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Sample records for x-ray-induced small-bowel adenocarcinoma

  1. Small bowel adenocarcinoma phenotyping, a clinicobiological prognostic study

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, T; Svrcek, M; Zaanan, A; Beohou, E; Laforest, A; Afchain, P; Mitry, Emmanuel; Taieb, J; Di Fiore, F; Gornet, J-M; Thirot-Bidault, A; Sobhani, I; Malka, D; Lecomte, T; Locher, C; Bonnetain, F; Laurent-Puig, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare tumour with a poor prognosis. Molecular biology data on SBA carcinogenesis are lacking. Methods: Expression of HER2, ?-catenin, p53 and mismatch repair (MMR) protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry. KRAS, V600E BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability were investigated. Results: We obtained samples from 63 SBA patients (tumour stages: I–II: 30% III: 35% IV: 32% locally advanced: 3%). HER2 overexpression (3+) was observed in 2 out of 62 patients, overexpression of p53 in 26 out of 62, abnormal expression of ?-catenin in 12 out of 61, KRAS mutation in 21 out of 49, BRAF V600E mutation in 1 out of 40 patients, MMR deficiency (dMMR) in 14 out of 61 and was consistent with Lynch syndrome in 9 out of 14 patients. All of the dMMR tumours were in the duodenum or jejunum and only one was stage IV. Median overall survival (OS) was 36.6 months (95% CI, 26.9–72.2). For all patients, in univariate analysis, stages I–II (P<0.001), WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.01) and dMMR phenotype (P=0.02) were significantly associated with longer OS. In multivariate analysis, disease stage (P=0.01) and WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.001) independently predicted longer OS. For stage IV patients, median OS was 20.5 months (95% CI: 14.6; 36.6 months). In multivariate analysis, WHO PS 0–1 (P=0.0001) and mutated KRAS status (P=0.02) independently predicted longer OS. Conclusion: This large study suggests that molecular alterations in SBA are closer to those in colorectal cancer (CRC) than those in gastric cancer, with low levels of HER 2 overexpression and high frequencies of KRAS mutations. The seemingly higher frequency of dMMR than in CRC may be explained by the higher frequency of Lynch syndrome in SBA patients. A dMMR phenotype was significantly associated with a non-metastatic tumour (P=0.02). A trend for a good prognosis and a duodenum or jejunum primary site was associated with dMMR. PMID:24196786

  2. Small bowel adenocarcinoma and Crohn's disease: Any further ahead than 50 years ago?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Caitlin; Gordon, Philip H; Petrucci, Andrea; Boutros, Marylise

    2014-01-01

    This review of the literature on small bowel carcinoma associated with Crohn’s disease specifically addresses the incidence, risk factors, and protective factors which have been identified. It also reviews the clinical presentation, the current modalities of diagnosis, the pathology, treatment, and surveillance. Finally, the prognosis and future direction are addressed. Our experience with small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn’s disease is reported. Readers will be provided with a better understanding of this rare and often poorly recognized complication of Crohn’s disease. PMID:25206256

  3. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M.; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B.; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W.; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman ?0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  4. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman -0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  5. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma as the Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Celiac Disease: A Rare Malignancy in a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Jaleh; Afari, Maxwell Eyram; Cordova, Alfredo C.; Olszewski, Adam J.; Minami, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of small bowel malignancies, particularly lymphoma. Its association with small bowel carcinoma is less known. Case Description. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with celiac disease who experienced recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and was ultimately found to have adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Discussion and Evaluation. Diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma is often delayed because of the need for specialized modalities, which are often deferred in the inpatient setting. Although resection is the modality of choice for small bowel tumors, a majority is either locally advanced or metastatic at diagnosis, and even localized cancers have worse prognosis than stage-matched colorectal tumors. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain, but it is often offered extrapolating data from other gastrointestinal cancers. Small bowel carcinomas occurring in the context of celiac disease appear to be associated with higher rates of microsatellite instability than sporadic tumors, although other specific genomic abnormalities and mechanisms of carcinogenesis in celiac disease remain unknown. Conclusion. Recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with celiac disease should prompt an early evaluation of the small bowel to assure timely diagnosis of carcinoma at an early curable stage. PMID:26290763

  6. Small bowel adenocarcinomas complicating Crohn's disease are associated with dysplasia: a pathological and molecular study.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Svrcek M; Piton G; Cosnes J; Beaugerie L; Vermeire S; Geboes K; Lemoine A; Cervera P; El-Murr N; Dumont S; Scriva A; Lascols O; Ardizzone S; Fociani P; Savoye G; Le Pessot F; Novacek G; Wrba F; Colombel JF; Leteurtre E; Bouhnik Y; Cazals-Hatem D; Cadiot G; Diebold MD; Rahier JF; Delos M; Fléjou JF; Carbonnel F

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). However, there are no guidelines for the screening and early diagnosis of SBA. Colorectal cancer associated with chronic colitis arises from dysplasia. High-risk patients benefit from surveillance colonoscopies aimed to detect dysplasia. The dysplasia-carcinoma sequence remains poorly documented in CD-associated SBA. Moreover, molecular data about SBA complicating CD and associated dysplasia are very limited. We therefore assessed dysplasia and several key molecular markers of carcinogenesis in SBA and dysplasia developed in patients with CD.METHODS: Forty-five SBA complicating CD and 4 specimens with dysplasia without SBA were screened. In SBA, we looked for dysplasia and determined their pathological characteristics (type, grade, distribution). We also stained for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2), p53, ?-catenin, and p16 and looked for KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations.RESULTS: All neoplastic lesions, except 1 lesion, were found in inflamed mucosal areas. Dysplasia was found in 20 of 41 patients with SBA (49%). Dysplasia was flat or raised, low grade or high grade, and adjacent or distant to concomitant SBA. Molecular markers of SBA carcinogenesis complicating CD were similar to those observed in chronic colitis-related colorectal cancer (KRAS, BRAF, p53, MSI), although differences were observed for ?-catenin and p16. No PIK3CA mutations were observed.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is an inflammation-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in at least half of CD-related SBA, similar to what is observed in chronic colitis-related colorectal cancer and may have implications for the prevention and treatment of this cancer.

  7. Occupation and small bowel adenocarcinoma: a European case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Kaerlev, L.; Teglbjaerg, P. S.; Sabroe, S.; Kolstad, H.; Ahrens, W.; Eriksson, M.; Gonzalez, A. L.; Guenel, P.; Hardell, L.; Launoy, G.; Merler, E.; Merletti, F.; Suarez-Varela, M.; Stang, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Because of the rarity of small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA), little is known about the aetiology of this disease. This study aimed to identify occupational clustering of cases SBA as a systematic approach to new hypotheses on the aetiology of this disease.?METHODS—A European multicentre case-control study was conducted in 1995-7, inclusive. Incident cases aged 35-69 years with SBA (n=168) were recruited before acceptance by a pathologist. Altogether 107 cases and 3915 controls were accepted, of which 79 cases, 579 colon cancer controls, and 2070 population controls were interviewed.?RESULTS—The strongest industrial risk factors for SBA taking account of 10 years' exposure lag were dry cleaning, manufacture of workwear, mixed farming (women), and manufacture of motor vehicles (men). A significantly increased risk of SBA (odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI)) was found among men employed as building caretakers, OR 6.7 (1.7 to 26.0) and women employed as housekeepers, OR 2.2 (1.1 to 4.9); general farm labourers, OR 4.7 (1.8 to 12.2); dockers, OR 2.9 (1.0 to 8.2); dry cleaners or launderers, OR 4.1 (1.2 to 13.6); and textile workers (sewers or embroiders), OR 2.6 (1.0 to 6.8). For the last four groups, together with welders OR 2.7 (1.1 to 6.6) (men) an exposure-response pattern was found when calculating the ORs for jobs held 1-5 years and >5 years, with never having held the job as reference. The ORs (95% CIs) for 1-5 years and >5 years were 4.3 (0.4 to 44.0) and 3.5 (0.9 to 13.7), 3.0 (0.3 to 26.2) and 4.3 (0.9 to 21.2), 4.6 (0.4 to 48.1) and 11.0 (2.0 to 60.4), 1.3 (0.2 to 11.0) and 5.8 (2.0 to 17.2), and 2.8 (0.3 to 23.8) and 4.6 (1.3 to 16.6), respectively, for each of these occupations. Among welders, people performing semiautomatic arc welding (MIG/MAG) were identified as a high risk group (OR 5.0 (1.3 to 19.6)). ?CONCLUSIONS—This explorative study suggests an increased occurrence of SBA in certain occupations, which needs further evaluation. ???Keywords: small intestine; adenocarcinoma; occupational risk factors PMID:11024200

  8. Small bowel obstruction caused by secondary tumors.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Efraim; Kashtan, Hanoch; Mavor, Eli; Brenner, Baruch

    2006-07-01

    Small bowel obstruction in an oncology patient is a common and serious medical problem which is associated with diagnostic as well as therapeutic dilemmas. While the condition is most commonly caused by postoperative adhesions and peritoneal carcinomatosis, other causes have been reported [Cormier WJ, Gaffey TA, Welch JM, et al. Linitis plastica caused by metastatic lobular carcinoma of the breast. Mayo Clinical Proceedings 1980;55:747-53; Clavien P-A, Laffer U, Torhos J, et al. Gastrointestinal metastases as first clinical manifestation of the dissemination of a breast cancer. European Journal of Surgical Oncology 1990;16:121-6; Bender GN, Maglinte DD, McLarney JH, et al. Malignant melanoma: patterns of metastasis to the small bowel, reliability of imaging studies, and clinical relevance. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2001;96:2392-400; Gatsoulis N, Roukounakis N, Kafetzis I, et al. Small bowel intussusception due to metastatic malignant melanoma. A case report. Technical Coloproctology 2004;8:141-3; Hung GY, Chiou T, Hsieh YL, et al. Intestinal metastasis causing intussusception in a patient treated for osteosarcoma with history of multiple metastases: a case report. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology 2001;31(4):165-7; Chen TF, Eardley I, Doyle PT, Bullock KN. Rectal obstruction secondary to carcinoma of the prostate treated by transanal resection of the prostate. British Journal of Urology 1992;70(6):643-7; Kamal HS, Farah RE, Hamzi HA, et al. Unusual presentation of rectal adenocarcinoma. Roman Journal of Gastroenterology 2003;12(1):47-50; Hofflander R, Beckes D, Kapre S, et al. A case of jejunal intussusception with gastrointestinal bleeding caused by metastatic testicular germ cell cancer. Digestive Surgery 1999;16(5):439-40]. One of these, reported thus far in only very few patients, is obstruction caused by secondary tumors, i.e. metastases from other organs to the small bowel wall. As cancer patients live longer with improved therapy, physicians are more likely to cope with rare phenomena of neoplasms, such as small bowel obstruction caused by secondary tumors. We hereby present a review of the relevant medical literature. The goal of this article is to define current knowledge on this phenomenon, with emphasis on its epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and to increase the awareness of the clinician treating cancer patients of such possibility. PMID:16905310

  9. Clinical applications of small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Uri; Seidman, Ernest G

    2013-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy has revolutionized our ability to visualize the entire small bowel mucosa. This modality is established as a valuable tool for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn’s disease, small bowel tumors, and other conditions involving the small bowel mucosa. This review includes an overview of the current and potential future clinical applications of small bowel video endoscopy. PMID:23983481

  10. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  11. Small bowel intussusception in adults.

    PubMed

    Potts, J; Al Samaraee, A; El-Hakeem, A

    2014-01-01

    Intussusception is the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent distal segment. This rare form of bowel obstruction occurs infrequently in adults. We report a case of small bowel intussusception in an adult male patient. We have also performed a literature review of this rare condition. PMID:24417823

  12. Sequestrated tubular duplications of small bowel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Ravi; Giri, Vijaya

    2011-06-01

    Duplications of bowel are well-known gastrointestinal tract anomalies. However, sequestrated duplications are very uncommon. Two sequestrated tubular duplications of the small bowel, separate from the ileum with autonomous blood supply and classic histologic features of small bowel are presented. Two sequestrated duplications in the same child are quite rare and have not been previously reported. PMID:21683191

  13. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-09-28

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  14. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  15. X-ray-induced thinning of 3 He mixture films

    E-print Network

    Pershan, Peter S.

    X-ray-induced thinning of 3 He and 3 HeÕ4 He mixture films Konstantin Penanen,* Masafumi Fukuto, Massachusetts 02138 Received 22 February 2000 Films of isotopic mixtures of helium have been studied using x in the thickness of 4 He films above the superfluid transition as well as films of pure 3 He and 3 He/4 He mixtures

  16. Bellyboard device reduces small bowel displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelrud, K.; Mehta, M.; Shanahan, T.; Utrie, P.; Gehring, M. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability to cure several pelvic malignancies is hampered by the inability to deliver doses greater than 45 to 50 Gy, beyond which radiation enteritis becomes dose-limiting. The design and fabrication of a device that allows exclusion of small bowel from the pelvis during radiation therapy are described in this study. A prospective dose-volume analysis conducted on 30 patients reveals a 66 percent reduction in the volume of small bowel within the radiation portals.

  17. Advances in Pediatric Small Bowel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tom K

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances for visualizing the small bowel have significantly grown over the past few decades. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has come to the forefront of these innovations, and has been found to be safe and effective in children with small bowel ailments. The expanding body of research into balloon-assisted enteroscopy will continue to refine the current knowledge base of this technique, along with a growing assessment of the long-term benefits of such interventions. PMID:26616902

  18. Small-bowel resection for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheneber, Ibrahim F.; Meterissian, Sarkis H.; Loutfi, Antoine; Watters, A. Kevin; Shibata, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine whether complete resection of small-bowel metastases from melanoma improves patient survival. Design A computer-aided chart review. Setting Hospitals associated with McGill University. Patients Twenty patients (17 men, 3 women), identified from 1524 patients with melanoma, who underwent surgery to the small bowel for metastases. Patient age and clinical presentation, tumour site and stage were recorded. Intervention Exploratory laparotomy with complete or partial resection of involved small bowel. Main Outcome Measures Operative morbidity, mortality and length of survival related to the extent of small-bowel resection. Results Eleven patients had complete resection, 8 patients had partial resection and 1 patient had a palliative bypass only. Long-term survival (ranging from 2 to 10 years) was 36% in those who had complete resection and 0% in those who had partial resection; operative morbidity and mortality were 20% and 15% respectively. Conclusion Complete resection of small-bowel metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma can result in long-term survival. PMID:8640618

  19. X-ray-induced phase transformation in congruent and vapor-transport-equilibrated lithium tantalate

    E-print Network

    Byer, Robert L.

    X-ray-induced phase transformation in congruent and vapor-transport-equilibrated lithium tantalate an effect of a partially reversible x-ray-induced increase of diffuse x-ray scattering in both congruent been attributed to x-ray-induced decay of the ferroelectric phase at room temperature. The x-ray

  20. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-09-28

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  1. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  2. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Intestinal Xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Herrera, L. E.; Arias, F.; Rodríguez-Urrego, P. A.; Palau-Lázaro, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Vast majority of bowel obstruction is due to postoperative adhesions, malignancy, intestinal inflammatory disease, and hernias; however, knowledge of other uncommon causes is critical to establish a prompt treatment and decrease mortality. Xanthomatosis is produced by accumulation of cholesterol-rich foamy macrophages. Intestinal xanthomatosis is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that may cause small bowel obstruction and several cases have been reported in the English literature as obstruction in the jejunum. We report a case of small intestinal xanthomatosis occurring in a 51-year-old female who presented with one day of copious vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain. Radiologic images revealed jejunal loop thickening and inflammatory changes suggestive of foreign body obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy found two strictures at the jejunum, and a pathologic examination confirmed a segmental small bowel xanthomatosis. This case illustrates that obstruction even without predisposing factors such as hyperlipidemia or lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26167322

  3. Double-balloon enteroscopy in small bowel tumors: A Chinese single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Guo; Shan, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Hong; Li, Lin; Yue, Min; Xiang, Zun; Cheng, Ying; Wu, Chen-Jiao; Fang, Ying; Chen, Li-Hua

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of small bowel tumors detected by double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) and to evaluate the diagnostic value of DBE in tumors. METHODS: Four hundred and forty consecutive DBE examinations were performed in 400 patients (250 males and 150 females, mean age 46.9 ± 16.3 years, range 14-86 years) between January 2007 and April 2012. Of these, 252 patients underwent the antegrade approach, and 188 patients underwent the retrograde approach. All the patients enrolled in our study were suspected of having small bowel diseases with a negative etiological diagnosis following other routine examinations, such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiography tests. Data on tumors, such as clinical information, endoscopic findings and operation results, were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Small bowel tumors were diagnosed in 78 patients, of whom 67 were diagnosed using DBE, resulting in a diagnostic yield of 16.8% (67/400); the other 11 patients had negative DBE findings and were diagnosed through surgery or capsule endoscopy. Adenocarcinoma (29.5%, 23/78), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (24.4%, 19/78) and lymphoma (15.4%, 12/78) were the most common tumors. Among the 78 tumors, 60.3% (47/78) were located in the jejunum, and the overall number of malignant tumors was 74.4% (58/78). DBE examinations were frequently performed in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (47.4%) and abdominal pain (24.4%). The positive detection rate for DBE in the 78 patients with small bowel tumors was 85.9% (67/78), which was higher than that of a computed tomography scan (72.9%, 51/70). Based on the operation results, the accuracy rates of DBE for locating small bowel neoplasms, such as adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and lymphoma, were 94.4%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The positive biopsy rates for adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were 71.4% and 60%, respectively. CONCLUSION: DBE is a useful diagnostic tool with high clinical practice value and should be considered the gold standard for the investigation of small bowel tumors. PMID:23801870

  4. Surgical Treatment of Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Farley, Heather A; Pommier, Rodney F

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the small bowel are rare, slow-growing malignancies that commonly metastasize to nodes at the root of the mesentery and the liver. Liver metastases are associated with carcinoid syndrome. Mesenteric nodal masses can cause bowel obstruction, intestinal angina, or variceal hemorrhage. Patients die of liver failure or bowel obstruction. Primary resection is associated with improved survival rates. Selected patients may benefit from liver debulking operations. Liver resection has excellent survival rates even in the event of an incomplete resection, as well as improvement in hormonal symptoms. Radiofrequency ablation can help to preserve hepatic parenchyma during resection. PMID:26614368

  5. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  6. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  7. Usefulness of Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Small Bowel Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Minoru; Manabe, Noriaki; Honda, Keisuke; Murao, Takahisa; Osawa, Motoyasu; Kawai, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takashi; Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; Hata, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasonography is a standard, noninvasive modality used to evaluate patients with gastrointestinal diseases. This study assessed the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of small bowel tumors. This study enrolled 558 consecutive patients (295 males, 263 females; mean age 71.1 years) who underwent ultrasonography before capsule endoscopy and/or balloon-assisted endoscopy. Ultrasonographic detection of small bowel tumors was compared with detection by capsule endoscopy and/or balloon-assisted endoscopy. In addition, factors affecting small bowel tumor detection by ultrasonography and clinical characteristics of patients with small bowel tumors undetected by ultrasonography were evaluated. Ninety-seven tumors (52 benign, 45 malignant) detected by capsule endoscopy and/or balloon-assisted endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in the detection of small bowel tumors were 50.5% (47/93) and 100% (465/465), respectively. If we restricted patients to those with a tumor >20?mm in size, its detection ratio would become higher (91.7%): the ratio of submucosal tumor >20?mm in size was 85.7% (6/7) and that of partial and circumferential ulcerative tumors >20?mm in size was 96.9% (31/32), respectively. Small bowel tumors detected by ultrasonography (mean 33.2?mm) were significantly larger than those undetected by ultrasonography (mean 8.7?mm). The percentage of small bowel tumors located in the ileum detected by ultrasonography (70.6%) was significantly higher than those undetected by ultrasonography (29.4%). Of the 46 small bowel tumors undetected by ultrasonography, 42 (91.3%) were benign tumors with good clinical prognosis. Ultrasonography is a useful modality for detecting larger small bowel tumors and ulcerative lesions. Ultrasonography should be considered a first-line modality for patients suspected of having small bowel tumors, because most small bowel tumors undetected by ultrasonography were benign tumors with good clinical prognosis. PMID:26448000

  8. Small bowel responses to enteral honey and glutamine administration following massive small bowel resection in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Eyarefe, O D; Emikpe, B O; Arowolo, O A

    2008-12-01

    The trophic effects of honey and glutamine in the healing and adaptation of the small bowel following intestinal resection were studied in some Nigerian non-descript breeds of rabbits. Nine rabbits of mixed sexes with mean body weight of 1.45 +/- 0.55 kg were used. They were randomised into three treatment groups following 50% small bowel resection. Group A rabbits were placed on oral honey treatment, Group B on oral glutamine and group C on normal saline (control). All groups exhibited signs of small bowel adaptation (glutamine(B) honey (A) control (C) at the end of the experiment (4 weeks) with oral glutamine showing the best overall effects on intestinal mucosal growth and adaptation evidenced by significant increase (P<0.05) in residual bowel length (37.3%), villi width (20.0%), crypt depth (113.3%) and a non significant increase in villus height (33.3%) and cellular mass (10.2%). Honey showed a better effect than control with a significant increase (P<0.05) in villi width (18.2%), crypts depth (66.7%) and cellular mass (33.9%) and a non significant increase in gross residual bowel length (24.6%), and villus height (30.5%). Our result shows that honey and glutamine have trophic effects on bowel mucosa healing and hyperplasia and have potential therapeutic effects on massive bowel resection in humans. PMID:19301706

  9. Advances in radiologic evaluation of small bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Algin, Oktay; Evrimler, Sehnaz; Arslan, Halil

    2013-01-01

    There are various methods that could be used for small bowel imaging. Although conventional enteroclysis has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of most of the small bowel diseases, it cannot provide any direct information about the mural-extramural diseases and the other abdominal structures. Besides, enteroclysis-based techniques have risk of additional radiation exposure, and they are poorly tolerated because placement of nasojejunal tube is required. New enterographic methods have been developed, and the number of enterographic techniques increased significantly in the recent years to overcome those limitations. The other modalities including ultrasound, small bowel follow-through, or capsule-endoscopy are often used as complementary methods in evaluation of the small bowel diseases. In this review, technique and clinic details, advantages, and disadvantages of the radiologic techniques that are used in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases, and the imaging findings of common pathologic conditions were discussed in the light of current literature. PMID:24270107

  10. Small bowel volvulus with jejunal diverticulum: Primary or secondary?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Guan, Wen-Xian; Cao, Ke; Wang, Hao; Du, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus, which is torsion of the small bowel and its mesentery, is a medical emergency, and is categorized as primary or secondary type. Primary type often occurs without any apparent intrinsic anatomical anomalies, while the secondary type is common clinically and could be caused by numerous factors including postoperative adhesions, intestinal diverticulum, and/or tumors. Here, we report a rare case of a 60-year-old man diagnosed with small bowel volvulus using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography. Further discovery by laparotomy showed one jejunal diverticulum, longer corresponding mesentery with a narrower insertion, and a lack of mesenteric fat. This case report includes several etiological factors of small bowel volvulus, and we discuss the possible cause of small bowel volvulus in this patient. We also highlight the importance of MDCT angiography in the diagnosis of volvulus and share our experience in treating this disease. PMID:26420976

  11. ANALYSIS OF X-RAY INDUCED HPRT MUTATIONS IN CHO CELLS: INSERTION AND DELETIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular alterations were examined in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of 41 independent X-ray-induced thioguanine-resistant (TGR) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones. Rapid screening of the clones by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fo...

  12. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended for patients with initial negative small bowel evaluations and ongoing overt or occult bleeding. PMID:26303132

  13. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Small Bowel and Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siva P; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has largely supplanted other available radiologic modalities in the evaluation of a wide variety of different vascular and inflammatory abnormalities of the small bowel, with computed tomography angiography (CTA) playing a major role in the diagnostic efficacy of MDCT for these diseases. Improvements in CTA imaging have proved particularly valuable in the evaluation of small bowel vascular and inflammatory disorders, diagnoses in which arterial phase images might be able to offer greater information than standard venous phase imaging. This article details the MDCT imaging findings of several small bowel vascular and inflammatory disorders. PMID:26654393

  14. Small bowel carcinoid: a rare cause of bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Gabriel; Prabhu, Raghunath; Ravi, Bharadwaj

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours though commonly affect the appendix, are a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, causing a diagnostic dilemma. We presented a 70-year-old man with small bowel obstruction, not responding to conservative management, which required an emergency laparotomy and was found to have a mass encasing the mid-jejunal loops and mesentery that was resected and reported to be a carcinoid tumour. PMID:24068379

  15. Kinetic modeling of the X-ray-induced damage to a metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Katherine M; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that biological samples undergo X-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring X-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room-temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage-sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of X-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC Mn(III) and Mn(IV) ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of X-ray-induced damage at a variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of X-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of dose deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and X-ray free electron laser sources. PMID:23815809

  16. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  17. CADAVERIC SMALL BOWEL AND SMALL BOWEL–LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN HUMANS1,2

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Reyes, Jorge; Fung, John J.; Casavilla, Adrian; Nakamura, Kenjiro; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Jain, Ashok; Murase, Noriko; Iwaki, Yuichi; Demetris, Anthony J.; Van Thiel, David; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Five patients had complete cadaveric small bowel transplants under FK506 immunosuppression, one as an isolated graft and the other 4 in continuity with a liver. Three were children and two were adults. The five patients are living 2–13 months posttransplantation with complete alimentation by the intestine. The typical postoperative course was stormy, with sluggish resumption of gastrointestinal function. The patient with small intestinal transplantation alone had the most difficult course of the five, including two severe rejections, bacterial and fungal translocation with bacteremia, renal failure with the rejections, and permanent consignment to renal dialysis. The first four patients (studies on the fifth were incomplete) had replacement of the lymphoreticular cells in the graft lamina propria by their own lymphoreticular cells. Although the surgical and aftercare of these patients was difficult, the eventual uniform success suggests that intestinal transplantation has moved toward becoming a practical clinical service. PMID:1738932

  18. Capsule endoscopy in the small bowel Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Argüelles-Arias, Federico; Rodríguez-Oballe, Juan; Duarte-Chang, Calixto; Castro-Laria, Luisa; García-Montes, Josefa María; Caunedo-Álvarez, Angel; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    CD is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated to mucosal and transmural inflammation of the bowel wall. It is well known that CD can affect the entire gastrointestinal. Therefore, ileocolonoscopy and biopsies of the terminal ileum as well as of each colonic segment to look for microscopic evidence of CD are the first-line procedures to establish the diagnosis. However, it has been observed that up to 30% of the patients have only small bowel involvement. Evaluation of the small bowel has been made with radiological procedures, barium radiography, and abdominal computed tomography or by ileocolonoscopy or enteroscopy, but they have many recognized limitations. CE is undoubtedly a very useful diagnostic tool proposed to observe small-bowel lesions undetectable by conventional endoscopy or radiologic studies. We review different studies that have been published reporting the use of CE in suspected and evaluation of the extension or the recurrence in CD and also its use in pediatric population and its complications. PMID:24741374

  19. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted.

  20. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800052 X-Ray Induced Synthesis of 8H Diamond**

    E-print Network

    Downs, Robert T.

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800052 X-Ray Induced Synthesis of 8H Diamond** By Zhongwu Wang,* Yusheng Zhao. Consequently, there has been a long-standing interest in exploring the possible diamond polytypes. Since the hexagonal form (2H diamond or lonsdaleite) was found in meteorites,[1] evidence for other non

  1. Small Bowel Obstruction Masquerading as Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Manan; Amor, Martin Miguel; Verma, Isha; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Paladugu, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    ST segment elevation on EKG remains among the most important presentations of acute myocardial infarction. Due to the urgency of intervention for this finding, other clinical scenarios causing ST elevations on EKG may sometimes go unaddressed and can lead to fatal complications. We present a case of an 86-year-old male presenting with small bowel obstruction leading to EKG findings of ST segment elevation in the absence of critical coronary obstruction. The EKG finding resolved after the improvement of small bowel obstruction reflecting the reversible cause of the changes.

  2. Delayed Fatal Hemorrhage Due to Small Bowel Mesenteric Laceration.

    PubMed

    Shkrum, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of small bowel and its mesentery due to blunt trauma are uncommon. Of deaths due to delayed intra-abdominal hemorrhage, mesenteric laceration is a rare cause of hemoperitoneum.A case of a 33-year-old man, who was hospitalized with chest and retroperitoneal trauma after a forklift rollover, is presented. He died 10 days after the incident. At autopsy, he had a massive hemoperitoneum due to a small bowel mesenteric laceration, which was not diagnosed during his clinical course. Microscopic examination of the hematoma around the laceration revealed healing and ruptured pseudoaneurysms in the distal branches of the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:26204431

  3. Enteroscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Tharian, Benjamin; Caddy, Grant; Tham, Tony Ck

    2013-10-16

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract resulting in inflammation, stricturing and fistulae secondary to transmural inflammation. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abnormal laboratory parameters, characteristic radiologic and endoscopic changes within the gastrointestinal tract and most importantly a supportive histology. The article is intended mainly for the general gastroenterologist and for other interested physicians. Management of small bowel CD has been suboptimal and limited due to the inaccessibility of the small bowel. Enteroscopy has had a significant renaissance recently, thereby extending the reach of the endoscopist, aiding diagnosis and enabling therapeutic interventions in the small bowel. Radiologic imaging is used as the first line modality to visualise the small bowel. If the clinical suspicion is high, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is used to rule out superficial and early disease, despite the above investigations being normal. This is followed by push enteroscopy or device assisted enteroscopy (DAE) as is appropriate. This approach has been found to be the most cost effective and least invasive. DAE includes balloon-assisted enteroscopy, [double balloon enteroscopy (DBE), single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) and more recently spiral enteroscopy (SE)]. This review is not going to cover the various other indications of enteroscopy, radiological small bowel investigations nor WCE and limited only to enteroscopy in small bowel Crohn's. These excluded topics already have comprehensive reviews. Evidence available from randomized controlled trials comparing the various modalities is limited and at best regarded as Grade C or D (based on expert opinion). The evidence suggests that all three DAE modalities have comparable insertion depths, diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies and complication rates, though most favour DBE due to higher rates of total enteroscopy. SE is quicker than DBE, but lower complete enteroscopy rates. SBE has quicker procedural times and is evolving but the least available DAE today. Larger prospective randomised controlled trial's in the future could help us understand some unanswered areas including the role of BAE in small bowel screening and comparative studies between the main types of enteroscopy in small bowel CD. PMID:24147191

  4. Enteroscopy in small bowel Crohn’s disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tharian, Benjamin; Caddy, Grant; Tham, Tony CK

    2013-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract resulting in inflammation, stricturing and fistulae secondary to transmural inflammation. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abnormal laboratory parameters, characteristic radiologic and endoscopic changes within the gastrointestinal tract and most importantly a supportive histology. The article is intended mainly for the general gastroenterologist and for other interested physicians. Management of small bowel CD has been suboptimal and limited due to the inaccessibility of the small bowel. Enteroscopy has had a significant renaissance recently, thereby extending the reach of the endoscopist, aiding diagnosis and enabling therapeutic interventions in the small bowel. Radiologic imaging is used as the first line modality to visualise the small bowel. If the clinical suspicion is high, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is used to rule out superficial and early disease, despite the above investigations being normal. This is followed by push enteroscopy or device assisted enteroscopy (DAE) as is appropriate. This approach has been found to be the most cost effective and least invasive. DAE includes balloon-assisted enteroscopy, [double balloon enteroscopy (DBE), single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) and more recently spiral enteroscopy (SE)]. This review is not going to cover the various other indications of enteroscopy, radiological small bowel investigations nor WCE and limited only to enteroscopy in small bowel Crohn’s. These excluded topics already have comprehensive reviews. Evidence available from randomized controlled trials comparing the various modalities is limited and at best regarded as Grade C or D (based on expert opinion). The evidence suggests that all three DAE modalities have comparable insertion depths, diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies and complication rates, though most favour DBE due to higher rates of total enteroscopy. SE is quicker than DBE, but lower complete enteroscopy rates. SBE has quicker procedural times and is evolving but the least available DAE today. Larger prospective randomised controlled trial’s in the future could help us understand some unanswered areas including the role of BAE in small bowel screening and comparative studies between the main types of enteroscopy in small bowel CD. PMID:24147191

  5. Orthotopic neobladder perforation: an unusual presentation of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jonathan D; Cast, James E I; Thomas, Philip J; Simms, Matthew S

    2013-01-01

    Orthotopic bladder reconstruction is becoming increasingly popular in patients who have undergone radical cystectomy. One of the rare complications is spontaneous rupture, which presents with various symptoms, but in particular, abdominal pain. We report a case of orthotopic bladder perforation in a patient who presented with the symptoms and signs of small bowel obstruction. PMID:24964454

  6. Orthotopic neobladder perforation: an unusual presentation of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Jonathan D.; Cast, James E.I.; Thomas, Philip J.; Simms, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Orthotopic bladder reconstruction is becoming increasingly popular in patients who have undergone radical cystectomy. One of the rare complications is spontaneous rupture, which presents with various symptoms, but in particular, abdominal pain. We report a case of orthotopic bladder perforation in a patient who presented with the symptoms and signs of small bowel obstruction. PMID:24964454

  7. Adult ileocolic intussusception presenting as small bowel metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bastawrous, Sarah; McKeown, Elizabeth; Bastawrous, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of small bowel intussusception that occurred in a young adult with unsuspected metastatic melanoma, diagnosed by imaging, laparotomy and histological examination. We further discuss the clinical presentation, imaging and surgical findings, and provide a brief discussion of adult intussusception.

  8. Ultraintense X-Ray Induced Ionization, Dissociation, and Frustrated Absorption in Molecular Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hoener, M.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B.; Berrah, N.; Kornilov, O.; Gessner, O.; Pratt, S. T.; Kanter, E. P.; Guehr, M.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Cryan, J.; Glownia, M.; McFarland, B.; Petrovic, V.; Blaga, C.; DiMauro, L.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Coffee, R.; Messerschmidt, M.

    2010-06-25

    Sequential multiple photoionization of the prototypical molecule N{sub 2} is studied with femtosecond time resolution using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A detailed picture of intense x-ray induced ionization and dissociation dynamics is revealed, including a molecular mechanism of frustrated absorption that suppresses the formation of high charge states at short pulse durations. The inverse scaling of the average target charge state with x-ray peak brightness has possible implications for single-pulse imaging applications.

  9. Ultraintense x-ray induced ionization, dissociation and frustrated absorption in molecular nitrogen.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoener, M.; Fang, L.; Kornilov, O.; Gessner, O.; Pratt, S. T.; Guhr, M.; Kanter, E. P.; Blaga, C.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Buth, C.; Chen, M.; Coffee, R.; Cryan, J.; DiMauro, L.; Glownia, M.; Hosler, E.; Kukk, E.; Leone, S. R.; McFarland, B.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, B.; Petrovic, V.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Western Michigan Univ.; LBNL; Ohio State Univ.; Louisiana State Univ.; LLNL; Univ. of Turku; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL; LCLS

    2010-06-23

    Sequential multiple photoionization of the prototypical molecule N2 is studied with femtosecond time resolution using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A detailed picture of intense x-ray induced ionization and dissociation dynamics is revealed, including a molecular mechanism of frustrated absorption that suppresses the formation of high charge states at short pulse durations. The inverse scaling of the average target charge state with x-ray peak brightness has possible implications for single-pulse imaging applications.

  10. Abdominal cocoon with small bowel obstruction: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Chauhan, Dinesh; Dalal, Usha; Khurana, Ujjawal

    2012-04-01

    Abdominal cocoon is a rare condition that results in an intestinal obstruction due to total or partial encapsulation of the small bowel by a fibrocollagenous membrane. Treatment is surgical resection of the membrane and free the bowel. Preoperative diagnosis is possible with combination of sonography and CT scan. We report two cases where the diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was suggested preoperatively based on the sonography and CT scan of abdomen. PMID:21643736

  11. Replacement of donor lymphoid tissue in small-bowel transplants

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Yuichi; Starzl, Thomas E.; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Taniwaki, Satoshi; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Tzakis, Andreas; Fung, John; Todo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    The presence of recipient lymphocytes in grafts is thought to equate with rejection. Thus, we wished to follow the fate of lymphocytes after transplant of the small bowel. Three complete small-bowel transplants, two with the liver from the same donor also transplanted, were done successfully. Patients were immunosuppressed with FK 506. 5 to 11% of lymphocytes in the recipients’ peripheral blood were of donor origin during the early postoperative period when there were no clinical signs of graft-versus-host disease. However, donor cells were no longer detectable after 12 to 54 days. Serial biopsy specimens of the grafted small bowel showed progressive replacement of lymphocytes in the lamina propria by those of the recipient’s HLA phenotype. Lymphoid repopulation was complete after 10 to 12 weeks but the epithelial cells of the intestine remained those of the donor. The patients are on enteral alimentation after 5, 6, and 8 months with histopathologically normal or nearly normal intestines. Re-examination of assumptions about the rejection of intestinal grafts and strategies for its prevention are required following these observations. PMID:1707470

  12. Evaluation of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation

    PubMed Central

    Li, You-Sheng; Li, Jie-Shou; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yun-Zhao; Li, Nan-Yun; Liu, Fang-Nan

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the effect of various solutions for small bowel graft preservation in pigs under hypothermic storage. METHODS: The swine segmental small bowel graft was autotransplanted after it was preserved with lactated Ringer¡äs (LR), Euro-Collins (EC), hyperosmolarity citrate adenine (HC-A) and WMO-1 solu-tions for 10, 18 and 24 h, respectively. The recipient survival rate, morphological structure, graft mucosal energy substances and Na+ K+ ATPase activity were studied, and graft absorption was estimated with D-xylose absorption test. RESULTS: The morphological study of the grafts preserved with LR or HC-A solution for 10 hours or with EC and WMO-1 solution for 18 h was nor-mal 6 d after operation. Mucosal ATP, total adenine nucleotides (TAN) contents and Na+-K+AT-Pase activity of the graft preserved with EC or WMO solution were higher than that of the graft preserved with LR or HC-A solution. Serum level of D-xylose was higher in EC and WMO-1 groups than in LR and HC-A groups when the graft was preserved for 24 h. CONCLUSIONS: EC and WMO-1 solutions can preserve the swine small bowel up to 18 h, which are superior to LR and HC-A solutions. PMID:11819258

  13. Multivisceral and Small Bowel Transplantation at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Mehdi, S. H.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A.; Bahreini, A.; Mansoorian, M. R.; Malekhosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multivisceral transplantations were initially done in animal models to understand the immunological effects. Later on, in human beings, it has been considered a salvage procedure for unresectable complex abdominal malignancies. With advancement in surgical techniques, availability of better immunosuppressive drugs, and development of better post-operative management protocols, outcomes have been improved after these complex surgical procedures. Objective: To analyze and report results of multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplantations done at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center, Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Medical records of all patients who underwent multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplants were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were 18 patients. The most common indications for the procedure in our series were unresectable carcinoma of pancreas followed by short bowel syndrome. 10 patients were alive after a median follow-up of 8.7 (range: 3–32) months. The remaining 8 patients died post-operatively, mostly from septicemia. Conclusion: Multivisceral and small bowel transplantations are promising treatments for complex abdominal pathologies. PMID:25013680

  14. [Peritoneal adhesions as cause of small bowel obstruction].

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Andrzej; Po?niczek, Marek; Kulawik, Jan; Krzywo?, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Due to increasing number of people treated surgically there is a rising a problem of peritoneal adhesions. They can cause pain, infertility of young women, technical problems during successive operations and--last but not least--adhesional bowel obstructions. Patients operated on due to mechanical small bowel obstruction in the 2nd Department of Surgery from 1st January 1987 to 30th June 2002 were included in the study. Diagnosis was set using clinical examination and imaging techniques such as X-ray and ultrasound and was confirmed during the operation. Strangulated hernia followed by peritoneal adhesions proved to be the most common causes of small bowel obstruction. Overall mortality rate in the group of adhesion-related obstructions reached 9.6%. In the group of 53 (39%) patients requiring small bowel resection mortality rate was 15.1%, and in the remaining patients, requiring only adhesiolysis--6.0%. There was markedly higher (18.4%) mortality rate noticed in the group of people older than 69 years as compared to younger patients (6.1%). More than twofold decrease in postoperative mortality rate observed throughout 15 years should be attributed to improvement of in-hospital care. PMID:14679690

  15. Recurrent portal hypertension after composite liver/small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Thomas M; Florman, Sander; Gondolesi, Gabriel; Leleiko, Neal S; Mitty, Harold A; Tschernia, Allan; Kaufman, Stuart S

    2002-07-01

    Late technical complications of composite liver/small bowel transplantation procedures are often complex and have not been well defined. Here we describe the unusual presentation and management of two cases of recurrent thrombocytopenia due to hypersplenism resulting from portacaval shunt stenosis. Both patients presented with portal hypertension late after composite liver/small bowel transplantation. One patient presented with recurrent bouts of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and was ultimately found to have a stenosis of her native portacaval shunt. After unsuccessful balloon dilatation of the anastomosis, a successful side-to-side distal splenorenal shunt was performed. The second patient presented with severe thrombocytopenia, the etiology of which was determined to be a short segment occlusion of the inferior vena cava between the native portacaval shunt and the piggyback outflow anastomosis of the liver graft. Total caval occlusion prevented balloon dilatation; the patient was relisted for transplantation but died of chronic rejection four months later. Recurrent portal hypertension is challenging in patients who have had combined liver/small bowel transplantation. Surgeons performing intestinal transplantation need to be increasingly aware of these possible late complications. PMID:12089720

  16. Combined small bowel and reduced auxiliary liver transplantation: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Liu, Dun-Gui; Ye, Qi-Fa; Sha, Bo; Zhen, Fan-Jun; Guo, Hui; Xia, Sui-Sheng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To present a case of combined small bowel and reduced auxiliary liver transplantation. METHODS: A 55-year-old patient with short bowel syndrome and TPN-related liver dysfunction received small bowel transplantation combined with a reduced auxiliary liver graft. A liver was added to restore the patient's liver function and to protect the intestinal allograft from rejection. His own liver was not removed. RESULTS: Without donor pretreatment and by conventional immunosuppresive therapy following transplantation, the patient experienced had only one episode of mild intestinal rejection, which was easily reversed by treatment with Methylprednisolone. No liver rejection occurred. Unfortunately, the patient died of heart and lung failure 30 d after transplantation, despite successful graft replacement. Histopathologic examination of specimens after death demonstrated normal structure in both intestinal and liver grafts. CONCLUSION: The auxiliary liver graft might play a role in preventing intestinal allograft rejection. However, the observation period in this case is short. Further study is needed to determine the risks, effect on the protecting the small-bowel from rejection, and feasibility of general application of this procedure. PMID:12378650

  17. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, S. E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Beye, M. E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M.; Ochmann, M.; Huse, N.; Ross, M.; Khalil, M.; Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Föhlisch, A.

    2015-02-09

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross correlation response.

  18. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future. PMID:25901264

  19. X-ray-Induced Shortwave Infrared Biomedical Imaging Using Rare-Earth Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Shortwave infrared (SWIR or NIR-II) light provides significant advantages for imaging biological structures due to reduced autofluorescence and photon scattering. Here, we report on the development of rare-earth nanoprobes that exhibit SWIR luminescence following X-ray irradiation. We demonstrate the ability of X-ray-induced SWIR luminescence (X-IR) to monitor biodistribution and map lymphatic drainage. Our results indicate X-IR imaging is a promising new modality for preclinical applications and has potential for dual-modality molecular disease imaging. PMID:25485705

  20. Influence of caffeine on X-ray-induced killing and mutation in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, S.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-02-01

    Effects produced by caffeine on X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells depended on the growth conditions of the cells. For exponentially growing cells, nontoxic concentrations of caffeine decreased the shoulder width from the survival curve, but the slope remained unchanged. The yield of mutants under the same conditions also remained unaffected. In case of density-inhibited cells, delaying trypsinization for 24 h after X irradiation increased the survival and decreased the yield of mutants. The presence of caffeine during this incubation period inhibited such recovery and significantly increased the yield of X-ray-induced mutants.

  1. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray--induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosomes aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells.

  2. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray-induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosome aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells.

  3. Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma with Small Bowel Metastasis Causing Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bustinza-Linares, Ernesto; Socola, Francisco; Ernani, Vinicius; Miller, Shelly A.; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female with history of chest wall extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) presented to the emergency department complaining of two weeks of lightheadedness and fatigue. Laboratories showed hemoglobin of 7.6?g/dL and a positive hemoccult test. Upper and lower endoscopies were unremarkable, and the patient was discharged after blood transfusion. The next day she returned to the ED with left-sided weakness and perioral numbness. Brain CT scan revealed a 6?cm right frontal mass with midline shift and edema that required urgent craniotomy with resection of a hemorrhagic tumor. The patient continued dropping her hemoglobin, and CT scans showed a rounded 3?cm small bowel mass in the mid ileum. Repeat upper endoscopy revealed a 2 × 2?cm ulcerated mass in the fourth portion of the duodenum. The patient was taken to the operating room and was found to have two lesions; one in the distal duodenum and a second one in the mid ileum causing small bowel intussusception. Pathology was consistent with metastatic EMC grade 2/3, involving the bowel and mesenteric fat. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma with unique features that distinguishes, it from other sarcomas. It has been often described as a low-grade sarcoma although there are certain characteristics like high mitotic activity and the presence of focal regions of Ki67 staining above 25% that correlate with aggressive behavior of the tumor. This is the first case of EMC metastatic to the small bowel to be reported to the medical community. PMID:23213584

  4. Characterization of X-ray-induced immunostaining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Masahiko; Sasaki, Takehito; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    1996-01-01

    The repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage related to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts by an indirect immunofluorescence method. PCNA staining induced by X rays was lost after DNase I treatment but not after RNase treatment. The staining was not induced when ATP was depleted or the temperature was lowered to 0{degrees}C during the X irradiation. When cells were incubated at 37{degrees}C after X irradiation, PCNA staining diminished gradually and was almost entirely absent 12-15 h later. On the other hand, PCNA staining persisted during aphidicolin treatment even 20 h after X irradiation. Induction of PCNA staining was not affected by the aphidicolin treatment. Cycloheximide treatment did not affect induction of the staining either, but did inhibit the disappearance of the staining. There was no difference in the staining pattern and time course of PCNA staining after X irradiation between normal and xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) cells. These results imply that PCNA-dependent, aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases may be involved in repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage in vivo, but the repair initiation step could be different from that of nucleotide excision repair initiated by XP proteins. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Digital ambulatory monitoring of small-bowel motility.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, G; Iwarzon, M; Stål, P; Seensalu, R

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes a new technique for ambulatory long-term monitoring of small-bowel motility. Intraluminal pressure was measured with a silicon catheter with two strain-gauge transducers spaced 15 cm apart. Pressure data were stored in a portable memory unit. Initial studies showed that a recording frequency of 2 Hz was sufficient for obtaining reliable motility measurements. Twelve-hour recordings of motility in the upper jejunum were done in 12 healthy volunteers. After a 1964-kJ meal the median duration of fed-state motility was 4.6 h (3.4-5.3 h, interquartile range). The activity front of the migrating motor complex propagated with a velocity of 2.7-5.3 cm/min, and the median cycle length was 77 (40-103) min. The frequency of contractions in the activity front was 11.4 (10.9-11.6)/min at the proximal transducer. This new technique enables small-bowel motility to be monitored over longer periods of time and with much less inconvenience to the patient than previously used methods. PMID:2320941

  6. Vanek’s tumor of the small bowel in adults

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs), or Vanek’s tumor, are one of the least common benign small bowel tumors. IFP affects both sexes and all age groups, with a peak of incidence in the fifth and seventh decades. They can be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract but most commonly in the gastric antrum or ileum. The underlying cause of IFPs is still unknown. Genetic study of IFP showed mutations in platelet derived growth factor alpha in some cases. At the time of diagnosis most IFPs have a diameter of 3 to 4 cm. The lesions have always been recorded as solitary polyps. Symptoms depend on the location and the size of the lesion, including abdominal pain, vomiting, altered small bowel movements, gastrointestinal bleeding and loss of weight. IFPs arising below the Treitz ligament can present with an acute abdomen, usually due to intussusceptions. Abdominal computed tomography is currently considered the most sensitive radiological method to show the polyp or to confirm intussusceptions. Most inflammatory fibroid polyps can be removed by endoscopy. Surgery is rarely needed. Exploratory laparoscopy or laparotomy is frequently recommended as the best treatment for intussusceptions caused by IFP. The operation should be performed as early as possible in order to prevent the intussusceptions from leading to ischemia, necrosis and subsequent perforation of the invaginated bowel segment. This report aims at reviewing the diagnosis, etiology, genetics, clinical presentation, endoscopy, radiology, and best treatment of IFP. PMID:25944993

  7. Vanek's tumor of the small bowel in adults.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Bassam

    2015-04-28

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs), or Vanek's tumor, are one of the least common benign small bowel tumors. IFP affects both sexes and all age groups, with a peak of incidence in the fifth and seventh decades. They can be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract but most commonly in the gastric antrum or ileum. The underlying cause of IFPs is still unknown. Genetic study of IFP showed mutations in platelet derived growth factor alpha in some cases. At the time of diagnosis most IFPs have a diameter of 3 to 4 cm. The lesions have always been recorded as solitary polyps. Symptoms depend on the location and the size of the lesion, including abdominal pain, vomiting, altered small bowel movements, gastrointestinal bleeding and loss of weight. IFPs arising below the Treitz ligament can present with an acute abdomen, usually due to intussusceptions. Abdominal computed tomography is currently considered the most sensitive radiological method to show the polyp or to confirm intussusceptions. Most inflammatory fibroid polyps can be removed by endoscopy. Surgery is rarely needed. Exploratory laparoscopy or laparotomy is frequently recommended as the best treatment for intussusceptions caused by IFP. The operation should be performed as early as possible in order to prevent the intussusceptions from leading to ischemia, necrosis and subsequent perforation of the invaginated bowel segment. This report aims at reviewing the diagnosis, etiology, genetics, clinical presentation, endoscopy, radiology, and best treatment of IFP. PMID:25944993

  8. Effect of caffeine on the expression of a major X-ray induced protein in human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, E.N.; Boothman, D.A. )

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the effect of caffeine on the concomitant processes of the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) and the synthesis of X-ray-induced proteins in the human malignant melanoma cell line, Ul-Mel. Caffeine administered at a dose of 5mM after X radiation not only inhibited PLD repair but also markedly reduced the level of XIP269, a major X-ray-induced protein whose expression has been shown to correlate with the capacity to repair PLD. The expression of the vast majority of other cellular proteins, including seven other X-ray-induced proteins, remained unchanged following caffeine treatment. A possible role for XIP269 in cell cycle delay following DNA damage by X irradiation is discussed.

  9. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented bleeding recurrence most possibly attributed to small bowel ulcers, nevertheless 30-d mortality was zero. Presence of chronic obstructive lung disease and diabetes was related with unexplained recurrence of hemorrhage in logistic regression analysis, while absence of small bowel ulcers was protective (relative risk 0.13, P = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Among NSAID consumers, more bleeders than non-bleeders with peptic ulcers present small bowel ulcers; lesions related to more severe bleeding and unexplained episodes of bleeding recurrence. PMID:25512771

  10. PVDF measurement of soft x ray induced shock and filter debris impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. E.; Lee, L. M.; Hedemann, M. A.; Bauer, F.

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer shock stress sensors have been used to measure the shock and impulse generated by soft X-rays and by filter debris in the SATURN Plasma Radiation Source at Sandia National Laboratories, NM. SATURN was used to generate 30 to 40 kJ, 20-ns duration, line radiation at 2 to 3 keV. Fluence on samples was nominally 40, 200, and 400 kJ/m(sup 2) (1, 5, and 10 cal/cm(sup 2)). Measurements of X-ray induced material shock response exposing both aluminum and PMMA acrylic samples agree well with companion measurements made with single crystal X-cut quartz gauges. Time-of-flight, stress, and impulse produced by Kimfol (polycarbonate/aluminum) filter debris were also measured with the PVDF gauges.

  11. Measurement of equilibrium elemental vapor pressures using x-ray induced fluorescense.

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J; Henins, A.; Estupinan, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Shastri, S. D.

    2011-04-29

    X-ray induced fluorescence is demonstrated as a novel and fast method for measuring vapor pressures at high temperatures and high pressures. As such, it is an excellent complement to the effusion method, which is limited to lower pressures. High-energy synchrotron radiation was used to measure the total densities of Dy in the equilibrium vapor over condensed DyI{sub 3} and Tm in the equilibrium vapor over condensed TmI{sub 3}. Corresponding vapor pressures were determined with measured vapor cell temperatures across a range of vapor pressures of nearly three orders of magnitude, from less than 10{sup 2} Pa to more than 10{sup 4} Pa. Individual data points were obtained in time periods ranging from 10 to 30 s each.

  12. Note: Loading method of molecular fluorine using x-ray induced chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; White, Melanie; Wang, Yonggang

    2014-08-15

    We have successfully loaded molecular fluorine into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of perfluorohexane (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}). “White” x-ray radiation from the Advanced Photon Source was used to initiate the chemical decomposition of C{sub 6}F{sub 14}, which resulted in the in situ production of F{sub 2} as verified via Raman spectroscopy. Due to the toxic nature of fluorine, this method will offer significant advantages in the ability to easily load a relatively nontoxic and inert substance into a chamber (such as a diamond anvil cell) that, when sealed with other reactants and irradiate with hard x-rays (>7 keV), releases highly reactive and toxic fluorine into the sample/reaction chamber to enable novel chemical synthesis under isolated and/or extreme conditions.

  13. Inflammatory Fibroid Polyp in the Jejunum Causing Small Bowel Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seok Won; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Kim, Jin Su; Song, Gyu Sang

    2015-01-01

    Intussusceptions are defined as the telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent distal segment. In the small bowel, intussusceptions are typically caused by benign processes, but can occasionally be caused by inflammatory fibroid polyps, which often present as intussusception and bowel obstruction. These polyps are rare, benign, tumorous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and are typically observed in the stomach, but can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Any case of a jejunojejunal intussusception caused by inflammatory fibroid polyps is considered rare, and we report the case of a 51-year-old woman with an inflammatory fibroid polyp of the jejunum presenting as an intussusception who was successfully treated with a resection. PMID:26161379

  14. A Case of Cavernous Lymphangioma of the Small Bowel Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Hong, In Taik; Cha, Jae Myung; Lee, Joung Il; Joo, Kwang Ro; Baek, Il Hyun; Shin, Hyun Phil; Jeon, Jung Won; Lim, Jun Uk

    2015-09-25

    Lymphangioma is a benign vascular lesion with characteristics of subepithelial tumor which can proliferate in the lymphatic system. Lymphangioma of the small-bowel mesentery is rare, having been reported in less than 2% of all lymphangiomas. Lymphangioma does not require any specific treatment because it is absolutely a benign tumor. However, surgical exploration is rarely required for cases with disease-related symptoms or complications, or for those misdiagnosed as a malignant lesion. We recently experienced a case of mesenteric cavernous lymphangomas in a 53-year-old female who was misdiagnosed as having a liposarcoma. The final diagnosis was confirmed by a pathologic examination of the specimen that was obtained via laparoscopic exploration. Herein, we report a very rare case of mesenteric cavernous lymphangioma along with a brief review of relevant literature. PMID:26387702

  15. Inflammatory Fibroid Polyp in the Jejunum Causing Small Bowel Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seok Won; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Kim, Jin Su; Song, Gyu Sang

    2015-06-01

    Intussusceptions are defined as the telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent distal segment. In the small bowel, intussusceptions are typically caused by benign processes, but can occasionally be caused by inflammatory fibroid polyps, which often present as intussusception and bowel obstruction. These polyps are rare, benign, tumorous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and are typically observed in the stomach, but can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Any case of a jejunojejunal intussusception caused by inflammatory fibroid polyps is considered rare, and we report the case of a 51-year-old woman with an inflammatory fibroid polyp of the jejunum presenting as an intussusception who was successfully treated with a resection. PMID:26161379

  16. An undigested cherry tomato as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mortezavi, A; Schneider, P M; Lurje, G

    2015-07-01

    Small bowel obstruction due to undigested fibre from fruits and vegetables is a rare but known medical condition. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato in a patient without a past medical history of abdominal surgery. A 66-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of lower abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. His last bowel movement had occurred on the morning of presentation. He underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT), which showed a sudden change of diameter in the distal ileum with complete collapse of the proximal small bowel segment. Laparoscopy confirmed a small bowel obstruction with a transition point close to the ileocaecal valve. An enterotomy was performed and a completely undigested cherry tomato was retrieved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato. PMID:26264111

  17. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost 15 years of use?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bruaene, Cedric; De Looze, Danny; Hindryckx, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001 has given gastroenterologists the opportunity to investigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE is most commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but other indications include diagnosis or follow-up of Crohn’s disease, suspicion of a small bowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease. Almost fifteen years have passed since the release of the small bowel capsule. The purpose of this review is to offer the reader a brief but complete overview on small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technical and procedural aspects, the possible complications and the most important indications. We will end with some future perspectives of CE. PMID:25610531

  18. Isochronal annealing study of X-ray induced defects in single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Chihiro; Kisoda, Kenji

    2013-09-21

    X-ray induced defects in single-walled (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Frenkel defects, interstitial-vacancy pairs, were revealed to form in both SWCNTs and DWCNTs after X-ray irradiation because these defects were entirely healed by thermal annealing. In order to clarify the structure of the X-ray induced defect in SWCNT and DWCNT, isochronal-annealing experiments were performed on the irradiated samples and the activation energy for defect healing was estimated. The intensity of D band (defect induced band) on Raman spectra was used as a measure of the density of X-ray induced defects. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulated values using second order reaction model, which indicated that the defect healing was determined by the migration energy of interstitials on the carbon layer. We also found that the activation energy for defect healing of SWCNT and DWCNT were around 0.5 eV and 0.32 eV, respectively. The X-ray induced defects in SWCNTs were more stable than those in DWCNTs. Compared these estimated activation energies to previous theoretical reports, we concluded that bridge and/or dumbbell interstitials are formed in both SWCNT and DWCNT by X-ray irradiation.

  19. Effect of intestinal resection on human small bowel motility.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T; Pfeiffer, A; Hackelsberger, N; Widmer, R; Meisel, C; Kaess, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few data are available on adaptive changes of human small bowel motility after intestinal resection. AIM: To characterise jejunal motility after extensive and limited distal intestinal resection. METHODS: Seven patients with a short bowel syndrome after total ileal and partial jejunal resection (residual jejunal segments between 60 and 100 cm) and six patients with limited distal ileal resection (resected segment between 30 and 70 cm) underwent ambulatory 24 hour jejunal manometry 15 (6-24) months after the operation. Normal values were obtained from 50 healthy subjects. Fasting motility and the motor response to a 600 kcal solid meal were analysed visually and by a computer program. RESULTS: Limited ileal resection did not result in changed jejunal motility. After extensive distal resection, patients had a significantly shorter migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle and a significantly shorter duration of the postprandial motor response compared with controls (p < 0.005). Intestinal resection had no influence on jejunal contraction frequency and amplitude and did not lead to any abnormal motor pattern. CONCLUSION: Extensive distal resection of the small intestine produces distinct abnormalities of fasting and postprandial motility in the intestinal remnant. The shortening of digestive motility and the increased frequency of MMC cycling could contribute to malabsorption and diarrhoea in the short bowel syndrome. PMID:8984024

  20. Mesenteric Vasculature-guided Small Bowel Segmentation on 3D CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Louie, Adeline; Nguyen, Tan B.; Wank, Stephen; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to its importance and possible applications in visualization, tumor detection and pre-operative planning, automatic small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis of small bowel pathology. However, segmenting the small bowel directly on CT scans is very difficult because of the low image contrast on CT scans and high tortuosity of the small bowel and its close proximity to other abdominal organs. Motivated by the intensity characteristics of abdominal CT images, the anatomic relationship between the mesenteric vasculature and the small bowel, and potential usefulness of the mesenteric vasculature for establishing the path of the small bowel, we propose a novel mesenteric vasculature map-guided method for small bowel segmentation on high-resolution CT angiography scans. The major mesenteric arteries are first segmented using a vessel tracing method based on multi-linear subspace vessel model and Bayesian inference. Second, multi-view, multi-scale vesselness enhancement filters are used to segment small vessels, and vessels directly or indirectly connecting to the superior mesenteric artery are classified as mesenteric vessels. Third, a mesenteric vasculature map is built by linking vessel bifurcation points, and the small bowel is segmented by employing the mesenteric vessel map and fuzzy connectness. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors with manually labeled reference standard. The result, 82.5% volume overlap accuracy compared with the reference standard, shows it is feasible to segment the small bowel on CT scans using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. PMID:23807437

  1. Fetal primary small bowel volvulus in a child without intestinal malrotation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Hee; Lim, Gye-Yeon; We, Ji Sun

    2013-07-01

    Fetal primary small bowel volvulus without atresia or malrotation is an extremely rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. We report a case of primary small bowel volvulus that presented as sudden fetal distress and was diagnosed on the basis of the 'whirl-pool sign' of fetal sonography. This diagnosis led to emergency operation after birth at the third trimester with a good outcome. Although the pathogenesis of fetal primary small bowel volvulus is unclear, ganglion cell immaturity may play a role in the etiology. PMID:23895987

  2. Imaging of malignant neoplasms of the mesenteric small bowel: new trends and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Philippe; Boudiaf, Mourad; Fishman, Elliot K; Hoeffel, Christine; Dray, Xavier; Manfredi, Riccardo; Marteau, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the recent advances in radiological imaging of malignant neoplasms of the mesenteric small bowel and provides an outline of new trends and perspectives that can be anticipated. The introduction of multidetector row technology, which allows the acquisition of submillimeter and isotropic voxels, has dramatically improved the capabilities of computed tomography in the investigation of the mesenteric small bowel. This technology combined with optimal filling of small bowel loops through the use of appropriate enteral contrast agents has markedly changed small bowel imaging. Computed tomography-enteroclysis, which is based on direct infusion of enteral contrast agent into the mesenteric small bowel through a naso-jejunal tube, provides optimal luminal distension. By contrast, computed tomography-enterography is based on oral administration of enteral contrast agent. These two techniques are now well-established ones for the detection and the characterization of small bowel neoplasms. During the same time, combining the advantages of unsurpassed soft tissue contrast and lack of ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging has gained wide acceptance for the evaluation of patients with suspected small bowel neoplasms. Rapid magnetic resonance imaging sequences used in combination with specific enteral contrast agents generate superb images of the mesenteric small bowel so that magnetic resonance-enteroclysis and magnetic resonance-enterography are now considered as effective diagnostic tools for both the detection and the characterization of neoplasms of the mesenteric small bowel. Recent improvements in image post-processing capabilities help obtain realistic three-dimensional representations of tumors and virtual enteroscopic views of the small bowel that are useful for the surgeon and the gastroenteroenteologist to plan surgical or endoscopic interventions. Along with a better knowledge of the potential and limitations of wireless capsule endoscopy and new endoscopic techniques, these recent developments in radiological imaging reasonably suggest that substantial changes in the investigation of small bowel tumors may be anticipated in a near future, thus potentially create a new paradigm shift after standard small bowel follow-through study has been universally abandoned. PMID:21035353

  3. Hyperthermia, polyamine depletion, and inhibition of X-ray-induced DNA strand break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Lachmann, P.J. )

    1989-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that HeLa cells that had been depleted of polyamines by treatment with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis were deficient in their ability to repair X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks. Since it had previously been demonstrated that hyperthermic shock also inhibited strand break repair following X irradiation and that hyperthermia resulted in a leakage of polyamines from cells, it seemed of interest to examine whether the inhibition of repair by hyperthermia was related to this loss of cellular polyamines. In the present paper it is demonstrated that both polyamine depletion and hyperthermia inhibit strand closure, and that a combined treatment further reduces the rate of repair. In cells not depleted of polyamines, repair is restored to normal levels if hyperthermia treatment is followed by a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C before X irradiation. In polyamine-depleted cells, this 37 degrees C incubation does not result in a return of repair ability. Polyamine supplementation was not effective in reversing hyperthermia-dependent repair inhibition, and, in fact, restoration of repair in control cells following hyperthermic shock corresponded to a time at which polyamines show a maximum decrease in those cells. These results suggest that the inhibition of repair and the increased radiosensitivity observed in hyperthermically treated cells is not related to polyamine depletion. However, data further suggest that polyamine-depleted cells may have other alterations, perhaps in chromatin, which render them more sensitive to thermal inhibition of repair.

  4. Role of double-balloon enteroscopy in malignant small bowel tumors

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Enrique Pérez-Cuadrado; Delgado, Pilar Esteban; Conesa, Paloma Bebia; Andrés, Blanca Martínez; Guggiana, Milivoj Franulic; Mateos, Eduardo Alcaraz; Caballero, Mariana Fernández; Agudo, José Luis Rodrigo; Martínez, Silvia Chacón; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel Herrerías; Martínez, Enrique Pérez-Cuadrado

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) role in malignant small bowel tumors (MSBT). METHODS: This is a retrospective descriptive study performed in a single center. All consecutive patients who underwent a DBE with final diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm from 2004 to 2014 in our referral center were included. Patient demographic and clinical pathological characteristics were recorded and reviewed. MSBT diagnosis was achieved either by DBE directed biopsy with multiple tissue sampling, endoscopic findings or histological analysis of surgical specimen. We have analyzed double-balloon enteroscopy impact in outcome and clinical course of these patients. RESULTS: Of 627 patients, 28 (4.5%) (mean age = 60 ± 17.3 years) underwent 30 procedures (25 anterograde, 5 retrograde) and were diagnosed of a malignant tumor. Patients presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 19, 67.9%), occlusion syndrome (n = 7, 25%) and diarrhea (n = 1, 3.6%). They were diagnosed by DBE biopsy (n = 18, 64.3%), histological analysis of surgical specimen (n = 7, 25%) and unequivocal endoscopic findings (n = 2, 7.1%). Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (n = 8, 28.6%), adenocarcinoma (n = 7, 25%), lymphoma (n = 4, 14.3%), neuroendocrine tumor (n = 4, 14.3%), metastatic (n = 3, 10.7%) and Kaposi sarcoma (n = 1, 3.6%) were identified. DBE modified outcome in 7 cases (25%), delaying or avoiding emergency surgery (n = 3), modifying surgery approach (n = 2) and indicating emergency SB partial resection instead of elective approach (n = 2). CONCLUSION: DBE may be critical in the management of MSBT providing additional information that may be decisive in the clinical course of these patients. PMID:26078833

  5. Small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar formation within meckel diverticulum: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Frazzini, V.I. Jr.; English, W.J.; Bashist, B.; Moore, E.

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a phytobezoar within a Meckel diverticulum is exceedingly rare, with only seven reported cases in the surgical literature. The most important precipitating factor is the ingestion of agents high in fiber and cellulose. Small bowel obstruction in all but one case was due to retrograde propagation of the bezoar into the small bowel lumen. We report the clinical and CT findings in such a patient following a vegetarian diet. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  7. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product's involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  8. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-01-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of ?-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, ?-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering. PMID:26568420

  9. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-11-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of ?-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, ?-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering.

  10. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-01-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of ?-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, ?-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering. PMID:26568420

  11. Acute small bowel volvulus in adults. A sporadic form of strangulating intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Roggo, A; Ottinger, L W

    1992-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is an uncommon but important cause of small intestinal obstruction. It often results in ischemia or even infarction. Delay in diagnosis and surgical intervention increases morbidity and mortality rates. Based on cause, small bowel volvulus can be divided into primary and secondary type. Goals for treatment of small bowel volvulus should include physician awareness of this uncommon diagnosis, accurate workup, and advanced surgical intervention. The presentation and subsequent management of 35 patients with small bowel volvulus confirmed by laparotomy are reviewed and discussed. The incidence of small bowel volvulus in the adult European and North American is low. The resultant mortality rate, however, makes diagnosis critically important. The cardinal presenting symptom is abdominal pain. There is no single specific diagnostic clinical sign or abnormality in laboratory or radiologic finding. In practice, the diagnosis can only be made by laparotomy. The failure to perform an exploratory laparotomy cannot be justified. Early diagnosis and early surgery are the keys for successful management of strangulation obstruction of the small bowel. PMID:1503517

  12. Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction: Early Operative versus Observational Management.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Joel; Keeley, Brieze; Krieger, Beth; Deliz, Juan; Wallace, Kojo; Kruse, Danielle; Dallas, Kai; Bornstein, Joseph; Chessin, David; Gorfine, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the nonoperative and operative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) and compared complication rates and surgical outcomes. ASBO is a common complication of abdominopelvic surgery. Although patients may respond to nonoperative management, many require surgery. We retrospectively studied patients admitted to Mount Sinai Hospital with a diagnosis of complete ASBO to determine outcomes of nonoperative management. Patients admitted with complete ASBO from 2001 to 2011 were included. Patients with no previous abdominopelvic surgery, surgery within the six weeks preceding admission and obstruction due to other identifiable causes, such as incarcerated hernia, were excluded. Complication rates and outcomes were compared between patients managed with immediate surgery and those managed initially with nonoperative strategies. Of 460 patients admitted with complete ASBO, 106 (23.0%) had surgery within 24 hours of admission. At surgery, 20 (18.9%) had ischemic bowel and 8 (7.5%) had perforations. The remaining 354 patients had a trial of nonoperative management lasting at least 24 hours. Of 354 patients managed initially without surgery, 100 (28.2%) patients were discharged without operative intervention during their index admissions. Among the patients having surgery more than 24 hours after admission, indications for surgery were generally failure to resolve, worsening clinical status, and change in imaging findings. Of those patients observed for at least 24 hours, 40 (15.7%) were found to have ischemic bowel and 5 (2.0%) had perforation at surgery. Rates of bowel resection, stoma creation and postoperative complications were similar for the immediate and delayed surgery groups. Among the delayed surgery group, 71 (28.0%) required a bowel resection and 11 (4.3%) stoma creation. Twenty one per cent had postoperative complications, most commonly ileus. There were no statistically significant differences in the outcomes between immediate and delayed groups regardless of duration of delay. Among patients observed with complete ASBO, 24.6 per cent of patients with adhesive obstruction resolved without surgery or readmission. Delaying operative management did not affect surgical findings or complication rates. PMID:26031276

  13. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-12-19

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91{sup phox} was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47{sup phox} was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22{sup phox} and gp91{sup phox} to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  14. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ?3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ?3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ?3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ?3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ?3 acute toxicity.

  15. Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhen-Yu; Ni, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Feng; Li, Ning; Li, You-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe an auxiliary combined liver-small bowel transplantation model with the preservation of duodenum, head of pancreas and hepatic biliary system in pigs. The technique, feasibility, security and immunosuppression were commented. METHODS: Forty outbred long-white pigs were randomized into two groups, and the auxiliary composite liver/small bowel allotransplantations were undertaken in 10 long-white pigs in each group with the recipient liver preserved. Group A was not treated with immunosuppressive drugs while group B was treated with cyclosporine A and methylprednisolone after operation. The hemodynamic changes and amylase of body fluid (including blood, urine and abdominal drain) were analyzed. RESULTS: The average survival time of the animals was 10 ± 1.929 d (6 to 25 d) in group A while more than 30 d in group B. The pigs could tolerate the hemodynamic fluctuation during operation and the hemodynamic parameters recovered to normal 2 h after blood reperfusion. The transient high amylase level was decreased to normal one week after operation and autopsy showed no pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Auxiliary en-bloc liver-small bowel transplantation with partial pancreas preservation is a feasible and safe model with simplified surgical techniques for composite liver/small bowel transplantation. This model may be used as a preclinical training model for clinical transplantation method, clinical liver-small bowel transplan-tation related complication research, basic research including immunosuppressive treatment, organ preservation, acute rejection, chronic rejection, immuno-tolerance and xenotransplantation. PMID:15133861

  16. Small bowel diverticulosis in patient with early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pyeong Su; Jung, Eun-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Jejunal and ileal diverticula are rare in adults. Duodenal diverticula are five times more prevalent than jejunoileal diverticula. Most patients are asymptomatic. However, chronic symptoms including intermittent abdominal pain, flatulence, diarrhea and constipation are seen in 10%-30% of patients. Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer in South Korea and here we report a case of early gastric cancer with multiple duodenal and jejunal diverticula. A 67-year-old woman was admitted to Konkuk University Medical Center with chronic diarrhea and weight loss of 19 kg over 2 months. Following gastroduodenoscopy, we identified adenocarcinoma of the lower body of the stomach. On abdominopelvic computed tomography, diverticula of duodenum and jejunum were found. Patient underwent distal gastrectomy and gastroduodenostomy with lymphadenectomy. She was discharged on the tenth postoperative day without complications. PMID:25317417

  17. EVICEL glue-induced small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Ofikwu, Godwin I; Sarhan, Mohammad; Ahmed, Leaque

    2013-02-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) frequently caused by adhesions and internal hernia. In addition, anastomotic leak that complicates LRYGB surgery contributes to the mortality of this procedure. Fibrin glue is commonly used intraoperatively for prevention of anastomotic leak and to secure hemostasis. We describe 2 cases of morbidly obese women who underwent LRYGB surgery for weight loss and developed early postoperative small bowel obstruction related to the use of the "EVICEL" fibrin sealant. Of note is that both patients required surgical intervention for this complication. PMID:23386172

  18. NSAID-induced deleterious effects on the proximal and mid small bowel in seronegative spondyloarthropathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Rimba?, Mihai; Marinescu, M?d?lina; Voiosu, Mihail Radu; B?icu?, Cristian R?svan; Caraiola, Simona; Nicolau, Adriana; Ni?escu, Doina; Badea, Georgeta Camelia; Pârvu, Magda Ileana

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the small bowel of seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) patients in order to ascertain the presence of mucosal lesions. METHODS: Between January 2008 and June 2010, 54 consecutive patients were enrolled and submitted to avideo capsule endoscopy (VCE) examination. History and demographic data were taken, as well as the history of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumption. After reading each VCE recording, a capsule endoscopy scoring index for small bowel mucosal inflammatory change (Lewis score) was calculated. Statistical analysis of the data was performed. RESULTS: The Lewis score for the whole cohort was 397.73. It was higher in the NSAID consumption subgroup (P = 0.036). The difference in Lewis score between NSAID users and non-users was reproduced for the first and second proximal tertiles of the small bowel, but not for its distal third (P values of 0.036, 0.001 and 0.18, respectively). There was no statistical significant difference between the groups with regard to age or sex of the patients. CONCLUSION: The intestinal inflammatory involvement of SpA patients is more prominent in NSAID users for the proximal/mid small bowel, but not for its distal part. PMID:21448355

  19. Coffee Enema for Preparation for Small Bowel Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE. PMID:25136541

  20. Displacement of Small bowel into the Lesser Sac in a Case of Complete Congenital Pouch Colon

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Bilal; Saleem, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative neonatal intestinal obstruction has a myriad of etiology. An operated case of imperforate anus developed intestinal obstruction early postoperatively. At re-operation, missed complete congenital pouch colon with a small perforation and displacement of small bowel into the lesser sac were found. The patient was managed by adhesionolysis, excision of pouch colon, and end ileostomy. The patient did well postoperatively. PMID:26023530

  1. Small bowel diverticulosis complicated by diverticulitis and paralytic ileus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nazir, M; Saebø, A

    1991-01-01

    Small bowel diverticulosis occurs in 0.3-4.4% of all autopsies. Generally the condition is clinically silent; but acute diverticulitis with peritonitis and paralytic ileus may occur in elderly people. This complication has a high mortality and its successful management requires early diagnosis and surgery. PMID:1950308

  2. Ethanol inhibition of glucose absorption in isolated, perfused small bowel of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, C.F.; Van Thiel, D.H.; Wargo, J.

    1983-08-01

    There is evidence for both humans and rats that malnutrition frequently occurs when ethanol is chronically ingested. Small bowel /sup 14/C-labelled glucose absorption was measured with an ex vivo system in which the small bowel of the rat was surgically removed and then arterially perfused with an artificial medium. Glucose absorption for a control group of seven rats was 248 +/- 8 microM/min/gm dry weight of small bowel (mean +/- SEM). This was significantly greater than the value 112 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight (P less than 0.005) for a group of five rats in which a competitive inhibitor of glucose absorption, phlorizin (0.2 mM), was added to the bowel lumen. In the presence of 3% ethanol within the gut lumen of five rats, glucose absorption was also reduced (to 131 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight) compared to absorption in the control group (P less than 0.005). The calculated amount of glucose absorbed was corrected for metabolism to lactate and carbon dioxide. We conclude that both phlorizin and ethanol inhibit glucose absorption in the isolated and perfused small bowel of rats and that probably at least part of the malnutrition in ethanol-fed rats is due to glucose malabsorption.

  3. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postprandial effect of the cold pressor test (repeated hand immersion in ice cold water) and injection of CRH, were assessed vs control in two groups of 18 HVs. Key Results CRH produced a significant rise from baseline salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.004) not seen with the cold pressor test. Small bowel water content (SBWC) fell postprandially on all four treatments. SBWC was significantly reduced by both stressors but CRH caused a greater effect (anova, p < 0.003 vs p = 0.02). Ascending colon (AC) volume was greater after CRH injection compared with saline (p = 0.002) but no differences were seen with the cold pressor test vs warm water. Postprandial increase in colon volume was also reduced by CRH which also increased the sensations of distension and bloating. Conclusions & Inferences Two experimental stressors were shown to constrict the small bowel, mimicking the effect previously seen in IBS-D patients. CRH increased the volume of the AC. We speculate that stress accelerates transfer of water from the small bowel to the AC. PMID:25703609

  4. Small Bowel Metastatic Cancer Observed With Double Balloon Enteroscopy in a Patient With a Past History of Multiple Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ji Young; Yu, Eun Sang; Na, Young Ju; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are very rare and generally malignant. As a result of the anatomical location and nonspecific manifestations of small bowel tumors, they are very difficult to diagnose. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy is a relatively noninvasive method compared to surgical resection, and allows for real-time observation, tissue confirmation with biopsy, and interventional procedures. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old woman with a small bowel metastatic carcinoma observed with double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). She had a history of multiple cancers including ovarian cancer, bladder cancer, and breast cancer. The antegrade DBE procedure was performed before surgery for biopsy tissue confirmation. The patient underwent small bowel resection, and the final diagnosis was the same as that determined by preoperative biopsy. The final diagnosis was metastatic small bowel cancer originating from a cancer of the breast. This is the first detailed report of the preoperative diagnosis of small intestinal metastatic breast cancer by DBE. PMID:26576142

  5. Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Bai Ligang; Liu Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Park, Changyong; Hatchett, David

    2012-03-15

    We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

  6. Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Hatchett, David

    2012-03-13

    We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

  7. X-Ray-Induced Damage to the Submandibular Salivary Glands in Mice: An Analysis of Strain-Specific Responses.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Mana; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Hayama, Kazuhide; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers often causes xerostomia (dry mouth) by acutely damaging the salivary glands through the induction of severe acute inflammation. By contrast, the mechanism underlying the X-ray-induced delayed salivary dysfunction is unknown and has attracted increasing attention. To identify and develop a mouse model that distinguishes the delayed from the acute effects, we examined three different mouse strains (C57BL/6, ICR, and ICR-nu/nu) that showed distinct T-cell activities to comparatively analyze their responses to X-ray irradiation. Three strains were irradiated with X-rays (25 Gy), and functional changes of the submandibular glands were examined by determining pilocarpine-induced saliva secretion. Structural changes were evaluated using histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of CD3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Bcl-xL. In C57BL/6 mice, the X-ray irradiation induced acute inflammation accompanied by severe inflammatory cell infiltration at 4 days postirradiation, causing substantial destruction and significant dysfunction at 2 weeks. Fibrotic repair was observed at 16 weeks. In ICR-nu/nu mice, the inflammation and organ destruction were much milder than in the other mice strains, but increased apoptotic cells and a significant reduction in salivary secretion were observed at 4 and 8 weeks and beyond, respectively. These results suggest that in C57BL/6 mice, X-ray-induced functional and structural damage to the salivary glands is caused mainly by acute inflammation. By contrast, although neither acute inflammation nor organ destruction was observed in ICR-nu/nu mice, apoptotic cell death preceded the dysfunction in salivary secretion in the later phase. These data suggest that the X-ray-irradiated ICR-nu/nu mouse may be a useful animal model for developing more specific therapeutic methods for the delayed dysfunction of salivary glands. PMID:26309806

  8. X-Ray-Induced Damage to the Submandibular Salivary Glands in Mice: An Analysis of Strain-Specific Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Mana; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Hayama, Kazuhide; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers often causes xerostomia (dry mouth) by acutely damaging the salivary glands through the induction of severe acute inflammation. By contrast, the mechanism underlying the X-ray-induced delayed salivary dysfunction is unknown and has attracted increasing attention. To identify and develop a mouse model that distinguishes the delayed from the acute effects, we examined three different mouse strains (C57BL/6, ICR, and ICR-nu/nu) that showed distinct T-cell activities to comparatively analyze their responses to X-ray irradiation. Three strains were irradiated with X-rays (25 Gy), and functional changes of the submandibular glands were examined by determining pilocarpine-induced saliva secretion. Structural changes were evaluated using histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of CD3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Bcl-xL. In C57BL/6 mice, the X-ray irradiation induced acute inflammation accompanied by severe inflammatory cell infiltration at 4 days postirradiation, causing substantial destruction and significant dysfunction at 2 weeks. Fibrotic repair was observed at 16 weeks. In ICR-nu/nu mice, the inflammation and organ destruction were much milder than in the other mice strains, but increased apoptotic cells and a significant reduction in salivary secretion were observed at 4 and 8 weeks and beyond, respectively. These results suggest that in C57BL/6 mice, X-ray-induced functional and structural damage to the salivary glands is caused mainly by acute inflammation. By contrast, although neither acute inflammation nor organ destruction was observed in ICR-nu/nu mice, apoptotic cell death preceded the dysfunction in salivary secretion in the later phase. These data suggest that the X-ray-irradiated ICR-nu/nu mouse may be a useful animal model for developing more specific therapeutic methods for the delayed dysfunction of salivary glands. PMID:26309806

  9. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Stomach and Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Das, Shiva K.; Li, X. Allen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Miften, Moyed

    2010-03-01

    Published data suggest that the risk of moderately severe (>=Grade 3) radiation-induced acute small-bowel toxicity can be predicted with a threshold model whereby for a given dose level, D, if the volume receiving that dose or greater (VD) exceeds a threshold quantity, the risk of toxicity escalates. Estimates of VD depend on the means of structure segmenting (e.g., V15 = 120 cc if individual bowel loops are outlined or V45 = 195 cc if entire peritoneal potential space of bowel is outlined). A similar predictive model of acute toxicity is not available for stomach. Late small-bowel/stomach toxicity is likely related to maximum dose and/or volume threshold parameters qualitatively similar to those related to acute toxicity risk. Concurrent chemotherapy has been associated with a higher risk of acute toxicity, and a history of abdominal surgery has been associated with a higher risk of late toxicity.

  10. Acute Portomesenteric Venous Thrombosis following Laparoscopic Small Bowel Resection and Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Yogarajah, Meera; Wilson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication of laparoscopic surgery that has been described in literature. Prompt diagnosis and early initiation of treatment are vital to prevent life-threatening complications such as mesenteric ischemia and infarction. A 51-year-old lady had laparoscopic small bowel resection and primary anastomosis with ventral hernia repair 4 weeks earlier for partial small bowel obstruction. Her postoperative period was uneventful and she was discharged home. Four weeks after surgery she developed watery diarrhea and generalized abdominal pain for four-day duration. A computed tomography of the abdomen revealed portomesenteric venous thrombosis although a computed tomography of abdomen before surgery 4 weeks back did not show any portomesenteric venous thrombosis. We are reporting a case of acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis as a complication of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26294984

  11. Peritonitis with small bowel perforation caused by a fish bone in a healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yonghoon; Kim, Gyuwon; Shim, Chansup; Kim, Dongkeun; Kim, Dongju

    2014-01-01

    Perforation of the gastrointestinal tract by ingested foreign bodies is extremely rare in otherwise healthy patients, accounting for < 1% of cases. Accidentally ingested foreign bodies could cause small bowel perforation through a hernia sac, Meckel’s diverticulum, or the appendix, all of which are uncommon. Despite their sharp ends and elongated shape, bowel perforation caused by ingested fish bones is rarely reported, particularly in patients without intestinal disease. We report a case of 57-year-old female who visited the emergency room with periumbilical pain and no history of underlying intestinal disease or intra-abdominal surgery. Abdominal computed tomography and exploratory laparotomy revealed a small bowel micro-perforation with a 2.7-cm fish bone penetrating the jejunal wall. PMID:24587641

  12. Two cases of small bowel obstruction secondary to a swallowed potato.

    PubMed

    Castren, E; Hakeem, A; Mahmood, N S; Aryal, K

    2015-01-01

    Bowel obstruction due to bezoars (compaction of ingested material within the gastrointestinal tract) is a rare, but well documented occurrence. In this paper, we present two cases of potato-induced small bowel obstruction. Both patients were approximately 50?years old and had cerebral palsy and learning disabilities, respectively. They presented with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting, with no medical or surgical history. Diagnosis of small bowel obstruction was confirmed by CT prior to taking the patients to the operating theatre, where whole potatoes were found to be obstructing each patient's bowel lumen. Both patients underwent laparotomy with enterotomy and removal of the potato. They both made a good recovery. Through a literature review of bezoar-induced bowel obstruction, these cases highlight important diagnostic and management principles. PMID:26689254

  13. Modified liver-free multivisceral transplantation for a metastatic small bowel neuroendocrine tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frilling, A; Giele, H; Vrakas, G; Reddy, S; Macedo, R; Al-Nahhas, A; Wasan, H; Clift, A K; Gondolesi, G E; Vianna, R M; Friend, P; Vaidya, A

    2015-04-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors originating from the small bowel frequently metastasize to the lymph nodes and/or liver. Although surgical extirpation of the primary tumor and locoregional metastases epitomizes the management of patients with such tumors, this is not always possible with conventional surgical techniques. Nonresectable, slow-growing tumors involving the mesenteric root represent a generally accepted indication for deceased donor intestinal and multivisceral transplantation. Furthermore, vascularized sentinel forearm flaps offer opportunities for monitoring graft rejection and tailoring immunosuppression regimens. Here, we report the first documented case of modified liver-free multivisceral transplantation preceded by neoadjuvant 177-lutetium peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in a patient with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor and extensive lymph node metastases in the mesenterium. At a follow-up of 21 months the patient is biochemically and radiologically disease-free. PMID:25689880

  14. Concurrent Spontaneous Sublingual and Intramural Small Bowel Hematoma due to Warfarin Use

    PubMed Central

    Pamukçu Günayd?n, Gül; Çiftçi Sivri, Hatice Duygu; Sivri, Serkan; Otal, Yavuz; Özhasenekler, Ayhan; Kurto?lu Çelik, Gülhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of concurrent spontaneous sublingual and intramural small bowel hematoma due to warfarin anticoagulation. Case. A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of a swollen, painful tongue. He was on warfarin therapy. Physical examination revealed sublingual hematoma. His international normalized ratio was 11.9. The computed tomography scan of the neck demonstrated sublingual hematoma. He was admitted to emergency department observation unit, monitored closely; anticoagulation was reversed with fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K. 26 hours after his arrival to the emergency department, his abdominal pain and melena started. His abdomen tomography demonstrated intestinal submucosal hemorrhage in the ileum. He was admitted to surgical floor, monitored closely, and discharged on day 4. Conclusion. Since the patient did not have airway compromise holding anticoagulant, reversing anticoagulation, close monitoring and observation were enough for management of both sublingual and spontaneous intramural small bowel hematoma. PMID:26649210

  15. The role of the arachidonic acid cascade in the species-specific X-ray-induced inflammation of the rabbit eye

    SciTech Connect

    Bito, L.Z.; Klein, E.M.

    1982-05-01

    To identify the mediator(s) of the apparently species-specific X-ray-induced inflammation of the rabbit eye, inhibitors of the synthesis and/or release of known or putative mediators of ocular inflammation were administered prior to irradiation. The X-ray-induced ocular inflammation, particularly the rise in intraocular pressure, was found to be inhibited by intravenous pretreatment of rabbits with flurbiprofen, indomethacin, or imidazole (1, 10, and 100 mg/kg i.v., respectively), or by combined intravitreal and topical administration of flurbiprofen. Systemic, intravitreal, and/or topical pretreatment with prednisolone or disodium cromoglycate or the retrobulbar injection of ethyl alcohol or capsaicin failed to block the inflammatory response, whereas vitamin E apparently exerted some protective effect. These findings show that the X-ray-induced inflammation of the rabbit eye is mediated, at least in part, by prostaglandins (PGs) and/or related autacoids. In addition, these results suggest that the unique sensitivity of the rabbit eye to X-ray-induced inflammation is due either to the presence in this species of a unique or uniquely effective triggering mechanism for the release of PG precursors or to the greater sensitivity of this species to the ocular inflammatory effects of PGs. Thus the rabbit eye may provide a unique model for studying some aspects of arachidonic acid release or ocular PG effects, but extreme caution must be exercised in generalizing such findings to other species.

  16. Small Bowel Stromal Tumors: Different Clinicopathologic and Computed Tomography Features in Various Anatomic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue-Min; Yuan, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-Ming; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) can present with different clinical and immunohistochemical characteristics according to different anatomic sites. The aim of this study was to compare clinicopathologic and computed tomography (CT) features of small bowel stromal tumors located in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. In total, 197 patients (109 male, 88 female) with small bowel GISTs were retrospectively reviewed. All tumors had definite anatomic sites in the small bowel tract with surgical confirmation. The clinicopathologic variables included age, sex, onset of symptoms, and tumor risk category. CT variables included tumor size, degree enhancement, enhancement pattern (region of necrosis), adjacent tissue involvement, lymphadenopathy, and distant metastasis. We assessed any possible differences according to different GIST site of origin. Based on tumor size and mitotic count, the risk categories in different anatomic sites did not differ significantly between duodenal and jejunal GISTs. However, high risk ileum GISTs accounted for 66.0% of ileal cases, which was higher than duodenum cases (36.8%, P = 0.002) and jejunum cases (43.9%, P = 0.004). The mean size of GISTs in the ileum was 9.77 cm, which was significantly larger than in the duodenum (7.41 cm, P = 0.043), and in the jejunum (8.14 cm, P = 0.027). On CT images, enhancement degree appeared to gradually increase from the duodenum to the ileum in the portal phase, and the enhancement pattern presented a tendency for heterogeneity. In Conclusions, the clinicopathologic and CT features of small bowel GISTs can differ according to different primary anatomic sites. PMID:26646242

  17. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  18. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  19. Interventional digital subtraction angiography for small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors with bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Ting; Sun, Hong-Liang; Luo, Jiang-Hong; Ni, Jia-Yan; Chen, Dong; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Zhou, Jing-Xing; Xu, Lin-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of interventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for bleeding small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2013, small bowel tumors in 25 consecutive patients undergoing emergency interventional DSA were histopathologically confirmed as GIST after surgical resection. The medical records of these patients and the effects of interventional DSA and the presentation and management of the condition were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients with an age range from 34- to 70-year-old (mean: 54 ± 12 years), 8 were male and 17 were female. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, including tarry or bloody stool and intermittent melena, was observed in all cases, and one case also involved hematemesis. Nineteen patients required acute blood transfusion. There were a total of 28 small bowel tumors detected by DSA. Among these, 20 were located in the jejunum and 8 were located in the ileum. The DSA characteristics of the GISTs included a hypervascular mass of well-defined, homogeneous enhancement and early developed draining veins. One case involved a complication of intussusception of the small intestine that was discovered during surgery. No pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or fistulae, or arterial rupture were observed. The completely excised size was approximately 1.20 to 5.50 cm (mean: 3.05 ± 1.25 cm) in maximum diameter based on measurements after the resection. There were ulcerations (n = 8), erosions (n = 10), hyperemia and edema (n = 10) on the intra-luminal side of the tumors. Eight tumors in patients with a large amount of blood loss were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization with gelfoam particles during interventional DSA. CONCLUSION: Emergency interventional DSA is a useful imaging option for locating and diagnosing small bowel GISTs in patients with bleeding, and is an effective treatment modality. PMID:25548494

  20. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy. PMID:26664542

  1. Small bowel intussussception due to metastatic melanoma of unknown primary site. Case report

    PubMed Central

    STAGNITTI, F.; ORSINI, S.; MARTELLUCCI, A.; TUDISCO, A.; AVALLONE, M.; AIUTI, F.; DI GIROLAMO, V.; STEFANELLI, F.; DE ANGELIS, F.; COSTANTINO, A.; DI GRAZIA, C.; NAPOLEONI, A.; NICODEMI, S.; CIPRIANI, B.; CECI, F.; MOSILLO, R.; CORELLI, S.; CASCIARO, G.; SPAZIANI, E.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is characterized by metastases also to the gastrointestinal tract, especially in the small bowel. The diagnosis is often delayed because unspecific clinical presentation (frequently as chronic iron deficiency anemia, rectal bleeding or intestinal obstruction). We present a case of melanoma of unknown primary site, with clinical presentation of intestinal obstruction. A segmental resection of the ileum was performed including mesentery with lymph nodes. Histology revealed metastatic melanoma from unknown primary. PET and MRI confirmed disseminated disease without brain metastasis. PMID:25419593

  2. CT enteroclysis/enterography findings in drug-induced small-bowel damage

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, K; Hashimoto, S; Onoda, H; Washida, Y; Sakaida, I; Matsunaga, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT enteroclysis (CTE)/enterography findings of patients with small-bowel mucosal damage induced by aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and to compare these findings with the duration of drug use and endoscopic findings. Methods: CTE findings of 11 patients (22 lesions) with drug-induced small-bowel damage were reviewed, including 8 NSAID users and 3 aspirin users. Three patients were short-term users (6 months or shorter) and eight were long-term users (3 years or longer). Nine patients also underwent videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) or double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Results: Small-bowel abnormalities were visible in 8 of 11 patients (73%) on CTE. Multiple lesions were seen in five patients, including all short-term users. Lesions were classified into three types. Type 1 (mucosal patchy enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, 12 lesions) all were short-term users. Small erosions with mild oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 2 (homogeneous hyperenhancement) was found in two of eight patients (25%, four lesions) who were long-term users. Large ulcers with marked oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 3 (stratification enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, six lesions), both short-term and long-term users. Annular or large ulcers with strictures were shown by VCE or DBE. Conclusion: On CTE, Type 1 lesions in patients with mostly short-term aspirin or NSAID use, Type 2 lesions in patients with long-term use and Type 3 lesions in both types of patients were detected. CTE may have usefulness for the detection of mild damage. Advances in knowledge: Small-bowel abnormalities owing to aspirin or NSAID present with three different patterns on CTE. PMID:25348282

  3. Small bowell perforation and mesentery injury after an unusual blunt abdominal trauma–Case report

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta de Castro, J.; Gomes, G.; Mateus, N.; Escrevente, R.; Pereira, L.; Jácome, P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In blunt abdominal trauma, lesions of the small bowell and mesentery are often underdiagnosed; although unusual, they represent the third most injured organ, with increasing morbidity and mortality. Presentation of case The authors present the case of a 68 years old male, admitted to the emergency department after being hit by a bale of straw, weighing around 300 kg, in the abdomen. After successful ressuscitation, a CT scan was performed, suggesting hemoperitoneum because of vascular lesion of the right colon bleeding. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, confirming the presence of blood in the abdominal cavity and identifying jejunal perforation, an apparently innocent hematoma of the small bowel mesentery (beside the bowel wall) distally to the first lesion and a laceration of the sigmoid serosa; a segmental jejunal resection and suture of the colon serosa were performed. In the early post-operative period, an enteric discharge was noticed, mandating surgical reexploration; a previously unnoticed bowel perforation, in the mesenteric border where the hematoma was identified, justified an additional enterectomy, after what the patients recovery progressed uneventfully. Discussion In this case, a sudden increase in abdominal pressure could explain that missed rupture of the mesenteric border of the jejunum, also causing the mesenteric hematoma, or, in spite of that, a state of low perfusion could have lead to total wall ischemia of an already irrigation compromised segment. Only noted after surgical exploration, despite prior evaluation with a computed tomography. Small bowell and mesenteric injuries are potentially missed due to decreased exploratory laparotomies for blunt abdominal trauma. Conclusion Although uncommon, small bowel and mesenteric injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. High clinical suspicion is essential for an early diagnosis PMID:25576959

  4. Aspirin-induced small bowel injuries and the preventive effect of rebamipide

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Kazunari; Abe, Takashi; Inoue, Kunimitsu; Uchida, Masahiro; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the influence of taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk on small intestinal complications and to examine the preventive effect of rebamipide. METHODS: This study was conducted as a single-center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study. Eleven healthy male subjects were enrolled. Each subject underwent video capsule endoscopy after 1 and 4 wk of taking aspirin and omeprazole, along with either rebamipide or placebo therapy. The primary endpoint was to evaluate small bowel damage in healthy subjects before and after taking low-dose aspirin for 4 wk. RESULTS: The number of subjects with mucosal breaks (defined as multiple erosions and/or ulcers) were 1 at 1 wk and 1 at 4 wk on the jejunum, and 6 at 1 wk (P = 0.0061) and 7 at 4 wk on the ileum (P = 0.0019). Rebamipide significantly prevented mucosal breaks on the ileum compared with the placebo group (P = 0.0173 at 1 wk and P = 0.0266 at 4 wk). CONCLUSION: Longer-term, low-dose aspirin administration induced damage in the small bowel. Rebamipide prevented this damage, and may be a candidate drug for treating aspirin-induced small bowel complications. PMID:22171147

  5. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  6. Small bowel volvulus with intussusception: an unusual revelation of neuroendocrine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lachhab, Imad; Traoré, Boubacar Zan; Saoud, Omar; Khedid, Yahia Zain Al Abidine; Zouaidia, Fouad; Echarrab, Mahjoub; Chkoff, Mohamed Rachid

    2015-01-01

    The primary malignant tumors of the small bowel are rare, representing 1 to 1.4% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We report a case of a 33 year-old women, admitted to our emergency department of visceral surgery for acute abdomen. The clinical examination revealed diffuse abdominal distension, defenseless, the hernia orifices were free and the rectal examination was normal. The biological test showed no hydro electrolytic disorders with normal hemoglobin and normal renal function. The abdominal CT-Scan showed signs of bowel obstruction due to a volvulus with intussusception without ischemia. The patient was operated urgently; the exploration has revealed a small bowel obstruction in the ileum with volvulus, an intussusceptum associated with a retractile mesenteritis, and the hepatic exploration found no metastases. The patient underwent a bowel resection taking away the intussusceptum with the infiltrated mesentery. The postoperative course was uneventful. The pathological result has proved a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor with five free nodes. Through this observation, we aim to highlight that an obstruction of small bowel with volvulus and intussusception could be exceptionally due to a neuroendocrine tumor, this complication has enabled a relatively early diagnosis in the absence of metastases and a 6-month follow-up without recurrence is a demonstration.

  7. A Rare Case of Hypermobile Mesentery With Segmental Small Bowel Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Pipaliya, Nirav; Poddar, Prateik; Pandey, Vikas; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis is a rare condition that affects 0.03% of the population. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall and the submucosa and/or intestinal subserosa. It is usually a secondary finding caused by a wide variety of underlying gastrointestinal or extragastrointestinal diseases. Here, we present the case of a 47-year-old man who was referred to our gastroenterology department with a history suggestive of intermittent small bowel obstruction associated with abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated PCI of the small bowel. The mesentery and branches of the superior mesenteric artery and superior mesenteric vein were twisted with minimal pneumoperitoneum. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, and demonstrated segmental small bowel PCI secondary to hypermobile mesentery. The affected segment of the ileum was resected, and jejunoileal anastomosis was performed. Here, we report a rare case of segmental PCI probably due to repeated twisting of hypermobile mesentery. The clinical and imaging features of this disorder may mimic those of visceral perforation or bowel ischemia. PCI can be a cause of severe abdominal pain that may require surgical intervention. PMID:26576141

  8. Graft-versus-host reaction in small bowel transplantation and possibilities for its circumvention

    SciTech Connect

    Deltz, E.; Ulrichs, K.; Schack, T.; Friedrichs, B.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.M.; Mueller-Hermelink, H.K.T.; Thiede, A.

    1986-03-01

    To describe GVHR in small bowel transplantation and its underlying mechanisms and to find methods for circumventing that response, accessory small bowel transplantation was carried out in the rat model. Animals not treated with cyclosporine, irradiation, or removal of the mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft died within 22 days postoperatively due to graft versus host disease. Mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft and recipient spleen and peripheral lymph nodes showed strong immunologic stimulation histologically and high antihost T-cell-mediated cytotoxic antihost reactivity. Seventy-one percent of the animals that had received 15 mg of cyclosporine per kilogram body weight orally survived 150 days after transplantation. After donor irradiation with 50 rads, 77 percent of the recipients survived 120 days. After microsurgical removal of the mesenteric lymph nodes of the graft, 89 percent survived 120 days. We conclude that GVHR plays an important role in small bowel transplantation and that the experimental regimens of donor, graft, and recipient treatment described herein have proved their efficacy for circumventing GVHR.

  9. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy: A ten-point contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Karargyris, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) in clinical practice increased the interest for the study of the small-bowel. Consequently, in about 10 years, an impressive quantity of literature on indications, diagnostic yield (DY), safety profile and technical evolution of CE has been published as well as several reviews. At present time, there are 5 small-bowel capsule enteroscopy (SBCE) models in the worldwide market. Head-to-head trials have showed in the great majority of studies comparable results in terms of DY, image quality and completion rate. CE meta-analyses formed the basis of national/international guidelines; these guidelines place CE in a prime position for the diagnostic work-up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, known and/or suspected Crohn’s disease and possible small-bowel neoplasia. A 2-L polyethylene glycol-based purge, administered the day before the procedure, is the most widely practiced preparation regimen. Whether this regimen can be further improved (i.e., by further decreasing its volume, changing the timing of administration, coupling it with prokinetics and/or other factors) or if it can really affect the DY, is still under discussion. Faecal calprotectin has been used in SBCE studies in two settings: in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to evaluate the type and extent of mucosal damage and, more importantly from a clinical point of view, in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease for assessment of inflammation activity. Although there is still a lot of debate around the exact reasons of SBCE poor performance in various small-bowel segments, it is worth to remember that the capsule progress is non-steerable, hence more rapid in the proximal than in lower segments of the small-bowel. Capsule aspiration, a relatively unexpected complication, has been reported with increasing frequency. This is probably related with the increase in the mean age of patients undergoing CE. CE video review is a time-consuming procedure. Therefore, several attempts have been made to develop technical software features, in order to make CE video analysis easier and shorter (without jeopardizing its accuracy). Suspected Blood Indicator, QuickView and Fujinon Intelligent Chromo Endoscopy are some of the software tools that have been checked in various clinical studies to date. PMID:23840112

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor of small bowel mesentery with postoperative bowel obstruction: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Jing; Li, Ruo-Tong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Cheng; Li, Wei-Dong; Fu, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) which is an extremely rare clinical entity has been reported infrequently. Most commonly it is distinguished into pleural and extrapleural forms, with same morphological resemblance. There has been many literatures reported regarding extrapleural form of SFT but few cases of SFT originating from small bowel mesentery have been reported till now. We here report one case of SFT of small bowel mesentery with some eventful postoperative bowel obstruction and literature review. PMID:26617912

  11. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  12. Fecal fat, cyclosporine, and alpha 1-antitrypsin for assessment of small bowel function following transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Ford, E G; Sinatra, F; Thomas, D; Atkinson, J B

    1991-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of transplanted small bowel. These include ischemic preservation and immunologic injury as well as the division of intestinal lymphatics during transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the recovery of fat absorption in transplanted small bowel in syngeneic rats. Orthotopic transplantation of the total small bowel with resection of the native intestine was performed. The experimental (n = 11) and a pair-fed, sham-operated control (n = 8) groups were fed a 50% kcal corn oil semipurified diet. Studies of cyclosporine (CSA) absorption, maltose absorption, dietary fat, and fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin (FA1AT) excretion in transplanted animals were performed preoperatively and at 15, 30, and 50 days postoperatively. There was no significant difference in the weight change or fat and maltose absorption in experimental animals compared with control animals at any time point. Peak serum CSA levels were lower at day 15 in transplanted animals than in controls (P = 0.006) and improved but remained lower than those in controls at days 30 and 50 (P = 0.017). FA1AT excretion was increased on postoperative day 15 (accompanied by a decrease in body weight) and returned to control levels at days 30 and 50. Transplanted isogeneic rats had weight recovery and fat and carbohydrate absorption similar to those of controls. Transplanted animals had a protein-losing enteropathy measured by FA1AT at day 15 that resolved by 30 and 50 days, respectively. CSA absorption showed a much more gradual return to control levels and remained abnormal at 50 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1941487

  13. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can involve allografts as well as native organs in solid organ transplant recipients. Infection is associated with variable necrosis and acute inflammation, in addition to a rejection-like infiltrate. Hematuria in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients may be associated with adenovirus nephritis and clinically silent graft involvement. Prompt diagnosis (aided by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and serology), with specific treatment, can prevent graft loss. PMID:26377431

  14. Ruptured jejunal diverticulum due to a single-band small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Durai, Rajaraman; Sinha, Ashish; Khan, Mihir; Hoque, Happy; Kerwat, Rajab

    2008-01-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is rare and often goes unnoticed until complications occur. The diverticula are true, acquired diverticula and often asymptomatic. Jejunal diverticulosis can be associated with diverticulosis of the duodenum, ileum, and colon. Here we describe a patient with known severe diverticular disease of the large bowel, who presented acutely with abdominal pain and signs of generalised peritonitis. Laparotomy showed ruptured jejunal diverticulosis with a single band over the terminal ileum, causing small bowel obstruction. Spontaneous perforation of a jejunal diverticulum is rare and is usually an intraoperative finding. One should exclude a precipitating cause, such as coexisting distal obstruction, stricture, or a foreign body. PMID:18836661

  15. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia associated with small bowel injury-case report.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Vlad; Carâp, Alexandru; Bobic, Simona; Albu, M?d?lina; Nica, Elvira; Socea, Bogdan

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWHs) are rare. Their diagnosis is mostly clinical and can be overlooked in the setting of trauma and distracting injuries or they can be misinterpreted as parietal hematomas. Associated lesions can influence decision making regarding time of operation and surgical technique. Our case highlights the management of a high-energy TAWH that associates a small bowel traumatic lesion. Surgical repair of TAWHs should follow general hernia repair principles. Further exploration of surgical options is necessary for a consensus to be reached. PMID:25972687

  16. Amebic perforation of small bowel: an unexpected localization of a fatal complication.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mehmet; Ergul, Emre; Donmez, Cem; Sisman, Ibrahim Cagatay; Ulger, Burak Veli; Kusdemir, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite E. histolytica is the causative organism responsible for human amebiasis and amebic dysentery. Although it is primarily an infection of the colon, it may also be spread by hematogenous path to other organs, especially the liver. In general, the clinical spectrum of colorectal amebiasis ranges from the state of asymptomatic carrier to severe fulminant necrotizing colitis with bleeding and perforation. Here we present an extremely rare case of necrotizing amebiasis of small bowel with a fatal outcome (Fig. 1, Ref. 4). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:19408834

  17. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays. Progress report, year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-09-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product`s involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  18. MCI extraction from Turkish galls played protective roles against X-ray-induced damage in AHH-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhua; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Huibin; Wang, Jianhua; Hu, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effects of MCI extract from Turkish galls against apoptosis induced by X-ray radiation in the AHH-1. Methods: The cells were divided into: control group; X-ray radiation group; MCI group, in which the confluent cells were preincubated with 5 ?g/ml MCI for 2 h followed by radiation. For the radiation, cells preincubated with MCI were exposed to X-ray beams with a dose of 8 Gy in total. Cell viability, apoptosis and intracellular alteration of redox were monitored by MTT and flow cytometry. Results: Compared with radiation group, the number of cells arrested at the G0/G1 phase was significantly reduced in MCI group (P < 0.05). X-ray radiation induces remarkable apoptosis in AHH-1, which was reversed by MCI. Compared with the radiation group, the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was abrogated by pre-incubation with MCI (P < 0.05). In addition, the up-regulation of procaspase-3 induced by radiation was reversed by MCI. Radiation could induce up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2; however, it is reversed completely after administration of MCI. Further, the enhanced expression of ERK and JNK induced by radiation was reversed by MCI. Conclusions: MCI extract from Turkish galls played protective effects on the X-ray induced damage through enhancing the scavenging activity of ROS, decreasing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the down-regulating the activity of procaspase-3, as well as modulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. PMID:26339380

  19. Ultrastructural evaluation of the radioprotective effects of melatonin against X-ray-induced skin damage in Albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mahmoud R; Abu-Dief, Eman E; Abd el-Reheem, Mohammad H; Abd-Elrahman, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge about the radioprotective effects of melatonin against X-ray-induced skin damage is still lacking. To examine these effects, an animal model of 60 Albino rats was used. The animals were divided into five groups: Group 1, nonirradiated; Group 2, X-ray irradiated (XRI, 8 Gy); Group 3, XRI pretreated with solvent (ethanol and phosphate-buffered saline); Group 4, nonirradiated group treated with melatonin; and Group 5, XRI pretreated with melatonin. The skin was evaluated for ultrastructural changes using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When compared to the nonirradiated skin (Groups 1 and 4), XRI skin (Groups 2 and 3) showed features of both cell injury and increased metabolic activity. The former included changes such as condensation of the nuclei, vacuolization of the cytoplasm, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swelling of the mitochondria with cristolysis, destruction of the ribosomes and intermediate filaments, fragmentation of the keratohyaline granules and loss of the irregularity of the basal cell borders. The central cells of the sebaceous gland alveoli had larger irregular nuclei and few lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The hair follicle cells had heterochromatic nuclei and less electron dense cytoplasm containing few complements of the organelles. The features of increased metabolic activity included increased euchromatin, irregularity of the nuclear membrane and increased branching of the melanocytes. Also, an increased number of the Birbeck granules were seen in the Langerhans cells. When compared to the irradiated skin (Groups 2 and 3), these changes were mild or absent in the skin of XRI animals pretreated with melatonin (Group 5). The ability of melatonin to minimize the injurious effects of XRI suggests a radioprotective role. The clinical ramifications of these observations warrant further studies. PMID:15676032

  20. The "Pavia model" of experimental small bowel transplantation in pigs: technical variations for ischemia reperfusion injury studies.

    PubMed

    Alessiani, M; Cobianchi, L; Viganò, J; Dominioni, T; Bottazzi, A; Zonta, S; Dionigi, P

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major field of study in small bowel transplantation because of its implications regarding intestinal immunity. In this study, we have introduced some variations to the described models of IRI in pigs to make possible a complete isolation of the small bowel for IRI studies. In swine, two anatomical barriers make impossible a complete isolation of the small bowel at the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and vein (SMV): the main colic vessels, which originate distally to form SMA and SMV, and the blood supply of the distal portion of the duodenum and the cephalic part of the pancreas. In a group of Large White pigs (n = 5), we have performed a complete isolation of the small bowel, including sub-total colectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy. Both SMA and SMV were isolated at the origin from the aorta and at the junction of the splenic vein, respectively. Intestinal continuity was restored with duodenojejunal anastomosis and with ileotransverse colon anastomosis. One pig died on postoperative day 5 from intestinal occlusion due to adhesions. The remaining four pigs were killed on postoperative day 7 after an uneventful postoperative course. No complications were found at autopsy. In swine, resection of part of the pancreas and duodenum and removal of the large bowel does not affect short-term survival, allowing a full isolation of the entire small bowel mimicking the transplantation procedure. Thus, this model appears to be attractive for IRI studies in the field of intestinal transplantation. PMID:25131126

  1. Perforation of small bowel caused by Schistosoma japonicum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jin-Jian; Cheng, Ben-Jing; Tian, Fu; Li, Mi; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Hui-Chuan; Hu, Xiao-Miao; Xiao, Bao-Lai; Xie, Jian-Ping; Shrestha, Arpana

    2015-03-01

    A 67-year-old man from Jingzhou was admitted to the First Hospital Affiliated to Yangtze University in July 2013 with sudden onset of abdominal pain with dizziness for 12 h. The patient had sign of peritoneal irritation. Ultrasonography of the abdomen and pelvis showed hepatic fibrosis due to schistosomiasis. Computed tomography showed free gas in the peritoneal cavity. Plain abdominal radiography showed bilateral subdiaphragmatic accumulation of gas, perforation of the viscus, and radio-opacity in the left renal area. The patient underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy. At laparotomy, a moderate amount of muddy yellow pus was found in the intra-abdominal cavity. At the junction of the jejunum and ileum, about 250 cm from Treitz's ligament, there was an about 10-cm length of inflamed small bowel with perforation (3 mm in diameter) along the mesenteric border at the middle of the lesion. The patient underwent resection of the affected intestinal segment, along with end-to-end intestinal anastomosis. Histopathological examination revealed mucosal necrosis and hemorrhage with a large number of infiltrating eosinophils and neutrophils, and acute submucosal inflammation with a large number of infiltrating eosinophils and neutrophils associated with Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) eggs. No intravascular adult parasite was found. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with praziquantel (30 mg/kg daily) for 4 d. The patient progressed well. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of small bowel perforation associated with eggs of S. japonicum. PMID:25759563

  2. Adult intussusception caused by myoepithelial hamartoma in the small bowel: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Adetunji, Adeyanju; Healy, Donagh; O’Donnell, Nessa; Davitt, Stephen; O’Hanrahan, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intussusception is rare in adults and can have acute, intermittent or chronic presentations. We present an unusual case of intussusception in an adult. Presentation of case A 25 year old male presented with sudden severe abdominal pain and vomiting. He had no relevant medical history. Mechanical small bowel obstruction was confirmed on imaging and laparotomy revealed a nodular lead point in the submucosa of the ileum. He had resection of a segment of small bowel with a primary anastamosis. Histopathology of the lesion demonstrated myoepithelial hamartoma (MEH), a rare cause of intussusception. Discussion Although intussusception is not uncommon in children, it is rare in adults. Management delays are a major cause of morbidity. This report details our management of a case of intussusception caused by MEH in an otherwise healthy adult. Conclusion Intussusception caused by MEH is a rare but serious cause of mechanical bowel obstruction. We propose that surgeons should consider this diagnosis in atypical cases of bowel obstruction and expedite laparotomy when it is suspected. PMID:25644557

  3. Small bowel obstruction due to enterolith (bezoar) formed in a duodenal diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shocket, E; Simon, S A

    1982-09-01

    An elderly patient with an acute small bowel obstruction due to an enterolith that evolved within a duodenal diverticulum is reported. Twenty-four prior instances of small bowel obstruction due to an enterolith formed within a small bowel diverticulum have been culled from the world literature and tabulated. In toto, 18 subjects are female and seven are male. The median age is 68 yr. Optimal surgical management is either to break up the enterolith and milk the components into the cecum without an enterotomy or, as is more often necessary, to milk the enterolith orad removing the concretion through an enterotomy made in less edematous small intestine. As in managing gallstone ileus, the bowel should be "run" seeking additional enteroliths. The diagnosis can be established only by documenting the normalcy of the gallbladder and the presence of duodenal and/or jejunal diverticula. PMID:6810693

  4. Current state of knowledge on neuroendocrine small bowel tumours: non-systematic review of the literature based on one case

    PubMed Central

    Simion, Nicolae Irinel; Muntean, Valentin; Fabian, Ovidiu

    2013-01-01

    More than 60% of neuroendocrine tumours, also called carcinoids, are localised within the gastrointestinal tract. Small bowel neuroendocrine tumours have been diagnosed with increasing frequency over the past 35?years, being the second most frequent tumours of the small intestine. Ileal neuroendocrine tumours diagnosis is late because patients have non-specific symptoms. We have proposed to illustrate as an example the case of a patient, and on its basis, to make a brief review of the literature on small bowel neuroendocrine tumours, resuming several recent changes in the field, concerning classification criteria of these tumours and new recommendations and current advances in diagnosis and treatment. This patient came to our emergency department with a complete bowel obstruction, along with a 2-year history of peristaltic abdominal pain, vomits and diarrhoea episodes. During emergency laparotomy, an ileal stricture was observed, that showed to be a neuroendocrine tumour of the small bowel. PMID:23329706

  5. Quantitative in vivo analysis of small bowel motility using MRI examinations in mice--proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, S; Wurnig, M C; Lesurtel, M; Patak, M A; Boss, A

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel motility analyses using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce current invasive techniques in animal studies and comply with the 'three Rs' rule for human animal experimentation. Thus we investigated the feasibility of in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice using dynamic MRI acquisitions. All experimental procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Six C57BL/6 mice underwent MRI without additional preparation after isoflurane anaesthetization in the prone position on a 4.7 T small animal imager equipped with a linear polarized hydrogen birdcage whole-body mouse coil. Motility was assessed using a true fast imaging in a steady precession sequence in the coronal orientation (acquisition time per slice 512?ms, in-plane resolution 234?×?234?µm, matrix size 128?×?128, slice thickness 1?mm) over 30?s corresponding to 60 acquisitions. Motility was manually assessed measuring the small bowel diameter change over time. The resulting motility curves were analysed for the following parameters: contraction frequency per minute (cpm), maximal contraction amplitude (maximum to minimum [mm]), luminal diameter (mm) and luminal occlusion rate. Small bowel motility quantification was found to be possible in all animals with a mean small bowel contraction frequency of 10.67?cpm (SD?±?3.84), a mean amplitude of the contractions of 1.33?mm (SD?±?0.43) and a mean luminal diameter of 1.37?mm (SD?±?0.42). The mean luminal occlusion rate was 1.044 (SD?±?0.45%/100). The mean duration needed for a single motility assessment was 185?s (SD?±?54.02). Thus our study demonstrated the feasibility of an easy and time-sparing functional assessment for in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice. This could improve the development of small animal models of intestinal diseases and provide a method similar to clinical MR examinations that is in concordance with the 'three Rs' for humane animal experimentation. PMID:25266965

  6. Small Bowel Carcinoids: A Single Surgeon’s Experience in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Nishchit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel carcinoid tumours are indolent neuroendocrine tumours usually seen in the 6th and 7th decades. Most often, they are silent with non-specific symptoms. They generate serotonin, provoking a desmoplastic reaction in the mesentery leading to bowel ischemia and obstruction. While CECT abdomen can help raise suspicion and show regional spread, elevated 24-hour urinary 5-HIAA levels, histopathology and immunohistochemistry for Chromogranin A are confirmatory. Aim To analyse a single surgeon’s experience of clinical features and diagnosis of carcinoid tumours of the small intestine. Setting and Design Retrospective study conducted at MS Ramaiah Medical College and Hospital, Bangalore, India. Materials and Methods Fourteen cases of carcinoid of the small bowel presenting to our institution over a 9-year period between December 2005 and November 2014 comprised the study. This included 10 males to 4 females aged 43 to 67 years (Mean: 54.4 years). The patients were investigated using x-ray abdomen, barium study, CECT abdomen, colonoscopy and 24-hour urinary 5- HIAA levels. All patients were surgically treated and histological examination of the resected tumours and immunohistochemistry for Chromogranin A was performed. Results Twelve patients with ileal carcinoids presented with long standing intestinal colic and sub-acute obstruction. Two patients with jejunal carcinoids had epigastric pain. X-ray abdomen was suggestive of small bowel obstruction in 12 patients. CECT abdomen done in 6 patients, showed ileal narrowing causing proximal dilatation; and cocooining of ileal loops at ileo-caecal junction in 2 cases. Ten patients underwent segmental resection-anastomosis of the tumour-bearing intestine while 4 patients underwent a right hemicolectomy. Lymph node spread was seen in 8 patients of whom 4 had liver metastases. Histopathology and Chromogranin A positivity confirmed the diagnoses. Postoperatively, 24-hour urinary 5-HIAA was mildly elevated in 2 patients. 12 patients were disease free at mean follow up of 4.3 years. 2 patients died due to inanition at 3 and 5 months postoperatively. Conclusion Carcinoid tumours of small intestine are uncommon in southern India. But they should be considered as differential diagnosis when intestinal tuberculosis is suspected in the elderly presenting with intestinal colic or sub-acute obstruction. They are associated with good prognosis after adequate resection. PMID:26675028

  7. Volvulus of Small Bowel in a Case of Simple Meconium Ileus

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Bilal; Sheikh, Afzal

    2011-01-01

    Meconium ileus is one of important causes of neonatal intestinal obstruction. Many patients respond well to nonsurgical management with enemas, however, few patients may develop complications in the postnatal period thus requiring urgent operation. A 2 day old newborn presented with clinical features of intestinal obstruction. There was a suspicion of meconium ileus. Contrast x-ray with gastrografin enema was suggestive of unused colon with beaded appearance. Patient had to be surgery as repeated enemas did not improve the condition and progressive abdominal distension occurred. At exploration twist of the dilated, meconium filled loop of small bowel found. De-twisting of the volvulus done and Bishop Koop ileostomy fashioned. Patient made an uneventful recovery. Stoma was closed six months later. PMID:22953274

  8. Seatbelt injury causing small bowel devascularisation: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Vincent; Kiernan, Christine; Lowery, Aoife; Khan, Waqar; Barry, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The use of seatbelts has increased significantly in the last twenty years, leading to a decrease in mortality from road traffic accidents (RTA). However, this increase in seatbelt use has also led to a change in the spectrum of injuries from RTA; abdominal injuries, particularly intestinal injuries have dramatically increased with the routine use of seatbelts. Such intestinal injuries frequently result from improper placement of the "lap belt". We present 3 cases in which passengers wearing a seatbelt sustained significant devascularisation injuries to the small bowel requiring emergency surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is crucial in such cases to prevent delays in diagnosis that can lead to severe complications and adverse outcomes. It is evident that while advocating seatbelt use, the importance of education in correct seatbelt placement should also be a focus of public health strategies to reduce RTA morbidity and mortality. PMID:22046543

  9. Unusual gastric band migration outcome: distal small bowel obstruction and coming out per-rectum.

    PubMed

    Bassam, Alkhalifah

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of unusual gastric band migration outcome. A 54 years old female was submitted to laparoscopic adjustable gastric band in September 2001. In September 2009 she developed access-port infection which needed drainage and access-port removal. Three months later in December 2009 the patient was investigated due to abdominal pain and abdominal distention. X-rays and Abdomen CT revealed migrated gastric band which is completely intraluminal with its connecting tube, causing transient distal small bowel obstruction and subsequently comes out per-rectum. Band erosion and intragastric migration is a late complication that frequently needs surgical removal. There are few reported cases in the literature of migrated gastric band removal by endoscopy. However according to my knowledge, this is the first reported case of migrated gastric band coming out per rectum without need for surgical or enoscoipic removal. PMID:23346273

  10. Small bowel injury after suprapubic catheter insertion presenting 3?years after initial insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kevin M; Good, Daniel W; Brush, John P; Al-hasso, Ammar; Stewart, Grant D

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to urology with blockages of her suprapubic catheter (SPC). The catheter was replaced easily in the emergency department, however, no urine was draining, only a cloudy green fluid was visible. On cystoscopy bilious material was identified in the bladder. There was no catheter visible. There seemed to be a fistulous tract entering the bladder at the left dome. The urethra was dilated, a urethral catheter was placed and the SPC was removed. A CT demonstrated that the SPC tract transfixed a loop of pelvic small bowel and entered the bladder with no intraperitoneal contrast leak. The patient recovered well and did not require laparotomy. This case emphasises that bowel perforation, although rare, must be considered as a complication of SPC placement even years after initial insertion when catheter problems arise. Unusually, we learn that this complication may not present with abdominal pain or peritonism. PMID:24326435

  11. Videocapsule endoscopy and single balloon enteroscopy: novel diagnostic techniques in small bowel pathology.

    PubMed

    Vere, C C; Foarf?, Camelia; Streba, C T; Cazacu, S; Pârvu, D; Ciurea, T

    2009-01-01

    Videocapsule endoscopic (VCE) exploration represents a major breakthrough in non-invasive imagistic, especially of the small bowel. Our study group consisted of 29 initial subjects admitted in the 1st Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Clinic at the Emergency County Hospital of Craiova between June 2008 and March 2009. We have excluded a number of eight subjects from the VCE-group, as their pathology represented an absolute contraindication for capsule ingestion. The remaining 21 patients (11 men - 52.38% vs. 10 women - 47.61%) underwent videocapsule diagnostic investigation followed by single balloon enteroscopy with biopsy or surgical removal, where case. Large resection cups were histologically prepared in the Pathology Department of the Emergency County Hospital of Craiova. We performed a statistical analysis of the data using Fisher's Exact Test, which is applicable to small numbered lots. In five cases (23.80%) VCE investigation did not reveal any abnormalities. Five (23.80%) cases had non-tumoral pathology, all of them being inflammatory lesions. We found tumoral lesions in 11 (52.38%) cases: five (23.80%) benign and six (28.57%) malign. We found that inflammatory lesions predominantly affected subjects in the 15-30 and 30-45 years intervals (p=0.00103), whereas tumoral lesions are positively correlated with old age, predominantly affecting the 45-60 and above 60-year-old groups (p=0.00216). VCE combined with SBE open new frontiers for small bowel exploration. Histology remains the single most accurate test for establishing the nature of a lesion. PMID:19690776

  12. Bevacizumab-induced small bowel perforation in a patient with breast cancer without intraabdominal metastases.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Edouard; Ouaffi, Lamia; Mir, Olivier; Berveiller, Paul; Maurel, Melinda; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Bouillot, Jean Luc; Veyrie, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    A 53-years-old woman presented with sudden abdominal pain. One year before, she was diagnosed an inflammatory ductal carcinoma of the left breast (T3N0M0) and received 6 cycles of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by 9 cycles of paclitaxel. A radical left mastectomy with lymphadenectomy was performed. On histopathology, the invasive ductal carcinoma was poorly differentiated, histological grade III without lymphovascular emboli, expressing E-cadherin, with negative hormone receptors status and no HER-2 overexpression. The final staging after chemotherapy was pT3N1M0, necessitating an adjuvant radiotherapy. Four months postoperatively, a CT-scan revealed liver and lung metastases and chemotherapy combining gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab was started for 13 days when she suddenly developed severe abdominal pain. A CT-scan showed a pneumoperitoneum. She had a median laparotomy confirming the diagnosis of peritonitis by digestive perforation without ovarian, uterine, lymphatic, or peritoneal carcinomatosis. Assessment of the totality of the gastrointestinal tract showed two distinct punched out perforations of the small bowel, without macroscopic signs of tumor or metastases: one on the jejunum at 50 cm from the Treitz and the second at 10 cm of the end of the ileum. Small bowel resection with jejunojejunostomy and a lateral ileostomy were performed. Regarding the macroscopical pathological findings, the mucosa showed an ulceration measuring of 1 cm without tumor. On microscopy we found a tranparietal neoplastic infiltration. Vessels were morphologically normal with tumoral cells' morphology and architecture identical to the primary breast carcinoma. Chemotherapy was not reintroduced after surgery and the patient died on the 57th postoperative day. PMID:20676743

  13. The challenge of segmental small bowel motility quantitation using MR enterography

    PubMed Central

    Menys, A; Plumb, A; Atkinson, D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of “cine” MRI using segmental regions of interest (ROIs) has become increasingly popular for investigating bowel motility; however, variation in motility in healthy subjects both within and between scans remains poorly described. Methods: 20 healthy individuals (mean age, 28 years; 14, males) underwent MR enterography to acquire dynamic motility scans in both breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) on 2 occasions. Motility data were quantitatively assessed by placing four ROIs per subject in different small bowel segments and applying two measures: (1) contractions per minute (CPM) and (2) Jacobian standard deviation (SD) motility score. Within-scan (between segment) variation was assessed using intraclass correlation (ICC), and repeatability was assessed using Bland–Altman limits of agreement (BA LoA). Results: Within-scan segmental variation: BH CPM and Jacobian SD metrics between the four segments demonstrated ICC R?=?0.06, p?=?0.100 and R?=?0.20, p?=?0.027 and in FB, the CPM and Jacobian SD metrics demonstrated ICC R?=??0.26, p?=?0.050 and R?=?0.19, p?=?0.030. Repeatability: BH CPM for matched segments ranged between 0 and 14 contractions with BA LoA of ±8.36 and Jacobian SD ranged between 0.09 and 0.51 with LoA of ±0.33. In FB data, CPM ranged between 0 and 10 contractions with BA LoA of ±7.25 and Jacobian SD ranged between 0.16 and 0.63 with LoA?=?±0.28. Conclusion: The MRI-quantified small bowel motility in normal subjects demonstrates wide intersegmental variation and relatively poor repeatability over time. Advances in knowledge: This article presents baseline values for healthy individuals of within- and between-scan motility that are essential for understanding how this process changes in disease. PMID:24919500

  14. Intestinal tachyarrhythmias during small bowel ischemia SCOTT A. SEIDEL,1 SANJAY S. HEGDE,1 L. ALAN BRADSHAW,2

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    Intestinal tachyarrhythmias during small bowel ischemia SCOTT A. SEIDEL,1 SANJAY S. HEGDE,1 L. ALAN., Sanjay S. Hegde, L. Alan Bradshaw, J. K. Ladipo, and William O. Richards. Intestinal tachyar- rhythmias electrical control activity (ECA) of the bowel is the omnipres- ent slow electrical wave of the intestinal

  15. Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth Associated with Persistence of Abdominal Symptoms in Children Treated with a Proton Pump Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Landowski, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Pawel; Kaminska, Barbara; Lifschitz, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) was diagnosed in 22.5% of 40 children treated for 3 months with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Compared with those without SBBO, children with SBBO had higher frequency of abdominal pain, bloating, eructation, and flatulence. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms after PPI treatment should be evaluated for SBBO rather than empirically prolonging PPI therapy. PMID:25681195

  16. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Panis, Y; Messing, B; Rivet, P; Coffin, B; Hautefeuille, P; Matuchansky, C; Rambaud, J C; Valleur, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reports the results of segmental reversal of the small bowel on parenteral nutrition dependency in patients with very short bowel syndrome. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be seen as an acceptable alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with very short bowel syndrome deemed to be dependent on home parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Eight patients with short bowel syndrome underwent, at the time of intestinal continuity restoration, a segmental reversal of the distal (n = 7) or proximal (n = 1) small bowel. The median length of the remnant small bowel was 40 cm (range, 25 to 70 cm), including a median length of reversed segment of 12 cm (range, 8 to 15 cm). Five patients presented with jejunotransverse anastomosis, and one each with jejunorectal, jejuno left colonic, or jejunocaecal anastomosis with left colostomy. RESULTS: There were no postoperative deaths. Three patients were reoperated early for wound dehiscence, acute cholecystitis, and sepsis of unknown origin. Three patients experienced transient intestinal obstruction, which was treated conservatively. Median follow-up was 35 months (range, 2 to 108 months). One patient died of pulmonary embolism 7 months postoperatively. By the end of follow-up, three patients were on 100% oral nutrition, one had fluid and electrolyte infusions only, and, in the four other patients, parenteral nutrition regimen was reduced to four (range of 3 to 5) cyclic nocturnal infusions per week. Parenteral nutrition cessation was obtained in 3 of 5 patients at 1 years and in 3 of 3 patients at 4 years. CONCLUSION: Segmental reversal of the small bowel could be proposed as an alternative to intestinal transplantation in patients with short bowel syndrome before the possible occurrence of parenteral nutrition-related complications, because weaning for parenteral nutrition (four patients) or reduction of the frequency of infusions (four patients) was observed in the current study. Images Figure 1. PMID:9114799

  17. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ?0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  18. Roles of NAD+, PARP-1, and Sirtuins in Cell Death, Ischemic Brain Injury, and Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray-Induced Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NAD+ plays crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including energy metabolism, aging, and calcium homeostasis. Multiple studies have also shown that NAD+ administration can profoundly decrease oxidative cell death and ischemic brain injury. A number of recent studies have further indicated that NAD+ administration can decrease ischemic brain damage, traumatic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue injury by such mechanisms as inhibiting inflammation, decreasing autophagy, and reducing DNA damage. Our latest study that applies nano-particles as a NAD+ carrier has also provided first direct evidence demonstrating a key role of NAD+ depletion in oxidative stress-induced ATP depletion. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and sirtuins are key NAD+-consuming enzymes that mediate multiple biological processes. Recent studies have provided new information regarding PARP-1 and sirtuins in cell death, ischemic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue damage. These findings have collectively supported the hypothesis that NAD+ metabolism, PARP-1 and sirtuins play fundamental roles in oxidative stress-induced cell death, ischemic brain injury, and radiation injury. The findings have also supported “the Central Regulatory Network Hypothesis”, which proposes that a fundamental network that consists of ATP, NAD+ and Ca2+ as its key components is the essential network regulating various biological processes. PMID:24386592

  19. Wireless capsule endoscopy and proximal small bowel lesions in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Calabrese, Emma; Zorzi, Francesca; Ascolani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Lolli, Elisabetta; Naccarato, Paola; Pallone, Francesco; Biancone, Livia

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of proximal small bowel (SB) lesions detected by wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) in Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: WCE was performed in 64 patients: 32 with CD of the distal ileum, and 32 controls with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) or diarrhea. WCE was performed using the Given SB-WCE, followed by small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS). Findings compatible with CD by using WCE included erosions, aphthoid or deep ulcers, and strictures/stenosis. RESULTS: WCE detected proximal SB lesions in 16/32 (50%) patients (14 aphthoid ulcers, 2 deep ulcers, one stricture), which appeared not to be related to clinical parameters [epigastric pain, age, smoking, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), IDA]. Among patients with proximal SB lesions, 6 (37%) were smokers, 3 (19%) NSAID users, 3 (19%) had epigastric pain and 4 (25%) had IDA. SICUS detected proximal SB lesions in 3/32 patients (19%) also showing lesions with WCE. No correlations were observed between proximal SB lesions assessed by WCE or by SICUS (?2 = 1.5, P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: The use of WCE allows the detection of previously unknown upper SB lesions in a high proportion of patients with a previous diagnosis of CD involving the distal ileum. PMID:20614486

  20. Management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction in older adult patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Jeremy E.; Bailey, Jonathan G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Johnson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was to examine the morbidity, mortality and rate of recurrent bowel obstruction associated with the treatment of small bowel obstruction (SBO) in older adults. Methods We prospectively enrolled all patients 70 years or older with an SBO who were admitted to a tertiary care teaching centre between Jul. 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Data regarding presentation, investigations, treatment and outcomes were collected. Results Of the 104 patients admitted with an SBO, 49% were managed nonoperatively and 51% underwent surgery. Patients who underwent surgery experienced more complications (64% v. 27%, p = 0.002) and stayed in hospital longer (10 v. 3 d, p < 0.001) than patients managed nonoperatively. Nonoperative management was associated with a high rate of recurrent SBO: 31% after a median follow-up of 17 months. Of the patients managed operatively, 60% underwent immediate surgery and 40% underwent surgery after attempted nonoperative management. Patients in whom nonoperative management failed underwent surgery after a median of 2 days, and 89% underwent surgery within 5 days. The rate of bowel resection was high (29%) among those who underwent delayed surgery. Surgery after failed nonoperative management was associated with a mortality of 14% versus 3% for those who underwent immediate surgery; however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion These data suggest that some elderly patients with SBO may be waiting too long for surgery. PMID:25421079

  1. Neutrophil and eosinophil involvement of the small bowel affected by chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, J F; Hällgren, R; Venge, P; Mesnard, B; Rambaud, J C

    1988-01-01

    Excessive ethanol intake may affect the intestinal mucosa functionally and morphologically. The ethanol effect could partly be the result of inflammatory mechanisms, possibly reflected by an enhanced local granulocyte turnover. This study investigated habitual alcoholics by segmental perfusion of the jejunum and analysed the perfusion fluid content of granulocyte granule constituents. The mean jejunal secretion rate of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a neutrophil granule constituent, was 152 (26) (SE) ng/min/40 cm jejunal segment in the controls (n = 16). The MPO secretion rate in non-cirrhotic habitual alcoholics (n = 7) was on average 450 (103) ng/min and significantly increased compared with controls (p less than 0.001). In contrast alcoholics with cirrhosis (n = 6) had normal MPO secretion rate. The mean secretion rate of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), an eosinophil granule constituent, was in the controls 77 (15) ng/min/40 cm jejunal segment. Corresponding values in non-cirrhotic and cirrhotic alcoholics were 141 (38) and 130 (93) ng/min, respectively (ns). The data suggest an enhanced neutrophil granulocyte turnover in the jejunum in alcoholics, possibly contributing to the ethanol induced affection of the small bowel. The lack of increased neutrophil activity in cirrhotic alcoholics may reflect a role of the liver for granulocyte activity. PMID:2851504

  2. Increased gastric acid secretion after massive small bowel resection is related to a decrease in enterogastrones.

    PubMed

    Sáinz, A; Lanas, A; Esteva, F; Morandeira, J R; Sáinz, R

    1995-01-01

    The reported increase of gastric secretion after small bowel (SB) resection is controversial. To determine the effect of SB resection on gastric acid secretion we studied basal and dose step pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion as well as basal serum gastrin, secretin, neurotensin and postprandial gastrin levels in 12 dogs, before and after resection of 60% of the intestine representing both proximal (n = 6) and distal (n = 6) SB. Rat bioassay was also performed to rule out the presence of unknown gastric secretagogues in the blood. Proximal SB resection produced a significant increase in basal and low dose (100 ng/kg/h) pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion (ED50 = 1,110 vs. 720 ng/kg/h after resection). However, no significant changes in gastric secretion were observed after distal SB resections. Neither proximal nor distal SB resection altered basal or postprandial serum gastrin levels. Proximal SB resection reduced serum secretin levels (229 +/- 38 vs. 134 +/- 16 pg/ml, p < 0.05) but did not alter neurotensin levels. Rat bioassay failed to reveal a circulating secretagogue after SB resections. We conclude that proximal but not distal SB resection increases basal and submaximally stimulated gastric acid secretion. Such an effect may be due to the observed decrease in circulating secretin levels. PMID:7890003

  3. Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Prostate Adenocarcinoma Prostate Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: November 05, 2015 What is prostate cancer? Prostate cancer is a disease of the prostate, a walnut-size gland in the male reproductive system.  Nearly all

  4. Disruption of the Murine Glp2r Impairs Paneth Cell Function and Increases Susceptibility to Small Bowel Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Lee, Jennifer; Li, Karen K.; Holland, Dianne; Maughan, Heather; Guttman, David S.; Yusta, Bernardo; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP-2R) activation elicits proliferative and cytoprotective responses in the gastrointestinal mucosa and ameliorates experimental small and large bowel gut injury. Nevertheless, the essential physiological role(s) of the endogenous GLP-2R remain poorly understood. We studied the importance of the GLP-2R for gut growth, epithelial cell lineage allocation, the response to mucosal injury, and host-bacterial interactions in Glp2r?/? and littermate control Glp2r+/+ mice. Glp2r?/? mice exhibit normal somatic growth and preserved small and large bowel responses to IGF-I and keratinocyte growth factor. However, Glp2r?/? mice failed to up-regulate intestinal epithelial c-fos expression in response to acute GLP-2 administration and do not exhibit changes in small bowel conductance or small or large bowel growth after administration of GLP-2R agonists. The crypt and villus compartment and the numbers and localization of Paneth, enteroendocrine, and goblet cells were comparable in Glp2r+/+ vs. Glp2r?/? mice. Although the severity and extent of colonic mucosal injury in response to 3% oral dextran sulfate was similar across Glp2r genotypes, Glp2r?/? mice exhibited significantly increased morbidity and mortality and increased bacterial translocation after induction of enteritis with indomethacin and enhanced mucosal injury in response to irinotecan. Moreover, bacterial colonization of the small bowel was significantly increased, expression of Paneth cell antimicrobial gene products was reduced, and mucosal bactericidal activity was impaired in Glp2r?/? mice. Although the Glp2r is dispensable for gut development and the response to colonic injury, Glp2r?/? mice exhibit enhanced sensitivity to small bowel injury, and abnormal host-bacterial interactions in the small bowel. PMID:22253424

  5. Double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy of intestinal hemodynamics following massive small bowel resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Rowland, Kathryn J.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Warner, Brad W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and intestinal adaptation. The exact mechanism that causes intestinal villus angiogenesis remains unknown. We hypothesize that hemodynamic changes within the remnant bowel after SBR will trigger intestinal angiogenesis. To validate this, we used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to image the microvascular system of the intestine in C57B6 mice and to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (sO2) of a supplying artery and vein. Baseline measurements were made 6 cm proximal to the ileal-cecal junction (ICJ) prior to resection. A 50% proximal bowel resection was then performed, and measurements were again recorded at the same location immediately, 1, 3 and 7 days following resection. The results show that arterial and venous sO2 were similar prior to SBR. Immediately following SBR, the arterial and venous sO2 decreased by 14.3 +/- 2.7% and 32.7 +/- 6.6%, respectively, while the arterial and venous flow speed decreased by 62.9 +/- 17.3% and 60.0 +/- 20.1%, respectively. Such significant decreases in sO2 and blood flow indicate a hypoxic state after SBR. Within one week after SBR, both sO2 and blood flow speed had gradually recovered. By 7 days after SBR, arterial and venous sO2 had increased to 101.0 +/- 2.9% and 82.7 +/- 7.3% of the baseline values, respectively, while arterial and venous flow speed had increased to 106.0 +/- 21.4% and 150.0 +/- 29.6% of the baseline values, respectively. Such increases in sO2 and blood flow may result from angiogenesis following SBR.

  6. Muscovite is protective against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Lu, Bin; Fan, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Lu; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Shuo; Meng, Li-Na

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of muscovite in preventing small bowel injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). METHODS: We recruited and screened thirty-two healthy volunteers who were randomly allocated equally into two groups: an NSAID control group, who received 75 mg slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d; and an NSAID-muscovite group, who received 3 g of muscovite in addition to the 75 mg of slow-release diclofenac, twice daily for 14 d. For gastroprotection, both groups were administered 20 mg/d of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. All eligible subjects underwent video capsule endoscopy (CE) prior to and 14 d after treatment. RESULTS: Thirty subjects (NSAID-muscovite group, n =16; NSAID control group, n =14) finally completed the whole trail. At the baseline CE examination, no statistically significant differences between the two groups have been observed. However, after 14 d of drug treatment, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of subjects with mucosal breaks when comparing the NSAID-muscovite group with the NSAID control group. While 71.4% (10/14) of subjects in the NSAID control group had at least one mucosal break, co-administration of muscovite in the NSAID-muscovite group reduced the rate to 31.3% (5/16) (P = 0.028). Moreover, higher number of mucosal breaks was found in the NSAID control group vs that in the NSAID-muscovite group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Muscovite co-therapy reduced the incidence of small intestinal injury after 14 d of diclofenac administration. PMID:25152605

  7. How much helpful is the capsule endoscopy for the diagnosis of small bowel lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Osman; Sivri, Bulent; Arslan, Serap; Batman, Figen; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the practically usefulness and diagnostic yield of this new method in a group of patients with suspected small bowel lesions. METHODS: Capsule endoscopic (CE) examination by using M2A capsule endoscope TM (Given Imaging, Yoqneam, Israel) was performed in thirty nine patients (26 males, 13 females) with suspected small intestinal lesions. The composing of the patients was as follows: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in twenty three patients, known Crohn’s disease in 6 patients, in whom CE was used to evaluate the severity and extension of the diseases, chronic diarrhea in 8 patients, abdominal pain in one patient and malignancy in one patient with unknown origin. RESULTS: In two patients CE failed. Different abnormalities were revealed in 26 patients overall. Detection rate of abnormalities was highest among patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the source of bleeding was demonstrated in 17 of 23 patients with obscure bleeding (73.9%). Entero-Behcet was diagnosed in two patients by CE as a source of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. In 6 patients with known Crohn's disease, CE revealed better evaluation of the disease extension. In 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with chronic diarrhea; CE revealed some mucosal abnormalities as the cause of chronic diarrhea. In a patient with unexplained abdominal pain and in a cancer patient with unknown origin, CE examination was normal. CONCLUSION: In our relatively small series, we found that capsule endoscopy is a useful diagnostic tool particularly in diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea and in estimating the extension of Crohn’s disease. PMID:16804980

  8. Syndromic and sporadic inflammatory/hyperplastic small-bowel polyps: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuli; Chen, Derrick; Dugum, Mohannad; Horvath, Bela; Yuan, Lisi; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory/hyperplastic small-bowel polyps (SBPs) occur either sporadically or in patients with a polyposis syndrome; however, comparison between these two settings of the histological features of SBPs has not been reported and the etiology of sporadic inflammatory/hyperplastic SBPs remains unclear. Method: Twenty-eight cases of sporadic inflammatory/hyperplastic SBPs and nine cases of syndromic SBPs were retrieved from the Department of Anatomic Pathology at the Cleveland Clinic. Clinico-demographics and histological features were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients with syndromic inflammatory/hyperplastic SBPs were younger (48 vs. 63 years; P?=?0.007) and had higher rates of hemorrhagic telangiectasia (55.6% vs. 0%; P?=?0.000), gastric polyps (87.5% vs. 21.4%; P?=?0.001), and family history of colon cancer (62.5% vs. 11.1%; P?=?0.014). Sporadic cases were more frequently associated with gastro-esophageal reflux (35.7% vs. 0%; P?=?0.079) and anti-reflux medication use (55.6% vs. 11.1%; P?=?0.026). Histologically, the syndromic SBPs were more often of pure intestinal type (45.4% vs. 3.8%; P?=?0.005) and had prominent vessels (81.8% vs. 42.3%; P?=?0.036). Conclusions: Patients with syndromic SBPs are younger and have higher rates of hemorrhagic telangiectasia, gastric polyps, and family history of colon cancer. Histologically, syndromic inflammatory/hyperplastic SBPs are more likely to be of pure intestinal type and to have prominent vessels. PMID:26049720

  9. Small-bowel mucosal injuries in low-dose aspirin users with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Mizokami, Yuji; Saito, Yoshifumi; Shimokobe, Koichi; Honda, Akira; Ikegami, Tadashi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical differences between small intestinal injuries in low-dose aspirin (LDA) users and in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) users who were examined by capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: A total of 181 patients who underwent CE for OGIB were included in this study. Based on clinical records, laboratory data such as hemoglobin levels, major symptoms, underlying diseases, the types and duration of LDA and NSAID use, and endoscopic characteristics of CE were reviewed. RESULTS: Out of a total of 45 cases of erosive lesions, 27 cases were taking LDA or NSAIDs (7 were on NSAIDs, 9 were on LDA alone, 9 were on LDA and thienopyridine, and 2 were on LDA and warfarin).The prevalence of ulcers or erosion during chronic use of LDA, LDA and the anti-platelet drug thienopyridine (clopidogrel or ticlopidine), and NSAIDs were 64.3%, 80.0%, and 75.0%, respectively. Erosive lesions were observed predominantly in chronic LDA users, while ulcerative lesions were detected mainly in NSAID users. However, concomitant use of thienopyridine such as clopidogrel with LDA increased the proportion of ulcers. The erosive lesions were located in the whole of the small intestine (jejunum and ileum), whereas ulcerative lesions were mainly observed in the ileum (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our CE findings indicate that chronic LDA users and NSAID users show different types and locations of small-bowel mucosal injuries. The concomitant use of anti-platelet drugs with LDA tends to exacerbate the injuries from LDA-type to NSAID-type injuries. PMID:25278707

  10. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation.

  11. Is virtual chromoendoscopy useful in the evaluation of subtle ulcerative small-bowel lesions detected by video capsule endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Rimba?, Mihai; Negreanu, Lucian; Ciobanu, Lidia; Bengu?, Andreea; Spada, Cristiano; B?icu?, Cristian R?svan; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Background: The identification of subtle small-bowel mucosal lesions by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) can be challenging. Virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, based on narrowing the bandwidth of conventional white light endoscopic imaging (WLI), were developed to improve the analysis of mucosal patterns. However, data on the already-implemented Flexible spectral Imaging (or Fujinon Intelligent) Color Enhancement (FICE) software application in VCE are limited. Materials and methods: An evaluation of 250 difficult-to-interpret small-bowel ulcerative and 50 artifact lesions selected from 64 VCE recordings was conducted by four experienced VCE readers in two steps: initially as WLI, then with the addition of all available virtual chromoendoscopy pre-sets (FICE 1, 2, and 3 and Blue mode). The readers labeled them as real or false ulcerative lesions and rated the usefulness of each of the pre-sets. Results: Between the first (WLI-only) and second (virtual chromoendoscopy-aided) readings, in terms of accuracy there was a global 16.5?% (95?% confidence interval [95?%CI] 13.6?–?19.4?%) improvement (P?small-bowel mucosal ulcerative lesions. However, care must be taken, and individual images should be evaluated only as part of a sequence in a recording because the technology can also mistakenly guide to the incorrect interpretation of artifacts as ulcerative lesions. PMID:26716122

  12. Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Lung Adenocarcinoma Lung Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: August 26, 2015 What is lung cancer? Lung cancer accounts for more deaths than any other cancer in both men and women, about 28 percent of all cancer deaths. In

  13. Mechanisms for dominance: Adh heterodimer formation in heterozygotes between ENU or x-ray induced null alleles and normal alleles in drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Lee, W.R.; Chang, S.H.; Silverman, H. )

    1992-01-01

    To study mechanisms for dominance of phenotype, eight ENU- and four x-ray-induced mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus were analyzed for partial dominance in their interaction with normal alleles. All ENU and one of the x-ray mutations were single base substitutions; the other three x-ray mutations were 9-21 base deletions. All but one of the 12 mutant alleles were selected for this study because they produced detectable mutant polypeptides, but seven of the 11 producing a peptide could not form dimers with the normal peptide and the enzyme activity of heterozygotes was about half that of normal homozygotes. Four mutations formed dimers with a decreased catalytic efficiency and two of these were near the limit of detectability; these two also inhibited the formation of normal homodimers. The mutant alleles therefore show multiple mechanisms leading to partial enzyme expression in heterozygotes and a wide range of dominance ranging from almost complete recessive to nearly dominant. All amino acid changes in mutant peptides that form dimers are located between amino acids 182 and 194, so this region is not critical for dimerization. It may, however, be an important surface domain for catalyzation. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Multistep nature of X-ray-induced neoplastic transformation in golden hamster embryo cells: expression of transformed phenotypes and stepwise changes in karyotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, F.; Watanabe, M.; Nikaido, O.

    1989-04-15

    We have examined the expression of transformed phenotypes and genetic changes associated with the expression of each transformed phenotype after X-ray irradiation. Unirradiated cells grown at a constant growth rate until 8 passages (population doubling number, 15) exhibited little morphological change and ceased to divide thereafter. X-irradiated cells escaped from senescence and showed morphological alteration and anchorage independence after a population doubling number of 20. The acquisition of tumorigenicity in nude mice was observed much later (35 population doublings after irradiation). From cytogenetic analysis, all anchorage-independent clones were consistently found to have trisomy of chromosome 7. Furthermore, cells derived from tumors contained three copies of chromosome 9q in addition to the trisomy of chromosome 7. We have not detected any augmented expression of v-Ha-ras- and v-myc-related oncogenes with RNA dot-blot analysis and could not find activation of any type of oncogenes by NIH3T3 transfection experiments. Our studies demonstrated that X-ray-induced neoplastic transformation is a multistep phenomenon and that the numerical change of specific chromosomes may play an important role in the expression of each transformed phenotype. The results suggest that different endogenous oncogenes, other than the ras gene family and myc oncogene, could be responsible for the progressive nature of neoplastic transformation.

  15. First glimpse of the soft x-ray induced excited spin-state trapping effect dynamics on spin cross-over molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Davesne, V.; Gruber, M.; Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe ; Miyamachi, T.; Da Costa, V.; Boukari, S.; Scheurer, F.; Joly, L.; Bowen, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Ohresser, P.; Otero, E.; Choueikani, F.; Gaspar, A. B.; Real, J. A.; Wulfhekel, W.

    2013-08-21

    The dynamics of the soft x-ray induced excited spin state trapping (SOXIESST) effect of Fe(phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (Fe-phen) powder have been investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using the total electron yield method, in a wide temperature range. The low-spin (LS) state is excited into the metastable high-spin (HS) state at a rate that depends on the intensity of the x-ray illumination it receives, and both the temperature and the intensity of the x-ray illumination will affect the maximum HS proportion that is reached. We find that the SOXIESST HS spin state transforms back to the LS state at a rate that is similar to that found for the light induced excited spin state trapping (LIESST) effect. We show that it is possible to use the SOXIESST effect in combination with the LIESST effect to investigate the influence of cooperative behavior on the dynamics of both effects. To investigate the impact of molecular cooperativity, we compare our results on Fe-phen with those obtained for Fe([Me{sub 2}Pyrz]{sub 3}BH){sub 2} (Fe-pyrz) powder, which exhibits a similar thermal transition temperature but with a hysteresis. We find that, while the time constant of the dynamic is identical for both molecules, the SOXIESST effect is less efficient at exciting the HS state in Fe-pyrz than in Fe-phen.

  16. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8?MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ?0.2?MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure. PMID:24311579

  17. The rate of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand break repair in the embryonic mouse brain is unaffected by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Following in utero exposure to low dose radiation (10–200 mGy), we recently observed a linear induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and activation of apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. No significant induction of DSB or apoptosis was observed following exposure to magnetic fields (MF). In the present study, we exploited this in vivo system to examine whether exposure to MF before and after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays impacts upon DSB repair rates. Materials and methods: 53BP1 foci were quantified following combined exposure to radiation and MF in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. Embryos were exposed in utero to 50 Hz MF at 300 ?T for 3 h before and up to 9 h after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays. Controls included embryos exposed to MF or X-rays alone plus sham exposures. Results: Exposure to MF before and after 100 mGy X-rays did not impact upon the rate of DSB repair in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment compared to repair rates following radiation exposure alone. Conclusions: We conclude that in this sensitive system MF do not exert any significant level of DNA damage and do not impede the repair of X-ray induced damage. PMID:25786477

  18. Effectiveness of polaprezinc for low-dose aspirin-induced small-bowel mucosal injuries as evaluated by capsule endoscopy: a pilot randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small-bowel injury has not been established. Polaprezinc, a chelate of zinc and L-carnosine, may be efficacious for such injury. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled study to investigate whether polaprezinc is effective against LDA-induced small-bowel injuries. Methods Consecutive patients under long-term (>3 months) LDA treatment and who agreed to participate in our study underwent initial capsule endoscopy (CE). Patients with LDA-induced small-bowel injury apparent upon initial CE (n?=?20) were randomized into a polaprezinc (150 mg/day for 4 weeks) group and a control (no polaprezinc treatment) group. All underwent follow-up CE after 4 weeks. Changes in the number and characteristics of small-bowel mucosal injuries were compared within and between the two groups. Results The median number of reddened lesions and erosions/ulcers upon follow-up CE in the polaprezinc group significantly decreased (P?small-bowel mucosal injury associated with long-term LDA therapy. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000003687. PMID:23826914

  19. Syngeneic small-bowel grafting increases susceptibility to lethal graft-versus-host disease in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, E; Kamada, N; Enosawa, S; Toyama, N; Miyata, M

    1995-01-01

    The rat model has been used to present evidence of the effect of surgical damage on the immune system. Syngeneic small bowel transplantation (SBT) has been used to show an increased incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as well as thymic atrophy and altered host T cell proliferative response. Syngeneic auxiliary SBT was carried out between (LEW x BN)F1 hybrids. Varying amounts of LEW mesenteric lymphocytes were injected into the last animals to induce GVHD. Results showed that in the SBT recipients the incidence of lethal GVHD was increased when compared with untreated or sham-laparotomy controls. Marked thymic atrophy was also observed, while the number of hepatic lymphocytes increased transiently. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A or interleukin-2 was impaired for up to 21 days postoperatively, whereas the mixed lymphocyte reaction reactivity was not affected. These results show that the number and proliferative activity of thymic T cells were impaired after major small bowel transplantation surgery and that extrathymic lymphocytes were developed in the liver. PMID:7890001

  20. Enteroscopic Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Diverticular Hemorrhage: A Multicenter Report from the Taiwan Association for the Study of Small Intestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang-Yuan; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Hsu, Chen-Ming; Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chu, Yen-Chang; Chang, Chen-Wang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Huang, Tien-Yu; Yen, Hsu-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel diverticulum is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diverticular hemorrhage is clinically challenging before the development of deep enteroscopy. In this multicenter study from the Taiwan Association for the Study of Small Intestinal Diseases (TASSID), 608 patients underwent deep enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding during January 2004 and April 2010 from eight medical centers in Taiwan. Small bowel diverticular hemorrhage account for 7.89% of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in this study. Most of the patients received endoscopic therapy with an initial hemostasis rate of 85.71% and rebleeding rate of 20%. In this large case series investigating the enteroscopic management of small intestinal diverticular hemorrhage, we found that, as to patients with peptic ulcer hemorrhage, most of these patients can be successfully managed by endoscopic therapy before surgery in the era of deep enteroscopy. PMID:26351451

  1. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  2. X-ray-induced catalytic active-site reduction of a multicopper oxidase: structural insights into the proton-relay mechanism and O2-reduction states.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Centeno-Leija, Sara; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    During X-ray data collection from a multicopper oxidase (MCO) crystal, electrons and protons are mainly released into the system by the radiolysis of water molecules, leading to the X-ray-induced reduction of O2 to 2H2O at the trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) of the enzyme. In this work, 12 crystallographic structures of Thermus thermophilus HB27 multicopper oxidase (Tth-MCO) in holo, apo and Hg-bound forms and with different X-ray absorbed doses have been determined. In holo Tth-MCO structures with four Cu atoms, the proton-donor residue Glu451 involved in O2 reduction was found in a double conformation: Glu451a (?7?Å from the TNC) and Glu451b (?4.5?Å from the TNC). A positive peak of electron density above 3.5? in an Fo - Fc map for Glu451a?O(?2) indicates the presence of a carboxyl functional group at the side chain, while its significant absence in Glu451b strongly suggests a carboxylate functional group. In contrast, for apo Tth-MCO and in Hg-bound structures neither the positive peak nor double conformations were observed. Together, these observations provide the first structural evidence for a proton-relay mechanism in the MCO family and also support previous studies indicating that Asp106 does not provide protons for this mechanism. In addition, eight composite structures (Tth-MCO-C1-8) with different X-ray-absorbed doses allowed the observation of different O2-reduction states, and a total depletion of T2Cu at doses higher than 0.2?MGy showed the high susceptibility of this Cu atom to radiation damage, highlighting the importance of taking radiation effects into account in biochemical interpretations of an MCO structure. PMID:26627648

  3. Al/Cu/sub 2/O thermite compatibility studies by x-ray photoelectron and x-ray induced Auger spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.S.; Haws, L.D.; Moddeman, W.E.; Rengan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The surface chemistry of A1/Cu/sub 2/O thermite in powdered mixtures and in pressed pellets was studied before and after accelerated agings with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and with x-ray induced Auger spectroscopy (XAES). The kinetic energies of the XPS or XAES signals were observed for A1 1s, Cu 2p/sub 1/2/, Cu 2p/sub 3/2/, Cu L/sub 3/-MM, O 1s, Al K-LL, C 1s and Cu 3s. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ film thicknesses on Al metal surfaces were deduced from signal intensity ratios of Al/sup +3/ and Al in XPS of Al 2s and from Al K-LL XAES signals. The oxide thicknesses on Al powders from the manufacturer were measured. Mixing Al with Cu/sub 2/O at room temperature, to form the thermitic composition, induced oxidation of the Al and increased the oxide film thickness. Hot pressing of thermite powders at 425/sup 0/C to form pellets was found to double the oxide layer. This oxide layer was found to protect the Al fuel; further aging of these pellets at 180/sup 0/C for several months showed a negligible change in composition and thickness of the surface oxide. The bulk of the pellet was found to be stable and of good quality. Stearic acid, the organic additive to Al powders, was detected by the C 1s signal. The CuO impurity in Cu/sub 2/O was observed in the Cu 2p/sub 3/2/ signal which was broadened by unpaired electron spin-spin interaction in the Cu/sup +2/d/sup 9/ orbital; both impurities were removed during the high temperature pressing operation.

  4. [Small bowel obstruction and gastric ulceration resulting from rice cake ingestion -computed tomography diagnosis in eight patients-].

    PubMed

    Oka, Akihiko; Amano, Yuji; Uchida, Yasushi; Kagawa, Kouji; Takatori, Kento; Kitajima, Naoto; Sonoyama, Hiroki; Tada, Yasumasa; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Oshima, Naoki; Moriyama, Ichiro; Yuki, Takafumi; Kawashima, Kousaku; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Here we report the cases of eight patients who developed small bowel obstruction and/or gastric ulcers after ingesting rice cake, the traditional Asian food, and were managed conservatively. This report adds to the existing literature on gastrointestinal disorders induced by rice cake ingestion, which are characterized by gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, and ulceration and are occasionally accompanied by peritonism. These conditions tend to occur in 50-60-year-old males who wear dentures or eat rapidly. Therapeutically, hard rice cake remnants in the upper gastrointestinal tract can be broken up by endoscopic snaring and can be detected by computed tomography as homogeneous high-density material at approximately 145 (range:120-206) Hounsfield units. PMID:24097152

  5. Effect of small bowel bacterial overgrowth on the immunogenicity of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Lagos, R; Fasano, A; Wasserman, S S; Prado, V; San Martin, O; Abrego, P; Losonsky, G A; Alegria, S; Levine, M M

    1999-11-01

    Several live oral vaccines (polio, bovine rotavirus, CVD 103-HgR cholera) are less immunogenic in developing than in industrialized countries. It was hypothesized that proximal small bowel bacterial overgrowth (common in children in less developed countries but rare in industrialized settings) diminishes the vibriocidal antibody response to CVD 103-HgR. In total, 202 fasting Santiago schoolchildren aged 5-9 years had lactulose breath H2 tests to detect proximal small bowel bacteria 1 day before ingesting CVD 103-HgR. Florid small bowel overgrowth was observed in 10 (5.6%) of 178 analyzable children. In children with florid overgrowth, vibriocidal seroconversion differed little from other children (60% vs. 67%), but the geometric mean titer was lower (160 vs. 368; P=.25). By logistic regression, increased peak breath H2 at small bowel time points was associated with diminished seroconversion (P=.04), as was the interaction of H2 value and weight (children >25 kg had lower seroconversion rates among subjects with heaviest overgrowth). PMID:10515838

  6. Clinical utility of capsule endoscopy with flexible spectral imaging color enhancement for diagnosis of small bowel lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yasushi; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Osuga, Takahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Tamura, Fumito; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: The clinical utility of computed virtual chromoendoscopy with flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) in capsule endoscopy (CE) remains controversial. To clarify the clinical utility of FICE-enhanced CE in evaluating small bowel lesions, we quantitatively assessed white light (WL), FICE, and blue mode (BM) images and examined the sensitivity of these 3 imaging modes of small-bowel lesions from patients who underwent CE. Methods: The CIELAB color difference (?E) and visual analogue scales (VAS) were measured in 261?CE images (3 different lesion categories) using WL and FICE set 1, 2, and 3, and BM images, respectively. Three endoscopists reviewed CE videos with WL, 3 FICE mode settings, and BM, and compared the sensitivity and detectability for small intestinal diseases from 50 patients who underwent CE. Results: In the assessment of visibility in the 152 vascular lesion images, the ?E and VAS of FICE set 1, 2, and BM images were significantly higher than that of WL images. In 88 erosion/ulceration images, the ?E and VAS of FICE set 1 and 2 images were significantly higher than that of WL images. In 21 tumor images, there were no significant differences in ?E among these modalities. When analyzed on a per-patient basis, FICE settings 1 and 2 had the highest sensitivity (100?%) and specificity (97.3?–?100?%) for vascular lesions. As for erosive/ulcerative lesions, FICE setting 2 had the highest sensitivity (100?%) and specificity (97.2?%). For tumors or polyps, WL had the highest sensitivity (90.9?%) and specificity (87.1?%). In per-lesion analysis, FICE settings 1 and 2 showed significantly superior detection ability over WL for vascular lesions. In the detection of erosive/ulcerative lesions, FICE setting 2 was significantly superior to WL. In tumor images, there was no significant improvement with any of the settings relative to WL images. Conclusions: FICE is most useful for improving CE image quality and detection in cases of angioectasia and erosion/ulceration of the small intestine. PMID:26135265

  7. High-Fat Diet Enhances Villus Growth During the Adaptation Response to Massive Proximal Small Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Pamela M.; Sun, Raphael C.; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high-fat diet (HFD) enhances adaptation if provided immediately following small bowel resection (SBR). The purpose of this study was to determine if HFD could further enhance villus growth after resection-induced adaptation had already taken place. C57/Bl6 mice underwent a 50 % proximal SBR or sham operation and were then provided a standard rodent liquid diet (LD) ad lib. After a typical period of adaptation (7 days), SBR and sham-operated mice were randomized to receive either LD or HFD (42 % kcal fat) for an additional 7 days. Mice were then harvested, and small intestine was collected for analysis. Adaptation occurred in both SBR groups; however, the SBR/HFD had significantly increased villus height compared to SBR/LD. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction of villus enterocytes showed a marked increase in CD36 expression in the SBR/HFD group compared with SBR/LD mice. While exposure to increased enteral fat alone did not affect villus morphology in sham-operated mice, HFD significantly increased villus growth in the setting of resection-induced adaptation, supporting the clinical utility of enteral fat in augmenting adaptation. Increased expression of CD36 suggests a possible mechanistic role in dietary fat metabolism and villus growth in the setting of short gut syndrome. PMID:24002772

  8. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

  9. A single-center United States experience with bleeding Dieulafoy lesions of the small bowel: diagnosis and treatment with single-balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lipka, Seth; Rabbanifard, Roshanak; Kumar, Ambuj; Brady, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A Dieulafoy lesion (DL) of the small bowel can cause severe gastrointestinal bleeding, and presents a difficult clinical setting for endoscopists. Limited data exists on the therapeutic yield of treating DLs of the small bowel using single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE). Methods: Data were collected from Tampa General Hospital a 1 018-bed teaching hospital affiliated with University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. Patients were selected from a database of patients that underwent SBE from January 2010 – August 2013. Results: Eight patients were found to have DL an incidence of 2.6?% of 309 SBE performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. 7/8 were identified in the jejunum, with one found in the duodenum. The mean age of patients with DL was 71.5 years old. 6/8 patients were on some form of anticoagulant/antiplatelet agent. The primary modality of therapy employed was electrocautery, multipolar electrocoagulation in seven patients and APC (argon plasma coagulation) in one patient. In three patients, electrocoagulation was unsuccessful and hemostasis was achieved with clip placement. Three patients required repeat SBE with one found to have rebleeding from a failed clip with hemostasis achieved upon reapplication of one clip. Conclusion: In our United States’ experience, SBE offers a reasonable therapeutic approach to treat DL of the small bowel with low rates of rebleeding, no adverse events, and no patient requiring surgery. PMID:26356602

  10. Altered transcription of murine genes induced in the small bowel by administration of probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Taylor, Corinda; Lawley, Blair; Loach, Diane; Gould, Maree; Dunn, Amy C; McLellan, Alexander D; Black, Michael A; McNoe, Les; Dekker, James; Gopal, Pramod; Collett, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is a probiotic strain reported to increase resistance to epithelium-adherent and -invasive intestinal pathogens in experimental animals. To increase understanding of the relationship between strain HN001 and the bowel, transcription of selected genes in the mucosa of the murine small bowel was measured. Mice previously naive to lactobacilli (Lactobacillus-free mice) were examined after daily exposure to HN001 in drinking water. Comparisons were made to results from matched Lactobacillus-free mice. Infant and adult mice were investigated to provide a temporal view of gene expression in response to exposure to HN001. Genes sgk1, angptl4, and hspa1b, associated with the apoptosis pathway, were selected for investigation by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR on the basis of a preliminary duodenal DNA microarray screen. Normalized to gapdh gene transcription, these three genes were upregulated after 6 to 10 days exposure of adult mice to HN001. Angptl4 was shown by immunofluorescence to be upregulated in duodenal epithelial cells of mucosal samples. Epithelial cell migration was faster in HN001-exposed mice than in the Lactobacillus-free controls. Transcriptional responses in infant mice differed according to bowel region and age. For example, sgk1 was upregulated in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa of mice less than 25 days old, whereas angptl4 and hspa1b were upregulated at 10 days in the duodenum but downregulated in the jejunal mucosa until mice were 25 days old. Overall, the results provide links between a probiotic strain, mucosal gene expression, and host phenotype, which may be useful in delineating mechanisms of probiotic action. PMID:24584241

  11. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  12. Small bowel tissue smear

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: chap 291. Semrad CE. Approach ... AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: chap 142. Giannella RA. Infectious ...

  13. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of these methods are discussed in detail below. Endoscopy and enteroscopy Endoscopes and enteroscopes are instruments used ... used as part of the CT scan. Capsule endoscopy Capsule endoscopy uses a device that is about ...

  14. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eat protein every day. Some foods may cause gas, loose stools, or constipation as you recover. Avoid foods that cause problems. If you become sick to your stomach or have diarrhea, avoid solid food and drink only clear fluids. Call your ...

  15. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reconnect, your surgeon makes an opening called a stoma through the skin of your belly. The small ... of your belly. Stool will go through the stoma into a drainage bag outside your body. This ...

  16. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition in which very large numbers of bacteria grow in the small intestine. ... of the intestine. These sacs allow too many bacteria to grow. These sacs can occur anywhere along the intestinal ...

  17. High chromosomal instability in adenocarcinoma of the ileum arising from multifocal gastric heterotopia with gastritis cystica profunda.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Schüler, Philipp; Enders, Christina; Scharf, Jens-Gerd; Cameron, Silke; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, László

    2011-12-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the small intestine arising from heterotopic gastric mucosa is extremely rare. In this report, we present the case of a 68-year-old woman who complained of abdominal pain, weight loss and subileus. Gross examination of resected small bowel revealed multiple flat polypous lesions with cysts in the ileal submucosa, one of which containing an ulcerated, stenosing tumour. On microscopic examination, an adenocarcinoma of the ileum arising from multifocal gastric heterotopia with secondary gastritis cystica profunda was diagnosed. Comparative genomic hybridization of the adenocarcinoma revealed chromosomal gains at 1q, 3q, 5p, 8q, 11p, 12p, 13q and losses at Xp, 4q, 8p, 10p, 14q, 17p, 20p, compatible with a high degree of genomic instability. PMID:20577832

  18. Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dicken, Bryan J.; Bigam, David L.; Cass, Carol; Mackey, John R.; Joy, Anil A.; Hamilton, Stewart M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This update reviews the epidemiology and surgical management, and the controversies of gastric adenocarcinoma. We provide the relevance of outcome data to surgical decision-making and discuss the application of gene-expression analysis to clinical practice. Summary Background Data: Gastric cancer mortality rates have remained relatively unchanged over the past 30 years, and gastric cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Well-conducted studies have stimulated changes to surgical decision-making and technique. Microarray studies linked to predictive outcome models are poised to advance our understanding of the biologic behavior of gastric cancer and improve surgical management and outcome. Methods: We performed a review of the English gastric adenocarcinoma medical literature (1980–2003). This review included epidemiology, pathology and staging, surgical management, issues and controversies in management, prognostic variables, and the application of outcome models to gastric cancer. The results of DNA microarray analysis in various cancers and its predictive abilities in gastric cancer are considered. Results: Prognostic studies have provided valuable data to better the understanding of gastric cancer. These studies have contributed to improved surgical technique, more accurate pathologic characterization, and the identification of clinically useful prognostic markers. The application of microarray analysis linked to predictive models will provide a molecular understanding of the biology driving gastric cancer. Conclusions: Predictive models generate important information allowing a logical evolution in the surgical and pathologic understanding and therapy for gastric cancer. However, a greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with gastric cancer is needed to guide surgical and medical therapy. PMID:15621988

  19. Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction: Clinical characteristics and diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Li, Hai-Fei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible predisposing factors of bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction (BI-SBO) and to discuss the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography, particularly contrast-enhanced scanning, in this condition. METHODS: A total of 35 BI-SBO cases treated at our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Complete clinical and computed tomography (CT) data of the patients were available and confirmed by surgery. SBO was clinically diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations. Of the 35 patients, 18 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT and 17 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT combined with contrast-enhanced examination. Original images were processed using a GE ADW4.3 workstation to obtain MPR, CPR, MIP and CTA images. The images of all patients were evaluated by two abdominal imaging experts. The main analytical contents of planar scanning included intestinal bezoar conditions, changes in the intestinal wall and changes in peri-intestinal conditions. Vascular hyperaemia and arterial blood supply conditions at a specific obstruction site and the distal end of the obstruction site were evaluated through contrast-enhanced examination. RESULTS: The proportion of males to females among the 35 cases was 1:1.69 (13:22); median age was 63.3 years. The following cases were observed: 29 (82.8%) cases occurred in autumn and winter and showed a history of consuming high amounts of persimmon and hawthorn; 19 (54.3%) cases revealed a history of gastrointestinal surgery; 19 exhibited incomplete dentition, with missing partial or whole posterior teeth; 26 suffered from obstruction at the ileum. A total of 51 bezoars were found in these patients, of whom 16 (45.7%) had multiple bezoars. CT planar scanning of bezoars showed lumps with mottled gas inside the intestinal cavity. Furthermore, 9 cases of bezoars had envelopes and 11 cases were accompanied with thickening of the distal wall of the obstructed bowel. Scanning of 17 cases was enhanced; the results revealed that the mesenteric blood vessels at the obstruction site and the proximal site were dilated, and a total of 7 cases were accompanied with distal vascular dilation and intestinal wall thickening. CONCLUSION: BI-SBO exhibits regional and seasonal characteristics. CT planar and contrast-enhanced scanning can be applied to diagnose and observe vascular conditions in obstructed zones. PMID:26361425

  20. IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel presenting as necrotizing mesenteric arteritis and a solitary jejunal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel D; Pillai, Sooraj R; Kumarasinghe, Marian Priyanthi; McGettigan, Ben; Thin, Lena W Y; Segarajasingam, Dev S; Hollingsworth, Peter N; Spagnolo, Dominic V

    2012-06-01

    Since first described in the mid 1990s, there has been burgeoning literature on IgG4-related sclerosing disease. The number of sites that may be involved is ever increasing, with the pancreas, salivary glands, and lymph nodes being the most commonly affected organs. There are no well-documented cases arising in the gastrointestinal tract. In this report, we present the first case to our knowledge of IgG4-related sclerosing disease involving the small bowel with a distinctly unusual clinicopathologic presentation. A previously well 46-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of intermittent abdominal pain with recent worsening due to small bowel obstruction. Following imaging, which showed jejunitis with surrounding mesenteric inflammatory changes, she proceeded to a segmental small bowel resection. The resected jejunum revealed an isolated, stenosing chronic ulcer associated with a necrotizing mesenteric arteritis. A transmural inflammatory infiltrate rich in IgG4 plasma cells was seen in the wall of the bowel and mesenteric artery. Abundant IgG4 interfollicular plasma cells were also identified in a mesenteric lymph node. The serum IgG4 level was elevated at >800 mg/dL (reference range 8 to 140 mg/dL). Although phlebitis is an almost constant feature of this disease, arteritis is not described other than in the lung and aorta. In this report, we also discuss the diagnostic pitfalls and the differential diagnoses that should be considered when this condition arises in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22367294

  1. First case of isolated small bowel transplantation at the university of cologne: rejection-free course under quadruple immunosuppression and endoluminal monitoring with video-capsule.

    PubMed

    Beckurts, K T E; Stippel, D; Schleimer, K; Schäfer, H; Benz, C; Dienes, H-P; Hölscher, A H

    2004-03-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the only curative form of treatment for fulminant short bowel syndrome. Results have been hampered by frequent rejection episodes as well as technical and infectious complications. We report the first case of complete small bowel transplantation performed at our institution. A 37-year-old male patient suffered from massive gut infarction due to a superior mesenteric artery embolus from a thrombus in the descending aorta resulting from hereditary protein S and C deficiency. The primary surgery resulted in a duodenocolostomy requiring total parenteral nutrition. The course was further complicated by multiple central line infections and pre-renal kidney failure induced by dehydration. After 17 months, we performed a cadaveric small bowel transplant using systemic venous drainage. The ileum was anastomosed end-to-end to the recipient ascending colon. The proximal jejunum was used to create a jejunostomy, with an end-to-side duodenojejunostomy. Immunosuppression consisted of a single-administration of antithymocyte globulin (ATG), tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and methylprednisolone given enterally from day 1. Biopsies of the upper jejunum showed no signs of rejection. The graft was monitored via capsule video endoscopy after 9 weeks and appeared normal. The patient was discharged on day 35, completely on an enteral diet and gaining weight with a good quality of life. Oral valganciclovir was given for the cytomegalovirus prophylaxis infection (donor-positive, recipient-negative constellation), with no clinical or serologic signs of infection. The early course after small bowel transplantation using a quadruple regimen was clinically successful. The use of video-capsules allows for noninvasive visual monitoring of bowel segments that cannot be reached endoscopically. PMID:15050152

  2. Ex-vivo Resection and Small-Bowel Auto-transplantation for the Treatment of Tumors at the Root of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A. R.; Mehdi, S. H.; Bahreini, A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tumors involving the root of the mesentery are generally regarded as “unresectable” with conventional surgical techniques. Resection with conventional surgery may end in life-threatening complications in these patients. Ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation avoids excessive bleeding and prevents ischemic related damage to the small intestine and other organs. Objective: To share our experience of ex-vivo resection of the tumors with involvement of small bowel mesentery followed by small bowel auto-transplantation. Methods: In this study, medical records of all the patients who underwent ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation at our center were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The most common indication for the procedure in our series was locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Our survival rate was 50% with a mean±SD follow-up of 10.1±9.8 (range: 0–26) months. Causes of early in-hospital mortality were multi-organ failure, sepsis, and cerebrovascular accident. Recurrence of disease was noted in one patient while one patient developed hepatic metastasis after 20 months of surgery. Conclusion: Ex-vivo resection of the tumor and auto-transplantation is the surgical treatment of choice for the locally advanced abdominal tumors involving the root of the mesentery. PMID:25184032

  3. Small bowel obstruction secondary to strangulation through a defect in the falciform ligament after blunt abdominal trauma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Joseph A; Norton, Karen I; Bhattacharya, Nishith; Stombaugh, Lauretta

    2010-06-01

    Obstruction caused by strangulation internal hernia secondary to incarceration within the falciform ligament, although rare, has been previously reported in the literature. These cases, however, were unrelated to trauma. We report on the first case in the pediatric literature of a strangulated internal hernia secondary to incarceration in the falciform ligament precipitated by blunt abdominal trauma. A 12-year-old girl presented to the emergency room less than 24 hours after sustaining a kick to the right upper quadrant. She described sharp, nonradiating, right-upper-quadrant abdominal pain, which was associated with nausea and vomiting. A KUB (kidney, ureter, bladder) view showed a paucity of bowel in the right upper quadrant with distended adjacent bowel. An ultrasound showed a small amount of abdominal ascites and a prominent liver. Computed tomography scan revealed a linear hypodensity at the tip of the right lobe of the liver, suggestive of a laceration. Moderate abdominal and pelvic ascites and multiple collapsed small-bowel loops with diffuse wall thickening and poor enhancement were seen in the right upper quadrant. Significantly, pneumatosis was noted, raising the question of obstruction/volvulus and/or bowel ischemia. An exploratory laparotomy revealed incarcerated small bowel herniated into a defect in the falciform ligament, which was resected. The defect was repaired. Seemingly trivial trauma may play a precipitating role in strangulation in a patient who already has a defect in the falciform ligament. PMID:20531130

  4. Incidence of bloodstream infections in small bowel transplant recipients receiving selective decontamination of the digestive tract: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Galloway, David; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Goldschmidt, Monique; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Courter, Joshua; Nathan, Jaimie D; Alonso, Maria; Tiao, Greg; Fei, Lin; Kocoshis, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing small bowel transplantation are susceptible to postoperative CLABSI. SDD directed against enteric microbes is a strategy for reducing CLABSI. We hypothesized that SDD reduces the frequency of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and allograft rejection during the first 30 days following transplant. A retrospective chart review of 38 pediatric small bowel transplant recipients at CCHMC from 2003 to 2011 was conducted. SDD antimicrobials were oral colistin, tobramycin, and amphotericin B. The incidence of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and rejection episodes were compared between study periods. The incidence of CLABSI did not differ between study periods (6.9 CLABSI vs. 4.6 CLABSI per 1000 catheter days; p = 0.727), but gram positives and Candida predominated in the first 30 days. Incidence of bacterial infections outside the bloodstream did not differ (p = 0.227). Rejection occurred more frequently during the first month following transplant (p = 0.302). SDD does not alter the incidence of CLABSI, bacterial infections outside the bloodstream, or allograft rejection in the immediate 30 days post-transplantation. However, SDD does influence CLABSI organism types (favoring gram positives and Candida) and Candidal infections outside the bloodstream. PMID:26332092

  5. Indications for Detection, Completion, and Retention Rates of Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy Based on the 10-Year Data from the Korean Capsule Endoscopy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lim, Chi Yeon; Cheung, Dae Young; Cheon, Jae Hee; Ye, Byong Duk; Song, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin Su; Do, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Kwang Jae; Shim, Ki-Nam; Chang, Dong Kyung; Park, Cheol Hee; Jang, Byung Ik; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chun, Hoon Jai; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Kim, Jin Oh

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Capsule endoscopy (CE) is widely used. However, CE has limitations including incomplete examination, inadequate bowel preparation, and retention. The aim of this study was to estimate the indications for and detection, completion, and retention rates of small intestine CE based on the 10-year data from the Korean Capsule Endoscopy Registry. Methods Twenty-four hospitals participated in this study. Clinical information, such as reasons for CE, method and quality of bowel preparation, and incomplete examination and capsule retention rates, was collected and analyzed. Results A total of 2,914 CEs were registered. The most common reason for CE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (59%). Significant lesions were detected in 66% of cases. Positive CE diagnosis occurred in 63% of cases. The preparation method did not significantly affect the quality of bowel preparation for CE. The overall incomplete rate was 33%, and was high in the elderly and those with poor bowel preparation. Capsule retention was 3% and high in patients with small bowel tumors and Crohn's disease and in children under 10 years of age. Conclusions CE is a valuable technique; while the overall detection rate is high, incompletion and retention rates are also relatively high. CE should be carefully considered in the elderly and children less than 10 years of age, as well as in patients with small bowel tumors and Crohn's disease. PMID:26473123

  6. A report of disseminated adenocarcinoma presenting as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Lopera, Elisa Lopera; Aguayo, Miguel Ángel; Montes, Yelda Hernandez; Llamas, Jose Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, peripheral thrombocytopenia, and organ failure of variable severity. TMAs encompass thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), typically characterized by fever, central nervous system manifestations and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), in which renal failure is the prominent abnormality. In patients with cancer TMAs may be related to various antineoplastic drugs or to the malignant disease itself. The reported series of patients with TMAs directly related to cancer are usually heterogeneous, retrospective, and encompass patients with hematologic malignancies with solid tumors or receiving chemotherapy, each of which may have distinct presentations and pathophysiological mechanisms. Patients with disseminated malignancy who present with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia may be misdiagnosed as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) Only a few cases of TTP secondary to metastatic adenocarcinoma are known in the literature. We present a case of a 34-year-old man with TTP syndrome secondary to metastatic small-bowel adenocarcinoma. Patients with disseminated malignancy had a longer duration of symptoms, more frequent presence of respiratory symptoms, higher lactate dehydrogenase levels, and more often failed to respond to plasma exchange treatment. A search for systemic malignancy, including a bone marrow biopsy, is appropriate when patients with TTP have atypical clinical features or fail to respond to plasma exchange. PMID:22184535

  7. A report of disseminated adenocarcinoma presenting as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Lopera, Elisa Lopera; Aguayo, Miguel Ángel; Montes, Yelda Hernandez; Llamas, Jose Carlos

    2011-08-31

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, peripheral thrombocytopenia, and organ failure of variable severity. TMAs encompass thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), typically characterized by fever, central nervous system manifestations and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), in which renal failure is the prominent abnormality. In patients with cancer TMAs may be related to various antineoplastic drugs or to the malignant disease itself. The reported series of patients with TMAs directly related to cancer are usually heterogeneous, retrospective, and encompass patients with hematologic malignancies with solid tumors or receiving chemotherapy, each of which may have distinct presentations and pathophysiological mechanisms. Patients with disseminated malignancy who present with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia may be misdiagnosed as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) Only a few cases of TTP secondary to metastatic adenocarcinoma are known in the literature. We present a case of a 34-year-old man with TTP syndrome secondary to metastatic small-bowel adenocarcinoma. Patients with disseminated malignancy had a longer duration of symptoms, more frequent presence of respiratory symptoms, higher lactate dehydrogenase levels, and more often failed to respond to plasma exchange treatment. A search for systemic malignancy, including a bone marrow biopsy, is appropriate when patients with TTP have atypical clinical features or fail to respond to plasma exchange. PMID:22184535

  8. Effect of proximal gastric vagotomy and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty on gastric functions and growth in puppies after massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S A; Telander, R L; Go, V L; Dozois, R R

    1979-08-01

    The effects of truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty and proximal gastric vagotomy on gastric acid hypersecretion, hypergastrinemia, and growth after massive bowel resection were studied in beagle puppies. In puppies with 80% enterectomy, neither type of vagotomy alters significantly the postprandial hypersecretion of acid from the Heidenhain pouch or the concentration of serum gastrin. Proximal gastric vagotomy tended to decrease the hypersecretion more than did truncal vagotomy. In beagle puppies undergoing 70% small bowel resection, growth was significantly decreased but survival was not impaired. Neither proximal gastric vagotomy nor truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty reversed completely the impaired growth produced by massive resection. Proximal gastric vagotomy caused a small improvements in growth, while truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty resulted in a slight decrease in growth. It remains possible that proximal gastric vagotomy could be of value in the management of growing infants with hypersecretion of acid due to short bowel syndrome. PMID:490290

  9. Electronic structure and soft-X-ray-induced photoreduction studies of iron-based magnetic polyoxometalates of type {(M)M5}12Fe(III)30 (M = Mo(VI), W(VI)).

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Karsten; Derks, Christine; Taubitz, Christian; Prinz, Manuel; Joly, Loïc; Kappler, Jean-Paul; Postnikov, Andrei; Yang, Wanli; Kuznetsova, Tatyana V; Wiedwald, Ulf; Ziemann, Paul; Neumann, Manfred

    2013-06-14

    Giant Keplerate-type molecules with a {Mo72Fe30} core show a number of very interesting properties, making them particularly promising for various applications. So far, only limited data on the electronic structure of these molecules from X-ray spectra and electronic structure calculations have been available. Here we present a combined electronic and magnetic structure study of three Keplerate-type nanospheres--two with a {Mo72Fe30} core and one with a {W72Fe30} core by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), SQUID magnetometry, and complementary theoretical approaches. Furthermore, we present detailed studies of the Fe(3+)-to-Fe(2+) photoreduction process, which is induced under soft X-ray radiation in these molecules. We observe that the photoreduction rate greatly depends on the ligand structure surrounding the Fe ions, with negatively charged ligands leading to a dramatically reduced photoreduction rate. This opens the possibility of tailoring such polyoxometalates by X-ray spectroscopic studies and also for potential applications in the field of X-ray induced photochemistry. PMID:23403844

  10. X-ray induced Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} conversion in fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses for the monitoring of high-doses in microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, Shahrzad; Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Muzar, Edward; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2012-10-01

    Fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses doped with trivalent samarium were evaluated as sensors of x-ray radiation for microbeam radiation therapy at the Canadian Light Source using the conversion of trivalent Sm{sup 3+} to the divalent form Sm{sup 2+}. Both types of glasses show similar conversion rates and may be used as a linear sensor up to {approx}150 Gy and as a nonlinear sensor up to {approx}2400 Gy, where saturation is reached. Experiments with a multi-slit collimator show high spatial resolution of the conversion pattern; the pattern was acquired by a confocal fluorescence microscopy technique. The effects of previous x-ray exposure may be erased by annealing at temperatures exceeding the glass transition temperature T{sub g} while annealing at T{sub A} < T{sub g} enhances the Sm conversion. This enhancement is explained by a thermally stimulated relaxation of host glass ionic matrix surrounding x-ray induced Sm{sup 2+} ions. In addition, some of the Sm{sup 3+}-doped glasses were codoped with Eu{sup 2+}-ions but the results show that there is no marked improvement in the conversion efficiency by the introduction of Eu{sup 2+}.

  11. Application of PIXE, RBS and high energy proton microbeams to the elemental analysis of coal and coal waste. [Proton and x-ray induced x-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Oakley, S.A.; Duedall, I.W.; Woodhead, P.M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Proton and x-ray induced x-ray emission have proved to be sensitive and convenient methods to measure major trace element concentrations in bulk quantities of coal and coal waste materials. These techniques are complementary in their sensitivities as a function of atomic number, and both require little sample preparation. The PIXE measurements were made with the proton beam in air in a microprobe configuration. Collimated proton beam scans were made on several thin sections of fly ash/sludge block materials and good trace sensitivities were observed for small specific volumes; SEM scans showed a high degree of material homogeneity which precluded significant elemental variations at the approx. 100 ..mu..m spatial resolution used. Rutherford backscattering was used to directly observe major and minor elemental concentrations in coal waste materials and in several representative ranks of coals. RBS is useful for only trace concentrations of heavy elements, but it does provide a method independent of fluoresced x rays for detection of possible middle Z interferences. Arsenic, present in trace amounts in coal, is an element of concern and is enriched in fly ash. The form of As in fly ash is unknown. However, because of its volatility most of the As probably becomes attached to the surfaces of the fly ash particles during and subsequent to combustion processes. This view is supported by the fact that As is rapidly mobilized in aqueous solutions whose pH > 9.

  12. Low-Dose Radiotherapy as a Chemopotentiator of Gemcitabine in Tumors of the Pancreas or Small Bowel: A Phase I Study Exploring a New Treatment Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Regine, William F. . E-mail: wregine@umm.edu; Hanna, Nader; Garofalo, Michael C.; Doyle, Austin; Arnold, Susanne; Kataria, Ritesh; Sims, Jacqueline; Tan Ming; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of upper abdominal low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (<1.0 Gy per fraction) given in combination with, and as a chemopotentiator for, gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Gemcitabine was given at 1,250 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min on Days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy was tested at two dose levels: 60 cGy per fraction and 70 cGy per fraction. Radiotherapy was given b.i.d. on Days 1, 2, 8, and 9. Four cycles were planned. Results: Twenty-seven patients have been put on study. Ten patients have been entered in Phase I: 6 with metastatic/recurrent pancreatic carcinoma and 4 with unresectable pancreatic/small bowel carcinoma. Two of four patients at Dose Level 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The overall radiographic response was 30%, and median survival was 11 months (range, 4-37 months). Conclusion: Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy to the upper abdomen is well tolerated at 60 cGy per fraction when combined with gemcitabine. Phase II evaluation is ongoing.

  13. Plasma cell infiltration of the small bowel: lack of evidence for a non-secretory form of alpha-heavy chain disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gilinsky, N H; Mee, A S; Beatty, D W; Novis, B H; Young, G; Price, S; Purves, L R; Marks, I N

    1985-01-01

    Eight patients with diffuse plasma cell infiltration of the small bowel who had the clinical features of immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID), but whose serum was negative for free alpha-heavy chains, were investigated for evidence of a non-secretory form of alpha-chain disease (alpha-CD). Molecular sieving and immunoblotting of serum, immunoperoxidase staining of biopsy specimens, and in vitro protein synthesis studies utilising an immunoprecipitation technique and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, failed to detect any new cases of alpha-CD. Four of the eight cases were found to have diffuse intestinal lymphoma. The remaining four patients, who were unsuccessfully investigated for evidence of a significant abnormality in cellular immunity, have not developed detectable alpha-CD protein or lymphoma over a mean of 143 months. Despite continuing exposure to possible environmental stimuli, it is concluded that not all cases of IPSID elaborate detectable alpha-CD protein or evolve to lymphoma. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3928450

  14. Granulocytic sarcoma of the small bowel, greater omentum and peritoneum associated with a CBF?/MYH11 fusion and inv(16) (p13q22): a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) is an extramedullary disease which is composed of immature myeloid cells or myeloblasts and usually occurs in association with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), as an initial presentation or a relapse. GS has been associated with various cytogenetic abnormalities, particularly with the t(8;21) translocation and less frequently the inv(16) type. Case presentation We present a rare case of GS of the small bowel, greater omentum and peritoneum, which caused obstruction, in a patient with AML associated with a CBF?/MYH11 fusion gene and an inv(16) (p13q22). In this patient there was only mild myeloid hyperplasia in bone marrow aspiration but molecular analysis identified a CBF?-MYH11 fusion and inv(16) (p13;q22). Conclusion Because of its nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings, this entity can be misdiagnosed and can mimic other solid neoplasms, making it a diagnostic challenge. In a GS with no or minimal morphological changes in bone marrow aspiration it is very important to perform a cytogenetic analysis to benefit from the diagnosis and therapeutic strategy. PMID:21255400

  15. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  16. Endocervical adenocarcinoma: selected diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ronnett, Brigitte M

    2016-01-01

    Endocervical adenocarcinomas can be classified into two main types of tumors, namely, those related to high-risk human papillomavirus and those unrelated to high-risk human papillomavirus. The former, representing the vast majority, are referred to as endocervical adenocarcinomas of usual type and the latter are dominated by the gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinomas. Commonly encountered diagnostic problems concerning these endocervical adenocarcinomas include: (1) diagnosing invasion for endocervical adenocarcinomas of usual type, particularly superficial forms which must be distinguished from extensive endocervical adenocarcinoma in situ; (2) distinguishing high-risk human papillomavirus-related endocervical adenocarcinomas from endometrial endometrioid carcinomas; and (3) distinguishing benign/hyperplastic mucinous endocervical glandular proliferations from gastric-type mucinous endocervical adenocarcinomas, particularly minimal deviation adenocarcinoma. The current review provides practical points and numerous illustrative examples to guide pathologists in addressing these diagnostic challenges in routine practice. PMID:26715171

  17. The Different Dose-Volume Effects of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Using LASSO for Acute Small-Bowel Toxicity during Radiotherapy in Gynecological Patients with or without Prior Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To develop normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) to analyze dose-volume effects that influence the incidence of acute diarrhea among gynecological patients with/without prior abdominal surgery. Methods and Materials. Ninety-five patients receiving gynecologic radiotherapy (RT) were enrolled. The endpoint was defined as the grade 2+ acute diarrhea toxicity during treatment. We obtained the range of small-bowel volume in V4?Gy to V40?Gy of dose. Results. The number of patients experiencing grade 2+ acute diarrhea toxicity was 23/61 (38%) in the group without abdominal surgery (group 0) and 17/34 (50%) patients with abdominal surgery (group 1). The most significant predictor was found for the logistic NTCP model with V16?Gy as the cutoff dose for group 0 and V40?Gy for group 1. Logistic regression NTCP model parameters were TV10 ? 290?cc for V16?Gy and TV10 ? 75?cc for V40?Gy, respectively. Conclusion. To keep the incidence of grade 2+ acute small-bowel toxicity below 10%, we suggest that small-bowel volume above the prescription dose (V16?Gy) should be held to <290?cc for patients without abdominal surgery, and the prescription dose (V40?Gy) should be maintained <75?cc for patients with abdominal surgery. PMID:25136554

  18. Protective effect of melatonin-supported adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Lo; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Chai, Han-Tan; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Tong, Meng-Shen; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that combined melatonin and autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) was superior to either alone against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion (SBIR) injury induced by superior mesenteric artery clamping for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 72 hr. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 50) were equally categorized into sham-operated controls SC, SBIR, SBIR-ADMSC (1.0 × 10(6) intravenous and 1.0 × 10(6) intrajejunal injection), SBIR-melatonin (intraperitoneal 20 mg/kg at 30 min after SI ischemia and 50 mg/kg at 6 and 18 hr after SI reperfusion), and SBIR-ADMSC-melatonin groups. The results demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-?, MPO, LyG6+ cells, CD68+ cells, WBC count, and gut permeability were highest in SBIR and lowest in SC, significantly higher in SBIR-ADMSC group and further increased in SBIR-melatonin group than in the combined therapy group (all P < 0.001). The ischemic mucosal damage score, the protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-?, NF-?B, MMP-9, MPO, and iNOS), oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2, and oxidized protein), apoptosis (APAF-1, mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP), mitochondrial damage (cytosolic cytochrome C) and DNA damage (?-H2AX) markers, as well as cellular expressions of proliferation (PCNA), apoptosis (caspase-3, TUNEL assay), and DNA damage (?-H2AX) showed an identical pattern, whereas mitochondrial cytochrome C exhibited an opposite pattern compared to that of inflammation among all groups (all P < 0.001). Besides, antioxidant expressions at protein (NQO-1, GR, and GPx) and cellular (HO-1) levels progressively increased from SC to the combined treatment group (all P < 0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin-ADMSC treatment offered additive beneficial effect against SBIR injury. PMID:26013733

  19. Comparison of the diagnostic yield and outcomes between standard 8 h capsule endoscopy and the new 12 h capsule endoscopy for investigating small bowel pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Merajur; Akerman, Stuart; DeVito, Bethany; Miller, Larry; Akerman, Meredith; Sultan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the completion rate and diagnostic yield of the PillCam SB2-ex in comparison to the PillCam SB2. METHODS: Two hundred cases using the 8-h PillCam SB2 were retrospectively compared to 200 cases using the 12 h PillCam SB2-ex at a tertiary academic center. Endoscopically placed capsules were excluded from the study. Demographic information, indications for capsule endoscopy, capsule type, study length, completion of exam, clinically significant findings, timestamp of most distant finding, and significant findings beyond 8 h were recorded. RESULTS: The 8 and 12 h capsule groups were well matched respectively for both age (70.90 ± 14.19 vs 71.93 ± 13.80, P = 0.46) and gender (45.5% vs 48% male, P = 0.69). The most common indications for the procedure in both groups were anemia and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PillCam SB2-ex had a significantly higher completion rate than PillCam SB2 (88% vs 79.5%, P = 0.03). Overall, the diagnostic yield was greater for the 8 h capsule (48.5% for SB2 vs 35% for SB2-ex, P = 0.01). In 4/70 (5.7%) of abnormal SB2-ex exams the clinically significant finding was noted in the small bowel beyond the 8 h mark. CONCLUSION: In our study, we found the PillCam SB2-ex to have a significantly increased completion rate, though without any improvement in diagnostic yield compared to the PillCam SB2. PMID:25987777

  20. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Sung, C.-C.; Ko, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 {+-} 27 cm{sup 3} and 489 {+-} 34 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001) in Group I patients with Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-3 diarrhea, respectively. The corresponding mean V100 of Group II patients was 56 {+-} 14 cm{sup 3} and 132 {+-} 19 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery.

  1. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not affect recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery when compared to traditional conservative treatment. Open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach can be attempted using open access technique. Access in the left upper quadrant should be safe. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably in case of first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band. A low threshold for open conversion should be maintained. Peritoneal adhesions should be prevented. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin can reduce incidence of adhesions. Icodextrin may reduce the risk of re-obstruction. HA cannot reduce need of surgery. PMID:21255429

  2. Comparative MiRNA Expressional Profiles and Molecular Networks in Human Small Bowel Tissues of Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Yuk Him; Ma, Terence Ping Yuen; Lam, Hugh Simon; Cheung, Hon Ming; Lee, Kim Hung; To, Ka Fai; Li, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) are acute intestinal conditions which could result in mortality and severe morbidity in preterm infants. Our objective was to identify dysregulated micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in small bowel tissues of NEC and SIP, and their possible roles in disease pathophysiology. Methods We performed differential miRNA arrays on tissues of NEC (n = 4), SIP (n = 4) and surgical-control (Surg-CTL; n = 4), and validated target miRNAs by qPCR (n = 10 each group). The association of target miRNAs with 52 dysregulated mRNAs was investigated by bioinformatics on functional and base-pair sequence algorithms, and correlation in same tissue samples. Results We presented the first miRNA profiles of NEC, SIP and Surg-CTL intestinal tissues in preterm infants. Of 28 validated miRNAs, 21 were significantly different between NEC or SIP and Surg-CTL. Limited overlapping in the aberrant expression of miRNAs between NEC and SIP indicated their distinct molecular mechanisms. A proposed network of dysregulated miRNA/mRNA pairs in NEC suggested interaction at bacterial receptor TLR4 (miR-31, miR-451, miR-203, miR-4793-3p), mediated via key transcription factors NFKB2 (miR-203), AP-1/FOSL1 (miR-194-3p), FOXA1 (miR-21-3p, miR-431 and miR-1290) and HIF1A (miR-31), and extended downstream to pathways of angiogenesis, arginine metabolism, cell adhesion and chemotaxis, extracellular matrix remodeling, hypoxia/oxidative stress, inflammation and muscle contraction. In contrast, upregulation of miR-451 and miR-223 in SIP suggested modulation of G-protein-mediated muscle contraction. Conclusions The robust response of miRNA dysregulation in NEC and SIP, and concerted involvement of specific miRNAs in the molecular networks indicated their crucial roles in mucosa integrity and disease pathophysiology. PMID:26274503

  3. Chemoprevention of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is rising rapidly in Western countries, and effective chemoprevention for this malignancy is lacking. Endoscopic surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus is currently employed to diagnose EAC at earlier stages, but this strategy has several limitations. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors are the most promising agents for prevention of EAC, and a randomized controlled trial of aspirin and esomeprazole is ongoing. Other agents under investigation include green tea, berries, and antioxidants. Cost-effectiveness analyses have shown that chemopreventive agents need to be highly effective at preventing EAC in order to have benefit beyond endoscopic surveillance. PMID:21180511

  4. Biomarkers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joza, Nicholas; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive cancer, with a median patient survival of less than one year. Clinically useful biomarkers capable of accurately assessing prognosis, as well as response to therapy, are urgently needed. At the 2014 ASCO Annual Meeting, Maus et al. (Abstract #e15199) and Neuzillet et al. (Abstract #e15200) present data on use of c-met as a prognostic biomarker, and Shultz et al. (Abstract #4133) use a multiplex antibody panel to identify predictive markers of response to gemcitabine and erlotinib. PMID:25076328

  5. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-05-27

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient's age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  6. Classification of different patterns of pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Truini, Anna; Santos Pereira, Poliana; Cavazza, Alberto; Spagnolo, Paolo; Nosseir, Sofia; Longo, Lucia; Jukna, Agita; Lococo, Filippo; Vincenzi, Giada; Bogina, Giuseppe; Tiseo, Marcello; Rossi, Giulio

    2015-10-01

    The epidemic increase of adenocarcinoma histology accounting for more than 50% of primary lung malignancies and the advent of effective molecular targeted-therapies against specific gene alterations characterizing this tumor type have led to the reconsideration of the pathologic classification of lung cancer. The new 2015 WHO classification provided the basis for a multidisciplinary approach emphasizing the close correlation among clinical, radiologic and molecular characteristics and histopathologic pattern of lung adenocarcinoma. The terms 'bronchioloalveolar carcinoma' and 'mixed adenocarcinoma' have been eliminated, introducing the concepts of 'adenocarcinoma in situ', 'minimally invasive adenocarcinoma' and the use of descriptive predominant patterns in invasive adenocarcinomas (lepidic, acinar, papillary, solid and micropapillary patterns). 'Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma' is the new definition for mucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, and some variants of invasive adenocarcinoma have been included, namely colloid, enteric and fetal-type adenocarcinomas. A concise update of the immunomorphologic, radiological and molecular characteristics of the different histologic patterns of lung adenocarcinoma is reported here. PMID:26313326

  7. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, T Y; Foulkes, W D

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be a feature of cancer susceptibility syndromes associated with germline mutations in p16, BRCA1, BRCA2, and APC. This highlights the need for a full family history in apparently sporadic cases. Somatic mutations in p16, BRCA2, and APC have also been reported in pancreatic cancer; however, K-RAS mutations appear to be the commonest oncogenic alteration. Recent advances in our understanding of the basis of hereditary cancer syndromes may be applicable to the diagnosis, treatment, and possibly prevention of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the future. PMID:8950667

  8. Adenocarcinoma arising in a gastrocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, B; Swanson, P E; Upton, M P; Yeh, M M

    2007-01-01

    Gastrocystoplasty is a form of surgical bladder augmentation or neobladder used to restore bladder capacity and compliance in children and in patients with neurogenic bladder. Other forms of bladder augmentation include ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. Reported complications of gastrocystoplasty include post-operative bleeding, haematuria, stricture, metabolic alkalosis and rupture of the gastric segment. There are reports of adenocarcinomas arising in the setting of ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. However, the first case of adenocarcinoma arising in the setting of a gastrocystoplasty is reported. PMID:17213351

  9. Adenocarcinoma arising in a gastrocystoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, B; Swanson, P E; Upton, M P; Yeh, M M

    2007-01-01

    Gastrocystoplasty is a form of surgical bladder augmentation or neobladder used to restore bladder capacity and compliance in children and in patients with neurogenic bladder. Other forms of bladder augmentation include ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. Reported complications of gastrocystoplasty include post?operative bleeding, haematuria, stricture, metabolic alkalosis and rupture of the gastric segment. There are reports of adenocarcinomas arising in the setting of ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. However, the first case of adenocarcinoma arising in the setting of a gastrocystoplasty is reported. PMID:17213351

  10. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, ...

  11. Immediate X-ray-inducible responses from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.; Majmudar, G.; Johnson, T.

    1994-04-01

    It has been nearly 6 years since we reported the induction of new proteins in human normal and tumor cells after ionizing radiation. Since that time there has been an explosion of new data and ideas from a number of laboratories regarding the immediate responses of human cells to ionizing radiation. The data are, however, extremely difficult to interpret since researchers are using confluence-arrested, log-phase, normal or tumor cells, and are exposing these to a variety of doses of ionizing radiation. It is especially difficult to interpret data from cells that are exposed to supralethal doses of ionizing radiation. Thus this session of the workshop entitled {open_quotes}Molecular, Genetic, and Cellular Basis of Radioresistance at Low Doses: A Case of Inducible Repair?{close_quotes} concentrated on inducible responses (both late and immediate) of human cells exposed to physiological doses of ionizing radiation. A major focus of future research in this field must be directed toward the function(s) of these inducible proteins and the expression of genes in DNA repair, cell cycle progression (especially radiation-induced cell progression delays) and/or cell death, including apoptosis. 32 refs.

  12. X-ray induced damage observations in ZERODUR mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; Furenlid, L.

    1997-07-01

    Catastrophic damage has been observed in some ZERODUR mirrors used as first mirrors in two beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Despite the high reflectivity of the coatings used on these mirrors, a significant flux of high energy photons penetrates below the coating and is absorbed in the substrate. Although model calculations indicate that the local temperature does not increase significantly, the authors suspect that over long time periods the absorbed flux produces structural changes in the material, leading to a build-up of surface stress, gross figure changes, and growth of fractures. These changes are probably related to the nature of the two-phase glass-ceramic composition of the ZERODUR material. Metal mirrors and single-phase materials do not exhibit such catastrophic damage under similar exposure conditions.

  13. X-ray induced demagnetization of single-molecule magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiser, Jan; Westerström, Rasmus; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald; Yang, Shangfeng; Popov, Alexey; Dunsch, Lothar; Greber, Thomas

    2014-07-21

    Low-temperature x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on the endohedral single-molecule magnet DySc{sub 2}N@C{sub 80} at the Dy M{sub 4,5} edges reveal a shrinking of the opening of the observed hysteresis with increasing x-ray flux. Time-dependent measurements show that the exposure of the molecules to x-rays resonant with the Dy M{sub 5} edge accelerates the relaxation of magnetization more than off-resonant x-rays. The results cannot be explained by a homogeneous temperature rise due to x-ray absorption. Moreover, the observed large demagnetization cross sections indicate that the resonant absorption of one x-ray photon induces the demagnetization of many molecules.

  14. Prostatic adenocarcinoma of ductal origin.

    PubMed

    Greene, L F; Farrow, G M; Ravits, J M; Tomera, F M

    1979-03-01

    Adenocarcinomas that arise from primary or secondary prostatic ducts have distinctive histopathologic features. The age of patients, symptoms, findings on digital rectal examination and determinations of serum acid and alkaline phosphatase are similar to those of patients with acinic carcinomas. Carcinomas of secondary ducts may be less responsive to endocrine manipulation and of greater malignancy than carcinomas of primary ducts. The course and survival of patients with ductal carcinomas treated conservatively are poor. PMID:219263

  15. [Advances of Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma with Micropapillary Pattern].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyu; Pang, Qingsong; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-20

    Lung adenocarcinoma with micropapillary pattern (MPP) is a kind of rare high invasive malignant tumor, which has been noticed because of high mortality. In 2011, the new pathological classification of lung adenocarcinoma classify it as an independent pathological type, researches on the individual treatment of the disease had been gradually expanded. Recent studies have demonstrated that lung adenocarcinoma with MPP has obvious heterogeneities in metastasis mechanism, clinical pathology, imageology, therapeusis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the progress of metastasis mechanism and clinical relevance in lung adenocarcinoma with MPP. PMID:26582227

  16. Upper GI and small bowel series

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the stomach may indicate the following problems: Gastric cancer Gastric ulcer - benign Gastritis Polyps (a tumor that is usually noncancerous and grows on the mucus membrane ) Pyloric stenosis ... ring Primary or idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

  17. Diverticular disease of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Aparicio, Francisco Emilio; Gutiérrez-Vega, Rafael; Gálvez-Molina, Yolanda; Ontiveros-Nevares, Patricia; Athie-Gútierrez, César; Montalvo-Javé, Eduardo E

    2012-09-01

    A diverticulum is a bulging sack in any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common site for the formation of diverticula is the large intestine. Small intestine diverticular disease is much less common than colonic diverticular disease. The most common symptom is non-specific epigastric pain and a bloating sensation. Major complications include diverticulitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, acute perforation, pancreatic or biliary (in the case of duodenal diverticula) disease, intestinal obstruction, intestinal perforation, localized abscess, malabsorption, anemia, volvulus and bacterial overgrowth. We describe the clinical case of a 65-year-old female patient with a diagnosis on hospital admittance of acute appendicitis and a intraoperative finding of diverticular disease of the small intestine, accompanied by complications such as intestinal perforation, bleeding and abdominal sepsis. This was surgically treated with intestinal resection and ileostomy and a subsequent re-intervention comprising perforation of the ileostomy and stomal remodeling. The patient remained hospitalized for approximately 1 month with antibiotics and local surgical wound healing, as well as changes in her diet with food supplements and metabolic control. She showed a favorable clinical evolution and was dismissed from the hospital to her home. We include here a discussion on trends in medical and surgical aspects as well as early handling or appropriate management to reduce the risk of fatal complications. PMID:23185148

  18. [Small bowel perforation caused by magnetic toys].

    PubMed

    Schroepfer, E; Siauw, C; Hoecht, B; Meyer, T

    2010-06-01

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is a common problem in infants and childhood, but ingestion of magnetic construction toys is very rare. In the case of ingestion of multiple parts of these magnetic construction toys, they may attract each other through the intestinal walls, causing pressure necrosis, perforation, fistula formation or intestinal obstruction. A 20-month-old boy presented with a three-day history of abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. Physical examination revealed a slighted distended abdomen. The -white blood cell count was increased, but the C-reactive protein was normal. Ultrasound and X-ray of the abdomen showed a distended bowel loop in the right upper quadrant, a moderate amount of free intraperitoneal liquid and 4 foreign bodies. Emergency laparotomy was performed and 2 perforations in the ileum were detected. The perforations were caused by a magnetic construction toy and 2 iron globes. The fourth foreign body was a glass marble. The foreign bodies were removed, both perforations were primarily sutured. The child was discharged on postoperative day 10 after an uneventful recovery. Parents should be warned against the potential dangers of children's constructions toys that contain these kinds of magnets. PMID:20549590

  19. Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    An international consortium with epidemiologic studies of Barrett's Esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Analyses so far have included alcohol consumption, anthropometry, cigarette smoking, excess risk models, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, reproductive factors, and genome-wide studies to identify susceptibility loci associated with Barrett’s esophagus and/or adenocarcinomas of the esophagus.

  20. Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Goode, R K; Corio, R L

    1988-01-01

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of salivary gland origin is an extremely rare neoplasm. The diagnosis is established on the basis of oncocytic cellular features in conjunction with dysplastic change. These dysplastic changes may occur in benign oncocytomas or arise de novo. The tumor occurs most commonly in the parotid glands of persons over 60 years of age. Tumors that measure less than 2 cm at the initial surgical procedure appear to have a better prognosis than larger tumors. Aggressive surgical intervention at the initial presentation of the neoplasm, compared to simple enucleation, seems to offer a more favorable prognosis. Recurrence is an ominous feature. Metastasis, when it occurs, is widespread. PMID:3422397

  1. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-29

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  2. [Alpha Fetoprotein-producing Lung Adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Sato, Kimiaki; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) -producing lung adenocarcinoma. A 53-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to right pneumothorax. Computed tomography showed right moderate pneumothorax, a solid tumor in the upper lobe (S3) and mediastinal lymph node swelling. The serum AFP level was as high as 223.0 ng/ml. Frozen examination revealed a low-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as AFP-producing lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26555914

  3. [Benign mimics of prostatic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kovylina, M V; Prilepskaia, E A; Govorov, A V; D'iakov, V V; Kolontarev, K B; Vasil'ev, A O; Sidorenkov, A V; Rasner, P I; Glotov, A V; Pushkar', D Iu; Nikitaev, V G; Pronichev, A N

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer occupies 2nd place on the prevalence and 6th place on mortality among all cancers in men. That is not to deny the social importance of prostate cancer, but attention is drawn to significant advantage of newly detected cases above the cancer-specific mortality. "Gold standard" for diagnosis includes morphological study of tissue fragments after transrectal multifocal prostate biopsy. The importance of the differential diagnosis is particularly relevant when analyzing fragments of prostate tissue obtained from biopsies as a false positive result may cause unnecessary and excessive treatment. This article presents the most common benign processes that can simulate various grade adenocarcinoma. Awareness about the presence of such cancer mimics and careful examination of micropreparations in most cases allows to come to the correct conclusion. PMID:25799728

  4. Catumaxomab for Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients With Gastric Adenocarcinomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type II Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type III Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

  5. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the absence or presence of distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of ... in other organs or tissues. Stage grouping The T, N, and M categories are combined (in a process called stage ...

  6. Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma showing Bcl-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Tulunay, Ozden; Orhan, Diclehan; Baltaci, Sümer; Gögü?, Cagatay; Müftüoglu, Yusuf Z

    2004-09-01

    Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma represents a rare histological variant of prostatic carcinoma with features of a papillary lesion at cystoscopy. There are conflicts regarding the existence, origin, staging, grading, treatment and clinical behavior of this tumor. The aim of the present study is to examine the expression of Bcl-2 and p53 in prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma and to evaluate its origin by analyzing prostate specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase, cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen expressions. The results confirmed the expression of prostate specific antigen and prostate specific acid phosphatase in prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The demonstrated expression of Bcl-2 was predominant in the better-differentiated tumor. Bcl-2 expression appears not to be associated with neuroendocrine differentiation as assessed by chromogranin A reactivity. Thus, the first case of a prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma showing Bcl-2 expression is presented. The tumor was negative for p53. PMID:15379952

  7. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Pelayo; Piazuelo, M Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the strongest recognized risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. This bacterial species colonizes the stomach of more than half of the world’s population; however, only a very small proportion of infected subjects develop adenocarcinoma. H. pylori causes a chronic gastritis that may last decades, and a multistep precancerous process is recognized for the most frequent histologic type of gastric adenocarcinoma: the intestinal type. The severity and long-term outcome of this infection is modulated by an increasing list of bacterial, host, and environmental factors, which interplay in a complex manner. Identification of individuals at high risk for gastric cancer that may enter a surveillance program and intervention during the precancerous process is the most suitable strategy for decreasing mortality due to this malignancy. PMID:21857882

  8. Ureteral metastasis of a prostatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Otta, Renan Javier; Gordillo, Carlos; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    The ureter is a rare location of metastasis for any kind of primary tumour. The first case of truly ureteral metastasis was described by Stow in 1909. Regarding prostatic metastasis, the frequency is much lower with only 43 cases reported in the last century. We present a case of an exceedingly rare ureteral metastasis of a prostatic adenocarcinoma. In spite of its low incidence, it should be considered in patients with ureteral obstruction and concurrent prostatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25844106

  9. Imaging preoperatively for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pietryga, Jason Alan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy which is increasing in incidence and mortality. The fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., pancreatic cancer is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2020. Patients with pancreatic cancer have an abysmal 5-year survival of 6%, and 90% of these patients eventually die from the disease. This is in large part due to the commonly advanced stage of disease at the time of diagnosis. Currently, the only potentially curative therapy for pancreatic carcinoma is complete surgical resection. Patients who undergo incomplete resection with residual disease have similar survival rates to those patients with metastatic disease and should be spared this relatively morbid surgery. Thus, the key to impacting prognosis is the detection of smaller and earlier stage lesions, and the key to optimal management is accurately determining which patients have potentially resectable surgery and which patients would not benefit from surgery. Cross-sectional imaging plays an essential role in both the diagnosis and appropriate staging of pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnosis and staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is performed with cross-sectional imaging. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is the most commonly used, best-validated imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. Modern contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to be equivalent to MDCT in detection and staging of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is very sensitive for detecting pancreatic masses; however, due to limitations in adequate overall abdominal staging, it is generally used in addition to or after MDCT. Transabdominal ultrasound and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have limited roles in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. Preoperative imaging is used to characterize patients as having resectable disease, borderline resectable disease, locally advanced disease (unresectable) and metastatic disease (unresectable). As the definitions of borderline resectable and unresectable may vary from institution to institution and within institutions, it is essential to accurately assess and describe the factors relevant to staging including: local extent of tumor, vascular involvement, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease. To facilitate this, standardized reporting templates for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have been created and published. Structured reporting for pancreatic cancer has been reported to provide superior evaluation of pancreatic cancer, facilitate surgical planning, and increase surgeons’ confidence about tumor resectability. PMID:26261722

  10. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  11. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  12. CDX-2 Expression in Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morgan L; Li, Qing K; Illei, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is a rare subtype of lung adenocarcinoma that is recognized as a variant type of primary adenocarcinoma in the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. Published immunohistochemistry studies show variable staining pattern for CDX-2 ranging from positivity in 71% of the cases to no staining. As little is known about CDX-2 expression in lung adenocarcinomas lacking histologic features of enteric differentiation, our aim was to determine the rate of CDX-2 positivity in non-enteric-type lung adenocarcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for CDX-2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, napsin A, and p40 using 4-?m sections of a previously constructed tissue microarray containing 93 primary lung adenocarcinomas that lack morphologic evidence of enteric differentiation. The cohort included 22 well, 54 moderately, and 17 poorly differentiated tumors (55 female, 38 male; age range: 42 to 86, median: 64.5). All 93 tumors were strongly CK7 positive, whereas variable CK20 staining was seen in 4 tumors (1 strong, 1 moderate, and 2 focal). Both TTF-1 and napsin A were positive in 81 of 93 (87%) tumors with only 6 of 93 (6.5%) tumors negative for both the markers. Eleven tumors were CDX-2 positive (5 strong, 3 moderate, and 3 weak), all of which were also TTF-1 and napsin A positive and p40 negative. One CDX-2-positive tumor showed focal CK20 staining. Mutation studies for EGFR/K-ras/ALK were performed in four CDX-2-positive tumors and detected a K-ras mutation in one of them. CDX-2 positivity can be seen in a subset (12%) of lung adenocarcinoma. These tumors are CK7, TTF-1, and napsin A positive and p40 negative. Focal CK20 staining is only seen in rare cases. CDX-2 positivity should not be used as the only criteria to exclude lung origin. PMID:26469326

  13. Mapping the Hallmarks of Lung Adenocarcinoma with Massively Parallel Sequencing

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, is responsible for more than 500,000 deaths per year worldwide. Here, we report exome and genome sequences of 183 lung adenocarcinoma tumor/normal ...

  14. Hereditary Factors in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    van Nistelrooij, Anna M.J.; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Wagner, Anja; Spaander, Manon C.W.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The vast majority of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cases are sporadic and caused by somatic mutations. However, over the last decades several families have been identified with clustering of EAC. Here, we review data from the published literature in order to address the current knowledge on familial EAC. Summary Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, it is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis of this type of cancer. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC to enable identification of relatives at risk, since endoscopic surveillance can diagnose preneoplastic or early neoplastic lesions leading to early treatment, with improved outcome. Key Message Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, this is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC in order to facilitate the identification of other family members with a predisposition for this type of cancer. Practical Implications Approximately 7% of BE and EAC cases are considered familial. Age at diagnosis is generally lower for patients with familial EAC as compared to sporadic cases, while other known risk factors for EAC, such as male gender and Caucasian ethnicity, do not differ between the two groups. In several described families with clustering of EAC the pattern of inheritance seems to be consistent with a rare autosomal dominant genetic trait. However, some association has been found with (attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis, mismatch repair deficiency and recently with the genes MSR1, ASCC1 and CTHRC1. Nevertheless, no specific genetic predisposition has yet been identified.

  15. Infected colonic mass revealing a lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doussot, Alexandre; Chalumeau, Claire; Combier, Christophe; Cheynel, Nicolas; Facy, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of lung adenocarcinoma revealed by infected colonic tumor in a 62-year-old man. An en bloc surgical resection was performed with uneventful recovery. The pathologic report concluded in a right mesocolic lymph node metastases from a mildly differentiated adenocarcinoma from pulmonary origin. GI metastases of lung cancer are described in the literature and are frequently asymptomatic in patient with a known primary cancer. In this patient, the complication of the metastases revealed the primary and immunochemistry permitted to adapt the systemic chemotherapy. PMID:23182674

  16. Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlah, Florentine; Haenze, Joerg; Arenz, Andrea; Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya; Gottschald, Oana R.; Seeger, Werner; Rose, Frank

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a phenomenon that could not be observed with carbon ion irradiation. Thus, in this model system evaluating angiogenesis, carbon ion irradiation may have a therapeutic advantage. This observation should be confirmed in orthotopic lung tumor models.

  17. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  18. Metastatic Thymic Adenocarcinoma from Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mina; Choi, Suk Jin; Yoon, Yong Han; Kim, Joung-Taek; Baek, Wan Ki; Kim, Young Sam

    2015-12-01

    This report describes the case of a 57-year-old man with an anterior mediastinal tumor. Four years previously, he underwent laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer. Thirty months after that procedure, bilateral pulmonary metastasectomy was performed. Twelve months later, follow-up computed tomography revealed a 1-cm pulmonary nodule on the upper lobe of the right lung and a solid mass on the anterior mediastinum, and the patient was also observed to have an elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level. Repeated pulmonary nodule resection and total thymectomy were performed. Immunohistochemical staining of the anterior mediastinal tumor revealed adenocarcinoma, and his serum CEA level returned to normal after the operation. These findings strongly suggested metastatic thymic adenocarcinoma from a colorectal cancer. PMID:26665119

  19. Metastatic Thymic Adenocarcinoma from Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mina; Choi, Suk Jin; Yoon, Yong Han; Kim, Joung-Taek; Baek, Wan Ki; Kim, Young Sam

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 57-year-old man with an anterior mediastinal tumor. Four years previously, he underwent laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer. Thirty months after that procedure, bilateral pulmonary metastasectomy was performed. Twelve months later, follow-up computed tomography revealed a 1-cm pulmonary nodule on the upper lobe of the right lung and a solid mass on the anterior mediastinum, and the patient was also observed to have an elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level. Repeated pulmonary nodule resection and total thymectomy were performed. Immunohistochemical staining of the anterior mediastinal tumor revealed adenocarcinoma, and his serum CEA level returned to normal after the operation. These findings strongly suggested metastatic thymic adenocarcinoma from a colorectal cancer.

  20. Metastatic lung adenocarcinoma to the bladder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YE, HAI-JUN; MA, JIAN; LIU, YING-JIE; YE, XIAO-FEI; ZHANG, LI-WANG; LI, JIN-GE

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of malignant tumor in the bladder, of which primary adenocarcinoma accounts for a small percentage. Secondary malignancies, in particular metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, are exceedingly rare, with only six cases previously reported in the literature. The present study describes the case of a 71-year-old Chinese male patient with known lung cancer for >2 years, who was diagnosed with metastatic adenocarcinoma to the bladder. The histopathological characteristics and immunohistochemical features of the patient are reported. It was proposed that pathologists should consider the possibility of metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, rather than assume a diagnosis of primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder or direct invasion of adenocarcinoma from the surrounding organs. Furthermore, it is essential to determine the medical history of each patient and observe the immunohistochemical features of all tumors prior to diagnosis.

  1. Carcinogenesis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Precursor Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gnoni, Antonio; Licchetta, Antonella; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Simone, Gianni; Nardulli, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Aieta, Michele; Delcuratolo, Sabina; Silvestris, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy. PMID:24084722

  2. An incidentally diagnosed prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stajno, Pawe?; Kalinowski, Tomasz; Ligaj, Marcin; Demkow, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate was initially described in 1967 by Melicow and Patcher. It was given the erroneous name endometrioid carcinoma, however, further studies confirmed the prostatic origin of this tumor. Currently DAP is classified as a histological variant of prostatic carcinoma. Compared with "classic" acinar carcinoma of the prostate, DAP is a rare histological finding. It's prevalence in prostatectomy and biopsy specimens varies from less than 1% for pure ductal adenocarcinoma up to 5% for mixed DAP. Because of its typical periurethral location, the tumor usually manifests itself clinically with urinary obstruction, urinary urgency, urinary frequency and hematuria. DAP is associated with more aggressive natural history and worse prognosis than pure AA - patients presented at more advanced stage, with poorly differentiated and distant disease. DAP has a tendency to spread to regional lymph nodes, axial skeleton, and visceral organs. We report a case of a 90-year old man who presented to our clinic with acute urinary retention and gross hematuria. He underwent suprapubic transvesical adenomectomy to diminish the urinary obstruction. The pathological examination of the specimens revealed a dominant focus of DAP, which was located near the intraprostatic urethra and a coexisting, smaller component of "classic" acinar adenocarcinoma. PMID:24579020

  3. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25079552

  4. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    2014-07-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25079552

  5. Gastric neo-adenocarcinoma arising in a gastric tube after Ivor Lewis oesophagectomy for oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Faisal; Kerr, Joana; Going, James J; Fullarton, Grant

    2015-05-01

    A 69-year-old man, seven years post Ivor-Lewis oesophagectomy for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, was diagnosed to have a moderately differentiated 4?cm, malignant ulcer within the gastric tube remnant on an endoscopic biopsy. His original presentation was with a T1N0 oesophageal adenocarcinoma, histologically intestinal in type with inflammatory features. He presented with anaemia and melena due to a malignant ulcer in the mid body of his gastric tube on an endoscopy which was confirmed to be a gastric neo-adenocarcinoma on biopsy. He underwent right posterolateral thoracotomy and a wedge resection of the gastric tube including the tumour. Pathology confirmed a T3 N0 (0/7 lymph nodes) with clear margins moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of intestinal phenotype with papillary features and was reported to be a histopathologically new tumour. Proposed surgical treatments in such patients are dependent on patient's fitness for major resection and may vary from Endoscopic Mucosal Resection to partial resection with preservation of right gastroepiploic vessels or total gastrectomy with intestinal interposition via a retromediastinal route. We suggest that regular endoscopic surveillance may be indicated in such post-oesophagectomy patients as the number of patients developing gastric tube cancers may increase with improve survival of those patients. PMID:25652293

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  7. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Presenting in a Premenopausal Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. S.; Chambers, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endometrial adenocarcinoma is very uncommon in women under 40 years of age. Case: A 39-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis and severe intellectual disability presented with irregular bleeding unresponsive to oral contraceptive therapy. She was subsequently found to have a deeply invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma. Conclusion:…

  8. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; Serra, Carla; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic adenocarcinoma and AIP were detected simultaneously. We must carefully monitor AIP patients for the simultaneous presence of pancreatic cancer, even when a diagnosis of AIP is confirmed. PMID:21769291

  9. Primary Adenocarcinoma with Focal Choriocarcinomatous Differentiation in the Sigmoid Colon.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sook Kyoung; Kim, Hyung Wook; Kang, Dae Hwan; Choi, Cheol Woong; Choi, Yu Yi; Lim, Hong Kyu; Goo, Ja Jun; Choi, Sung Yeol

    2015-11-25

    Primary colorectal choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm. Only 19 cases have been reported worldwide, most of which involved adenocarcinomas. The prognosis is usually poor, and the standard therapy for this tumor has not been established. A 61-year-old woman presented with constipation and lower abdominal discomfort. She was diagnosed with primary adenocarcinoma with focal choriocarcinomatous differentiation in the sigmoid colon and liver metastasis. Because the serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin level was not significantly elevated, and because only focal choriocarcinomatous differentiation was diagnosed, we selected the chemotherapy regimen that is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma. The patient survived for 13 months after the initial diagnosis. This is the first case in Korea to assess the suppressive effects of the standard chemotherapy for colorectal adenocarcinoma against coexisting colorectal choriocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma. PMID:26586354

  10. Genomic aberrations in cervical adenocarcinomas in Hong Kong Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tony K H; Van Hummelen, Paul; Chan, Paul K S; Cheung, Tak Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei Y; Ducar, Matthew D; Thorner, Aaron R; MacConaill, Laura E; Doran, Graeme; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Wong, Raymond R Y; Wang, Vivian W; Freeman, Samuel S; Lau, Tat San; Kwong, Joseph; Chan, Loucia K Y; Fromer, Menachem; May, Taymaa; Worley, Michael J; Esselen, Katharine M; Elias, Kevin M; Lawrence, Michael; Getz, Gad; Smith, David I; Crum, Christopher P; Meyerson, Matthew; Berkowitz, Ross S; Wong, Yick Fu

    2015-08-15

    Although the rates of cervical squamous cell carcinoma have been declining, the rates of cervical adenocarcinoma are increasing in some countries. Outcomes for advanced cervical adenocarcinoma remain poor. Precision mapping of genetic alterations in cervical adenocarcinoma may enable better selection of therapies and deliver improved outcomes when combined with new sequencing diagnostics. We present whole-exome sequencing results from 15 cervical adenocarcinomas and paired normal samples from Hong Kong Chinese women. These data revealed a heterogeneous mutation spectrum and identified several frequently altered genes including FAT1, ARID1A, ERBB2 and PIK3CA. Exome sequencing identified human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences in 13 tumors in which the HPV genome might have integrated into and hence disrupted the functions of certain exons, raising the possibility that HPV integration can alter pathways other than p53 and pRb. Together, these provisionary data suggest the potential for individualized therapies for cervical adenocarcinoma based on genomic information. PMID:25626421

  11. An unusual cause of hematospermia: Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicle.

    PubMed

    Eken, Alper; Izol, Volkan; Aridogan, I Atilla; Erdogan, Seyda; Ac?kal?n, Arbil; Tansug, Zuhtu

    2012-12-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles is one of the rare causes of hematospermia. Primary seminal vesicle adenocarcinoma is extremely rare and difficult to diagnose due to frequent invasion of adenocarcinomas of the surrounding organs, especially the prostate. In the present study, a case of a primary seminal vesicle adenocarcinoma will be discussed in the light of the current literature. PMID:23283099

  12. Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Lung Adenocarcinoma In Situ/Minimally Invasive Adenocarcinoma (AIS/MIA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Claire H; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hung, Rayjean J; Boffetta, Paolo; Xie, Dong; Wampfler, Jason A; Cote, Michele L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Ugolini, Donatella; Neri, Monica; Le Marchand, Loic; Schwartz, Ann G; Morgenstern, Hal; Christiani, David C; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke on the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma in situ/minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (AIS/MIA). Data from seven case-control studies participating in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) were pooled, resulting in 625 cases of AIS/MIA and 7,403 controls, of whom 170 cases and 3,035 controls were never smokers. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted ORs (ORadj) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status (ever/never), and pack-years of smoking. Study center was included in the models as a random-effects intercept term. Ever versus never exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke was positively associated with AIS/MIA incidence in all subjects (ORadj = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.93) and in never smokers (ORadj = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.00-2.12). There was, however, appreciable heterogeneity of ORadj across studies (P = 0.01), and the pooled estimates were largely influenced by one large study (40% of all cases and 30% of all controls). These findings provide weak evidence for an effect of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on AIS/MIA incidence. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using the newly recommended classification of subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(12); 1902-6. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26503035

  13. Mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostopoulos, Antonios; Ruthven, Stuart; Kingston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Mesonephric adenocarcinoma is a rare type of cervical cancer that derives from mesonephric remnants in the uterine cervix. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 34th case of mesonephric adenocarcinoma in adult women documented in the literature. We present an asymptomatic 64-year-old postmenopausal woman presenting with a suspicious-looking cervix as an incidental finding and diagnosed with a stage IB mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the cervix. This case was managed with radical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The rarity of such cases imposes challenges on the management in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options. PMID:23230242

  14. Targeting cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Romain; Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Faivre, Sandrine; de Gramont, Armand; Raymond, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030. Current therapeutic options are limited, warranting an urgent need to explore innovative treatment strategies. Due to specific microenvironment constraints including an extensive desmoplastic stroma reaction, PDAC faces major metabolic challenges, principally hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Their connection with oncogenic alterations such as KRAS mutations has brought metabolic reprogramming to the forefront of PDAC therapeutic research. The Warburg effect, glutamine addiction, and autophagy stand as the most important adaptive metabolic mechanisms of cancer cells themselves, however metabolic reprogramming is also an important feature of the tumor microenvironment, having a major impact on epigenetic reprogramming and tumor cell interactions with its complex stroma. We present a comprehensive overview of the main metabolic adaptations contributing to PDAC development and progression. A review of current and future therapies targeting this range of metabolic pathways is provided. PMID:26164081

  15. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  16. Preclinical models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. The 5-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7% and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the USA. Despite intensive efforts, the translation of findings in preclinical studies has been ineffective, due partially to the lack of preclinical models that faithfully recapitulate features of human PDA. Here, we review current preclinical models for human PDA (eg human PDA cell lines, cell line-based xenografts and patient-derived tumour xenografts). In addition, we discuss potential applications of the recently developed pancreatic ductal organoids, three-dimensional culture systems and organoid-based xenografts as new preclinical models for PDA. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26419819

  17. Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  18. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  19. Strategies to identify novel therapeutic targets for oesophageal adenocarcinoma 

    E-print Network

    O'Neill, John Robert

    2014-11-28

    Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the UK and current systemic therapies are ineffective for the majority of patients. The central aim of this work was to explore strategies to identify ...

  20. Small bowel infarction in a patient with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, A; Duthie, F; Galloway, D J

    2006-01-01

    A 40 year old man was admitted with a four week history of intractable diarrhoea and abdominal pain. A clinical diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease was supported by biopsies of colonic mucosa. There was no response to Mesalazine and over 12 days the patient became critically ill with diarrhoea, hypovolaemia, and peritonism. A laparotomy was performed and 130?cm of infarcted ileum was resected. Extensive investigations excluded thrombophilia and echocardiography excluded intracardiac thrombus. Postoperatively the patient continued to have diarrhoea and he was diagnosed with coeliac disease on the basis of positive antiendomysial and antitissue transglutaminase autoantibodies and duodenal histology. Although there is no proof that mesenteric infarction occurred as a direct consequence of coeliac disease, clinicians should be aware of this possibility. PMID:16443742

  1. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Interstitial Hernia: Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Gallesio, J. M.; Schlottmann, F.; Sadava, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial hernias are a rare entity. Most of them are detected incidentally on imaging studies. We present a case of abdominal bowel obstruction secondary to interstitial hernia on the fifth postoperative day of an open incisional hernia repair. Laparoscopy confirmed the diagnosis and led to an accurate treatment avoiding a new laparotomy. In this case, prompt surgical decision based on clinical and CT scan findings allowed a mini-invasive approach with satisfactory outcome. PMID:26576315

  2. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  3. Small bowel obstruction by mesh migration after umbilical hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Di Muria, Antonio; Formisano, Vincenzo; Di Carlo, Filippo; Aveta, Achille; Giglio, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    A case of intestinal obstruction due to mesh migration is described. A 61 year old patient affected by BPCO and chronic atrial fibrillation is admitted for mechanical intestinal obstruction. He underwent a umbilical hernia repair with mesh and omphalectomy 6 years before. Laparotomy revealed the obstruction due to an inflammatory block including polypropylene mesh penetrating an ileal loop. Intestinal resection and mechanical isoperistaltic L-L anastomosis is performed. The post-operative period is complicated by cardiorespiratory problems and the patient comes discharged in XVII day. The prosthesis migration after umbilical hernia repair is an event never described in the literature; instead rare cases of migration after inguinal hernia repair are reported. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication are not still cleared and that makes necessary a careful technique in the use of the hernia mesh. PMID:17518333

  4. Incidental Cystic Lymphangioma of the Small Bowel Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Cupido, Brindley David; Low, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign lesions of mesenchymal origin. Although more commonly encountered in the head and neck, intra-abdominal lymphangiomas are a rare entity that typically present as multiloculated intra-abdominal cystic lesions that are often incidentally discovered on imaging. This case report discusses such a case. PMID:26605129

  5. [Colorectal adenocarcinoma in a 5 year old girl].

    PubMed

    Pais, Alejandro B; Candarle, Pablo; Ferrer, Marisol; Costaguta, Alejandro; Tabacco, Omar

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is exceptional in children, generally diagnosed in advanced stages, with worse prognosis. We report the case of a 5 year old girl with isolated hematochezia lasting two months without other findings, in whom a colorectal adenocarcinoma was confirmed by colonoscopy. Staging revealed localized disease, extending to perisigmoid fat and a few adjacent ganglia. She was treated by laparoscopic resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, being free of disease at 21 moths of follow-up. PMID:26593811

  6. Metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the penis: a series of 29 cases with predilection for ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Carla L; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-nine men with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the penis were identified at our institution between 1993 and 2013. Of the 29 patients, 19 had a prior history of adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and 8 of those had ductal features in the primary lesion. Sixteen of 29 revealed ductal features in the metastasis. Seven of the 8 cases with ductal features in the primary had ductal features in the penile metastasis. Seven penile metastases were proven to be of prostatic origin solely by immunohistochemistry. Three cases were originally misdiagnosed as urothelial carcinoma upon review of the penile lesion. Other variant morphologies in the metastases included sarcomatoid carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and adenosquamous carcinoma. In summary, prostate carcinoma involving the penis displays ductal features considerably more often than prostate cancer in general. Features that can cause difficulty in recognizing metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the penis include the unusual anatomic site for prostate cancer, poor differentiation, an increased prevalence of variant morphology, a long interval from the primary lesion, and, in some cases, no documented history of a primary prostatic lesion. Immunohistochemical analysis should be performed to rule out prostate carcinoma in penile/penile urethral tumors with morphology that differs from typical squamous or urothelial carcinoma. Even in the setting of metastatic disease, there is a critical need for an accurate diagnosis so that the appropriate therapy can be initiated, symptomatic relief can be provided, and long-term survival achieved in some cases, while at the same time avoiding penectomy for a misdiagnosis of a primary penile cancer. PMID:25025445

  7. Right Atrium Myxoma After Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi Tashnizi, Mohhamad; Soltani, Ghasem; Mehrabi Bahar, Mostafa; Ahmadi, Mahnaz; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Saremi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Heart secondary tumors are much more common than primary tumors. These two types of tumors differ not only by their source but also by their symptoms and location in heart chambers. Case Presentation: This report presents a 66-year-old heavy smoker female with a history of pulmonary lobectomy due to lung adenocarcinoma, hysterectomy due to myoma, and lumpectomy due to benign breast mass, who had symptoms of right heart failure for months. Physical examinations followed by imaging showed a mass in her right atrium, which was most likely, a myxoma. After a successful surgical excision, histopathological findings confirmed the diagnosis. More studies are needed to evaluate a possible combination between these soft tissue masses. Conclusions: A right atrium myxoma in a patient with a history of multiple soft tissue tumors has been limited to only a few cases. This may suggest a genomic affinity or similarity; if so, those with multiple different type soft tissue masses should be screened for a heart mass before the mass becomes complicated.

  8. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Adam J.; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Shmulevich, Ilya; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Miller, Michael; Bernard, Brady; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Curtis, Christina; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Weinhold, Nils; Kelsen, David P.; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Cherniack, Andrew; Getz, Gad; Liu, Yingchun; Noble, Michael S.; Pedamallu, Chandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Akbani, Rehan; Lee, Ju-Seog; Liu, Wenbin; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Da; Zhang, Wei; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Gulley, Margaret; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Schneider, Barbara G.; Kim, Jihun; Boussioutas, Alex; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Rabkin, Charles S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Ng, Sam; Garman, Katherine; Beer, David G.; Pennathur, Arjun; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Odze, Robert; Kim, Hark K.; Bowen, Jay; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Weaver, Stephanie; McLellan, Michael; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Sakai, Ryo; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lichtenstein, Lee; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Ding, Li; Niu, Beifang; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Chu, Justin; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Clarke, Amanda; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan A.; Lim, Emilia; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen L.; Nip, Ka Ming; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott L.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cho, Juok; Cibulskis, Kristian; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Heiman, David I.; Jung, Joonil; Kim, Jaegil; Lander, Eric S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Meyerson, Matthew; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Schumacher, Steven E.; Sougnez, Carrie; Stojanov, Petar; Tabak, Barbara; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Voet, Doug; Rosenberg, Mara; Zack, Travis I.; Zhang, Hailei; Zou, Lihua; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Parfenov, Michael; Lee, Semin; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Xi, Ruibin; Bristow, Christopher A.; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Hinoue, Toshinori; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Shen, Hui; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda; Liu, Yingchun; Murray, Bradley A.; Noble, Michael S.; Askoy, B. Arman; Ciriello, Giovanni; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Sinha, Rileen; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Weinhold, Nils; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Bernard, Brady; Iype, Lisa; Kramer, Roger W.; Kreisberg, Richard; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rovira, Hector; Tasman, Natalie; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ng, Santa Cruz Sam; Haussler, David; Stuart, Josh M.; Akbani, Rehan; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Rao, Arvind; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roeland G.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Taylor, Barry S.; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Carney, Julie Ann; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Helsel, Carmen; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; McAllister, Cynthia; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Tabler, Teresa R.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Penny, Robert; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Curely, Erin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Shelton, Troy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Benz, Christopher; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Fedosenko, Konstantin; Manikhas, Georgy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Belyaev, Smitry; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brzezinski, Jakub; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Kycler, Witold; ?aŸniak, Radoslaw; Leporowska, Ewa; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawel; Spycha?a, Arkadiusz; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Tatka, Honorata; Teresiak, Marek; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Abdel-Misih, Raafat; Bennett, Joseph; Brown, Jennifer; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Kwon, Sun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein–Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also knownasPD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  9. Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    2014-09-11

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. We propose a molecular classification dividing gastric cancer into four subtypes: tumours positive for Epstein-Barr virus, which display recurrent PIK3CA mutations, extreme DNA hypermethylation, and amplification of JAK2, CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also known as PD-L2); microsatellite unstable tumours, which show elevated mutation rates, including mutations of genes encoding targetable oncogenic signalling proteins; genomically stable tumours, which are enriched for the diffuse histological variant and mutations of RHOA or fusions involving RHO-family GTPase-activating proteins; and tumours with chromosomal instability, which show marked aneuploidy and focal amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases. Identification of these subtypes provides a roadmap for patient stratification and trials of targeted therapies. PMID:25079317

  10. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for adenocarcinoma: safe and reasonable?

    PubMed Central

    Postlewait, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of technological advances during the past two decades, surgeons now use minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches to pancreatic resection more frequently, yet the role of these approaches for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma resections remains uncertain, given the aggressive nature of this malignancy. Although there are no controlled trials comparing MIS technique to open surgical technique, laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is performed with increasing frequency. Data from retrospective studies suggest that perioperative complication profiles between open and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy are similar, with perhaps lower blood loss and fewer wound infections in the MIS group. Concerning oncologic outcomes, there appear to be no differences in the rate of achieving negative margins or in the number of lymph nodes (LNs) resected when compared to open surgery. There are limited recurrence and survival data on laparoscopic compared to open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but in the few studies that assess long term outcomes, recurrence rates and survival outcomes appear similar. Recent studies show that though laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy entails a greater operative cost, the associated shorter length of hospital stay leads to decreased overall cost compared to open procedures. Multiple new technologies are emerging to improve resection of pancreatic cancer. Robotic pancreatectomy is feasible, but there are limited data on robotic resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and outcomes appear similar to laparoscopic approaches. Additionally fluorescence-guided surgery represents a new technology on the horizon that could improve oncologic outcomes after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, though published data thus far are limited to animal models. Overall, MIS distal pancreatectomy appears to be a safe and reasonable approach to treating selected patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, though additional studies of long-term oncologic outcomes are merited. We review existing data on MIS distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26261727

  11. New Aminothiol Prevention of X-Ray-Induced Mouse Mutagenesis and Tumorigenesis | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  12. Effect of dietary fat on x-ray-induced mammary cancer in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, J.; Shellabarger, C.J.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.; Weisburger, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    We studied the effect of dietary fat levels on the induction of mammary cancer by 350 rads total-body x-radiation given to noninbred albino Sprague-Dawley rats at 50 days of age. Compared to rats on a low-fat (LF) diet (5% lard), rats on a high-fat (HF) diet (20% lard) from 30 days of age had more tumors, with a higher multiplicity of carcinomas per rat. LF-fed groups exhibited a longer median tumor latency period than did HF-fed groups. A similar trend toward more tumors with an earlier time of death was seen in rats given single iv doses of 50 mg 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea/kg and fed an HF diet as compared to an LF diet.

  13. Soft X-ray-induced decomposition of amino acids: An XPS, massspectrometry, and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Yan; Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, Lothar; Heske,Clemens; Umbach, Eberhard; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Grunze, Michael

    2003-09-15

    Decomposition of five amino acids, alanine, serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, and asparagine, under irradiation with soft X-rays (magnesium Ka X-ray source) in ultra-high vacuum was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and mass spectrometry. A comparative analysis of changes in XPS line shapes, stoichiometry and residual gas composition indicates that the molecules decompose by several pathways. Dehydration, decarboxylation, decarbonylation,deamination and desulfurization of pristine molecules accompanied by desorption of H2, H2O, CO2, CO, NH3and H2S are observed with rates depending on the specific amino acid. NEXAFS spectra of cysteine at the carbon, oxygen and nitrogen K-shell and sulfur L2,3 edges complement the XPS and mass spectrometry data and show that the exposure of the sample to an intense soft X-ray synchrotron beam results in the formation of C-C and C-N double and triple bonds. Qualitatively, the amino acids studied can be arranged in the following ascending order of radiation stability:serine

  14. Soft X-ray-induced decomposition of amino acids: An XPS, massspectrometry, and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Y.; Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.; Denlinger, J.D.; Grunze, M.

    2003-02-26

    Decomposition of five amino acids, viz. alanine, serine,cysteine, aspartic acid, and asparagine under soft X-ray irradiation (MgK? X-ray source) in ultra-high vacuum has been studied by meansof XPS and mass-spectrometry. A comparative analysis of changes in XPSline shapes, stoichiometry, and residual gas composition indicates thatthe molecules decompose via severalpathways. Dehydration,decarboxylation, decarbonylation, deamination, and desulfurization ofpristine molecules accompanied by desorption of H2, H2O, CO2, CO, NH3,H2S are observed with rates depending on the specific amino acid. NEXAFSspectra of cysteine at the C, O, N K- and S L2,3-edges complement the XPSand mass-spectrometry data and show that exposure of the sample to anintense soft X-ray synchrotron beam results in a formation of C-C and C-Ndouble and triple bonds. Qualitatively, the studied amino acids can bearranged in the following ascending order for radiation stability: serine

  15. X-ray Induced Trap States in the Organic Semiconductor Rubrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morf, Tobias; Zimmerling, Tino; Haas, Simon; Batlogg, Bertram

    2013-03-01

    The charge transport in organic semiconductors and thus the device performance is broadly affected by localised electronic states capturing charge carriers. In a controlled irradiation experiment, the formation and microscopic origin of these trap states is studied quantitatively. Rubrene crystals with a low pristine trap density are irradiated with monochromatised CuK ? radiation. The spectral density of trap states (DOS) is determined by the well-established SCLC method before and after each exposure step. After irradiation, a well defined additional DOS peak is measured. Its density grows linearly by approximately 1017 trap states per Joule of absorbed energy. These new states are closely peaked around 0.3 eV above the HOMO (valence band) mobility level. The results are compared to those of the previous ion-irradiation study. Even though the ionic doses were higher by a factor of 103 we find very similar changes in the DOS both with respect to quantity and energy of the trap states. This remarkable result suggests a much higher trap creation efficiency of X-rays as compared to ion radiation. Furthermore, the two different radiation methods seem to cause the same type of microscopic perturbation of the molecular crystal.

  16. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia.

  17. X-ray induced damage in DNA monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Stypczynska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel J.; Klyachko, Dimitri V.; Sanche, Leon

    2008-08-14

    In this work, the chemical changes in calf thymus DNA samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The DNA samples were irradiated for over 5 h and spectra were taken repeatedly every 30 min. In this approach the X-ray beam both damages and probes the samples. In most cases, XPS spectra have complex shapes due to contributions of C, N, and O atoms bonded at several different sites. We show that from a comparative analysis of the modification in XPS line shapes of the C 1s, O 1s, N 1s, and P 2p peaks, one can gain insight into a number of reaction pathways leading to radiation damage to DNA.

  18. X-ray induced mobility of molecular oxygen at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Sneed, Daniel; Guardala, Griffin; Smith, Quinlan; Popov, Dmitry; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-11-25

    We report an in situ Raman study of KClO{sub 4} irradiated with x-rays in a diamond anvil cell. Decomposition via KClO{sub 4} + hv ? KCl + 2O{sub 2} was monitored via the O{sub 2} vibron at 2 GPa, 6 GPa, and 9 GPa. For all pressures, the vibron grew in intensity and then diminished after successive irradiation suggesting that O{sub 2} was diffusing away from the irradiated region. Surprisingly, the diffusion rate accelerated with pressure increase, indicating that the nonhydrostatic pressure gradient was likely driving molecular diffusion of oxygen. At 9 GPa, the vibron bifurcated suggesting that O{sub 2} exists as two forms: interstitial and bulk solid. This method can be employed to study molecular diffusion under extreme conditions.

  19. Prevailing features of X-ray induced molecular electron spectra revealed with fullerenes

    E-print Network

    Garibay, Abraham Camacho; Rost, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Intense X-ray photo-absorption from short and intense pulses by a molecule triggers complicated electron and subsequently ion dynamics leading to photo-electron spectra which are difficult to interpret. Illuminating fullerenes offers a way to separate out the electron dynamics. Moreover, the fullerene cage confines spatially the origin of photo and Auger electrons. Together with the sequential nature of the photo processes at intensities available at X-ray free electron lasers, this allows for a remarkably detailed interpretation of the photo-electron spectra as we will demonstrate. The general features derived can serve as a paradigm for less well-defined situations in other large molecules or clusters.

  20. X-ray induced photocurrent characteristics of CVD diamond detectors with different carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirru, F.; Lohstroh, A.; Jayawardena, K. D. G. I.; Henley, S. J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Diamond has unique properties which make it suitable for a broad range of radiation detection applications ranging from particle timing and spectroscopy, to neutron, UV and X-ray sensors. In X-ray dosimetry, the atomic number of diamond (Z = 6) close to that of the human tissues (Z = 7.42) allows to mimic the real absorbed dose avoiding off-line recalculations. Moreover, its low atomic number and the capability to withstand high radiation fluxes make possible its use as beam monitor without altering significantly the properties of the interacting beam. To preserve the tissue equivalence of the diamond and minimize the perturbation and absorption of the incident beam, diamond detectors based on low thickness and low atomic number electrodes become a requirement. In this paper we present the X-ray detection characteristics of electronic grade CVD diamond sensors prepared in house with thin amorphous carbon electrodes fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique in the fluence range of 2.3-3.6 J·cm-2. The devices showed a linear dependence of the induced photocurrent respect to the dose rate. Also, best dynamic response and better stability of the signals were achieved for applied bias up to ±50 V with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ~ 300.

  1. POLARIZATION OF THE CHARGE-EXCHANGE X-RAYS INDUCED IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Gacesa, M.; Kharchenko, V.; Mueller, H.-R.; Cote, R.

    2011-05-10

    We report results of a theoretical investigation of polarization of the X-ray emissions induced in charge-exchange collisions of fully stripped solar wind (SW) ions C{sup 6+} and O{sup 8+} with the heliospheric hydrogen atoms. The polarization of X-ray emissions has been computed for line-of-sight observations within the ecliptic plane as a function of SW ion velocities, including a range of velocities corresponding to the slow and fast SW, and coronal mass ejections. To determine the variability of polarization of heliospheric X-ray emissions, the polarization has been computed for solar minimum conditions with self-consistent parameters of the SW plasma and heliospheric gas and compared with the polarization calculated for an averaged solar activity. We predict the polarization of charge-exchange X-rays to be between 3% and 8%, depending on the line-of-sight geometry, SW ion velocity, and the selected emission lines.

  2. Polarization of the Charge-exchange X-rays Induced in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacesa, M.; Müller, H.-R.; Côté, R.; Kharchenko, V.

    2011-05-01

    We report results of a theoretical investigation of polarization of the X-ray emissions induced in charge-exchange collisions of fully stripped solar wind (SW) ions C6 + and O8 + with the heliospheric hydrogen atoms. The polarization of X-ray emissions has been computed for line-of-sight observations within the ecliptic plane as a function of SW ion velocities, including a range of velocities corresponding to the slow and fast SW, and coronal mass ejections. To determine the variability of polarization of heliospheric X-ray emissions, the polarization has been computed for solar minimum conditions with self-consistent parameters of the SW plasma and heliospheric gas and compared with the polarization calculated for an averaged solar activity. We predict the polarization of charge-exchange X-rays to be between 3% and 8%, depending on the line-of-sight geometry, SW ion velocity, and the selected emission lines.

  3. INVOLVEMENT OF P53 IN X-RAY INDUCED INTRACHROMOSOMAL RECOMBINATION IN MICE. (R825359)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. X-ray induced alterations in the differentiation and mineralization potential of murine preosteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yueyuan; Lau, Patrick; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine E.; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on murine preosteoblastic cell differentiation, we directed OCT-1 cells to the osteoblastic lineage by treatment with a combination of ?-glycerophosphate (?-GP), ascorbic acid (AA), and dexamethasone (Dex). In vitro mineralization was evaluated based on histochemical staining and quantification of the hydroxyapatite content of the extracellular bone matrix. Expression of mRNA encoding Runx2, transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1), osteocalcin (OCN), and p21CDKN1A was analyzed. Exposure to IR reduced the growth rate and diminished cell survival of OCT-1 cells under standard conditions. Notably, calcium content analysis revealed that deposition of mineralized matrix increased significantly under osteogenic conditions after X-ray exposure in a time-dependent manner. In this study, higher radiation doses exert significant overall effects on TGF-?1, OCN, and p21CDKN1A gene expression, suggesting that gene expression following X-ray treatment is affected in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we verified that Runx2 was suppressed within 24 h after irradiation at 2 and 4 Gy. Although further studies are required to verify the molecular mechanism, our observations strongly suggest that treatment with IR markedly alters the differentiation and mineralization process of preosteoblastic cells.

  5. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions. PMID:25945574

  6. Multigene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1996-06-01

    K-ras codon 12 point mutations mRb and p53 gene deletions were examined in tissues from 120 normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were Formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago. The results showed that 12 of 60 (20%) lung adenocarcinomas had mRb deletions. All lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found bearing deleted mRb had p53 deletions (15 of 15; 100%). A significantly higher mutation frequency for K-ras codon 12 point mutations was also found in the lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 24 once-weekly neutron irradiation (10 of 10; 100%) compared with those exposed to 24 or 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses (5 of 10; 50%). The data suggested that p53 and K-ras gene alterations were two contributory factors responsible for the increased incidence of lung adenocarcinoma in B6CF{sub 1} male mice exposed to protracted neutron radiation.

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of Lung Adenocarcinoma - Matthew Meyerson, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Comprehensive Analysis of Lung Adenocarcinoma - Matthew Meyerson Comprehensive Analysis of Lung Adenocarcinoma - Matthew Meyerson, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or

  8. High-Grade Serous Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Transcriptome Sequencing - Andrew Mungall, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos High-Grade Serous Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Transcriptome Sequencing - Andrew Mungall High-Grade Serous Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Transcriptome Sequencing - Andrew Mungall, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You

  9. Perspectives in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Arregui, Angel; Juarez, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an incurable lethal disease whose incidence rate is growing. There is no effective screening for detection of early stage tumors and, in most cases, PDAC is diagnosed at advanced disease stages, when radical pancreatic resection is not possible. The aggressive nature of pancreatic tumor cells lies in the complex genetic mechanisms behind their uncontrolled capability to grow and metastasize, which involve essential adaptive changes in cellular metabolism, signaling, adhesion and immunoediting. In addition, PDAC cells promote a dense functional stroma that facilitates tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. During the last two decades, gemcitabine has been the reference for the systemic treatment of PDAC. However, recently, a regimen combining fluorouracil, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin (FOLFIRINOX) and another combining albumin-bound paclitaxel with gemcitabine have shown clear therapeutic advantage in advanced PDAC, with survival outcomes of 11.3 and 8.5 mo on phase III trials, respectively, over single-agent gemcitabine. With the pending issue of their higher toxicities, these regimens set the reference for ongoing and future clinical studies in advanced PDAC. In addition, the efficacy of oral fluoropyrimidine (S-1) has been well documented in Asiatic PDAC patients. The development of therapeutic approaches other than cytotoxic drugs has proven difficult in the past, with only one drug (erlotinib) approved to date. Besides, a number of agents targeting signaling pathways in tumor or stroma cells are being investigated. Likewise, immunotherapies that target PDAC in various ways are the subject of a number of clinical trials. The search for reliable biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic value using genomics and mass spectrometry methods may facilitate monitoring and refinement of therapies. This review focuses on current understanding of the pathogenesis of PDAC and the latest developments in the treatment of advanced PDAC. PMID:26309356

  10. Papillary adenocarcinoma in situ of the skin: report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Asgari, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Although rare isolated cases of adenocarcinoma in situ of skin have been reported in the literature, adenocarcinoma in situ of skin as a concept and as a diagnostic category has not been established in the field of dermatopathology. In this work, four cases of papillary adenocarcinoma in situ of the skin are presented. In addition, the notion that lesions previously reported in the medical literature under the term of “papillary eccrine adenoma” are actually adenocarcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:24855569

  11. Cystic prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an unusual presentation and cytological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Henderson-Jackson, Evita; Sexton, Wade; Zhang, Jingsong; Hakam, Ardeshir; Petrovskyy, Vyacheslav S; Bui, Marilyn M; Chuang, Shang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is an uncommon histological variant of prostatic adenocarcinoma that may present clinically as a cystic mass [1-3]. We report a case of cystic PDA presenting as a cystic perirectal mass in a 61 year old male. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed malignant cells with round-oval to focally elongated nuclei, conspicuous nucleoli, and amphophilic cytoplasm with focal acinar formation. Tumor cells were positive for prostate-specific antigen; however, the cytology was non-specific for site of origin. The radical cystoprostatectomy specimen revealed the true site of origin and showed a cystic PDA adjacent to conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. Our objective is to describe the common cytological features of PDA and to analyze the differential diagnoses associated with cystic masses of the prostate. PMID:22371914

  12. Numb chin syndrome secondary to leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Riesgo, Vincent J.; Poveda, Julio; Rammohan, Kottil

    2015-01-01

    Numb chin syndrome (NCS) can be a sign of malignancy. Its association with gastric adenocarcinoma is rare. We report a case of a 27-year-old Hispanic female that presented with complaint of left sided headache associated with numbness of the left side of chin and lower gingiva. Initial brain MRI, whole body gallium scan, high resolution CT of chest and elevated protein in the CSF were suggestive of sarcoidosis. She was treated with IV steroids with transient clinical improvement. Two weeks later, her symptoms worsened and further evaluation revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma with leptomeningeal involvement. This case report aims to emphasize the importance of identifying NCS as a possible indication of an underlying malignant condition. Reported cases of NCS associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma are very rare. PMID:25830044

  13. Mitochondrial genome instability in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luiza F; Fonseca, Aline S; Muys, Bruna R; Plaça, Jessica R; Bueno, Rafaela B L; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Santos, Anemari R D; Molfetta, Greice A; Zanette, Dalila L; Souza, Jorge E S; Valente, Valeria; Silva, Wilson A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of cancer progression. In the current study, we evaluated mitochondrial genome instability and copy number in colorectal cancer using Next Generation Sequencing approach and qPCR, respectively. The results revealed higher levels of heteroplasmy and depletion of the relative mtDNA copy number in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma samples also presented an increased number of mutations in nuclear genes encoding proteins which functions are related with mitochondria fusion, fission and localization. Moreover, we found a set of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, which cooperate in the same mitochondrial function simultaneously mutated in adenocarcinoma. In summary, these results support an important role for mitochondrial function and genomic instability in colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:26069104

  14. The distinctive nature of adenocarcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Roviello, Giandomenico

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many personalized treatments have been developed for NSCLC (non-small-cell lung cancer) patients. Among these, gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors for patients with EGFR gene mutations, while crizotinib and ceritinib are two new tyrosine kinase inhibitors directed against the echinoderm microtubule-like protein 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation. The possibility of these new molecules being used to treat patients without adenocarcinoma histology is notably small. For example, EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion gene rearrangement are rare in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (generally <1%). Additionally, the benefit of targeted treatment approaches in patients with small-cell lung cancer histology is limited. All of these findings highlight the distinctive nature of adenocarcinoma of the lung among all lung cancer subtypes. Unfortunately, to date, less than 15% of patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung are ideal candidates for these targeted therapies. PMID:26366094

  15. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma and Mucocele of the Appendix: An Unusual Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mavrona, Amalia; Grammenou, Sophia; Zacharioudakis, Georgios; Aggelidou, Stamatia; Rousso, David

    2013-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a rare clinical entity, which is however quite often associated with mucinous ovarian tumor. The coexistence of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix and endometrial adenocarcinoma has not been reported before. A 49-year-old woman presented to our clinic with postmenopausal bleeding and no other symptom. Endometrial biopsy revealed endometrial adenocarcinoma of endometrioid type (grade I). Preoperative CT scanning revealed an appendiceal mucocele, and a colonoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and appendectomy. The final histopathological examination showed a mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix and confirmed the diagnosis of endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma. The coexistence of appendiceal mucocele and female genital tract pathology is rare. However, gynecologists should keep a high level of suspicion for such possible coexistence. Both the diagnostic approach and the therapeutic management should be multidisciplinary, most importantly with the involvement of general surgeons. PMID:23762686

  16. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism ? is insignificant in the researched spectral range ?=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  17. A critical review of immunotherapy of disseminated renal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Montie, J E; Bukowski, R M; James, R E; Straffon, R A; Stewart, B H

    1982-09-01

    Sixty patients with renal adenocarcinoma have been treated with five different immunotherapy trials consisting of 1) Transfer Factor (TF), 2) TF and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), 3) TF, BCG, Chloroethyl-cyclohexy-nitrosurea (CCNU) and megestrol acetate (Megase), 4) BCG, CCNU, and Megase, or 5) BCG. Using strict response criteria for measurable disease, objective responses were seen in 14-22% of cases. While this nonspecific immunotherapy of renal adenocarcinoma has been associated with documented regression of metastases, response rates are similar to that obtained with hormonal therapy alone. Objective responses support the concept of further trials in this disease with more sophisticated immunotherapy. PMID:7109637

  18. F-prostanoid receptor regulation of inflammation in endometrial adenocarcinoma 

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    20 and its receptor CCR6 was elevated in endometrial adenocarcinoma. The induction of CCL20 by PGF2? -FP signalling in FPS cells was dependent on the signalling molecules Gq, EGFR, ERK, calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT...

  19. Inhibitory effects of dobutamine on human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui-Xia; Wu, Li-Na; Xiao, Hong; Du, Qian; Liang, Jian-Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibitory effects of dobutamine on gastric adenocarcinoma cells. METHODS: Dobutamine was used to treat gastric adenocarcinoma cells (SGC-7901) and cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of dobutamine combined with cisplatin on cell viability were also analyzed. Cell migration was studied using the wound healing assay, and cell proliferation was analyzed using the colony formation assay. A cell invasion assay was carried out using Transwell cell culture chambers. The cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in treated cells. RESULTS: Dobutamine significantly inhibited cell growth, migration, cell colony formation, and cell invasion into Matrigel. Dobutamine also arrested the cell cycle at G1/S phase, and increased the rate of apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The expression of YAP was detected mainly in the nucleus in the absence of dobutamine. However, reduced expression of phosphorylated YAP was mainly found in the cytosol following treatment with dobutamine. CONCLUSION: Dobutamine has significant inhibitory effects on gastric adenocarcinoma cells and may be used in neoadjuvant therapy not only for gastric cancer, but also for other tumors. PMID:25493021

  20. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  1. Intestinal adenocarcinoma causing recurrent colic in the horse.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey-Micay, J

    1999-01-01

    An 8-year-old, Thoroughbred-cross mare presented with recurrent colic. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large mass near the right dorsal colon; white, raised foci on the liver; and enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Cytological examination of biopsies revealed neoplastic cells. The diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histological examination. PMID:10572671

  2. Diversity of gene expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Diversity of gene expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung Mitchell E. Garber*, Olga G. Troyanskaya Contributed by David Botstein, September 21, 2001 The global gene expression profiles for 67 human lung tumors pathologic analysis. Four main histologic subtypes of lung cancer are regularly distinguished by tumor

  3. Serous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid mesentery arising in cystic endosalpingiosis

    PubMed Central

    McCoubrey, A; Houghton, O; McCallion, K; McCluggage, W G

    2005-01-01

    This case report describes a Mullerian serous adenocarcinoma arising within a multoloculated cyst lined by ciliated serous-type epithelium located in the sigmoid mesentery. Twenty years previously the patient underwent a hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and omentectomy. The ovaries contained bilateral serous cystadenofibromas, and multiple cysts lined by ciliated serous-type epithelium were present in the omentum. The resection specimen 20 years later contained a 14 cm multiloculated cyst located in the sigmoid mesentery. This was lined largely by benign ciliated serous-type epithelium but a focus of well differentiated serous adenocarcinoma projected into the lumen. Two further peritoneal cysts were present, both of which were lined by ciliated serous-type epithelium. There was a coincidental renal cell carcinoma. This is a unique case of multiple omental, peritoneal, and retroperitoneal cysts (classified as cystic endosalpingiosis), one of which developed a focus of serous adenocarcinoma. Although rarely serous adenocarcinomas, similar to those occurring within the ovary, arise in the retroperitoneum, this is the first reported occurrence in association with a pre-existing benign lesion. PMID:16254118

  4. The Key Role of Calmodulin in KRAS-Driven Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Muratcioglu, Serena; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Jang, Hyunbum; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    KRAS4B is a highly oncogenic splice variant of the KRAS isoform. It is the only isoform associated with initiation of adenocarcinomas. Insight into why and how KRAS4B can mediate ductal adenocarcinomas, particularly of the pancreas, is vastly important for its therapeutics. Here we point out the overlooked critical role of calmodulin (CaM). Calmodulin selectively binds to GTP-bound K-Ras4B; but not to other Ras isoforms. Cell proliferation and growth require the MAPK (Raf/MEK/ERK) and PI3K/Akt pathways. We propose that Ca(2+)/calmodulin promote PI3K?/Akt signaling, and suggest how. The elevated calcium levels clinically observed in adenocarcinomas may explain calmodulin's involvement in recruiting and stimulating PI3K? through interaction with its n/cSH2 domains as well as K-Ras4B; importantly, it also explains why K-Ras4B specifically is a key player in ductal carcinomas, such as pancreatic (PDAC), colorectal (CRC), and lung cancers. We hypothesize that calmodulin recruits and helps activate PI3K? at the membrane, and that this is the likely reason for Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependence in adenocarcinomas. Calmodulin can contribute to initiation/progression of ductal cancers via both PI3K?/Akt and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. Blocking the K-Ras4B/MAPK pathway and calmodulin/PI3K? binding in a K-Ras4B/calmodulin/PI3K? trimer could be a promising adenocarcinoma-specific therapeutic strategy. Mol Cancer Res; 13(9); 1265-73. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26085527

  5. Prostate Adenocarcinomas Aberrantly Expressing p63 Are Molecularly Distinct from Usual-Type Prostatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David M.; Vaghasia, Ajay M.; Giannico, Giovanna A.; Ross, Hillary M.; Ghosh, Susmita; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Sangoi, Ankur R.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    We have described a rare group of prostate adenocarcinomas that show aberrant expression of p63, a protein strongly expressed in prostatic basal cells and absent from usual-type acinar prostate cancers. The partial basal-like immunophenotype of these tumors is intriguing in light of the persistent debate surrounding the cell-of-origin for prostate cancer, however their molecular phenotype is unknown. We collected 37 of these tumors on radical prostatectomy and biopsy and assessed subsets for a diverse panel of molecular markers. The majority of p63-expressing tumors were positive for the ?Np63 isoform (6/7) by immunofluorescence and p63 mRNA (7/8) by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Despite p63 positivity, these tumors uniformly expressed luminal-type cytokeratin proteins such as CK18 (13/13), CK8 (8/8) and markers of androgen axis signaling commonly seen in luminal cells, including androgen receptor (10/11), NKX3.1 (8/8) and prostein (12/13). Conversely, basal cytokeratins such as CK14 and CK15 were negative in all cases (0/8) and CK5/6 was weakly and focally positive in 36% (4/11) of cases. Pluripotency markers including ?-catenin, Oct4 and c-kit were negative in p63-expressing tumors (0/11). Despite nearly universal expression of androgen receptor and downstream androgen signaling targets, p63-expressing tumors lacked ERG rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (0/14) and ERG protein expression (0/37). No tumors expressed SPINK1 or showed PTEN protein loss (0/19). Surprisingly, 74% (14/19) of p63-expressing tumors expressed GSTP1 protein at least focally, and 33% (2/6) entirely lacked GSTP1 CpG island hypermethylation by bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to usual prostatic adenocarcinomas, prostate tumors with p63-expression show a mixed luminal/basal immunophenotype, uniformly lack ERG gene rearrangement and frequently express GSTP1. These data strongly suggest that p63-expressing prostate tumors represent a molecularly distinct subclass and further study of this rare tumor type may yield important insights into the role of p63 in prostatic biology and the prostate cancer cell-of-origin. PMID:25216229

  6. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 expression is useful to differentiate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas from adenocarcinomas of the biliary and gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Ney, Jasmin Teresa; Zhou, Hui; Sipos, Bence; Büttner, Reinhard; Chen, Xin; Klöppel, Günter; Gütgemann, Ines

    2007-02-01

    Metastases of adenocarcinomas from the pancreas, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are difficult to distinguish from each other because of their similar morphological and immunohistochemical features. So far, no specific marker for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas has been described. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PODXL-1) is expressed on vascular endothelium, hematopoietic precursor cells, and renal podocytes. We found that 44% (71/160) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas expressed PODXL-1 in a membranous pattern. There was no expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (0/18, P < .001), rarely in adenocarcinomas of the extrahepatic bile ducts (1/13, P = .009), and none in duodenal adenocarcinomas (0/5, P = .070). PODXL-1 expression was seen in only 9% of hepatocellular carcinomas (5/56, P < .001), 9% (4/47, P < .001) of gastric carcinomas, 10% of esophageal adenocarcinomas (2/20, P = .003), and 6% of colonic adenocarcinomas (1/17, P = .001). When used as a differential diagnostic marker, ampullary carcinoma needs to be excluded, as 30% (6/20, P = .24) of ampullary carcinomas stain positive, especially those of the signet-ring type (3/3). Adenocarcinomas of the lung and prostate, and liver metastases of colorectal carcinomas lacked PODXL-1 expression. It is concluded that immunoreactivity for PODXL-1 favors a pancreatic origin if ampullary carcinoma is excluded. PMID:17137615

  7. Noninfiltrating Adenocarcinoma of the Lung Causing ST-Segment Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Padaliya, Bimal; Mohan, Sri Krishna Madan

    2015-01-01

    ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung who presented with ST-segment elevation in the presence of an extracardiac lung mass but no objective evidence of myocardial ischemia or pericardial involvement. After the patient died of hypoxic respiratory failure, autopsy findings confirmed normal-appearing pericardium and myocardium, and mild-to-moderate atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. A 4.5 × 4-cm extracardiac left hilar lung mass was confirmed to be poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung adjacent to the myocardium. The persistent current of injury that had been detected electrocardiographically was thought to occur from direct myocardial compression. ST-segment elevations secondary to direct mass contact on the myocardium should be considered in patients who have a malignancy and ST-segment elevation. PMID:26413024

  8. TGF-ß Signaling Pathway in Lung Adenocarcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Toonkel, Rebecca L.; Borczuk, Alain C.; Powell, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    The histological distinction between bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and other adenocarcinomas is tissue invasion. The clinical importance of lung adenocarcinoma invasion is supported by several recent studies indicating that the risk of death in non-mucinous BAC is significantly lower than that of pure invasive tumors and in tumors with greater than 0.6 cm of fibrosis or linear invasion. Using microarray gene expression profiling of human tumors, dysregulation of transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) signaling was identified as an important mediator of tumor invasion. Subsequent studies showed that the CC chemokine RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed, and presumably Secreted) was upregulated in invasive tumors and was required for invasion in cells with repressed levels of the TGF-ß type II receptor. Taken together, these studies illustrate how information gained from global expression profiling of tumors can be used to identify key pathways and genes mediating tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. PMID:20101143

  9. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5?cm × 2?cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  10. Mucinous Bladder Adenocarcinoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruno Mello R.; de Souza, Julia Duarte; Lima, Rachel Silviano Brandão Correa; de Lima, Enaldo Melo

    2015-01-01

    Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma is an extremely rare type of bladder cancer, with aggressive behavior and poor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The symptoms are similar to those of other bladder tumors. Surgery is the main treatment and remains the only curative option. There may be a progression from mucinous metaplasia to mucinous adenoma and then mucinous adenocarcinoma. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with recurrent lower urinary tract infections, submitted to imaging tests, which showed a bladder tumor. After transurethral resection, pathology showed intestinal mucinous carcinoma. Metastatic work-up was negative. New surgical procedure showed metaplasia but no recurrence of the carcinoma. The patient is now using antibiotic prophylaxis and will undergo a cystoscopy every 3 months and computed tomography in one year. PMID:26421206

  11. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  12. Uterine adenocarcinoma in a Przewalski's wild horse (Equus ferus przewalskii).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rachel; Armién, Aníbal G; Rasmussen, James M; Wolf, Tiffany M

    2014-06-01

    A 25-yr-old, nulliparous, female Przewalski's wild horse (Equus ferus przewalskii) with a history of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction and recent onset of serosanguinous vaginal discharge was euthanized after a period of lethargy and inappetance. Postmortem examination confirmed an infiltrative uterine adenocarcinoma, which is an uncommon neoplasia in equids. Reproductive disease is significant in this species as they are considered endangered by IUCN. Reproductive soundness and success are paramount to conservation efforts. PMID:25000717

  13. [Types of cell differentiation in colonic and rectal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zaretskaia, A I

    1979-01-01

    The Normal mucous membrane and tumours of the large intestine and the rectum were studied electron microscopically. Five known cell types were found in normal intestinal mucosa: intestinal epitheliocyte with striated border, goblet enterocyte, intestinal argentaffinocyte, enterocyte with acidofilic granules, borderless enterocyte. Adenocarcinoma cells differentiate in the direction of 3 cell types: intestinal epitheliocytes, goblet enterocytes, and borderless enterocytes. The level of differentiation in different cells varies considerably. PMID:426634

  14. Primary Intestinal-type Adenocarcinoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Belli, S; Taskin, U; Caglar, A; Tetikkurt, US

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a rare case of sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinoma in the nasal cavity. A 31-year old man presented with headache and epistaxis. We identified a malignant tumour, which is a rare pathology, with detailed physical examination, anterior rhinoscopy, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic examination. Endoscopic excision of the tumour was performed. After three years of follow-up of the patient in our clinic, there was no sign of any recurrence. PMID:25803391

  15. Ethnicity affects EGFR and KRAS gene alterations of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SOH, JUNICHI; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; MATSUO, KEITARO; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; WISTUBA, IGNACIO I.; LAM, STEPHEN; FONG, KWUN M.; GAZDAR, ADI F.; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Mutations or copy number gains (CNGs) of the EGFR and KRAS genes are representative alterations in lung adenocarcinomas that are individually associated with patient characteristics such as ethnicity, smoking status and gender. However, the effects of combinations of these genetic alterations have not been statistically examined. The present study analyzed previously examined lung adenocarcinoma cases in Asian (n=166) and non-Asian (n=136) individuals in whom all four EGFR and KRAS alterations had been studied. The polynomial logistic regression models were used following adjustment for gender and smoking status, and using patients without any type of EGFR/KRAS alterations as a reference. Between the two ethnic groups, EGFR CNGs (gEGFR) occurred more frequently than EGFR mutations (mEGFR) (46 vs. 38% in Asians; 21 vs. 10% in non-Asians), whereas KRAS mutations (mKRAS) were more frequent than KRAS CNGs (gKRAS) (13 vs. 7% and 35 vs. 4%, respectively). Additionally, gEGFR and gKRAS occurred significantly more frequently in respective mutant cases, and all EGFR alterations were almost exclusive of all KRAS alterations. The polynomial logistic regression models confirmed that all types of EGFR alterations were significantly more frequent among Asian individuals than among non-Asian individuals, independent of gender and smoking status (odds ratios, 2.36–6.67). KRAS alterations occurred less frequently among Asian individuals than among non-Asian individuals, although a significant difference was not detected. The present study results indicated that the EGFR and KRAS profiles, including mutations and CNGs, differ between Asian and non-Asian individuals with lung adenocarcinoma, suggesting that ethnicity strongly affects the molecular characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma.

  16. Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma: time for a new synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian J.; Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Vaughan, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The public health importance of Barrett’s oesophagus lies in its association with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has risen at an alarming rate over the past four decades in many regions of the Western world and there are indications that the incidence of this disease is on the rise in Asian populations where it has been rare. Much has been learned of host and environmental risk factors that affect the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and data indicate that patients with Barrett’s oesophagus rarely develop oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Given that 95% of oesophageal adenocarcinoma arise in individuals without a prior diagnosis of Barrett’s oesophagus, what strategies can be used to reduce late diagnosis of oesophageal adenocarcinoma? PMID:20094044

  17. Current status of novel agents in advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal (GE) adenocarcinomas are highly lethal malignancies and despite multiple chemotherapy options, 5-year survival rates remain dismal. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment but patients are often limited by toxicity and poor performance status. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and develop targeted therapies that act on individual tumors. Trastuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody, was the first such agent shown to improve response rate, progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) when added to cisplatin based chemotherapy in patients with HER2 over-expressing GE junction (GEJ) and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, HER2 over expressing GE tumors are in the minority and the need for additional targeted agents is urgent. Though many agents are in development, incorporating targeted therapy in the treatment of GE cancers comes with a unique set of challenges. In this review, we outline oncogenic pathways relevant to GE adenocarcinomas, including HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and c-Met, and discuss recent trials with agents targeting these pathways. PMID:25642339

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene amplification in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Manuel H; Lingohr, Philipp; Sträßer, Anke; Lehnen, Nils C; Braun, Martin; Perner, Sven; Höller, Tobias; Kristiansen, Glen; Kalff, Jörg C; Gütgemann, Ines

    2015-10-01

    Gastric adenocarcinomas are associated with a poor prognosis due to the fact that the tumor has often metastasized by the time of diagnosis. Thus, identification of novel therapeutic targets is highly desirable. Here, we examined gene copy number of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), a potential target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and clinicopathologic parameters in a large cohort of gastric adenocarcinomas. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 293 gastric adenocarcinomas using tissue microarrays. Amplification of the FGFR1 gene is a rare but noticeable event that can be found in 2% (6/293) of cases and was associated with poor 10-year survival (median 15.3 months in FGFR1-amplified cases versus 36 months in nonamplified cases, P = .047) and a higher rate of distant metastasis (P = .025). FGFR1 appears to represent a potential new therapeutic target in a subset of patients with gastric carcinoma. Identification of gastric cancers harboring FGFR1 amplification may be important in preselecting patients and/or interpreting clinical studies using tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26239623

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the appendix presenting as bilateral ureteric obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran; Hoque, Robiol; El-Tawil, Sherif; Khan, Mohammad S; George, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix is a rare neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation mimics acute appendicitis, but right iliac fossa mass and intestinal obstruction have also been reported. These presentations reflect various stages of a locally expanding tumour causing luminal obstruction of appendix. The investigation and subsequent management with a review of the literature is presented. Case presentation We report a case of appendicular adenocarcinoma found unexpectedly in a 43 year old male who presented with urinary symptoms. Cystoscopy and uretero-renoscopy showed normal bladder but external compression of the ureters and therefore bilateral stents were inserted. CT scan showed a caecal mass. After colonoscopy, that showed external compression, and diagnostic laparoscopy the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Histopathology revealed well differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring morphology with multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was referred for chemotherapy where he received infusional 5 fluorouracil but died 7 months after surgery. Conclusion Patients with atypical manifestations related to right lower abdominal quadrant should be thoroughly investigated with an open mind. Every attempt should be made to make a precise diagnosis through all the available means to direct the treatment along correct lines. PMID:18291037

  20. [Mesonephric adenocarcinoma arising in the female urethral diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Fukui, I; Sakano, Y; Yoshimura, K; Maeda, H; Yonese, J; Yamauchi, T; Kawai, T

    1996-09-01

    A forty four-year-old house-wife presented with gross hematuria and difficulty on urination of a year and 3 months duration. Transvaginal examination showed a hen egg-sized soft mass on the anterior vaginal wall. Urine cytology revealed many clusters of malignant cells suggestive of adenocarcinoma. Cystourethrography revealed two urethral diverticula, whose orifices were cystoscopically located at the proximal and distal side of urethral sphincter, respectively. By vaginal digital pressing, a soy-bean sized papillary tumor came out of the proximal diverticulum. Histopathological examination of the biopsied tumor suggested poorly differentiated transitional cell carcinoma with inverted growth. Under the diagnosis of carcinoma arising in the urethral diverticulum, anterior pelvic exenteration with formation of Indiana pouch was carried out. The tumor in the proximal diverticulum was histologically composed of a variety of adenocarcinomatous pattern, such as tubular, papillary and cystic structure with a distinctive pattern of tubules lined by a superficial layer of hobnail cells, leading to the diagnosis of mesonephric adenocarcinoma of urethral diverticulum. Postoperative radiation therapy was given because the diverticulum was adherent to the pubic bone, though lymph node metastasis was negative. She has been well with no evidence of the disease for 1 year and 4 months after the operation. Although the histogenesis of female urethral mesonephric adenocarcinoma was still controversial, this case seems to be the forty fourth case in the world literature. PMID:8914398

  1. Clinical Efficacy of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Adenocarcinomas of the Esophagogastric Junction

    PubMed Central

    Nagami, Yasuaki; Machida, Hirohisa; Shiba, Masatsugu; Obayashi, Tomoko; Ominami, Masaki; Fukunaga, Shusei; Sugimori, Satoshi; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aims There are a few reports about the efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). However, there is no detailed analysis that divides EGJ cancers into Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of ESD for EGJ cancers, comparing these two adenocarcinomas. Patients and Methods This study included 43 patients who underwent ESD for type II EGJ cancers between 2004 and 2011.?Pathological examination of resected specimens confirmed 14 cases of Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and 29 cases of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Cutting margins on the oral side were placed 1?cm from the squamocolumnar junction, or 1?cm away from the slight elevation that is an endoscopic sign of subsquamous carcinoma extension. Clinical outcomes, prevalence and length of subsquamous carcinoma extension, and long-term outcomes were compared between these two types of adenocarcinoma. Results No significant differences in clinical outcomes were found between these two types of adenocarcinoma (en bloc, 100?% versus 100?%; complete, 100?% versus 89.7?%; curative, 85.7?% versus 75.9?%). No serious adverse events were encountered. The prevalence of subsquamous carcinoma extension was significantly higher in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma compared with gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Local and distant recurrence were not observed in any cases with curative resection during the follow-up period (1.6?–?87.6 months). Conclusion ESD for EGJ cancers, including both Barrett’s adenocarcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, was efficient and useful. ESD with a 1?cm safety margin may be acceptable for EGJ cancers. PMID:26134607

  2. Construction and analysis of three networks of genes and microRNAs in adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    NING, JIAHUI; GUO, XIAOXIN; WANG, NING; XUE, LUCHEN

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is one of the most serious diseases that threaten human health. Numerous studies have investigated adenocarcinoma and have obtained a considerable amount of data regarding genes and microRNA (miRNA) in adenocarcinoma. However, studies have only focused on one or a small number of genes and miRNAs, and the data is stored in a scattered form, making it challenging to summarize and assess the associations between the genes and miRNAs. In the present study, three networks of genes and miRNAs in adenocarcinoma were focused on. This enabled the construction of networks of elements involved in adenocarcinoma and the analysis of these networks, rather than only discussing one gene. Transcription factors (TFs), miRNAs, and target and host genes of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma, and the regulatory associations between these elements were identified in the present study. These elements and associations were then used to construct three networks, which consisted of the differentially-expressed, associated and global networks. The similarities and differences between the three networks were compared and analyzed. In total, 3 notable TFs, consisting of TP53, phosphatase and tensin homolog and SMAD4, were identified in adenocarcinoma. These TFs were able to regulate the differentially-expressed genes and the majority of the differentially-expressed miRNAs. Certain important regulatory associations were also found in adenocarcinoma, in addition to self-regulating associations between TFs and miRNAs. The upstream and downstream elements of the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs were recorded, which revealed the regulatory associations between genes and miRNAs. The present study clearly revealed components of the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma and the regulatory associations between the elements in adenocarcinoma. The present study may aid the investigation of gene therapy in adenocarcinoma and provides a theoretical basis for studies of gene therapy methods as a treatment for adenocarcinoma. PMID:26722320

  3. Trefoil factor 3 as a novel biomarker to distinguish between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Nan; Wang, Shu-Jing; Pandey, Vijay; Chen, Ping; Li, Qing; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Wu, Qiang; Lobie, Peter E

    2015-05-01

    In carcinoma, such as of the lung, the histological subtype is important to select an appropriate therapeutic strategy for patients. However, carcinomas with poor differentiation cannot always be distinguished on the basis of morphology alone nor on clinical findings. Hence, delineation of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the 2 most common epithelial-origin carcinomas, is pivotal for selection of optimum therapy. Herein, we explored the potential utility of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) as a biomarker for primary lung adenocarcinoma and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas derived from different organs. We observed that 90.9% of lung adenocarcinomas were TFF3-positive, whereas no expression of TFF3 was observed in squamous cell carcinomas. The subtype of lung carcinoma was confirmed by four established biomarkers, cytokeratin 7 and thyroid transcription factor 1 for adenocarcinoma and P63 and cytokeratin 5/6 for squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, expression of TFF3 mRNA was observed by quantitative PCR in all of 11 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and highly correlated with markers of the adenocarcinomatous lineage. In contrast, little or no expression of TFF3 was observed in 4 lung squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. By use of forced expression, or siRNA-mediated depletion of TFF3, we determined that TFF3 appeared to maintain rather than promote glandular differentiation of lung carcinoma cells. In addition, TFF3 expression was also determined in adenocarcinomas from colorectum, stomach, cervix, esophagus, and larynx. Among all these extrapulmonary carcinomas, 93.7% of adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 2.9% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. Totally, 92.9% of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 1.5% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. In conclusion, TFF3 is preferentially expressed in adenocarcinoma and may function as an additional biomarker for distinguishing adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25997063

  4. The Significance of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Jun; Hyun, Kwanyong; Park, Jae Kil; Moon, Seok Whan

    2015-01-01

    Background A raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) may be associated with significant pathology during the postoperative follow-up of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 305 patients who underwent surgical resections for primary lung adenocarcinoma at a single institution between April 2006 and February 2013. Results Preoperative CEA levels were significantly associated with age, smoking history, pathologic stage including pT (pathologic tumor stge), pN (pathologic nodal stage) and overall pathological stage, tumor size and differentiation, pathologically positive total lymph node, N1 and N2 lymph node, N2 nodal station (0/1/2=1.83/2.94/7.21 ng/mL, p=0.019), and 5-year disease-free survival (0.591 in group with normal preoperative CEA levels vs. 0.40 in group with high preoperative CEA levels, p=0.001). Preoperative CEA levels were significantly higher than postoperative CEA levels (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Postoperative CEA level was also significantly associated with disease-free survival (p<0.001). A follow-up serum CEA value of >2.57 ng/mL was found to be the appropriate cutoff value for the prediction of cancer recurrence with sensitivity and specificity of 71.4% and 72.3%, respectively. Twenty percent of patients who had recurrence of disease had a CEA level elevated above this cutoff value prior to radiographic evidence of recurrence. Postoperative CEA, pathologic stage, differentiation, vascular invasion, and neoadjuvant therapy were identified as independent predictors of 5-year disease-free survival in a multivariate analysis. Conclusion The follow-up CEA level can be a useful tool for detecting early recurrence undetected by postoperative imaging studies. The perioperative follow-up CEA levels may be helpful for providing personalized evaluation of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26509127

  5. Primary adenocarcinoma of rete testis with distinct biphasic pattern: An extremely rare entity and diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma of rete testis is one of the rarest intrascrotal tumors. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. In addition, presence of biphasic component creates difficulty in the diagnosis. We present here a unique third case of rete testis adenocarcinoma having distinct cytologically malignant spindle cell component in a young male who presented with recurrent hydrocele. PMID:25810664

  6. Early Diagnosis of a Small Adenocarcinoma in a Rectovaginal Fistula Related to Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Serur, Anna; Khulpateea, Neekianund

    2015-01-01

    While adenocarcinomas have occasionally been reported in perianal fistulae, malignant changes occurring in rectovaginal fistulae are rare, with only a handful of reported cases. We report a 73-year-old woman with Crohn's disease who was diagnosed at an early stage with adenocarcinoma in a rectovaginal fistula. This rare disease poses many diagnostic challenges. PMID:26203449

  7. Femoral metastases from ovarian serous/endometroid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beresford–Cleary, NJA; Mehdi, SA; Magowan, B

    2012-01-01

    Bony metastases from ovarian cancer are rare, tend to affect the axial skeleton and are associated with abdomino-pelvic disease. The median time interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and presentation of bony metastases is 44 months (1). We describe a rare case of high grade left ovarian serous / endometrioid adenocarcinoma presenting with a pathological right femoral fracture 4 weeks following diagnosis and optimal debulking of the ovarian tumour. Orthopaedic surgeons must be vigilant when planning treatment of fractures presenting in patients with a history of ovarian cancer. PMID:24960734

  8. Unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma with complete clinical response following chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Erol; Ula?, Murat; Çolako?lu, Muhammet Kadri; Özer, ?lter; Bostanc?, Erdal Birol; Ako?lu, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Locally advanced or metastatic disease is present in 2/3s of patients with pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer patients are assessed as resectable, potentially resectable (borderline) and unresectable according to pre-operative examinations. The chance for operability may be enhanced by using adjuvant-neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. The rates of R0 resection may be increased by means of treatment delivered this way. This case report presents a pancreatic adenocarcinoma case that was assessed to be resectable but was identified to be unresectable during surgical exploration, thus received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The patient was then re-evaluated, identified as resectable and received pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25931951

  9. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasonography: Intratumoral Injection for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Lawrence A.; Aguilar, Laura K.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Walker, Jon P.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive disease that has poor outcomes despite maximal traditional therapies. Thus, treatment of this cancer demands innovative strategies to be used in addition to standing therapies in order to provide new avenues of care. Here, we describe the technique of using endoscopic ultrasound in order to directly inject both novel and conventional therapies into pancreatic tumors. We detail the rationale behind this strategy and the many benefits it provides. We then describe our technique in detail, including our experience injecting the AdV-tk adenoviral vector to create an in situ vaccine effect. PMID:23606830

  10. Histopathological spectrum of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Varun; Tupkari, Jagdish V; Joy, Tabita; Verma, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas (PLGA) are distinctive salivary gland neoplasms, with an almost exclusive propensity to arise from the minor salivary glands. PLGA frequently manifests as an asymptomatic, slow-growing mass within the oral cavity, which must be separated from adenoid cystic carcinoma and benign mixed tumor for therapeutic and prognostic considerations. We report a case of a 67-year-old male, who presented with a long-standing mass in the palate. This lesion was diagnosed as PLGA based on histopathological findings, which was further confirmed by the immunohistochemical marker.

  11. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics of colonic adenocarcinoma using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong; Li, Hongsheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a noninvasive optical method with high resolution and high sensitivity, can obtain detailed microstructures of biotissues at submolecular level. In this study, MPM is used to image microstructure varieties of human colonic mucosa and submucosa with adenocarcinoma. Some parameters, such as gland configuration, SHG/TPEF intensity ratio, and collagen orientation and so on, should serve the indicators of early colorectal cancer. The exploratory results show that it's potential for the development of multiphoton mini-endoscopy in real-time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  12. Establishment of primary mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell culture

    PubMed Central

    LUO, SHULI; SUN, MEI; JIANG, RUI; WANG, GUAN; ZHANG, XINYI

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease worldwide and is the leading cause of death from cancer. Primary cultures derived from lung cancer are essential for understanding abnormal growth function in lung epithelia. In this study, 2 out of 5 primary lung adenocarcinoma cultures derived from DNA repair-deficient mice were established and characterised using electron microscopy and immunostaining. Results of the tumourigenicity tests confirmed that these primary cells are tumourigenic. In conclusion, an effective primary culture method provides a tool for clinical antitumour drug testing. PMID:22848239

  13. [Adenocarcinomas of unknown origin. Study of 17 autopsies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    van den Heule, B; Gompel, C

    1978-01-01

    This article reports on the autopsy results of 17 patients with adenocarcinomas from occult primary tumours: 10 are of bronchial origin, 3 of renal origin, 1 of hepatic origin, 1 of ovarian origin, and 1 of pancreatic or bronchial origin. In one case no primary tumour was found. Factors which can lead the clinicians toward further investigations are the location or nature of the first clinical signs (neurological and respiratory for bronchial cancers, subdiaphragmatic for primary abdominal tumours) and smoking habit (bronchial carcinoma in smokers). PMID:747797

  14. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  15. Endometrioid adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis of the uterine cervix: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Moie; Lee, Sang Soo; Eom, Dae Woon; Kang, Gil Hyun; Yi, Sang Wook; Sohn, Woo Seok

    2009-08-01

    Endometrioid adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis of the uterine cervix is rare in premenopausal woman. We describe here a patient with this condition and review the clinical and pathological features of these tumors. A 48-yr-old woman complaining of severe dysmenorrhea was referred for investigation of a pelvic mass. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. Histological examination revealed an endometrioid adenocarcinoma directly adjacent to the endometriosis at the uterine cervix, with a transition observed between endometriosis and endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The patient was diagnosed as having endometrioid adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis of the uterine cervix and underwent postoperative chemotherapy. Gynecologists and pathologists should be aware of the difficulties associated with a delay in diagnosis of endometrioid adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis when the tumor presents as a benign looking endometrioma. PMID:19654969

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the bladder following nephrogenic adenoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hungerhuber, Edwin; Bach, Ekkehard; Hartmann, Arndt; Frimberger, Dominic; Stief, Christian; Zaak, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Nephrogenic adenomas are generally considered to be benign lesions, but there remains a risk for malignant transformation. Patients with immunosuppression in particular appear to be at a higher risk of malignant disease. We report a case of post-traumatic nephrogenic adenoma in a young patient without immunosuppression, which transformed into an adenocarcinoma of the bladder. Case presentation A 25-year-old man had a traumatic bladder perforation caused by a car accident. After physical recovery from the accident, he developed a neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder 18 months after the accident. The adenoma was treated repeatedly with transurethral resections. The initial pathologic findings were benign, however, the last resection revealed that the former benign adenoma had transformed into a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the bladder (tumor present but no invasion, multifocal, no lymph nodes involved, no metastasis, grade 2). He subsequently underwent radical cystectomy and has remained tumor-free for the last 4 years. Conclusion Nephrogenic adenoma is a rare disease with some potential for malignant transformation. However, patients with nephrogenic adenoma under immunosuppression and patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction appear to be at a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. PMID:18485239

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach and exposure to occupational dust

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Garabrant, D.H.; Mack, T.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors studied 1342 cases of adenocarcinoma of the stomach identified by a population-based cancer registry in Los Angeles County, California. The cases were males aged 20-64 years first diagnosed between 1972 and 1982. To determine whether exposure to occupational dust increased the risk of developing stomach cancer, occupational titles were rated for the likelihood of exposure to various kinds of dust. Men who worked in dusty jobs had a risk for developing stomach cancer 1.3 times that of unexposed men. The association of exposure to dust with stomach cancer was stronger at higher levels of exposure. The risk was not uniform throughout the stomach: the highest risk (1.8 times that of unexposed men) was found for the antrum/pylorus. At that site, exposure to mineral dust carried the greatest risk for cancer (3.7 times the risk for unexposed men). The highest risks from dust exposure were observed in blacks. Risk was related to race, socioeconomic status, and immigrant status, but these factors did not entirely explain the association with dust exposure. The observed relation between dust exposure and stomach cancer is consistent with results of previous mortality and case-control studies of cancer in men who worked in dusty occupations. Ingested dust may be one factor in the etiology of adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

  18. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: treating a systemic disease with systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Walsh, R Matthew; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Khorana, Alok A

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, even when resectable, remains highly lethal. Although surgical outcomes have improved considerably, median overall survival after surgery and adjuvant therapy such as single-agent gemcitabine remains less than 2 years. We discuss preclinical and clinical data supporting the contention that even early-stage pancreatic cancer is a systemic disease. Autopsy series reveal that 70% to 85% of patients die of systemic recurrence, rather than local disease, after pancreatic cancer resection. Preclinical studies using genomics and mouse models reveal evidence of metastatic spread even before histopathologic evidence of a pancreatic tumor. Analogous to breast cancer, we propose that the Halstedian approach of treating pancreatic cancer as a local, surgical problem should be replaced by Fisher's alternative hypothesis of cancer as a systemic disease. Newer multiagent chemotherapy regimens have shown meaningful response rates and improvement in overall survival in the metastatic setting and, for the first time, offer investigators an opportunity to use effective systemic therapy. We emphasize that a surgery-first approach is not resonant with our current understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinoma biology and that an upfront systemic approach for even resectable pancreatic cancer warrants testing in clinical trials. PMID:24563516

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the parotid salivary gland in a cow.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Breno S; Monteiro, Lidianne N; Grandi, Fabrizio; Nonogaki, Suely; Rocha, Rafael M; Rocha, Noeme S

    2012-09-01

    A 6-year-old Girolando dairy cow was presented for evaluation of a large subcutaneous facial mass. Fine-needle aspirates of the mass contained many neoplastic cells with high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios arranged in sheets and loosely cohesive clusters with streaming erythrocytes and neutrophils in the background. Neoplastic cells were 13-25 ?m in diameter and were round to cuboidal with variably distinct borders. Based on the signalment, anatomic location, and cytologic findings, differential diagnoses included salivary adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The cow was euthanized and a necropsy was performed. The primary neoplasm arose from the left parotid salivary gland and meastatic tumor was found in the regional lymph nodes and lung. Histologically, the tumor was composed of anastomosing and irregular solid islets surrounded by scant stroma. Cells were negative for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), PAS-diastase, and Alcian blue pH 2.5 stains, used to detect mucin. On immunohistochemical analysis, neoplastic luminal salivary gland cells expressed cytokeratin, but not S100, ?-smooth muscle actin, or vimentin. Peripheral cells of neoplastic islets were immunoreactive for p63. The final diagnosis was nonsecretory adenocarcinoma of the parotid salivary gland. PMID:22954300

  20. Unilateral testicular metastasis of low PSA level prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Brianna Jeanette; Greenwald, David W; Ahmad, Navid

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with a firm left testicle 15?years after being diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma. After the initial diagnosis, the patient underwent a radical prostatectomy. He received radiation therapy 5?years after surgery for a slightly elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and a negative metastatic workup. Eight years later, the patient's PSA rose to 3.38?ng/mL and he was started on intermittent Lupron therapy. It was then 3?years later when the patient discovered the testicular mass. At that time, his PSA level was 2.98?ng/mL. He underwent a left orchiectomy which demonstrated metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. Currently, the patient is doing well 3?months postorchiectomy and is now receiving continuous testosterone suppression therapy. This case report discusses the unique modes of spread from the prostate to the testicle as well as the importance of follow-up care in patients with prostate cancer, especially in the setting of low PSA levels. PMID:25994435

  1. Prognostic significance of cytoplasmic p53 oncoprotein in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, X F; Carstensen, J M; Zhang, H; Stål, O; Wingren, S; Hatschek, T; Nordenskjöld, B

    1992-12-01

    Mutation of p53, a tumour-suppressor protein, leads to overexpression of the protein and loss of its tumour-suppressive properties. In some tumours (eg, breast) p53 expression is related to well-known prognostic factors, but findings in colorectal tumours are equivocal. We have used the polyclonal antibody CM1 to investigate nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression in colorectal tumours and to assess their relations with prognosis. Of 293 colorectal adenocarcinomas, 71 (24%) showed p53 expression in the nucleus alone, 30 (10%) showed p53 in the cytoplasm alone, and 43 (15%) showed both nuclear and cytoplasmic expression. Nuclear p53 expression showed no relation with survival or Dukes' stage of the tumour. However, the frequency of cytoplasmic expression increased with advancing Dukes' stage (chi 2 for trend 11.18, 1 df, p = 0.0008) and cytoplasmic expression was associated with poor survival (rate ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1.6-3.3], p < 0.0001). Among tumours of Dukes' stage A-C, cytoplasmic expression showed prognostic value independent of nuclear staining, grade of differentiation, and Dukes' stage (2.3 [1.4-3.7], p = 0.0021). We conclude that cytoplasmic expression of p53 may be a useful biological indicator of prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:1360088

  2. Atypical Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Mimicking a Gastric Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Becq, Aymeric; Mateescu, Christian; Khayat, David; Bouattour, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) relies on imaging tools and biopsy. It usually does not present to be a challenge. Here we report the case of a 69-year-old patient with HCC, initially mistaken for a gastric hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC), with a favorable outcome after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The initial presentation (clinical signs, morphological features, and histological findings) led to the diagnosis of a gastric hepatoid adenocarcinoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine protocol was administered. Biological (alpha-fetoprotein [AFP] decreased by a factor of 10), radiological (?35% RECIST), and histological (20% of necrosis) responses were observed. Complete surgical resection was then performed. The final pathological diagnosis was a well-differentiated HCC, staged pT4 N0?(0/24) R0. There are no guidelines as to how such tumors should be managed. Nonetheless, neoadjuvant chemotherapy yielded a good outcome. This observation stresses the importance of the final pathological findings and addresses the issue of neoadjuvant therapy in some cases of HCC. PMID:26166099

  3. Splenic metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marco; Martins, Vilma; Moreno, Filipa; Vizcaíno, J. Ramón; Mesquita, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated splenic metastasis are very rare. There are only a few reported cases of patients with isolated splenic metastasis from gastric primary tumors. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a 71-year-old patient with isolated splenic metastasis, diagnosed 6 years after primary treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma, who previously had a lung resection also for metastasis. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy and then to splenectomy. The patient is alive and has no evidence of disease 7 months after splenectomy. DISCUSSION We discuss the theories that explain the rare event of splenic metastasis, the route of metastization, the workup, treatment and survival of patients with isolated splenic metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, our case has the second longest interval from the primary diagnosis of gastric cancer to the diagnosis of splenic metastasis. CONCLUSION In cases of isolated splenic metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma, fit patients should be considered for splenectomy, since there are reports of good patient survivals. PMID:25465647

  4. Acinic cell adenocarcinoma. A clinicopathologic analysis of 294 cases.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L; Corio, R L

    1983-08-01

    Two hundred and ninety-four cases of acinic cell adenocarcinoma were reviewed for the purpose of defining the clinical parameters and determining the distribution of the four histomorphologic tissue patterns and five cell types for correlation to biologic behavior. The vast majority occurred in the parotid gland. There was a male predominance and a peak incidence in the third decade of life. The tumors were usually less than 3 cm in diameter and were slow growing. Pain was a common symptom, but was not indicative of prognosis. Nearly one half of the neoplasms exhibited multiple tissue growth patterns, and three fourths of the tumors displayed more than one cell type. The microcystic pattern was seen most frequently, regardless of the biological behavior of the tumors. The well-differentiated acinic cell was the most prevalent cell type except in cases with metastases, where the intercalated-duct cell type was slightly more frequent. Follow-up of 244 cases revealed a recurrence rate of 12%, a metastatic rate of 7.8%, and death rate of 6.1%. Since all histomorphologic patterns and cell types were manifest in tumors which recurred, metastasized, or caused the death of the patients, it seems appropriate to consider these neoplasms as low-grade adenocarcinomas rather than essentially benign with occasional unpredictable malignant behavior. PMID:6861091

  5. Parotid gland metastasis - an unusual presentation of adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Debnath, C R; Shahjahan, S M; Debnath, M R; Alam, M M; Moshwan, M M; Khan, M F; Rana, M S; Himel, R R; Ahmed, S

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent malignant disease and the most common cause of cancer death in the world. Primary carcinoma of the lung was an uncommon cancer until the 1930s. Common cell types in bronchial carcinoma are squamous 35%, Adenocarcinoma 30%, Small-cell 20%, Large-cell 15%. We present a case of a bronchial neoplasm metastasis to the parotid gland. A 50 years old male patient presented with a 7×5cm painless parotid mass that was metastatic adenocarcinoma on histopathology. Then we thoroughly examined the patient and he was investigated accordingly. There was an abnormal shadow in the lung on chest x-ray, CT revealed a lung tumour on left side. Metastasis to the parotid gland from any distant primary site is quite unusual. We are going to present this case in the journal because of its rarity. Parotid gland metastasis from the lung is rare & if a careful examination is not performed primary focus may be overlooked, negatively affecting the lifetime survival rate & the prognosis of the patient. PMID:25725686

  6. Beta-human Chorionic Gonadotropin-secreting Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WONG, Yin Ping; TAN, Geok Chin; AZIZ, Suraya; PONGPRAKYUN, Sucharit; ISMAIL, Fuad

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) is frequently associated with germ cell tumours, especially choriocarcinoma. Ectopic secretion of ?-hCG by non-small cell lung cancer is exceptional. We present an exceedingly rare case of pulmonary adenocarcinoma that secretes ?-hCG. Our patient is a 62-year-old postmenopausal woman, a nonsmoker, who presented with a six-month history of progressive dyspnoea, associated with decreased appetite and significant weight loss. Her serum ?-hCG was very high (11211.9 mIU/ml), which prompted investigations to exclude germ cell tumour. Radiological imaging revealed a 10-cm right lung mass with adrenal metastasis. No other focal lesions were detected. Microscopy of the lung biopsy specimen showed replacement of normal lung tissue by sheets of malignant cells, forming vague glands in some areas. Immunohistochemically, the malignant cells showed focal immunopositivity for thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), napsin A, cytokeratin 7 (CK7) and ?-hCG. A diagnosis of ?-hCG-secreting pulmonary poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was rendered. Serum ?-hCG level decreased significantly to 168.6 mIU/ml after the first cycle of chemotherapy. In conclusion, ?-hCG expression in lung cancer should be recognised to facilitate prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate intervention. PMID:26715912

  7. Human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell: electrochemistry and nicotine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S C B; Santarino, I B; Enache, T A; Nunes, C; Laranjinha, J; Barbosa, R M; Oliveira-Brett, A M

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that colorectal cancer HT-29 cells can secrete epinephrine (adrenaline) in an autocrine manner to auto-stimulate cellular growth by adrenoreceptors activation, and that this secretion is enhanced by nicotine, showing an indirect relation between colorectal cancer and tobacco. The electrochemical behaviour of human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells from a colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, the hormone and neurotransmitter epinephrine, and nicotine, were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, using indium tin oxide (ITO), glassy carbon (GC) and screen printed carbon (SPC) electrodes. The oxidation of the HT-29 cells, previously grown onto ITO or SPC surfaces, followed an irreversible oxidation process that involved the formation of a main oxidation product that undergoes irreversible reduction, as in the epinephrine oxidation mechanism. The effect of nicotine stimulation of the HT-29 cells was also investigated. Nicotine, at different concentration levels 1, 2 and 15 mM, was introduced in the culture medium and an increase with incubation time, 0 to 3h and 30 min, of the HT-29 cells oxidation and reduction peaks was observed. The interaction of nicotine with the HT-29 cells stimulated the epinephrine secretion causing an increase in epinephrine release concentration, and enabling the conclusion that epinephrine and nicotine play an important role in the colorectal tumour growth. PMID:23774106

  8. Neurotrophin receptor TrkB promotes lung adenocarcinoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sinkevicius, Kerstin W.; Kriegel, Christina; Bellaria, Kelly J.; Lee, Jaewon; Lau, Allison N.; Leeman, Kristen T.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Beede, Alexander M.; Fillmore, Christine M.; Caswell, Deborah; Barrios, Juliana; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sholl, Lynette M.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Chirieac, Lucian R.; Winslow, Monte M.; Haigis, Marcia C.; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is notorious for its ability to metastasize, but the pathways regulating lung cancer metastasis are largely unknown. An in vitro system designed to discover factors critical for lung cancer cell migration identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which stimulates cell migration through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2). Knockdown of TrkB in human lung cancer cell lines significantly decreased their migratory and metastatic ability in vitro and in vivo. In an autochthonous lung adenocarcinoma model driven by activated oncogenic Kras and p53 loss, TrkB deficiency significantly reduced metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 directly regulated TrkB expression, and, in turn, TrkB activated Akt signaling in metastatic lung cancer cells. Finally, TrkB expression was correlated with metastasis in patient samples, and TrkB was detected more often in tumors that did not have Kras or epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. These studies demonstrate that TrkB is an important therapeutic target in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:24982195

  9. BRAF Activation Initiates but Does Not Maintain Invasive Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Alexander S.; Ouyang, Xuesong; Figueiredo, Jose L.; Ding, Zhihu; Jiang, Shan; Guney, Isil; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Shin, Eyoung; Hahn, William C.; Loda, Massimo F.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Weissleder, Ralph; Chin, Lynda

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Activation of MAP kinase signaling pathway has been implicated in advanced and androgen-independent prostate cancers, although formal genetic proof has been lacking. In the course of modeling malignant melanoma in a tyrosinase promoter transgenic system, we developed a genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) model of invasive prostate cancers, whereby an activating mutation of BRAFV600E–a mutation found in ?10% of human prostate tumors–was targeted to the epithelial compartment of the prostate gland on the background of Ink4a/Arf deficiency. These GEM mice developed prostate gland hyperplasia with progression to rapidly growing invasive adenocarcinoma without evidence of AKT activation, providing genetic proof that activation of MAP kinase signaling is sufficient to drive prostate tumorigenesis. Importantly, genetic extinction of BRAFV600E in established prostate tumors did not lead to tumor regression, indicating that while sufficient to initiate development of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma, BRAFV600E is not required for its maintenance. PMID:19079609

  10. Retrotransposon insertions in the clonal evolution of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rodi?, Nemanja; Steranka, Jared P; Makohon-Moore, Alvin; Moyer, Allison; Shen, Peilin; Sharma, Reema; Kohutek, Zachary A; Huang, Cheng Ran; Ahn, Daniel; Mita, Paolo; Taylor, Martin S; Barker, Norman J; Hruban, Ralph H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Boeke, Jef D; Burns, Kathleen H

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is typically diagnosed after the disease has metastasized; it is among the most lethal forms of cancer. We recently described aberrant expression of an open reading frame 1 protein, ORF1p, encoded by long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1; L1) retrotransposon, in PDAC. To test whether LINE-1 expression leads to somatic insertions of this mobile DNA, we used a targeted method to sequence LINE-1 insertion sites in matched PDAC and normal samples. We found evidence of 465 somatic LINE-1 insertions in 20 PDAC genomes, which were absent from corresponding normal samples. In cases in which matched normal tissue, primary PDAC and metastatic disease sites were available, insertions were found in primary and metastatic tissues in differing proportions. Two adenocarcinomas secondarily involving the pancreas, but originating in the stomach and duodenum, acquired insertions with a similar discordance between primary and metastatic sites. Together, our findings show that LINE-1 contributes to the genetic evolution of PDAC and suggest that somatic insertions are acquired discontinuously in gastrointestinal neoplasms. PMID:26259033

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the minor duodenal papilla: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Arichika; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mizutani, Satoshi; Ishii, Hideaki; Watanabe, Masanori; Bou, Hideki; Yoshino, Masanori; Komine, Osamu; Uchida, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of adenocarcinoma of the minor papilla of the duodenum treated with transduodenal minor papillectomy. A 64-year-old woman was treated for an asymptomatic duodenal tumor detected on gastroduodenoscopy. Endoscopy showed a 15-mm sessile mass in the descending duodenum proximal to the major papilla. The major papilla was a villous 24-mm-diameter polypoid tumor. Histopathologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed tubular adenoma with moderate epithelial atypia. Transduodenal major and minor papillectomies were performed. The orifice of the duct of Santorini and the pancreatic duct were re-approximated to the duodenal wall to prevent acute pancreatitis caused by scarring and stenosis of the duct orifice. Histological findings were consistent with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma limited to the minor duodenal papilla, without infiltration of the duodenal wall submucosa, and confirmed complete resection. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and has remained asymptomatic, without evidence of tumor recurrence or stenosis of the pancreatic duct orifice, for 4 years. PMID:23657071

  12. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA. PMID:26191312

  13. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA. PMID:26191312

  14. Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: The Influence of Medications Used to Treat Comorbidities on Cancer Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thrift, Aaron P

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma has undergone a continuous rise in incidence since the early 1970s and is the fastest rising cancer among white men in the United States. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that medications commonly used to treat multiple chronic conditions (for example, aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and statins) as well as powerful acid suppressants such as proton pump inhibitors are associated with a reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The chemopreventive potential of these classes of medications appears to be especially applicable to persons with Barrett's esophagus, the only known premalignant condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, it is not known whether these medications also influence cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in persons diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This is an important question because most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma have 1 or more comorbid conditions at the time of their cancer diagnosis and are receiving medication to treat these conditions. This article summarizes the evidence on the associations between 4 commonly used classes of medications and (1) risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus and (2) risk of cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25835331

  15. Adenocarcinoma at Anastomotic Site of Ureterosigmoidostomy Potentially of Urothelial Origin Spreading to the Upper Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Katsuhiro; Kume, Haruki; Morikawa, Teppei; Niimi, Aya; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Ureterosigmoidostomy is associated with the risk of several late complications including cancer development at anastomotic sites. We present an unusual case with adenocarcinoma of the anastomotic site associated with multiple adenocarcinoma lesions in the upper urinary tract. A 69-year-old man complained of persistent melena and hematuria. He had undergone radical cystectomy for high-grade bladder cancer and ureterosigmoidostomy 30 years before. Colonoscopy showed a tumor at the right ureterocolonic anastomosis, which was endoscopically resected and histologically diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. Seven years later, a tumor of the left ureterocolonic anastomosis associated with hydronephrosis was found. He underwent temporal percutaneous nephrostomy followed by sigmoidectomy and left ureterocutaneostomy. Eighteen months after the operation, computed tomography (CT) detected left renal pelvic tumor with a mass along the former nephrostomy tract. Left nephroureterectomy and resection of the nephrostomy tract tumor revealed adenocarcinoma with multiple lesions of adenocarcinoma in the ureter. These tumors showed atypical immunohistochemistry as a colonic adenocarcinoma: positive for cytokeratin 7, negative for cytokeratin 20, and negative for ?-catenin nuclear accumulation. Anastomotic site adenocarcinoma of the present case is potentially of urothelial origin because of unusual clinical manifestation and immunohistochemistry as a colon cancer.

  16. Cholecystokinin A and B receptors are differentially expressed in normal pancreas and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, D S; Ruggeri, B; Barber, M T; Biswas, S; Miknyocki, S; Waldman, S A

    1997-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) plays an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. While human CCK-A and -B receptors have been fully characterized, their relative roles in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma remain unclear. Thus, expression of CCK-A and -B receptors in normal human pancreas, pancreatic adenocarcinomas, and other human extrapancreatic tissues and malignancies was examined, using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). mRNA isolated from 15 normal pancreas specimens, 22 pancreatic adenocarcinomas, and 58 extrapancreatic tissues and tumors was subjected to RT-PCR using primers specific for human CCK-A and -B receptors. Expression of CCK-B receptors was detected in all tissues arising from pancreas and in most extrapancreatic tissues and tumors. In contrast, CCK-A receptors exhibited a more selective pattern of expression in gall bladder, intestine, brain, ovary, spleen, and thymus. Of significance, CCK-A receptors were expressed selectively in all pancreatic adenocarcinomas, but not in any normal pancreas specimens. In situ hybridization, using receptor-specific riboprobes, localized CCK-A receptor expression to ductal cells, the presumed origin of most human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Southern blot analysis revealed no evidence of CCK-A receptor gene amplification or rearrangement in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Because of its selective expression, the CCK-A receptor may serve as selective biomarker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:9239407

  17. Detection of phosphorylated insulin receptor in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma: implications for prognosis and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, Claudia; Diodoro, Maria Grazia; Sperduti, Isabella; Mileo, Anna Maria; Pattaro, Giada; De Salvo, Laura; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Perrotti, Nicola; Paggi, Marco G

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal carcinoma remains among the most frequent causes of cancer death. Besides the well-known genetic predisposition, a key role in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma etio-pathogenesis, mainly in sporadic cases, is played by definite risk factors, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, hyper-insulinemia, and insulin therapy. These epidemiological data motivated us to determine, by means of immunohistochemistry, the amount of activated (phosphorylated) insulin receptor in archival samples from 22 colorectal adenoma and 117 adenocarcinoma patients, with the objective to estimate the role of this factor in colorectal epithelium transformation and cancer progression. Statistical analysis of the results clearly showed that positive staining for phosphorylated insulin receptor was significantly more frequent in adenomas than adenocarcinomas (P?adenocarcinoma cohort, it was more frequent in low-grade tumors (P?=?0.005). In adenomas, staining was exclusively cytoplasmic, while in adenocarcinomas it was cytoplasmic and/or nuclear (P?adenocarcinoma patients pointed out a significantly better prognosis for those bearing a positive staining for phosphorylated insulin receptor (P?=?0.02). From these data, we can argue that activated insulin receptor plays a fundamental role at the early stages of tumorigenesis, where late stages could be characterized by a shift toward more active oncogenic drivers. Determining the amount of phosphorylated insulin receptor could thus represent a novel prognostic/predictive tool in colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:25102778

  18. Spiradenocarcinoma in Preexisting Spiradenoma With a Large In Situ Adenocarcinoma Component.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yo; Fukumoto, Takaya; Kimura, Tetsunori

    2015-10-01

    Spiradenocarcinoma is a very rare malignant tumor. In situ adenocarcinoma has recently been observed and defined by the preservation of a peripheral myoepithelial cell layer. The pathway for this phenomenon has been hypothesized to involve a sequence of adenomatous changes followed by atypical adenomatous changes, adenocarcinoma in situ, and invasive adenocarcinoma. However, there are no clearly defined morphological distinctions between atypical adenomatous changes and adenocarcinoma in situ. The authors present a case of spiradenocarcinoma in a preexisting spiradenoma in the left inguinal area of a 71-year-old woman. Adenomatous changes, atypical adenomatous changes, adenocarcinoma in situ, and invasive adenocarcinoma were found within the same lesion. The majority of the malignant component was an in situ adenocarcinoma. Although a loss of the myoepithelial cell layer and coalescing, irregular, glandular nests were present in several discrete foci, this case did not show infiltrative growth beyond the fibrous connective tissue. The authors speculate that this case represents a very early invasive spiradenocarcinoma lesion. We present this case to discuss the histological and/or immunohistochemical criteria of atypical adenomatous changes and to discuss the optimal treatment in cases with a disparity between the preservation of the whole architecture and the loss of the myoepithelial cell layer, which may be associated with favorable biological behavior. PMID:25830720

  19. FOXM1 Promotes Lung Adenocarcinoma Invasion and Metastasis by Upregulating SNAIL

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ping; Zhang, Nu; Wang, Yiqin; Li, Dawei; Wang, Lisha; Sun, Xiangjie; Shen, Chen; Yang, Yusi; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor is one of the key genes inducing tumor invasion and metastasis by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of FOXM1 overexpression on metastatic human lung adenocarcinoma and the underlying mechanism. FOXM1 expression was analyzed in 78 frozen lung adenocarcinoma tissue samples using an Affymetrix microarray and a 155-paraffin-embedded lung adenocarcinoma tissue microarray with immunohistochemical detection. FOXM1 was found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma, particularly in metastatic patients, compared to non-metastatic patients. Knockdown of FOXM1 by a specific siRNA significantly suppressed EMT progression, migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas restored expression of FOXM1 had the opposite effect. FOXM1 binds directly to the SNAIL promoter through two specific binding sites and constitutively transactivates it. Collectively, our findings indicate that FOXM1 may play an important role in advancing lung adenocarcinoma progression. Aberrant FOXM1 expression directly and constitutively activates SNAIL, thereby promoting lung adenocarcinoma metastasis. Inhibition of FOXM1-SNAIL signaling may present an ideal target for future treatment. PMID:25561901

  20. Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma tyrosine kinase receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression and activation in canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (cpAC) biospecimens. As histological similarities exist between human and cpAC, we hypothesized that cpACs will have increased TKR mRNA and protein expression as well as TKR phosphorylation. The molecular profile of cpAC has not been well characterized making the selection of therapeutic targets that would potentially have relevant biological activity impossible. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to define TKR expression and their phosphorylation state in cpAC as well as to evaluate the tumors for the presence of potential epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activating mutations in exons 18–21. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for TKR expression was performed using a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from twelve canine tumors and companion normal lung samples. Staining intensities of the IHC were quantified by a veterinary pathologist as well as by two different digitalized algorithm image analyses software programs. An antibody array was used to evaluate TKR phosphorylation of the tumor relative to the TKR phosphorylation of normal tissues with the resulting spot intensities quantified using array analysis software. Each EGFR exon PCR product from all of the tumors and non-affected lung tissues were sequenced using sequencing chemistry and the sequencing reactions were run on automated sequencer. Sequence alignments were made to the National Center for Biotechnology Information canine EGFR reference sequence. Results The pro-angiogenic growth factor receptor, PDGFR?, had increased cpAC tumor mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation when compared to the normal lung tissue biospecimens. Similar to human pulmonary adenocarcinoma, significant increases in cpAC tumor mRNA expression and receptor phosphorylation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine receptor were present when compared to the corresponding normal lung tissue. The EGFR mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation were not increased compared to the normal lung and no activating mutations were identified in exons 18–21. Conclusions Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma TKRs are detected at both the mRNA and protein levels and are activated. Further investigation into the contribution of TKR activation in cpAC tumorigenesis is warranted. PMID:24423144

  1. Oestrogen receptor protein and mRNA in adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, S. M.; Thomas, G. A.; Ghandour, F. A.; Davies, H. G.; Attanoos, R.; Williams, E. D.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the oestrogen receptor (ER) status of 20 cervical adenocarcinomas by immunocytochemistry for ER protein and non-isotopic in situ hybridisation for ER mRNA. Both methods, which are applicable to paraffin sections, were developed and validated in breast carcinomas with known ER content. Six cervical adenocarcinomas contained immunocytochemically demonstrable ER protein; all contained ER mRNA, but staining was less intense in poorly differentiated areas of four tumours. This disparity between protein and mRNA detection needs further investigation as does the possibility that oestrogens may play a role in the pathogenesis of cervical adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1457356

  2. Mucinous Pleural Effusion in a Dog with a Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma and Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Tropf, Melissa; Sellon, Rance; Paulson, Kathleen; Nelson, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    An 11 yr old castrated male greyhound presented to the Washington State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital (WSU VTH) for evaluation of a 4 day history of pleural effusion. The pleural effusion had a gelatinous appearance, suggestive of mucus, and was characterized cytologically as a pyogranulomatous exudate with some features suggestive of a carcinoma. Postmortem examination identified a pulmonary mass with evidence of carcinomatosis. Pulmonary papillary adenocarcinoma with carcinomatosis was the histologic diagnosis. Abundant mucin production was present, consistent with a mucinous pulmonary adenocarcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a mucinous pulmonary adenocarcinoma with mucus pleural effusion in a dog. PMID:26355581

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in a Wistar Hannover GALAS Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Hagio, Soichiro; Abe, Masayoshi; Furukawa, Satoshi; Nakae, Dai

    2013-01-01

    There are no reported spontaneous cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and there are few reports about chemically-induced PDAC in rats. We encountered a PDAC in a Wistar Hannover GALAS rat that had been subjected to a medium-term multiorgan carcinogenicity bioassay. This article describes the histological and histochemical findings of the tumor. The tumor was located in the pancreatic tissue and had not invaded the liver parenchyma or the mucosal layer of the alimentary tract. The tumor cells were atypical and were mainly arranged in small tubules. In addition, abundant stroma and mucus production were observed in the tumor. In an immunohistochemical examination, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, Sox9 and pancreas duodenum homeobox 1 and negative for amylase 2A and insulin. Therefore, the tumor was diagnosed as a PDAC based on its histological and histochemical findings. We considered that the tumor was caused by the carcinogens administered during the abovementioned bioassay. PMID:25352717

  4. Chemotherapy of transplanted adenocarcinomas of the colon in mice.

    PubMed

    Double, J A; Ball, C R

    1975-01-01

    Transplantable adenocarcinomas of the colon in mice have been developed from primary tumors induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Two such transplant lines, MAC-13 and MAC-15, have been used to assess the possible value of this type of tumor in chemotherapy screening. A protocol has been established and 11 standard drugs were tested against the two lines. Both tumors show sensitivity which is remarkably similar to that of human large bowel cancer, and MAC-13 would have correctly predicted the activity in man for ten of the 11 drugs. Quantitatively, CCNU, methyl-CCNU, and cyclophamide were the most effective drugs. A comparison of the predictive efficiencies of L1210 leukemia, B16 melanoma, and these new tumors as screening systems for colorectal cancer is made and discussed. PMID:1222393

  5. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Wes A; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Hollibush, Shawn; Gaschen, Lorrie; Hodgin, E Clay; Mitchell, Mark A

    2008-09-01

    An adult female hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) was presented for sudden onset of severe weakness in the legs. Neurologic examination revealed bilateral paresis of the pelvic limbs and decreased proprioception. Results of radiographs and computed tomography (CT) revealed variably sized soft tissue nodules throughout the lungs and invading into the spine and vertebral canal. Soon after the CT scan, the bird went into cardiorespiratory arrest and died. At necropsy, several yellow, coalescing nodules that were firm with a caseous component were present in the lungs, and a focus of similar tissue was attached to the vertebrae and invaded the spinal canal. On histologic examination, the diagnosis was primary pulmonary bronchial adenocarcinoma with spinal invasion. PMID:19014095

  6. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  7. Coexistence of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis and gallbladder adenocarcinoma: a fortuitous association?

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Chelly, B; Hassan, F; Haddad, I; Ben Slama, S; Lahmar, A; Bouraoui, S; Mzabi-Regaya, S

    2013-08-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis is a relatively uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis, characterized by marked thickening of the gallbladder wall and dense local adhesions. Not only does xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimic malignancy, it can also be infrequently associated with gallbladder carcinoma in 0.2% to 35.4% of cases. Herein, the authors report a new case of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis concomitant with gallbladder adenocarcinoma in a 65-year-old female patient. Because of its overlapping clinical, radiological and macroscopic findings with gallbladder cancer, definitive diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis relies on extensive sampling and thorough microscopic examination of the surgical specimen to exclude the possibility of coexisting tumour. It is still a matter of debate whether xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis is truly a precursor of gallbladder carcinoma or if it is just an incidental finding. This aspect needs to be explored in the future with further studies. PMID:24471194

  8. Role of the tumor microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian-Jun; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Mao, Ai-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with proclivity for early metastasis, which accounts for its poor prognosis. The clinical problem of pancreatic cancer is its resistance to conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy or radiation. Based upon these challenges, the focus of research on pancreatic cancer has shifted gradually towards the tumor microenvironment. The cancer microenvironment consists of various components, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, immune cells, and endocrine cells, that interact with each other, and with the cancer cells in a complex fashion. Evidence is accumulating that the cancer microenvironment plays an active role in disease progression, and efforts are being made to target this interplay between cancer cells and host cells, to improve the prognosis of the disease. In the present review, we describe the cellular microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), the major type of pancreatic cancer. Our hope is that a better understanding of the cellular microenvironment of PDA will eventually lead to better treatments for this disease. PMID:26709759

  9. Differential N-Glycosylation Patterns in Lung Adenocarcinoma Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruhaak, L Renee; Taylor, Sandra L; Stroble, Carol; Nguyen, Uyen Thao; Parker, Evan A; Song, Ting; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Rom, William N; Pass, Harvey; Kim, Kyoungmi; Kelly, Karen; Miyamoto, Suzanne

    2015-11-01

    To decrease the mortality of lung cancer, better screening and diagnostic tools as well as treatment options are needed. Protein glycosylation is one of the major post-translational modifications that is altered in cancer, but it is not exactly clear which glycan structures are affected. A better understanding of the glycan structures that are differentially regulated in lung tumor tissue is highly desirable and will allow us to gain greater insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of aberrant glycosylation in lung cancer. Here, we assess differential glycosylation patterns of lung tumor tissue and nonmalignant tissue at the level of individual glycan structures using nLC-chip-TOF-MS. Using tissue samples from 42 lung adenocarcinoma patients, 29 differentially expressed (FDR < 0.05) glycan structures were identified. The levels of several oligomannose type glycans were upregulated in tumor tissue. Furthermore, levels of fully galactosylated glycans, some of which were of the hybrid type and mostly without fucose, were decreased in cancerous tissue, whereas levels of non- or low-galactosylated glycans mostly with fucose were increased. To further assess the regulation of the altered glycosylation, the glycomics data was compared to publicly available gene expression data from lung adenocarcinoma tissue compared to nonmalignant lung tissue. The results are consistent with the possibility that the observed N-glycan changes have their origin in differentially expressed glycosyltransferases. These results will be used as a starting point for the further development of clinical glycan applications in the fields of imaging, drug targeting, and biomarkers for lung cancer. PMID:26322380

  10. Prognostic comparison between mucinous and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Seob; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) is a histological subtype of colorectal cancer. The oncologic behavior of MAC differs from nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (non-MAC). Our aim in this study was to characterize patients with colorectal MAC through evaluation of a large, institutional-based cohort with long-term follow-up. A total of 6475 patients with stages I to III colorectal cancer who underwent radical surgery were enrolled from January 2000 to December 2010. Prognostic comparison between MAC (n?=?274, 4.2%) and non-MAC was performed. The median follow-up period was 48.0 months. Patients with MAC were younger than those without MAC (P?=?0.012) and had larger tumor size (P?

  11. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  12. Response and Resistance to NF-?B Inhibitors in Mouse Models of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-print Network

    Xue, Wen

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently showed that genetic inhibition of the NF-?B pathway affects both the initiation and the maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as ...

  13. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation ...

  14. Elevated circulating branched chain amino acids are an early event in pancreatic adenocarcinoma development

    E-print Network

    Mayers, Jared R.

    Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are diagnosed with advanced disease and survive less than 12 months. PDAC has been linked with obesity and glucose intolerance, but whether changes in circulating ...

  15. Lung adenocarcinoma with giant cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer with large cyst formation is relatively rare. This is a case report of a patient with lung cystic adenocarcinoma with multiple histologic patterns. This type of lung adenocarcinoma is believed to be the first reported case in English language medical literature. Case presentation A 60-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to hospital complaining of dyspnea and died of respiratory failure. She had been suffering from lung cancer with pleural effusion for five years. Autopsy analysis revealed lung adenocarcinoma with large cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns. Conclusions Autopsy analysis of this atypical case of lung cancer may provide insight and lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneity and clonal expansion of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21108775

  16. Identifying genes that are required for the maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    E-print Network

    Jenq, Harry

    2012-01-01

    We searched for genes that are potentially important for the maintenance of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PDAC is the 4th leading cause for cancer-related deaths and exhibits a 5-year survival rate of less than ...

  17. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  18. Search for X-Ray Induced Acceleration of the Decay of the 31-yr Isomer 178Hf Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I; Banar, J C; Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Kraemer, A; Mashayekhi, A; McNabb, D P; Miller, G G; Moore, E F; Pangault, L N; Rundberg, R S; Schiffer, J P; Shastri, S D; Wang, T F; Wilhelmy, J B

    2002-05-09

    Releasing the energy stored in an isomeric nuclear state in a controlled way with an atomic or electromagnetic trigger is an attractive speculation: the energy gain may be on the order of the ratio of nuclear/atomic energies - MeV/keV. (Nuclear isomers are loosely defined as excited nuclear states with lifetimes longer than 10{sup -9} s.) Nuclear isomers, therefore, represent an opportunity for a stand-alone energy source if suitable schemes for trigger and control of the energy release can be found. Potential applications include space drive, as well as very bright {gamma}-ray sources. The nucleus {sup 178}Hf has a nuclear isomer with excitation energy E{sub x} = 2.447 MeV. The 2.447-MeV isomeric state decays slowly (t{sub 1/2} = 31 y) to the nearby state at 2.433 MeV. The J{sup {pi}} = 13{sup -} state loses energy in a rapid (t {approx} 10{sup -12} s) {gamma}-ray cascade ending at the 8{sup -} rotational band head which in turn decays via the ground-state rotational band cascade. The {gamma}-ray cascade is delayed at the 8{sup -} state at 1.147 MeV, since the 8{sup -} state is also isomeric, with t{sub 1/2} = 4 s. Very scarce quantities of the 16{sup +}, 31-yr isomer are available for research ({approx} 10{sup 15} atoms). Reports of triggered decay of the {sup 178}Hf isomer induced by x-rays delivered by a dental x-ray machine have been made [2,3]. Enhancements of {approx} 1 - 2% in the isomer decay rate (dN/dt = - (1 + {var_epsilon})N/{tau}) had been reported for various {gamma}-rays in the cascade (distinguished by red and vertical lines in Figure 1). The reported integrated cross section for triggering the decay is cm{sup 2} keV, so large as to demand new physics. We have sought to verify these reports taking advantage of the intense photon flux available at the Advanced Photon Source.

  19. Angular distribution of Au and U L x-rays induced by 22.6-keV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, S.; Mitra, D.; Sarkar, M.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2007-02-15

    The angular distribution of the L x-ray fluorescent lines from Au and U induced by 22.6-keV x rays from a {sup 109}Cd has been measured. A Si(Li) detector having a resolution of 160 eV at 5.90 keV was used to detect these L lines over the angular range of 70 degree sign -150 degree sign . No strong anisotropy was observed as mentioned by some groups. In the case of Au, a maximum anisotropy of 5% was observed while for U it was within experimental errors (2%). From the angular distribution of the L1 line of Au, the alignment parameter was obtained and its value was found to be 0.10{+-}0.14.

  20. An improved model for ultraviolet-and x-ray-induced electron emission from CsI

    E-print Network

    -calculated photoemission enhancement under high external electric fields is also considered and is fairly compatible differential and integral emission characteristics, such as energy spectra and quantum efficiencies with measured values. The applicability of the model in the field of radiation detectors incorporating solid

  1. Ultrafast probing of the x-ray-induced lattice and electron dynamics in graphite at atomic-resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2010-10-07

    We used LCLS pulses to excite thin-film and bulk graphite with various different microstructures, and probed the ultrafast ion and electron dynamics through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS). We pioneered XRTS at LCLS, making this technique viable for other users. We demonstrated for the first time that the LCLS can be used to characterize warm-dense-matter through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering. The warm-dense-matter conditions were created using the LCLS beam. Representative examples of the results are shown in the Figure above. In our experiment, we utilized simultaneously both Bragg and two Thomson spectrometers. The Bragg measurements as a function of x-ray fluence and pulse length allows us to characterize the onset of atomic motion at 2 keV with the highest resolution to date. The Bragg detector was positioned in back-reflection, providing us access to scattering data with large scattering vectors (nearly 4{pi}/{lambda}). We found a clear difference between the atomic dynamics for 70 and 300 fs pulses, and we are currently in the process of comparing these results to our models. The outcome of this comparison will have important consequences for ultrafast diffractive imaging, for which it is still not clear if atomic resolution can truly be achieved. The backward x-ray Thomson scattering data suggests that the average graphite temperature and ionization was 10 eV and 1.0, respectively, which agrees with our models. In the forward scattering data, we observed an inelastic feature in the Thomson spectrum that our models currently do not reproduce, so there is food for thought. We are in the process of writing these results up. Depending on if we can combine the Bragg and Thomson data or not, we plan to publish them in a single paper (e.g. Nature or Science) or as two separate papers (e.g. two Phys. Rev. Lett.). We will present the first analysis of the results at the APS Plasma Meeting in November 2010. We had a fantastic experience performing our experiment at the LCLS, and we are grateful to the beamline scientists and all the support personnel for enabling this experiment. A major hurdle was the very short transition time of two days, which despite all our preparations did not give us sufficient time to test the full system before the start of the beam time. We further were not able to make optimal use of the beam time since we had to exchange samples in the middle of the 36-hours shift. An additional 12-hours break could have avoided this. Finally, our experiment would have benefitted from the best possible focus, but 5 shifts do not allow performing the experiment while fine-tuning the focusing optics.

  2. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays. Progress report, Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    I will describe our recent data in which we have extracted and purified a sufficient amount of RNA from primed and unprimed U1-Mel cells to begin the search for new genes which are modulated by priming or high dose irradiation during the establishment and/or challenge of adapted cells, respectively. Gene transcripts which are altered during ASRs now include alterations in xip5 (a gene with homology to human growth hormone), xipl2 (a gene with homology to human angiogenesis factor and a gene which may be involved in apoptosis due to its possible RNase activity), cyclin A (which is altered in primed cells only after a high dose of ionizing radiation), cyclin B (which is also altered in a similar manner as cyclin A), p53 (a tumor suppressor gene involved in cell division control in G{sub 1} following ionizing radiation), and glutathionine S transferase-pi (a gene product which has been demonstrated to be involved in DNA repair and redox cycling). In contrast, the remaining xip CDNA clones [i.e., xip1-4,6-11, which were isolated following high dose ionizing radiation exposure to human U1-Mel cells], Prad-1 (a gene involved in cell cycle controlling events at the G{sub 1} portion of the cell cycle), 36B4 (a gene involved in homeostasis), and cdc2 (a gene involved in the regulation of the S-phase portion of the cell cycle), were not altered following ionizing radiation, either during the establishment or challenge of adapted human cells.

  3. Modelling energy deposition in nanoscintillators to predict the efficiency of the X-ray-induced photodynamic effect.

    PubMed

    Bulin, Anne-Laure; Vasil'ev, Andrey; Belsky, Andrei; Amans, David; Ledoux, Gilles; Dujardin, Christophe

    2015-03-19

    Scintillating nanoparticles (NPs) in combination with X-ray or ?-radiation have a great potential for deep-tissue cancer therapy because they can be used to locally activate photosensitizers and generate singlet oxygen in tumours by means of the photodynamic effect. To understand the complex spatial distribution of energy deposition in a macroscopic volume of water loaded with nanoscintillators, we have developed a GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program. We thus obtain estimates of the maximum expected efficiency of singlet oxygen production for various materials coupled to PS, X-ray energies, NP concentrations and NP sizes. A new parameter, ?nano, is introduced to quantify the fraction of energy that is deposited in the NPs themselves, which is crucial for the efficiency of singlet oxygen production but has not been taken into account adequately so far. We furthermore emphasise the substantial contribution of primary interactions taking place in water, particularly under irradiation with high energy photons. The interplay of all these contributions to the photodynamic effect has to be taken into account in order to optimize nanoscintillators for therapeutic applications. PMID:25746211

  4. Internal energy dependence in x-ray-induced molecular fragmentation: An experimental and theoretical study of thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukk, E.; Ha, D. T.; Wang, Y.; Piekarski, D. G.; Diaz-Tendero, S.; Kooser, K.; Itälä, E.; Levola, H.; Alcamí, M.; Rachlew, E.; Martín, F.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics leading to fragmentation of doubly ionized molecular thiophene is presented. Dissociation of double-ionized molecules was induced by S 2 p core photoionization and the ionic fragments were detected in coincidence with Auger electrons from the core-hole decay. Rich molecular dynamics was observed in electron-ion-ion coincidence maps exhibiting ring breaks accompanied by hydrogen losses and/or migration. The probabilities of various dissociation channels were seen to be very sensitive to the internal energy of the molecule. Theoretical simulations were performed by using the semiempirical self-consistent charge-density-functional tight-binding method. By running thousands of these simulations, the initial conditions encountered in the experiment were properly taken into account, including the systematic dependencies on the internal (thermal) energy. This systematic approach, not affordable with first-principle methods, provides a good overall description of the complex molecular dynamics observed in the experiment and shows good promise for applicability to larger molecules or clusters, thus opening the door to systematic investigations of complex dynamical processes occurring in radiation damage.

  5. Interactions between X-ray induced transient defects and pre-existing damage precursors in DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Saw, C K; Demos, S G

    2008-10-24

    Large-aperture laser systems, currently designed to achieve high energy densities at the target location (exceeding {approx} 10{sup 11} J/m{sup 3}), will enable studies of the physics of matter and radiation under extreme conditions. As a result, their optical components, such as the frequency conversion crystals (KDP/DKDP), may be exposed to X-rays and other ionizing radiation. This in turn may lead to a change in the damage performance of these materials as they may be affected by radiation-induced effects by either forming new damage initiation centers or interacting with the pre-existing damage initiating defects (so-called damage precursors). We present an experimental study on the laser-induced bulk damage performance at 355-nm of DKDP crystals following X-ray irradiation at room temperature. Results indicate that the damage performance of the material is affected by exposure to X-rays. We attribute this behavior to a change in the physical properties of the precursors which, in turn, affect their individual damage threshold.

  6. Control of X-ray Induced Electron and Nuclear Dynamics in Ammonia and Glycine Aqueous Solution via Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Unger, Isaak; Hollas, Daniel; Seidel, Robert; Thürmer, Stephan; Aziz, Emad F; Slaví?ek, Petr; Winter, Bernd

    2015-08-20

    Recently, a new family of autoionization processes has been identified in aqueous phases. The processes are initiated by core-electron ionization of a solute molecule and involve proton transfer along the solute-solvent hydrogen bond. As a result, short-lived singly charged cations form with structures sharing a proton between solute and solvent molecules. These molecular transients decay by autoionization, which creates reactive dicationic species with the positive charges delocalized over the entire molecular entity. Here, we investigate the ultrafast electron and nuclear dynamics following the core ionization of hydrated ammonia and glycine. Both molecules serve as models for exploring the possible role of the nonlocal relaxation processes in the chemical reactivity at the interface between, for instance, a protein surface and aqueous solution. The nature of the postionization dynamical processes is revealed by high-accuracy Auger-electron spectroscopy measurements on liquid microjets in vacuum. The proton-transfer-mediated processes are identified by electron signals in the high-energy tail of the Auger spectra with no analogue in the Auger spectra of the corresponding gas-phase molecule. This high-energy tail is suppressed for deuterated molecules. Such an isotope effect is found to be smaller for aqueous ammonia as compared to the hydrated H2O molecule, wherein hydrogen bonds are strong. An even weaker hydrogen bonding for the hydrated amino groups in glycine results in a negligibly small proton transfer. The dynamical processes and species formed upon the nitrogen-1s core-level ionization are interpreted using methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. With the assistance of such calculations, we discuss the conditions for the proton-transfer-mediated relaxation processes to occur. We also consider the solvent librational dynamics as an alternative intermolecular ultrafast relaxation pathway. In addition, we provide experimental evidence for the umbrella-type motion in aqueous ammonia upon core ionization. This intramolecular channel proceeds in parallel with intermolecular relaxation processes in the solution. PMID:26225896

  7. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shinji Sawada, Ken; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Karashima, Takashi; Shuin, Taro; Nishioka, Akihito; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone, and combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH{sub 4}Cl before the X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  8. X-ray-Induced Changes in the Expression of Inflammation-Related Genes in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Guo, Fei; Han, Lin; Wang, Xi’ai; Li, Jie; Guo, Yan; LÜ, Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array, we explored and compared the expression changes of inflammation-related genes in human peripheral blood irradiated with 0.5, 3, and 10 Gy doses of X-rays 24 h after exposure. Results indicated that the expression of 62 out of 84 genes was significantly altered after X-ray radiation. Among these 62 genes, 35 (such as TNFSF4) are known to be associated with radiation response, but others are novel. At a low radiation dose (0.5 Gy), 9 genes were up-regulated and 19 were down-regulated. With further increased dose to 3 Gy, 8 unique genes were up-regulated and 19 genes were down-regulated. We also identified 48 different genes that were differentially expressed significantly after 10 Gy of irradiation, and among these transcripts, up-regulated genes accounted for only one-third (16 genes) of the total. Of the 62 genes, 31 were significantly altered only at a specific dose, and a total of 10 genes were significantly expressed at all 3 doses. The dose- and time-dependent expression of CCL2 was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. A number of candidate genes reported herein may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in human peripheral blood. PMID:25350114

  9. In vivo experimental evidence that the nitric oxide pathway is involved in the X-ray-induced antiangiogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Hatjikondi, O.; Ravazoula, P.; Kardamakis, D.; Dimopoulos, J.; Papaioannou, S.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated both the effects of X-rays on angiogenesis and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) on the observed antiangiogenic effect of X-rays, using as an in vivo model the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). These effects were assessed both morphologically and biochemically, by measuring vascular density and collagenous protein biosynthesis, respectively, on days 9 and 14 of the chick embryo development. Vascular density and cytotoxicity of the CAM were also evaluated histologically. We have shown that X-rays have an antiangiogenic effect on the system used and that the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) promoted angiogenesis of the non-irradiated CAM and reversed the antiangiogenic effect of irradiation. D-NAME, which is an inactive enantiomer of L-NAME, showed no such effects. L-Arginine, which is the substrate for NO synthase, had a modest antiangiogenic effect on the non-irradiated CAM, no effect on the irradiated CAM and abolished the angiogenic effect of L-NAME on these CAM preparations. These results suggest that NO is involved in the antiangiogenic mechanism of X-rays and that pharmacological manipulation of NO firstly, may offer a better understanding of these mechanisms and, secondly, may also prove to be an alternative therapeutic approach for treating pathological conditions involving angiogenesis. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 12 PMID:8980390

  10. Pearls and pitfalls of imaging metastatic disease from pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Atif; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Oh, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a systemic disease due to the presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis and local recurrence as well as distant metastatic disease after treatment in a majority of patients. Recognition of these metastatic sites may help in accurate staging and assessment of therapeutic response. The authors discuss and illustrate imaging findings of metastatic disease from pancreatic adenocarcinoma in different organ systems with emphasis on entities that can mimic metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:25981735

  11. Adenocarcinomas of the sinonasal tract: a case series from an Oncology Centre in Northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Veloso-Teles, R; Ribeiro, I; Castro-Silva, J; Monteiro, E

    2015-08-01

    Sinonasal malignant neoplasms are rare and adenocarcinomas account for 10-20 % of these cancers. Our aim is to characterise the clinical presentation, risk factors and outcomes of patients with adenocarcinoma treated at our institution. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with sinonasal adenocarcinomas, treated at IPO-Porto from January 2008 until December 2012. Twenty-eight patients with adenocarcinomas were selected from a total of 53 patients with sinonasal cancers. There was a male predominance (93 %), a mean age at diagnosis of 56 years and a rate of occupational wood dust exposure of 71 %. The most common treatment option was surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The 5 year disease-free and cancer-specific survival was 58 and 60 %, respectively. The following factors had negative impact on disease-free survival: advanced AJCC stage (p = 0.014); skull base invasion (p = 0.002); poorly differentiated or mucinous subtypes histology (p = 0.034) and imaging findings of residual tumour before adjuvant radiotherapy (p < 0.001). Endoscopic tumour resection was not associated with adverse outcomes. The role of volume-modulated arch therapy in the treatment of sinonasal tumours has to be clarified. The higher rate of adenocarcinomas among sinonasal cancers in this series comparing with previous reports, even from our institution, suggests that this pathology is rising in Northern Portugal. Despite substantial local failure, sinonasal adenocarcinomas have a relatively favourable prognosis in terms of cancer-specific survival. PMID:25193547

  12. Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Prevention in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Using Rat Duodenoesophageal Reflux Models

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Takashi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Sasaki, Shozo; Nishijima, Koji; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Ohta, Tetsuo; Koichi, Miwa; Takanori, Hattori

    2011-01-01

    Development from chronic inflammation to Barrett's adenocarcinoma is known as one of the inflammation-related carcinogenesis routes. Gastroesophageal reflux disease induces regurgitant esophagitis, and esophageal mucosa is usually regenerated by squamous epithelium, but sometimes and somewhere replaced with metaplastic columnar epithelium. Specialized columnar epithelium, so-called Barrett's epithelium (BE), is a risk factor for dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in esophagus. Several experiments using rodent model inducing duodenogastroesophageal reflux or duodenoesophageal reflux revealed that columnar epithelium, first emerging at the proliferative zone, progresses to dysplasia and finally adenocarcinoma, and exogenous carcinogen is not necessary for cancer development. It is demonstrated that duodenal juice rather than gastric juice is essential to develop esophageal adenocarcinoma in not only rodent experiments, but also clinical studies. Antireflux surgery and chemoprevention by proton pump inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, green tea, retinoic acid and thioproline showed preventive effects on the development of Barrett's adenocarcinoma in rodent models, but it remains controversial whether antireflux surgery could regress BE and prevent esophageal cancer in clinical observation. The Chemoprevention for Barrett's Esophagus Trial (CBET), a phase IIb, multicenter, randomized, double-masked study using celecoxib in patients with Barrett's dysplasia failed to prove to prevent progression of dysplasia to cancer. The AspECT (Aspirin Esomeprazole Chemoprevention Trial), a large multicenter phase III randomized trial to evaluate the effects of esomeprazole and/or aspirin on the rate of progression to high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma in patients with BE is now ongoing. PMID:24212953

  13. Cytokeratin7 expression in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma: Correlation with prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Jalali-Nadooshan, Mohammadreza; Siadati, Sepideh; Davati, Ali; Torabi_Parizi, Gholamreza; Ghasemi, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma are the second and the fifth most common cancers in Iran, respectively. Expression of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) is established in most malignancies including gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma. Demonstration of Ck7 could be related to prognostic factors and help to the better management of the patients. The objective of our study was to evaluate the CK7 expression in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma and its correlation with other prognostic factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 99 tissue blocks from patients with gastric or colorectal adenocarcinoma undergoing surgery. Tumor grade, tumor size, depth of invasion and metastasis to lymph nodes were determined. Then, the expression of CK7 was studied using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: Expression of CK7 was 50% and 33.8% in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma, respectively. There was not only a significant correlation between CK7 expression and tumor size (r=0.267, P=0.009) but also histologic grade (r=0.222, P=0.028). Conclusion: CK7 could be more expressed with the increase in tumor size and was associated with poorly differentiated gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma. However, with these results gathered, it is highly recommended that further studies will be conducted to reveal the exact prognostic role of this factor.

  14. Genomic Rearrangements Define Lineage Relationships between Adjacent Lepidic and Invasive Components in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen J.; Wigle, Dennis A.; Lima, Joema Felipe; Harris, Faye R.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Halling, Geoffrey; Asiedu, Michael K.; Seto, Charlie T.; Terra, Simone; Kosari, Farhad; Peikert, Tobias; Yang, Ping; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Vasmatzis, George

    2015-01-01

    The development of adenocarcinoma of the lung is believed to proceed from in situ disease (adenocarcinoma in situ, AIS) to minimally invasive disease with prominent lepidic growth (minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, MIA), then to fully invasive adenocarcinoma (AD), but direct evidence for this model has been lacking. Because some lung adenocarcinomas show prominent lepidic growth (AD-L), we designed a study to address the lineage relationship between the lepidic (noninvasive) component (L) and the adjacent nonlepidic growth component representing invasive disease within individual tumors. Lineage relationships were evaluated by next-generation DNA sequencing to define large genomic rearrangements in microdissected tissue specimens collected by laser capture. We found a strong lineage relationship between the majority of adjacent lepidic and invasive components, supporting a putative AIS–AD transition. Notably, many rearrangements were detected in the less aggressive lepidic component, although the invasive component exhibited an overall higher rate of genomic rearrangement. Furthermore, a significant number of genomic rearrangements were present in histologically normal lung adjacent to tumor, but not in host germline DNA, suggesting field defects restricted to zonal regions near a tumor. Our results offer a perspective on the genetic pathogenesis underlying adenocarcinoma development and its clinical management. PMID:24879567

  15. Recent Developments in Non-HPV-related Adenocarcinomas of the Lower Female Genital Tract and Their Precursors.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Most adenocarcinomas in the lower female genital tract (cervix, vagina, vulva) arise in the cervix and are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, there is an emerging spectrum of non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas, the most common of which is so-called gastric type. In this review, the concept of gastric-type cervical adenocarcinomas and their possible precursor lesions is covered, the precursor lesions still being poorly understood. Other non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas are also discussed, including new information regarding molecular events in mesonephric adenocarcinoma. A variety of primary vaginal adenocarcinomas, including clear cell, endometrioid, intestinal and gastric types are also discussed. The spectrum of benign and malignant glandular lesions involving the lower female genital tract and probably derived from misplaced Skene's (periurethral) glands is also covered. PMID:26645463

  16. Early human prostate adenocarcinomas harbor androgen-independent cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fiñones, Rita R; Yeargin, Jo; Lee, Melissa; Kaur, Aman Preet; Cheng, Clari; Sun, Paulina; Wu, Christopher; Nguyen, Catherine; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Meyer, April N; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Although blockade of androgen receptor (AR) signaling represents the main treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PrCa), many patients progress to a lethal phenotype of "Castration-Resistant" prostate cancer (CR-PrCa). With the hypothesis that early PrCa may harbor a population of androgen-unresponsive cancer cells as precursors to CR-recurrent disease, we undertook the propagation of androgen-independent cells from PrCa-prostatectomy samples of early, localized (Stage-I) cases. A collection of 120 surgical specimens from prostatectomy cases was established, among which 54 were adenocarcinomas. Hormone-free cell culture conditions were developed allowing routine propagation of cells expressing prostate basal cell markers and stem/progenitor cell markers, and which proliferated as spheres/spheroids in suspension cultures. Colonies of androgen-independent epithelial cells grew out from 30/43 (70%) of the adenocarcinoma cases studied in detail. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that CR-PrCa cells were positive for CD44, CD133, CK5/14, c-kit, integrin ?2?1, SSEA4, E-Cadherin and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH). All 30 CR-PrCa cell cultures were also TERT-positive, but negative for TMPRSS2-ERG. Additionally, a subset of 22 of these CR-PrCa cell cultures was examined by orthotopic xenografting in intact and castrated SCID mice, generating histologically typical locally-invasive human PrCa or undifferentiated cancers, respectively, in 6-8 weeks. Cultured PrCa cells and orthotopically-induced in vivo cancers lacked PSA expression. We report here the propagation of Cancer Initiating Cells (CIC) directly from Stage I human PrCa tissue without selection or genetic manipulation. The propagation of stem/progenitor-like CR-PrCa cells derived from early human prostate carcinomas suggests the existence of a subpopulation of cells resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy and which may drive the subsequent emergence of disseminated CR-PrCa. PMID:24086346

  17. Genomic Aberrations in Lung Adenocarcinoma in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Beau-Faller, Michèle; Camilleri-Broët, Sophie; Girard, Philippe; Hofman, Paul; Mazières, Julien; Toujani, Saloua; Lacroix, Ludovic; Laffaire, Julien; Dessen, Philippe; Fouret, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung cancer in never smokers would rank as the seventh most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Methods and Findings We performed high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of lung adenocarcinoma in sixty never smokers and identified fourteen new minimal common regions (MCR) of gain or loss, of which five contained a single gene (MOCS2, NSUN3, KHDRBS2, SNTG1 and ST18). One larger MCR of gain contained NSD1. One focal amplification and nine gains contained FUS. NSD1 and FUS are oncogenes hitherto not known to be associated with lung cancer. FISH showed that the amplicon containing FUS was joined to the next telomeric amplicon at 16p11.2. FUS was over-expressed in 10 tumors with gain of 16p11.2 compared to 30 tumors without that gain. Other cancer genes present in aberrations included ARNT, BCL9, CDK4, CDKN2B, EGFR, ERBB2, MDM2, MDM4, MET, MYC and KRAS. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering with adjustment for false-discovery rate revealed clusters differing by the level and pattern of aberrations and displaying particular tumor characteristics. One cluster was strongly associated with gain of MYC. Another cluster was characterized by extensive losses containing tumor suppressor genes of which RB1 and WRN. Tumors in that cluster frequently harbored a central scar-like fibrosis. A third cluster was associated with gains on 7p and 7q, containing ETV1 and BRAF, and displayed the highest rate of EGFR mutations. SNP array analysis validated copy-number aberrations and revealed that RB1 and WRN were altered by recurrent copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. Conclusions The present study has uncovered new aberrations containing cancer genes. The oncogene FUS is a candidate gene in the 16p region that is frequently gained in never smokers. Multiple genetic pathways defined by gains of MYC, deletions of RB1 and WRN or gains on 7p and 7q are involved in lung adenocarcinoma in never smokers. PMID:21151896

  18. Development of lung adenocarcinomas with exclusive dependence on oncogene fusions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Shimada, Yoko; Shiraishi, Kouya; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Tsuta, Koji; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kato, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    This report delivers a comprehensive genetic alteration profile of lung adenocarcinomas (LADC) driven by ALK, RET, and ROS1 oncogene fusions. These tumors are difficult to study because of their rarity. Each drives only a low percentage of LADCs. Whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation analyses were performed on a Japanese LADC cohort (n = 200) enriched in patients with fusions (n = 31, 15.5%), followed by deep resequencing for validation. The driver fusion cases showed a distinct profile with smaller numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in cancer-related genes or truncating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex genes than in other LADCs (P < 0.0001). This lower mutation rate was independent of age, gender, smoking status, pathologic stage, and tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001) and was validated in nine fusion-positive cases from a U.S. LADCs cohort (n = 230). In conclusion, our findings indicate that LADCs with ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions develop exclusively via their dependence on these oncogene fusions. The presence of such few alterations beyond the fusions supports the use of monotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the fusion products in fusion-positive LADCs. PMID:25855381

  19. Patterns of Invasion of Cervical Adenocarcinoma as Predicators of Outcome.

    PubMed

    Roma, Andres A

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a recently published pattern-based risk stratification system of endocervical adenocarcinoma (EAC) is presented. This novel system evaluates the morphologic features of the tumor and establishes patterns that are associated with a particular tumor behavior. Patients with pattern A EAC do not develop lymph node metastasis, and therefore avoiding lymph node resection in these patients should be considered. These patients also have stage I tumors and conservative surgery would be beneficial to decrease morbidity. Patients with pattern B tumors rarely show metastases to lymph nodes, only if there is lymphovascular invasion, whereas those with pattern C tumors would require aggressive treatment as most lymph node or distant metastases and recurrences were noted in patients with this tumor pattern. Combining this new risk stratification system with an algorithm that surgeons and oncologists could complement to other actionable data would result in a more conservative treatment plan in patients with a new diagnosis of invasive usual-type EAC, as opposed to the current more radical treatment plan. This risk stratification model significantly improves on conventionally used factors such as histologic type, grade, and stage to help manage patients with EAC and identify those in need for aggressive surgical management versus a more conservative approach. PMID:26452210

  20. Recognition of Intrabiliary Hepatic Metastases From Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Klimstra, David S.; Brown, Karen T.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Kurtz, Robert C.; Jarnagin, William R.; Fong, Yuman

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic involvement of bile ducts, by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma growing from within or invading the lumen of bile ducts, is not a well recognized pattern of tumor growth. Clinical, radiographic, operative, and histopathologic aspects of 15 patients with intrabiliary colorectal metastases were described. Fourteen patients were explored for possible hepatic resection. Two had jaundice, two radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, 10 intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and six microscopic evidence of intrabiliariy tumor. Eleven patients underwent hepatic resection. Five of the resected patients developed hepatic recurrence. Four patients were explored for possible repeat resection. One had jaundice, one radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, all had intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and three microscopic evidence of intrabiliary tumor. Three patients underwent repeat hepatic resection. All patients with preoperative jaundice and radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect were unresectable. Overall, actuarial five-year survival is 33% for those patients resected versus 0% for those not resected. Intraoperative recognition of intrabiliary tumor at exploration for hepatic resection was more common than clinical, radiographic, or histopathologic recognition. More diligent examination of resected liver tissue by the surgeon and pathologist may increase identification of bile duct involvement and aid in achieving adequate tumor clearance. PMID:10977117

  1. Study of aggressiveness prediction of mammary adenocarcinoma by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Bitar, Renata; da Silva Martinho, Herculano; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; dos Santos Junior, Arnaldo Rodrigues; Silva Ramalho, Fernando; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2012-01-01

    Although there are many articles focused on in vivo or ex vivo Raman analysis for cancer diagnosis, to the best of our knowledge its potential to predict the aggressiveness of tumor has not been fully explored yet. In this work Raman spectra in the finger print region of ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured and associated to matrix metalloproteinase-19 (MMP-19) immunohistochemical exam. It was possible to verify that normal breast, benign lesions, and adenocarcinomas spectra, including the subtypes (cribriform, papillary and solid) could have their aggressiveness diagnosed by vibrational Raman bands. By using MMP- 19 exam it was possible to classify the samples by malignant graduation in accordance to the classification results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The spectra NM /MH were classified correctly in 100% of cases; CA/CPA group had 60 % of spectra correctly classified and for PA/AS 54% of the spectra were correctly classified.

  2. I?B Kinase ? Expression in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anna; Guo, Jianping; Henderson-Jackson, Evita; Kim, Donghwa; Malafa, Mokenge; Coppola, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    I?B kinase (IKK?) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that belongs to the IKK kinase family. Recent studies have shown that IKK? functions as a breast and ovarian cancer oncogene. We demonstrated frequent overexpression of IKK? in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). We immunohistochemically evaluated 78 PDAs using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method and the anti-IKK? rabbit polyclonal antibody. Elevated IKK? reactivity (immunohistochemical score, 4–9) was observed in 64% of PDAs (50/78), but in 0.0% of nonneoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium (0/113; P < .001). Kaplan-Meier analysis of overall survival revealed that patients with high IKK?-immunohistochemical scores (4–9) had significantly shorter survival than did patients with low IKK? immunohistochemical scores (0–3; P = .023; log-rank test) independent of tumor stage or grade. These data indicate that deregulation of IKK? is a common event in PDA and might have an important role in the pathogenesis of this deadly disease. In addition, IKK? could serve as a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target for PDA intervention. PMID:21685032

  3. Genomic catastrophes frequently arise in esophageal adenocarcinoma and drive tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patch, Ann-Marie; Bailey, Peter; Newell, Felicity; Holmes, Oliver; Fink, J. Lynn; Quinn, Michael C.J.; Tang, Yue Hang; Lampe, Guy; Quek, Kelly; Loffler, Kelly A.; Manning, Suzanne; Idrisoglu, Senel; Miller, David; Xu, Qinying; Waddell, Nick; Wilson, Peter J.; Bruxner, Timothy J.C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Anderson, Matthew; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Wood, Scott; Simpson, Peter T.; Reid, Lynne E.; Krause, Lutz; Hussey, Damian J.; Watson, David I.; Lord, Reginald V.; Nancarrow, Derek; Phillips, Wayne A.; Gotley, David; Smithers, B. Mark; Whiteman, David C.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Campbell, Peter J.; Pearson, John V.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Barbour, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) incidence is rapidly increasing in Western countries. A better understanding of EAC underpins efforts to improve early detection and treatment outcomes. While large EAC exome sequencing efforts to date have found recurrent loss-of-function mutations, oncogenic driving events have been underrepresented. Here we use a combination of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and single-nucleotide polymorphism-array profiling to show that genomic catastrophes are frequent in EAC, with almost a third (32%, n = 40/123) undergoing chromothriptic events. WGS of 22 EAC cases show that catastrophes may lead to oncogene amplification through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (MYC and MDM2) or breakage-fusion-bridge (KRAS, MDM2 and RFC3). Telomere shortening is more prominent in EACs bearing localized complex rearrangements. Mutational signature analysis also confirms that extreme genomic instability in EAC can be driven by somatic BRCA2 mutations. These findings suggest that genomic catastrophes have a significant role in the malignant transformation of EAC. PMID:25351503

  4. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44nm (NP44) and 100nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors. PMID:26585375

  5. Mutants of human colon adenocarcinoma, selected for thymidylate synthase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, P.J.; Germain, G.S.; Hazelton, B.J.; Pennington, J.W.; Houghton, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    GC{sub 3}/c1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were treated with the mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate, and three clones deficient in thymidylate synthase activity were selected and characterized. Growth in medium deficient in thymidine caused cell death in two clones (TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 1} and TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 3}), whereas one clone (TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 2}) showed limited growth. Growth correlated with thymidine synthase activity and 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine 5{prime}-monophosphate-binding capacity and with incorporation of 2{prime}-deoxy(6-{sup 3}H)uridine into DNA. In the presence of optimal thymidine, growth rates were only 5-18% that of the parental clone (GC{sub 3}/c1), which grew equally well in thymidine-deficient or -replete medium. Analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA showed normal levels of a 1.6-kilobase transcript in TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 1} and TS{sup minus}c{sub 2} but decreased levels in TS{sup {minus}}c{sub 3}. Clone TS{sup minus}c{sub 3} was 32-, 750-, and >100,000-fold more resistant than the parental clone to 5-fluorouracil, 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine, and methotrexate, respectively. When inoculated into athymic nude mice, each TS{sup {minus}} clone produced tumors, demonstrating continued ability to proliferate in vivo.

  6. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of ?-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  7. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Treated With Irreversible Electroporation Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Trueba-Arguiñarena, Francisco Javier; de Prado-Otero, Diego Soto; Poves-Alvarez, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new nonthermal tumor ablation modality that induces apoptosis in the treated tissue without affecting collagen. Its use is particularly indicated for tumors involving major structures, such as encompassed or infiltrated vessels and/or ducts, which need to be preserved and hinder or preclude surgical resection. We report a 66-year-old male patient with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, treated with IRE. Two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine were administered. After these 2 cycles, IRE ablation was performed with a percutaneous transgastric access under general anesthesia. Later, 4 additional chemotherapy cycles were administrated. At 48?hours of electroporation, blood tests were normal. On day 5, a computed tomography (CT) scan showed portal vein and celiac artery were normal in appearance. Three months later, a positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed disappearance of abnormal uptake in the pancreas and other sites. A 12-month follow-up the patient is disease free. IRE opens a new way to treat tumors with involvement or proximity of neighboring structures. This procedure is more costly than other techniques and is not free of complications. The percutaneous transgastric access is feasible and without serious complications. In our case, complications were resolved and the patient presented a good short/medium-term outcome. PMID:26131840

  8. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  9. Decreased LKB1 predicts poor prognosis in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Yu; Jiang, Shu-Heng; Liu, De-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Huo, Yan-Miao; Li, Jiao; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) has been identified as a critical modulator involved in cell proliferation and polarity. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the expression pattern of LKB1 and assess the clinical significance of LKB1 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. LKB1 mRNA expression which was analyzed in 32 PDAC lesions and matched non-tumor tissues, was downregulated in 50% (16/32) of PDAC lesions. Similar results were also obtained by analyzing three independent datasets from Oncomine. Protein expression of LKB1 was significantly reduced in 6 PDAC cell lines and downregulated in 31.3% (10/32) of PDAC lesions compared to matched non-tumorous tissues, as determined by Western blot analysis. Additionally, tissue microarray containing 205 PDAC specimens was evaluated for LKB1 expression by IHC and demonstrated that reduced expression of LKB1 in 17.6% (36/205) of PDAC tissues was significantly correlated with clinical stage, T classification, N classification, liver metastasis and vascular invasion. Importantly, Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses were executed to evaluate the prognosis of PDAC and found that LKB1 protein expression was one of the independent prognostic factors for overall survival of PDAC patients. PMID:26015068

  10. Stem cells as the root of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Balic, Anamaria; Dorado, Jorge; Alonso-Gomez, Mercedes; Heeschen, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells play a crucial role not only in the generation and maintenance of different tissues, but also in the development and progression of malignancies. For the many solid cancers, it has now been shown that they harbor a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells that bear stem cell features and therefore, these cells are termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-propagating cells. CSC are exclusively tumorigenic and essential drivers for tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma does not only contain one homogeneous population of CSC rather than diverse subpopulations that may have evolved during tumor progression. One of these populations is called migrating CSC and can be characterized by CXCR4 co-expression. Only these cells are capable of evading the primary tumor and traveling to distant sites such as the liver as the preferred site of metastatic spread. Clinically even more important, however, is the observation that CSC are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy resulting in their relative enrichment during treatment and rapid relapse of disease. Many laboratories are now working on the further in-depth characterization of these cells, which may eventually allow for the identification of their Achilles heal and lead to novel treatment modalities for fighting this deadly disease.

  11. The deubiquitinase USP9X suppresses pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mancera, Pedro A; Rust, Alistair G; van der Weyden, Louise; Kristiansen, Glen; Li, Allen; Sarver, Aaron L; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Grützmann, Robert; Aust, Daniela; Rümmele, Petra; Knösel, Thomas; Herd, Colin; Stemple, Derek L; Kettleborough, Ross; Brosnan, Jacqueline A; Li, Ang; Morgan, Richard; Knight, Spencer; Yu, Jun; Stegeman, Shane; Collier, Lara S; ten Hoeve, Jelle J; de Ridder, Jeroen; Klein, Alison P; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Chang, David K; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Wood, Stephen A; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Pilarsky, Christian; Largaespada, David A; Adams, David J; Tuveson, David A

    2012-06-14

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains a lethal malignancy despite much progress concerning its molecular characterization. PDA tumours harbour four signature somatic mutations in addition to numerous lower frequency genetic events of uncertain significance. Here we use Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal preneoplasia to identify genes that cooperate with oncogenic Kras(G12D) to accelerate tumorigenesis and promote progression. Our screen revealed new candidate genes for PDA and confirmed the importance of many genes and pathways previously implicated in human PDA. The most commonly mutated gene was the X-linked deubiquitinase Usp9x, which was inactivated in over 50% of the tumours. Although previous work had attributed a pro-survival role to USP9X in human neoplasia, we found instead that loss of Usp9x enhances transformation and protects pancreatic cancer cells from anoikis. Clinically, low USP9X protein and messenger RNA expression in PDA correlates with poor survival after surgery, and USP9X levels are inversely associated with metastatic burden in advanced disease. Furthermore, chromatin modulation with trichostatin A or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine elevates USP9X expression in human PDA cell lines, indicating a clinical approach for certain patients. The conditional deletion of Usp9x cooperated with Kras(G12D) to accelerate pancreatic tumorigenesis in mice, validating their genetic interaction. We propose that USP9X is a major tumour suppressor gene with prognostic and therapeutic relevance in PDA. PMID:22699621

  12. Oviduct adenocarcinoma in some species of captive snakes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M E; Viner, T C

    2008-09-01

    This article reports 5 cases of oviduct adenocarcinoma in adult captive snakes from Smithsonian's National Zoological Park. This neoplasm was found in 1 of each of the following species: emerald tree boa (Corallus caninus), Amazonian tree boa (Corallus enydris enydris), Burmese rock python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern pine snake (Pituophis melanoleucus melanoleucus), and corn snake (Elaphe guttata). Grossly, tan to red firm masses were found within oviducts in 3 cases. In an additional 2 cases, the primary tumor was detected only histologically. Microscopically, neoplasms were papillary, and often extended transmurally. The neoplastic cells were polygonal and organized in acini or cords, with often abundant fibrovascular stroma. Hemorrhages and necrosis were present in all cases. Inflammation, myxomatous material, desmoplasia, and bacteria were often observed. Histologic evidence of metastasis was present in all cases. Solid metastases were seen in all animals except the Northern pine snake and involved several organs including the liver, lung, and heart. Emboli of neoplastic cells were observed in all animals but the Burmese rock python and corn snake. PMID:18725476

  13. Cystic mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lung: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cabibi, Daniela; Sciuto, Antonio; Geraci, Girolamo; Lo Nigro, Chiara; Modica, Giuseppe; Cajozzo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Mucinous cystic tumors of the lung are uncommon, the preoperative pathologic diagnosis is difficult and their biological behavior is still controversial. We report the case of a patient with a clinically benign cystic lesion that post-operatively showed to be consistent with an invasive adenocarcinoma arising in a mucinous cystadenoma of the lung. We underline the difficulty of the clinical pre-operative diagnosis of this cystic neoplasia radiologically mimicking a hydatid cyst, and we report the negative TTF1 immunostaining potentially misleading in the differential diagnosis with metastatic mucinous carcinomas. Finallly, we evidence the presence of a pre-existing mucinous benign lesion suggesting early and complete resection of benign appearing lung cysts because they can undergo malignant transformation if left untreated or they can already harbor foci of invasive carcinoma at the time of the presentation. Even if a good prognosis, better than in other lung carcinomas, with no recurrrence or metastasis after complete surgical exicision, has been reported for cystic mucinous cystoadenocarcinomas, the follow-up showed an aggressive biological behaviour, with the early onset of metastasis, in keeping with P53 positive immunostaining and high Ki-67 proliferation index. PMID:21970610

  14. Cystic mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lung: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mucinous cystic tumors of the lung are uncommon, the preoperative pathologic diagnosis is difficult and their biological behavior is still controversial. We report the case of a patient with a clinically benign cystic lesion that post-operatively showed to be consistent with an invasive adenocarcinoma arising in a mucinous cystadenoma of the lung, We underline the difficulty of the clinical pre-operative diagnosis of this cystic neoplasia radiologically mimicking a hydatid cyst, and we report the negative TTF1 immunostaining potentially misleading in the differential diagnosis with metastatic mucinous carcinomas. Finallly, we evidence the presence of a pre-existing mucinous benign lesion suggesting early and complete resection of benign appearing lung cysts because they can undergo malignant transformation if left untreated or they can already harbor foci of invasive carcinoma at the time of the presentation. Even if a good prognosis, better than in other lung carcinomas, with no recurrrence or metastasis after complete surgical exicision, has been reported for cystic mucinous cystoadenocarcinomas, the follow-up showed an aggressive biological behaviour, with the early onset of metastasis, in keeping with P53 positive immunostaining and high Ki-67 proliferation index. PMID:21970610

  15. Prognosis and status of lymph node involvement in patients with adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma—a systematic literature review and pooled-data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Long; Yin, Weiqiang; Peng, Guilin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianrong; Liu, Yang; Zhong, Shengyi; He, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) have been brought up that substitute for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), according to the new classification of lung adenocarcinoma. There has been increasing opinions that argues for the adjustment of lymph node disposition in patients with such early stage tumors. Therefore, we sought to overview the prognosis and status of lymph node involvement in AIS/MIA patients. Methods PubMed, Springer and Ovid databases were searched for relevant studies. Data was extracted and results summarized to demonstrate the disposition of lymph nodes in AIS/MIA. Results Twenty-three studies consisting of 6,137 lung adenocarcinoma were included. AIS/MIA accounted for 821 of the total 6,137. All included patients received curative surgery. After a review of the summarized data we found that only one patient (with MIA) had N1 node metastasis, N2 disease was not found in any of the included patients. In concordance with this, studies that reported 5-year disease free survival (5-year DFS) have almost 100% rate. Conclusions Our findings indicated that patients with AIS/MIA have good survival prognosis after surgical resection, and that recurrence and lymph node metastasis in these patients is rare. Therefore, we strongly encouraged further studies to determine the role of different lymph node disposition strategies. PMID:26716039

  16. The utility of cytology in the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma lung: A tertiary care center study

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Saumya; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Husain, Nuzhat; Gupta, Anurag; Anand, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary adenocarcinoma harbors various molecular abnormalities that include epidermal growth factor mutation, anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene re-arrangement, K-RAS mutations. The availability of targeted therapy against these molecular markers has revolutionized personalized medicine. Accurate cytological diagnosis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma will aid in utilising the cytology smears for molecular testing. Objective: The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of various cytology samples in the diagnosis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: The study included a retrospective case series of 50 patients with biopsy proven non small cell lung carcinoma of adenocarcinoma subtype. The corresponding cytology reports of all the 50 cases were analyzed for different samples including broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), bronchial washings, bronchial brush smears, pleural fluid, sputum and guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of lung and metastatic lymph nodes. The overall cyto-diagnosis efficacy as well that of various cytological samples were analyzed. Results: Multiple cytology samples were received in 14 of 50 cases. The overall diagnostic efficacy of the various cytology samples in the diagnosis of malignancy was 78% and 66.6% cases were accurately typed as non small cell lung carcinoma-adenocarcinoma. The best cytological sample for the detection of pulmonary adenocarcinoma was bronchial brush smears which had a detection rate of 70%. In fine needle aspiration cytology samples and bronchial washings the detection rate was 65.5% and 25% respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: In cases where the cytological diagnosis is certain the tissue biopsies can be simultaneously tested for EGRF and ALK gene mutations. Repeat biopsies are often required due to small amount of tumor tissue or necrotic biopsies. Alternate use of cytological specimen for molecular testing can be done when a diagnosis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma is established.

  17. Loss of TGF-? Adaptor ?2SP Activates Notch Signaling and SOX9 Expression in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shumei; Maru, Dipen M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Chan, Chia-Hsin; Honjo, Soichiro; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Correa, Arlene; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Davila, Marta; Stroehlein, John; Mishra, Lopa

    2013-01-01

    TGF-? and Notch signaling pathways play important roles in regulating self-renewal of stem cells and gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Loss of TGF-? signaling components activates Notch signaling in esophageal adenocarcinoma, but the basis for this effect has been unclear. Here we report that loss of TGF-? adapter ?2SP (SPNB2) activates Notch signaling and its target SOX9 in primary fibroblasts or esophageal adenocarcinoma cells. Expression of the stem cell marker SOX9 was markedly higher in esophageal adenocarcinoma tumor tissues than normal tissues, and its higher nuclear staining in tumors correlated with poorer survival and lymph node invasion in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients. Downregulation of ?2SP by lentivirus short hairpin RNA increased SOX9 transcription and expression, enhancing nuclear localization for both active Notch1 (intracellular Notch1, ICN1) and SOX9. In contrast, reintroduction into esophageal adenocarcinoma cells of ?2SP and a dominant-negative mutant of the Notch coactivator mastermind-like (dnMAN) decreased SOX9 promoter activity. Tumor sphere formation and invasive capacity in vitro and tumor growth in vivo were increased in ?2SP-silenced esophageal adenocarcinoma cells. Conversely, SOX9 silencing rescued the phenotype of esophageal adenocarcinoma cells with loss of ?2SP. Interaction between Smad3 and ICN1 via Smad3 MH1 domain was also observed, with loss of ?2SP increasing the binding between these proteins, inducing expression of Notch targets SOX9 and C-MYC, and decreasing expression of TGF-? targets p21(CDKN1A), p27 (CDKN1B), and E-cadherin. Taken together, our findings suggest that loss of ?2SP switches TGF-? signaling from tumor suppression to tumor promotion by engaging Notch signaling and activating SOX9. PMID:23536563

  18. Downregulation of EMX2 is Associated with Clinical Outcomes in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Junichi; Kratz, Johannes R.; Hirata, Tomomi; Mikami, Iwao; Raz, Dan; Segal, Mark; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Pham, Patrick; Li, Hui; Beltran, Adam; Ray, M. Roshni; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Kazuo; Jablons, David; He, Biao

    2012-01-01

    Background The 5-year survival rate for stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of 50% to 70% indicates that our current staging methods do not adequately predict outcome. Empty spiracles homeobox 2 (EMX2) is a homeo–domain-containing transcription factor that regulates a key developmental pathway known to promote lung tumorigenesis. This study assessed the significance of EMX2 as a prognostic biomarker in lung adenocarcinoma including bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC). Patients and Methods 144 patients with lung adenocarcinoma undergoing surgical resection were studied. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Immunohistochemistry were used to analyze EMX2 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Association of EMX2 mRNA expression levels with clinical outcomes was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results EMX2 mRNA expression was significantly downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma compared with matched adjacent normal tissue (P < .001). EMX2 protein expression was similarly found to be downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma. The EMX2-high mRNA expressing group had statistically significant better overall survival (OS) than the EMX2-low mRNA expressing group (P = .005). Subgroup analysis also demonstrated improved survival in stage I patients (P = .01) and patients with BAC (P = .03). Lastly, the EMX2-high mRNA expressing group had statistically significant better recurrence-free survival (RFS) than the EMX2-low mRNA expression group in patients with adenocarcinoma (P < .001). Conclusion EMX2 expression is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma. Low EMX2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with decreased OS and RFS in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, particularly with stage I disease and BAC. PMID:21726823

  19. Expression of calcium sensing receptor and E-cadherin correlated with survival of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liyuan; Sun, Lichun; Xi, Yuhui; Chen, Xuesong; Xing, Ying; Sun, Weiling; Meng, Qingwei; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been reported that the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), a widely expressed G protein-coupled receptor, can stimulate cell differentiation and proliferation. However, in malignant tumors, loss of CaSR expression has been associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and progression. Recent studies have indicated that the CaSR could promote the expression of E-cadherin, which was considered a tumor suppressor. However, in human lung adenocarcinoma, the importance of the CaSR and E-cadherin has not been sufficiently investigated. Methods Expression levels of CaSR and E-cadherin in paraffin sections from 117 resected lung adenocarcinoma patients were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation between our target proteins and clinical variables. Clinical significance was analyzed by multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan–Meier curve, and log-rank test. Results Expression of the CaSR in lung adenocarcinoma tissue was significantly lower than in the normal sample (P = 0.003). Kendall tau-b analysis showed that, in a lung adenocarcinoma sample, the expression of CaSR positively correlated with a high level of E-cadherin (P < 0.001). Lung adenocarcinoma patients with a strong expression of CaSR (P = 0.034) or E-cadherin (P = 0.001) had longer overall survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model analysis showed that the combined marker was an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival (hazard ratio = 0.440, confidence interval = 0.249–0.779, P = 0.005). Conclusions We identified the CaSR as a new prognostic biomarker in lung adenocarcinoma. These results also suggested that the CaSR may become a new therapeutic target of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26557914

  20. Multiplex H. pylori Serology and Risk of Gastric Cardia and Noncardia Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Ramin; Malekzadeh, Reza; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Pawilta, Michael; Murphy, Gwen; Islami, Farhad; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Michel, Angelika; Etemadi, Arash; Waterboer, Tim; Poustchi, Hossein; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Kamangar, Farin; Abnet, Christian C

    2015-11-15

    The reported associations with gastric adenocarcinoma and seropositivity to different Helicobacter pylori antigens using multiplex serology have not been consistent across studies. We aimed to investigate the association between 15 different multiplex serology antigens and the risk of gastric cardia (GCA) and gastric noncardia (GNCA) adenocarcinomas in northeastern Iran, a population with high rates of gastric adenocarcinoma. We included 272 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma (142 GCA, 103 GNCA, and 27 unspecified) and 524 controls who were individually matched to cases for age, sex, and place of residence in a population-based case-control study. Seropositivity to H. pylori was assessed using both multiplex serology and H. pylori IgG ELISA. Ninety-five percent of controls were seropositive to H. pylori. Of the 15 antibodies in the multiplex assay, 11 showed no significant association with gastric adenocarcinomas. CagA and VacA were associated with a significantly increased risk of all gastric adenocarcinoma and GNCA in multivariate models. Surprisingly, GroEL and NapA were significantly associated with a reduced risk of these tumors. Only CagA antigen was associated with significantly elevated risk of GCA. We found no associations between H. pylori seropositivity overall either by whole-cell ELISA test or multiplex serology, likely due to the high prevalence of seropositivity. Individual antigen testing showed that CagA positivity was associated with increased risk of both noncardia and cardia adenocarcinoma, which is similar to some other Asian populations, whereas two antigens were associated with lower risk of gastric cancer. This latter result was unexpected and should be retested in other populations. Cancer Res; 75(22); 4876-83. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26383162

  1. Synchronous Ovarian and Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Nonbacterial Thrombotic Endocarditis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism: Adenocarcinoma with Thrombotic Events

    PubMed Central

    Erturk, N. K.; Erturk, A.; Basaran, D.; Ozgul, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare manifestation of hypercoagulability in patients with malignant neoplasms. Case Report. A fifty-six-year-old woman presented to the emergency service; the clinical workup revealed deep vein thrombosis in right leg and bilateral massive PTE. As the abdominal sections on the spiral CT revealed a giant pelvic mass of ovarian origin, she was referred to our hospital's gynecologic oncology department. She was scheduled for surgery under enoxaparin. She described numbness on one side of her face. Cranial imaging findings revealed acute ischemic cerebral lesions and transesophageal echocardiogram showed vegetation on the aortic cusp. Under anticoagulation treatment, she underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and infracolic omentectomy. After tumor resection, her neurological symptoms dissolved with aggressive anticoagulant treatment. Pathology result was synchronous endometrial and ovarian adenocarcinoma. Discussion. NBTE is a rare condition often associated with advanced malignancies. Peripheral embolism and venous thrombosis are complications that have been associated with NBTE due to hypercoagulable state. These disorders could be resistant to routine anticoagulant treatment. In case of a thrombotic complication due to ovarian malignancy, surgical resection of the primary tumor may increase the effect of anticoagulant treatment. PMID:26576308

  2. Distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from pulmonary adenocarcinoma: an immuno-histochemical approach using a panel of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, S E; Lucas, J G; Bucci, D M; Schlom, J; Primus, J

    1990-10-01

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was employed to evaluate antigen expression in pulmonary adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. Monoclonal anti-human milk fat globulin (HMFG-2), anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (NP-2), anti-epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), anti-cytokeratin (PKK-1), anti-tumor-associated antigen 72 (B72.3), and anti-human myelomonocytic antigen (Leu M-1) antibodies were used to localize their respective antigens in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors by using the avidin-biotin-complex immunoperoxidase technique. In all, 28 mesotheliomas obtained from Ohio State University Anatomic Pathology files and from a Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) protocol were compared to 22 pulmonary adenocarcinomas by using this MAb panel. None of the mesotheliomas demonstrated positive staining with MAbs NP-2 (anti-CEA) or Leu M-1. However, 95% (21/22) of adenocarcinomas stained with one of these two antibodies. Although neither of these two MAbs stained all adenocarcinomas, each antibody demonstrated positive immunostaining in more than 90% of the adenocarcinomas studied. Therefore, MABs NP-2 and Leu M-1 are, individually, quite useful for distinguishing mesothelioma from adenocarcinoma. However, in our study, no single MAb could be used to distinguish these two tumor types in every case. MAb B72.3 stained 91% (20/21) adenocarcinomas but also stained 7% (2/28) of mesotheliomas. MAb HMFG-2 reacted positively with 95% of adenocarcinomas, but also stained 39% of the mesotheliomas, usually in a membranous pattern. MAbs EMA and PKK-1 were not found useful in distinguishing mesothelioma from adenocarcinoma. We conclude that MAbs Leu M-1 and NP-2 were both useful in distinguishing mesothelioma from pulmonary adenocarcinoma in that positive staining was demonstrated in adenocarcinomas and not mesotheliomas. PMID:2214794

  3. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(?T ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (?), and depolarization (?L)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (?T , ?L, RT ,and ?) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues. PMID:26021717

  4. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  5. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT), retardance (RT), depolarization (?T), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (?), and depolarization (?L)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (?T, ?L, RT,and ?) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DT and D showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  6. LTPB2 acts as a prognostic factor and promotes progression of cervical adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan; Lu, Huan; Zhao, Danmei; Ou, Yangjun; Yu, Kang; Gu, Jiandong; Wang, Li; Jiang, Shuheng; Chen, Mo; Wang, Jinghao; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Congjian

    2015-01-01

    Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2) is a member of the fibrillin/LTBP super family of extracellular matrix proteins, found to be overexpressed in certain malignant tumors. However, the clinical significance and biological role of LTBP-2 in cervical adenocarcinoma has remains unclear. We found that the expression of LTBP2 was higher in cervical adenocarcinoma than in normal cervical epithelial tissue as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of LTBP2 is related to clinical stage, cervical tumor size, depth of cervical stromal invasion and lymph node metastasis. Knockdown of LTBP2 expression can inhibit the proliferation and migration of HeLa cells. Moreover, LTBP2 knockdown affected multiple tumor-related pathway genes including: the MAPK signaling pathway, the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and the P53 pathway. Taken together, this work suggests that LTBP2 may promote the development of cervical adenocarcinoma and serve as a prognostic factor in the clinical evaluation of patients with cervical adenocarcinoma. Our findings provide a new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of cervical adenocarcinoma. PMID:26279753

  7. Resection of metachronous pancreatic cancer 4 years after pancreaticoduodenectomy for stage III pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hamner, John B; White, Michael; Crowder, Carly; Singh, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma frequently recurs in patients even after resection with curative intent. The majority of these are early recurrences and are associated with metastatic disease, thus not amenable to repeat resection. Here we report a patient who underwent completion pancreatectomy for a metachronous pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This patient initially presented with painless jaundice and computed tomography (CT) revealed a mass in the head of the pancreas. Brushings obtained at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were positive for adenocarcinoma. This patient then underwent a Whipple procedure and final pathology demonstrated stage III pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant therapy included gemcitabine and erlotinib. This patient was followed with physical examinations and serial laboratory and imaging studies. There was no evidence of disease for four years at which time and sharp elevation in CA-19-9 was found. Subsequent imaging revealed a mass in the remnant pancreas. Curative intent completion pancreatectomy was then performed which confirmed the presence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This was followed by adjuvant Gemcitabine based chemotherapy and chemoradiation. One year later the patient is alive with no evidence of disease. Thus, in highly selected patients with recurrent or metachronous pancreatic cancer, repeat pancreatectomy can be considered, but the course of treatment should be considered in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:26419361

  8. Morphometry Analysis of Lymphatics in Pulmonary Adenocarcinomas With a Lepidic Growth Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Sannier, Aurélie; Kambouchner, Marianne; Danel, Claire; Callard, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Lymph vessels play an important role in tumor progression. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas, accounting for half of non-small-cell lung carcinomas, compose a spectrum of histological types, exclusively or without a lepidic growth pattern (LGP) along preserved interalveolar septa. In that context, this study was designed to investigate the lymphatic vascular pattern associated with LGP and the concomitant invasive component of pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Using the D2-40 monoclonal antibody as a marker of lymphatic endothelial cells, the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and vessel-area fraction (LVAF) were morphometrically analyzed in four adenocarcinomas in situ (AIS) and the LGP of eight invasive adenocarcinomas (LPIA), and compared with their invasive pattern (IPIA). LVD in AIS (2.1 ± 0.7 mm?2) and LPIA (2.4 ± 1 mm?2) were significantly lower than that in IPIA (14.9 ± 13.6 mm?2) (p=0.001). Moreover, the lymphatic vascular pattern in LGP was similar to that of normal lung, with isolated small lymphatic vessels within the interalveolar septa. Our results showing the scarcity of lymphatics in LGP suggest an absence of septal lymphangiogenesis associated with the LGP pattern in lung adenocarcinomas, which could explain, at least partially, the better prognosis observed in tumors with exclusive or predominant lepidic spread compared with other subtypes. PMID:23686364

  9. CUEDC2 down-regulation is associated with tumor growth and poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Liu, Yangli; Cai, Jinghuang; Guo, Yubiao; Zhu, Zhiwen; Xie, Canmao

    2015-01-01

    CUE domain-containing 2 (CUEDC2) is a multi-functional protein, which regulates cell cycle, growth factor signaling and inflammation. We found that CUEDC2 was low in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and lung adenocarcinoma tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Low levels of CUEDC2 were correlated with a shorter survival time in patients with lung adenocarcinoma (p = 0.004). CUEDC2 expression was correlated with tumor T classification (P = 0.001) at clinical stage (P = 0.001) and tumor size (P = 0.033). Multivariate analysis suggested that CUEDC2 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Ectopic expression of CUEDC2 decreased cell proliferation in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. Knockdown of endogenous CUEDC2 by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) increased tumor growth. Inhibition of proliferation by CUEDC2 was associated with inactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, induction of p21 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Our results suggest that decreased expression of CUEDC2 contributes to tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma, leading to a poor clinical outcome. PMID:26023733

  10. Fractal Analysis and the Diagnostic Usefulness of Silver Staining Nucleolar Organizer Regions in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Alex; Simionescu, Cristiana; Pirici, Daniel; Ciurea, Raluca; Margaritescu, Claudiu

    2015-01-01

    Pathological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma often requires complementary methods. On prostate biopsy tissue from 39 patients including benign nodular hyperplasia (BNH), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), and adenocarcinomas, we have performed combined histochemical-immunohistochemical stainings for argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and glandular basal cells. After ascertaining the pathology, we have analyzed the number, roundness, area, and fractal dimension of individual AgNORs or of their skeleton-filtered maps. We have optimized here for the first time a combination of AgNOR morphological denominators that would reflect best the differences between these pathologies. The analysis of AgNORs' roundness, averaged from large composite images, revealed clear-cut lower values in adenocarcinomas compared to benign and atypical lesions but with no differences between different Gleason scores. Fractal dimension (FD) of AgNOR silhouettes not only revealed significant lower values for global cancer images compared to AAH and BNH images, but was also able to differentiate between Gleason pattern 2 and Gleason patterns 3–5 adenocarcinomas. Plotting the frequency distribution of the FDs for different pathologies showed clear differences between all Gleason patterns and BNH. Together with existing morphological classifiers, AgNOR analysis might contribute to a faster and more reliable machine-assisted screening of prostatic adenocarcinoma, as an essential aid for pathologists. PMID:26366372

  11. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies B1 and B3 that react with mucinous adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pastan, I; Lovelace, E T; Gallo, M G; Rutherford, A V; Magnani, J L; Willingham, M C

    1991-07-15

    B1 and B3 are two newly isolated monoclonal antibodies that react uniformly with the surface of many mucinous carcinomas of the colon, stomach, and ovary but with a limited number of normal tissues, among which are glands of the stomach, epithelia of the trachea and bladder, differentiated epithelium of the esophagus, and small bowel mucin. They also react uniformly with many human tumor cell lines, including MCF7, MDA-MB-468, and HTB20 (breast), A431 (epidermoid), HT29 (colon), HTB33 (cervical), and DU145 (prostate). Immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that B1 and B3 react with epitopes present on a large number of glycoproteins, ranging in molecular weight from greater than 200,000 to less than 40,000. Using a panel of 37 different carbohydrate residues attached to albumin to form neoglycoproteins, it was found that B1 reacts with Ley and H-type 2 and B3 reacts with Ley, di-Lex, and tri-Lex antigens. Thus, each antibody reacts with a distinct portion of a carbohydrate residue. Because of the limited reactivity of these antibodies with normal tissues, they merit evaluation in the treatment of cancer. PMID:1648444

  12. Chromosomal imbalances of primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Goeze, Almut; Schlüns, Karsten; Wolf, Guenter; Thäsler, Zsuzsanna; Petersen, Simone; Petersen, Iver

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to screen 83 lung adenocarcinomas of 60 patients for chromosomal imbalances. The most common alteration was DNA overrepresentation on chromosome 1q, with a peak incidence at 1q22-q23 in 73% of the primary tumours, followed by DNA overrepresentation on chromosomes 8q and 20q, and deletions on chromosomes 3p, 4q, 6q, 9p, 9q, and 13q, in at least 60%. The generation of a difference histogram of metastasizing versus non-metastasizing tumours and a case-by-case histogram for the comparison of 23 paired samples of primary tumours and corresponding metastases suggested that deletions on chromosomes 3p12-p14, 3p22-p24, 4p13-15.1, 4q21-qter, 6q21-qter, 8p, 10q, 14q21, 17p12-p13, 20p12, and 21q, and overrepresentations on chromosomes 1q21-q25, 7q11.2, 9q34, 11q12-q13, 14q11-q13, and 17q25 are associated with the metastatic phenotype. In contrast, losses on chromosome 19 and gains on 3p, 4q, 5p, and 6q were preferentially found in non-metastasizing tumours. The analysis of the paired samples revealed considerable chromosomal instability, but indicated a clonal relationship in each case. The primary tumours often showed additional deletions, suggesting that loss of function mutations are critical in the initial phase of tumour dissemination, whereas the metastases preferentially acquired DNA gains, probably modulating the metastatic phenotype. The primary data from this study (ratio profiles, clinicopathological parameters, histograms) are also available at http://amba.charite.de/cgh. PMID:11748636

  13. Clinical implications of chromosomal abnormalities in gastric adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chew-Wun; Chen, Gen-Der; Fann, Cathy S.-J.; Lee, Anna F.-Y.; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Jacqueline M.; Weier, Ulli; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2003-06-23

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and has a very poor prognosis. Genetic imbalances in 62 primary gastric adenocarcinomas of various histopathologic types and pathologic stages and six gastric cancer-derived cell lines were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization, and the relationship of genomic abnormalities to clinical features in primary GC was evaluated at a genome-wide level. Eighty-four percent of the tumors and all six cell lines showed DNA copy number changes. The recurrent chromosomal abnormalities including gains at 15 regions and losses at 8 regions were identified. Statistical analyses revealed that gains at 17q24-qter (53 percent), 20q13-qter (48 percent), 1p32-p36 (42 percent), 22q12-qter (27 percent), 17p13-pter (24 percent), 16p13-pter (21 percent), 6p21-pter (19 percent), 20p12-pter (19 percent), 7p21-pter (18 percent), 3q28-qter (8 percent), and 13q13-q14 (8 percent), and losses at 18q12-qter (11 percent), 3p12 (8 percent), 3p25-pter (8 percent), 5q14-q23 (8 percent), and 9p21-p23 (5 percent), are associated with unique patient or tumor-related features. GCs of differing histopathologic features were shown to be associated with distinct patterns of genetic alterations, supporting the notion that they evolve through distinct genetic pathways. Metastatic tumors were also associated with specific genetic changes. These regions may harbor candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

  14. Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: role in 2014 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin H.; Ross, Samuel W.; Seshadri, Ramanathan; Swan, Ryan Z.; Iannitti, David A.; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma has found new avenues for performing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) procedures, a historically technically challenging operation. Multiple studies have found laparoscopic PD to be safe, with equivalent oncologic outcomes as compared to open PD. In addition, several series have described potential benefits to minimally invasive PD including fewer postoperative complications, shorter hospital length of stay, and decreased postoperative pain. Yet, despite these promising initial results, laparoscopic PDs have not become widely adopted by the surgical community. In fact, the vast majority of pancreatic resections performed in the United States are still performed in an open fashion, and there are only a handful of surgeons who actually perform purely laparoscopic PDs. On the other hand, robotic assisted surgery offers many technical advantages over laparoscopic surgery including high-definition, 3-D optics, enhanced suturing ability, and more degrees of freedom of movement by means of fully-wristed instruments. Similar to laparoscopic PD, there are now several case series that have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of robotic PD with seemingly equivalent short-term oncologic outcomes as compared to open technique. In addition, having the surgeon seated for the procedure with padded arm-rests, there is an ergonomic advantage of robotics over both open and laparoscopic approaches, where one has to stand up for prolonged periods of time. Future technologic innovations will likely focus on enhanced robotic capabilities to improve ease of use in the operating room. Last but not least, robotic assisted surgery training will continue to be a part of surgical education curriculum ensuring the increased use of this technology by future generations of surgeons. PMID:26261726

  15. Multiple genetic alterations in hamster pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, K W; Laconi, S; Mangold, K A; Hubchak, S; Scarpelli, D G

    1995-06-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas induced in the Syrian golden hamster (SGH) by N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine share many similarities with the human disease, including mutations of the K-ras oncogene. In vitro carcinogenesis studies with immortal SGH pancreatic duct cells indicate that neoplastic transformation in this system can occur without mutational inactivation of p53 suppressor gene. In this study we extend the genetic analysis of the in vivo SGH model to increase the number of cases analyzed for the status of K-ras and to determine further the spectrum of alterations involved; we have studied the status of the p53, DCC, and Rb-1 suppressor genes and the status of the mdm2 oncogene, which can involve p53 indirectly. The partial SGH-coding sequence of mdm2 and DCC was determined. K-ras mutation in the second position of codon 12 was present in 17 of 19 (90%) of tumors. Immunohistochemistry and single strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed no evidence of p53 mutation in 21 tumors. RNase protection assays showed overexpression of mdm2 in 5 of 19 (26%) tumors. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed a complete or partial loss of DCC expression in 10 of 19 (53%) neoplasms and of Rb-1 (42%) expression in 8 of 19 tumors when compared to matched controls. Deregulation of these genes appears to be significant in SGH pancreatic carcinogenesis as indicated by their frequencies. However, the fact that 6 tumors showed either only a K-ras mutation or the absence of alterations of the 5 genes analyzed indicates that additional as yet unstudied or unknown genes are also involved in SGH pancreatic duct carcinogenesis. PMID:7780969

  16. Curcumin Modulates Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell-Derived Exosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Lynch, James C.; Leaf, Patrick; Gonda, Amber; Ferguson Bennit, Heather R.; Griffiths, Duncan; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rates of all cancer types. One potential explanation for the aggressiveness of this disease is that cancer cells have been found to communicate with one another using membrane-bound vesicles known as exosomes. These exosomes carry pro-survival molecules and increase the proliferation, survival, and metastatic potential of recipient cells, suggesting that tumor-derived exosomes are powerful drivers of tumor progression. Thus, to successfully address and eradicate pancreatic cancer, it is imperative to develop therapeutic strategies that neutralize cancer cells and exosomes simultaneously. Curcumin, a turmeric root derivative, has been shown to have potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have suggested that exosomal curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory properties on recipient cells. However, curcumin’s effects on exosomal pro-tumor function have yet to be determined. We hypothesize that curcumin will alter the pro-survival role of exosomes from pancreatic cancer cells toward a pro-death role, resulting in reduced cell viability of recipient pancreatic cancer cells. The main objective of this study was to determine the functional alterations of exosomes released by pancreatic cancer cells exposed to curcumin compared to exosomes from untreated pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate, using an in vitro cell culture model involving pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2, that curcumin is incorporated into exosomes isolated from curcumin-treated pancreatic cancer cells as observed by spectral studies and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, curcumin is delivered to recipient pancreatic cancer cells via exosomes, promoting cytotoxicity as demonstrated by Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy as well as AlamarBlue and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy of curcumin may be enhanced in pancreatic cancer cells through exosomal facilitation. PMID:26177391

  17. Risk assessment of esophageal adenocarcinoma using ?-H2AX assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Enping; Gong, Yilei; Gu, Jian; Jie, Lin; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Xifeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutagen-induced DNA damage as measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) has been associated with increased risks of cancers. The formation of ?-H2AX is an early cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We hypothesize that higher level of radiation-induced ?-H2AX in PBLs may be associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Methods Laser scanning cytometer–based immunocytochemical method was used to measure baseline and irradiation-induced ?-H2AX levels in PBLs from 211 EAC patients and 211 healthy controls. The ratio of induced ?-H2AX level to baseline level was used to evaluate individual susceptibility to DSBs. Relative risks for EAC associated with ?-H2AX were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Radiation-induced ?-H2AX level and the ?-H2AX ratio were significantly higher in cases than in controls. Dichotomized at the median in controls, a significantly increased risk for EAC was observed in association with high ?-H2AX ratio (odds ratio=2.94, 95% confidence interval=1.83–4.72). Quartile analyses showed significant dose-response associations between higher ?-H2AX ratio and increased risk of EAC (P for trend, 1.64E-06). In addition, joint effect between ?-H2AX ratio and smoking was observed: smokers who had high ?-H2AX ratio exhibited the highest risk of EAC (OR =5.53, 95% CI: 2.71–11.25) compared to never-smokers with low ?-H2AX ratio. Conclusion Radiation-induced DNA damage assessed by ?-H2AX ratio is associated with an increased risk of EAC. Impact ?-H2AX assay is a new and robust method to measure DSB damage in PBLs, which can be used to assess mutagen sensitivity and EAC risk. PMID:23904462

  18. Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: role in 2014 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Baker, Erin H; Ross, Samuel W; Seshadri, Ramanathan; Swan, Ryan Z; Iannitti, David A; Vrochides, Dionisios; Martinie, John B

    2015-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma has found new avenues for performing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) procedures, a historically technically challenging operation. Multiple studies have found laparoscopic PD to be safe, with equivalent oncologic outcomes as compared to open PD. In addition, several series have described potential benefits to minimally invasive PD including fewer postoperative complications, shorter hospital length of stay, and decreased postoperative pain. Yet, despite these promising initial results, laparoscopic PDs have not become widely adopted by the surgical community. In fact, the vast majority of pancreatic resections performed in the United States are still performed in an open fashion, and there are only a handful of surgeons who actually perform purely laparoscopic PDs. On the other hand, robotic assisted surgery offers many technical advantages over laparoscopic surgery including high-definition, 3-D optics, enhanced suturing ability, and more degrees of freedom of movement by means of fully-wristed instruments. Similar to laparoscopic PD, there are now several case series that have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of robotic PD with seemingly equivalent short-term oncologic outcomes as compared to open technique. In addition, having the surgeon seated for the procedure with padded arm-rests, there is an ergonomic advantage of robotics over both open and laparoscopic approaches, where one has to stand up for prolonged periods of time. Future technologic innovations will likely focus on enhanced robotic capabilities to improve ease of use in the operating room. Last but not least, robotic assisted surgery training will continue to be a part of surgical education curriculum ensuring the increased use of this technology by future generations of surgeons. PMID:26261726

  19. Lumican Is Overexpressed in Lung Adenocarcinoma Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Cappellesso, Rocco; Millioni, Renato; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Simonato, Francesca; Caroccia, Brasilina; Iori, Elisabetta; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Ventura, Laura; Tessari, Paolo; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma (AdC) is the most common lung cancer subtype and is often associated with pleural effusion (PE). Its poor prognosis is attributable to diagnostic delay and lack of effective treatments and there is a pressing need in discovering new biomarkers for early diagnosis or targeted therapies. To date, little is known about lung AdC proteome. We investigated protein expression of lung AdC in PE using the isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) approach to identify possible novel diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. This provided the identification of 109 of lung AdC-related proteins. We further analyzed lumican, one of the overexpressed proteins, in 88 resected lung AdCs and in 23 malignant PE cell-blocks (13 lung AdCs and 10 non-lung cancers) using immunohistochemistry. In AdC surgical samples, lumican expression was low in cancer cells, whereas it was strong and diffuse in the stroma surrounding the tumor. However, lumican expression was not associated with tumor grade, stage, and vascular/pleural invasion. None of the lung cancer cell-blocks showed lumican immunoreaction, whereas those of all the other tumors were strongly positive. Finally, immunoblotting analysis showed lumican expression in both cell lysate and conditioned medium of a fibroblast culture but not in those of A549 lung cancer cell line. PE is a valid source of information for proteomic analysis without many of the restrictions of plasma. The high lumican levels characterizing AdC PEs are probably due to its release by the fibroblasts surrounding the tumor. Despite the role of lumican in lung AdC is still elusive, it could be of diagnostic value. PMID:25961303

  20. Prostatic carcinosarcoma: a case originating in a previous ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Poblet, E; Gomez-Tierno, A; Alfaro, L

    2000-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a variant of prostatic carcinoma that appears to originate in the ducts of the prostate. Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon and aggressive tumour composed of an intimate admixture of adenocarcinoma and sarcoma. In this report we describe the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a case of prostatic carcinosarcoma that appeared in a 66-year-old man who had had a ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate diagnosed 3 years previously. The patient died of the disease 3 months after the carcinosarcoma was diagnosed. This case may represent further evidence of the dedifferentiation theory in the origin of carcinosarcoma. The case also illustrates that this dedifferentiation may occur from any type of prostatic carcinoma. PMID:10982020

  1. Advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a review of current treatment strategies and developing therapies

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Andrea; Lim, Kian-Huat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest solid malignancies. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of presentation and, unfortunately, this severely limits the number of patients who can undergo surgical resection, which offers the only chance for cure. Recent therapeutic advances for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have extended overall survival, but prognosis still remains grim. Given that traditional chemotherapy is ineffective in curing advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, current research is taking a multidirectional approach in the hopes of developing more effective treatments. This article reviews the major clinical trial data that is the basis for the current chemotherapy regimens used as first- and second-line treatments for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We also review the current ongoing clinical trials, which include the use of agents targeting the oncogenic network signaling of K-Ras, agents targeting the extracellular matrix, and immune therapies. PMID:25755680

  2. Primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Thelin, Camille; Alquist, Caroline R; Engel, Lee S; Dewenter, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A case of primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon, a rare oncologic variant, was diagnosed in a 25-year-old man who presented with partial bowel obstruction. To understand better the pathology of this neoplasm, a retrospective review of Entrez PubMed entries describing primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon and/or rectum was performed. Only 13 previous cases of primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon and/or rectum have been reported, with an average presentation age of 57 years and generally afflicting the descending colon of men. Herein we present a case occurring in the distal ascending colon of the youngest patient in the literature to date. Our patient's diagnosis is rare in occurrence, location, and age of onset. PMID:25311456

  3. Development of a panel of DNA Aptamers with High Affinity for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Champanhac, Carole; Teng, I-Ting; Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Zhoa, Zilong; Fu, Ting; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer costs nearly 40,000 lives in the U.S. each year and has one of the lowest survival rates among cancers. Effective treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is hindered by lack of a reliable biomarker. To address this challenge, aptamers were selected by cell-SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) targeting human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PL45). Five promising aptamers presenting low Kd values and good specificity were generated. Among these five aptamers, one was tailored into a nanostructure carrying a high drug payload for specific drug delivery. The results show a viability of almost 80% for negative cells while only 50% of the target cells remained alive after 48?h incubation. These results lead to the conclusion that further research could reveal protein biomarkers specific to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with probes available for early detection. PMID:26603187

  4. Gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix with neoadjuvant therapy mimicking clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifen; Liang, Li; Euscher, Elizabeth D; Liu, Jinsong; Ramalingam, Preetha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma, an uncommon subtype of cervical carcinoma, is characterized by a distinct morphology and immunophenotype. Herein, we report a case of a 71-year-old woman who received neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy after cervical biopsy revealed moderately differentiated invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma. Subsequently, the outside patient underwent radical hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The post-neoadjuvant therapy hysterectomy specimen showed tumor cells with clear cytoplasm, hyperchromatic nuclei with irregular contours, which mimicked clear cell carcinoma. However, immunohistochemical staining showed that these tumor cells were positive for carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 7 (diffuse), and cytokeratin 20 (patchy), After review of the pretreatment cervical biopsy specimen, the tumor was favored to represent a gastric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the cervix. Pathologists should be aware of this rare tumor and its post-neoadjuvant therapy morphologic changes, which can make diagnosis more challenging. PMID:26617929

  5. Development of a panel of DNA Aptamers with High Affinity for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Champanhac, Carole; Teng, I-Ting; Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Zhoa, Zilong; Fu, Ting; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer costs nearly 40,000 lives in the U.S. each year and has one of the lowest survival rates among cancers. Effective treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is hindered by lack of a reliable biomarker. To address this challenge, aptamers were selected by cell-SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) targeting human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PL45). Five promising aptamers presenting low Kd values and good specificity were generated. Among these five aptamers, one was tailored into a nanostructure carrying a high drug payload for specific drug delivery. The results show a viability of almost 80% for negative cells while only 50% of the target cells remained alive after 48?h incubation. These results lead to the conclusion that further research could reveal protein biomarkers specific to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with probes available for early detection. PMID:26603187

  6. Cancer Stem Cell Markers CD44, CD133 in Primary Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Anahita; Naghshvar, Farshad; Khanari, Somaieh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are unique subpopulations that have the capacity to drive malignant progression with renewal abilities. Recently the role of some of CSCs in gastric adenocarcinoma has been studied. This study was performed in order to evaluate CD44 and CD133 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 95 primary gastric adenocarcinoma and their relation to clinical and pathological parameters of these tumors. There was a significant correlation between CD44 expression and cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion, no lymphatic/vascular invasion and moderate differentiation. There was a significant correlation between CD133 expression and patient's age (> 65 years), cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion and moderate differentiation. CSC markers like CD 44 and CD133 had high expression in primary gastric adenocarcinoma and had some relations to clinical and pathological parameters of tumors. PMID:25635255

  7. Comparison of absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Zelinska, N. V.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism ? is insignificant in the researched spectral range ?=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  8. A Role of Three-Dimensional (3D)-Reconstruction in the Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Onozato, Maristela L.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Yagi, Yukako; Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Background: Three-dimensional (3D)-reconstruction from paraffin embedded sections has been considered laborious and time-consuming. However, the high-resolution images of large object areas and different fields of view obtained by 3D-reconstruction make one wonder whether it can add a new insight into lung adenocarcinoma, the most frequent histology type of lung cancer characterized by its morphological heterogeneity. Objective: In this work, we tested whether an automated tissue sectioning machine and slide scanning system could generate precise 3D-reconstruction of microanatomy of the lung and help us better understand and define histologic subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: Four formalin-fixed human lung adenocarcinoma resections were studied. Paraffin embedded tissues were sectioned with Kurabo-Automated tissue sectioning machine and serial sections were automatically stained and scanned with a Whole Slide Imaging system. The resulting stacks of images were 3D reconstructed by Pannoramic Viewer software. Results: Two of the four specimens contained islands of tumor cells detached in alveolar spaces that had not been described in any of the existing adenocarcinoma classifications. 3D-reconstruction revealed the details of spatial distribution and structural interaction of the tumor that could hardly be observed by 2D light microscopy studies. The islands of tumor cells extended into a deeper aspect of the tissue, and were interconnected with each other and with the main tumor with a solid pattern that was surrounded by the islands. The finding raises the question whether the islands of tumor cells should be classified into a solid pattern in the current classification. Conclusion: The combination of new technologies enabled us to build an effective 3D-reconstruction of resected lung adenocarcinomas. 3D-reconstruction may help us refine the classification of lung adenocarcinoma by adding detailed spatial/structural information to 2D light microscopy evaluation. PMID:21955723

  9. Tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting overcomes radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. . E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org; Zhang Xiaochun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cheung, Rex; Fang Bingliang

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To overcome radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma by tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting using tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Methods and Materials: Adenoviral vector Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD with a tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcription promoter was used to transfer TRAIL gene to human esophageal adenocarcinoma and normal human lung fibroblastic cells (NHLF). Activation of apoptosis was analyzed by Western blot, fluorescent activated cell sorting, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate labeling (TUNEL) assay. A human esophageal adenocarcinoma mouse model was treated with intratumoral injections of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus local radiotherapy. Results: The combination of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy increased the cell-killing effect in all esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines but not in NHLF cells. This combination also significantly reduced clonogenic formation (p < 0.05) and increased sub-G1 deoxyribonucleic acid accumulation in cancer cells (p < 0.05). Activation of apoptosis by Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus radiotherapy was demonstrated by activation of caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase in vitro and TUNEL assay in vivo. Combined Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy dramatically inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mean survival in the esophageal adenocarcinoma model to 31.6 days from 16.7 days for radiotherapy alone and 21.5 days for Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The combination of tumor-specific TRAIL gene targeting and radiotherapy enhances the effect of suppressing esophageal adenocarcinoma growth and prolonging survival.

  10. Afatinib in Treatment-Naive Patients With EGFR-Mutated Lung Adenocarcinoma With Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shih-Hong; Hsieh, Meng-Heng; Fang, Yueh-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were previously the standard first-line treatments for lung cancers with activating EGFR mutations. The first-generation reversible EGFR TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated substantial efficacy in the treatment of brain metastases from EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma. However, the efficacy of afatinib, the second-generation irreversible EGFR TKI, as the first-line treatment in lung adenocarcinoma patients with brain metastasis has yet to be evaluated. Here, we report cases of 3 patients who received afatinib alone as the first-line treatment in combination with whole-brain radiotherapy or following surgical resection of brain metastases. All 3 patients had EGFR L858R mutation. The first patient had lung adenocarcinoma with brain metastasis and no neurologic symptoms. After consultation, she received afatinib as a first-line treatment. Chest computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed partial response. The second patient had lung adenocarcinoma accompanied with a metastatic brain lesion associated with seizures. This patient received whole-brain radiotherapy and afatinib treatment following brain MRI and subsequently showed significant regression of the brain metastasis. The third patient had strabismus of the right eye, and brain MRI showed a single tumor at the cerebellar pontine angle. This patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor followed by afatinib treatment. He refused adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery for brain metastasis. The brain MRI showed no recurrent brain metastasis, and the patient had relatively less neurologic deficiency. This series of 3 cases indicate that afatinib may be an appropriate first-line treatment alternative in patients having lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutations. Further retrospective analyses and prospective clinical trials are required to substantiate the efficacy of afatinib in the treatment of brain metastases of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26469914

  11. A Case of Clostridium septicum Aortitis With Concomitant Adenocarcinoma of the Cecum

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Diana; Sampath, Kartik; Toor, Arifa

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare infection that is strongly associated with underlying adenocarcinoma of the colon. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman with peripheral vascular disease who presented after 4 weeks of severe abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed thickening of the cecal wall and gas in the aortic wall. Colonoscopy revealed a large ulcerated moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in the cecum. Blood cultures grew Clostridium septicum. The patient was offered surgical intervention but refused; she was treated with antibiotics and discharged home where she died 1 week later. PMID:26203448

  12. Colon Adenocarcinoma Associated with Synchronous Extramural Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) of the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Nikolaidou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal stromal tumour and colon adenocarcinoma Symptoms: Fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Right Hemicolectomy and enterectomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: GISTs are mesenchymal tumors representing approximately 1% of all gastrointestinal neoplasia. Their concurrence with colorectal cancers is rare. Case Report: We present a case of coexistence of colon adenocarcinoma and GIST of the ileum in a 68-year-old white woman. Conclusions: The coexistence of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasia is very challenging; further research is needed to clarify the role of oncogenic mutations and signalling pathways in carcinogenesis of neoplasia of various histiogenic origins. PMID:26608682

  13. SMALL INTESTINAL ADENOCARCINOMA WITH CARCINOMATOSIS IN A SWIFT FOX (VULPES VELOX).

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Shambhunath; Andrews, Gordon A; Carpenter, James W

    2015-09-01

    A 7-yr-old, intact, female swift fox (Vulpes velox) presented to the Veterinary Health Center at Kansas State University with a history of chronic weight loss, lethargy, inappetence, and myiasis. On physical examination, a firm mass was palpated in the mid- to cranial abdomen. The fox was euthanatized as a result of the grave prognosis. Gross necropsy and histologic findings included a small intestinal adenocarcinoma with diffuse transperitoneal spread throughout the abdominal cavity (carcinomatosis). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal adenocarcinoma with carcinomatosis in a swift fox. PMID:26352968

  14. Metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma to the prostate presenting with bilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Hyams, Elias S; Dulabon, Lori; Shah, Ojas

    2010-02-01

    Carcinoma metastatic to the prostate occurs rarely and is most commonly associated with malignant bladder neoplasms. We present the case of a 73-year-old male with a history of gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma and clinically symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent photoselective vaporization of the prostate and presented several months later with gross hematuria, intermittent urinary retention and bilateral ureteral obstruction causing acute renal failure. After relieving the ureteral obstruction, subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate revealed locally invasive metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of metastatic gastroesophageal carcinoma to the prostate. PMID:20156389

  15. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well classified patient samples would prove useful in identifying novel blood based biomarkers for gastric cancers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25952687

  16. A rapid in vivo screen for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Ozhan; Pashkov, Victor; Kollipara, Rahul K; Zolghadri, Yalda; Cruz, Victoria H; Hale, Michael A; Heath, Blake R; Artyukhin, Alex B; Christie, Alana L; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Lorens, James B; Swift, Galvin H; Brekken, Rolf A; Wilkie, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and is projected to be second by 2025. It has the worst survival rate among all major cancers. Two pressing needs for extending life expectancy of affected individuals are the development of new approaches to identify improved therapeutics, addressed herein, and the identification of early markers. PDA advances through a complex series of intercellular and physiological interactions that drive cancer progression in response to organ stress, organ failure, malnutrition, and infiltrating immune and stromal cells. Candidate drugs identified in organ culture or cell-based screens must be validated in preclinical models such as KIC (p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D);Cdkn2a(f/f)) mice, a genetically engineered model of PDA in which large aggressive tumors develop by 4 weeks of age. We report a rapid, systematic and robust in vivo screen for effective drug combinations to treat Kras-dependent PDA. Kras mutations occur early in tumor progression in over 90% of human PDA cases. Protein kinase and G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling activates Kras. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are coincidence detectors that can be induced by multiple inputs to feedback-regulate GPCR signaling. We crossed Rgs16::GFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice with KIC mice and show that the Rgs16::GFP transgene is a Kras(G12D)-dependent marker of all stages of PDA, and increases proportionally to tumor burden in KIC mice. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of cultured primary PDA cells reveals characteristics of embryonic progenitors of pancreatic ducts and endocrine cells, and extraordinarily high expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl, an emerging cancer drug target. In proof-of-principle drug screens, we find that weanling KIC mice with PDA treated for 2 weeks with gemcitabine (with or without Abraxane) plus inhibitors of Axl signaling (warfarin and BGB324) have fewer tumor initiation sites and reduced tumor size compared with the standard-of-care treatment. Rgs16::GFP is therefore an in vivo reporter of PDA progression and sensitivity to new chemotherapeutic drug regimens such as Axl-targeted agents. This screening strategy can potentially be applied to identify improved therapeutics for other cancers. PMID:26438693

  17. A rapid in vivo screen for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ocal, Ozhan; Pashkov, Victor; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Zolghadri, Yalda; Cruz, Victoria H.; Hale, Michael A.; Heath, Blake R.; Artyukhin, Alex B.; Christie, Alana L.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Lorens, James B.; Swift, Galvin H.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Wilkie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and is projected to be second by 2025. It has the worst survival rate among all major cancers. Two pressing needs for extending life expectancy of affected individuals are the development of new approaches to identify improved therapeutics, addressed herein, and the identification of early markers. PDA advances through a complex series of intercellular and physiological interactions that drive cancer progression in response to organ stress, organ failure, malnutrition, and infiltrating immune and stromal cells. Candidate drugs identified in organ culture or cell-based screens must be validated in preclinical models such as KIC (p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;Cdkn2af/f) mice, a genetically engineered model of PDA in which large aggressive tumors develop by 4 weeks of age. We report a rapid, systematic and robust in vivo screen for effective drug combinations to treat Kras-dependent PDA. Kras mutations occur early in tumor progression in over 90% of human PDA cases. Protein kinase and G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling activates Kras. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are coincidence detectors that can be induced by multiple inputs to feedback-regulate GPCR signaling. We crossed Rgs16::GFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice with KIC mice and show that the Rgs16::GFP transgene is a KrasG12D-dependent marker of all stages of PDA, and increases proportionally to tumor burden in KIC mice. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of cultured primary PDA cells reveals characteristics of embryonic progenitors of pancreatic ducts and endocrine cells, and extraordinarily high expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl, an emerging cancer drug target. In proof-of-principle drug screens, we find that weanling KIC mice with PDA treated for 2 weeks with gemcitabine (with or without Abraxane) plus inhibitors of Axl signaling (warfarin and BGB324) have fewer tumor initiation sites and reduced tumor size compared with the standard-of-care treatment. Rgs16::GFP is therefore an in vivo reporter of PDA progression and sensitivity to new chemotherapeutic drug regimens such as Axl-targeted agents. This screening strategy can potentially be applied to identify improved therapeutics for other cancers. PMID:26438693

  18. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. Prostate cancer originating in basal cells progresses to adenocarcinoma propagated by luminal-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Cooper, Aaron R.; Drake, Justin M.; Liu, Xian; Armstrong, Andrew J.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Zhang, Hong; Kohn, Donald B.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.; Goldstein, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the cells that initiate cancer and the cancer stem-like cells that propagate tumors has been poorly defined. In a human prostate tissue transformation model, basal cells expressing the oncogenes Myc and myristoylated AKT can initiate heterogeneous tumors. Tumors contain features of acinar-type adenocarcinoma with elevated eIF4E-driven protein translation and squamous cell carcinoma marked by activated beta-catenin. Lentiviral integration site analysis revealed that alternative histological phenotypes can be clonally derived from a common cell of origin. In advanced disease, adenocarcinoma can be propagated by self-renewing tumor cells with an androgen receptor-low immature luminal phenotype in the absence of basal-like cells. These data indicate that advanced prostate adenocarcinoma initiated in basal cells can be maintained by luminal-like tumor-propagating cells. Determining the cells that maintain human prostate adenocarcinoma and the signaling pathways characterizing these tumor-propagating cells is critical for developing effective therapeutic strategies against this population. PMID:24282295

  20. A Speculative Role for Stromal Gastrin Signaling in Development and Dissemination of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matters, Gail L; Clawson, Gary A

    2013-04-01

    The peptide growth factor gastrin and its receptor, the G-protein coupled cholecystokinin receptor type B (CCKBR), play an integral role in the growth and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Gastrin immunoreactivity is found in the fetal pancreas but its expression is not detected in normal pancreas after birth, except when it is re-expressed in malignant lesions. PMID:25346875

  1. LYN, a Key Gene From Bioinformatics Analysis, Contributes to Development and Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dabiao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a lethal malignancy whose incidence is rapidly growing in recent years. Previous reports suggested that Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is represented by metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma transition, is regarded as the premalignant lesion of esophageal neoplasm. However, our knowledge about the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is still very limited. MATERIAL AND METHODS In order to acquire better understanding about the pathological mechanisms in this field, we obtained gene profiling data on BE, esophageal adenocarcinoma patients, and normal controls from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, were conducted. RESULTS Our results revealed that several pathways, such as the wound healing, complement, and coagulation pathways, were closely correlated with cancer development and progression. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was discovered to be responsible for the predisposition stage of cancer; while response to stress, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, nod-like receptor signaling pathway, and ECM-receptor interaction were chief contributors of cancer progression. More importantly, we discovered in this study that LYN was a critical gene. It was found to be the key nodule of several significant biological networks, which suggests its close correlation with cancer initiation and progression. CONCLUSIONS These results provided more information on the mechanisms of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which enlightened our way to the clinical discovery of novel therapeutic makers for conquering esophageal cancer. PMID:26708841

  2. Genetic Mutation Analysis of Human Gastric Adenocarcinomas Using Ion Torrent Sequencing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hua; Tang, Chuanning; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Dong, Haichao; Sun, Hong; Jiang, Shouwen; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; He, Yan; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Gu, Dongying; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wu, Xiaomin; Wei, Xiaowei; Hong, Lingzhi; Zhang, Yangmei; Yang, Jinsong; Gong, Yonglin; Tang, Cuiju; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F.; Chen, Si-Yi; Chen, Jinfei

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the one of the major causes of cancer-related death, especially in Asia. Gastric adenocarcinoma, the most common type of gastric cancer, is heterogeneous and its incidence and cause varies widely with geographical regions, gender, ethnicity, and diet. Since unique mutations have been observed in individual human cancer samples, identification and characterization of the molecular alterations underlying individual gastric adenocarcinomas is a critical step for developing more effective, personalized therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic mutations on an individual basis by DNA sequencing remained a daunting task. Recent advances in new next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, makes DNA sequencing cheaper, faster, and more reliable. In this study, we aim to identify genetic mutations in the genes which are targeted by drugs in clinical use or are under development in individual human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using Ion Torrent sequencing. We sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes in 238 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel. The sequencing analysis revealed a high occurrence of mutations along the TP53 locus (9.7%) in our sample set. Thus, this study indicates the utility of a cost and time efficient tool such as Ion Torrent sequencing to screen cancer mutations for the development of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25025766

  3. Polymorphisms of inflammatory and metalloproteinase genes, Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Früh, M; Zhou, W; Zhai, R; Su, L; Heist, R S; Wain, J C; Nishioka, N S; Lynch, T J; Shepherd, F A; Christiani, D C; Liu, G

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection appears protective against oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) risk. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are released in the presence of HP infection. In MMP2 wild-type individuals, HP was significantly protective of EA risk (adjusted odds ratio: 0.29; 95% confidence interval=0.1–0.7). Matrix metalloproteinases may modulate the EA–HP relationship. PMID:18253117

  4. Development and Validation of a Prognostic Gene-Expression Signature for Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Sang Cheol; Sohn, Bo Hwa; Chu, In-Sun; Jeong, Woojin; Mills, Gordon B.; Byers, Lauren Averett; Lee, Ju-Seog

    2012-01-01

    Although several prognostic signatures have been developed in lung cancer, their application in clinical practice has been limited because they have not been validated in multiple independent data sets. Moreover, the lack of common genes between the signatures makes it difficult to know what biological process may be reflected or measured by the signature. By using classical data exploration approach with gene expression data from patients with lung adenocarcinoma (n?=?186), we uncovered two distinct subgroups of lung adenocarcinoma and identified prognostic 193-gene gene expression signature associated with two subgroups. The signature was validated in 4 independent lung adenocarcinoma cohorts, including 556 patients. In multivariate analysis, the signature was an independent predictor of overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 4.8; p?=?0.01). An integrated analysis of the signature revealed that E2F1 plays key roles in regulating genes in the signature. Subset analysis demonstrated that the gene signature could identify high-risk patients in early stage (stage I disease), and patients who would have benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus, our study provided evidence for molecular basis of clinically relevant two distinct two subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:22970185

  5. Collagen type V promotes the malignant phenotype of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, Sonja; Grünwald, Barbara; Krüger, Achim; Reithmeier, Anja; Hähl, Teresa; Cheng, Tao; Feuchtinger, Annette; Born, Diana; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Esposito, Irene

    2015-01-28

    Excessive matrix production by pancreatic stellate cells promotes local growth and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and provides a barrier for drug delivery. Collagen type V is a fibrillar, regulatory collagen up-regulated in the stroma of different malignant tumors. Here we show that collagen type V is expressed by pancreatic stellate cells in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and affects the malignant phenotype of various pancreatic cancer cell lines by promoting adhesion, migration and viability, also after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Pharmacological and antibody-mediated inhibition of ?1-integrin signaling abolishes collagen type V-induced effects on pancreatic cancer cells. Ablation of collagen type V secretion of pancreatic stellate cells by siRNA reduces invasion and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells and tube formation of endothelial cells. Moreover, stable knock-down of collagen type V in pancreatic stellate cells reduces metastasis formation and angiogenesis in an orthotopic mouse model of ductal adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, paracrine loops involving cancer and stromal elements and mediated by collagen type V promote the malignant phenotype of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and underline the relevance of epithelial-stromal interactions in the progression of this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:25449434

  6. ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA PETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single case of adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium occurred in a guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters. his is the first such tumor reported from fishes. he left eye of the affected fish was severely exophthalmic because of a large intraocular tumor mass. he tumor, whi...

  7. LACK OF EFFECTS FROM 2000-HZ MAGNETIC FIELDS ON MAMMARY ADENOCARCINOMA AND REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female rats were implanted with mammary adenocarcinoma tissue and 25 days later exposed to 2,OOO-Hz magnetic fields 1 h a day for 9 days. nalysis showed that tumor weights and the levels of several reproductive hormones were not significantly different between treated and control...

  8. A rare association of Sarcina with gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Priyanka; Gupta, Nalini; Kumar, Mahendra; Radotra, Bishan D.; Sinha, Saroj K.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcina is a Gram-positive anaerobic organism, having exclusively fermentative metabolism and has been associated with gastric outlet obstruction. We demonstrate the present case to highlight the presence of Sarcina with a coexisting gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology. PMID:25948948

  9. New Insights Into the Cell Lineage of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: Evidence for Tumor Stem Cells in

    E-print Network

    Sander, Maike

    New Insights Into the Cell Lineage of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: Evidence for Tumor Stem Cells in Premalignant Lesions? See "Identification and manipulation of biliary metaplasia in pancreatic distinct subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties in pre-invasive pancreatic cancer," by Bailey JM

  10. The Role of Imaging in the Diagnosis of Recurrence of Primary Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Silvotti, Monica; Casali, Massimiliano; Giovanardi, Franco; Zadro, Alvise; Froio, Armando; Erba, Paola Anna; Versari, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Primary seminal vesicle (SV) adenocarcinoma is a rare tumor. A small amount of data about the role of imaging to detect tumor recurrence is available. We report the case of a 58-year-old patient with primary SV clear-cell well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Clinical and instrumental examinations were negative for the 32 months after treatments when computed tomography scan, [18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging showed the appearance of a lesion in the left perineal muscle suspected for recurrence. Patient was symptomless. Cytology of the suspected lesion confirmed SV adenocarcinoma recurrence. The combined approach, using radiological and nuclear medicine techniques, seems to be effective in the follow-up of SV adenocarcinoma. Technological advances, together with awareness of this rare tumor, have the potential of improving patients outcomes not only by providing earlier detection and accurate staging, but also by detecting recurrence and thereby avoiding delays and therapeutic dilemmas. PMID:24872954

  11. Are there imaging characteristics associated with lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements?

    PubMed Central

    Halpenny, Darragh F.; Riely, Gregory J.; Hayes, Sara; Yu, Helena; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 5% of lung adenocarcinomas harbor rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This study compared computed tomography (CT) imaging features in patients with ALK rearrangements and those with EGFR mutations. Material/methods 30 patients with ALK rearrangements were studied. 97 patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations were used as controls. Features assessed included size and location of thoracic lymphadenopathy, and the size, contour, consistency and location of the primary tumor. Results 127 lung adenocarcinomas were examined. 30 (24%) tumors harbored ALK rearrangements, 97 (76%) tumors harbored EGFR mutations. ALK tumors had larger thoracic lymphadenopathy than the control group (p = 0.005). Both readers identified 17 (57%) patients in the ALK group with lymph nodes >1.5 cm. Reader 1 identified 19 (20%) patients in the EGFR group with lymph nodes >1.5 cm, and reader 2 identified 18 (19%) (kappa 0.969). Patients with ALK rearrangements were more likely to have multi-focal lymphadenopathy. Reader 1 identified 22 (73%) ALK patients versus 35 (36%) EGFR patients with multifocal thoracic nodal enlargement, while reader 2 identified 20 (67%) ALK patients versus 30 (31%) EGFR patients (kappa 0.953). 92% of ALK positive lesions were solid. Conclusion ALK positive lung adenocarcinomas are more likely than EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinomas to be associated with larger volume, multifocal thoracic lymphadenopathy. While routine testing for ALK should be standard, the presence of such characteristics in a solid tumor should further prompt testing for ALK rearrangement. PMID:25312988

  12. Rare long-term survivors of pancreatic adenocarcinoma without curative resection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Stephen Y; Edwards, Alicia; Mandelson, Margaret T; Lin, Bruce; Dorer, Russell; Helton, W Scott; Kozarek, Richard A; Picozzi, Vincent J

    2015-12-28

    Long-term outcome data in pancreatic adenocarcinoma are predominantly based on surgical series, as resection is currently considered essential for long-term survival. In contrast, five-year survival in non-resected patients has rarely been reported. In this report, we examined the incidence and natural history of ? 5-year survivors with non-resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received oncologic therapy alone without surgery at our institution between 1995 and 2009 were identified. Non-resected ? 5-year survivors represented 2% (11/544) of all non-resected patients undergoing treatment for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and 11% (11/98) of ? 5-year survivors. Nine patients had localized tumor and 2 metastatic disease at initial diagnosis. Disease progression occurred in 6 patients, and the local tumor bed was the most common site of progression. Six patients suffered from significant morbidities including recurrent cholangitis, second malignancy, malnutrition and bowel perforation. A rare subset of patients with pancreatic cancer achieve long-term survival without resection. Despite prolonged survival, morbidities unrelated to the primary cancer were frequently encountered and a close follow-up is warranted in these patients. Factors such as tumor biology and host immunity may play a key role in disease progression and survival. PMID:26730170

  13. Rare long-term survivors of pancreatic adenocarcinoma without curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Stephen Y; Edwards, Alicia; Mandelson, Margaret T; Lin, Bruce; Dorer, Russell; Helton, W Scott; Kozarek, Richard A; Picozzi, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome data in pancreatic adenocarcinoma are predominantly based on surgical series, as resection is currently considered essential for long-term survival. In contrast, five-year survival in non-resected patients has rarely been reported. In this report, we examined the incidence and natural history of ? 5-year survivors with non-resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received oncologic therapy alone without surgery at our institution between 1995 and 2009 were identified. Non-resected ? 5-year survivors represented 2% (11/544) of all non-resected patients undergoing treatment for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and 11% (11/98) of ? 5-year survivors. Nine patients had localized tumor and 2 metastatic disease at initial diagnosis. Disease progression occurred in 6 patients, and the local tumor bed was the most common site of progression. Six patients suffered from significant morbidities including recurrent cholangitis, second malignancy, malnutrition and bowel perforation. A rare subset of patients with pancreatic cancer achieve long-term survival without resection. Despite prolonged survival, morbidities unrelated to the primary cancer were frequently encountered and a close follow-up is warranted in these patients. Factors such as tumor biology and host immunity may play a key role in disease progression and survival.

  14. Axillary apocrine adenocarcinoma in a young male suspected initially on fine-needle aspiration cytology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Ranjan; Garg, Cheena; Agarwal, Arjun; Kumar, Parbodh

    2015-01-01

    Primary apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinomas are a rare entity, with only a few case reports so far. Many of these carcinomas are slow-growing with a high recurrence rate. A distinct cytological diagnosis can be made, and metastatic adenocarcinomas are always considered as a differential diagnosis on cytology. Our case was a 35-year-old male who presented with a discharging axillary sinus and swelling for the past 1 year. A clinical suspicion of tuberculous sinus was raised that however, remained unsupported by laboratory investigations. There was quite a high suspicion of apocrine adenocarcinoma on cytological examination that was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The patient was successfully treated with total excision and a wide margin. We report this case in view of its rarity and its occurrence in a 35-year-old young male, and emphasize that an initial cytological suspicion should be raised for primary apocrine adenocarcinoma in case of an axillary tumor, especially keeping in consideration the poor prognosis of the same and chances of early metastasis.

  15. Proteomic analysis of stage I primary lung adenocarcinoma aimed at individualisation of postoperative therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, J; Hirano, T; Ogiwara, A; Akimoto, S; Kawakami, T; Fukui, Y; Oka, T; Gong, Y; Guo, R; Inada, H; Nawa, K; Kojika, M; Suga, Y; Ohira, T; Mukai, K; Kato, H

    2008-01-01

    Although postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (PAC) with uracil–tegafur significantly improves the prognosis of patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma, subset analysis has revealed that only 11.5% of patients with stage IB derive actual benefit from such therapy. Therefore, it is extremely important to identify patients for whom adjuvant chemotherapy will be beneficial. We performed comprehensive protein analysis of 24 surgically resected specimens of stage I adenocarcinoma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), followed by bioinformatical investigations to identify protein molecules. Furthermore, we carried out immunohistochemical studies of 90 adenocarcinoma specimens to validate the results of LC-MS/MS. We detected two kinds of protein molecules (myosin IIA and vimentin) by LC-MS/MS. We confirmed their immunohistochemical expression and distribution, and evaluated the relationship between the expression of these proteins and prognosis after adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with no expression of either myosin IIA or vimentin showed a significantly better outcome regardless of PAC using uracil–tegafur. However, we were unable to select responders to uracil–tegafur using these proteins. Cases of adenocarcinoma lacking expression of either myosin IIA or vimentin show a good outcome without PAC, and therefore do not require such treatment. PMID:18212748

  16. An endonasal approach to the resection of a papillary seromucinous adenocarcinoma of the Eustacian tube

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Papillary seromucinous adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal tract is exceedingly rare. The objectives of this case report are to describe a case of papillary seromucinous adenocarcinoma presenting in the nasopharynx and to review the literature pertaining to other similar cases. Methods A review of the patient's chart and a review of the English literature were conducted. Results We describe the case of a 64 year-old woman who presented with a 3-year history of epistaxis and right-sided otitis media with effusion. The patient had been followed for a known nasopharyngeal mass that had twice been biopsied and in both cases was considered a benign mass pathologically. A third biopsy was diagnosed as a low-grade papillary seromucinous adenocarcinoma. The patient was otherwise asymptomatic. The patient was referred to a multidisciplinary cancer clinic at which endoscopic resection was determined to be the preferred treatment modality. A literature review and approach to patients with nasopharyngeal masses will be presented. Conclusions Papillary seromucinous adenocarcinoma is a rare tumor that can present in the nasopharynx. We describe the endoscopic surgical management of one such patient that presented to our care. PMID:23663512

  17. [Asymptomatic Synchronous Tuberculosis Involving Stomach and Small Bowel in Immunocompetent Patient].

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Soo; Cho, Young Bum; Heo, Won Gak; Jo, Dong Ho; Jeong, Young Hun; Seo, Geom Seog

    2015-12-25

    Gastrointestinal tuberculosis that is not an unusual form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and it is usually associated with immunocompromised condition that may present with clinical symptoms including fever, weight loss or pain. Terminal ileum and cecum are the common sites of involvement, but involvement of the stomach is rare. Furthermore, synchronous tuberculosis involving both the stomach and lower gastrointestinal tract has been reported in very few cases. Herein, we report a case of incidentally detected synchronous tuberculosis involving both the stomach and terminal ileum that was successfully treated by antituberculosis therapy in an asymptomatic immunocompetent patient. PMID:26691192

  18. Limitations of indirect methods of estimating small bowel transit in man

    SciTech Connect

    Pressman, J.H.; Hofmann, A.F.; Witztum, K.F.; Gertler, S.L.; Steinbach, J.H.; Stokes, K.; Kelts, D.G.; Stone, D.M.; Jones, B.R.; Dharmsathaphorn, K.

    1987-07-01

    Experiments were carried out in healthy volunteers to explore the utility of a new (/sup 14/C)lactulose breath test for measuring small intestinal transit time in man and to use this procedure to test whether two antidiarrheal agents, codeine and clonidine, alter small intestinal transit time during digestion of a liquid meal. In an initial validation study performed in 12 subjects, a liquid test meal containing 10 g (/sup 14/C)lactulose was administered and the colonic entry time estimated from the time course of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion in breath compared with that of H/sub 2/ excretion. There was a fair correlation (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) between results obtained by the two methods; both methods gave similar results, but /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ output was delayed when compared to H/sub 2/ output and was incomplete. The meal also contained xylose and (/sup 13/C)glycine, permitting the duodenal entry time of the meal to be estimated by the appearance of xylose in blood and /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ in breath, respectively. The same liquid meal was then used to examine the effect on small intestinal transit time (colonic entry time minus duodenal entry time) of codeine or clonidine. 99Tc-sulfur colloid was also added to the meal to permit a comparison of small intestinal transit estimated by imaging with that estimated by the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-lactulose breath test. /sup 99/Tc radioactivity appeared in the cecum (as assessed using gamma scintigraphy) about 2 hr before /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ radioactivity appeared in breath; the correlation between transit time estimated by the two methods was moderate (r = 0.61; P less than 0.05). Based on the (/sup 14/C)lactulose data, small intestinal transit time ranged from less than 1 to 3 hr for a liquid meal containing 10 g lactulose; within-subject variation was considerably less than between-subject variation.

  19. A Rare Complication of Biliary Stent Migration: Small Bowel Perforation in a Patient with Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Özkan; Kiziltan, Remzi; Aydin, Oktay; Bayrak, Vedat; Kotan, Çetin

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary stents have been recently applied with increasing frequency as a palliative and curable method in several benign and malignant diseases. As a reminder, although most of the migrated stents pass through the intestinal tract without symptoms, a small portion can lead to complications. Herein, we present a case of intestinal perforation caused by a biliary stent in the hernia of a patient with a rarely encountered incarcerated incisional hernia. PMID:26273488

  20. A rat decellularized small bowel scaffold that preserves villus-crypt architecture for intestinal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Garriboli, Massimo; Riegler, Johannes; Orlando, Giuseppe; Burns, Alan J; Sebire, Neil J; Smith, Virpi V; Fishman, Jonathan M; Ghionzoli, Marco; Turmaine, Mark; Birchall, Martin A; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay; Lythgoe, Mark F; Seifalian, Alexander; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-04-01

    Management of intestinal failure remains a clinical challenge and total parenteral nutrition, intestinal elongation and/or transplantation are partial solutions. In this study, using a detergent-enzymatic treatment (DET), we optimize in rats a new protocol that creates a natural intestinal scaffold, as a base for developing functional intestinal tissue. After 1 cycle of DET, histological examination and SEM and TEM analyses showed removal of cellular elements with preservation of the native architecture and connective tissue components. Maintenance of biomechanical, adhesion and angiogenic properties were also demonstrated strengthen the idea that matrices obtained using DET may represent a valid support for intestinal regeneration. PMID:22305104