend of the reference CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) method. Quantitative analysis revealed that the MRAC method resulted in average relative errors of -5.2 ± 7.1% and -6.1 ± 6.7% in the lungs and lesions, respectively. These were reduced by the MLAA algorithm to -0.8 ± 6.3% and -3.3 ± 4.7%, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated the potential and capability of emission-based methods in deriving patient

  13. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  15. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  16. Material decomposition with the multi-energy attenuation coefficient ratio by using a multiple discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Kang, Se-Ryong; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a spectral CT system using a photon counting detector and to decompose materials by applying a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) to the energy-dependent attenuation coefficient ratios. We imaged cylindrical phantoms of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with four holes filled with calcium chloride, iodine, and gold nanoparticle contrast agents. The attenuation coefficients were measured via reconstructed multi-energy images, and the linear attenuation ratio was used for material identification. The MDA projection matrix, determined from training phantoms, was used to identify the four materials in the testing phantoms. For quantification purposes, the relationships between the attenuation coefficients at multiple energy bins and the concentrations were characterized by using the least-squares method for each material. The mean identification accuracy for each of the three materials were 0.94 ± 0.09 for iodine, 0.96 ± 0.07 for gold nanoparticles, and 0.92 ± 0.05 for calcium chloride. The mean quantification errors were 1.90 ± 1.58% for iodine, 3.85 ± 3.13% for gold nanoparticle, and 3.40 ± 2.62% for calcium chloride. The developed multi-energy CT system based on the photon-counting detector with MDA can precisely decompose the four materials.

  17. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  18. Electrical conductivity anomaly and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Qing; Chang, Aimin E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu; Li, Yiyu; Liu, Yin; Wu, Yiquan E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu

    2014-03-10

    Electrical conductivity anomaly of perovskite-type YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient (NTC) ceramics produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been investigated by using defect chemistry theory combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. From the results of the lnρ-1/T curves and the XPS analysis, it can be considered that YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics exhibit the hopping conductivity. The major carriers in YCrO{sub 3} are holes, which are compensated by the oxygen vacancies produced due to the introduction of Mn ions. The Mn{sup 4+} ion contents increase monotonically in the range of 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.5. The resistivity increases at first and then decreases with increasing Mn contents, which has the same varying tendency with activation energy. The electrical conductivity anomaly appearing in these ceramics may be due to the variation of Cr{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions concentration as Mn content changes.

  19. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  20. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  1. Quantitative RNFL attenuation coefficient measurements by RPE-normalized OCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate significantly different scattering coefficients of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) between normal and glaucoma subjects. In clinical care, SD-OCT is routinely used to assess the RNFL thickness for glaucoma management. In this way, the full OCT data set is conveniently reduced to an easy to interpret output, matching results from older (non- OCT) instruments. However, OCT provides more data, such as the signal strength itself, which is due to backscattering in the retinal layers. For quantitative analysis, this signal should be normalized to adjust for local differences in the intensity of the beam that reaches the retina. In this paper, we introduce a model that relates the OCT signal to the attenuation coefficient of the tissue. The average RNFL signal (within an A-line) was then normalized based on the observed RPE signal, resulting in normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient maps. These maps showed local defects matching those found in thickness data. The average (normalized) RNFL attenuation coefficient of a fixed band around the optic nerve head was significantly lower in glaucomatous eyes than in normal eyes (3.0mm-1 vs. 4.9mm-1, P<0.01, Mann-Whitney test).

  2. Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E.; Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A.

    2011-09-09

    For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

  3. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    PubMed

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  4. Direct three-dimensional coherently scattered x-ray microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Congwu; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that coherently scattered x rays can be used to discriminate and identify specific components in a mixture of low atomic weight materials. The authors demonstrated a new method of doing coherently scattered x-ray tomography with a thin sheet of x ray. Methods: A collimated x-ray fan-beam, a parallel polycapillary collimator, and a phantom consisting of several biocompatible materials of low attenuation-based contrast were used to investigate the feasibility of the method. Because of the particular experimental setup, only the phantom translation perpendicular to the x-ray beam is needed and, thus, there is no need of Radon-type tomographic reconstruction, except for the correction of the attenuation to the primary and scattered x rays, which was performed by using a conventional attenuation-based tomographic image data set. The coherent scatter image contrast changes with momentum transfer among component materials in the specimen were investigated with multiple x-ray sources with narrow bandwidth spectra generated with anode and filter combinations of Cu∕Ni (8 keV), Mo∕Zr (18 keV), and Ag∕Pd (22 keV) and at multiple scatter angles by orienting the detector and polycapillary collimator at different angles to the illuminating x ray. Results: The contrast among different materials changes with the x-ray source energy and the angle at which the image was measured. The coherent scatter profiles obtained from the coherent scatter images are consistent with the published results. Conclusions: This method can be used to directly generate the three-dimensional coherent scatter images of small animal, biopsies, or other small objects with low atomic weight biological or similar synthetic materials with low attenuation contrast. With equipment optimized, submillimeter spatial resolution may be achieved. PMID:21302788

  5. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging.Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator.Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 10{sup 3}. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 10{sup 4}. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases

  6. Comparison of photon attenuation coefficients (2-150 KeV) for diagnostic imaging simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Charles W., III; Flynn, Michael J.

    2004-05-01

    The Radiology Research Laboratory at the Henry Ford Hospital has been involved in modeling x-ray units in order to predict image quality. A critical part of that modeling process is the accurate choice of interaction coefficients. This paper serves as a review and comparison of existing interaction models. Our objective was to obtain accurate and easily calculated interaction coefficients, at diagnostically relevant energies. We obtained data from: McMaster, Lawrence Berkeley Lab data (LBL), XCOM and FFAST Data from NIST, and the EPDL-97 database via LLNL. Our studies involve low energy photons; therefore, comparisons were limited to Coherent (Rayleigh), Incoherent (Compton) and Photoelectric effects, which were summed to determine a total interaction cross section. Without measured data, it becomes difficult to definitively choose the most accurate method. However, known limitations in the McMaster data and smoothing of photo-edge transitions can be used as a guide to establish more valid approaches. Each method was compared to one another graphically and at individual points. We found that agreement between all methods was excellent when away from photo-edges. Near photo-edges and at low energies, most methods were less accurate. Only the Chanter (FFAST) data seems to have consistently and accurately predicted the placement of edges (through M-shell), while minimizing smoothing errors. The EPDL-97 data by LLNL was the best over method in predicting coherent and incoherent cross sections.

  7. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  8. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  9. Improved contrast of materials based on multi-voltage images decomposition in X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiaotong; Han, Yan; Chen, Ping

    2016-02-01

    A polychromatic X-ray beam results in hardening artefacts and contrast reduction in the reconstructed image, increasing the difficulty of distinguishing materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients. For this reason, a model is proposed to decompose multi-voltage X-ray images into many ‘narrow-energy-width’ X-ray images by minimizing the weighted sum of the squared error in decomposition. This approach requires no change of hardware in the typical computed tomography imaging system. The ‘narrow-energy-width’ projection is obtained directly from the decomposition and is used to reconstruct the image. The distinction among materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients is enlarged in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image. A cylinder composed of aluminium and silicon is used in the verification experiment. The contrast of silicon and aluminium is improved, and there is a significant difference between silicon and aluminium in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Hard X-ray emission from X-ray bursters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Liang, E.

    1996-11-01

    Hard X-ray emission from compact objects has been considered a spectral signature of black hole candidates. However, SIGMA and BATSE recently detected transient emission in the energy range 30-200keV from several X-ray bursters (XRBs) believed to contain weakly magnetized neutron stars. At least seven XRBs (including Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52) are currently known to produce erratic hard X-ray outbursts with typical durations of several weeks. These results lead us to reconsider theoretical models of high-energy emission from compact objects, and in particular thermal Comptonization models vs. non-thermal models of particle energization and X-ray emission from weakly magnetized neutron stars. We summarize here recent results for magnetic field reconnection models of non-thermal particle acceleration and high-energy emission of accretion disks. For intermediate soft X-ray luminosities below the Eddington limit, non-thermal hard X-ray emission is predicted to have a (broken) power-law spectrum with intensity anticorrelated with the soft X-ray luminosity. Recent GINGA/BATSE data for the XRB 4U 1608-52 are in agreement with the mechanism of emission proposed here: transient hard X-ray emission consistent with a broken power-law spectrum was detected for a sub-Eddington soft X-ray luminosity.