Science.gov

Sample records for x-ray spectroscopy instrumentation

  1. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  2. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  3. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  4. Deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic broadening in core-shell x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Rehr, J. J.; Kas, J. J.; Nagle, K. P.; Elam, W. T.; Cross, J. O.

    2007-05-01

    Intrinsic and experimental mechanisms frequently lead to broadening of spectral features in core-shell spectroscopies. For example, intrinsic broadening occurs in x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of heavy elements where the core-hole lifetime is very short. On the other hand, nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) and other energy loss measurements are more limited by instrumental resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the Richardson-Lucy (RL) iterative algorithm provides a robust method for deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic resolutions from typical XAS and XRS data. For the K-edge XAS of Ag, we find nearly complete removal of {approx}9.3 eV full width at half maximum broadening from the combined effects of the short core-hole lifetime and instrumental resolution. We are also able to remove nearly all instrumental broadening in an XRS measurement of diamond, with the resulting improved spectrum comparing favorably with prior soft x-ray XAS measurements. We present a practical methodology for implementing the RL algorithm in these problems, emphasizing the importance of testing for stability of the deconvolution process against noise amplification, perturbations in the initial spectra, and uncertainties in the core-hole lifetime.

  5. Deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic broadening in core-shell x-ray spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Rehr, J. J.; Kas, J. J.; Elam, W. T.; Cross, J. O.; Nagle, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    Intrinsic and experimental mechanisms frequently lead to broadening of spectral features in core-shell spectroscopies. For example, intrinsic broadening occurs in x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of heavy elements where the core-hole lifetime is very short. On the other hand, nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) and other energy loss measurements are more limited by instrumental resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the Richardson-Lucy (RL) iterative algorithm provides a robust method for deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic resolutions from typical XAS and XRS data. For the K -edge XAS of Ag, we find nearly complete removal of ˜9.3eV full width at half maximum broadening from the combined effects of the short core-hole lifetime and instrumental resolution. We are also able to remove nearly all instrumental broadening in an XRS measurement of diamond, with the resulting improved spectrum comparing favorably with prior soft x-ray XAS measurements. We present a practical methodology for implementing the RL algorithm in these problems, emphasizing the importance of testing for stability of the deconvolution process against noise amplification, perturbations in the initial spectra, and uncertainties in the core-hole lifetime.

  6. A versatile instrument for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: The Lund cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Jan; Andersen, Jesper N.; Schnadt, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    During the past one and a half decades ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) has grown to become a mature technique for the real-time investigation of both solid and liquid surfaces in the presence of a gas or vapour phase. APXPS has been or is being implemented at most major synchrotron radiation facilities and in quite a large number of home laboratories. While most APXPS instruments operate using a standard vacuum chamber as the sample environment, more recently new instruments have been developed which focus on the possibility of custom-designed sample environments with exchangeable ambient pressure cells (AP cells). A particular kind of AP cell solution has been driven by the development of the APXPS instrument for the SPECIES beamline of the MAX IV Laboratory: the solution makes use of a moveable AP cell which for APXPS measurements is docked to the electron energy analyser inside the ultrahigh vacuum instrument. Only the inner volume of the AP cell is filled with gas, while the surrounding vacuum chamber remains under vacuum conditions. The design enables the direct connection of UHV experiments to APXPS experiments, and the swift exchange of AP cells allows different custom-designed sample environments. Moreover, the AP cell design allows the gas-filled inner volume to remain small, which is highly beneficial for experiments in which fast gas exchange is required. Here we report on the design of several AP cells and use a number of cases to exemplify the utility of our approach.

  7. The MIT high resolution X-ray spectroscopy instruments on AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Dewey, D.; Galton, E. B.; Markert, T. H.; Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; Jordan, S.

    1992-01-01

    The general design and performance characteristics of MIT's two dispersive spectrometers, the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), now being developed for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), are described. Particular attention is given to the development of the critical technologies incorporated into these instruments, including BCS diffractors, imaging gas flow proportional counters, and grating elements for the HETG. The principal stages and the current status of the developments are reviewed.

  8. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-12-15

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected.

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  10. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  12. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  13. Technology development for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P. T.; Sipilä, H. J.; Koskinen, T.; Mattila, M.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy instruments lose part of their performance due to the lack of suitable components for soft X-ray region below 1 keV. Therefore, in the analysis of low atomic number elements including lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon instrument sensitivity is often limited. In this work we describe how the performance of the spectroscopy of soft X-rays is significantly improved when all devices integrated in the spectroscopic instrument are suitable for both soft and hard X-rays. This concept is based on utilizing ultra-thin SiN X-ray windows with proven performance not only as a detector window but also as an X-ray source window. By including a soft-X-ray-sensitive silicon drift detector with efficient surface charge collection in this concept the sensitivity and performance of the instrument is significantly increased.

  14. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  15. Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, Harvey

    1996-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission study concept has evolved strongly over the last year culminating in the merging of LAXS with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) proposal for a similar mission, the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White). The resulting merger, re-named the High Throughput X-rays Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission has also expanded by the inclusion of another SAO proposed new mission concept proposal, the Hard X-Ray Telescope (PI: Paul Gorenstein). The resultant multi-instrument mission retains much of heritage from the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for robustness. These mergers resulted from a series of contacts between various team members, via e-mail, telecons, and in-person meetings. The impetus for the mergers was the fundamental similarity between the missions, and the recognition that all three proposal teams had significant contributions to make in the effort to define the next stage in the X-ray exploration of the universe. We have enclosed four items that represent some of the work that has occurred during the first year of the study: first, a presentation at the Leicester meeting, second a presentation that was made to Dan Goldin following the merging of LAXS and NGXO, third a copy of the first announcement for the Workshop, and finally the interim report that was prepared by the HTXS study team towards the end of the first year. This last document provides the foundation for the HTXS Technology Roadmap that is being generated. The HTXS roadmap will define the near-term goals that the merged mission must achieve over the next few years. A web site has been developed and populated that contains much of the material that has been generated over the past year.

  16. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Bär, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

    2008-06-17

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

  17. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  19. Global spectroscopy and imaging of atmospheric X-ray bremsstrahlung - Instrumentation and initial results from the PEM/AXIS instrument aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenette, D. L.; Datlowe, D. W.; Imhof, W. L.; Schumaker, T. L.; Tobin, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (PEM/AXIS) aboard NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite provides continuous horizon to horizon images, both day and night, of the 3- to 100-keV X-ray flux emitted from the top of the atmosphere. AXIS achieves a spatial resolution to better than 100 km using a one-dimensional array of 16 passively cooled silicon detectors. The primary purpose of this instrument is to provide a global monitor of electron energy input to the upper atmosphere. We describe the design, development, and calibration of AXIS and provide an assessment of its excellent on-orbit performance. The unique capabilities of X-ray imaging spectrometers are demonstrated through an analysis of specific examples from October and November 1991. Important new developments for follow-on instruments also will be described.

  20. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  1. X-ray Spectroscopy of Stellar Coronae: History - Present - Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, Rolf

    1996-12-01

    Since in 1948 X-rays were detected from the solar corona, stellar coronae were among the first predicted non-solar X-ray sources. However, because of their relatively low X-ray luminosity, the first non-solar stellar corona was not detected in X-rays until 1974 - twelve years after the discovery of the first non-solar X-ray source. After the 1980s, with the advent of sensitive X-ray imaging instruments on board the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, and later the ROSAT observatories, the study of stellar coronae has become a vastly growing field of research. These X-ray observations have demonstrated that X-ray emitting coronae are a common feature among stars on the cool side of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with the probable exception of single very cool giant and supergiant stars and A-type dwarfs. The instruments on board these satellites provided for the first time a taste of what can be achieved with X-ray spectroscopy and with the advent of the EUVE (1992) and ASCA (1993), detailed spectroscopy of stellar coronae in the EUV and X-ray regimes got off to a real start. The observations have permitted the identification of coronal material at different temperatures whose existence relates to a range of possible magnetic loop structures in the hot outer atmospheres of stars. The higher spectral resolution of the next generation of spectrometers on board NASA's AXAF (1998), ESA's XMM (1999), and the Japanese ASTRO-E (2000) will improve the determination of coronal temperature structure, abundances, and densities from which loop geometries can be derived and will enable velocity diagnostics. This paper reviews our present knowledge of observational stellar X-ray spectroscopy up to EUVE and ASCA and briefly discusses the perspectives for coronal diagnostics offered by AXAF, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

  2. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  3. Instrumentation for X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert A.; Decher, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Less than five decades ago, the first X-ray observations of the sky were made using simple devices such as film and geiger counters with crude collimators. These instruments were carried aloft by sounding rockets and made observations lasting only a few minutes at most. Today, orbiting observatories, utilizing high-resolution charged coupled devices (CCD's) at the focus of arc sec optics, have lifetimes measured in years. To maintain the pace of discovery in X-ray astronomy, detectors must continue to evolve into devices of ever increasing sensitivity and sophistication. Further progress depends upon a host of technologies: grazing incidence optics, proportional counters, semiconductors, calorimeters, etc. In this article we present a brief qualitative overview of these technologies and of the principles behind them, as well as some examples of how they are employed in scientific missions for X-ray observations at energies up to 100 keV.

  4. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  5. Fourier transform spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime: An instrument for the study of the spectrum of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locklin, Scott Christopher

    This dissertation is an account of an attempt to develop a novel type of vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer; with the most obvious application being the study of quantum chaos in the electronic spectrum of helium, as a classic example of the three body problem. The three-body problem in the form of the earth-moon-sun system has a history dating back to the ancient Greeks. It remains today an object of intense study in atomic physics. Classically, the problem is chaotic, yet, it remains a quantum mechanical problem. The history of the classical three-body problem is briefly examined. Some ideas in chaotic dynamics are explored, with a numeric investigation of the double-pendulum being used as an example. The quantum mechanics of the helium atom is reviewed, and the tension between classical and quantum physics; and the signs that one expects from the so-called "quantum chaos" are explored. Finally, a novel Fourier transform spectrometer designed to operate in the soft X-ray regime and based on a division-of-wavefront strategy is discussed. This is eventually to be used for the ultra-high resolution study of the helium atom. The instrument is described, and directions for future progress with this system are given.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy: Enlightened state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, James K.

    2014-07-01

    Determining the sequence of events following photon absorption by a molecule can be a surprisingly challenging task. An innovative use of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy has revealed an important insight into the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of a well-known inorganic chromophore.

  7. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  8. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Seidler, G T; Mortensen, D R; Remesnik, A J; Pacold, J I; Ball, N A; Barry, N; Styczinski, M; Hoidn, O R

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10(6)-10(7) photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species. PMID:25430123

  9. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  10. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of microcalorimeters for high-resolution, high quantum efficiency, nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been demonstrated over the past few years. In this paper, the principles of X-ray calorimetry are reviewed, and the results of ongoing X-ray tests using microcalorimetry are summarized. An approach to building an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer is discussed.

  11. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Photoionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopy allows study of sources on small spatial scales, and can provide detailed diagnostic information about elemental abundances, temperature, density and gas dynamics. For compact sources such as accreting black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) and X-ray binaries X-ray spectra provide truly unique insight. Observations using Chandra and XMM have revealed components of gas in these systems which were previously unknown or poorly studied. Interpretation of these data presents modeling and analysis challenges, and requires an understanding of atomic physics, ionization and spectrum formation in a radiation-dominated environment. In this talk I will discuss examples, and how they have contributed to our understanding of accreting sources and the nearby gas.

  12. X-Ray spectroscopy of cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies occur when the cooling time of the gas is shorter than the age of the cluster; material cools and falls to the center of the cluster potential. Evidence for short X-ray cooling times comes from imaging studies of clusters and X-ray spectroscopy of a few bright clusters. Because the mass accretion rate can be high (a few 100 solar mass units/year) the mass of material accumulated over the lifetime of a cluster can be as high as 10(exp 12) solar mass units. However, there is little evidence for this material at other wavelengths, and the final fate of the accretion material is unknown. X-ray spectra obtained with the Einstein SSS show evidence for absorption; if confirmed this result would imply that the accretion material is in the form of cool dense clouds. However ice on the SSS make these data difficult to interpret. We obtained ASCA spectra of the cooling flow cluster Abell 85. Our primary goals were to search for multi-temperature components that may be indicative of cool gas; search for temperature gradients across the cluster; and look for excess absorption in the cooling region.

  13. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  14. Instrument Development for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current x-ray observatories such as Chandra and XMM-Newton have delivered spectacular results at soft-x-ray energies thanks to their grazing incidence mirrors. To continue these advances necessitates the development of mirrors with even larger collecting areas, yet within manageable weights and budgets, and focal detectors with improved energy resolution. At higher energies where x-ray critical-grazing angles become very small, x-ray optics have typically not been employed and thus this region remains relatively unexplored at high sensitivity levels and fine angular resolutions. This situation is changing with the development of hard-x-ray optics carried aloft by high-altitude balloons, which promise to bring about dramatic advances. This presentation will review developments in all these areas.

  15. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juett, Adrienne Marie

    2004-10-01

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first part of this thesis concentrates on results from the subset of LMXBs with orbital periods less than an hour, known as ultracompact binaries. Previous low- resolution X-ray spectra of four systems (4U 0614+091, 2S 0918-549, 4U 1543-624, and 4U 1850-087) all contain a broad residual near 0.7 keV which had been attributed to unresolved line emission. I show that this residual is due to an incorrect model of the intervening photoelectric absorption and can be accounted for by allowing a non-standard Ne/O abundance ratio in the intervening material. I propose that there is neon-rich material local to each binary and that the mass donor is a low-mass, neon-rich degenerate dwarf in an ultracompact binary. Follow-up spectroscopy of 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard Chandra and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard XMM confirms the excess neutral neon absorption. Interestingly, the Ne/O ratio of 4U 1543-624 varies by a factor of three between the Chandra and XMM observations, supporting the suggestion that some of the absorption originates local to the binaries. I also present X-ray spectroscopy of another ultracompact binary, the accretion-powered millisecond pulsar XTE J0929-314. No emission or absorption features are found in the high-resolution spectrum of this source, and the neutral absorption edge depths are consistent with the estimated interstellar absorption. The second part of this thesis uses LMXBs as probes of the interstellar medium (ISM). High-resolution X-ray studies of ISM absorption features can provide measurements of the relative abundances and ionization fractions of all the elements from carbon through iron. X-ray studies also probe the ISM on larger scales than is

  16. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  20. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  1. The UHURU X-ray instrument.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Austin, G.; Mickiewicz, S.; Goddard, R.

    1972-01-01

    On Dec. 12, 1970, the UHURU X-ray observatory was launched into equatorial orbit with the prime mission of conducting an all-sky survey of astronomical X-ray sources with intensities of 0.00005 Sco-X1 or greater. The X-ray detection system contains 12 gas-filled proportional counters, 6 behind each collimator. The aspect system is discussed together with the structure, the pulse height analyzer, the command system, the calibration system, and the power distribution system. Pulse shape discrimination circuits used on UHURU use the same technique that was used on the system originally developed for large area proportional counters described by Gorenstein and Mickiewicz (1968).

  2. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, W. C.; Bozak, M. J.; Williams, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies of each of sample received were completed. Since low angle X-ray could not be performed because of instrumentation problems, Auger spectrometry was employed instead. The results of these measurements for each of the samples is discussed in turn.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak assignment for perfluoropolyether oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1990-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) oils are increasingly being used as vacuum pump oils and as lubricants for magnetic recording media and instrumentation for satellites. In this paper, the relative binding energies of three PFPE oils are determined. When sample oils are continuously irradiated during X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, the relative peak intensity of the spectra is altered significantly, indicating that gaseous products form from the oils during XPS measurements. Thus, attention should be paid to chemical changes when XPE is used to characterize fluorinated carbons such as PFPE oils.

  4. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  5. Crystals for astronomical X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burek, A.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal spectrometric properties and the factors that affect their measurement are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on KAP are summarized and theoretical results based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction are given for the acid phthalates as well as for the commonly used planes of ADP, PET and EDDT. Anomalous dispersion is found to be important for understanding the details of crystal Bragg reflection properties at long X-ray wavelengths and some important effects are pointed out. The theory of anomalous dispersion is applied to explain the anomalous reflectivity exhibited by KAP at 23.3 A.

  6. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  7. Hard X-ray Pump, X-ray Probe Spectroscopy of Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loether, Aaron; Decamp, Matt; Walko, Donald

    Recent advancements in intense x-ray pulses have made it possible to perform hard x-ray pump probe spectroscopy. Inspired by optical pump probe, we've built a retroreflector for use with synchrotron based x-rays, using Germanium crystals at Bragg condition in place of mirrors, to control relative timing of x-ray pulses and perform time resolved measurements. Testing of multiple versions of the retroreflector was done both experimentally and via simulation; the comparison allows us to show efficiencies achievable theoretically and realistically. A proof of concept time resolved diffraction experiment on a Germanium 111 crystal was performed utilizing high intensity broadband x-ray pulses and the resulting heating and propagated strains were measured by low intensity monochromatic x-ray pulses. This work was supported from the DOE-EPSCoR Grant No. DE-FG02-11ER46816. Use of the 178 Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, 179 Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, M.M. |

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  9. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  10. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  11. Soft X-ray induced damage in PVA-based membranes in water environment monitored by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzvetkov, George; Späth, Andreas; Fink, Rainer H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of synchrotron X-ray flux in a soft X-ray scanning-transmission microspectroscope (STXM) instrument on the chemical structure of air-filled poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based microbubbles and their stabilizing shell has been examined. Prolonged soft X-ray illumination of the particles in aqueous suspension leads to the breaking of the microbubbles' protective polymer shell and substantial chemical changes. The latter were clarified via a micro-spot C K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy with further respect to the absorbed X-ray doses. Our results revealed a continuous degradation of the PVA network associated with formation of carbonyl- and carboxyl-containing species as well as an increased content of unsaturated bonds. The observed effects must be taken into account in studies of micro- and nanostructured polymer materials utilizing X-rays.

  12. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Bregman, Joel; Garcia, Michael; Zhang, W.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Bandler, S.

    2012-09-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe SMBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a microcalorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high-resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arcsec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer- review.

  13. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  14. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  15. The High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Tananbaum, H.; Kahn, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The HTXS mission concept combines large effective area (approximately 15,000 sq cm at 1 keV), high spectral resolution (E/Delta(E) approximately 300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV and possibly up to 100 keV) by using replicated optics together with a complement of spectroscopic instrumentation including reflection gratings readout by charge-coupled device detectors (CCDs), quantum micro-calorimeters, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or comparable high energy detectors. An essential feature of this concept involves minimization of cost (approximately $350M for development and approximately $500-600M including launches) and risk by building six identical modest satellites to achieve the large area. Current mission and technology studies are targeted towards a new start in the 2002 timeframe, with first launch around 2005-2006. The HTXS mission represents a major advance, providing as much as a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over currently planned high resolution X ray spectroscopy missions. HTXS will mark the start of a new era when high quality X ray spectra will be obtained for all classes of X ray sources, over a wide range of luminosity and distance. With its increased capabilities, HTXS will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as the origin and distribution of the elements from carbon to zinc, the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies, the validity of general relativity in the strong gravity limit, the evolution of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, the details of supernova explosions and their aftermath, and the mechanisms involved in the heating of stellar coronae and driving of stellar winds.

  16. Development of Instruments onboard ASTRO-H for Future X-ray Studies of Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.

    2015-09-01

    The next astronomical X-ray satellite ASTRO-H will be launched by Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in this Japanese fiscal year. It allows us to combine a simultaneous coverage of the 0.4-600 keV band, and a high energy-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.3-12 keV band with an FWHM energy resolution of < 7 eV at 6 keV. The wide-band capability is provided by several instruments; X-ray CCD cameras cover the 0.4-12 keV band at a focal plane of soft X-ray telescopes, a hard X-ray imager covers the 5-80 keV range with multilayer coating hard X-ray mirrors, and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector covers the 40-600 keV band. The high energy-resolution spectroscopy is realized by the X-ray micro-calorimeter array operated at 50 mK on a focal plane of the soft X-ray telescope. With the unprecedented performances, the ASTRO-H observations of active galactic nuclei are expected to give us important X-ray information about tori including their dynamics, size, ionization state and so on. In the present talk, we introduce the current status of developments of the instruments onboard ASTRO-H, especially focusing on the performance of the X-ray micro-calorimeter derived in the ongoing ground testing and calibration.

  17. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  18. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. C.; Cumings, N. P.; Winkler, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    AXAF is to be equipped with a high performance X-ray telescope for the conduction of detailed astrophysics research. The observatory is to be serviced by the Space Station or the Shuttle, depending on capabilities during the AXAF operational period. The AXAF is to utilize the wavelength band from 1.2 A to 120 A. Attention is given to the AXAF science team, the AXAF observatory characteristics, the AXAF science instrument definition program, the Advanced Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the High Resolution Camera (HRC), the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS), the X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), the transmission gratings, and the program schedule.

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    After several decades of development, a significant amount of the effort in low temperature detectors (LTDs) is concentrated on deploying real-world experiments. This has resulted from a great deal of basic detector physics performed by several generations of students, post-docs, and researchers. One of the most fruitful applications of LTDs is in non-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. LTD x-ray spectrometers are broadband, efficient, moderately high-resolution, and can handle moderately high count rates. However, they require significantly more power, mass, and infrastructure compared to traditional solid state x-ray spectrometers, and cannot achieve, at least at low energies, the resolving powers achieved with dispersive spectrometers. In several fields, however, LTDs have or will make a significant contribution. In this review, we will discuss x-ray spectroscopy in general, the fields of science where LTDs are making a significant impact, and some of the current and near-term LTD spectrometers.

  20. The X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei are discussed. The underlying energy source, the regions responsible for the optical emission lines, the different types of active galaxies, and cosmology are considered. The requirements for an X-ray mission of broad band width, large collecting area, modest spatial resolution and good spectral resolution are outlined. It is concluded that the ESA XMM mission meets these requirements.

  1. Kinoform optics applied to x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.; Sprung, M.; Su, J.-D.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Isakovic, A. F.; Stein, A.; BNL

    2010-01-01

    Moderate-demagnification higher-order silicon kinoform focusing lenses have been fabricated to facilitate small-angle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. The geometric properties of such lenses, their focusing performance and their applicability for XPCS measurements are described. It is concluded that one-dimensional vertical X-ray focusing via silicon kinoform lenses significantly increases the usable coherent flux from third-generation storage-ring light sources for small-angle XPCS experiments.

  2. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K.

    2004-08-01

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a μm-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF). We developed a μ-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit μ-XRF (GE-μ-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 μm at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant "Quinoa". The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-μ-XRF. We expect that GE-μ-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region.

  3. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe; Bordage, Amélie; Cammarata, Marco; Canton, Sophie E; Dohn, Asmus O; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Fritz, David M; Galler, Andreas; Glatzel, Pieter; Harlang, Tobias; Kjær, Kasper S; Lemke, Henrik T; Møller, Klaus B; Németh, Zoltán; Pápai, Mátyás; Sas, Norbert; Uhlig, Jens; Zhu, Diling; Vankó, György; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M; Bressler, Christian

    2016-02-18

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute-solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic and structural changes, and local solvent structural changes are desired. We have studied the intra- and intermolecular dynamics of a model chromophore, aqueous [Fe(bpy)3](2+), with complementary X-ray tools in a single experiment exploiting intense XFEL radiation as a probe. We monitored the ultrafast structural rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering patterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited solute. By simultaneous combination of both methods only, we can extract new information about the solvation dynamic processes unfolding during the first picosecond (ps). The measured bulk solvent density increase of 0.2% indicates a dramatic change of the solvation shell around each photoexcited solute, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with ∼1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us to directly observe the structure of the excited solute molecules well before the solvent contributions become dominant. PMID:26783685

  4. Photoelectron and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J; Chung, B; Schulze, R; Farr, J; Shuh, D

    2003-11-12

    We have performed Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy upon highly radioactive samples of Plutonium at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA. First results from alpha and delta Plutonium are reported as well as plans for future studies of actinide studies.

  5. Instrumentation developments in scanning soft x-ray microscopy at the NSLS (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Shawn; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Maser, Jörg; Wirick, Sue; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ade, Harald; Rivers, Mark

    1995-02-01

    The Scanning Transmission Soft X-ray Microscope at the NSLS has been instrumented for the following new forms of imaging: (1) XANES microscopy for the mapping of chemical constituents and for absorption spectroscopy of small specimen areas; (2) luminescence microscopy for locating visible light emitting labels at the resolution determined by the size of the x-ray microprobe; and (3) dichroism microscopy for mapping the alignment of molecules whose absorption spectra are polarization dependent. Since the instrument is used mostly for the imaging of biological and other radiation sensitive materials, a cryostage is being planned to accommodate frozen hydrated specimens.

  6. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature. PMID:27036761

  8. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higley, Daniel J.; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L3,2-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  9. X-ray and Electron Spectroscopy of Water.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Besley, Nicholas A; Winter, Bernd; Rehr, John J; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-07-13

    Here we present an overview of recent developments of X-ray and electron spectroscopy to probe water at different temperatures. Photon-induced ionization followed by detection of electrons from either the O 1s level or the valence band is the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy. Excitation between the O 1s and the unoccupied states or occupied states is utilized in X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. These techniques probe the electronic structure of the liquid phase and show sensitivity to the local hydrogen-bonding structure. Both experimental aspects related to the measurements and theoretical simulations to assist in the interpretation are discussed in detail. Different model systems are presented such as the different bulk phases of ice and various adsorbed monolayer structures on metal surfaces. PMID:27244473

  10. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  11. Indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuya; Imai, Ryo; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2010-11-01

    An indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector is employed for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The detector consists of a phosphor screen, an image intensifier (microchannel plate), a coupling lens and either a CCD or CMOS image sensor. By changing the gain of the image intensifier, both photon-counting and integrating measurements can be performed. Speckle patterns with a high signal-to-noise ratio can be observed in a single shot in the integrating mode, while XPCS measurement can be performed with much fewer photons in the photon-counting mode. By switching the image sensor, various combinations of frame rate, dynamic range and active area can be obtained. By virtue of these characteristics, this detector can be used for XPCS measurements of various types of samples that show slow or fast dynamics, a high or low scattering intensity, and a wide or narrow range of scattering angles. PMID:20975218

  12. Effect of X-ray flux on polytetrafluoroethylene in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the X-ray flux in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (STAT) on the constitution of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface has been examined. The radiation dose rate for our specimen was about 10 to the 7th rad/s. The structure, magnitude and binding energy of the C(1s) and F(1s) features of the XPS spectrum and the mass spectrum of gaseous species evolved during irradiation are observed. The strong time dependence of these signals over a period of several hours indicated that the surface constitution of PTFE is greatly affected by this level of radiation dose. The results are consistent with the development of a heavily cross-linked or branched structure in the PTFE surface region and the evolution of short chain fragments into the gas phase.

  13. X-ray induced damage in DNA monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Stypczynska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel J.; Klyachko, Dimitri V.; Sanche, Leon

    2008-08-14

    In this work, the chemical changes in calf thymus DNA samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The DNA samples were irradiated for over 5 h and spectra were taken repeatedly every 30 min. In this approach the X-ray beam both damages and probes the samples. In most cases, XPS spectra have complex shapes due to contributions of C, N, and O atoms bonded at several different sites. We show that from a comparative analysis of the modification in XPS line shapes of the C 1s, O 1s, N 1s, and P 2p peaks, one can gain insight into a number of reaction pathways leading to radiation damage to DNA.

  14. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  15. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 20 X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1) (Web, free access)   The NIST XPS Database gives access to energies of many photoelectron and Auger-electron spectral lines. The database contains over 22,000 line positions, chemical shifts, doublet splittings, and energy separations of photoelectron and Auger-electron lines.

  16. [Development of Nanotechnology for X-Ray Astronomy Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    This Research Grant provides support for development of nanotechnology for x-ray astronomy instrumentation. MIT has made significant progress in several development areas. In the last year we have made considerable progress in demonstrating the high-fidelity patterning and replication of x-ray reflection gratings. We developed a process for fabricating blazed gratings in silicon with extremely smooth and sharp sawtooth profiles, and developed a nanoimprint process for replication. We also developed sophisticated new fixturing for holding thin optics during metrology without causing distortion. We developed a new image processing algorithm for our Shack-Hartmann tool that uses Zernike polynomials. This has resulted in much more accurate and repeatable measurements on thin optics.

  17. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G R; García, M A

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10(-3) to 10(-5), depending on the particular experiment. PMID:22938268

  18. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  19. Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy with multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Martinez, Dennis S.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer optics operated at normal incidence offer a powerful new technology for the study of the solar spectrum in the XUV. The spectra of most cosmic X-ray sources are strongly extinguished at wavelengths above 40 A due to absorption and scattering by interstellar grains. We describe a number of configurations which allow multilayer optics to be used at nonnormal angles of incidence in conjunction with grazing incidence optics to analyze the spectra of cosmic X-ray sources in the wavelength interval between 1.5 and 40 A. These optical configurations utilize both multilayer mirrors and gratings, and permit the efficient observation of extended sources using stigmatic spectrographs. The response of the instruments described to typical cosmic X-ray sources is also discussed.

  20. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MST.

    PubMed

    Clayton, D J; Almagri, A F; Burke, D R; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; Kaufman, M C; O'Connell, R

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Z(eff) and the particle diffusion coefficient D(r). A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Z(eff) and D(r). PMID:21034007

  1. Tenth International Colloquium on UV and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eric H.; Kahn, Steven M.

    UV and X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas draws interest from many disciplines. Contributions from international specialists are collected together in this book from a timely recent conference. In astrophysics, the Hubble Space Telescope, Astro 1 and ROSAT observatories are now providing UV and X-ray spectra and images of cosmic sources in unprecedented detail, while the Yohkoh mission recently collected superb data on the solar corona. In the laboratory, the development of ion-trap facilities and novel laser experiments are providing vital new data on high temperature plasmas. Recent innovations in the technology of spectroscopic instrumentation are discussed. These papers constitute an excellent up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. These proceedings give an up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. Various speakers presented some of the first results from the high resolution spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, the high sensitivity far ultraviolet and X-ray spectrometers of the ASTRO 1 Observatory, the imaging X-ray spectrometer on the ROSAT Observatory, and the high resolution solar X-ray spectrometer on Yohkoh. The development of ion trap devices had brought about a revolution in laboratory investigations of atomic processes in highly charged atoms. X-ray laser experiments had not only yielded considerable insight into electron ion interactions in hot dense plasmas, but also demonstrated the versatility of laser plasmas as laboratory X-ray sources. Such measurements also motivated and led to refinements in the development of large-scale atomic and molecular codes. On the instrumental side, the design and development of the next series of very powerful short wavelength observatories had generated a large number of

  2. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, Carl E.; Dailey, Carroll C.; Cumings, Nesbitt P.

    1991-01-01

    The overall AXAF program is summarized, with particular emphasis given to its science instruments. The science objectives established for AXAF are to determine the nature of celestial objects, from normal stars to quasars, to elucidate the nature of the physical processes which take place in and between astronomical objects, and to shed light on the history and evolution of the universe. Attention is given to the AXAF CCD imaging spectrometer, which is to provide spectrally and temporally resolved imaging, or, in conjunction with transmission grating, high-resolution dispersed spectral images of celestial sources. A high-resolution camera, an X-ray spectrometer, and the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer are also discussed.

  3. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůža, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil; Nikl, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu3Al5O12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d2 transition of Ce3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  4. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  5. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant λ Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Hervé, A.; Nazé, Y.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Gosset, E.; Eenens, P.; Uuh-Sonda, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, it has been suggested that the stars in the Oef class feature large-scale structures in their wind. Aims: High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. Methods: We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6 Ief star λ Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He ii λ 4686 and Hα emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of λ Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. Results: During our observing campaign, the He ii λ 4686 line varies on a timescale of ~18 h. On the contrary, the Hα line profile displays a modulation on a timescale of 4.1 days which is likely the rotation period of the star. The X-ray flux varies on timescales of days and could in fact be modulated by the same 4.1-day period as Hα, although both variations are shifted in phase. The high-resolution X-ray spectrum reveals broad and skewed emission lines as expected for the X-ray emission from a distribution of wind-embedded shocks. Most of the X-ray emission arises within less than 2 R∗ above the photosphere. Conclusions: The properties of the X-ray emission of λ Cep generally agree with the expectations of the wind-embedded shock model. There is mounting evidence for the existence of large-scale structures that modulate the Hα line and about 10% of the X-ray emission of λ Cep. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA

  6. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.

    My thesis work consisted of the design, fabrication and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This payload was designated the Cygnus X-ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) and launched from White Sands Missile Range on November 20th, 2006. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire- grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto never before flown Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 seconds of usable data between 43-49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log( T )=6.2 ( kT e =0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft x-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave with the walls of a precursor formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop.

  7. Atomic Multiplets in X-ray Spectroscopies of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delley, Bernard; Uldry, Anne-Christine

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structures of compounds involving open d- and f- shell are studied frequently by X-ray and electron spectroscopies. For a better understanding of the multiplets arising in spectra involving one or more open shells, we have developed recently an easy to use program multiX,[2] which is available to download.[3] This first step allows the inclusion of the crystal environment as a crystal field entered simply as positions and charges of a cluster of atoms around the core hole site. This often gives valuable insights in the case of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) measurements. However, in many cases it is desirable to allow for hybridization of the open shell electrons with the orbitals of neighbor atoms. This requires dealing with a significantly larger active Hilbert space. This is addressed with our recent Lanczos-based procedure to calculate spectra. First results will be discussed. Swiss SNF grant 200021-129970 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. The GEMS X-Ray Polarlimeter: Instrument Concpet and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presented. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  9. High-Resolution Kaonic-Atom X-ray Spectroscopy with Transition-Edge-Sensor Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishimoto, S.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Ullom, J. N.; Yamada, S.

    2014-09-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an X-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2-3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  10. Probing deeper by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O. Martinez, E.; Delaye, V.; Detlefs, B.; Zegenhagen, J.; Gaumer, C.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2014-02-03

    We report an hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method combining high excitation energy (15 keV) and improved modelling of the core-level energy loss features. It provides depth distribution of deeply buried layers with very high sensitivity. We show that a conventional approach relying on intensities of the core-level peaks is unreliable due to intense plasmon losses. We reliably determine the depth distribution of 1 ML La in a high-κ/metal gate stack capped with 50 nm a-Si. The method extends the sensitivity of photoelectron spectroscopy to depths beyond 50 nm.

  11. Operando X-ray absorption and infrared fuel cell spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Emily A.; Kendrick, Ian; Jia, Qingying; Grice, Corey; Segre, Carlo U.; Smotkin, Eugene S.

    2011-11-17

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell enables operando X-ray absorption and infrared spectroscopy of the membrane electrode assembly catalytic layer with flowing fuel and air streams at controlled temperature. Time-dependent X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra of the Pt and Ni edge of Pt based catalysts of an air-breathing cathode show that catalyst restructuring, after a potential step, has time constants from minutes to hours. The infrared Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed on Pt at 100, 200, 300 and 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode were obtained. The Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed at 400 mV exhibit a precipitous drop in frequency coincident with the adsorption potential. The turn-down potential decreases relative to the adsorption potential and is approximately constant after 300 mV. These Stark tuning characteristics are attributed to potential dependent adsorption site selection by CO and competitive adsorption processes.

  12. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärtner, F. X.; Ahr, F.; Calendron, A.-L.; Çankaya, H.; Carbajo, S.; Chang, G.; Cirmi, G.; Dörner, K.; Dorda, U.; Fallahi, A.; Hartin, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hobbs, R.; Hua, Y.; Huang, W. R.; Letrun, R.; Matlis, N.; Mazalova, V.; Mücke, O. D.; Nanni, E.; Putnam, W.; Ravi, K.; Reichert, F.; Sarrou, I.; Wu, X.; Yahaghi, A.; Ye, H.; Zapata, L.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Miller, R. J. D.; Berggren, K. K.; Graafsma, H.; Meents, A.; Assmann, R. W.; Chapman, H. N.; Fromme, P.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  13. Observatory Science with the NICER X-ray Timing Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, Ronald A.

    2016-04-01

    This presentation is submitted on behalf of the NICER Observatory Science Working Group. NICER will be deployed on the International Space Station later in 2016. The X-ray sensitivity spans 0.2-12 keV, with CCD-like spectral resolution, low background rates, and unprecedented timing accuracy. A Guest Observer (GO) Program has been approved by NASA as one of the proposed Science Enhancement Options, contingent on NICER meeting its Prime Mission Science Objectives. The NICER Science team will observe limited Observatory Science targets (i.e., sources other than neutron stars) in year 1, and GO observations will constitute 50% of the exposures in year 2. Thereafter, NICER will compete for continuation via the NASA Senior Review process. NICER Instrument performance is compared with Missions such as XMM-Newton and RXTE. We briefly highlight the expected themes for Observatory Science relating to accreting black holes on all mass scales, magnetic CVs, active stars, and clusters of galaxies.

  14. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  15. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray...

  16. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray...

  17. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray...

  18. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray...

  19. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray...

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Iwao; Tanida, Hajime; Kawauchi, Sigehiro; Harada, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been constructed for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of elements at air/aqueous solution interface. Its surface sensitivity is gained from glancing incidence of synchrotron radiation under total reflection condition. The absorption is detected by total conversion He ion-yield method. This apparatus was operated at the beam line 7C of Photon Factory, where the incident photon beam comes from a sagittal focus double-crystal monochromator via a 70-cm-long bent mirror. The mirror focuses the beam vertically and changes the beam direction downward by 1 mrad to irradiate solution surface. The essential requirement of this technique, ripple-free liquid surface at accurate position, was attained by introducing a trough on a floating boat, continuous surface level monitoring, and an automatic Z-stage control. The x-ray absorption edge jump demonstrated that surface concentration of bromide ion follows the Langmuir type adsorption for tetraalkylammonuim bromide solution. By comparing the jump values for surface-active and -inactive bromide salt solutions, the detecting depth of the present technique was determined to be 8.8 nm. An extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of bromide ion segregated to the surface by stearyltrimethylammonium cation indicated that its solvation structure is different from that of bulk.

  1. In situ/operando soft x-ray spectroscopy characterization of ion solvation and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua

    Many important systems especially in energy-related regime are based on the complexity of material architecture, chemistry and interactions among constituents within. To understand and thus ultimately control the varying applications calls for in-situ/operando characterization tools. We will present the recent development of the in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopic in the studies of catalytic and alkali ion solvation under bias condition, and reveal how to overcome the challenge that soft X-rays cannot easily peek into the high-pressure catalytic cells or liquid electrochemical cells. Also the different feasible detection approaches can provide surface and bulk sensitivity experimentally from those in-situ cells. The unique design of in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation and fabrication principle with examples in Ca, Na, Mg based solutions at ambient pressure/temperature and high temperature (~250°C) gas catalysis will be shown.

  2. X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy for Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Kenter, A.; Murray, S.; Elvis, M.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Garcia, M.; Forman, W.; Geary, J.; McCoy, T.; Smith, R.

    2012-10-01

    We are developing monolithic backside illuminated CMOS detectors as soft X-ray imaging spectrometers for high energy astrophysics missions. These devices represent a significant advance over CCD technology and have unique properties that would make them ideal sensors for various planetary mission concepts. The benefits of CMOS include higher levels of integration which provide maximum pixel gain and therefore very low noise, very fast parallel output signal chains for high frame rates. CMOS imaging detectors have zero or one charge transfer so that they can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs provide near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines. Possible mission concepts for these sensors include X-ray fluorescence studies of rocky bodies, and investigation of the magnetospheres of the gas giants and their moons. In this presentation, we discuss the current state of our technology development and outline its scientific potential for planetary physics with particular emphasis on studies of the Jovian magnetosphere. We contrast the capabilities of our instrument with that which has been achieved by the current generation of Earth-orbiting X-ray observatories.

  3. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Accretion Shocks in Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of accreting young stars is providing new insights into the physical conditions of the shocked plasma. While young stars exhibit exceedingly active coronae (>10 MK) with highly energetic flares, the relatively low temperature ( 3 MK), high density (>1012 cm-3) accretion shock can only be clearly distinguished at high spectral resolution. The nearby Classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae was the first to show evidence of accretion using 50 ks with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). More recently a Chandra HETG Large Program (489 ks obtained over the course of one month) on TW Hydrae has found evidence for a new type of coronal structure. In the standard model, the accreting gas shocks near the atmosphere of the star and gently settles onto the surface as it slows down and cools. On TW Hydrae the observed post-shock region is not this predicted settling flow, since its mass is 30 times the mass of material that passes through the shock. Instead the stellar atmosphere must be heated to soft X-ray emitting temperatures. Of the CTTS systems observed with the gratings on Chandra and XMM-Newton not all show the accretion shock signature; however, all of them show excess soft X-ray emission related to accretion. The production of highly charged ions in the proximity of both open and closed magnetic field lines has important implications for coronal heating, winds and jets in the presence of accretion. This work is supported by the Chandra X-ray Observatory through a NASA contract with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  4. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the O1s→π* transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  5. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the [Formula: see text] transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  6. The Astro-H Mission and High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, K.; Awaki, H.; Fujimoto, R.; den Herder, J. W.; Ishida, M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kunieda, H.; Maeda, Y.; McCammon, D.; Ohashi, T.; Okajima, T.; Porter, F.; Serlemitsos, P.; Soong, Y.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takahashi, T.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tawara, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Astro-H Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (JAXA/ISAS) is developing a major new high-energy astrophysics observatory. Astro-H will provide broadband, high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging over the 0.3-600 keV band using four co-aligned instruments operated simultaneously. The mission will have major US participation supported by NASA as well as contributions from Europe and Canada. For high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy, the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) will feature an x-ray calorimeter spectrometer and x-ray mirror. The instrument will cover the energy range 0.3-12 keV and is expected to have an energy resolution better than 5 eV (FWHM) with a collecting area of over 200 cm2 at 6 keV. The cooling system will have both cryogenic and mechanical coolers for up to five years of operation. The SXS is a joint collaboration between NASA/GSFC, ISAS/JAXA and SRON, and the NASA participation was selected as an Explorers Mission of Opportunity in June 2008. As part of this investigation, a fully supported US guest observer program was also proposed and is under review by NASA. Other instruments on Astro-H include a soft x-ray imager (SXI) consisting of a large area CCD camera with 35 arcmin field-of-view and a hard x-ray imager (HXI) that uses focusing x-ray optics combined with both double-sided silicon strip detectors and CdTe array. The 12-m focal length optical system will provide an effective area of 300 cm2 at 30 keV, and high sensitivity from 10-80 keV using multilayer x-ray mirrors with 2-4 arcmin imaging. The soft gamma detector (SGD) is a non-focusing instrument based on a new, narrow-field-of-view Compton telescope with an energy range of 10-600 keV and sensitivity at 300 keV that is more than 10 times higher than Suzaku. Astro-H is planned for launch in 2014 aboard a JAXA HII-A rocket.

  7. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  8. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  9. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  10. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Picón, A; Lehmann, C S; Bostedt, C; Rudenko, A; Marinelli, A; Osipov, T; Rolles, D; Berrah, N; Bomme, C; Bucher, M; Doumy, G; Erk, B; Ferguson, K R; Gorkhover, T; Ho, P J; Kanter, E P; Krässig, B; Krzywinski, J; Lutman, A A; March, A M; Moonshiram, D; Ray, D; Young, L; Pratt, S T; Southworth, S H

    2016-01-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site. PMID:27212390

  11. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Moonshiram, D.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site.

  12. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Moonshiram, D.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site. PMID:27212390

  13. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; et al

    2016-05-23

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Specifically, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. In this paper, we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ionsmore » during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site.« less

  14. Hubbard Model Approach to X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq

    We have implemented a Hubbard model based first-principles approach for real-space calculations of x-ray spectroscopy, which allows one to study excited state electronic structure of correlated systems. Theoretical understanding of many electronic features in d and f electron systems remains beyond the scope of conventional density functional theory (DFT). In this work our main effort is to go beyond the local density approximation (LDA) by incorporating the Hubbard model within the real-space multiple-scattering Green's function (RSGF) formalism. Historically, the first theoretical description of correlated systems was published by Sir Neville Mott and others in 1937. They realized that the insulating gap and antiferromagnetism in the transition metal oxides are mainly caused by the strong on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized unfilled 3d orbitals. Even with the recent progress of first principles methods (e.g. DFT) and model Hamiltonian approaches (e.g., Hubbard-Anderson model), the electronic description of many of these systems remains a non-trivial combination of both. X-ray absorption near edge spectra (XANES) and x-ray emission spectra (XES) are very powerful spectroscopic probes for many electronic features near Fermi energy (EF), which are caused by the on-site Coulomb interaction of localized electrons. In this work we focus on three different cases of many-body effects due to the interaction of localized d electrons. Here, for the first time, we have applied the Hubbard model in the real-space multiple scattering (RSGF) formalism for the calculation of x-ray spectra of Mott insulators (e.g., NiO and MnO). Secondly, we have implemented in our RSGF approach a doping dependent self-energy that was constructed from a single-band Hubbard model for the over doped high-T c cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4. Finally our RSGF calculation of XANES is calculated with the spectral function from Lee and Hedin's charge transfer satellite model. For all these cases our

  15. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  16. Astrophysics with Laboratory X-ray and EUV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the spectral resolution of x-ray observatories have necessitated increasing accuracies in the spectral models used in the analysis of astrophysical data. In response, we have been carrying out laboratory measurements to assess the fidelity of the atomic data used in the models and to calibrate specific spectral diagnostics. The goal is to meet the current need for spectroscopic models to be able to predict line intensities on the order of a few percent for the strongest transitions and to represent line positions with spectroscopic accuracy. Our spectroscopy measurements are performed in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regimes and are mostly carried out at the electron beam ion trap facility at Livermore, which produces the relevant ions in a density and temperature environment similar to those of astrophysical plasmas. Examples discussed in this talk fall into four categories. (1) The identification of lines seen in astrophysical spectra but missing in the models; (2) the establishment of benchmark wavelengths for K-shell transitions in M-shell ions and for L-shell transitions in L-shell ions needed for the interpretation of absorption line features; (3) the calibration of the line emission of key spectroscopic diagnostics, such as the L-shell lines of Fe XVII; (4) the disentanglement of line excitation processes, especially those associated with charge exchange, that produce x-ray emission from comets, planets, and the interstellar medium. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Contracts NNG14WF24I and NNG13WF99I.

  17. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy on the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray spectroscope presented features both spectral and one dimensional spatial resolution. The capabilities of observing sources like supernova remnants, X-ray stars, and the halo surrounding galaxies are discussed.

  18. (Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-11-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm/sup 2/. The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm/sup 2/ in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 ..mu..m. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs.

  19. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.

    2007-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

  20. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  1. Research relative to high energy astrophysics. [large area modular array of reflectors, X-ray spectroscopy, and thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1984-01-01

    Various parameters which affect the design of the proposed large area modular array of reflectors (LAMAR) are considered, including thermal control, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, pointing control, and mirror performance. The LAMAR instrument is to be a shuttle-launched X-ray observatory to carry out cosmic X-ray investigations. The capabilities of LAMAR are enumerated. Angular resolution performance of the mirror module prototype was measured to be 30 sec of ARC for 50% of the power. The LAMAR thermal pre-collimator design concepts and test configurations are discussed in detail.

  2. Past, Present and Future Prospects of High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2006-08-01

    The first high resolution X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies have revolutionised the study of cooling flows. These excellent data have been obtained with an instrument (the RGS of XMM-Newton) that has not been optimised for spectroscopy of extended sources. I will present a few recent examples of what can be achieved further with the RGS in combination with the imaging EPIC cameras for the study of chemical enrichment of clusters. The new generation of high spectral resolution imaging TES arrays that is currently being studied for a variety of possible future X-ray observatories (such as XEUS, Constellation-X, DIOS, Estremo and NEW) offer exciting new opportunities to study the physics of clusters of galaxies. I will present examples of how these new instruments will achieve this.

  3. VUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C. G.; Joyce, J. J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Guziewicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Optical and photoelectron spectroscopies using VUV and Soft X-ray photons are powerful tools for studies of elemental and compound actinides. Large changes in the relative atomic cross sections of the 5f, 6d and sp electrons allow decomposition of the character of the valence bands using photoemission. Resonant enhancement of photoelectrons and Auger electrons at the 5d core threshold further aids the decomposition and gives a measure of elemental specificity. Angle-resolved photoemission can be used to map the momentum dependence of the electronic states. The large changes in relative cross section with photon energy yields further details when the mapping is done at equivalent points in multiple zones. Spectra for well understood rare earth materials will be presented to establish spectral characteristics for known atomic character initial states. These signatures will be applied to the case of USb to investigate f-d hybridization near the Fermi level.

  4. The Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert; Content, David; Lehan, John; O'Dell, Stephen; Owens, Scott; Podgorsky, William; Stewart, Jeff; Zhang, William

    2004-01-01

    The status of technology development for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT) mirror is presented. The SXT mirror combines a large (1.6 m) aperture with modest (12 arc sec half power diameter) angular resolution and low mass (750 kg). The overall collecting area, larger than 9,600 square cm at 0.25 keV, requires high throughput, and thus nesting of a substantial number of thin reflectors. A phased development program is underway to develop reflectors, mounting and alignment approaches, and metrology techniques for components and the mirror has a whole. The latest results in all these areas are summarized, along with an overview of results of optical testing of reflector performance.

  5. Polytetrafluoroethylene transfer film studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was rubbed against nickel in ultrahigh vacuum at loads up to 3.9 N and speeds up to 94 mm/sec. The transfer film formed on the nickel was analyzed using X-ray phototectron spectroscopy. The film was indistinguishable from bulk PTFE except for the possible presence of a small amount of NiF2. The transfer film was found to be about 1 molecule (0.5 nm) thick under all conditions; but at speeds above 10 mm/sec, there was evidence of bulk transfer in the form of fragments as well. The thickness measurements required a choice among conflicting published values of the inelastic mean free path for electrons in polymers. The values chosen gave internally consistent results.

  6. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  7. Hard x ray/microwave spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    1992-01-01

    The joint study of hard x ray and microwave observations of solar flares is extremely important because the two complementary ways of viewing the accelerated electrons yield information that cannot be obtained using hard x rays or microwaves alone. The microwaves can provide spatial information lacking in the hard x rays, and the x ray data can give information on the energy distribution of electrons that remove ambiguities in the radio data. A prerequisite for combining the two data-sets, however, is to first understand which range of microwave frequencies correlate best with the hard x rays. This SMM Guest Investigator grant enabled us to combine multi-frequency OVRO data with calibrated hard x ray data to shed light on the relationship between the two emissions. In particular, the questions of which microwave frequencies correspond to which hard x ray energies, and what is the corresponding energy of the electrons that produce both types of emission are investigated.

  8. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  9. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  10. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  11. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  12. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    PubMed Central

    Orville, Allen M.; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matt; Héroux, Annie; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Schneider, Dieter K.; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael J.; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Sweet, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population. PMID:21525643

  13. Implications of stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for spectroscopy, imaging, and diffraction in the regime from soft to hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The ultrahigh peak brilliance available at X-ray free-electron lasers opens the possibility to transfer nonlinear spectroscopic techniques from the optical and infrared into the X-ray regime. Here, we present a conceptual treatment of nonlinear X-ray processes with an emphasis on stimulated resonant X-ray scattering as well as a quantitative estimate for the scaling of stimulated X-ray scattering cross sections. These considerations provide the order of magnitude for the required X-ray intensities to experimentally observe stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for photon energies ranging from the extreme ultraviolet to the soft and hard X-ray regimes. At the same time, the regime where stimulated processes can safely be ignored is identified. With this basis, we discuss prospects and implications for spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

  14. Instrument data processing unit for spectrometer/telescope for imaging x-rays (STIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skup, Konrad R.; Cichocki, A.; Graczyk, R.; Michalska, M.; Mosdorf, M.; Nowosielski, W.; Orleański, P.; Przepiórka, A.; Seweryn, K.; Stolarski, M.; Winkler, M.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Mrozek, T.; Podgorski, P.; Benz, A. O.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.; Arnold, N. G.; Önele, H.; Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Grimm, O.

    2012-05-01

    The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, an M-class mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) scheduled to be launch in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. These detectors are source of data collected and analyzed in real-time by Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). Besides the data processing the IDPU controls and manages other STIX's subsystems: ASICs and ADCs associated with detectors, Aspect System, Attenuator, PSU and HK. The instrument reviewed in this paper is based on the design that passed the Instrument Preliminary Design Review (IPDR) in early 2012 and Software Preliminary Design Review (SW PDR) in middle of 2012. Particular emphasis is given to the IDPU and low level software called Basic SW (BSW).

  15. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ> 3000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer (XGS) that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority science questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large- scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. While no grating missions or instruments are currently approved, an XGS aboard a potential future X-ray Surveyor could easily surpass the above performance metrics. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions or instruments, grating technology has to progress and advance to higher Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). To that end we have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, high transparency at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. At present we have fabricated large-area freestanding CAT gratings with narrow integrated support structures from silicon-on- insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching. Our latest x-ray test results show record high absolute diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders in excess of 30% with room for improvement.

  16. Diagnostics of the Solar Wind Composition by X-Ray Spectroscopy of Comets from Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    X-rays are excited in comets by charge exchange of the solar wind heavy ions with cometary neutrals, which are mostly H2O, OH, and O. The excitation cross sections are known with a reasonable accuracy from theory and laboratory studies. The advanced capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) and the recently developed method of analysis [Krasnopolsky et al. Icarus 160, 437, 2002] of the CXO observations of comets result in identification of the emissions excited by the solar wind ions O+8, O+7, C+6, C+5, Ne+9, Ne+8, Mg+10, Mg+9, Mg+8, and Si+9. The CXO observations of comets McNaught-Hartley (MH) and LINEAR S4 (S4) have been processed using this method to compare X-rays from those comets and the composition of the solar wind. The X-ray isophotes are crescent-like in S4 and more circular in MH because of the different phase angles (98° and 44° , respectively). The peak X-ray brightness is greater in S4 than that in MH by a factor of 1.5 and smaller by a factor of 1.7 after the correction for heliocentric distance. The X-ray luminosities of MH and S4 are equal to 8.6 and 1.4*E-15 erg s-1 inside the apertures of ρ = 1.5 and 0.5*E4 km, respectively. (Brightness is 0.2 of the peak value at these ρ .) Efficiencies of X-ray excitation corrected to the solar wind flow are similar and equal to 4.3*E-14 erg AU3/2 in both comets. This confirms the solar wind excitation of X-rays in comets. The line identification is given. Ion ratios in the solar wind have been extracted from the spectra. O+8/O+7 is equal to 0.29+/-0.04 and 0.14+/-0.03 in MH and S4. These ratios correspond to T=2.17 and 1.93*E6K and correlate with the solar wind speed of 390 and 500 km s-1 in MH and S4, respectively. Ne+9/O+7 is (15+/-6)*E-3 and (19+/-7)*E-3, and C+6/O+7 is 0.7+/-0.2 in both MH and S4. X-ray spectroscopy of comets may be used as a diagnostic tool to study the solar wind composition.

  17. X-Ray Line Spectroscopy of Massive X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liedahl, D. A.; Sako, M.; Wojdowski, P. S.; Paerels, F.; Kahn, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Spectra from ASCA have provided the most, detailed view to date of the X-ray spectral properties of stellar winds in massive X-ray binaries. Using detailed atomic models that account for recombination cascade kinetics, we have reexamined archival data from Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 in the context of simple models of their wind geometries and velocity distributions. Our approach emphasizes apparent differential emission measure (DEM) distributions, and their dependence on orbital phase and wind parameters. A grid of theoretical DEM distributions is used to generate model spectra, which are compared to the data. We obtain good fits, and derive constraints oil the stellar wind parameters. We provide a summary of the method, and show that, even though the companion stars in Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 have comparable mass-loss rates, the winds in these two systems are dramatically different, in character.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bacterial sulfur globules

    SciTech Connect

    George, Graham N.

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful in situ probe of sulfur biochemistry in intact cells and tissues. Under favorable circumstances the technique can provide quantitative information on the chemical identify of the sulfur species that are present in a sample. Prange et al. have recently reported an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of bacterial sulfur storage globules. Unfortunately there are substantial problems with the experimental technique employed that, they contend, lead to completely erroneous conclusions. In the more recent of their two papers Prange et al. employed a curve-fitting method similar to that used by us (for more than 10 years). In essence, the method employs simply fitting a linear combination of the spectra of standard compounds to that of the unknown, in this case cultures of bacterial cells. This type of analysis can provide quantitative estimates of the individual sulfur types in the sample, but is critically dependent upon the choice of reference spectra. Prange et al. deduce substantial differences between the chemical forms of sulfur stored in the globules of different organisms; they conclude that the globules of Beggiatoa alba and Thiomargarita namibiensis contain cyclo-octasulfur (S{sub 8}), while those of other organisms contain polythionates (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans) and polymeric sulfur (e.g. Allochromatium vinosum). This is in contradiction with an earlier study, in which they found that sulfur in all globule species examined resembled that expected for various sized spherical particles of S{sub 8}. The discrepancy is due to an experimental artefact in the work of Prange et al. arising from their choice of transmittance detection, which is also discussed.

  19. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applications Using Microfocused X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Robert; Cormia, Robert; Siordia, Ruth

    1986-08-01

    A focusing quartz crystal monochromator system. has been developed that provides a bright X-ray spot at 1486.6ev. The X-ray spot size may he varied from one-hundred fifty (150) to one-thousand (1000) microns in four (4) steps. The X-ray system is combined with a high. performance electron lens that collects greater than five (5) percent of the photoemitted electrons and passes them into a hemispherical capacitor energy analyzer. The electrons are detected at the exit plane with a two (2) dimensional position sensitivity detector. Using this system, XPS has been carried out on a wide variety of practical samples. We will provide a brief review of the system, design followed by examples of the solution to unique problems. Samples which have been CLosen for discussion include: Crash Zone on a Winchester Disk An interocular Lens . Single 5 micron Carbon. Fiber Plasma Modified Polymeric Say The unique benefits of a focused. source with high energy resolution will also be discussed.

  20. Observations of hard X-rays along the ecliptic by the Sneg-2MP instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhamimov, Sh. Iu.; Estulin, I. V.

    The paper develops a method for taking into account the contribution of activation to the hard X-rays observed along the ecliptic by the Sneg-2MP instrument aboard Prognoz-6. The possibility of observing X-ray sources in the 25-280 keV range is shown.

  1. The GEMS X-Ray Polarimeter: Instrument Concept and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presente d. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  2. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray spectrometer that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority sciences questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large-scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. Numerous mission concepts that meet these requirements have been studied and proposed over the last few years, including grating instruments for the International X-ray Observatory. Nevertheless, no grating missions are currently approved. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions, grating technology has to progress and be advanced to higher TRLs. We have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. We have fabricated large-area free-standing CAT gratings with minimal integrated support structures from silicon-on-insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching, and will present our latest x-ray test results showing record high diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders.

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs-Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure. PMID:26931918

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  5. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperini, F. M.; Pereira, G. R.; Granjeiro, J. M.; Calasans-Maia, M. D.; Rossi, A. M.; Perez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2011-07-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  6. Multi-speckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering range.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Chushkin, Yuriy; Prevost, Sylvain; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2016-07-01

    Multi-speckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) measurements in the ultra-small-angle range are performed using a long pinhole collimation instrument in combination with two-dimensional photon-counting and high-sensitivity imaging detectors. The feasibility of the presented setup to measure dynamics on different time and length scales pertinent to colloidal systems is shown. This setup offers new research opportunities, such as for example in the investigation of non-equilibrium dynamics in optically opaque, complex systems over length scales from tens of nanometres to several micrometres. In addition, due to the short duration of the X-ray exposure involved in the ultra-small-angle range, possible radiation-induced effects are alleviated. Furthermore, the performance of two different detectors, a photon-counting Pilatus 300K and an integrating FReLoN CCD, are compared, and their applicability for accurate XPCS measurements is demonstrated. PMID:27359141

  7. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  8. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  9. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dinuclear Metallohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, David L.; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the physical origin of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) before illustrating its application using dinuclear metallohydrolases as exemplary systems. The systems we have selected for illustrative purposes present a challenging problem for XAS, one that is ideal to demonstrate the potential of this methodology for structure/function studies of metalloenzymes in general. When the metal ion is redox active, XAS provides a sensitive measure of oxidation-state-dependent differences. When the metal ion is zinc, XAS is the only spectroscopic method that will provide easily accessible structural information in solution. In the case of heterodimetallic sites, XAS has the unique ability to interrogate each metal site independently in the same sample. One of the strongest advantages of XAS is its ability to examine metal ion site structures with crystallographic precision, without the need for a crystal. This is key for studying flexible metal ion sites, such as those described in the selected examples, because it allows one to monitor structural changes that occur during substrate turnover. PMID:25229134

  10. Testing black holes via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The study of the properties of the radiation emitted by gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can provide useful information on the spacetime geometry around these compact objects and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. The iron line method is the most promising techniques to test black hole candidates. In this talk, we present a new reflection model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We use the formalism of the transfer function and we split the calculations into two blocks. One is the calculation of the transfer function, which takes into account all the relativistic effects and only depends on the background metric. The second block is the calculation of the intrinsic spectrum in the rest frame of the gas. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. The transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER, which is the best reflection code available today. The result is best model to test black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  11. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  12. X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnopper, Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extra-solar X-ray astronomy became a reality in 1962 after a successful rocket flight discovered an X-ray source in the constellation Scorpius. The X-ray "telescope" consisted of a roughly collimated Geiger counter. New sources were discovered by many groups in a rapid series of rocket flights that were characterized by finer angular and spectral measurements made with better mechanical collimators and proportional detectors. These discoveries led to the association of the newly discovered X-ray sources with objects already know in other wavelength bands. It was quickly understood that high precision measurements of angular position, spectral features and timing fluctuations were needed to make physical sense of the X-ray data and to put it into the context of the wealth of data obtained from other wavelength bands. These needs were met by a succession of major missions that began with UHURU (1970) and followed with the X-ray telescopes on EINSTEIN (1977), EXOSAT (1983), ROSAT (1990), GINGA (1987), ASCA (1993), CHANDRA (1999) and XMM.(1999). Each brought greater precision to measurements that allowed highly refined interpretations of the properties of x-ray sources. Several of the technical milestones that made these advances possible will be discussed.

  13. Flares from small to large: X-ray spectroscopy of Proxima Centauri with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, M.; Audard, M.; Reale, F.; Skinner, S. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    We report results from a comprehensive study of the nearby M dwarf Proxima Centauri with the XMM-Newton satellite, using simultaneously its X-ray detectors and the Optical Monitor with its U band filter. We find strongly variable coronal X-ray emission, with flares ranging over a factor of 100 in peak flux. The low-level emission is found to be continuously variable on at least three time scales (a slow decay of several hours, modulation on a time scale of 1 hr, and weak flares with time scales of a few minutes). Several weak flares are characteristically preceded by an optical burst, compatible with predictions from standard solar flare models. We propose that the U band bursts are proxies for the elusive stellar non-thermal hard X-ray bursts suggested from solar observations. In the course of the observation, a very large X-ray flare started and was observed essentially in its entirety. Its peak luminosity reached 3.9× 1028 erg s-1 [0.15-10 keV], and the total X-ray energy released in the same band is derived to be 1.5× 1032 ergs. This flare has for the first time allowed to measure significant density variations across several phases of the flare from X-ray spectroscopy of the O VII He-like triplet; we find peak densities reaching up to 4× 1011 cm-3 for plasma of about 1-5 MK. Abundance ratios show little variability in time, with a tendency of elements with a high first ionization potential to be overabundant relative to solar photospheric values. Using Fe XVII lines with different oscillator strengths, we do not find significant effects due to opacity during the flare, indicating that large opacity increases are not the rule even in extreme flares. We model the large flare in terms of an analytic 2-Ribbon flare model and find that the flaring loop system should have large characteristic sizes (≈ 1R*) within the framework of this simplistic model. These results are supported by full hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing the large flare to flares of similar

  14. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre; Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van

    2013-07-15

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  15. The Soft X-ray Research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael; Krupin, Oleg; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights. PMID:25931059

  16. The Soft X-ray research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael; Krupin, Oleg; European XFEL, Hamburg; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-04-02

    The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights.

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of five BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Five X-ray bright BL Lacertae objects were observed in the energy range 0.6-4.5 keV with the solid state spectrometer (SSS) of the Einstein Observatory. The 14 SSS spectra obtained represent most of the X-ray spectra of BL Lac objects with resolution better than approximately 3. These data do not reveal the presence of large amounts of thermal gas, with upper limits for the equivalent width of individual spectral features typically less that about 100 eV. However, the SSS spectra are the first set of X-ray data to indicate low-energy absorption in excess of that caused by the cold interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Comparison with contemporaneous, lower energy X-ray data implies that this absorption does not arise in cold neutral material, but in hotter, highly ionized material, probably intrinsic to the source. All five BL Lac objects have X-ray continua that are well fitted by power-law models, with power-law energy indices usually greater than about 1. In a few cases, a flattening at higher energies is observed; these and other data suggest that two-component X-ray spectra, steep at low energies and flat at high energies, are a common feature of BL Lac objects. Three of the five sources clearly vary between SSS observations, with time scales ranging from days to years. A historical synopsis of the X-ray spectral data confirms the tendency for BL Lacertae objects to be highly variable in the X-ray band but reveals no correlation between spectral and intensity changes.

  18. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  19. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging of a plasma collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Rancu, O.; Renaudin, P.

    1995-07-14

    The collision of laser-produced plasmas has been diagnosed by x-ray spectroscopy and imaging. The two colliding plasmas are produced on Al thin foils at a distance of 200 to 900 {mu}m irradiated at {lambda} = 0.53 {mu}m with laser intensities of 3 {times} 10{sup 13} to 6 {times} 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. Interpenetration of the plasmas was visualized by replacing one of the foils material by magnesium. The main diagnostics viewing the inter-target space were time-resolved monochromatic imaging of the 1s{sup 2} 1s3p aluminum line (He{Beta} at {lambda} {minus} 6.635 {Angstrom}). Doppler broadening measurement with a vertical Johann very high resolution spectrograph in the range 6.5--6.7{Angstrom}, space-resolved high resolution spectra of the dielectronic satellites of the 1s-2p 1 yman, space-resolved spectra with a flat-crystal spectrograph in the range 5--7 {Angstrom} and in the range of 43--48 {Angstrom} obtained with a new OHM crystal spectrograph and a pinhole camera. A multifluid eulerian monodimensional hydrodynamic code coupled with a radiative-atomic package provided simulations of the experiments. Hydrodynamic 2D simulations calculating the lateral expansion of the plasma enabled a reliable treatment of reabsorption along the line of sight of the spectrographs. The size the time duration of the collision, the plasma parameters (Te,Ti and ne) in the collision region and interpenetration were measured. The hydrocode simulations give a good understanding of the behavior of the collision in function of intertarget distance and laser intensity.

  1. TES-based microcalorimeter for future X-ray astronomy missions. Software development for instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga-Encinas, R.; Cobo, B.; Ceballos, M.; Schuurmans, J.; van der Kuur, J.; Carrera, F.; Barcons, X.

    2013-05-01

    The XMS (X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer) is an instrument prototype with imaging capability in X-rays and high-spectral resolution. This instrument is a microcalorimeter based on transition edge sensors. As part of the Spanish contribution to the advancement of the XMS, we present the work carried out by the X-ray astronomy group at the Instituto de Física de Cantabria in collaboration with The Netherlands Institute for Space Research. The main work hereby presented includes the development and testing of software for this prototype with the purpose of instrument calibration and characterization, X-ray pulse detection and energy resolution calculations (Bergmann 2004, Tekst. Proefschrift Universiteit Utrecht; Boyce et al. 1999, Proc SPIE 3765; Den Herder et al. 2011, SRON-XMS-RP-2011-033; ATHENA Assessment Study Report, ESA/SRE(2011)17)

  2. Development of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for fusion and light-source research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Efthimion, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    2014-09-01

    One dimensional spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy with spherically bent crystals and 2D pixelated detectors is an established technique on magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) experiments world wide for Doppler measurements of spatial profiles of plasma ion temperature and flow velocity. This technique is being further developed for diagnosis of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) plasmas at laser-plasma facilities and synchrotron/x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. Useful spatial resolution (micron scale) of such small-scale plasma sources requires magnification, because of the finite pixel size of x-ray CCD detectors (13.5 μm). A von-Hamos like spectrometer using spherical crystals is capable of magnification, as well as uniform sagittal focusing across the full x-ray spectrum, and is being tested in laboratory experiments using a tungsten-target microfocus (5-10 μm) x-ray tube and 13-μm pixel x-ray CCD. A spatial resolution better than 10 μm has been demonstrated. Good spectral resolution is indicated by small differences (0.02 - 0.1 eV) of measured line widths with best available published natural line widths. Progress and status of HEDP measurements and the physics basis for these diagnostics are presented. A new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer with a convex spherically bent crystal is also reported. The status of testing of a 2D imaging microscope using matched pairs of spherical crystals with x rays will also be presented. The use of computational x-ray optics codes in development of these instrumental concepts is addressed.

  3. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  4. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.

  5. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  6. X27A - A New Hard X-ray Micro-Spectroscopy Facility at the National Synchrtron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ablett,J.; Kao, C.; Reeder, R.; Tang, Y.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new hard X-ray micro-spectroscopy beamline has recently been installed at bending-magnet beamline X27A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, where the focus of research is primarily directed towards the environmental, geological and materials science communities. This instrument delivers moderate, {approx}10 {micro}m spatial resolution using achromatic dynamically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, in addition to providing high X-ray flux throughput and selectable energy resolution. The balance between moderate spatial resolution and high flux throughput, in combination with a liquid nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector, is particularly well suited to the investigation of dilute and thin-film systems using the fluorescence X-ray absorption fine-structure mode of detection. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of this instrument and highlight a recent experimental study undertaken at this facility.

  7. Double conical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high resolution ultrafast x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of Al K edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, A.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Santos, J. J.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Bouillaud, R.

    2010-06-01

    An x-ray spectrometer devoted to dynamical studies of transient systems using the x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy technique is presented in this article. Using an ultrafast laser-induced x-ray source, this optical device based on a set of two potassium acid phthalate conical crystals allows the extraction of x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy structures following the Al absorption K edge. The proposed experimental protocol leads to a measurement of the absorption spectra free from any crystal reflectivity defaults and shot-to-shot x-ray spectral fluctuation. According to the detailed analysis of the experimental results, a spectral resolution of 0.7 eV rms and relative fluctuation lower than 1% rms are achieved, demonstrated to be limited by the statistics of photon counting on the x-ray detector.

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  9. A whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in cargo inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Ryge, Peter; Sinha, Shrabani; Shaw, Tim; Strellis, Dan

    2013-04-19

    The bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum used in high-energy, high-intensity x-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by the materials in the cargo in a Z-dependent way. Therefore, spectroscopy of the detected x rays yields information about the Z of the x-rayed cargo material. It has previously been shown that such ZSpectroscopy (Z-SPEC) is possible under certain circumstances. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), has also been shown to be effective, and it can be used either by itself or in conjunction with Z-SPEC when the x-ray count rate is too high for individual x-ray spectroscopy. Both techniques require fast x-ray detectors and fast digitization electronics. It is desirable (and possible) to combine all techniques, including x-ray imaging of the cargo, in a single detector array, to reduce costs, weight, and overall complexity. In this paper, we take a whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in x-ray cargo inspection systems, and show how the various parts interact with one another. Faster detectors and read-out electronics are beneficial for both techniques. A higher duty-factor x-ray source allows lower instantaneous count rates at the same overall x-ray intensity, improving the range of applicability of Z-SPEC in particular. Using an intensity-modulated advanced x-ray source (IMAXS) allows reducing the x-ray count rate for cargoes with higher transmission, and a stacked-detector approach may help material discrimination for the lowest attenuations. Image processing and segmentation allow derivation of results for entire objects, and subtraction of backgrounds. We discuss R and D performed under a number of different programs, showing progress made in each of the interacting subsystems. We discuss results of studies into faster scintillation detectors, including ZnO, BaF{sub 2} and PbWO{sub 4}, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out and digitization electronics. We discuss high

  10. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  11. A whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in cargo inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Ryge, Peter; Sinha, Shrabani; Shaw, Tim; Strellis, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum used in high-energy, high-intensity x-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by the materials in the cargo in a Z-dependent way. Therefore, spectroscopy of the detected x rays yields information about the Z of the x-rayed cargo material. It has previously been shown that such ZSpectroscopy (Z-SPEC) is possible under certain circumstances. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), has also been shown to be effective, and it can be used either by itself or in conjunction with Z-SPEC when the x-ray count rate is too high for individual x-ray spectroscopy. Both techniques require fast x-ray detectors and fast digitization electronics. It is desirable (and possible) to combine all techniques, including x-ray imaging of the cargo, in a single detector array, to reduce costs, weight, and overall complexity. In this paper, we take a whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in x-ray cargo inspection systems, and show how the various parts interact with one another. Faster detectors and read-out electronics are beneficial for both techniques. A higher duty-factor x-ray source allows lower instantaneous count rates at the same overall x-ray intensity, improving the range of applicability of Z-SPEC in particular. Using an intensity-modulated advanced x-ray source (IMAXS) allows reducing the x-ray count rate for cargoes with higher transmission, and a stacked-detector approach may help material discrimination for the lowest attenuations. Image processing and segmentation allow derivation of results for entire objects, and subtraction of backgrounds. We discuss R&D performed under a number of different programs, showing progress made in each of the interacting subsystems. We discuss results of studies into faster scintillation detectors, including ZnO, BaF2 and PbWO4, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out and digitization electronics. We discuss high-duty-factor linear

  12. Recent progress on synchrotron-based in-situ soft X-ray spectroscopy for energy materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Liu, Zhi

    2014-12-10

    Soft X-ray spectroscopy (SXS) techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy are efficient and direct tools to probe electronic structures of materials. Traditionally, these surface sensitive soft X-ray techniques that detect electrons or photons require high vacuum to operate. Many recent in situ instrument developments of these techniques have overcome this vacuum barrier. One can now study many materials and model devices under near ambient, semi-realistic, and operando conditions. Further developments of integrating the realistic sample environments with efficient and high resolution detection methods, particularly at the high brightness synchrotron light sources, are making SXS an important tool for the energy research community. In this progress report, we briefly describe the basic concept of several SXS techniques and discuss recent development of SXS instruments. We then present several recent studies, mostly in situ SXS experiments, on energy materials and devices. Using these studies, we would like to highlight that the integration of SXS and in situ environments can provide in-depth insight of material's functionality and help researchers in new energy material developments. The remaining challenges and critical research directions are discussed at the end. PMID:24799004

  13. X-ray spectroscopy studies of nonradiative energy transfer processes in luminescent lanthanide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacold, Joseph I.

    having a strong charge-transfer character. A second primary result comes from an an x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) study that demonstrates, for the first time, that the high flux of modern synchrotron light sources can induce high fractional populations of excited states in trivalent lanthanide phosphors. In this work we have identified the leading-order nonlinear-response mechanism by drawing on strong similarities between XEOL and cathodoluminescence. These results establish the groundwork for studies that would allow deeper inquiry into energy-transfer mechanisms through time-resolved x-ray pump/optical-probe spectroscopies, through time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy, or through quantifying of higher-order nonlinear effects at further-enhanced fractional excitation levels. The above scientific results are augmented by a supporting effort in instrumental methodology. This includes the development of high-efficiency x-ray emission spectrometers and their use in collaborations to study pressure-induced changes in f-electron physics and to characterize the intermediate states that occur after photoexcitation of the photosystem-II protein.

  14. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Heimann, P.; Krupin, O.; Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Kelez, N.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; and others

    2012-04-15

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  15. Corrosion and degradation studies utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Holly Gwyndolen

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation involves studies of corrosion behavior at the surface of various metal samples, as well as the degradation of wool fibers obtained from the Star-Spangled Banner. Molybdenum metal and iron-zinc alloys were examined under corrosive conditions, and the degradation of the wool fibers was studied. The behavior of a polished molybdenum metal surface upon exposure to both aerated and deaerated water and 1.0 M NaCl solution was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Exposure to deaerated water and NaCl failed to produce oxidation of the metal surfaces, but exposing the polished metal surface to aerated water produced significant oxidation. Metal surfaces cleaned by argon-ion etching were found to be inert to oxidation by aerated water. The etching process also appears to passivate the metal surface. The behavior of molybdenum metal in 0.5 M Hsb2SOsb4 treated at various potentials has been studied using core and valence band XPS. The study indicates that Mosp{IV} and Mosp{VI} (including possibly Mosp{V} in some cases) were formed as the potential of the system was increased within the active range of molybdenum. The corrosive behavior of iron-zinc alloys that have been electroplated on plain steel in both aerated and deaerated quadruply-distilled water has been studied using XPS. Several different iron-zinc alloys were electroplated for comparative purposes: an iron-rich alloy, a zinc-rich alloy, and an alloy of similar iron and zinc composition. Treatment in aerated water produces oxidation for the iron-rich and similar composition alloys, but the oxide is reduced for the zinc-rich alloy. Degradation of the fibers in the original Star-Spangled Banner has been monitored using XPS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Comparison of white and red wool fibers and linen fibers from the flag with new, mechanically-abraded, and chemically-treated white, red, and linen fibers, respectively, was performed in an attempt to determine the fibers' levels

  16. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter. PMID:25931062

  17. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  18. Laboratory Spectroscopy in Support of X-ray Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2004-05-01

    A multi-institutional, multi-faceted laboratory astrophysics program is being carried out at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility using various unique capabilities, such as a Maxwellian plasma simulator, an assortment of crystal and grating spectrometers, including a 45 m grazing incidence spectrometer, and a 6x6 microcalorimeter array from the ASTRO-E mission. Our measurements aim to address specific issues associated with recent X-ray observations. In particular, we are conducting complete spectral surveys to identify and catalog unknown emission lines from L-shell ions that fall into the 20--100 Å region. We are also measuring the stationary wavelengths of K-shell absorption lines needed for determining the flows of absorbers surrounding AGNs. Our measurements calibrate diagnostic line ratios, including those of in Fe XVII, and have discovered the first X-ray diagnostic for magnetic field strength. We have also successfully simulated the X-ray emission of comets C/Linear 1999 S4 and C/McNaught-Hartley 1999 T1. An overview of recent results will be given, including recent measurements obtained with the X-ray microcalorimeter from the upcoming ASTRO-E2 mission. This work was supported by NASA SARA and Planetary Atmospheres programs and performed under the auspices of the DOE by UC-LLNL under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Si(Li) X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The general considerations involved in the choice of Si(Li) as a non-dispersive spectrometer for X-ray astronomy are discussed. In particular, its adaptation to HEAO-B is described as an example of the space-borne application of Si(Li) technology.

  20. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  1. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  2. The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: A facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischetti, R.; Stepanov, S.; Rosenbaum, G.; Barrea, R.; Black, E.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Kondrashkina, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, K.; Irving, T.C.; Bunker, G.B.

    2008-07-02

    The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

  3. Instrument for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Haskel, D.; Tseng, Y. C.; Lang, J. C.; Sinogeikin, S.

    2007-08-15

    An instrument has been developed for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at high pressures and low temperatures. This instrument couples a nonmagnetic copper-beryllium diamond anvil cell featuring perforated diamonds with a helium flow cryostat and an electromagnet. The applied pressure can be controlled in situ using a gas membrane and calibrated using Cu K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements. The performance of this instrument was tested by measuring the XMCD spectra of the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} giant magnetocaloric material.

  4. A novel instrument for quantitative nanoanalytics involving complementary X-ray methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeck, J.; Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Holfelder, I.; Hoenicke, P.; Mueller, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Reinhardt, F.; Weser, J.

    2013-04-15

    A novel ultra-high vacuum instrument for X-ray reflectometry and spectrometry-related techniques for nanoanalytics by means of synchrotron radiation has been constructed and commissioned. This versatile instrument was developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute, and includes a 9-axis manipulator that allows for an independent alignment of the samples with respect to all degrees of freedom. In addition, a rotational and translational movement of several photodiodes as well as a translational movement of an aperture system in and out of the beam is provided. Thus, the new instrument enables various analytical techniques based on energy dispersive X-ray detectors such as reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), total-reflection XRF, grazing-incidence XRF in addition to optional X-ray reflectometry measurements or polarization-dependent X-ray absorption fine structure analyses. With this instrument samples having a size of up to 100 mm Multiplication-Sign 100 mm can be analyzed with respect to their mass deposition, elemental or spatial composition, or the species in order to probe surface contamination, layer composition and thickness, the depth profile of matrix elements or implants, the species of nanolayers, nanoparticles or buried interfaces as well as the molecular orientation of bonds. Selected applications of this advanced ultra-high vacuum instrument demonstrate both its flexibility and capability.

  5. Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

    2003-01-27

    An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

  6. Detecting the Missing Metals and Missing Baryons Through X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.

    2016-04-01

    About 90% of the metals produced in the universe and 50% of the baryons are unaccounted for through UV-IR and radio studies of stars and gas. This large amount of missing gas and metals likely lies in a hot phase (0.5-10x106 K) and must be enriched to about 0.2-0.3 of the solar metallicity, so it should be a good absorber of X-rays in the resonance lines of common elements. Both existing data and simulations predict that hot galactic halos have N(H) ~1-10x1019 cm-2 and EW(OVII) = 3-10 mÅ, which are best studied with instruments that can resolve the lines, as the estimated line widths are 100-200 km/s. This sort of resolution and sensitivity is possible with grating spectroscopy of the type envisioned for missions such as Arcus and X-Ray Surveyor. These same instruments can probe the dynamics of the gas, and when applied to the halo of the Milky Way, can determine the rates of rotation and infall (or outflow) and the degree of turbulence.

  7. Simulated 'On-Line' Wear Metal Analysis of Lubricating Oils by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Partos, Richard D.; Nelson, Irina

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XFS) for quantitative evaluation of metal particle content in engine oil suspensions and the feasibility of real-time, dynamic wear metal analysis. The study was focused on iron as the majority wear metal component. Variable parameters were: particle size, particle concentration and oil velocity. A commercial XFS spectrometer equipped with interchangeable static/dynamic (flow cell) sample chambers was used. XFS spectra were recorded for solutions of Fe-organometallic standard and for a series of DTE oil suspensions of high purity spherical iron particles of 2g, 4g, and 8g diameter, at concentrations from 5 ppm to 5,000 ppm. Real contaminated oil samples from Langley Air Force Base aircraft engines and NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels were also analyzed. The experimental data conform the reliability of XFS as the analytical method of choice for this project. Intrinsic inadequacies of the instrument for precise analytic work at low metal concentrations were identified as being related to the particular x-ray beam definition, system geometry, and flow-cell materials selection. This work supports a proposal for the design, construction and testing of a conceptually new, miniature XFS spectrometer with superior performance, dedicated to on-line, real-time monitoring of lubricating oils in operating engines. Innovative design solutions include focalization of the incident x-ray beam, non-metal sample chamber, and miniaturization of the overall assembly. The instrument would contribute to prevention of catastrophic engine failures. A proposal for two-year funding has been presented to NASA Langley Research Center Internal Operation Group (IOG) Management, to continue the effort begun by this summer's project.

  8. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  9. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>1013 photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  10. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the current status of high spectral resolution soft X-ray observations of solar flares is given. The review concentrates primarily on recent results and interpretations of results obtained from orbiting Bragg crystal spectrometers flow during the last solar maximum on the US DoD P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA SMM, and the ISAS Hinotori spacecraft. Results and several key issues regarding interpretation of the spectra are presented. Specifically, the dynamics of coronal flare plasmas as revealed by X-ray line profiles and wavelength shifts are discussed. Recent results concerning the theory of chromospheric evaporation are given. The temperature of coronal flare plasma is discussed within the context of a differential mission measure. Results concerning electron density measurements, nonequilibrium processes, and relative element abundances are also reviewed.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  12. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    During the past 13 years high resolution X ray spectrometers have been developed that use cryogenically cooled microcalorimeters. These devices have inherently high signal-to-noise by operating at temperatures below 0.1 K and can achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV over the 0.1-10 keV band. Existing devices use doped semiconductor thermometers and typically employ HgTe absorbers. The energy resolution depends on achieving a low heat capacity for the device. For soft X ray applications a relatively thin absorber (approximately 1 micrometer) may be used and an energy resolution of approximately 7 eV has been achieved. For applications up to approximately 10 keV an absorber thickness of approximately 10 micrometer is required and the energy resolution is typically approximately 12 eV. Improvements to the energy resolution in this energy band could be achieved if the problems of thermalizing X rays in low heat capacity superconductors can be overcome. The recent work on transition edge thermometers by Irwin et nl. looks particularly promising because of the higher sensitivity achievable from a sharp superconducting transition. The relatively low impedance of such a device permits the use of a low noise SQUID amplifier for readout. This would also significantly reduce the cryogen heat load compared with JFETs required by higher impedance semiconductor thermometers.

  13. Cylindrical Crystal Imaging Spectrometer (CCIS) for cosmic X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Taylor, P. O.

    1981-01-01

    A "stigmatic" focusing, Bragg crystal spectrometer was developed and used for high spectral resolution X-ray emission line diagnostics on hot laboratory plasmas. The concept be applied at the focal plane of an orbiting X-ray telescope where it offers several advantages over conventional spectrometers, i.e., mechanical simplicity, high resolving power and sensitivity, simultaneous measurement of an extended segment of spectrum, and good imaging properties. The instrument features a simple, unambiguous, non-scanning spectrum readout that is not adversely affected by either spacecraft pointing error or source extent. The performance of the instrument is estimated in the context of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysical Facility mission.

  14. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is often the preferred choice for X-ray microanalysis, but there are still many disadvantages associated with EDS, the most significant of which is the relatively poor energy resolution, which limits detection sensitivity and the ability to distinguish among closely spaced spectral features, limiting even qualitative analysis. A new type of EDS detector that operates on the principle of microcalorimetry has the potential to eliminate this shortcoming, reaching resolutions an order of magnitude better. The detector consists of an absorber in thermal contact with a transition edge sensor (TES). An X-ray from the specimen hits the absorber and manifests itself as a change in temperature. Because the system is kept at 80 mK, the heat capacity is low and the temperature spike is observable. The TES responds to the increase in temperature by transitioning from its superconducting to its normal conducting state, thus sharply raising the overall resistance of the circuit. The circuit is kept at a constant voltage, so the increase in resistance is manifested as a decrease in current flow. This decrease in current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and by integrating the current over time, the energy of the incident X-ray is determined. The prototype microcalorimeter was developed by NIST, and this technology is now available commercially through a partnership between Vericold Technologies and EDAX International. ORNL has received the first of these commercial microcalorimeters in the United States. The absorber in this detector is gold, and the TES consists of a gold-iridium bilayer. It is designed to offer spectral resolution of 10-15 eV at a count rate of ~150 s-1. The goal of this project was to analyze and document the performance of the detector, with particular attention given to the effects of an X-ray optic used to improve collection efficiency, the multiple window system and any other sources

  15. Evolutionary developments in x ray and electron energy loss microanalysis instrumentation for the analytical electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaluzec, Nester J.

    Developments in instrumentation for both X ray Dispersive and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (XEDS/EELS) over the last ten years have given the experimentalist a greatly enhanced set of analytical tools for characterization. Microanalysts have waited for nearly two decades now in the hope of getting a true analytical microscope and the development of 300 to 400 kV instruments should have allowed us to attain this goal. Unfortunately, this has not generally been the case. While there have been some major improvements in the techniques, there has also been some devolution in the modern AEM (Analytical Electron Microscope). In XEDS, the majority of today's instruments are still plagued by the hole count effect, which was first described in detail over fifteen years ago. The magnitude of this problem can still reach the 20 percent level for medium atomic number species in a conventional off-the-shelf intermediate voltage AEM. This is an absurd situation and the manufacturers should be severely criticized. Part of the blame, however, also rests on the AEM community for not having come up with a universally agreed upon standard test procedure. Fortunately, such a test procedure is in the early stages of refinement. The proposed test specimen consists of an evaporated Cr film approx. 500 to 1000A thick supported upon a 3mm diameter Molybdenum 200 micron aperture.

  16. AEGIS: An Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy---a Soft X-ray, High-resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Bautz, M. W.; Davis, J. E.; Heilmann, R. K.; Houck, J. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Neilsen, J.; Nicastro, F.; Nowak, M. A.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Schulz, N. S.; Smith, R. K.; Wolk, S.; AEGIS Team

    2012-01-01

    AEGIS is a concept for a high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observatory developed in response to NASA's request for definitions of the next X-ray astronomy mission. At a small fraction of the cost of the once-planned International X-ray Observatory (IXO), AEGIS has capabilities that surpass IXO grating spectrometer requirements, and which are far superior to those of existing soft X-ray spectrometers. AEGIS incorporates innovative technology in X-ray optics, diffraction gratings and detectors. The mirror uses high area-to-mass ratio segmented glass architecture developed for IXO, but with smaller aperture and larger graze angles optimized for high-throughput grating spectroscopy with low mass and cost. The unique Critical Angle Transmission gratings combine low mass and relaxed figure and alignment tolerances of Chandra transmission gratings but with high diffraction efficiency and resolving power of blazed reflection gratings. With more than an order of magnitude better performance over Chandra and XMM grating spectrometers, AEGIS can obtain high quality spectra of bright AGN in a few hours rather than 10 days. Such high resolving power allows detailed kinematic studies of galactic outflows, hot gas in galactic haloes, and stellar accretion flows. Absorption line spectroscopy will be used to study large scale structure, cosmic feedback, and growth of black holes in thousands of sources to great distances. AEGIS will enable powerful multi-wavelength investigations, for example with Hubble/COS in the UV to characterize the intergalactic medium. AEGIS will be the first observatory with sufficient resolution below 1 keV to resolve thermally-broadened lines in hot ( 10 MK) plasmas. Here we describe key science investigations enable by Aegis, its scientific payload and mission plan. Acknowledgements: Support was provided in part by: NASA SAO contract SV3-73016 to MIT for the Chandra X-ray Center and Science Instruments; NASA grant NNX08AI62G; and the MKI

  17. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  18. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanli, Yang; Ruimin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries.

  19. Analytical characterization of a new mobile X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction instrument combined with a pigment identification case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Vekemans, Bart; Verhaeven, Eddy; Tack, Pieter; De Wolf, Robin; Garrevoet, Jan; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-08-01

    A new, commercially available, mobile system combining X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence has been evaluated which enables both elemental analysis and phase identification simultaneously. The instrument makes use of a copper or molybdenum based miniature X-ray tube and a silicon-Pin diode energy-dispersive detector to count the photons originating from the samples. The X-ray tube and detector are both mounted on an X-ray diffraction protractor in a Bragg-Brentano θ:θ geometry. The mobile instrument is one of the lightest and most compact instruments of its kind (3.5 kg) and it is thus very useful for in situ purposes such as the direct (non-destructive) analysis of cultural heritage objects which need to be analyzed on site without any displacement. The supplied software allows both the operation of the instrument for data collection and in-depth data analysis using the International Centre for Diffraction Data database. This paper focuses on the characterization of the instrument, combined with a case study on pigment identification and an illustrative example for the analysis of lead alloyed printing letters. The results show that this commercially available light-weight instrument is able to identify the main crystalline phases non-destructively, present in a variety of samples, with a high degree of flexibility regarding sample size and position.

  20. The X-ray Pump-Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M; Langton, J Brian; Nelson, Silke; Ramsey, Kelley; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Stefanescu, Daniel; Srinivasan, Venkat; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T; Fritz, David M

    2015-05-01

    The X-ray Pump-Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4-24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale. PMID:25931060

  1. The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; Ramsey, Kelley; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Stefanescu, Daniel; Srinivasan, Venkat; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4–24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale. PMID:25931060

  2. The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; et al

    2015-04-21

    The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4–24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale.

  3. Fundamental studies of X-ray and secondary electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulapudi, Satya Prasad

    Microanalysis of submicron particles in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is only possible by using low incident electron beam energies due to smaller interaction volume and suppressed beam induced charging. Such low beam energies must use L- and M-lines rather than the familiar K-lines. The information about the fundamental parameters of X-ray emission and transport at low energies is limited, so the use of L- and M-lines is problematic. The rate of generation of X-rays from an element irradiated at some energy E depends on the product of the ionization cross-section sigma(E) and the fluorescent yield o. Unfortunately neither of these quantities is well established independently, especially outside of the K-series of lines. Therefore the absolute X-ray generation efficiencies (photons/electron) were directly measured and parameterized for a wide range of K, L , and M lines from different elements. It is anticipated that a complete set of such data would be of great value in applications such as spectrum simulation and standardless analysis. Secondary electron spectra have been collected from both pure elements and from compounds examined under conditions approximating those found in a scanning electron microscope. Despite the presence of substantial surface contamination these spectra are found to be reproducible and characteristic of the underlying material. Typically the peak in such spectra is found to be at an energy of about 5 eV, and 50% of the total secondary electron emission falls within the range 0--12 eV. These data may be of value for the design of detectors for scanning microscopy and might have applications for microanalysis.

  4. X-ray fluorescence spectrometer onboard Hayabusa: instrument, science and observation plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Kato, M.; Hayabusa Xrs Team

    We have developed a CCD-based X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, XRS, onboard the HAYABUSA spacecraft, with heritage technology from the X-ray fluorescence and atmospheric detector onboard the S310-28 sounding rocket experiment. Its scientific objectives are (1) to determine surface major elemental composition of asteroid 25143 Itokawa (1998SF36), (2) to map longitudinal variation of elements, if it exists, by asteroid rotation, (3) to inform on surface microscopic roughness via measurement of surface regolith's particle size effect in X-ray fluorescence, and (4) to observe X-ray bodies and X-ray cosmic backgrounds. At the earth swing-by phase, we have a plan to observe X-rays from the earth and moon. In addition, thermal design of the XRS is suitable, and examined in the spacecraft thermal vacuum test, for thermal emission study of asteroid to observe during the asteroid touchdown phase for sample collection, because the XRS has a large radiator at the asteroid pointing direction and the chassis is thermally isolated from the structure of spacecraft. We will present details of the XRS instrumentation, scientific objectives, and future observation plans, together with some results of pre-flight laboratory experiments and preliminary results of in-flight observations.

  5. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of the SSME plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Dan F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to examine the potential of using SSME exhaust plume radiation in the soft X-ray spectrum as an early warning system of imminent engine failure, a low cost, low risk experiment was devised. An approach was established, equipment was leased, the system was installed and checked out, and data were successfully acquired demonstrating the proof-of-concept. One spectrum measurement of the SSME plume was acquired during a 300 second burn on the A-1 Test Stand. This spectrum showed a prominent, line emission feature at about 34.5 KeV, a result which was not expected, nor can it be explained at this time. If X-ray spectra are to be useful as a means of monitoring nominal engine operation, it will be necessary to explore this region of the EM spectrum in greater detail. The presence of structure in the spectrum indicates that this technology may prove to be useful as an engine health monitoring system.

  7. In situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Fundamental insights in surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Christian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-01

    Since the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources optimized for providing soft X-rays up to 2 keV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been developed to be an outstanding tool to study surface properties and surface reactions at an unprecedented level. The high resolution allows identifying various surface species, and for small molecules even the vibrational fine structure can be resolved in the XP spectra. The high photon flux reduces the required measuring time per spectrum to the domain of a few seconds or even less, which enables to follow surface processes in situ. Moreover, it also provides access to very small coverages down to below 0.1% of a monolayer, enabling the investigation of minority species or processes at defect sites. The photon energy can be adjusted according to the requirement of a particular experiment, i.e., to maximize or minimize the surface sensitivity or the photoionization cross-section of the substrate or the adsorbate. For a few instruments worldwide, a next step forward was taken by combining in situ high-resolution spectrometers with supersonic molecular beams. These beams allow to control and vary the kinetic and internal energies of the incident molecules and provide a local pressure of up to ~10-5 mbar, which can be switched on and off in a controllable way, thus offering a well-defined time structure to study adsorption or reaction processes.

  8. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    The past 3–5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  9. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  10. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  11. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  12. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  13. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, G; Ehrlich, Y; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements. PMID:22938276

  14. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  15. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  16. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Bromine Compounds and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Luo, Yi; Le, Linh; Pradhan, A. K.; Chowdhury, E.; Pitzer, R.; Montenegro, M.

    2010-06-01

    In conventional biomedical applications intense and broadband high energy X-rays are used in therapy and diagnostics (theranostics) to ensure sufficient tissue penetration for imaging or treatment. To avoid damages incurred by these, our proposed method, Resonant Theranosticsb,c, aims to find narrow energy regions that corresponds to resonant absorption or emission. We show that such energy bands lie below the K-shell ionization energy, contrary to the research focus on the K-shell ionization energy itself. Targeting these energy bands, Auger processes can be initiated to produce a number of photons and electrons from each atomic/molecular species via photon fluorescence and electron ejections. We will report our study on the bromine compound bromodeoxyuridyne (BUdR), widely used as radiological contrast agent in radiation imaging. The active system is Br^o-Br^+ combination, which can emit or absorb X-rays in the relative narrow energy range of 12 to 13.6 keV, through 1s-np transitions. We will present the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for various Auger or K-shell 1s-np transitions. We will show that the corresponding cross sections and attenuation coefficients per unit mass, are orders of magnitude higher than the background and that at K-shell ionization energy. Employing these attenuation coefficients in the Monte Carlo simulation program Geant4, we study the intensities of photon and electron emission spectra. Acknowledgment: Partially support: Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA (SNN). The computational work was carried out at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-Ray Enhancement of the Auger Effect in High-Z atoms, molecules, and Nanoparticles: Biomedical Applications", A. K. Pradhan, S. N. Nahar, M. Montenegro, Yan Yu, H. L. Zhang, C. Sur, M. Mrozik, R. M. Pitzer, J. of Phys. Chem. A, 113 (2009), 12356. "Monte Carlo Simulations and Atomic Calculations for Auger Processes in

  17. X-ray Spectroscopy of Hot Dense Plasmas: Experimental Limits, Line Shifts and Field Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Oldrich; Sauvan, Patrick; Dalimier, Elisabeth; Riconda, Caterina; Rosmej, Frank B.; Weber, Stefan; Nicolai, Philippe; Peyrusse, Olivier; Uschmann, Ingo; Hoefer, Sebastian; Kaempfer, Tino; Loetzsch, Robert; Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Oks, Eugene

    2008-10-22

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is capable of providing complex information on environmental conditions in hot dense plasmas. Benefiting from application of modern spectroscopic methods, we report experiments aiming at identification of different phenomena occurring in laser-produced plasma. Fine features observed in broadened profiles of the emitted x-ray lines and their satellites are interpreted using theoretical models predicting spectra modification under diverse experimental situations.

  18. Capturing Transient Electronic and Molecular Structures in Liquids by Picosecond X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gawelda, W.; Pham, V. T.; El Nahhas, A.; Kaiser, M.; Zaushitsyn, Y.; Bressler, C.; Chergui, M.; Johnson, S. L.; Grolimund, D.; Abela, R.; Hauser, A.

    2007-02-02

    We describe an advanced setup for time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. It combines an intense femtosecond laser source synchronized to the x-ray pulses delivered into the microXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The setup is applied to measure the short-lived high-spin geometric structure of photoexcited aqueous Fe(bpy)3 at room temperature.

  19. GaAs arrays for X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Andersson, Hans; Campbell, M.; Lumb, David H.; Nenonen, Seppo A. A.; Tlustos, Lukas

    2004-09-01

    We present results from our compound semiconductor laboratory program and describe the development of a large area GaAs imaging array for planetary remote sensing applications. The device is fabricated from ~150 micron thick epitaxial material, patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array, back-thinned and contacted. It will be flip-chip bump bonded onto a custom designed, fully spectroscopic, low noise (< 20 e- rms) active pixel sensor ASIC. At present, the ASIC is still under development and so in order to validate and qualify the various technological steps, we have produced a GaAs imager based on the MEDIPIX-1 format using a MEDIPIX-1 readout chip. In X-ray tests, the device was found to work well with a bump yield of 99.9%. After flat field corrections, the spatial uniformity of the array was commensurate with Poisson noise.

  20. Arcus: An X-ray Grating Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Arcus Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be proposed to NASA as a MIDEX in 2016. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission design parameters are R~3000 and >700 cm^2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from ~10-50Å. Arcus will use the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs.

  1. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-10-26

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  2. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy: the Potential of Astrophysics-developed Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Kraft, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Masterton, R.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence from the surface of airless bodies has been studied since the Apollo X-ray fluorescence experiment mapped parts of the lunar surface in 1971-1972. That experiment used a collimated proportional counter with a resolving power of ~1 and a beam size of ~1degree. Filters separated only Mg, Al and SI lines. We review progress in X-ray detectors and imaging for astrophysics and show how these advances enable much more powerful use of X-ray fluorescence for the study of airless bodies. Astrophysics X-ray instrumentation has developed enormously since 1972. Low noise, high quantum efficiency, X-ray CCDs have flown on ASCA, XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Swift and Suzaku, and are the workhorses of X-ray astronomy. They normally span 0.5 to ~8 keV with an energy resolution of ~100 eV. New developments in silicon based detectors, especially individual pixel addressable devices, such as CMOS detectors, can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs mean near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines.such as CMOS detectors, promise advances. X-ray imaging has advanced similarly far. Two types of imager are now available: specular reflection and coded apertures. X-ray mirrors have been flown on the Einstein Observatory, XMM-Newton, Chandra and others. However, as X-ray reflection only occurs at small (~1degree) incidence angles, which then requires long focal lengths (meters), mirrors are not usually practical for planetary missions. Moreover the field of view of X-ray mirrors is comparable to the incident angle, so can only image relatively small regions. More useful

  3. Spherical crystal imaging spectrometer (SCIS) for cosmic x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schnopper, H W; Taylor, P O

    1980-10-01

    The application of a spherically bent crystal x-ray spectrometer to cosmic x-ray problems is discussed. This is the only geometry whose diffraction properties are preserved under all rotations of the spacecraft. The combination of Bragg reflection and spherical aberration provides for stigmatic imaging of extended sources and minimum spatial and/or spectral resolution loss arising from source extent and spacecraft pointing errors. The sensitivity of the instrument is discussed in the context of a Spacelab mission. PMID:20234612

  4. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  5. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  6. Broad-band soft x-ray diagnostic instruments at the LLNL Novette laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tirsell, K.G.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Nilson, D.G.; Medecki, H.

    1983-09-15

    Complementary broad-band instruments have been developed to measure time dependent, absolute soft x-ray spectra at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nd glass laser irradiation facilities. Absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas are important for understanding laser absorption and energy transport. We will describe two new 10-channel XRD systems that have been installed at the LLNL Novette facility for use in the 0.15- to 1.5-keV range. Since XRD channel time response is limited by available oscilloscope performance to 120 ps, a soft x-ray streak camera has been developed for better time resolution (20 ps) and greater dynamic range (approx.10/sup 3/) in the same x-ray energy region. Using suitable filters, grazing incidence mirrors, and a gold or cesium-iodide transmission cathode, this streak camera instrument has been installed at Novette to provide one broad and four relatively narrow channels. It can also be used in a single channel, spatially discriminating mode by means of pinhole imaging. The complementary nature of these instruments has been enhanced by locating them in close proximity and matching their channel energy responses. As an example of the use of these instruments, we present results from Novette 2..omega..(0.53 ..mu..m) gold disk irradiations at 1 ns and 10/sup 14/ to 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  7. Calibration sources for the soft x-ray spectrometer instrument on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, C. P.; Lowes, P.; den Herder, J. W.; Aarts, H.; Haas, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Gendreau, K.

    2012-09-01

    The SXS instrument is the Soft X-ray micro-calorimeter Spectrometer planned for the Japanese ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2014. In this paper we describe the X-ray calibration sources used in this instrument. These sources use light sensitive photo-cathodes to generate electrons, which in turn generate the X-rays. This design has the unique property to allow for fast discrete pulsations of the generated X-rays. This enables the energy scale calibration of the instrument simultaneously with astronomical observations, without adding to the background in the astronomical data. Flight-model sources have been made, and a number of them have been operating in the past several months to monitor their behaviour. Here we report on the characterisation and performance of these sources. In addition, we will elaborate on the nature and expected accuracy of the energy calibration, in relation to the expected stability of the instrument, given the calibration source strength and its mode of operation.

  8. A robot-based detector manipulator system for a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D., Maser, J., Holt, M. , Winarski, R., Preissner, C.,Lai, B., Vogt, S., Stephenson, G.B.

    2007-11-11

    This paper presents the design of a robot-based detector manipulator for microdiffraction applications with a hard X-ray nanoprobe instrument system being constructed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Applications for detectors weighing from 1.5 to 100 kg were discussed in three configurations.

  9. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  10. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, David W.

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 μm thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  11. Critical-angle transmission grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy on the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Davis, John E.; Dewey, Daniel; Bautz, Mark W.; Foster, Rick; Bruccoleri, Alex; Mukherjee, Pran; Robinson, David; Huenemoerder, David P.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Guo, L. Jay; Kaplan, Alex F.; Schweikart, Russell B.

    2010-07-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy at energies below 1 keV covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions, and is central to studies of the Interstellar Medium, the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium, warm absorption and outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei, coronal emission from stars, etc. The large collecting area, long focal length, and 5 arcsecond half power diameter telescope point-spread function of the International X-ray Observatory will present unprecedented opportunity for a grating spectrometer to address these areas at the forefront of astronomy and astrophysics. We present the current status of a transmission grating spectrometer based on recently developed high-efficiency critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the traditional advantages of blazed reflection and transmission gratings. The optical design places light-weight grating arrays close to the telescope mirrors, which maximizes dispersion distance and thus spectral resolution and minimizes demands on mirror performance. It merges features from the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, and provides resolving power R = E/ΔE = 3000 - 5000 (full width half max) and effective area >1000 cm2 in the soft x-ray band. We discuss recent results on ray-tracing and optimization of the optical design, instrument configuration studies, and grating fabrication.

  12. Design and Operation of a High Pressure Reaction Cell for in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S.; Mickelson, G.; Modica, F.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of catalytic reactions have been instrumental in advancing the understanding of catalytic processes. These measurements require an in situ catalysis reaction cell with unique properties. Here we describe the design and initial operation of an in situ/operando catalysis reaction cell for transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The cell is designed: to be an ideal catalytic reactor with no mass transfer effects; to give the same conversion and selectivity under similar space velocities as standard laboratory micro-reactors; to be operational temperatures up to 600 {sup o}C and pressures up to 14 bar; to be X-ray transparent allowing XAS measurement to be collected in transmission for all elements with Z {>=} 23 (vanadium K-edge at 5.5 keV); to measure the actual catalyst bed temperature; to not use o-ring seals, or water cooling; to be robust, compact, easy to assemble, and use, and relatively low cost to produce. The heart of the cell is fabricated from an X-ray transparent beryllium tube that forms a plug flow reactor. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a Re/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a function of hydrogen pressure from 0.05 to 8 bar, and from a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during n-heptane reforming are given as initial examples of the versatility of the reactor.

  13. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Romanowski, P.; Bąk-Misiuk, J.; Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.; Iwanowski, R. J.; Heinonen, M. H.; Ermakova, O.; Dąbkowska, H.

    2011-10-01

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5° and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1 s, V 2 p, Lu 4 f) as well as the valence band range.

  14. Probing electrode/electrolyte interfaces in situ by X-ray spectroscopies: old methods, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng Hao; Weatherup, Robert S; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2015-11-11

    Electrode/electrolyte interfaces play a vital role in various electrochemical systems, but in situ characterization of such buried interfaces remains a major challenge. Several efforts to develop techniques or to modify existing techniques to study such interfaces are showing great promise to overcome this challenge. Successful examples include electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopies, environmental transmission electron microscopy (E-TEM), and surface X-ray scattering. Other techniques such as X-ray core-level spectroscopies are element-specific and chemical-state-specific, and are being widely applied in materials science research. Herein we showcase four types of newly developed strategies to probe electrode/electrolyte interfaces in situ with X-ray core-level spectroscopies. These include the standing wave approach, the meniscus approach, and two liquid cell approaches based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These examples demonstrate that with proper modifications, many ultra-high-vacuum based techniques can be adapted to study buried electrode/electrolyte interfaces and provide interface-sensitive, element- and chemical-state-specific information, such as solute distribution, hydrogen-bonding network, and molecular reorientation. At present, each method has its own specific limitations, but all of them enable in situ and operando characterization of electrode/electrolyte interfaces that can provide important insights into a variety of electrochemical systems. PMID:26514115

  15. New Instruments for Spectrally-Resolved Solar Soft X-ray Observations from CubeSats, and Larger Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Shih, A.; Warren, H. P.; DeForest, C. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics and evolution of these energetic processes; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport. A better understanding of the thermal plasma informs our interpretation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations of nonthermal particles, improving our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-SDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. An X123-CdTe cadmium-telluride detector is also included for ~5-100 keV HXR spectroscopy with ~0.5-1 keV FWHM resolution. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a pinhole aperture and X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide full-Sun imaging from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. We discuss scaled versions of these instruments, with greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and significantly improved spectral and spatial resolutions for the imager, for deployment on larger platforms such as Small Explorer missions.

  16. Prototyping a global soft X-ray imaging instrument for heliophysics, planetary science, and astrophysics science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carter, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Chornay, D. J.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Keller, J. W.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K.; Read, A. M.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N.

    2012-04-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the ESA AXIOM mission.

  17. A microprocessor controlled instrument for measurement and display of X-ray waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. R.

    1983-04-01

    The National Center for Devices and Radiological Health has developed a radiation measurement instrument for use by Food and Drug Administration personnel in determining compliance of X-ray machines with applicable performance standards. The instrument measures radiation exposures from 1 mR to 590 R and exposure times from 1 msec to 5.76 seconds. It is compact, lightweight and battery powered, and suitable for field use.

  18. Prototyping a Global Soft X-ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W.; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Any M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven; Thomas, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the FSA AXIOM mission

  19. Prototyping a Global Soft X-Ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carter, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Chornay, D. J.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Keller, J. W.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K.; Read, A. M.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N.

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobstereye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the ESA AXIOM mission.

  20. Recent Developments of Multilayer Mirror Optics for Laboratory X-ray Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelsen, Carsten; Wiesmann, Jörg; Hoffmann, C.; Wulf, K.; Brugemann, Lutz; Storm, A.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we review various improvements that we made in the development of multilayer mirror optics for home-lab x-ray analytical equipment in recent years. For the detection of light elements using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, we developed a number of new multilayers with improved detection limits. In detail, we found that La/B4C multilayers improve the detection limit of boron by 29 % compared to the previous Mo/B4C multilayers. For the detection of carbon, TiO2/C multilayers improve the detection limit also by 29 % compared to the V/C multilayers previously used. For the detection of aluminum, WSi2/Si or Ta/Si multilayers can lead to detection limit improvements over the current W/Si multilayers of up to 60 % for samples on silicon wafers. For the use as beam-conditioning elements in x-ray diffractometry, curved optics coated with laterally d-spacing graded multilayers give rise to major improvements concerning usable x-ray intensity and beam quality. Recent developments lead to a high quality of these multilayer optics concerning beam intensity, divergence, beam uniformity and spectral purity. For example, x-ray reflectometry instruments equipped with such multilayer optics have dynamic ranges previously only available at synchrotron sources. Two-dimensional focusing multilayer optics are shown to become essential optical elements in protein crystallography and structural proteomics.

  1. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  2. What Can Be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Both solar wind charge exchange emission and diffuse thermal emission from the Local Bubble are strongly dominated in the soft X-ray band by lines from highly ionized elements. While both processes share many of the same lines, the spectra should differ significantly due to the different production mechanisms, abundances, and ionization states. Despite their distinct spectral signatures, current and past observatories have lacked the spectral resolution to adequately distinguish between the two sources. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation proposed for future missions has the potential to answer fundamental questions such as whether there is any hot plasma in the Local Hot Bubble, and if so, what are the abundances of the emitting plasma and whether the plasma is in equilibrium. Such instrumentation will provide dynamic information about the solar wind including data on ion species which are currently difficult to track. It will also make possible remote sensing of the solar wind.

  3. FORTRAN program for x ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reformatting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN program has been written for use on an IBM PC/XT or AT or compatible microcomputer (personal computer, PC) that converts a column of ASCII-format numbers into a binary-format file suitable for interactive analysis on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) computer running the VGS-5000 Enhanced Data Processing (EDP) software package. The incompatible floating-point number representations of the two computers were compared, and a subroutine was created to correctly store floating-point numbers on the IBM PC, which can be directly read by the DEC computer. Any file transfer protocol having provision for binary data can be used to transmit the resulting file from the PC to the DEC machine. The data file header required by the EDP programs for an x ray photoelectron spectrum is also written to the file. The user is prompted for the relevant experimental parameters, which are then properly coded into the format used internally by all of the VGS-5000 series EDP packages.

  4. A stored-ion target for x-ray spectroscopy of multicharged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    With the evolution of the new third generation synchrotron radiation sources providing intense beams of hard x-rays, it is natural to consider exploiting these to investigate the 3-body Coulomb problem. The atomic physics community could advance this field considerably by developing general techniques to investigate the x-ray spectroscopy of heliumlike ions. To do so, however, requires the development of a target of such ions with sufficient density to permit photoexcitation studies in the hard x-ray regime. A possible scheme to achieve this is described. Such a target system would permit x-ray studies with exotic species such as highly charged atomic ions, size-selected cluster ions, and atomic and molecular negative ions which have hitherto been impractical to study with conventional techniques.

  5. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of AGN with the AXAF 'Microcalorimeter'. [Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    A novel technique for X-ray spectroscopy has been configured as part of the definition payload of the AXAF Observatory. It is basically a calorimeter which, operating at 0.1 K, senses the total conversion of single photoelectrically absorbed X-rays via the differential temperature rise of the absorber. The technique promises to achieve less than 10 eV FWHM with near-unit efficiency simultaneously over the entire AXAF bandpass. This combination of high resolution and high efficiency allows for the possibility of investigating thermal, fluorescent and absorption X-ray line features in many types of X-ray source, including a large sample of active galactic nuclei.

  7. Local structure analysis of magnetic transparent conducting films by x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    We prepared Mn-doped indium-tin oxide (ITO) films on glass substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and investigated local structures surrounding Mn ions in the films by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Fourier transform of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum indicated that the Mn ions preferably substitute the In ions at the b sites of the In2O3 lattice. According to the threshold energy obtained from the inflection point of the edge in the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum, the valence of the Mn ions was evaluated to range from  +2 to  +3. These x-ray absorption spectroscopic data are useful for revealing the origin of the magnetism of the Mn-doped ITO films.

  8. X-ray diffraction and electron spectroscopy of epitaxial molecular C sub 60 films

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.M.; Ohlberg, D.A.A.; You, H.K.; Williams, R.S.; Anz, S.J.; Alvarez, M.M.; Whetten, R.L.; Rubin, Y.; Diederich, F.N. )

    1991-06-13

    Films of the new carbon allotrope, molecular C{sub 60}, also known as Buckminsterfullerene, have been grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films have been characterized with X-ray 2{theta} diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The diffraction data from oriented films show that close-packed planes of C{sub 60} molecules are stacked parallel to the substrate surface but that the correlation length for X-ray scattering is less than 200 {angstrom}. The electron spectroscopic data show that the C atoms of C{sub 60} are essentially sp{sup 2}-bonded, but there are significant differences with respect to graphite.

  9. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A. ); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. ); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. ); Moodenbaugh, A.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  10. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A.; Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M.; Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.