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Sample records for x-ray fluorescence experiment

  1. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  2. Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the SIM bay of the command service module was employed principally for compositional mapping of the lunar surface while in lunar orbit, and secondarily, for X-ray astronomical observations during the trans-earth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristics energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of measurements of X-rays from pre-selected galactic sources such as Cyg-X-1 and Sco X-1 as well as from the galactic poles.

  3. The Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The CSM spectrometric data on the lunar surface with respect to its chemical composition are presented for Al, Mg, and Si as Al/Si and Mg/Si ratios for the various features overflow by the spacecraft. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristic energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The results showed that the highlands and maria are chemically different, with the highlands having considerably more Al and less Mg than the maria. The mare-highland contact is quite sharp and puts a limit on the amount of horizontal transport of material. The X-ray data suggest that the dominant rock type of the lunar highlands is a plagioclase-rich pyroxene bearing rock, probably anorthositic gabbro or feldspathic basalt. Thus the moon appears to have a widespread differentiated crust (the highlands) systematically richer in Al and lower in Mg than the maria. This crust is pre-mare and may represent the first major internal differentiation of the moon.

  4. Apollo 16 Geochemical X-ray Fluorescence Experiment: Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Adler, I; Trombka, J; Gerard, J; Lowman, P; Schmadebeck, R; Blodget, H; Eller, E; Yin, L; Lamothe, R; Osswald, G; Gorenstein, P; Bjorkholm, P; Gursky, H; Harris, B

    1972-07-21

    The lunar surface was mapped with respect to magnesium, aluminum, and silicon as aluminum/ silicon and magnesium/ silicon intensity ratios along the projected ground tracks swept out by the orbiting Apollo 16 spacecraft. The results confirm the observations made during the Apollo 15 flight and provide new data for a number of features not covered before. The data are consistent with the idea that the moon has a widespread differentiated crust (the highlands). The aluminum/ silicon and magnesium/ silicon concentration ratios correspond to those for anorthositic gabbros through gabbroic anorthosites or feldspathic basalts. The x-ray results suggest the occurrence of this premare crust or material similar to it at the Descartes landing site. PMID:17815621

  5. Apollo 16 geochemical X-ray fluorescence experiment: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Lowman, P.; Schmadebeck, R.; Blodgett, H.; Eller, E.; Yin, L.; Lamothe, R.; Osswald, G.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar surface was mapped with respect to Mg, Al, and Si, as Al/Si and Mg/Si ratios along the projected ground tracks swept out by the orbiting Apollo 16 spacecraft. The results confirm the observations made during the Apollo 15 flight and provide data for a number of features not covered before. The data are consistent with the idea that the moon has a widespread differentiated crust (the highlands). The Al/Si and Mg/Si chemical ratios correspond to that for anorthositic gabbro through gabbroic anorthosites or feldspathic basalts. The X-ray results suggest the occurrence of this premare crust or material similar to it as the Descartes landing site.

  6. Apollo 16 geochemical X-ray fluorescence experiment - Preliminary report.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Lowman, P.; Schmadebeck, R.; Blodget, H.; Eller, E.; Yin, L.; Lamothe, R.; Osswald, G.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping of the lunar surface with respect to magnesium, aluminum, and silicon as aluminum/silicon and magnesium/silicon intensity ratios along the projected ground tracks swept out by the orbiting Apollo 16 spacecraft. The results confirm the observations made during the Apollo 15 flight and provide new data for a number of features not covered before. The data are consistent with the idea that the moon has a widespread differentiated crust (the highlands). The aluminum/silicon and magnesium/silicon concentration ratios correspond to those for anorthositic gabbros through gabbroic anorthosites or feldspathic basalts. The X-ray results suggest the occurrence of this premare crust or material similar to it at the Descartes landing site.

  7. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. PMID:22318258

  8. SAVLOC, computer program for automatic control and analysis of X-ray fluorescence experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program for a PDP-15 computer is presented which provides for control and analysis of trace element determinations by using X-ray fluorescence. The program simultaneously handles data accumulation for one sample and analysis of data from previous samples. Data accumulation consists of sample changing, timing, and data storage. Analysis requires the locating of peaks in X-ray spectra, determination of intensities of peaks, identification of origins of peaks, and determination of a real density of the element responsible for each peak. The program may be run in either a manual (supervised) mode or an automatic (unsupervised) mode.

  9. Fluorescent X-Ray Computed Tomography towards Molecular Imaging: Proof-of-Concept Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Akatsuka, Takao; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Dilmanian, F. Avraham

    2009-03-10

    By means of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) one can detect and image a distribution of non-radioactive imaging agent, e.g., iodine, in a biomedical subject at a high spatial resolution, so it can be a novel molecular imaging modality. We have been studying an FXCT system using synchrotron radiation for in-vivo imaging brains of small animals such as mouse, or rat. For the purpose, we propose a fast FXCT imaging method based on the novel geometry. In this study, we prove the feasibility of this concept and investigate its imaging properties, including spatial and contrast resolutions and quantitativeness, by imaging an acrylic phantom and a normal mouse brain using a preliminary imaging system with monochromatic synchrotron x rays.

  10. Filtered fluorescer x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, H.C.; Emig, J.A.; Thoe, R.S.; Springer, P.T.; Hernandez, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, an instrument capable of measuring x-rays between 8 and 90 keV was conceived to help understand conditions pertaining to pulsed power research. This resulted in the development of a versatile device that would incrementally detect x-rays emitted at predetermined energy bands over this range. To accomplish this, an array of well characterized filter-fluorescer combinations were produced which would allow fluoresced x-rays to be observed by time resolved electro-optical devices. As many as sixteen channels could be utilized with each channel having a corresponding background channel. Upon completion of the device, a three week series of experiments was then successfully carried out.

  11. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  12. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  13. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  14. Correlation of dark mantle deposits with high Mg/Al ratios. [from orbital X-ray fluorescence experiment on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Mg/Al concentration ratios from the orbital fluorescence X-ray experiment were used to characterize dark mantle deposits on the moon. The areas studied included the regions of Sulpicius Gallus, Taurus-Littrow, Hadley Rille, Mare Crisium (craters Picard and Pierce), and NE Mare Fecunditatis. In all these cases these deposits exhibit high Mg/Al ratios which suggest the presence of orange, black, and green pyroclastic glasses. The highest concentration of glasses was inferred in the Sulpicius Gallus Formation at about 35%. The depth of the initial pyroclastic deposits was estimated at 3 to 4 meters. Central Mare Serenitatis exhibits high Mg/Al values but does not possess dark mantle deposits. Orbital Al and Mg/Al data for this region is similar to the very low titanium mare basalts.

  15. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  16. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  17. The Mapping X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MAPX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Downs, Robert; Gailhanou, Marc; Marchis, Franck; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Sole, Vincente Armando; Thompson, Kathleen; Walter, Philippe; Wilson, Michael; Yen, Albert; Webb, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    MapX will provide elemental imaging at =100 micron spatial resolution over 2.5 X 2.5 centimeter areas, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks. MapX is a full-frame spectroscopic imager positioned on soil or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample surface with X-rays or alpha-particles / gamma rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Fluoresced X-rays pass through an X-ray lens (X-ray µ-Pore Optic, "MPO") that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto a CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the positions and energies of individual photons are retained. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are stored and processed. A MapX experiment provides elemental maps having a spatial resolution of =100 micron and quantitative XRF spectra from Regions of Interest (ROI) 2 centimers = x = 100 micron. ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. The MapX geometry is being refined with ray-tracing simulations and with synchrotron experiments at SLAC. Source requirements are being determined through Monte Carlo modeling and experiment using XMIMSIM [1], GEANT4 [2] and PyMca [3] and a dedicated XRF test fixture. A flow-down of requirements for both tube and radioisotope sources is being developed from these experiments. In addition to Mars lander and rover missions, MapX could be used for landed science on other airless bodies (Phobos/Deimos, Comet nucleus, asteroids, the Earth's moon, and the icy satellites of the outer planets, including Europa.

  18. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of olfactory receptor neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dučić, T.; Breunig, E.; Schild, D.; Herbst, J.; Nováková, E.; Susini, J.; Tucoulu, R.; Salditt, T.

    2009-09-01

    We report a x-ray fluorescence microscopy study of cells and tissues from the olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. In this experiment we focus on sample preparation and experimental issues, and present first results of fluorescence maps of the elemental distribution of Cl, K, Ca, P, S and Na both in individual isolated neural cells and in cross-sections of the same tissue.

  19. Preliminary results from the Viking X-ray fluorescence experiment - The first sample from Chryse Planitia, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulmin, P., III; Rose, H. J., Jr.; Clark, B. C.; Baird, A. K.; Keil, K.

    1976-01-01

    Iron, calcium, aluminum, silicon, and sulfur are major elements in the first surface sample of Mars that has been analyzed by the Viking X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Titanium is present in minor quantities. This is consistent with the sample's being a mixture of fine silicate and oxide mineral grains, with a significant proportion of sulfates, possibly hydrated. Ferric oxide is regarded as the red pigmenting agent on the Martian surface, but if it coats silicate grains, the coatings must be very thin or discontinuous. A high abundance of Fe, relatively low abundances of Al, Rb, Sr, and Zr, and a high Ca/K ratio are distinctive features of the spectra. Preliminary determinations indicate the following abundances (as percentages by weight): Fe, 14 plus or minus 2; Ti, less than 1; S, 2 to 5; the Ca/K ratio by weight is greater than 5.

  20. Preliminary results from the viking x-ray fluorescence experiment: The first sample from chryse planitia, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toulmin, P., III; Clark, B. C.; Baird, A.K.; Keil, Klaus; Rose, H.J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Iron, calcium, aluminum, silicon, and sulfur are major elements in the first surface sample of Mars that has been analyzed by the Viking x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Titanium is present in minor quantities. This is consistent with the sample being a mixture of fine silicate and oxide mineral grains, with a significant proportion of sulfates, possibly hydrated. Ferric oxide is regarded as the red pigmenting agent on the martian surface, but if it coats silicate grains, the coatings must be very thin (??? 2 micrometers) or discontinuous. A high abundance of Fe, relatively low abundances of Al, Rb, Sr, and Zr, and a high Ca/K ratio are distinctive features of the spectra. Preliminary determinations indicate the following abundances (as percentages by weight): Fe, 14 ?? 2; Ti < 1; S, 2 to 5; the Ca/K ratio by weight is greater than 5.

  1. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase. PMID:18855420

  2. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  3. Remote X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The legacy of planetary X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) began in 1960 when W. Parish proposed an XRD instrument for deployment on the moon. The instrument was built and flight qualified, but the Lunar XRD program was cancelled shortly before the first human landing in 1969. XRF chemical data have been collected in situ by surface landers on Mars (Viking 1 & 2, Pathfinder) and Venus (Venera 13 & 14). These highly successful experiments provide critical constraints on our current understanding of surface processes and planetary evolution. However, the mineralogy, which is more critical to planetary surface science than simple chemical analysis, will remain unknown or will at best be imprecisely constrained until X-ray diffraction (XRD) data are collected. Recent progress in X-ray detector technology allows the consideration of simultaneous XRD (mineralogic analysis) and high-precision XRF (elemental analysis) in systems miniaturized to the point where they can be mounted on fixed landers or small robotic rovers. There is a variety of potential targets for XRD/XRF equipped landers within the solar system, the most compelling of which are the poles of the moon, the southern highlands of Mars and Europa.

  4. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Edgar, R. J.; Juda, M.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Mccammon, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Skinner, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment, or 'DXS', is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy diffuse X-ray background with about 10 eV energy resolution and 15-deg spatial resolution. During a 5-day Space Shuttle mission, DXS is to measure the spectrum of ten 15 x 15 deg regions lying along a single 150-deg-long great circle arc on the sky. DXS carries two large-area X-ray Bragg spectrometers for the 44-84 A wavelength range; these permit measurement of the wavelength spectrum of the cosmic low-energy diffuse X-ray background with good spectral resolution.

  5. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  6. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  7. X-ray fluorescence micro-tomography and laminography using an x-ray scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hoshino, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Aoki, S.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Using a scanning microscope with a zone plate, x-ray fluorescence micro-tomography was investigated at SPring-8 BL20XU. A 120 nm-thick zinc layer could be resolved in the reconstructed section image. A frozen phytoplankton and a iron impurity of a diamond could be also reconstructed. X-ray fluorescence laminography was tested at SPring-8 BL47XU. A tantalum line pattern of 3 μm line width could be reconstructed.

  8. PARTICULATE MATTER ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION BY X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task is primarily concerned with the elemental characterization, by X-ray fluorescence analysis, of particulate matter (PM) collected during active or passive sampling of ambient air. The NERL X-ray fluorescence laboratory is an in-house research facility dedicated to quant...

  9. X-ray fluorescence in investigations of archaeological finds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechák, T.; Hložek, M.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2007-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence can be successfully used for analysing the elemental composition of the superficial layers of a measured object, especially for investigating surface coatings, deposits of adventitious materials on the surface, etc. An energy dispersive version of X-ray fluorescence analysis is used in our investigations for analysing various historic objects, art works and archaeological finds. Examples of the application of X-ray fluorescence to various archaeological finds from excavations in the Czech Republic are presented - shards of ancient glazed ceramics, moulds for casting metal products, the remains of a human finger with traces of brass, probably from a ring, etc.

  10. Recoil splitting of x-ray-induced optical fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, S.; Aagren, H.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Sun, Y.-P.; Levin, S.

    2010-03-15

    We show that the anisotropy of the recoil velocity distribution of x-ray-ionized atoms or molecules leads to observable splittings in subsequent optical fluorescence or absorption when the polarization vector of the x rays is parallel to the momentum of the fluorescent photons. The order of the magnitude of the recoil-induced splitting is about 10 {mu}eV, which can be observed using Fourier or laser-absorption spectroscopic techniques.

  11. X-ray fluorescence imaging with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The micro-distribution of trace elements is of great interest in fields such as geochemistry, biology and material science. The synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe provides a technique to quantitatively measure trace element compositions at individual points and to construct semiquantitative two dimensional maps of trace element compositions. This paper describes an x-ray fluorescence system used at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

  12. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis. PMID:27209767

  13. Are Atom-sized X-ray Experiments Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Huang Rong

    2004-05-12

    The success of advanced microbeam facilities at third generation synchrotron sources have inspired us to ask ultimate questions such as how small an x-ray beam diameter can be made. With the hope of more brilliant Energy Recovery Linac or X-ray Free Electron Laser sources due to arrive in the next decade, it appears possible to think of fluorescent x-ray experiments that can be performed on even a single impurity atom in a silicon wafer, for instance. Not all x-ray optical developers are yet convinced, however, so there is critical need to assess whether in principle this can really be done or not. We are optimistic that 1 nm diameter x-ray beams can be made of sufficient flux from future sources or even demonstration experiments at lower count rates from 3rd generation sources if it turns out to be worthwhile to actively develop optics and methods that vastly exceed the current x-ray microbeam capabilities.

  14. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) set-up with a low power X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sheenu; Deep, Kanan; Jain, Lalita; Ansari, M A; Mittal, Vijay Kumar; Mittal, Raj

    2010-10-01

    The X-ray fluorescence set-up with a 100 W X-ray tube comprises a computer controlled system developed for remote operation and monitoring of tube and an adjustable stable 3D arrangement to procure variable excitation energies with low scattered background. The system was tested at different filament currents/anode voltages. The MDL of the set-up at 0.05-1.00 mA/4-12 kV is found approximately (1-100)ppm for K and L excitations and approximately (200-700)ppm for M excitations of elements and improves with filament current and anode voltage. Moreover, L measurements for Sm and Eu at five K X-ray energies of elements(Z=29-40) and analytical determination in some synthetic samples were undertaken. PMID:20570160

  15. Capillary optics for micro x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Langhoff, N.; Bjeoumikhova, S.; Wedell, R.

    2005-06-15

    Practically achieved parameters of capillary optics are presented. A micro x-ray fluorescence (XRF) arrangement was realized by using a microfocus x-ray tube and a capillary optic. Several examples for application of micro XRF are given. It was shown that polycapillary lenses free of the 'halo effect' well suited for micro XRF of heavy elements can be manufactured. Limits of opportunities for micro XRF applications and further development for micro XRF by using capillary optics are analyzed.

  16. Sampling the Soils around a Residence Containing Lead-Based Paints: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachofer, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Sampling experiments utilizing field portable instruments are instructional since students collect data following regulatory protocols, evaluate it, and begin to recognize their civic responsibilities upon collecting useful data. A lead-in-soil experiment educated students on a prevalent exposure pathway. The experimental site was a pre-1950…

  17. Wavelength dispersive analysis with the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Thorn, K. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) was tested on the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Compared to WDS spectra using an electron microprobe, the synchrotron WDS spectra have much better sensitivity and, due to the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation, lower backgrounds. The WDS spectrometer was successfully used to resolve REE L fluorescence spectra from standard glasses and transition metal K fluorescence spectra from kamacite.

  18. Detection of terrestrial radionuclides with X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Trojek, T; Čechák, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of analytical methods frequently used to identify terrestrial radionuclides in samples. While radioactivity is normally measured through the ionising radiation produced during the spontaneous decay of unstable atoms, selected radionuclides or their chemical elements can be quantified with instrumental techniques based on stimulated emission or counting of atoms. The advantages and disadvantages of these analytical methods are discussed. Particular attention is paid to X-ray fluorescence analysis of materials containing uranium and thorium. It is also possible to determine the area distributions of these chemical elements in samples with the use of scanning X-ray fluorescence systems. PMID:25977354

  19. X-ray fluorescence analysis of various alloys. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, J.W. Jr.; Ferguson, M.R.; Eager, M.H.

    1980-02-15

    For a number of years, x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been used in the Y-12 Plant Laboratory for the analysis of a wide variety of materials. During the past few years, the technique has been applied to the analysis of a large number of experimental alloys. The general procedure consists of the following steps: (1) ignition of the alloy to oxides, (2) addition of suitable internal standards, (3) dissolution of the oxides and internal standards by sodium tetraborate (borax) fusion, (4) casting a pellet from the fusion in a graphite mold (Figure 1), and (5) determination of the major constituents by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  20. X-ray emission from the outer planets: Albedo for scattering and fluorescence of solar X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Clark, J.; Bhardwaj, A.; Elsner, R.; Waite, J. H.; Maurellis, A. N.; Gladstone, G. R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2006-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission has been observed from the low-latitude "disk" of both Jupiter and Saturn as well as from the auroral regions of these planets. The disk emission as observed by ROSAT, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton appears to be uniformly distributed across the disk and to be correlated with solar activity. These characteristics suggest that the disk X rays are produced by (1) the elastic scattering of solar X rays by atmospheric neutrals and (2) the absorption of solar X rays in the carbon K-shell followed by fluorescent emission. The carbon atoms are found in methane molecules located below the homopause. In this paper we present the results of calculations of the scattering albedo for soft X rays. We also show the calculated X-ray intensity for a range of atmospheric abundances for Jupiter and Saturn and for a number of solar irradiance spectra. The model calculations are compared with recent X-ray observations of Jupiter and Saturn. We conclude that the emission of soft X rays from the disks of Jupiter and Saturn can be largely explained by the scattering and fluorescence of solar soft X rays. We suggest that measured X-ray intensities from the disk regions of Jupiter and Saturn can be used to constrain both the absolute intensity and the spectrum of solar X rays.

  1. Archaeometrical studies using X-ray fluorescence methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pauna, Catalina; Constantinescu, B.; Constantin, F.; Bugoi, R.; Stan, D.; Vasilescu, A.

    2010-04-26

    Elemental analysis contributes to authentication (knowing the elemental composition and considering the information about the usual composition of the objects in different historical periods it can be established if the item is original or fake), provenance studies (minor and trace elements indicates ores origin and 'consequently' mines location), (relative) dating of archaeological objects (e.g. for painted items--the chemical recipes for pigments can offer information about the age of objects). The paper gives a general layout for the NIPNE Archaeometry Laboratory's applications using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), micro--Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE), micro-Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-Ray Fluorescence (micro--SR-XRF) methods.

  2. X-ray fluorescence analysis major elements in silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    An automated wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer is operational for analysis of major elements in rocks and minerals. Procedures for trace-element analysis are being developed. Sample preparation methods and analytical techniques are similar to those commonly used elsewhere, but data reduction is conducted by the Fundamental Parameters program developed by Criss. Unlike empirically derived calibration curves, this data reduction method considers x-ray absorption and secondary fluorescence, which vary with differences in sample composition. X-ray intensities for each element from several standards are averaged to develop a theoretical standard for comparison with samples of unknown composition. Accurate data for samples with wide compositional ranges result from these data reduction and standardization techniques.

  3. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  4. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  5. Basic studies on x-ray fluorescence analysis for active x-ray spectrometer on SELENE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hiroki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kodama, Takuro; Oyama, Yuki; Tanaka, Reiko; Amano, Yoshiharu; Kim, Kyeong J.; Matias Lopes, Josè A.

    2013-09-01

    An active X-ray spectrometer (AXS) is now being developed as a payload candidate for the rover on SELENE-2, the next Japanese lunar exploration mission. The AXS will determine the chemical compositions of lunar rocks and regolith around the landing site. The surface of lunar rock samples will be ground using a rock abrasion tool. Thus, fundamental studies on the X-ray fluorescence analysis for lunar rocks and regolith are required to design and develop the AXS. In this study, we have investigated the X-ray fluorescence analysis in order to evaluate the effects of surface roughness of samples and the angle of incident and emergent X-rays. It was found that the fluorescent X-ray yield for low energy X-rays, i.e. the light elements, decreases at rough surface samples. This effect of surface roughness becomes small for smooth surface samples. It was also found that the fluorescent X-ray yield depends on the incident angle, which is attributed to the fact that the X-ray fluorescence occurs closer to the sample surface at larger incident angles. Since the emergent X-rays are affected by the detection geometry and surface roughness, the incident angle effect also depends on the above conditions.

  6. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  7. Numerical simulation of X-ray fluorescence production using MCNPX code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong Ja; Park, Junghun Park

    Numerical simulation for the production of X-ray fluorescence by an active X-ray spectrometer was accomplished by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-particle eXtended) Code. Purpose of this study is to cross check between the simulation result and the actual measurement to validate the numerical simulation for prospective usage for various possible cases of measurements which are not easily accessible in a laboratory environment. This study was initiated as a conjunction of Phase A study for the SELENE-2 science payload proposed in 2011. The active X-ray Spectrometer includes an X-ray spectrometer and a pyroelectric crystal-used X-ray generator. For Phase A study, we used both XRS and XRG available from the commercial company, Amptek Inc. Numerical simulation is important to optimize both instrument design and geometry of measurement to perform the best measurement output of an experiment planned. The main purpose of this study is to understand the production of X-ray fluorescence by an active X-ray spectrometer which could be onboard for future planetary spacecraft. For the numerical simulation, we used the lunar simulant FSJ-1 composition, and the input parameters for X-ray flux and energy distribution were accessed from the information of the X-ray generator, Cool-X. The parameters for geometry setting were defined as the experimental setting used for the actual measurement. It was found that the spectrum of numerical simulation is compared well with the actual measurement at the laboratory setting with respect to the number of elements, peak counts, and energy spectrum. To find optimal distance and geometry settings toward the production of X-ray fluorescence, multiple simulations at various geometry settings are currently under investigation.

  8. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy: the Potential of Astrophysics-developed Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Kraft, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Masterton, R.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence from the surface of airless bodies has been studied since the Apollo X-ray fluorescence experiment mapped parts of the lunar surface in 1971-1972. That experiment used a collimated proportional counter with a resolving power of ~1 and a beam size of ~1degree. Filters separated only Mg, Al and SI lines. We review progress in X-ray detectors and imaging for astrophysics and show how these advances enable much more powerful use of X-ray fluorescence for the study of airless bodies. Astrophysics X-ray instrumentation has developed enormously since 1972. Low noise, high quantum efficiency, X-ray CCDs have flown on ASCA, XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Swift and Suzaku, and are the workhorses of X-ray astronomy. They normally span 0.5 to ~8 keV with an energy resolution of ~100 eV. New developments in silicon based detectors, especially individual pixel addressable devices, such as CMOS detectors, can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs mean near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines.such as CMOS detectors, promise advances. X-ray imaging has advanced similarly far. Two types of imager are now available: specular reflection and coded apertures. X-ray mirrors have been flown on the Einstein Observatory, XMM-Newton, Chandra and others. However, as X-ray reflection only occurs at small (~1degree) incidence angles, which then requires long focal lengths (meters), mirrors are not usually practical for planetary missions. Moreover the field of view of X-ray mirrors is comparable to the incident angle, so can only image relatively small regions. More useful

  9. Silver coins analyses by X-ray fluorescence methods.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Italiano, A; Cutroneo, M; Gentile, C; Torrisi, A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation on the differences occurring in the manufacture of silver coins allows to get information on their elemental composition and represents a powerful support to the methodology to identify the producing technologies, workshops being also instrumental to distinguish between original and counterfeit ones. Aim of the present work is to study recent and old silver coins through non-destructive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The XRF was applied to extend the analysis to the deepest layers of the coins; for surface layers an X-ray tube or an electron beam were employed to induce the atom fluorescence to obtain information on the surface elemental composition. Moreover, a detailed study has been performed to evaluate the influence of the surface curvature on the measurement, by deducing a proper corrective factor to keep into account in the data analysis. The elemental atomic composition was measured for each coin, mainly by means of the X-ray tube excitation for the bulk and the electron Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) microbeam probe for the surface patina analysis. Ionization was induced by an X-ray tube using an Ag anode for the bulk and by an electron microprobe for the surface composition. X-ray detection was performed by using a semiconductor Si device cooled by a Peltier system. The Ag L-lines X-ray yield is affected by coin surface morphology and geometry. The comparison between coin spectra and standard samples, shows that the Ag quantitative analysis is influenced by error of the atomic concentration lower that 10%. PMID:24004868

  10. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Perez Gravie, Homero

    2011-03-01

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  11. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J. Gamboa, E. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B.; Streit, J.

    2014-11-15

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-α x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  12. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  13. X-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Maser, Jörg; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle

    2006-12-15

    Characteristic X-ray fluorescence is a technique that can be used to establish elemental concentrations for a large number of different chemical elements simultaneously in different locations in cell and tissue samples. Exposing the samples to an X-ray beam is the basis of X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). This technique provides the excellent trace element sensitivity; and, due to the large penetration depth of hard X-rays, an opportunity to image whole cells and quantify elements on a per cell basis. Moreover, because specimens prepared for XFM do not require sectioning, they can be investigated close to their natural, hydrated state with cryogenic approaches. Until several years ago, XFM was not widely available to bio-medical communities, and rarely offered resolution better then several microns. This has changed drastically with the development of third-generation synchrotrons. Recent examples of elemental imaging of cells and tissues show the maturation of XFM imaging technique into an elegant and informative way to gain insight into cellular processes. Future developments of XFM-building of new XFM facilities with higher resolution, higher sensitivity or higher throughput will further advance studies of native elemental makeup of cells and provide the biological community including the budding area of bionanotechnology with a tool perfectly suited to monitor the distribution of metals including nanovectors and measure the results of interactions between the nanovectors and living cells and tissues. PMID:17006954

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectrometer onboard Hayabusa: instrument, science and observation plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Kato, M.; Hayabusa Xrs Team

    We have developed a CCD-based X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, XRS, onboard the HAYABUSA spacecraft, with heritage technology from the X-ray fluorescence and atmospheric detector onboard the S310-28 sounding rocket experiment. Its scientific objectives are (1) to determine surface major elemental composition of asteroid 25143 Itokawa (1998SF36), (2) to map longitudinal variation of elements, if it exists, by asteroid rotation, (3) to inform on surface microscopic roughness via measurement of surface regolith's particle size effect in X-ray fluorescence, and (4) to observe X-ray bodies and X-ray cosmic backgrounds. At the earth swing-by phase, we have a plan to observe X-rays from the earth and moon. In addition, thermal design of the XRS is suitable, and examined in the spacecraft thermal vacuum test, for thermal emission study of asteroid to observe during the asteroid touchdown phase for sample collection, because the XRS has a large radiator at the asteroid pointing direction and the chassis is thermally isolated from the structure of spacecraft. We will present details of the XRS instrumentation, scientific objectives, and future observation plans, together with some results of pre-flight laboratory experiments and preliminary results of in-flight observations.

  15. X-ray fluorescence analysis of spent reactor fuel solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.V.; Iokhin, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present work examines the possibility of laboratory analytic control by means of a crystal-free x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) installation specifically designed for this purpose with a prior selection of fluorescent emissions by energy. Monitoring by fluorescent emissions from selenium positioned in the installation along with a metering cuvette allows the exclusion of errors associated with the instability of the x-ray tube beam and the effects of the superpositioning of impulses and of dead time. Tests were made on the possibility of using hard standards, consisting of pellets of uranium-aluminum alloy in a fluoroplastic casing. Some characteristics are shown of the crystal-free x-ray fluorescent method of determining uranium concentration in the technological products from reprocessing spent fuel from a water-moderated, water-cooled reactor. The determination of the uranium content in diluted incoming solutions in the reprocessing of spent fuel from such a reactor was also tested by comparison with the results of the method of isotopic dilution concluded using mass-spectrometry.

  16. X-ray fluorescence from rough rocky surfaces of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) from orbit is a frequently-used technique to determine the elemental composition of atmosphereless planetary bodies. So far, XRF observations have been conducted for asteroids by the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Shoemaker mission at (433) Eros [1] and the Hayabusa mission at (25143) Itokawa [2]. There has been difficulties to interpret the XRF data to derive the composition quantitatively. One of the reasons is the surface-roughness effect. We have investigated the XRF intensity influenced by a powdery surface as an analogue to fine regolith [3,4]. However, the surfaces of asteroids explored by the spacecraft at, e.g., (25143) Itokawa or (433) Eros, were not always covered with fine regolith but with pebbles or boulders. Thus, we have performed laboratory experiments to study the roughness effect for rocky surfaces to interpret the XRF observations of those asteroids and the observations of future missions. For the powdery surface, we have obtained the following results: 1) the XRF with lower energy is more effective for the same roughness; 2) the XRF intensity decreases for rougher surfaces but converges to a constant value almost 50--60 % of that of a flat surface; and 3) the XRF intensity decreases for larger phase angles, but does not change so for a varying incident angle when when the phase angle remains fixed. We started the experiments for rocky surfaces to investigate the elemental composition of natural unprepared rocks as well as ground rocks for past and future planetary missions. We prepared the basaltic rock samples with different surface roughness. The roughness of the rock surface is measured with a laser microscope to obtain the three-dimensional surface features and characterize the roughness in <10, 30, 60, 100-micron scales by a rectangular function as in our previous studies. We used the X-ray generator (RIGAKU RINT-2000) using an X-ray tube of Cr-target (V-filter) at 20 kV and 10mA, and detected with the Si-PIN diode

  17. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K.

    2004-08-01

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a μm-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF). We developed a μ-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit μ-XRF (GE-μ-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 μm at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant "Quinoa". The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-μ-XRF. We expect that GE-μ-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region.

  18. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groover, Krishangi; Izbicki, John

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  19. Determination of regional myocardial perfusion by x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B M; McInerney, J J

    1990-05-01

    Validation studies were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of an x-ray induced fluorescence system in quantitating regional myocardial perfusion in vivo. In a series of 13 open-chested canines, x-ray induced fluorescence was used to simultaneously monitor iodine concentration transients which arose in the left ventricular lumen and in the myocardium after the intravenous injection of an iodinated flow tracer. Deconvolution of the recorded transients produced a transfer function from which the mean transit time for the tracer to travel between the left ventricular lumen and the myocardium was calculated. Measurements of regional myocardial perfusion (Q) made by radioactive microspheres were compared with the reciprocals of the mean transit times (MTT-1) and gave a linear correlation (n = 38): MTT-1 = 0.033 + 0.069 Q, r = 0.71. Comparison of the percent change in perfusion (dQ) relative to a control study for each dog with the percent change in the respective reciprocals of the mean transit times (dMTT-1) produced a linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.88 for the regression line dMTT-1 = 0.46 dQ - 10.7. The x-ray induced fluorescence system may provide a minimally invasive means for monitoring iodine concentration transients and determining relative, if not absolute, measures of regional myocardial perfusion. PMID:2345078

  20. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, S. C.; Reddy, K. R. C; Sastry, G. V. S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe3O4 of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe2O3. The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  1. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S C; Reddy, K R C; Sastry, G V S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe(3)O(4) of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe(2)O(3). The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  2. Application of X-ray fluorescence in an investigation of photographic heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechák, T.; Kopecká, I.; Trojek, T.; Štanzel, T.; Bártová, H.

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis uses ionizing radiation to study the elemental composition of materials. It is widely used for many purposes, including studies of various cultural and historic relicts and objects of art. This paper summarizes our experience with X-ray fluorescence analysis and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in investigating historical photographs by means of portable spectroscopic devices. The results of these measurements provide information about the composition of historical photographs and their toning. They can be used for comparing the processes used in fabricating the photographs, for assessing the quality of the paper and, in many cases, for information about how to repair damaged parts.

  3. Numerical Modeling of X-ray Photoionization Experiments Driven by Z-Pinch X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, N. C.; Cohen, D. H.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    We have performed an initial round of experiments at the Z-Machine at Sandia National Laboratory in an attempt to create and characterize an X-ray photoionized plasma that is analogous to those found in X-ray binaries and AGNs. The ultimate goal is to benchmark X-ray spectral modeling codes that are used to analyze Chandra and XMM data from accretion powered astrophysical objects. The initial experiments involved neon and the primary measurement made was time-integrated, back-lit X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the photoionized neon. We present numerical modeling of this experiment, including non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics and spectral synthesis results, that are in good agreement with the data. We also present scaling studies for future experiments, including sythesized time-resolved X-ray emission spectra that correspond to the high-resolution spectral data being produced by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. The authors acknowledge the support of Research Corporation grant CC5489.

  4. Tentative study on x-ray enhancement by fluorescent emission of radiation by plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki; Sakamaki, Kimio; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    1999-09-01

    Tentative study on characteristic x-ray enhancement by fluorescent emission of radiation by plasma x-ray source is described. The enhancement was performed by the plasma flash x-ray generator having a cold-cathode triode. And the generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x-ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was almost equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was less than 30 kA. The characteristic x-ray intensity substantially increased according to the growth in the plasma x-ray source. When the linear plasma x-ray source formed, the bremsstrahlung x-rays were absorbed without using a monochromatic filter, and high- intensity characteristic x-rays were produced.

  5. X-Ray Stellar Classes - Skylab Student Experiment ED-24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment X-Ray Stellar Classes, proposed by Joe Reihs of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. This experiment utilized Skylab's X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope to observe and determine the general characteristics and location of x-ray sources. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  6. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence to extraterrestrial materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) is a valuable technique for trace element analyses of extraterrestrial materials permitting minimum detection limits less than 1 ppM for 20 micrometer spots. SXRF measurements have been performed on iron meteorites and micrometeorites using white synchrotron radiation and an energy dispersive x-ray detector at the National Synchrotron Light Source (X-26C), Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY). Partitioning of Cu between troilite (FeS) and metal in the nine iron meteorites studied suggests sub-solidus re-equilibration in these objects. A technique has been developed for determining self-absorption corrections for filtered, continuum excitation of small specimens, such as stratospheric particles and refractory inclusions in meteorites.

  7. Micro-X-ray Fluorescence in Food Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Jeor, V. L.; Muroski, A. R.; McGuire, C.; Lape, A.

    2011-09-01

    All forms of commercially available x-ray microscopy are finding growing application opportunities within the food industry; this includes micro-x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro-CT. In this example, we demonstrate the use of micro-XRF in discovering the cause for a particularly troubling anomaly discovered by one of our customers during the production of a batch of their chicken hotdogs. Although their claim was that iron filings must be present to cause such anomalies, no "iron filings" were discovered in our initial observations. More traditional EDS methods were attempted to determine the elemental content within these anomalies, but they were not sensitive enough to detect the small amounts of iron that were, in fact, present. Nor could EDS determine the source for this minute amount of iron. Only micro-XRF displayed the required sensitivity to detect the iron and to make an initial diagnosis regarding its potential source. Visible spectroscopy confirms. Instrumentation is reviewed.

  8. Hybrid fluorescence tomography/x-ray tomography improves reconstruction quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, R. B.; Ale, A.; Sarantopoulos, A.; Freyer, M.; Söhngen, R.; Zientkowska, M.; Ntziachristos, V.

    2009-07-01

    A novel hybrid imaging system for simultaneous X-ray and Fluorescence Tomography is presented, capitalizing on 360°-projection free-space fluorescence tomography. The system is implemented within a commercial micro-CT scanner allowing reconstructions with a resolution of 95μm. Acquired data sets are intrinsically coregistered in the same coordinate system and can be used to correctly localize reconstructed fluorescence distributions with morphological features. More importantly, the micro-CT data, automatically segmented into different organ and tissue segments can be used to guide the fluorescence reconstruction algorithm and reduce the ill coditioning of the inverse problem. We showcase the use of the system and the improvements in image quality for lesions in brain and lung.

  9. Combined use of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging and X-ray fluorescence microscopy for sub-cellular metal quantification.

    PubMed

    Kosior, Ewelina; Bohic, Sylvain; Suhonen, Heikki; Ortega, Richard; Devès, Guillaume; Carmona, Asuncion; Marchi, Florence; Guillet, Jean Francois; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to obtain quantitative maps of the projected metal concentration in whole cells. The experiments were performed on freeze dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). X-ray fluorescence analysis gives the areal mass of most major, minor and trace elements; it is validated using a biological standard of known composition. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is validated using calibration samples and through comparison with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy. Up to now, absolute quantification at the sub-cellular level was impossible using X-ray fluorescence microscopy but can be reached with the use of the proposed approach. PMID:22182730

  10. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Wang, Ge; Wu, Xizeng

    2014-03-15

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub α} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 –69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub α} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub α} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom

  11. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, Konstantin; Huwig, Kathy; Harvey, Ralph; Ishii, Hope; Bradley, John; Luening, Katharina; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero

    2007-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 × 4) μm2 beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  12. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, K; Huwig, K; Harvey, R; Ishii, H; Bradley, J; Luening, K; Brennan, S; Pianetta, P

    2006-08-23

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 x 4) {micro}{sup 2} beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  13. First X-ray Fluorescence MicroCT Results from Micrometeorites at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatyev, Konstantin; Luening, Katharina; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero; Huwig, Kathy; Harvey, Ralph; Ishii, Hope; Bradley, John

    2007-01-19

    X-ray fluorescence microCT (computed tomography) is a novel technique that allows non-destructive determination of the 3D distribution of chemical elements inside a sample. This is especially important in samples for which sectioning is undesirable either due to the risk of contamination or the requirement for further analysis by different characterization techniques. Developments made by third generation synchrotron facilities and laboratory X-ray focusing systems have made these kinds of measurements more attractive by significantly reducing scan times and beam size. First results from the x-ray fluorescence microCT experiments performed at SSRL beamline 6-2 are reported here. Beamline 6-2 is a 54 pole wiggler that uses a two mirror optical system for focusing the x-rays onto a virtual source slit which is then reimaged with a set of KB mirrors to a (2 x 4) {mu}m2 beam spot. An energy dispersive fluorescence detector is located in plane at 90 degrees to the incident beam to reduce the scattering contribution. A PIN diode located behind the sample simultaneously measures the x-ray attenuation in the sample. Several porous micrometeorite samples were measured and the reconstructed element density distribution including self-absorption correction is presented. Ultimately, this system will be used to analyze particles from the coma of comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust particles both of which were collected during the NASA Stardust mission.

  14. Portable X-ray Fluorescence Unit for Analyzing Crime Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.

    2003-12-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Justice have teamed up to apply NASA technology to the field of forensic science. NASA hardware that is under development for future planetary robotic missions, such as Mars exploration, is being engineered into a rugged, portable, non-destructive X-ray fluorescence system for identifying gunshot residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. This project establishes the shielding requirements that will ensure that the exposure of a user to ionizing radiation is below the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's allowable limits, and also develops the benchtop model for testing the system in a controlled environment.

  15. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael W M; Phillips, Nicholas W; van Riessen, Grant A; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J; Nashed, Youssef S G; Mudie, Stephen T; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributions via X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated. PMID:27577770

  16. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  17. X-ray fluorescence analysis of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Vassilaros, G L; McKaveney, J P

    1969-02-01

    An X-ray solution method is proposed for determining major amounts of Mo, Sn and Zr in Ti alloys. The method utilizes adjacent elements in the periodic table as internal standards and has been successfully applied to levels of 3-10% Sn, 11-40% Mo and 6-20% Zr. The procedure involves three steps: dissolving the sample with a suitable acid mixture; adding the suitable internal standard at the concentration levels experimentally found to give optimum accuracy and precision; analysing the resulting solution mixture by X-ray fluorescence. Antimony was found to be a suitable internal standard for its adjacent element tin at a concentration ratio of 3:1 Sb:Sn. Niobium was successfully used for both its adjacent elements, molybdenum and zirconium, at 2:1 concentration ratios, Nb:Mo and Nb:Zr. A number of elements non-adjacent to tin, molybdenum and zirconium (i.e., copper, bromine, titanium, bismuth and tantalum) were experimentally found unsuitable as internal standards. Concentration factors of the internal standard and the adjacent elements sought were found to affect significantly the precision of analysis. PMID:18960488

  18. X-ray fluorescence surface contaminant analyzer: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Hudson B.

    1988-01-01

    The bonding of liner material to the inner metal surfaces of solid rocket booster cases is adversely affected by minute amounts of impurities on the metal surface. Suitable non-destructive methods currently used for detecting these surface contaminants do not provide the means of identifying their elemental composition. The feasibility of using isotopic source excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence as a possible technique for elemental analysis of such contaminants is investigated. A survey is made of the elemental compositions of both D-6ac steel, a common construction material for the booster cases, and Conoco HD-2 grease, a common surface contamination. Source and detector choices that maximize signal to noise ratio in a Recessed Source Geometry are made. A Monte Carlo simulation is then made of the optimized device incorporating the latest available X-ray constants at the energy of the chosen source to determine the device's response to a D-6ac steel surface contained with Conoco HD-2 grease.

  19. Inorganic chemical investigation by X-ray fluorescence analysis - The Viking Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulmin, P., III; Rose, H. J., Jr.; Baird, A. K.; Clark, B. C.; Keil, K.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic chemical investigation experiment added in August 1972 to the Viking Lander scientific package uses an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in which four sealed, gas-filled proportional counters detect X-rays emitted from samples of the Martian surface materials irradiated by X-rays from radioisotope sources (Fe-55 and Cd-109). The instrument is inside the Lander body, and samples are to be delivered to it by the Viking Lander Surface Sampler. Instrument design is described along with details of the data processing and analysis procedures. The results of the investigation will characterize the surface materials of Mars as to elemental composition with accuracies ranging from a few tens of parts per million (at the trace-element level) to a few per cent (for major elements) depending on the element in question.

  20. Feasibility of x ray fluorescence for spent fuel safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Corey Ross; Mozin, Vladimir; Tobin, Stephen J; Fensin, Michael L; White, Julia M; Croft, Stephen; Stafford, Alissa; Charlton, William

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel is necessary for many reasons, in particular to verify that diversion or other illicit activities have not occurred. Therefore, safeguarding the world's nuclear fuel is paramount to responsible nuclear regulation and public acceptance, but achieving this goal presents many difficulties from both a technical and economic perspective. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of NA-24 is funding a large collaborative effort between multiple laboratories and universities to improve spent nuclear fuel safeguards methods and equipment. This effort involves the current work of modeling several different nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Several are being researched, because no single NDA technique, in isolation, has the potential to properly characterize fuel assemblies and offer a robust safeguards measure. The insights gained from this research, will be used to down-select from the original set a few of the most promising techniques that complement each other. The goal is to integrate the selected instruments to create an accurate measurement system for fuel verification that is also robust enough to detect diversions. These instruments will be fabricated and tested under realistic conditions. This work examines one of the NDA techniques; the feasibility of using x ray emission peaks from Pu and U to gather information about their relative quantities in the spent fuel. X Ray Fluorescence (XRF), is unique compared to the investigated techniques in that it is the only one able to give the elemental ratio of Pu to U, allowing the possibility of a Pu gram quantity for the assembly to be calculated. XRF also presents many challenges, mainly its low penetration, since the low energy x rays of interest are effectively shielded by the first few millimeters of a fuel pin. This paper will explore the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code calculations of spent fuel x ray peaks. The MCNPX

  1. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  2. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  3. Using X-ray Fluorescence to Date Petroglyphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, James

    2009-10-01

    Petroglyphs were created by ancient peoples of the Colorado Plateau who pecked figures of cultural or religious significance into the desert varnish, the ubiquitous dark patina covering the rock surfaces of the region. Manganese (Mn) is a significant elemental component of desert varnish that is often at trace levels in the substrate rock. As such, F. Lytle has shown that under certain conditions, it may be possible to estimate the age of petroglpyhs using Mn levels. In this work we use x-ray fluorescence to measure Mn levels in the desert varnish of petroglyphs and then use dated graffiti to attempt to calibrate the Mn level with age. Preliminary results from petroglyph panels in eastern Utah will be presented.

  4. Analysis of tungsten carbides by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kinson, K; Knott, A C; Belcher, C B

    Five sample presentation techniques were examined for the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric analysis of tungsten carbide alloys in powder and cemented forms. Powder samples may be oxidized by air at 600 degrees before fusion (I), or preferably by lithium nitrate during fusion (II); the fusion is effected with lithium-lanthanum tetraborate followed by briquetting with graphite. Powder samples may also be blended with wax and briquetted (III). Cemented carbides are surface-prepared with silicon carbide before analysis (V). Briquettes prepared by blending carbide powder, lithium-lanthanum tetraborate and graphite (IV), give poor reproducibility, however, owing to micro-absorption effects the technique is not recommended. The determination of eight common elements in tungsten carbide is discussed and the relative standard deviations are 0.002-0.004 for major and 0.008-0.01 for minor elements. PMID:18961988

  5. Determination of thorium by fluorescent x-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adler, I.; Axelrod, J.M.

    1955-01-01

    A fluorescent x-ray spectrographic method for the determination of thoria in rock samples uses thallium as an internal standard. Measurements are made with a two-channel spectrometer equipped with quartz (d = 1.817 A.) analyzing crystals. Particle-size effects are minimized by grinding the sample components with a mixture of silicon carbide and aluminum and then briquetting. Analyses of 17 samples showed that for the 16 samples containing over 0.7% thoria the average error, based on chemical results, is 4.7% and the maximum error, 9.5%. Because of limitations of instrumentation, 0.2% thoria is considered the lower limit of detection. An analysis can be made in about an hour.

  6. X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy for Investigation of Archival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Paunesku, T.; Wanzer, M. B.; Kirillova, E. N.; Muksinova, K. N.; Revina, V. S.; Romanov, S. A.; Lyubchansky, E. R.; Grosche, B.; Birschwilks, M.; Vogt, S.; Finney, L.; Woloschak, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent efforts in radiation biology community worldwide have amassed records and archival tissues from animals exposed to different radionuclides and external beam irradiation. In most cases, these samples come from life-long studies on large animal populations conducted in national laboratories and equivalent institutions throughout Europe, North America, and Japan. While many of these tissues were used for histopathological analyses, much more information may still be obtained from these samples. A new technique suitable for imaging of these tissues is X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM). Following development of third generation synchrotrons, XFM has emerged as an ideal technique for study of metal content, speciation, and localization in cells, tissues and organs. Here we review some of the recent XFM literature pertinent to tissue sample studies and present examples of XFM data obtained from tissue sections of beagle dog samples which show that the quality of archival tissues allows XFM investigation. PMID:22951477

  7. Counter tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, R.; Holm, M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the best design tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer for quantitative analysis of Venusian dust and condensates. The principal objective of the project was to develop the best counter tube window geometry for the sensing element of the instrument. This included formulation of a mathematical model of the window and optimization of its parameters. The proposed detector and instrument has several important features. The instrument will perform a near real-time analysis of dust in the Venusian atmosphere, and is capable of measuring dust layers less than 1 micron thick. In addition, wide dynamic measurement range will be provided to compensate for extreme variations in count rates. An integral pulse-height analyzer and memory accumulate data and read out spectra for detail computer analysis on the ground.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation in grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Gangadhar Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-06-24

    The Compton and elastic scattering radiations are the major contributor to the spectral background of an x-ray fluorescence spectrum, which eventually limits the element detection sensitivities of the technique to µg/g (ppm) range. In the present work, we provide a detail mathematical descriptions and show that how polarization properties of the synchrotron radiation influence the spectral background in the x-ray fluorescence technique. We demonstrate our theoretical understandings through experimental observations using total x-ray fluorescence measurements on standard reference materials. Interestingly, the azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation is shown to have a vital role on the significance of the x-ray fluorescence detection sensitivities.

  9. X-ray laser `` oscillator-amplifier`` experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shimkaveg, G.M.; Carter, M.R.; Young, B.K.F.; Walling, R.S.; Osterheld, A.L.; Trebes, J.E.; London, R.A.; Ratowsky, R.P.; Stewart, R.E.; Craxton, R.S.

    1993-03-19

    We present results from experiments directed toward increasing the degree of transverse coherence in x-ray laser beams. We have concentrated on the neon-like yttrium (Z=39) collisionally-pumped x-ray laser as the test system for these studies because of its unique combination of brightness, monochromaticity, and high-reflectivity optics availability. Attempts at improving laser performance using proximate feedback optics failed. Modest success has been found to date in ``double foil`` experiments, involving two x-ray lasers spatially separated by 29 cm and shot sequentially in an ``oscillator-amplifier`` configuration.

  10. Sub-micron Hard X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Synthetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurement such as μ-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used SXFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L3 or L2 edge as well as lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope 242Pu. Elemental maps reveal that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions for an average 202 μm2 cell is 1.4 fg Pu/cell or 2.9 × 10−20 moles Pu/μm2, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge SXFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its Lα X-ray emission. PMID:22444530

  11. Recent X-Ray Laser Characterization Experiments at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-02-26

    We report on a series of experiments, using the COMET picosecond facility, designed to characterize and develop different x-ray laser sources. This work encompasses collisional pumping of slab and gas puff targets.

  12. Ultrafast laser pump/x-ray probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Judd, E.; Schuck, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    In an ongoing project aimed at probing solids using x-rays obtained at the ALS synchrotron with a sub-picosecond time resolution following interactions with a 100 fs laser pulse, the authors have successfully performed pump-probe experiments limited by the temporal duration of ALS-pulse. They observe a drop in the diffraction efficiency following laser heating. They can attribute this to a disordering of the crystal. Studies with higher temporal resolution are required to determine the mechanism. The authors have also incorporated a low-jitter streakcamera as a diagnostic for observing time-dependant x-ray diffraction. The streakcamera triggered by a photoconductive switch was operated at kHz repetition rates. Using UV-pulses, the authors obtain a temporal response of 2 ps when averaging 5000 laser pulses. They demonstrate the ability to detect monochromatized x-ray radiation from a bend-magnet with the streak camera by measuring the pulse duration of a x-ray pulse to 70 ps. In conclusion, the authors show a rapid disordering of an InSb crystal. The resolution was determined by the duration of the ALS pulse. They also demonstrate that they can detect x-ray radiation from a synchrotron source with a temporal resolution of 2ps, by using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera. Their set-up will allow them to pursue laser pump/x-ray probe experiments to monitor structural changes in materials with ultrafast time resolution.

  13. Cosputtered composition-spread reproducibility established by high-throughput x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Dover, R. Bruce van

    2010-09-15

    We describe the characterization of sputtered yttria-zirconia composition spread thin films by x-ray fluorescence (XRF). We also discuss our automated analysis of the XRF data, which was collected in a high throughput experiment at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. The results indicate that both the composition reproducibility of the library deposition and the composition measurements have a precision of better than 1 atomic percent.

  14. Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer for Zirconium-Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn Moore

    2013-09-01

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides details of preliminary testing/experiments performed using a handheld X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The analyzer will be utilized in upcoming fuel-foil-rolling optimization studies at the INL. The studies are being performed in support of DOE’s Office of Global Threat Reduction -- Reactor Conversion Subprogram. Details of the equipment used, operating parameters, and measurement results are provided in this report.

  15. Quo Vadis total reflection X-ray fluorescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlke, Siegfried

    2003-12-01

    The multielement trace analytical method 'total reflection X-ray fluorescence' (TXRF) has become a successfully established method in the semiconductor industry, particularly, in the ultra trace element analysis of silicon wafer surfaces. TXRF applications can fulfill general industrial requirements on daily routine of monitoring wafer cleanliness up to 300 mm diameter under cleanroom conditions. Nowadays, TXRF and hyphenated TXRF methods such as 'vapor phase decomposition (VPD)-TXRF', i.e. TXRF with a preceding surface and acid digestion and preconcentration procedure, are automated routine techniques ('wafer surface preparation system', WSPS). A linear range from 10 8 to 10 14 [atoms/cm 2] for some elements is regularly controlled. Instrument uptime is higher than 90%. The method is not tedious and can automatically be operated for 24 h/7 days. Elements such as S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Sn, Sb, Ba and Pb are included in the software for standard peak search. The detection limits of recovered elements are between 1×10 11 and 1×10 7 [atoms/cm 2] depending upon X-ray excitation energy and the element of interest. For the determination of low Z elements, i.e. Na, Al and Mg, TXRF has also been extended but its implementation for routine analysis needs further research. At present, VPD-TXRF determination of light elements is viable in a range of 10 9 [atoms/cm 2]. Novel detectors such as silicon drift detectors (SDD) with an active area of 5 mm 2, 10 mm 2 or 20 mm 2, respectively, and multi-array detectors forming up to 70 mm 2 are commercially available. The first SDD with 100 mm 2 (!) area and integrated backside FET is working under laboratory conditions. Applications of and comparison with ICP-MS, HR-ICP-MS and SR-TXRF, an extension of TXRF capabilities with an extremely powerful energy source, are also reported.

  16. Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lombi, Enzo; de Jonge, Martin D.; Donner, Erica; Kopittke, Peter M.; Howard, Daryl L.; Kirkham, Robin; Ryan, Chris G.; Paterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples. PMID:21674049

  17. Recent X-Ray Laser Experiments on the COMET Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Barbee, T W; Shlyaptsev, V N; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A

    2001-09-22

    The development of the transient collisional excitation x-ray laser scheme using tabletop laser systems with multiple pulse capability has progressed rapidly in the last three years. The high small-signal gain and strong x-ray output have been demonstrated for laser drive energies of typically less than 10 J. We report recent x-ray laser experiments on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) tabletop facility using this technique. In particular, the saturated output from the Ni-like Pd ion 4d - 4p x-ray laser at 146.8 {angstrom} has been well characterized and has potential towards a useable x-ray source in a number of applications. One important application of a short wavelength x-ray laser beam with picosecond pulse duration is the study of a high density laser-produced plasma. We report the implementation of a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer using diffraction grating optics as beam splitters designed for the Ni-like Pd laser and show results from probing a 600 ps heated plasma. In addition, gas puff targets are investigated as an x-ray laser gain medium and we report results of strong lasing on the n = 3 - 3 transitions of Ne-like Ar.

  18. Sensitivity of in vivo X-ray fluorescence determination of skeletal lead stores

    SciTech Connect

    Sokas, R.K.; Besarab, A.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Shapiro, I.M.; Bloch, P. )

    1990-09-01

    Eighteen patients with known past occupational lead exposure underwent parenteral diagnostic chelation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and x-ray fluorescent determination of in vivo skeletal lead stores at the distal styloid process of the ulna and at the temporal base bone using a cobalt 57 source and measuring lead Ka x-rays. X-ray fluorescent lead measurements in both locations correlated with results of diagnostic chelation. Using a post-chelation urinary excretion of greater than 600 micrograms lead/24 h as the definition of high-lead stores, sensitivity of x-ray fluorescence at the wrist and temple was 56% and 39%, respectively.

  19. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2011-04-26

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  20. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2009-04-14

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow-separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  1. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  2. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996.

  3. Measurement uncertainty in Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floor, G. H.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-09-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a multi-elemental technique using micro-volumes of sample. This work assessed the components contributing to the combined uncertainty budget associated with TXRF measurements using Cu and Fe concentrations in different spiked and natural water samples as an example. The results showed that an uncertainty estimation based solely on the count statistics of the analyte is not a realistic estimation of the overall uncertainty, since the depositional repeatability and the relative sensitivity between the analyte and the internal standard are important contributions to the uncertainty budget. The uncertainty on the instrumental repeatability and sensitivity factor could be estimated and as such, potentially relatively straightforward implemented in the TXRF instrument software. However, the depositional repeatability varied significantly from sample to sample and between elemental ratios and the controlling factors are not well understood. By a lack of theoretical prediction of the depositional repeatability, the uncertainty budget can be based on repeat measurements using different reflectors. A simple approach to estimate the uncertainty was presented. The measurement procedure implemented and the uncertainty estimation processes developed were validated from the agreement with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and/or reference/calculated values.

  4. Continuous Flow Cryostat for X-Ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Glatzel, Pieter; Lapras, Christophe; Krzyzowski, Michael

    2010-06-23

    A continuous Helium flow cryostat was designed and built by Cryovac GMbH to specifications given by ESRF beamline ID26. The beamline has constructed a high energy resolution X-ray emission spectrometer using multiple spherically bent analyser crystals, together with the sample and detector on a vertical Rowland circle. The double shrouded cryostat has a low profile designed to fit into the spectrometer setup, the lowest detector position allows for a Bragg angle of 85 degrees with a 1 meter diameter Rowland circle. The cryostat has a temperature range of 5 to 300 Kelvin on the sample holder which is cooled by static Helium exchange gas. The cryostat has triple windows for beam entrance, transmission and fluorescence; the latter offers an opening angle of 80 degrees horizontally and 50 degrees vertically. The cryostat can be configured to work in two different operation modes: translation or rotation. The translation mode offers a displacement of 50 mm to accommodate multiple samples on the sample holder. The rotation mode is used for polarisation studies on single crystals.We show recent results obtained on Chromium containing molecular complexes; data collection was done at a temperature of 10 Kelvin to avoid radiation damage.

  5. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  6. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kappen, P.; Arhatari, B. D.; Luu, M. B.; Balaur, E.; Caradoc-Davies, T.

    2013-06-15

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography/diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  7. The BioCAT Microprobe for X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging, MicroXAFS and Microdiffraction Studies on Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kondrashkina, E.; Weng, T.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Orgel, J.; Davidson, M.; Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Irving, T.C.

    2007-07-31

    Microbeam capabilities have been recently added to the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source to allow x-ray elemental mapping, micro x-ray absorption fine structure and microdiffraction studies on biological samples. The microprobe setup comprises a pair of platinum coated silicon KB mirrors; a sample holder mounted in a high precision positioner (100 nm accuracy); fluorescence detectors including a Si drift detector, Fe and Zn Bent Laue analyzers and a Ge detector; and a CCD detector for micro-diffraction experiments. The energy range of the microprobe is from 3.5 keV up to 17 keV. The fast scanning capabilities of the Bio-CAT beamline facilitate rapid acquisition of x-ray elemental images and micro-XAFS spectra. This paper reports the results of commissioning the KB mirror system and its performance in initial x-ray fluorescence mapping and micro-diffraction studies.

  8. New X-Ray Detector for Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process that occurs in plasmas where magnetic field lines break and re-attach to form a different topology having lower energy. Since the magnetic field is changing very fast in the reconnection region, Faraday's Law states that there is a large electric field that accelerates electrons which can then create x-rays. X-rays have been previously observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment and in similar experiments. We have assembled a new detector consisting of a scintillator that is more than 10 times the volume of the previous one and a light guide that allows the photomultiplier tube to be 2 meters from the experiment so that electrical noise is reduced. The setup has been tested using a weak natural Thorium source and will soon be mounted on the Caltech jet experiment in front of a kapton vacuum window that allows x-rays to pass. Kapton has good transmission above 5 KeV.

  9. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging. PMID:22289255

  10. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  11. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence: Determination of an optimum geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Y.M.; Chang, C.H.; Padmore, H.A.

    1997-04-01

    Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a widely used technique in which the normal trace element detection capability of hard x-ray fluorescence (XRF) is enhanced by use of an x-ray reflective substrate. TXRF is more sensitive than normal photon induced XRF due to the reduction of the substrate scattering and fluorescence signals. This reduction comes about because in total external reflection, the photon field only penetrates about 20 {angstrom} into the surface, instead of typically 50 {mu}m for a silicon substrate at normal incidence for 10 KeV photons. The technique is used in many fields of trace element analysis, and is widely used in the determination of metal impurity concentrations on and in the surface of silicon wafers. The Semiconductor Industry Association roadmap (SIA) indicates a need for wafer contamination detection at the 10{sup 7}atoms/cm{sup 2} level in the next few years. Current commercial systems using rotating anode x-ray sources presently routinely operate with a sensitivity level of around 10{sup 10} atoms/cm{sup 2} and this has led to interest in the use of synchrotron radiation to extend the sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. The pioneering work of Pianetta and co-workers at SSRL has clearly shown that this should be possible, using a fully optimized source and detector. The purpose of this work is to determine whether ALS would be a suitable source for this type of highly sensitive wafer TXRF. At first look it appears improbable as the SSRL work used a high flux multipole wiggler source, and it is clear that the detected fluorescence for relevant concentrations is small. In addition, SSRL operates at 3.0 GeV rather than 1.9 GeV, and is therefore more naturally suited to hard x-ray experiments. The aim of this work was therefore to establish a theoretical model for the scattering and fluorescence processes, so that one could predict the differences between alternative geometries and select an optimum configuration.

  12. Effect of regolith on planetary X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy: laboratory and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranen, Jyri; Carpenter, James; Parviainen, Hannu; Muinonen, Karri

    Fluorescent X-rays from the surfaces of airless planetary bodies in the inner solar system have been measured by instruments on several spacecraft. X-ray emission follows photoionisation by incident solar X-rays and charged particles and reveals the elemental composition of the surface. Analyses of X-ray spectra obtained by orbiting spacecraft, use the relative intensities of elemental emission lines (e.g., Ca/Si, Fe/Si) to determine the geochemistry of the target body. Historically, the analysis of X-ray spectra has assumed that surfaces can be considered as homogeneous plane-parallel media. It has been shown, however, that relative line intensities are affected by the physical properties of the target surface (e.g. particle size distribution and packing density of the regolith) and the viewing and illumination geometry of observations. We describe experimental investigations into the effects of regolith properties on the line ratios measured by a nadir pointing (emergence angle 0° ) orbiting instrument, with with solar illumination angles in the range 25-75° from zenith. The planetary regolith analogue used in these experiments was a terrestrial, olivine rich basalt, which has been used by previous authors as an analogue to the lunar maria. The basalt samples were ground to powder and sieved to discriminate particles in the ranges, <75µm, 75-250µm, and 250-500µm. These separate powders were then pressed into solid pellets. The separation of particles with different sizes allows some determination of the effects due to changes in particle size. All measurements were made at pressures of less than 0.5 mbar to prevent absorption of fluorescent X-rays in air. The relative fluorescent line ratios of several major rock forming elements (K, Ca, Ti, Si) were measured. We find that for measurements made in a "nadir" pointing geometry, the measured spectrum becomes increasingly hard as illumination angle increases (i.e. X-ray lines at higher energies are enhanced

  13. Virtual Young's Double Slit Experiment for Hard X-ray Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakovic, Abdel; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Siddons, D. P.; Stein, A.; Warren, J. B.; Sandy, A.; Narayanan, S.; Metzler, M.

    2010-03-01

    Coherent hard X-ray beams underlie many of the recent advances in X-ray imaging and characterization, and it is crucial to quantify the coherence properties of X-ray beams for further advances. The classic Young's double slit experiment is an accepted method from which one can deduce the transverse coherence length, but unfortunately the double slit experiment is difficult to implement at these wavelengths. Micro-fabricated prisms are used to implement a virtual Young's double slit experiment, and interference fringes are quantified by X-ray fluorescence from a 30 nm Cr film in addition to being recorded with YAG crystal and CCD. The maximum number of fringes in the classical overlap region is comparable to δ/4πβ, the ratio of real to imaginary parts of the X-ray refractive index of the prism material. We have measured the horizontal and vertical transverse coherence lengths at beamline APS 8-ID. We suggest this to be a flexible, easily applied method that can be implemented at X-ray laboratories for both, coherence measurements and interferometric imaging. http://arxiv.org/abs/0910.5524

  14. [Methods of detector response function establishment in X-ray fluorescence spectra analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Tuo, Xian-Guo; Yang, Jian-Bo; Liu, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Bin

    2012-11-01

    During the measurement and analysis process of X-ray fluorescence spectra, it is very helpful to improve the analyze speed, accuracy and automaticity of X-ray fluorescence spectra analysis by establishing detector response function(DRF), which represents the shape of full energy peak and can provide former basic data for subsequent X-ray analysis technique. For the theory and model of semiconductor DRF in X-ray energy spectrum measurements, methods of three typical detector response function model establishment, key parameters of full energy peak standard deviation and Fano factor calculation, etc. are discussed, and meanwhile, the summarization and contrast of existing studies are shown in this paper. Finally, the suggestion for modeling methods of DRF in X-ray fluorescence spectra measurements is provided. PMID:23387190

  15. X-ray fluorescence analyzers for investigating postmediaeval pottery from Southern Moravia.

    PubMed

    Trojek, Tomás; Hlozek, Matin; Cechák, Tomás; Musílek, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with an investigation of ceramic archaeological finds with the use of in-situ X-ray fluorescence analysis. Firstly, three configurations of X-ray fluorescence analyzers constructed and used at the Czech Technical University in Prague are described and compared for use in a non-destructive survey of siliceous materials. Detection limits, depth of analysis, the relation of the analyzed area, the homogeneity of the samples, and variations in the element concentrations are discussed. Secondly, many shards of postmediaeval pottery from Southern Moravia are analyzed with X-ray fluorescence analysis and some of them also with electron microprobe analysis. Selected results are described. PMID:19914840

  16. The SHEAL Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Snowden, S. L.; Edgar, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer (DXS) experiment which will be carried on board the NASA's SHEAL 2 mission, scheduled to be launched as an attached Shuttle payload in 1992. The SHEAL DXS is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy (0.15 to 0.28 keV) diffuse X-ray background with the energy resolution better than 0.01 keV. The results of calculations of the anticipated data are presented together with diagrams of the DXS assembly.

  17. RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS BY HIGH SENSITIVITY DUAL-OPTIC MICRO X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and...

  18. X-Ray Astronomy Discovery Experiments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, P. C.

    2008-04-01

    A Lockheed proposal to ``scan along the galactic equator in the direction of the galactic center '' ^1 was made to NASA in late 1960, over a year before Giacconi's discovery of Sco X-1, in 1962.^2 The nature of the Lockheed survey and first results were announced in 1964. Data in several publications verified the 1960 postulate that the brightest sources would lie within the galaxy and at low galactic latitude. A fourth publication summarized results.^3 A recent listing ^4 confirmed the discovery nature of the nearly fifty-year-old Lockheed proposal, and the effort's success. Data from the two concurrent experiments will be presented, and several published or just copyrighted appraisals of the two efforts will be described. *Work supported by NASA contracts NAS5-1174 and NASw-909, the Lockheed Independent Research Program, and several successive forms of Ruffner Associates. ^1P. C. Fisher, Lockheed Missiles and Space Division Document LMSD 702172, Palo Alto, (1960) ^2R. Giacconi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 9 (1962) 439 ^3P. C. Fisher et al., Astrophys. J., 151 (1968) 1. ^4P. C. Fisher, Who'sWho in the World, Marquis Who's Who LLC, New Providence, NJ, 22^nd Edition, (2005) 667-668.

  19. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  20. The radiation monitor cosmic X-ray experiment OSO-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive technical description is presented of the Radiation Monitor which is part of the GSFC cosmic X-ray experiment to be flown on the OSO-1 satellite. The theory of operation, fabrication and assembly, and cone angle determination are reported.

  1. [Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for determination of shooting distance].

    PubMed

    Havel, J

    2003-10-01

    The article follows up the experiences Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons--authors: dipl. Ing. J. Havel and dipl. Ing. K. Zelenka and Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for identification of inlets (gunshot--entries) and outlets (gunshot--exits)--author: dipl. Ing. J. Havel. PMID:14661530

  2. A 30 nm-resolution hard X-ray microscope with X-ray fluorescence mapping capability at BSRF.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qingxi; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Youli; Huang, Wanxia; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhu, Peiping; Gelb, Jeff; Tkachuk, Andrei; Hornberger, Benjamin; Feser, Michael; Yun, Wenbing; Wu, Ziyu

    2012-11-01

    A full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) operating continuously from 5 keV to 12 keV with fluorescence mapping capability has been designed and constructed at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, a first-generation synchrotron radiation facility operating at 2.5 GeV. Spatial resolution better than 30 nm has been demonstrated using a Siemens star pattern in both absorption mode and Zernike phase-contrast mode. A scanning-probe mode fluorescence mapping capability integrated with the TXM has been shown to provide 50 p.p.m. sensitivity for trace elements with a spatial resolution (limited by probing beam spot size) of 20 µm. The optics design, testing of spatial resolution and fluorescence sensitivity are presented here, including performance measurement results. PMID:23093765

  3. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Y.; Błachucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-15

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers.

  4. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, Y.; Błachucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO2 optical fibers.

  5. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Y; Błachucki, W; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Neff, M; Romano, V

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO2 optical fibers. PMID:24784587

  6. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  7. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  8. Multiplexed biomarker detection using x-ray fluorescence of composition-encoded nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Mainul; Wang Chaoming; Su Ming

    2010-12-27

    Multiple DNA and protein biomarkers have been detected based on characteristic x-ray fluorescence of a panel of metal and alloy nanoparticles, which are modified with ligands of biomarkers to create a one-to-one correspondence and immobilized on ligand-modified substrates after forming complexes with target biomarkers in three-strand or sandwich configuration. By determining the presence and concentration of nanoparticles using x-ray fluorescence, the nature and amount of biomarkers can be detected with limits of 1 nM for DNA and 1 ng/ml for protein. By combining high penetrating ability of x-rays, this method allows quantitative imaging of multiple biomarkers.

  9. Pseudo-color enhanced x-ray fluorescence imaging of the Archimedes Palimpsest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Knox, Keith T.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of x-ray fluorescence and image processing has been shown to recover text characters written in iron gall ink on parchment, even when obscured by gold paint. Several leaves of the Archimedes Palimpsest were imaged using rapid-scan, x-ray fluorescence imaging performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. A simple linear show-through model is shown to successfully separate different layers of text in the x-ray images, making the text easier to read by the scholars.

  10. Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Camera Combined with Wide Band Pass Monochromatic Synchrotron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Kenji; Mizusawa, Mari

    2004-05-12

    A double W/B4C multilayer monochromator (2d=50.4A) was commissioned for non-scanning X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging experiments. The combination of a brilliant multi-pole wiggler source and the present wide band pass monochromator permits 1.2 x 1013 photons/sec at the sample position for 8.04 keV X-rays. Energy resolution {delta}E and {delta}E/E are 300{approx}500 eV and {approx}5%, respectively. The exit beam height is constant for X-ray energy ranging from 5.5 to 13.0 keV. Indirect cooling of the 1st multilayer works successfully. In addition, a new fast CCD camera was developed for quick readout and transfer of the image data. It was found that the typical exposure time for one XRF image with 1000 x 1000 pixels is 0.03{approx}1 sec. This permits in-situ movie recording for the distribution of elements.

  11. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  12. X-ray astronomy experiments from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul

    1987-01-01

    During the past fourteen years, the M.I.T. X-ray Astronomy sounding rocket group has designed, fabricated, and flown five different scientific sounding rocket payloads. These experiment payloads were launched on a total of twelve sounding rocket flights of which only one failed because of rocket problems. Eight of these flights yielded astronomical data that resulted in a total of twelve publications. The bulk of this research was supported by NASA Grant NGR 22-009-730 X-Ray Astronomy Experiments Sounding Rockets. The fifth and final experiment payload conceived and built under this Grant (the Wide Field Soft X-ray Camera: WFSXC) served as the prototype for the British Wide Field Camera (WFC) experiment to be launched on the ROSAT mission. The five experiment payloads and the results obtained from these experiments are briefly described. In the case of the WFSXC, which served principally as an engineering prototype for a major space mission, a number of papers written by British collaborators which describe the ROSAT Wide Field Camera are presented.

  13. Two facets of the x-ray microanalysis at low voltage: The secondary fluorescence x-rays emission and the microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Hendrix

    The best spatial resolution, for a microanalysis with a scanning electron microscope (SEND, is achieved by using a low voltage electron beam. But the x-ray microanalysis was developed for high electron beam energy (greater than 10 keV). Also, the specimen will often contain light and medium elements and the analyst will have to use a mixture of K, L, and sometime M x-ray peaks for the x-ray microanalysis. With a mixture of family lines, it will be common to have secondary fluorescence x-rays emission by K--L and L--K interactions. The accuracy of the fluorescence correction models presently used by the analyst are not well known for these interactions. This work shows that the modified secondary fluorescence x-rays emission correction models can improve the accuracy of the microanalysis for K--L and L--K interactions. The general equation derived in this work allows the identification of three factors which influence the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. The fluorescence production factor epsilonƒ can be used to predict the importance of the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. A large value of epsilonƒ indicates that a fluorescence correction is needed. Another disadvantage of using a low voltage is that there are more frequent occurrences of x-ray peaks overlap. A new microanalysis instruments that combines the high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution for x-ray detection is needed. The microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer (muEDS) should improve the low voltage microanalysis, but the maturity of this technology has to be evaluated first. One of the first commercial muEDS for x-ray microanalysis in a SEM is studied and analyzed in this work. This commercial muEDS has an excellent energy resolution (˜ 15 eV) and can detect x-rays of low energy. This x-ray detector can be used as a high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution microanalysis instrument. There are still hurdles that this technology must overcome before its

  14. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for coating thickness measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carapelle, Alain; Fleury-Frenette, Karl; Collette, Jean-Paul; Garnir, Henri-Pierre; Harlet, Philippe

    2007-12-15

    A handheld x-ray spectrometer has been realized and tested. The purpose of the device is to measure the thickness of coated samples in the range of 1-1500 nm in an industrial environment. Accuracy of {approx}3% has been achieved in this range with a measurement time of 1 min. Automated software has been implemented to allow utilization by a nonspecialist operator. An automated calibration procedure, based on measurements of reference samples, is used.

  15. X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is an experiment probing hypothetical particles: the axions, created in the solar core. Inside the transverse magnetic field of the CAST magnet, axions can be converted into x-rays, and be detected by four x-ray detectors at CAST. The expected x-ray signal in CAST is in 1-10 keV range, intensity depending strongly on the coupling constant of axion-photon conversion gaγ, which is expected to be low. This requires CAST to have detectors with very low background levels. The CAST Experiment makes use of three Micromesh Gaseous Structure (micromegas) detectors, which are gaseous detectors, derived from ideas of Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPC). CAST Micromegas detectors show perfect stability, good spatial and energy resolution. The intense study on Micromegas has enabled CAST to understand the nature of its background level, and improve it by a factor of 102 over ten years. New detector design, new readout system, better cosmic veto and addition of x-ray telescope will further improve the background in the next data taking of the experiment. The Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) of CAST is a pn-CCD detector with 200 × 64 pixels. The CAST CCD is coupled to an X-ray telescope, focusing all the parallel x-rays into a 9 mm diameter spot. The CCD will be replaced by the InGrid detector, a special manufactured micromegas detector. It is able to detect single electrons, and the low energy capabilities will open new frontiers on search of axions and other exotic particles. Another option is the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD), which is being tested in 2013, and has an energy threshold as low as 250 eV. The CAST experiment is the pioneering helioscope that excludes an important part of axion mass-coupling constant parameter space, and expects to exclude more in the following years. To succeed CAST, a new experiment, the International AXion Observatory (IAXO) is being designed and optimised, comprising the construction of a magnet specially built

  16. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Ryan, Christopher G.; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer. PMID:25177992

  17. Development and applications of an epifluorescence module for synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Smith, Randy J.; Ruppel, Meghan E.; Ott, Cassandra H.; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2005-06-15

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe is a valuable analysis tool for imaging trace element composition in situ at a resolution of a few microns. Frequently, epifluorescence microscopy is beneficial for identifying the region of interest. To date, combining epifluorescence microscopy with x-ray microprobe has involved analyses with two different microscopes. We report the development of an epifluorescence module that is integrated into a synchrotron XRF microprobe beamline, such that visible fluorescence from a sample can be viewed while collecting x-ray microprobe images simultaneously. This unique combination has been used to identify metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease plaques and the mineral distribution in geological samples. The flexibility of this accessory permits its use on almost any synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe beamline and applications in many fields of science can benefit from this technology.

  18. Determination of L X-ray fluorescence parameters for Ho, Lu, W, Hg and Bi.

    PubMed

    Turhan, M F; Durak, R; Akman, F

    2014-07-01

    In this work, L X-ray fluorescence cross sections, L sub-shell fluorescence yields and level widths and radiative vacancy transfer probabilities of L sub-shells to Mi, Ni and Oi sub-shells were measured for the elements Ho, Lu, W, Hg and Bi. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique was used to measure L X-ray photons. To obtain related parameters, we used 59.54 keV gamma photons of (241)Am radioactive point source. Emitted L X-ray photons from targets were collected by means of a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 180 eV at 5.9 keV. The present results are generally in a good agreement with theoretical calculations and the other results obtained in the literature, within their range considering experimental uncertainty. PMID:24631748

  19. OSO-8 soft X-ray experiment (Wisconsin)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Information for operating and reducing data from the experiment which was designed to map low energy X-ray background emissions from 130 eV to 35 keV is presented. The detectors, counters, data system, and the gas system are discussed along with the functional operation of the subsystems. A command list indicating preconditions and resulting telemetry response for each command is included.

  20. A tube-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for use in small-diameter boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Shepard, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    A portable in-situ x-ray fluorescence analytical system that uses an x-ray tube excitation source and a cooled Si(Li) spectrometer for detecting characteristic emission x rays has been developed for use in small-diameter wells and boreholes. The 15-watt, iron-anode x-ray tube operates up to 30 kV. Three wells at the Sandia National Laboratory Chemical Waste Landfill, lined with 76 {mu} thick polyethylene, were logged specifically for Cr contamination. Detection limits below 50 ppM were achieved with counting intervals of 600 seconds and with the Si(Li) detector operating at 450-eV resolution (full width at half maximum [FWHM] for the Mn K-alpha x ray).

  1. High-Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment Detections of Hard X-Ray Tails in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Flavio; Heindl, William A.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Gruber, Duane E.

    2001-02-01

    We report the detection of a nonthermal hard X-ray component from Sco X-1 based on the analysis of 20-220 keV spectra obtained with the High-Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite. We find that the addition of a power-law component to a thermal bremsstrahlung model is required to achieve a good fit in five of 16 observations analyzed. Using Proportional Counter Array data, we were able to track the movement of the source along the Z diagram, and we found that the presence of the hard X-ray tail is not confined to a specific Z position. However, we do observe an indication that the power-law index hardens with increasing M, as indicated from the position on the Z diagram. We find that the derived nonthermal luminosities are ~10% of that derived for the brightest of the atoll sources.

  2. The cosmic X-ray experiment aboard HEAO-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Bolt, E.; Holt, S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Garmire, G.; Agrawal, P.; Reigler, G.; Bowyer, C. S.; Lampton, M.

    1978-01-01

    The HEAO-1 A-2 experiment, designed to study the large scale structure of the galaxy and the universe at X-ray energies is described. The instrument consists of six gas proportional counters of three types nominally covering the energy ranges of 0.15-3 keV, 1.2-20 keV, and 2.5-60 keV. The two low energy detectors have about 400 sq cm open area each while the four others have about 800 sq cm each. Dual field of view collimators allow the unambiguous determination of instrument internal background and diffuse X-ray brightness. Instrument characteristics and early performance are discussed.

  3. Cryo X-ray microscope with flat sample geometry for correlative fluorescence and nanoscale tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gerd; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Werner, Stephan; Follath, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging offers a new 3-D view into cells. With its ability to penetrate whole hydrated cells it is ideally suited for pairing fluorescence light microscopy and nanoscale X-ray tomography. In this paper, we describe the X-ray optical set-up and the design of the cryo full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. Compared to previous TXM set-ups with zone plate condenser monochromator, the new X-ray optical layout employs an undulator source, a spherical grating monochromator and an elliptically shaped glass capillary mirror as condenser. This set-up improves the spectral resolution by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the partially coherent object illumination improves the contrast transfer of the microscope compared to incoherent conditions. With the new TXM, cells grown on flat support grids can be tilted perpendicular to the optical axis without any geometrical restrictions by the previously required pinhole for the zone plate monochromator close to the sample plane. We also developed an incorporated fluorescence light microscope which permits to record fluorescence, bright field and DIC images of cryogenic cells inside the TXM. For TXM tomography, imaging with multi-keV X-rays is a straightforward approach to increase the depth of focus. Under these conditions phase contrast imaging is necessary. For soft X-rays with shrinking depth of focus towards 10nm spatial resolution, thin optical sections through a thick specimen might be obtained by deconvolution X-ray microscopy. As alternative 3-D X-ray imaging techniques, the confocal cryo-STXM and the dual beam cryo-FIB/STXM with photoelectron detection are proposed. PMID:22273540

  4. Monte Carlo simulation applied in total reflection x-ray fluorescence: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Meira, Luiza L. C.; Inocente, Guilherme F.; Vieira, Leticia D.; Mesa, Joel

    2013-05-06

    The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a technique for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical constituents in a sample. This method is based on detection of the characteristic radiation intensities emitted by the elements of the sample, when properly excited. A variant of this technique is the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) that utilizes electromagnetic radiation as excitation source. In total reflection of X-ray, the angle of refraction of the incident beam tends to zero and the refracted beam is tangent to the sample support interface. Thus, there is a minimum angle of incidence at which no refracted beam exists and all incident radiation undergoes total reflection. In this study, we evaluated the influence of the energy variation of the beam of incident x-rays, using the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo NParticle) based on Monte Carlo method.

  5. X-ray fluorescence analysis for prediction of Space Shuttle solid rocket motor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulsipher, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of uncured solid propellant by X-ray fluorescence has been conducted on mixes prepared for four development motors produced for the Space Shuttle SRM Project. X-ray readings for chlorine (ammonium perchlorate) and iron (ferric oxide) were recorded for each mix during processing of the propellant. These values were used to predict burning rates for uncured acceptance, uncured acoustic emission and cured acoustic emission strands. Predicted burning rates all fell within control limits and when compared to actual burning rates, most were within experimental error. The X-ray analysis required one-third the time of current methods and met casting schedules.

  6. Gadolinium concentration analysis in brain phantom by X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Musaed; Majid, Samir Abdul; Butler, Philip H; Reinisch, Lou

    2010-06-01

    We have measured the X-ray fluorescence from gadolinium as a function of concentration and position in tumors of different sizes and shapes in a head phantom. The gadolinium fluorescence was excited with a 36 GBq Am-241 source. The fluorescence signal was detected with a CdTe detector and a multi-channel analyzer. The fluorescence peak was clearly separated from the scattered X-rays. Concentrations of 5.62-78.63 mg/ml of Gd ion were used in 1, 2, and 3 cm diameter spherical tumors and a 2x4 cm oblate spheroid tumor. The data show trends approaching saturation for the highest concentrations, probably due to reabsorption in the tumor. A comparison of X-ray photographic imaging and densitometer measurements to determine concentration is also presented. PMID:20596811

  7. An X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and its applications in materials studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Han, K. S.

    1977-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence system based on a Co(57) gamma-ray source has been developed. The system was used to calculate the atomic percentages of iron implanted in titanium targets. Measured intensities of Fe (k-alpha + k-beta) and Ti (k-alpha + k-beta) X-rays from the Fe-Ti targets are in good agreement with the calculated values based on photoelectric cross sections of Ti and Fe for the Co(57) gamma rays.

  8. OSO-8 soft X-ray wheel experiment: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The soft X-ray experiment hardware and its operation are described. The device included six X-ray proportional counters, two of which, numbers 1 and 4, were pressurized with on-board methane gas supplies. Number 4 developed an excessive leak rate early in the mission and was turned off on 1975 day number 282 except for brief (typically 2-hour) periods up to day 585 after which it as left off. Counter 1 worked satisfactorily until 1975 day number 1095 (January 1, 1978) at which time the on-board methane supply was depleted. The other four counters were sealed and all except number 3 worked satisfactorily throughout the mission which terminated with permanent satellie shut-down on day 1369. This was the first large area thin-window, gas-flow X-ray detector to be flown in orbit. The background problems were severe and consumed a very large portion of the data analysis effort. These background problems were associated with the Earth's trapped electron belts.

  9. OSO-8 soft X-ray wheel experiment: Data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    The soft X-ray experiment hardware and its operation are described. The device included six X-ray proportional counters, two of which, numbers 1 and 4, were pressurized with on-board methane gas supplies. Number 4 developed an excessive leak rate early in the mission and was turned off on 1975 day number 282 except for brief (typically 2-hour) periods up to day 585 after which it as left off. Counter 1 worked satisfactorily until 1975 day number 1095 (January 1, 1978) at which time the on-board methane supply was depleted. The other four counters were sealed and all except number 3 worked satisfactorily throughout the mission which terminated with permanent satellie shut-down on day 1369. This was the first large area thin-window, gas-flow X-ray detector to be flown in orbit. The background problems were severe and consumed a very large portion of the data analysis effort. These background problems were associated with the Earth's trapped electron belts.

  10. Imaging experiments of Ne-like x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C., Nilsen, J.; Barbee, T.W.; Da Silva, L.B.; Fill, E.; Li, Y,; Lu, P.

    1997-06-01

    We discuss high resolution two-dimensional near-field images of the neon-like nickel and germanium x-ray laser obtained using the Asterix laser at the Max-Planck-Institute and the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our imaging diagnostic consisted of a concave multilayer mirror that imaged the output end of the x-ray laser line onto a backside illuminated x-ray CCD detector. A 25 microm thick wire positioned at the end of the target provided a spatial fiducial. With the Asterix iodine laser, a prepulse 5.23 ns before the main pulse, was used to irradiate slab targets. A great deal of structure was observed in the near field images, particularly in the J=0-1 emission. We observed a large difference in the spatial dependence of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of germanium, with the J=2-1 emission peaking farther away from the original target surface. A larger prepulse moved the peak emission farther away from the target surface. For the Nova experiments we used a series of 100 ps pulses spaced 400 ps apart to illuminate a germanium target. We obtained high resolution images of both the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of Ge. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations coupled with atomic kinetics and including refraction effects.

  11. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for environmental monitoring of inorganic pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Michael G. (Inventor); Clark, III, Benton C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a portable sensor unit containing a battery, a high voltage power supply, an x-ray tube which produces a beam x-ray radiation directed toward a target sample, and a detector for fluorescent x-rays produced by the sample. If a silicon-lithium detector is used, the sensor unit also contains either a thermoelectric or thermochemical cooler, or a small dewar flask containing liquid nitrogen to cool the detector. A pulse height analyzer (PHA) generates a spectrum of data for each sample consisting of the number of fluorescent x-rays detected as a function of their energy level. The PHA can also store spectrum data for a number of samples in the field. A processing unit can be attached to the pulse height analyzer to upload and analyze the stored spectrum data for each sample. The processing unit provides a graphic display of the spectrum data for each sample, and provides qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of the sample by comparing the peaks in the sample spectrum against known x-ray energies for various chemical elements. An optional filtration enclosure can be used to filter particles from a sample suspension, either in the form of a natural suspension or a chemically created precipitate. The sensor unit is then temporarily attached to the filtration unit to analyze the particles collected by the filter medium.

  12. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun; Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z > 11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  13. Design and characterization of a pulsed x-ray source for fluorescent lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blankespoor, S.C. |

    1993-12-01

    To search for new, fast, inorganic scintillators, the author and his colleagues have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray source for determining fluorescent lifetimes and wavelengths of compounds in crystal or powdered form. This source uses a light-excited x-ray tube which produces x-rays when light from a laser diode strikes its photocathode. The x-ray tube has a tungsten anode, a beryllium exit window, a 30 kV maximum tube bias, and a 50 HA maximum average cathode current. The laser produces 3 {times} 10{sup 7} photons at 650 nm per {approximately}100 ps pulse, with up to 10{sup 7} pulses/sec. The time spread for the laser diode, x-ray tube, and a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is less than 120 ps fwhm. The mean x-ray photon energy, at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, is 9.4, 10.3, and 11.1 keV, respectively. They measured 140, 230, and 330 x-ray photons per laser diode pulse per steradian at tube biases of 20, 25, and 30 kV, respectively. Background x-rays due to dark current occur at a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} photons/sec/steradian at tube biases of 25 and 30 kV, respectively. Data characterizing the x-ray output with an aluminum filter in the x-ray beam are also presented.

  14. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuder, A.; Sawan, M. Kh.; Karjou, J.; Razouk, A. K.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise ( Anisum vulgare), licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood ( Artemisia herba-alba).

  15. Analysis of eight argonne premium coal samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Sellers, G.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Vivit, D.V.; Kent, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods were used in the analysis of eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce) in coal ash were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) in coal ash and trace elements (Cl and P) in whole coal were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of this study will be used in a geochemical database compiled for these materials from various analytical techniques. The experimental XRF methods and procedures used to determine these major and trace elements are described.

  16. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  17. Comparison of Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Mapping and Micro-XANES to Bulk X-Ray Absorption Spectra in Metal-Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, P; Carroll, S A; Bajt, S

    2003-01-16

    Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is one of the few techniques that can supply molecular-scale information for a variety of elements at concentrations relevant to natural systems in non-vacuum conditions. Bulk XAS analysis supplies the dominant chemical bonding mode(s) for a specific element. In complex materials such as natural soils and sediments, however, the dominant mode may not necessarily be the most reactive because changes in speciation at surfaces may results in changes in reactivity. Our previous work at Naval Air Station (NAS) Alameda (CA) focused on in situ metal chemistry in surface and deep sediments, and the impact of metal mobility by sediment oxidation. Estuary sediments at the Alameda Naval Station Air in California have elevated metal concentrations that increase with increasing depth. The metal concentrations in these sediments are: Cd (10-350 ppm), Cr (200-1000 ppm), Cu (100-230 ppm), Pb (200-1200 ppm) and Zn (250-600 ppm). We have extensively characterized these sediments using bulk XAS and other non-synchrotron supporting methods [ 1]. In this experiment, we collected fluorescence element maps using synchrotron X-ray microprobe of unreacted and seawater-oxidized sediment samples from Alameda NAS to determine the spatial distribution and correlation of lead, zinc, and iron. We then compared micro-XANES spectra for lead and zinc collected with the X-ray microprobe to previously collected bulk XANES spectra. The results from our bulk XAS characterization of the sediments showed both oxide and sulfide components for the trace metals. However, the bulk XAS data were not able to identify the composition of the oxide component (i.e. carbonate or hydroxide), nor could absorbed species or solid solutions be definitively identified. Our objective in using micro-XANES and fluorescence element maps was to attempt a more precise identification of metal speciation in or on individual particles.

  18. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  19. Planning, performing and analyzing X-ray Raman scattering experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sahle, Ch. J.; Mirone, A.; Niskanen, J.; Inkinen, J.; Krisch, M.; Huotari, S.

    2015-01-01

    A compilation of procedures for planning and performing X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) experiments and analyzing data obtained from them is presented. In particular, it is demonstrated how to predict the overall shape of the spectra, estimate detection limits for dilute samples, and how to normalize the recorded spectra to absolute units. In addition, methods for processing data from multiple-crystal XRS spectrometers with imaging capability are presented, including a super-resolution method that can be used for direct tomography using XRS spectra as the contrast. An open-source software package with these procedures implemented is also made available. PMID:25723942

  20. Planning, performing and analyzing X-ray Raman scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Ch J; Mirone, A; Niskanen, J; Inkinen, J; Krisch, M; Huotari, S

    2015-03-01

    A compilation of procedures for planning and performing X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) experiments and analyzing data obtained from them is presented. In particular, it is demonstrated how to predict the overall shape of the spectra, estimate detection limits for dilute samples, and how to normalize the recorded spectra to absolute units. In addition, methods for processing data from multiple-crystal XRS spectrometers with imaging capability are presented, including a super-resolution method that can be used for direct tomography using XRS spectra as the contrast. An open-source software package with these procedures implemented is also made available. PMID:25723942

  1. Spectrally resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wenxiang; Shen, Haiou; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    The nanophosphors, or other similar materials, emit near-infrared (NIR) light upon x-ray excitation. They were designed as optical probes for in vivo visualization and analysis of molecular and cellular targets, pathways, and responses. Based on the previous work on x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), here we propose a spectrally-resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography (SXLCT or SXFCT) approach to quantify a spatial distribution of nanophosphors (other similar materials or chemical elements) within a biological object. In this paper, the x-ray scattering is taken into account in the reconstruction algorithm. The NIR scattering is described in the diffusion approximation model. Then, x-ray excitations are applied with different spectra, and NIR signals are measured in a spectrally resolving fashion. Finally, a linear relationship is established between the nanophosphor distribution and measured NIR data using the finite element method and inverted using the compressive sensing technique. The numerical simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:21721815

  2. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  3. Micro x-ray fluorescence as a high throughput screening method for metal chelating compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minogue, Edel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Taylor, Tammy P.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2005-06-01

    Micro X-ray Fluorescence (MXRF) has proven to be a powerful tool in the rapid and quantitative means of screening oliogpeptides. MXRF is a non-destructive method of analysis, which can detect elemental composition of a sample by measuring its characteristic X-ray emission wavelengths or energies. An effective high throughput screening technique is described for the rapid screening of bead-based libraries by MXRF in order to identify suitable chelating agents that will bind metals found in radioactive dispersive devices. It is a sensitive technique which in conjunction with the wide range of chemistry inherent in peptide libraries (e.g. varying charge, length, hydrophobicity, aromaticity etc.), provides a rapid and quantitative means for screening chelator-ion binding. The method involves the selection of a suitable library of ligands; in this case it is a bead-based library of peptides. The library is exposed to the cation of interest and immobilized on to a microarray. The array is then analyzed by MXRF enabling rapid identification of chelating agents. This enables the screening of approximately 27,500 sequences per day. Initial experiments carried out successfully identified sequences that are selective for Co under certain binding conditions. This involved the screening of 8,400 sequences in adverse environmental conditions containing possible interferences (e.g. Ca, Fe, Al, Cs, Ir), which could be encountered in our application.

  4. Modeling of x-ray fluorescence using MCNPX and Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingam, Akshayan; Hoover, Andrew S; Fensin, Michael L; Tobin, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is one of thirteen non-destructive assay techniques being researched for the purpose of quantifying the Pu mass in used fuel assemblies. The modeling portion of this research will be conducted with the MCNPX transport code. The research presented here was undertaken to test the capability of MCNPX so that it can be used to benchmark measurements made at the ORNL and to give confidence in the application of MCNPX as a predictive tool of the expected capability of XRF in the context of used fuel assemblies. The main focus of this paper is a code-to-code comparison between MCNPX and Geant4 code. Since XRF in used fuel is driven by photon emission and beta decay of fission fragments, both terms were independently researched. Simple cases and used fuel cases were modeled for both source terms. In order to prepare for benchmarking to experiments, it was necessary to determine the relative significance of the various fission fragments for producing X-rays.

  5. Analysis of Russian kopecks (1877-1933) using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavness, B.; Williams, S.

    2013-04-01

    We have analyzed five Russian kopecks minted between the years of 1877 and 1933 using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) as part of an undergraduate research project. The intensities of the Cu K-shell X-rays were studied in order to compare the relative purities of the Cu used to mint the kopecks. The economic conditions under which the kopecks were minted are discussed, as well as impurities discovered during XRF analysis. In addition to XRF analysis, kopecks produced just before (1915) and after (1924) the October Revolution of 1917 were weighed in order to determine whether or not the Decree of February 22, 1924 was carried out. The legislation (enacted by the Central Executive Committee and the Council of the People's Commissaries) decreed that the proportions of pure Ag and Cu used in the minting of new coins should be the identical to those produced before the revolution and that the diameters and weights of the kopecks should also remain the same. The data from our experiments suggest that the legislation was successfully carried out.

  6. Lunar X-ray fluorescence spectrometery with the Selene orbiter: science and instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Kato, M.; Selene Xrs Team

    We have been developing an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, XRS, for the SELENE lunar orbiter mission to map major elemental composition of the Moon as well as to understand the mechanism of X-ray excitation in the nightside and physical properties caused by surface materials. We present here scientific objectives and instrumentation of the XRS, since a critical design review and satellite interface test has been finished and the flight model is now in preparation. The XRS is based on charge-coupled devices with heritage technology after the S310-28 sounding rocket experiment in 1999 and HAYABUSA (former MUSES-C) asteroid mission launched in 2003 but has been redesigned most suitable for lunar mission and improved its performance. The detection area of 100cm2 and FOV of 12 deg enables to limit the footprint of 20km. Utilization of CCD under more stable control of temperature and short integration time increases the apparent energy resolution. On the SELENE around the lunar polar orbit, total surface coverage except for the polar region will be achieved. The mission is now in the component calibration phase after satellite interface tests has been finished. The XRS is in final preparation for flight and has been also examined in detail its function and performance in the laboratory.

  7. Laboratory Scale X-ray Fluorescence Tomography: Instrument Characterization and Application in Earth and Environmental Science.

    PubMed

    Laforce, Brecht; Vermeulen, Bram; Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Janssen, Colin; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-03-15

    A new laboratory scale X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging instrument, based on an X-ray microfocus tube equipped with a monocapillary optic, has been developed to perform XRF computed tomography experiments with both higher spatial resolution (20 μm) and a better energy resolution (130 eV @Mn-K(α)) than has been achieved up-to-now. This instrument opens a new range of possible applications for XRF-CT. Next to the analytical characterization of the setup by using well-defined model/reference samples, demonstrating its capabilities for tomographic imaging, the XRF-CT microprobe has been used to image the interior of an ecotoxicological model organism, Americamysis bahia. This had been exposed to elevated metal (Cu and Ni) concentrations. The technique allowed the visualization of the accumulation sites of copper, clearly indicating the affected organs, i.e. either the gastric system or the hepatopancreas. As another illustrative application, the scanner has been employed to investigate goethite spherules from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, revealing the internal elemental distribution of these valuable distal ejecta layer particles. PMID:26891032

  8. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load. PMID:27577782

  9. X-Ray Spectroscopic Laboratory Experiments in Support of the X-Ray Astronomy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    Our program is to perform a series of laboratory investigations designed to resolved significant atomic physics uncertainties that limit the interpretation of cosmic X-ray spectra. Specific goals include a quantitative characterization of Fe L-shell spectra; the development of new techniques to simulate Maxwellian plasmas using an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT); and the measurement of dielectronic recombination rates for photoionized gas. New atomic calculations have also been carried out in parallel with the laboratory investigations.

  10. TU-A-9A-09: Proton Beam X-Ray Fluorescence CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, M; Ahmad, M; Fahrig, R; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate x-ray fluorescence computed tomography induced with proton beams (pXFCT) for imaging of gold contrast agent. Methods: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence was studied by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using TOPAS, a MC code based on GEANT4. First, proton-induced K-shell and L-shell fluorescence was studied as a function of proton beam energy and 1) depth in water and 2) size of contrast object. Second, pXFCT images of a 2-cm diameter cylindrical phantom with four 5- mm diameter contrast vials and of a 20-cm diameter phantom with 1-cm diameter vials were simulated. Contrast vials were filled with water and water solutions with 1-5% gold per weight. Proton beam energies were varied from 70-250MeV. pXFCT sinograms were generated based on the net number of gold K-shell or L-shell x-rays determined by interpolations from the neighboring 0.5keV energy bins of spectra collected with an idealized 4π detector. pXFCT images were reconstructed with filtered-back projection, and no attenuation correction was applied. Results: Proton induced x-ray fluorescence spectra showed very low background compared to x-ray induced fluorescence. Proton induced L-shell fluorescence had a higher cross-section compared to K-shell fluorescence. Excitation of L-shell fluorescence was most efficient for low-energy protons, i.e. at the Bragg peak. K-shell fluorescence increased with increasing proton beam energy and object size. The 2% and 5% gold contrast vials were accurately reconstructed in K-shell pXFCT images of both the 2-cm and 20-cm diameter phantoms. Small phantom L-shell pXFCT image required attenuation correction and had a higher sensitivity for 70MeV protons compared to 250MeV protons. With attenuation correction, L-shell pXFCT might be a feasible option for imaging of small size (∼2cm) objects. Imaging doses for all simulations were 5-30cGy. Conclusion: Proton induced x-ray fluorescence CT promises to be an alternative quantitative imaging technique to

  11. Polychromatic excitation improves detection limits in total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis compared with monochromatic excitation.

    PubMed

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Kawai, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Detection limits obtained by a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer with or without a monochromator are compared. A 1 W X-ray tube (tube voltage: 20 kV) is used in this spectrometer. Polychromatic excitation improves the detection limits in TXRF analysis with the low power X-ray tube compared with monochromatic excitation. A detection limit of 26 pg is achieved for Co when using the weak polychromatic X-rays. PMID:20535410

  12. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  13. Grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence analysis of a hazardous metal attached to a plant leaf surface using an X-ray absorber method.

    PubMed

    Awane, Tohru; Fukuoka, Shintaro; Nakamachi, Kazuo; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2009-05-01

    If human beings or animals repeatedly ingest plant leaves contaminated with minute quantities of hazardous metals (Pb, As, Hg, Cd, etc.), the metals will gradually accumulate in their bodies. When the quantities of the metals in the bodies reach toxic levels, they may cause serious symptoms of poisoning. Therefore, it is significant to detect and analyze the minute quantities of hazardous metals that attach to plant leaves in terms of epidemiology and disease prevention. We developed grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (GE-micro-XRF), which was expected to analyze the localized surface of an aqueous plant leaf with a much faster and simpler sample treatment than with conventional analytical methods, to detect Pb attached to a surface of a leaf of Camellia hiemalis. A micro X-ray beam was produced by using a polycapillary X-ray lens. GE-v-XRF is a grazing exit X-ray analysis (GE-XA) method in which X-rays emitted from only the near-surface region of a specimen are selectively detected under a grazing exit angle condition (extremely low exit angle near 0 degrees). In any GE-XA method, X-rays emitted from inside the specimen must be absorbed inside the specimen and attenuated when X-rays pass through the specimen. However, we deduced that X-rays emitted from inside aqueous organic material such as a plant leaf are scarcely absorbed because X-ray absorption in any aqueous organic material is much smaller than that in most metallic and semiconductor materials, which was analyzed with GE-XA methods. Therefore, we have developed a novel GE-micro-XRF method in which a chip of a silicon wafer is placed between the analyzed leaf and an X-ray detector as an absorber of the X-rays emitted from inside the leaf. As a result of GE-XRF analysis of a leaf dipped in Pb standard solution using the X-ray absorber, we have for the first time selectively detected X-rays emitted from the near-surface region of an aqueous plant leaf. Therefore, we have detected X-rays emitted

  14. Results of the Apollo 15 and 16 X-ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodget, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Podwysocki, M.; Weidner, J. R.; Bickel, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Except for some minor modifications the Apollo 16 X-ray fluorescence experiment was similar to that flown aboard Apollo 15. The Apollo 16 provided data for a number of features not previously covered such as Mare Cognitum, Mare Nubium, Ptolemaeus, Descartes, Mendeleev, and other areas. Many data points were obtained by the X-ray experiments, so that comparisons could be drawn between Apollo 15 and 16 flights. The agreement was generally within about 10%. Al/Si concentration ratios ranged from 0.38% in Mare Cognitum to 0.67% in the Descartes area highlands. A comparison of the Apollo 16 data Al/Si values with optical albedo values along the ground tracks showed the same positive correlation as in the Apollo 15 flight. A reexamination of the detector and collimator geometries showed that the spatial resolution was better by almost a factor of two than the initial estimates.

  15. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of samples of less than `infinite thickness': Difficulties and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Rafał

    2009-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry due to its nondestructive nature is widely applied in analysis of single layers and multiple layer films (e.g. semiconductors, electrooptic and solar cell devices, coatings, corrosion and paint layers), individual particles (airborne, fly ash, gunshot residue particles, etc.), art and archeological objects (manuscripts, paintings, icons) and many others. Quantitative analysis of these materials, frequently classified as samples of less than infinite thickness (thin or intermediate-thickness samples), required applying adequate matrix correction methods taking into account complex dependence of analyte fluorescent radiation intensity on full matrix composition and sample thickness. In this article, the matrix correction methods including fundamental parameters, Monte Carlo simulations, influence coefficients algorithms and methods based on X-ray transmission measurements are reviewed. The difficulties in the analysis of single layer and multiple layer films and the accuracy of fundamental parameter methods in simultaneous determination of their thickness and composition are discussed. The quantitative analysis of individual particles and inhomogeneous and/or complex structure materials using fundamental parameter and Monte Carlo simulation methods in micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are also reviewed. Some references are devoted to the analysis of light matrix samples, e.g. geological, environmental and biological samples, in which undetectable low-Z elements are present (so-called 'dark matrix') using backscattered fundamental parameter methods. Since the samples of less than infinite thickness are partially transparent for X-ray beams, the transmission measurements present possibilities that are unattainable for bulk samples. Thus, the emission-transmission method and also new instruments allowing measurements of the primary X-ray beam transmitted through the sample together with measurements of X-ray fluorescence

  16. X-ray microprobe synchroton radiation X-ray fluorescence application on human teeth of renal insufficiency patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F.; Marques, J. P.; Casaca, C.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2004-10-01

    This work reports on the measurements of elemental profiles in teeth collected from patients with renal insufficiency. Elemental concentrations of Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb Sr and Pb in different parts of teeth from patients with renal insufficiency are discussed and correlated with the corresponding values for healthy citizens. Both situations, patients with and without dialysis treatment were studied. The purpose of this work is to point out the influence of renal insufficiency together with long dialysis treatment, on teeth elemental content. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, installed at the LURE synchrotron (France) was used for elemental determination. The resolution of the synchrotron microprobe was 100 μm and the energy of the incident photons was 19 keV. Teeth of citizens with renal insufficiency and those submitted since several years to dialysis treatment show a similar concentration with teeth of healthy subjects in what concerns the elemental distribution for Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Sr. However, higher levels of Pb were found in pulp region of diseased citizens when compared to values of healthy people. Very low concentrations of Ti, Co, Ni, Se, Br and Rb were found in all the analysed teeth. No difference was found in patients with and without dialysis treatment.

  17. The use of a mercuric iodide detector for X-ray fluorescence analysis in archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, R.; Gigante, G. E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A.

    1992-11-01

    For about two decades, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) has been employed in Rome for the analysis of works of art. A short history of the applications of EDXRF to paintings and alloys is presented. Finally, the usefulness of mercuric iodide room-temperature semiconductor detectors in this field is shown.

  18. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S G; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and ∼90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context. PMID:25675478

  19. Determination of rhenium in molybdenite by X-ray fluorescence. A combined chemical-spectrometric technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solt, M.W.; Wahlberg, J.S.; Myers, A.T.

    1969-01-01

    Rhenium in molybdenite is separated from molybdenum by distillation of rhenium heptoxide from a perchloric-sulphuric acid mixture. It is concentrated by precipitation of the sulphide and then determined by X-ray fluorescence. From 3 to 1000 ??g of rhenium can be measured with a precision generally within 2%. The procedure tolerates larger amounts of molybdenum than the usual colorimetric methods. ?? 1969.

  20. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  1. Rapid screening for zinc deficiency using portable x-ray fluorescence in fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elemental composition of fingernails is a useful indicator of micronutrient status and may reflect an individual’s intake over time. Our objective was to determine if portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a viable method to assess zinc content in fingernails in the field. Human fingernail samples ran...

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT OF POTENTIAL THIN STANDARDS FOR CALIBRATION OF X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thin films containing known concentrations of metals are important for the calibration of X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), especially for the analysis of collected airborne particulate matter. A focused ion-beam sputtering technique has been investigated as a candidate meth...

  3. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  4. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - FIELD PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYZER - HNU SYSTEMS, SEFA-P

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 1995, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a demonstration of field portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) Analyzers. The primary objectives of this demonstration were (1) to determine how well FPXRF analyzers perform in comparison to a standard reference m...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - FIELD PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYZER - SCITEC, MAP SPECTRUM ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a demonstration of field portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) analyzers. The primary objectives of this demonstration were (1) to determine how well FPXRF analyzers perform in comparison to standard reference...

  7. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  8. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  9. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF CHROMIUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS USING FIELD-PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed characterization of the underlying and adjacent soils near a chrome plating shop utilized field-portable X- ray fluorescence (XRF) as a screening tool. XRF permitted real-time acquisition of estimates for total metal content of soils. A trailer-mounted soil coring unit...

  11. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY/X-RAY FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF POST-ABATEMENT DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to characterize post-abatement dust collected with a HEPA filtered vacuum. hree size fractions of resuspended dust (0-30 pm, 2.5-15 pm, and <2.5 pm) were collected on teflon filters and analyzed ...

  12. Use of a Superconducting Tunnel Junction for X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, L

    2001-03-06

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) in combination with a superconducting absorber of radiation may function as a highly resolving x-ray spectrometer. Electronic excitations, or quasiparticles, are created when a superconductor absorbs an x ray and are detected as an excess tunnel current through the junction. The number of quasiparticles created and the magnitude of the excess current is proportional to the energy of the absorbed x ray. This is similar to existing semiconductor-based spectrometers that measure electron-hole pairs, but with 1000 times more excitations. The energy measurement therefore can be up to 30 times more precise with a superconducting detector than with a semiconductor detector. This work describes the development and testing of an STJ spectrometer design for x-ray fluorescence applications. First, the basic principles of the STJ spectrometer are explained. This is followed by detailed simulations of the variance in the number of quasiparticles produced by absorption of an x ray. This variance is inherent in the detector and establishes an upper limit on the resolving power of the spectrometer. These simulations include effects due to the materials used in the spectrometer and to the multilayer structure of the device. Next, the spectrometer is characterized as functions of operating temperature, incident x-ray energy, and count rate. Many of these tests were performed with the spectrometer attached to a synchrotron radiation port. Finally, example x-ray fluorescence spectra of materials exposed to synchrotron radiation are presented. These materials are of interest to semiconductor processing and structural biology, two fields that will benefit immediately from the improved resolving power of the STJ spectrometer.

  13. Experimental validation of L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the current advances in nanoscience, molecular biochemistry, and x-ray detector technology, x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) has been considered for molecular imaging of probes containing high atomic number elements, such as gold nanoparticles. The commonly used XFCT imaging performed with K-shell x rays appears to have insufficient imaging sensitivity to detect the low gold concentrations observed in small animal studies. Low energy fluorescence L-shell x rays have exhibited higher signal-to-background ratio and appeared as a promising XFCT mode with greatly enhanced sensitivity. The aim of this work was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of L-shell XFCT imaging and to assess its achievable sensitivity. We built an experimental L-shell XFCT imaging system consisting of a miniature x-ray tube and two spectrometers, a silicon drift detector (SDD), and a CdTe detector placed at [Formula: see text] with respect to the excitation beam. We imaged a 28-mm-diameter water phantom with 4-mm-diameter Eppendorf tubes containing gold solutions with concentrations of 0.06 to 0.1% Au. While all Au vials were detectable in the SDD L-shell XFCT image, none of the vials were visible in the CdTe L-shell XFCT image. The detectability limit of the presented L-shell XFCT SDD imaging setup was 0.007% Au, a concentration observed in small animal studies. PMID:26839910

  14. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  15. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm(3)) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules. PMID:27370459

  16. Characterization of an indirect X-ray imaging detector by simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Doshi, C; van Riessen, G; Balaur, E; de Jonge, M D; Peele, A G

    2015-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive model of a commercial indirect X-ray imaging detector that accurately predicts the detector point spread function and its dependence on X-ray energy. The model was validated by measurements using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and extended to polychromatic X-ray sources. Our approach can be used to predict the performance of an imaging detector and can be used to optimize imaging experiments with broad-band X-ray sources. PMID:25203971

  17. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  18. A High-Speed Detector System for X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddons,P.D.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, g.; Kuczewski, A.; Kuczewski, J.; O

    2006-10-29

    We have developed a high-speed system for collecting x-ray fluorescence microprobe data, based on ASICs developed at BNL and high-speed processors developed by CSIRO. The system can collect fluorescence data in a continuous raster scan mode, and present elemental images in real time using Ryan's Dynamic Analysis algorithm. We will present results from a 32-element prototype array illustrating the concept. The final instrument will have 384 elements arranged in a square array around a central hole.

  19. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  20. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, Nivedh; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  1. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L.; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  2. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  3. Evaluation of fluorescent dye degradation indirectly induced by x-ray ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Clayton Augusto; Duarte de Menezes, Frederico; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-08-01

    This work evaluated the fluorescent dye degradation indirectly induced by ionizing radiation with high energy photons (50 keV). Aqueous gels of agarose with low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G and Fluorescein were submitted to doses of x-ray radiation up to 200 Gy. The dye degradation was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, using an excitation light-emitting diode with a peak wavelength of 462 nm. A rate equation model of fluorophores and radicals' species populations was developed to describe the degradation time behavior of the fluorescent solutions. The model suggests fluorescent dyes should be used in dosimetry. PMID:26368112

  4. X-ray fluorescence microtomography of SiC shells

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Chung, J.S.; Nagedolfeizi, M.

    1997-04-01

    TRISCO coated fuel particles contain a small kernel of nuclear fuel encapsulated by alternating layers of C and SiC. The TRISCO coated fuel particle is used in an advanced fuel designed for passive containment of the radioactive isotopes. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier for radioactive elements in the kernel. The effectiveness of this barrier layer under adverse conditions is critical to containment. The authors have begun the study of SiC shells from TRISCO fuel. They are using the fluorescent microprobe beamline 10.3.1. The shells under evaluation include some which have been cycled through a simulated core melt-down. The C buffer layers and nuclear kernels of the coated fuel have been removed by laser drilling through the SiC and then exposing the particle to acid. Elements of interest include Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce and Eu. The radial distribution of these elements in the SiC shells can be attributed to diffusion of elements in the kernel during the melt-down. Other elements in the shells originate during the fabrication of the TRISCO particles.

  5. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jacob N.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Basu, Soumendra N.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2012-12-01

    Commonly, SOFCs are operated at high temperatures (above 800°C). At these temperatures expensive housing is needed to contain an operating stack as well as coatings to contain the oxidation of the metallic interconnects. Lowering the temperature of an operating device would allow for more conventional materials to be used, thus lowering overall cost. Understanding the surface chemical states of cations in the surface of the SOFC cathode is vital to designing a system that will perform well at lower temperatures. The samples studied were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM-20) was grown on YSZ and NGO (neodymium gallate). The films on YSZ have a fiber texture. LSM-20 on NGO is heteroepitaxial. Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF-6428) films were grown on LAO and YSZ with a GDC barrier layer. Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to depth profile the samples. In a typical experiment, the angle of the incident beam is varied though the critical angle. Below the critical angle, the x-ray decays as an evanescent wave and will only penetrate the top few nanometers. TXRF experiments done on LSM films have suggested strontium segregates to the surface and form strontium enriched nanoparticles (1). It should be pointed out that past studies have focused on 30% strontium A-site doping, but this project uses 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite. XANES and EXAFS data were taken as a function of incoming angle to probe composition as a function of depth. XANES spectra can be difficult to analyze fully. For other materials density functional theory calculations compared to near edge measurements have been a good way to understand the 3d valence electrons (2).

  6. Molar concentration from sequential 2-D water-window X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence in hydrated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. W. M.; Elgass, K. D.; Junker, M. D.; de Jonge, M. D.; van Riessen, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments in biological X-ray microscopy have allowed structural information and elemental distribution to be simultaneously obtained by combining X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Experimentally, these methods can be performed simultaneously; however, the optimal conditions for each measurement may not be compatible. Here, we combine two distinct measurements of ultrastructure and elemental distribution, with each measurement performed under optimised conditions. By combining optimised ptychography and fluorescence information we are able to determine molar concentrations from two-dimensional images, allowing an investigation into the interactions between the environment sensing filopodia in fibroblasts and extracellular calcium. Furthermore, the biological ptychography results we present illustrate a point of maturity where the technique can be applied to solve significant problems in structural biology.

  7. Molar concentration from sequential 2-D water-window X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence in hydrated cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M. W. M.; Elgass, K. D.; Junker, M. D.; de Jonge, M. D.; van Riessen, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in biological X-ray microscopy have allowed structural information and elemental distribution to be simultaneously obtained by combining X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Experimentally, these methods can be performed simultaneously; however, the optimal conditions for each measurement may not be compatible. Here, we combine two distinct measurements of ultrastructure and elemental distribution, with each measurement performed under optimised conditions. By combining optimised ptychography and fluorescence information we are able to determine molar concentrations from two-dimensional images, allowing an investigation into the interactions between the environment sensing filopodia in fibroblasts and extracellular calcium. Furthermore, the biological ptychography results we present illustrate a point of maturity where the technique can be applied to solve significant problems in structural biology. PMID:27067957

  8. New Approaches for Correction of Interlayer Absorption Effects in X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Paintings.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Paweł M; Frączek, Piotr; Lankosz, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The X-ray fluorescence imaging technique allows not only the imaging itself but also the identification of the hidden paint layers what makes it much more versatile as compared with X-ray radiography. One of the main disadvantages of the former method is the fact that the characteristic X-rays from the deeper paint layers are absorbed in the covering layers. This effect is manifested by some artifacts that impede a proper interpretation of the acquired images. In this work, it is shown that the methodology for correction of the interlayer absorption effects can be extended to the case of polychromatic excitation. Additionally, a new approach for determination of the optimal correction parameters has also been presented. The methodology was verified using either the test painting or the mock-up painting both measured with a table-top micro-XRF setup. PMID:26708500

  9. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-19

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future.

  10. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future.

  11. Application of X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Ščančar, Janez; Jaćimović, Radojko; Simčič, Jurij; Pelicon, Primož; Budnar, Miloš; Jeran, Zvonka; Pongrac, Paula; Regvar, Marjana; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs the use of higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Progress in the field is however handicapped by limited knowledge of the biological processes involved in plant metal uptake, translocation, tolerance and plant-microbe-soil interactions; therefore a better understanding of the basic biological mechanisms involved in plant/microbe/soil/contaminant interactions would allow further optimization of phytoremediation technologies. In view of the needs of global environmental protection, it is important that in phytoremediation and plant biology studies the analytical procedures for elemental determination in plant tissues and soil should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this study was therefore to present the main characteristics, sample preparation protocols and applications of X-ray fluorescence-based analytical techniques (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—EDXRF, total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—TXRF and micro-proton induced X-ray emission—micro-PIXE). Element concentrations in plant leaves from metal polluted and non-polluted sites, as well as standard reference materials, were analyzed by the mentioned techniques, and additionally by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of X-ray fluorescence-based techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies. It is the EDXRF, which is recommended as suitable to be used in the analyses of a large number of samples, because it is multi-elemental, requires only simple preparation of sample material, and it is analytically comparable to the most frequently used instrumental chemical techniques. The TXRF is compatible to FAAS in sample preparation, but relative to AAS it is fast

  12. Reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of semiconductor surfaces with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fliegauf, Rolf; Kolbe, Michael; Müller, Matthias; Weser, Jan; Ulm, Gerhard

    2007-10-15

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a well-established method to monitor lowest level contamination on semiconductor surfaces. Even light elements on a wafer surface can be excited effectively when using high-flux synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray range. To meet current industrial requirements in nondestructive semiconductor analysis, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operates dedicated instrumentation for analyzing light element contamination on wafer pieces as well as on 200- and 300-mm silicon wafer surfaces. This instrumentation is also suited for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and conventional energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of buried and surface nanolayered structures, respectively. The most prominent features are a high-vacuum load-lock combined with an equipment front end module and a UHV irradiation chamber with an electrostatic chuck mounted on an eight-axis manipulator. Here, the entire surface of a 200- or a 300-mm wafer can be scanned by monochromatized radiation provided by the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This beamline provides high spectral purity and high photon flux in the range of 0.078-1.86 keV. In addition, absolutely calibrated photodiodes and Si(Li) detectors are used to monitor the exciting radiant power respectively the fluorescence radiation. Furthermore, the footprint of the excitation radiation at the wafer surface is well-known due to beam profile recordings by a CCD during special operation conditions at BESSY II that allow for drastically reduced electron beam currents. Thus, all the requirements of completely reference-free quantitation of TXRF analysis are fulfilled and are to be presented in the present work. The perspectives to arrange for reference-free quantitation using X-ray tube-based, table-top TXRF analysis are also addressed. PMID:17880182

  13. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, M.; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Malzer, W.; Beckhoff, B.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  14. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources.

    PubMed

    Spanier, M; Herzog, C; Grötzsch, D; Kramer, F; Mantouvalou, I; Lubeck, J; Weser, J; Streeck, C; Malzer, W; Beckhoff, B; Kanngießer, B

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample. PMID:27036820

  15. X-ray fluorescence analysis of low concentrations metals in geological samples and technological products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoida, I. A.; Trushin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    For the past several years many nuclear physics methods of quantitative elemental analysis have been designed. Many of these methods have applied in different devices which have become useful and effective instrument in many industrial laboratories. Methods of a matter structure analysis are based on the intensity detection of the X-ray radiation from the nuclei of elements which are excited by external X-ray source. The production of characteristic X-rays involves transitions of the orbital electrons of atoms in the target material between allowed orbits, or energy states, associated with ionization of the inner atomic shells. One of these methods is X-ray fluorescence analysis, which is widespread in metallurgical and processing industries and is used to identify and measure the concentration of the elements in ores and minerals on a conveyor belt. Samples of copper ore with known concentrations of elements, were taken from the Ural deposit. To excite the characteristic X-rays radionuclide sources 109Cd, with half-life 461.4 days were used. After finding the calibration coefficients, control measurements of samples and averaging of overall samples were made. The measurement error did not exceed 3%.

  16. Soft-x-ray fluorescence study of buried silicides in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1997-04-01

    Multilayer films made by alternate deposition of two materials play an important role in electronic and optical devices such as quantum-well lasers and x-ray mirrors. In addition, novel phenomena like giant magnetoresistance and dimensional crossover in superconductors have emerged from studies of multilayers. While sophisticated x-ray techniques are widely used to study the morphology of multilayer films, progress in studying the electronic structure has been slower. The short mean-free path of low-energy electrons severely limits the usefulness of photoemission and related electron free path of low-energy electrons severely limit spectroscopies for multilayer studies. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) is a bulk-sensitive photon-in, photon-out method to study valence band electronic states. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) measured with partial photon yield can give complementary bulk-sensitive information about unoccupied states. Both these methods are element-specific since the incident x-ray photons excite electrons from core levels. By combining NEXAFS and SXF measurements on buried layers in multilayers and comparing these spectra to data on appropriate reference compounds, it is possible to obtain a detailed picture of the electronic structure. Results are presented for a study of a Fe/Si multilayer system.

  17. Evaluation of different synchrotron beamline configurations for X-ray fluorescence analysis of environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Barberie, Sean R; Iceman, Christopher R; Cahill, Catherine F; Cahill, Thomas M

    2014-08-19

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) is a powerful elemental analysis tool, yet synchrotrons are large, multiuser facilities that are generally not amenable to modification. However, the X-ray beamlines from synchrotrons can be modified by simply including X-ray filters or removing monochromators to improve the SR-XRF analysis. In this study, we evaluated four easily applied beamline configurations for the analysis of three representative environmental samples, namely a thin aerosol sample, an intermediate thickness biological sample, and a thick rare earth mineral specimen. The results showed that the "white beam" configuration, which was simply the full, polychromatic output of the synchrotron, was the optimal configuration for the analysis of thin samples with little mass. The "filtered white beam" configuration removed the lower energy X-rays from the excitation beam so it gave better sensitivity for elements emitting more energetic X-rays. The "filtered white beam-filtered detector" configuration sacrifices the lower energy part of the spectrum (<15 keV) for improved sensitivity in the higher end (∼26 to 48 keV range). The use of a monochromatic beam, which tends to be the standard mode of operation for most SR-XRF analyses reported in the literature, gave the least sensitive analysis. PMID:25025342

  18. X-ray fluorescence from the element with atomic number Z=120.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, M O; Jacquet, D; Morjean, M; Bonnet, E; Chbihi, A; Frankland, J D; Rivet, M F; Tassan-Got, L; Dechery, F; Drouart, A; Nalpas, L; Ledoux, X; Parlog, M; Ciortea, C; Dumitriu, D; Fluerasu, D; Gugiu, M; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Fabris, D; Corsi, A; Barlini, S

    2012-03-23

    An atomic clock based on x-ray fluorescence yields has been used to estimate the mean characteristic time for fusion followed by fission in reactions 238U + 64Ni at 6.6  MeV/A. Inner shell vacancies are created during the collisions in the electronic structure of the possibly formed Z=120 compound nuclei. The filling of these vacancies accompanied by a x-ray emission with energies characteristic of Z=120 can take place only if the atomic transitions occur before nuclear fission. Therefore, the x-ray yield characteristic of the united atom with 120 protons is strongly related to the fission time and to the vacancy lifetimes. K x rays from the element with Z=120 have been unambiguously identified from a coupled analysis of the involved nuclear reaction mechanisms and of the measured photon spectra. A minimum mean fission time τ(f)=2.5×10(-18)  s has been deduced for Z=120 from the measured x-ray multiplicity. PMID:22540578

  19. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of Wilson disease using X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Kewish, Cameron M; Rouzière, Stéphan; Schmitt, Françoise; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Poupon, Joël; Sandt, Christophe; Francou, Bruno; Somogyi, Andrea; Samuel, Didier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Bazin, Dominique; Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to mutations of the gene encoding the copper-transporter ATP7B. The diagnosis is hampered by the variability of symptoms induced by copper accumulation, the inconstancy of the pathognomonic signs and the absence of a reliable diagnostic test. We investigated the diagnostic potential of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) that allows quantitative analysis of multiple elements. Studies were performed on animal models using Wistar rats (n = 10) and Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats (n = 11), and on human samples including normal livers (n = 10), alcohol cirrhosis (n = 8), haemochromatosis (n = 10), cholestasis (n = 6) and WD (n = 22). XRF experiments were first performed using synchrotron radiation to address the elemental composition at the cellular level. High-resolution mapping of tissue sections allowed measurement of the intensity and the distribution of copper, iron and zinc while preserving the morphology. Investigations were further conducted using a laboratory X-ray source for irradiating whole pieces of tissue. The sensitivity of XRF was highlighted by the discrimination of LEC rats from wild type even under a regimen using copper deficient food. XRF on whole formalin-fixed paraffin embedded needle biopsies allowed profiling of the elements in a few minutes. The intensity of copper related to iron and zinc significantly discriminated WD from other genetic or chronic liver diseases with 97.6% specificity and 100% sensitivity. This study established a definite diagnosis of Wilson's disease based on XRF. This rapid and versatile method can be easily implemented in a clinical setting. PMID:27499926

  20. [Application of Three Dimensional Confocal Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technology Based on Polycapillary X-Ray Lens in Analysis of Rock and Mineral Samples].

    PubMed

    Li, Fang-zuo; Liu, Zhi-guo; Sun, Tian-xi; Yi, Long-tao; Zhao, Wei-gang; He, Jia-lin; Peng, Song; Wang, Li-li; Zhao, Guang-cui; Ding, Xun-liang

    2015-09-01

    Confocal three dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer based on a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens (PFXRL) in the excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) in the detection channel was developed. The PFXRL and PPXRL were placed in a confocal configuration. This was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the XRF spectra, and accordingly lowered the detection limitation of the XRF technology. The confocal configuration ensured that only the XRF signal from the confocal micro-volume overlapped by the output focal spot of the PFXRL and the input focal spot of the PPXRL could be detected by the detector. Therefore, the point-to-point information of XRF for samples could be obtained non-destructively by moving the sample located at the confocal position. The magnitude of the gain in power density of the PFXRL was 10(3). This let the low power conventional X-ray source be used in this confocal XRF, and, accordingly, decreased the requirement of high power X-ray source for the confocal XRF based on polycapillary X-ray optics. In this paper, we used the confocal 3D micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to non-destructively analyzed mineral samples and to carry out a 3D point-to-point elemental mapping scanning, which demonstrated the capabilities of confocal 3D micro XRF technology for non-destructive analysis elements composition and distribution for mineral samples. For one mineral sample, the experimental results showed that the area with high density of element of iron had high density of copper. To some extent, this reflected the growth mechanisms of the mineral sample. The confocal 3D micro XRF technology has potential applications in such fields like the analysis identification of ore, jade, lithoid utensils, "gamble stone" and lithoid flooring. PMID:26669153

  1. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of runoff water and vegetation from abandoned mining of Pb Zn ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Bordalo, M.

    2003-12-01

    The present work reports on the heavy metal content: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in running waters and vegetation around abandoned mining areas. Two species of mosses ( Dicranum sp. and Pleurocarpus sp.) and three different species of wild grass ( Bromus sp., Rumex sp. and Pseudoavena sp.) growing on the surrounding areas of old lead-zinc mines (Aran Valley, Pyrenees, NE Spain) have been analyzed. Both water and vegetation were collected in two different sampling places: (a) near the mine gallery water outlets and (b) on the landfill close to the abandoned mineral concentration factories. For the heavy metal content determination, two different techniques were used: total reflection X-ray fluorescence for water analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence for vegetation study. Surface waters around mine outlets exhibit anomalous content of Co, Ni, Zn, Cd. Stream waters running on mining landfills exhibit higher Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than those of the waters at the mine gallery outlets. The results allow us to assess the extent of the environmental impact of the mining activities on the water quality. The intake of these elements by vegetation was related with the sampling place, reflecting the metal water content and the substrate chemistry. Accumulation of metals in mosses is higher than those exhibited in wild grasses. Furthermore, different levels of accumulation were found in different wild grass. Rumex sp. presented the lowest metal concentrations, while Pseudoavena sp. reported the highest metal content.

  2. Educational X-Ray Experiments and XRF Measurements with a Portable Setup Adapted for the Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianoudis, I.; Drakaki, E.; Hein, A.

    2010-01-01

    It is common to modify valuable, sophisticated equipment, originally acquired for other purposes, to adapt it for the needs of educational experiments, with great didactic effectiveness. The present project concerns a setup developed from components of a portable system for energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF). Two educational…

  3. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  4. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  5. Sulfur abundance of asteroid 25143 Itokawa observed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer onboard Hayabusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takehiko; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yamamoto, Yukio; Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Kato, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa spacecraft successfully carried out in situ observations of S-class asteroid 25143 Itokawa, including the surface major elemental analysis with the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRSHayabusa). Our previous results for the X-ray experiments (Okada et al., 2006a) indicated that major elemental ratios of Mg/Si and Al/Si on the surface of Itokawa resemble ordinary LL- or L-chondrites more than any other meteorite analogues. In the NEAR Shoemaker observations of S-class asteroid 433 Eros, the results of X-ray fluorescence observations indicated the depletion of sulfur, probably reflecting impact-induced volatilization, photoor ion-induced sputtering at the surface, or the loss of FeS-rich materials due to partial melting. Here, we determined the elemental abundance of sulfur (S) on the surface of Itokawa, in addition to that of Mg, Al, and Si, and its regional variation using XRS-Hayabusa observations. In particular, we carefully corrected the fluctuation of solar X-rays, variation of surface geometry, and sensor response function in this analysis, and thus we believe that the results are more accurate than those of our previous report. In this study, the upper and lower limits for Mg/Si, Al/Si, and S/Si overlap those of meteorite analogues for ordinary chondrites or primitive achondrites. In terms of the major elemental composition, Itokawa is best classified as a ordinary chondrite or a primitive achondrite. Our models do not include the mineral mixing effects. With the effects, the abundance of sulfur is expected to be 30% lower than our results. Hence, we conclude that the abundance of sulfur on the surface of Itokawa is almost equal to or even lower than the average abundance in ordinary chondrites. Although the abundances for Mg and Si are globally homogeneous, best-fit or upper limits of mass fraction for Al and S vary in local areas. There is a negative correlation (-0.92) for Al/Si vs. S/Si in ten facets. In particular, the area with the

  6. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. We conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples. PMID:25600825

  7. Trace elements analysis in biological samples by radioisotopic x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Cesareo, R

    1976-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique, induced by radioisotopic sources, provides a very simple method for the simultaneous analysis of trace elements in biological samples. For blood, serum, platelets, etc., samples of about 0.1 ml were deposited on filter paper disks, dried, and analyzed. In such a way the "thin specimen" approximation is realized, resulting in the following advantages: The X-ray intensity of a given element is a liner function of mass per unit area over several orders of magnitude. Interelement effects became negligible. The ratio of fluorescent X-rays to scattered radiation is increased. The sensitivity of the technique for elements with atomic number ranging from about 20-92 varies from some units to some tens of parts per million by weight in 100 s measuring time, by using a gas proportional counter, and from about some tenths to some parts per million by using an X-ray semiconductor detector, in a measuring time of 10(3)-10(4)s. In such a way and with the described features, the Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br content of several speciments of blood and serum was determined. Measurements were further carried out in order to labelling blood components with stable tracers and to detect their concentration by means of the X-ray fluorescence technique. The life span of platelets was, for example, measured after labelling platelets with stable Selenocystine. The sensitivity of the XRF technique can further be enhanced by about three orders of magnitude by using a pre-enrichment step with ion-exchange resins and liquid volumes not lower than 500 ml. Urine analyses have been carried in such a way, and copper in about 20 ml serum after selective extraction. PMID:1017430

  8. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.

  9. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral responsemore » of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.« less

  10. Development of a new Planetary SCD-based X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Package for in-situ Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabel, Oliver; Köhler, Eberhard; Dreißigacker, Anne; Meyer, Matthias; van Gasselt, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    We propose an X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument Package (XRF-X and XRF-ISM) in order to measure the composition of rock-surface materials from orbiter, lander, and rover-based systems directly and quantitatively. It is suited for all future missions to the Moon, but also to the Galilean Satellites or any other solid-surface solar system body without an atmosphere. Collected data will be used for constructing detailed geochemical maps of the target body's surface composition. The typical spectral range is 1 - 10 keV (1.2 - 0.12 nm) with no sharp limits, achieving a spectral resolution of 160 eV at 6 keV. At these conditions, elemental abundances of lighter elements (atomic no. 11-32, K-Lines) and heavier elements (atomic no. 33-80, L-lines) will be observable. This will allow for mapping concentrations of the main mineral- (and therefore rock-) forming elements of surface materials, in particular Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe. The spatial resolution (GSD) is 10 km/px at an orbit altitude of 50 km. The package consists of two subsystems: (1) the main instrument targeting at a body's surface (XRF-X), and (2) a zenith-pointing solar monitor which incorporates calibration targets for taking account of solar X-Rays and particles (XRF-ISM). Both instruments make use of Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDX) with solar X-Ray excitation to probe materials over arbitrary distances. By monitoring incident Solar X-Ray and potential particle flux through synchronous measurement of a calibration target, XRF-X measurements can be obtained even over long distances, e.g. from a lunar orbiter. A scalable and modular design allows for instrument adaptions to desired resolution, to weight and power-consumption constraints and to expected sun emission intensities. The design will also allow adaption for employment on different observation platforms. In the current laboratory setup, both experiments are developed using large-area swept charge devices (SCD) to allow for high X-Ray

  11. Bent Laue X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Manganese in Biological Tissues--Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Ying; Zhang Honglin; Bewer, Brian; Nichol, Helen; Chapman, Dean; Thomlinson, Bill

    2010-06-23

    Manganese (Mn) is not abundant in human brain tissue, but it is recognized as a neurotoxin. The symptoms of manganese intoxication are similar to Parkinson's disease (PD), but the link between environmental, occupational or dietary Mn exposure and PD in humans is not well established. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and in particular X-ray fluorescence can provide precise information on the distribution, concentration and chemical form of metals. However the scattered radiation and fluorescence from the adjacent abundant element, iron (Fe), may interfere with and limit the ability to detect ultra-dilute Mn. A bent Laue analyzer based Mn fluorescence detection system has been designed and fabricated to improve elemental specificity in XAS imaging. This bent Laue analyzer of logarithmic spiral shape placed upstream of an energy discriminating detector should improve the energy resolution from hundreds of eV to several eV. The bent Laue detection system was validated by imaging Mn fluorescence from Mn foils, gelatin calibration samples and adult Drosophila at the Hard X-ray MicroAnalysis (HXMA) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). Optimization of the design parameters, fabrication procedures and preliminary experimental results are presented along with future plans.

  12. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  13. Sub-Picosecond Tunable Hard X-Ray Undulator Source for Laser/X-Ray Pump-Probe Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S.; Streun, A.; Schmidt, T.; Abela, R.; Al-Adwan, A.; Abramsohn, D.; Boege, M.; Grolimund, D.; Keller, A.; Krasniqi, F.; Rivkin, L.; Rohrer, M.; Schilcher, T.; Schmidt, T.; Schlott, V.; Schulz, L.; Veen, F. van der; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The FEMTO source under construction at the {mu}XAS beamline is designed to enable tunable time-resolved laser/x-ray absorption and diffraction experiments in photochemistry and condensed matter with ps- and sub-ps resolution. The design takes advantage of (1) the highly stable operation of the SLS storage ring, (2) the reliable high harmonic operation of small gap, short period undulators to generate hard x-rays with energy 3-18 keV at 2.4 GeV beam energy, and (3) the progress in high power, high repetition rate fs solid-state laser technology to employ laser/e-beam 'slicing' to reach a time resolution of ultimately 100 fs. The source will profit from the inherently synchronized pump (laser I: 100 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz) and probe (sliced X-rays, laser II: 50 fs, 5 mJ, 1 kHz) pulses, and from the excellent stability of the SLS storage ring which is operated in top-up mode and controlled by a fast orbit feedback (FOFB). Coherent radiation emitted at THz frequencies by the sliced 100 fs electron bunches will be monitored as on-line cross-correlation signal to keep the laser-electron beam interaction at optimum. The source is designed to provide at 8 keV (100 fs) a monochromized flux of 104 ph/s/0.01% bw (Si crystal monochromator) and 106 ph/s/1.5% bw (multilayer monochromator) at the sample. It is operated in parasitic mode using a hybrid bunch filling pattern. Because of the low intensity measurements are carried out repetitively over many shots using refreshing samples and gated detectors. 'Diffraction gating' experiments will be used to characterize the sub-ps X-ray pulses.

  14. Characterization of phosphorus in organisms at sub-micron resolution using X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.; Ingall, E; Vogt, S; Paterson, D; DeJonge, M; Rao, C; Brandes, J

    2009-01-01

    X-ray spectromicroscopy (combined X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy) is uniquely capable of determining sub-micron scale elemental content and chemical speciation in minimally-prepared particulate samples. The high spatial resolutions achievable with this technique have enabled the close examination of important microscale processes relevant to the cycling of biogeochemically important elements. Here, we demonstrate the value of X-ray microscopy to environmental and biological research by examining the phosphorus and metal chemistry of complete individual cells from the algal genera Chlamydomonas sp. and Chlorella sp. X-ray analysis revealed that both genera store substantial intracellular phosphorus as distinct, heterogeneously distributed granules whose X-ray fluorescence spectra are consistent with that of polyphosphate. Polyphosphate inclusions ranged in size from 0.3-1.4 {micro}m in diameter and exhibited a nonspecies-specific average phosphorus concentration of 6.87 {+-} 1.86 {micro}g cm{sup -2}, which was significantly higher than the average concentration of phosphorus measured in the total cell, at 3.14 {+-} 0.98 {micro}g cm{sup -2} (95% confidence). Polyphosphate was consistently associated with calcium and iron, exhibiting average P:cation molar ratios of 8.31 {+-} 2.00 and 108 {+-} 34, respectively (95% confidence). In some cells, polyphosphate was also associated with potassium, zinc, manganese, and titanium. Based on our results, X-ray spectromicroscopy can provide high-resolution elemental data on minimally prepared, unsectioned cells that are unattainable through alternative microscopic methods and conventional bulk chemical techniques currently available in many fields of marine chemistry.

  15. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  16. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  17. Application of the X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray diffraction in geochemical studies of the Pleistocene tills from Holy Cross Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Ludwikowska-Kȩdzia, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.

    2013-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis methods (wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (WDXRF) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) have been applied in complementary geochemical studies of the Pleistocene till samples. The XRPD technique gave information about the mineral composition of the analyzed samples while the WDXRF and TXRF studies allowed the fast elemental analysis. The till samples were collected from different regions of Holy Cross Mountains (located in central Poland) which are still not unambiguously described in the context of the geochemical studies of the Quaternary sediments. The analysis was concentrated on the geochemical composition of the till samples both for materials occurring on the surface (characterized by continuous weathering processes) and for samples taken from core borehole. The overriding purpose of these studies is determination of the local lithotype of the tills and its lithologic and petrographic diagnostic properties, including the chemical composition of clay and minerals found in the clay. In the presented work the experimental sets up, sample preparation procedure and measurements programme will be discussed in details. Finally, the elemental and mineral compositions will be presented for studied different groups of the samples.

  18. Elemental mapping of biofortified wheat grains using micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, I.; Pataco, I. M.; Mourinho, M. P.; Lidon, F.; Reboredo, F.; Pessoa, M. F.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Guerra, M.

    2016-06-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence has been used to obtain elemental maps of biofortified wheat grains. Two varieties of wheat were used in the study, Triticum aestivum L. and Triticum durum desf. Two treatments, with different nutrient concentration, were applied to the plants during the whole plant growth cycle. From the obtained elemental maps it was possible to extract information regarding the plant's physiological processes under the biofortification procedures. Both macro and micronutrients were mapped, providing useful insight into the posterior food processing mechanisms of this biofortified staple food. We have also shown that these kind of studies can now be performed with laboratory benchtop apparatus, rather than using synchrotron radiation, increasing the overall attractiveness of micro X-ray fluorescence in the study of highly heterogeneous biological samples.

  19. Application of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique to trace elements determination in tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Zarazua, G.; Avila-Perez, P.; Navarrete, M.; Tejeda, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have identified an important number of toxic elements along with organic carcinogen molecules and radioactive isotopes in tobacco. In this work we have analyzed by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence 9 brands of cigarettes being manufactured and distributed in the Mexican market. Two National Institute of Standards and Technology standards and a blank were equally treated at the same time. Results show the presence of some toxic elements such as Pb and Ni. These results are compared with available data for some foreign brands, while their implications for health are discussed. It can be confirmed that the Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence method provides precise (reproducible) and accuracy (trueness) data for 15 elements concentration in tobacco samples.

  20. X-ray Fluorescence Emission Tomography (XFET) with Novel Imaging Geometries – A Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Li, Nan; La Riviere, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study for using two new imaging geometries for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence emission tomography (XFET) applications. In the proposed approaches, the object is illuminated with synchrotron X-ray beams of various cross-sectional dimensions. The resultant fluorescence photons are detected by high-resolution imaging-spectrometers coupled to collimation apertures. To verify the performance benefits of the proposed methods over the conventional line-by-line scanning approach, we have used both Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical system performance index to compare several different imaging geometries. This study has demonstrated that the proposed XFET approach could lead to a greatly improved imaging speed, which is critical for making XFET a practical imaging modality for a wide range of applications. PMID:22228913

  1. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  2. Elemental analysis of waste glass by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F.; Jurgensen, A.R.; Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R.G.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    An X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique is reported which shows promise for the elemental analysis of low-level mixed waste glasses. This technique can be used for both quantitative laboratory analysis and process control. The glass-forming melts are cast into graphite molds and resulting disks are annealed and polished. The disk is then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and the elemental intensities are converted into concentration with a fundamental parameters routine without the use of matrix-matched standards. Precision of elemental determinations are all better than one percent relative standard deviation. The XRF analysis has been compared with a reference method utilizing conventional wet chemical dissolution techniques followed by atomic spectroscopic determination. Results show that there is no significant difference between these two techniques, however, the XRF technique is much simpler and faster than the wet chemical methods.

  3. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  4. Detection and quantification of trace elements in rice and rice products using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foran, Kelly A.; Fleming, David E. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to examine the presence of arsenic (As) and other trace elements (manganese, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc) in rice and rice products. A portable XRF analyzer was used to test samples, and amplitudes for the analyzed elements were identified in the resulting data. The detection limit of the system was sufficiently low to detect As in some rice and rice product samples.

  5. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials are presented regarding dopant metal ions in the crystal matrices. Types of samples that are amenable to the technique will be discussed, along with sample format and experimental conditions. The chemical information that one can obtain from samples will be presented, and examples of copant contaminant studies in crystals will be given. New types of samples that are possible to study using this technique will be presented.

  6. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of As-Se glasses and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovskiĭ, G. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.; Smirnova, N. N.; Terukov, E. I.

    2009-11-01

    The concentrations of arsenic and selenium in As100 - x Se x glassy alloys and related films have been determined by the X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using the external standard technique. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach allows the compositions of As100 - x Se x glasses and films to be quantitatively determined with an accuracy of Δ x = ±0.02.

  7. Determining analyte concentrations in plutonium metal by x-ray fluorescence using a dried residue method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Christopher G.; Havrilla, George J.

    2000-07-01

    Accurately determining the concentration of certain elements in plutonium is of vital importance in manufacturing nuclear weapons. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) provides a means of obtaining this type of elemental information accurately, quickly, with high precision, and often with little sample preparation. In the present work, a novel method was developed to analyze the gallium concentration in plutonium samples using wavelength-dispersive XRF. A description of the analytical method will be discussed.

  8. X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of gold nanoparticle-loaded objects using 110 kVp x-rays.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Jones, Bernard L; Siddiqi, Arsalan K; Liu, Fang; Manohar, Nivedh; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2010-02-01

    A conventional x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) technique requires monochromatic synchrotron x-rays to simultaneously determine the spatial distribution and concentration of various elements such as metals in a sample. However, the synchrotron-based XFCT technique appears to be unsuitable for in vivo imaging under a typical laboratory setting. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, the possibility of performing XFCT imaging of a small animal-sized object containing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at relatively low concentrations using polychromatic diagnostic energy range x-rays. Specifically, we created a phantom made of polymethyl methacrylate plastic containing two cylindrical columns filled with saline solution at 1 and 2 wt% GNPs, respectively, mimicking tumors/organs within a small animal. XFCT scanning of the phantom was then performed using microfocus 110 kVp x-ray beam and cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector under a pencil beam geometry after proper filtering of the x-ray beam and collimation of the detector. The reconstructed images clearly identified the locations of the two GNP-filled columns with different contrast levels directly proportional to gold concentration levels. On the other hand, the current pencil-beam implementation of XFCT is not yet practical for routine in vivo imaging tasks with GNPs, especially in terms of scanning time. Nevertheless, with the use of multiple detectors and a limited number of projections, it may still be used to image some objects smaller than the current phantom size. The current investigation suggests several modification strategies of the current XFCT setup, such as the adoption of the quasi-monochromatic cone/fan x-ray beam and XFCT-specific spatial filters or pinhole detector collimators, in order to establish the ultimate feasibility of a bench-top XFCT system for GNP-based preclinical molecular imaging applications. PMID:20071757

  9. Recent Immersed Bz X-ray Diode Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. M.; McLean, J.; Davitt, R.; Goldsack, T. J.

    2002-12-01

    The immersed Bz diode is being fielded on one of the AWE Superswarf machines which provides a 55ns, 5.5MV, 35kA electron beam. The external magnetic field, up to 25Tesla, is produced by a solenoid which is driven by a 624μF, 22kV capacitor bank. The magnetic field constrains the electron beam to a small diameter at the target which results in a small x-ray source size. Recent experiments to try and reduce the source size include investigation of shaped field solenoids and the effects of reducing the cathode diameter. The inclusion of a time resolved source size diagnostic has provided more information on the behaviour of the diode. One of the better Bz shots has produced 72R@1m with a 4.0mm spot. This compares to a standard paraxial diode 80R@1m with a 5.3mm spot and the enhanced vacuum cell paraxial diode 65R@1m with a 4.0mm spot. Future investigations aimed at reducing the spot size will include providing a better vacuum in the diode and a possible reduction in the pre-pulse on the diode.

  10. A New Workflow for x-ray fluorescence tomography: MAPSToTomoPy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Pyo; Chen, Si; Jacobsen, Chris

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography involves the acquisition of a series of 2D x-ray fluorescence datasets between which a specimen is rotated. At the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the workflow at beamlines 2-ID-E and 21-ID-D (the Bionanoprobe, a cryogenic microscope system) has included the use of the program MAPS for obtaining elemental concentrations from 2D images, and the program TomoPy which was developed to include several tomographic reconstruction methods for x-ray transmission data. In the past, fluorescence projection images from an individual chemical element were hand-assembled into a 3D dataset for reconstruction using interactive tools such as ImageJ. We describe here the program MAPSToTomoPy, which provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to control a workflow between MAPS and TomoPy, with tools for visualizing the sinograms of projection image sequences from particular elements and to use these to help correct misalignments of the rotation axis. The program also provides an integrated output of the 3D distribution of the detected elements for subsequent 3D visualization packages. PMID:27103755